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Sample records for carotid artery occlusion

  1. Missed Total Occlusion Due to the Occipital Artery Arising from the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Ustunsoz, Bahri Gumus, Burcak; Koksal, Ali; Koroglu, Mert; Akhan, Okan

    2007-02-15

    A 56-year-old man was referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with an ultrasound diagnosis of right proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis for possible carotid artery stenting. DSA revealed total occlusion of the ICA and an occipital artery arising from the stump and simulating continuation of the ICA. An ascending pharyngeal artery also arose from the same occipital artery. This case is of interest because this is a rare variation besides being a cause of misdiagnosis at carotid ultrasound.

  2. Evolution of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion in Non-Traumatic Carotid Dissection

    PubMed Central

    RUSU, Octavia; VASILE, Mihai; BAJENARU, Ovidiu; ANTOCHI, Florina

    2014-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection is becoming a more frequently identified cause of ischemic stroke among the young and middleaged patients. The pathogenesis of non-traumatic dissection has not been yet entirely elucidated, but certain risk factors have been reported. We present the case of a young patient with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory secondary to internal carotid artery dissection and occlusion, in whom we identified two rarely incriminated risk factors: migraine and recent infection (pneumonia). PMID:25705278

  3. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  4. [Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coiling in a Patient with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion via the Posterior Communicating Artery].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Noriaki; Saitoh, Minoru; Fujita, Atsushi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Background:De novo aneurysms after internal carotid artery(ICA)occlusion occur in the contralateral ICA or anterior communicating artery. Hemodynamic changes with increased blood flow to the contralateral carotid circulation were considered the main factor for the formation of these aneurysms. We report a rare case of ruptured ICA aneurysm associated with ipsilateral ICA occlusion treated with coil embolization via the vertebrobasilar and posterior communicating arteries. Case Presentation:An 82-year-old woman presented with sudden-onset disturbance of consciousness at our outpatient clinic and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. Computed tomography(CT)performed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation revealed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a right ICA aneurysm associated with the ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Considering that the patient showed clinical improvement with the critical care for neurogenic pulmonary edema, the aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery. With this technique, complete obliteration was attained without perioperative complication. Conclusion:Endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery was proven effective as a treatment method for ruptured ICA aneurysms with ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Hemodynamic stress due to increased blood flow in the posterior communicating artery may play an important role in the growth and rupture of ICA aneurysms. PMID:27605482

  5. Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis after internal carotid arterial occlusion in polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Reches, A; Lavy, S

    1976-01-01

    Two patients with untreated polycythaemia vera developed intracranial internal carotid arterial occlusion followed by monocular blindness and the characteristic features of ipsilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Primary septic source and signs of systemic infection were absent. It is suggested that the predisposing factors in this unusual syndrome were hyperviscosity and venous sludging induced by the basic haematological disorder and progression of the thrombotic process within the internal carotid artery towards its intracavernous portion with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and of the arterial branches which supply the walls of the sinus. Images PMID:932749

  6. Emergency endovascular revascularization of tandem occlusions: Internal carotid artery dissection and intracranial large artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Leker, Ronen R; Eichel, Roni; Gomori, Moshe; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) with concomitant occlusive intracranial large artery emboli is an infrequent cause of acute stroke, with poor response to intravenous thrombolysis. Reports on the management of this entity are limited. We present our recent experience in the endovascular management of occlusive ICAD and major intracranial occlusion. Consecutive anterior circulation acute stroke patients meeting Medical Center criteria for endovascular management of ICAD from June 2011 to June 2015 were included. Clinical, imaging, and procedure data were collected retrospectively under Institutional Review Board approval. The endovascular procedure for carotid artery revascularization and intracranial stent thrombectomy is described. Six patients met inclusion criteria (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 12-24, time from symptom onset 2-8hours). Revascularization of the extracranial carotid dissection and stent thrombectomy were achieved in 5/6 patients, resulting in complete recanalization (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3 in a mean 2.7hours), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-2 at 90 day follow-up. In one patient, attempts to microcatheterize the true arterial lumen failed and thrombectomy was therefore not feasible. No arterial dissection, arterial rupture or accidental stent detachment occurred, and there was no intracerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic transformation. Our preliminary data on this selected subgroup of patients suggest the presented approach is safe, feasible in a significant proportion of patients, and efficacious in achieving arterial recanalization and improving patient outcome. Crossing the dissected segment remains the most important limiting factor in achieving successful ICA recanalization. Further evaluation in larger series is warranted. PMID:26924182

  7. Carotid artery stenting using the proximal or dual protection method for near occlusion of the cervical internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kajihara, Yosuke; Shibukawa, Masaaki; Okazaki, Takahito; Matsushige, Toshinori; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Mukada, Kazutoshi; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2013-10-01

    The treatment for patients with near occlusion of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) is controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the results of carotid artery stenting (CAS) as a surgical treatment for ICA near occlusion. Between April 2008 and September 2012, 14 patients (all men; mean age, 75.4 years) with ICA near occlusion were treated with CAS. This represents 5.2% of a total of 267 patients treated with CAS during the study period. All patients were treated with CAS using an embolic protection device. The proximal balloon protection method was performed in five patients, and the dual protection method using a proximal balloon and distal filter protection was used in nine patients. We examined the change of stenotic lesion, hyperintensity spot in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and perioperative complications after CAS. All near occlusions were successfully dilated. Among 2 of 14 patients, DWI showed 1 and 4 hyperintensity spots. Transient and persistent complications, including neurological deficits, did not occur in any patients. In this small number of cases, CAS using the proximal or dual embolic protection method seems to be a safe and beneficial treatment for ICA near occlusion. PMID:23793616

  8. Emergent surgical embolectomy for middle cerebral artery occlusion due to carotid plaque rupture followed by elective carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Kiyofuji, Satoshi; Inoue, Tomohiro; Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Tamura, Akira; Saito, Isamu

    2014-09-01

    Embolic intracranial large artery occlusion with severe neurological deficit is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The safest and most effective treatment strategy has not yet been determined when such emboli are associated with unstable proximal carotid plaque. The authors performed emergent surgical embolectomy for left middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, and the patient experienced marked neurological recovery without focal deficit and regained premorbid activity. Postoperative investigation revealed "vulnerable plaque" of the left internal carotid artery without apparent evidence of cardiac embolism, such as would be seen with atrial fibrillation. Specimens from subsequent elective carotid endarterectomy (CEA) showed ruptured vulnerable plaque that was histologically consistent as a source of the intracranial embolic specimen. Surgical embolectomy for MCA occlusion due to carotid plaque rupture followed by CEA could be a safer and more effective alternative to endovascular treatment from the standpoint of obviating the risk of secondary embolism that could otherwise occur as a result of the manipulation of devices through an extremely unstable portion of plaque. Further, this strategy is associated with a high probability of complete recanalization with direct removal of hard and large, though fragile, emboli. PMID:24905562

  9. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2015-01-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25636626

  11. Emergency placement of stent-graft for symptomatic acute carotid artery occlusion after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Sang Weon; Lee, Tae Hong

    2016-03-01

    A patient underwent a left-sided carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for an asymptomatic 80% carotid artery (CA) stenosis. There were no signs of intolerance during the carotid cross-clamping and an initially uneventful awakening was observed. However, in the third postoperative hour he experienced left amaurosis and dysarthria. An urgent MRI showed an occluded internal CA on the operated site without evidence of acute infarction. To recanalize the occluded internal CA and minimize leakage from the arteriotomy site, a self-expandable stent-graft was placed, covering the dissection and the distal atherosclerotic lesions. Complete recanalization of the left internal CA was achieved and the patient showed a dramatic improvement of his preoperative deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first case of stent-graft implantation for a symptomatic acute CA occlusion following CEA. Stent-graft placement should be considered as an alternative method of treatment for acute CA occlusion or dissection following CEA. PMID:25653229

  12. Emergency revascularization of acute internal carotid artery occlusion: Follow the spike, it guides you.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Leker, Ronen R; Eichel, Roni; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-07-01

    The present study sought to examine the incidence of the angiographic "spike sign" and to assess its predictive significance for achieving carotid revascularization in 54 patients with acute internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusions that required urgent endovascular revascularization. Clinical and imaging files of consecutive patients with ICA occlusion who were treated in a tertiary care academic medical center from 2011-2015 were retrospectively examined under Institutional Review Board approval with a waiver of the requirement for informed consent. All proximal ICA occlusions were treated by stent-assisted carotid angioplasty, and all distal embolic occlusions were managed with stent-assisted mechanical thrombectomy. The study included 24 patients with acute ICA occlusion (group 1) and 30 patients with tandem ICA-intracranial occlusions (group 2). The spike sign was seen in 16/24 patients in group 1 (67%), and successful ICA revascularization was achieved in 14/16 (88%). The sign was seen in 26/30 patients in group 2 (87%), and ICA revascularization was successful in all 26 (100%). The remaining 12 patients had no spike sign, and ICA revascularization was successful in only 7/12 (58%). The spike sign is a transient finding that represents the proximal patent remnant of the stenotic corridor in fresh clot. Acute ICA occlusion frequently leaves the spike sign as a marker of the recent thrombotic event. The spike vertex points to the "path of least resistance" for the guidewire to cross the occlusion and engage the true arterial lumen, a critical step during ICA endovascular revascularization. PMID:26935747

  13. Delayed Transcranial Echo-Contrast Bolus Arrival in Unilateral Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis and Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Schreiber, Stephan J; Weih, Markus; Doepp, Florian; Valdueza, José M

    2015-07-01

    Some patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion or stenosis are at risk of developing a hemodynamic stroke. Transcranial ultrasonography using an echo-contrast bolus technique might be able to assess the extent of hemodynamic compromise. We describe a transcranial Doppler sonographic method that analyzes the differences in echo-contrast bolus arrival between both middle cerebral arteries after intravenous echo-contrast application. Ten patients with 50%-79% ICA stenosis, 10 patients with 80%-99% ICA stenosis and 22 patients with ICA occlusion were studied and compared with 15 age-matched controls. There were significant increases in delayed filling of the middle cerebral artery in both 80%-99% stenoses and occlusions compared with controls. The extent of the observed delays did not correlate with vasomotor reactivity. Echo-contrast bolus arrival time can be used to gain additional information on the intracranial hemodynamic effects of extracranial carotid artery disease that seems to be independent of the established ultrasound indices. PMID:25890887

  14. The risk of stroke with occlusion of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G E; Keushkerian, S M; Hermreck, A S; Iliopoulos, J I; Thomas, J H

    1989-01-01

    Reports of all cervicocephalic arteriograms (n = 1836) performed at one institution during a 10-year period were reviewed and the patients were classified into three groups according to the indication for arteriography. Group I included all patients with symptoms or findings compatible with occlusive disease of the carotid or vertebral artery (n = 806). Group II included patients with cerebrovascular symptoms unrelated to carotid or vertebral disease (e.g., patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage) (n = 367). Group III consisted of patients with no evidence of cerebrovascular disease (e.g., patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors) (n = 663). One hundred ten atherosclerotic occlusions of the internal carotid artery (ICA) were found in 106 patients in group I. Fifty-one percent of these patients had a history of stroke before arteriography, 24% had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or amaurosis fugax (AF), and 12% had nonhemispheric symptoms. Only 13% (1.7% of group I patients) were without symptoms. Ninety-one percent of the strokes and 75% of the TIAs or AF were ipsilateral to the ICA occlusion. Seventy-six percent of patients with stroke and 80% with ipsilateral TIAs or AF vs only 29% of patients without symptoms had contralateral stenosis of 60% diameter reduction or greater (p less than 0.003). No occlusions of the ICA occurred in groups II or III. Three hundred forty-six patients in groups II and III were more than 60 years of age. Assuming either Poisson or binomial distributions, the incidence of silent ICA occlusion in the population at large older than 60 years was estimated at less than 1% (p less than 0.03). PMID:2911144

  15. A Lumped Parameter Method to Calculate the Effect of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion on Anterior Cerebral Artery Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, M.; Navidbakhsh, M.; Razmkon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Numerical modeling of biological structures would be very helpful tool to analyze hundreds of human body phenomena and also diseases diagnosis. One physiologic phenomenon is blood circulatory system and heart hemodynamic performance that can be simulated by utilizing lumped method. In this study, we can predict hemodynamic behavior of one artery of circulatory system (anterior cerebral artery) when disease such as internal carotid artery occlusion is occurred. Method Pressure-flow simulation is one the leading common approaches for modeling of circulatory system behavior and forecasts of hemodynamic in numerous physiological conditions. In this paper, by using lumped model (electrical analogy), CV system is simulated in MATLAB software (SIMULINK environment). Results The performance of healthy blood circulation and heart is modeled and the obtained results used for further analyses. The stenosis of internal carotid artery at different rates was, then, induced in the circuit and the effects are studied. In stenosis cases, the effects of internal carotid artery occlusion on  left anterior cerebral artery pressure waveform are investigated. Conclusion The findings of this study may have implications not only for understanding the behavior of human biological system at healthy condition but also for diagnosis of diseases in circulatory and cardiovascular system of human body. PMID:27026953

  16. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  17. Cerebral autoregulation and brain networks in occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Avirame, Keren; Lesemann, Anne; List, Jonathan; Witte, Anja Veronica; Schreiber, Stephan Joachim; Flöel, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Patients with unilateral occlusive processes of the internal carotid artery (ICA) show subtle cognitive deficits. Decline in cerebral autoregulation and in functional and structural integrity of brain networks have previously been reported in the affected hemisphere (AH). However, the association between cerebral autoregulation, brain networks, and cognition remains to be elucidated. Fourteen neurologically asymptomatic patients (65±11 years) with either ICA occlusion or high-grade ICA stenosis and 11 age-matched healthy controls (HC) (67±6 years) received neuropsychologic testing, transcranial Doppler sonography to assess cerebral autoregulation using vasomotor reactivity (VMR), and magnetic resonance imaging to probe white matter microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Patients performed worse on memory and executive tasks when compared with controls. Vasomotor reactivity, white matter microstructure, and RSFC were lower in the AH of the patients when compared with the unaffected hemisphere and with controls. Lower VMR of the AH was associated with several ipsilateral clusters of lower white matter microstructure and lower bilateral RSFC in patients. No correlations were found between VMR and cognitive scores. In sum, impaired cerebral autoregulation was associated with reduced structural and functional connectivity in cerebral networks, indicating possible mechanisms by which severe unilateral occlusive processes of the ICA lead to cognitive decline. PMID:25388676

  18. Systemic Hypoxia and the Depression of Synaptic Transmission in Rat Hippocampus after Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, J C; Gervitz, L M; Hamilton, M E; Walker, J A

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between step reductions in inspired oxygen and the amplitude of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) recorded from hippocampal CA1 neurons was examined in anaesthetized rats with a unilateral common carotid artery occlusion. The amplitudes of fEPSPs recorded from the hippocampus ipsilateral to the occlusion were significantly more depressed with hypoxia than were the fEPSPs recorded from the contralateral hippocampus. The adenosine A1-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT), blunted the hypoxic depression of the fEPSP. Tissue partial pressure of oxygen (Ptiss,O2) was measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampus using glass Clark-style microelectrodes. Ptiss,O2 fell to similar levels as a function of inspired oxygen in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampus, and in the ipsilateral hippocampus after administration of 8-CPT. Hippocampal blood flow (HBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A decline in HBF was associated with systemic hypoxia in both hippocampi. HBF, as a function of inspired oxygen, fell significantly more in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hippocampus. We conclude that endogenous adenosine acting at the neuronal A1 receptor plays a major role in the depression of synaptic transmission during hypoxic ischaemia. The greater susceptibility of the fEPSP in the ipsilateral hippocampus to systemic hypoxia cannot be explained entirely by differences in Ptiss,O2 or HBF between the two hemispheres. PMID:12807994

  19. Therapeutic internal carotid or vertebral artery occlusion using the WEB device.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Bechan, Ratna; Peluso, Jo Pp

    2016-06-01

    The WEB device was used to occlude the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery as treatment for large aneurysms. The WEB could be placed accurately at the desired position inside the vessel. Two WEBs were sufficient to occlude the parent artery. PMID:26861025

  20. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lisa A.; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S.; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet’s equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  1. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Christina; Duricki, Denise A; Roy, Lisa A; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet's equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  2. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  3. Acute Stroke and Obstruction of the Extracranial Carotid Artery Combined with Intracranial Tandem Occlusion: Results of Interventional Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Lescher, Stephanie Czeppan, Katja; Porto, Luciana; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2015-04-15

    PurposeDue to high thrombus load, acute stroke patients with tandem obstructions of the extra- and intracranial carotid arteries or the middle cerebral artery show a very limited response to systemic thrombolysis. Interventional treatment with mechanical thrombectomy—often in combination with acute stenting of underlying atherosclerotic stenosis or dissection—is increasingly used. It has been shown that such complex interventions are technically feasible. The lack of optimal management strategies and clinical data encouraged us to review our acute stroke interventions in patient with anterior circulation tandem lesions to determine lesion patterns, interventional approaches, and angiographic or clinical outcomes.Patients and MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed a series of 39 consecutive patients with intracranial vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation simultaneously presenting with high-grade cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis or occlusion.ResultsEmergency ICA stent implantation was technically feasible in all patients, and intracranial recanalization with TICI ≥ 2b was reached in a large number of patients (64 %). Good clinical outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 at 3 months) were achieved in one third of the patients (36 %). Symptomatic hemorrhages occurred in four patients (10 %). Mortality was 10 %.ConclusionEndovascular recanalization of acute cervical carotid artery occlusion was technically feasible in all patients, and resulted in high extra- and intracranial revascularization rates. A trend for favorable clinical outcome was seen in a higher TICI score, younger age, good collateral status, and combined IV rTPA and endovascular therapy.

  4. Bilateral internal carotid artery and vertebral artery dissections with retinal artery occlusion after a roller coaster ride - case report and a review.

    PubMed

    Ozkan Arat, Yonca; Volpi, John; Arat, Anıl; Klucznik, Richard; Diaz, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    We present the first case of a woman with no significant medical history who developed dissections of bilateral carotid and bilateral vertebral arteries, as well as a retinal artery occlusion, after a roller coaster ride. A 35-year-old woman developed right-sided neck pain followed by a frontal headache immediately after a roller coaster ride. Five days after the incident, she developed complete loss of vision in her right eye for two hours. Subsequently, the vision improved but remained significantly decreased. On presentation, her visual acuity was 20/200 in the right and 20/20 in the left eye. Her fundus exam revealed retinal edema in the superotemporal retinal artery distribution without any visible emboli. Her neurological exam was otherwise normal. The cerebral angiogram showed bilateral internal carotid and vertebral artery dissections. The patient remained stable with conservative therapy without further worsening of vision or any new neurological deficits. Outcomes for cervicocephalic arterial dissection are usually favorable, but early diagnosis is critical for initiation of appropriate treatment of possible complications. Physicians must have a high index of suspicion for arterial dissection when patients note any headache, neck pain or vertigo triggered by violent motion after leisure activities such as roller coaster rides. PMID:21341139

  5. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  6. Effect of brovincamine on cerebral circulation and metabolism in internal carotid artery occlusion examined by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fukuyama, H; Yonekura, Y; Konishi, J

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of brovincamine on the circulatory and metabolic state in the brain ischemia with internal carotid artery occlusion accompanying the 'misery perfusion syndrome'. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured by PET before and after intravenous loading of brovincamine. Brovincamine increased CBF and decreased OEF significantly on the occluded side of the hemisphere. CMRO2 did not show any remarkable changes upon brovincamine administration. It was concluded that brovincamine might be useful for increasing the hemodynamic reserve, but did not affect the metabolic state immediately after its administration. PMID:1490496

  7. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  8. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  9. Occupational death due to bilateral carotid artery occlusion - a medico-legal case report.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Patra, Ambika Prasad; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Sukumar, Sanjay; Chaudhari, Vinod Ashok; Rahman, Nisreen Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Occupational deaths are work-related deaths and usually occur in the work place of an individual. A case of occupational death in a female factory worker has been described, where the saree she was wearing accidentally got entangled in the moving belt and caused ligature strangulation. She was unconscious throughout indicating bilateral occlusion of the carotids and died a day after the incident. The authors have described the correlation between the distribution of the injuries on the body and the manner a saree is worn. Investigation of the workplace revealed that the place where she was standing was located between two machines, and the space was inadequate for normal movement. Some suggestions have been offered which may decrease the incidences of occupational ligature strangulation due to entanglement of dress materials in the moving machineries. PMID:25882146

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  11. Brain BDNF levels elevation induced by physical training is reduced after unilateral common carotid artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Banoujaafar, Hayat; Van Hoecke, Jacques; Mossiat, Claude M; Marie, Christine

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the contribution of blood flow elevation in the cerebrovasculature to physical training-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels elevation in the brain. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels were measured in the motor cortex 24 h after the last session of a forced treadmill walking (30 minutes a day, 18 m/minute for 7 consecutive days). Unilateral common carotid artery occlusion and modulation of exercise intensity (0 versus -10% inclination of the treadmill) were used as strategies to reduce the (normal) elevation of flow in the cerebrovasculature occurring during exercise. Administration of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 60 mg/kg before each exercise sessions) and genetic hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats) were used as approaches to reduce stimulation of nitric oxide production in response to shear stress elevation. Vascular occlusion totally and partially abolished the effect of physical training on BDNF levels in the hemisphere ipsilateral and contralateral to occlusion, respectively. BDNF levels were higher after high than low exercise intensity. In addition, both genetic hypertension and L-NAME treatment blunted the effects of physical training on BDNF. From these results, we propose that elevation of brain BDNF levels elicited by physical training involves changes in cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25052557

  12. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  13. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  14. Basilar vascular system supplied by only right proatlantal intersegmentary artery type 1 with aneurysm and left internal carotid occlusion: a case report and review from the literature.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Alessandro; Brogna, Barbara; Giliberti, Raffaele; Vassallo, Pasquale; De Magistris, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Persistence of proatlantal artery (PA) is a rare condition. More than 40 cases were described in the literature. Aneurysm may involve the PA itself in approximately 2% of cases, most arising from the internal carotid artery (ICA) side of PA. This case was particular because the PA showed a saccular aneurysm on the posterior wall, probably due to atherosclerosis disease and other alterations: plaque ulcerative of ICA, occlusion of left ICA, and aberrant right VA. PMID:27594943

  15. Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: A Feasible Animal Model for Ocular Ischemic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yacong; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Qi, Wei; Liang, Willmann; Wang, Chunmei; T W Yew, David; Ye, Cunxi; Sha, Ou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing ocular ischemic syndrome in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats had bilateral occlusion or sham surgery. They were divided into 4 groups: (1) hypertensive-ischemia, (2) hypertensive-sham, (3) normotensive-ischemia, and (4) normotensive-sham. Four months after the operation, the global changes of the eye and pupillary light reflex were assessed. Then each rat was perfused, and randomly one of the bulbuses oculi was prepared as retinal flat mounts for investigation of vascular changes. The opposite eyeball was prepared as a paraffin section for observation of the linear density of retinal ganglion cells and for thickness measurement. One hypertensive-ischemia rat had a cataract in one eye and another rat in the same group had bulbus oculi collapse in one eye. The light reflex disappeared in 13.33% of hypertensive-ischemia rats, and the rest of the hypertensive-ischemia rats and normotensive-ischemia rats had slow reflex. Compared with the respective controls, the peripheral retinal vascular network in hypertensive-ischemia and normotensive-ischemia rats was sparse; linear density of the retinal ganglion cells was significantly reduced; and the retinal thickness was reduced. Compared with normotensive-ischemia rats, the hypertensive-ischemia rats demonstrated more severe changes. After bilateral common carotic artery occlusion, the eyes of hypertensive rats developed various pathological changes similar to those of ocular ischemic syndrome. In conclusion, an animal model for ocular ischemic syndrome can be created by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Anat Rec, 299:806-814, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917224

  16. Efficacy of Proximal Aspiration Thrombectomy for Using Balloon-Tipped Guide Catheter in Acute Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Won; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Park, Jaechan; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for acute intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is often complicated by difficult revascularization and non-involved territory embolization possibly related with larger clot-burden. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of proximal aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) using a balloon-tipped guide catheter for clot-burden reduction in such cases with period-to-period analysis (period 1 : standard MT without PAT; period 2 : PAT first, then standard MT for the remaining occlusion). Methods Eighty-six patients who underwent MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion were included in this analysis from the prospectively maintained stroke registry (33 patients in period 1 and 53 in period 2). In period 2, 'responder' was defined as a case where some amount of clot was retrieved by PAT and the following angiography showed partial or full recanalization. Results Fifteen of fifty-three patients in period 2 (28.3%) were 'responders' to PAT. There was a significantly higher incidence of atrial fibrillation in the 'responder' subgroup. Period 2 showed a significantly shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time (94.5 minutes vs. 56.0 minutes; p=0.002), a significantly higher Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction of 2b-3 reperfusion (45.5% vs. 73.6%; p=0.009), but only a trend for better 3-month favorable outcome (mRS 0–2; 36.4% vs. 54.7%; p=0.097). There was no increase in the incidence of procedure-related complications or intracranial hemorrhage in period 2. Conclusion A strategy of PAT before standard MT may result in shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time and better angiographic outcome than a strategy of standard MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion. PMID:27446520

  17. [Endovascular versus conventional vascular surgery - old-fashioned thinking? : Part 2: carotid artery stenosis and peripheral arterial occlusive disease].

    PubMed

    Debus, E S; Manzoni, D; Behrendt, C-A; Heidemann, F; Grundmann, R T

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular therapy has widely replaced conventional open vascular surgical reconstruction. For this reason, both techniques were widely considered to be competing approaches. Evidence-based data from randomized prospective trials, meta-analyses and clinical registries, however, demonstrated that both techniques should be used to complement each other. It became increasingly more evident that the use of either procedure depends on the underlying disease and the anatomical conditions, whereby a combination of both (hybrid approach) may be the preferred option in certain situations. This review focuses on the treatment of patients with carotid artery stenosis, intermittent claudication, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia. PMID:26801751

  18. [Comparative analysis of action of beta-phenyl derivatives of glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric acid on cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular endothelium after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Volotova, E V; Kurkin, D V; Mazina, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the effect of phenyl derivatives of glutamic (RGPU-135) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (Phenibut) on cerebral blood flow, vasodilatory endothelial function and the number of circulating endothelial cells desquamated in animals after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid arteries. It was found that animals treated prophylactically by RGPU-135, after occlusion of the common carotid arteries have higher cerebral blood flow and lower the severity of endothelial dysfunction than in animals treated with Phenibut. PMID:24003482

  19. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  20. Successful Recanalization of Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion by a Combination of Intraarterial Thrombolysis and Mechanical Thrombectomy with a Carotid Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sinak, Igor; Janik, Jan; Mikolajcik, Anton; Mistuna, Dusan

    2013-06-15

    Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion is a life-threatening disease, and acute intestinal ischemia develops from the sudden decrease in perfusion to the intestines. The key to saving the patient's life is early diagnosis, and prompt revascularization of the SMA can prevent intestinal infarction and decrease the risk of bowel segment necrosis. Computed tomographic angiography may be useful for rapid diagnosis. We report recanalization of an SMA occlusion in an 80-year-old man with a combination of intraarterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy with a carotid filter.

  1. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  2. Impairment of intradimensional shift in an attentional set-shifting task in rats with chronic bilateral common carotid artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Choi, Bo-Ryoung; Jeon, Won Kyung; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rats with chronic bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAo), an animal model for vascular dementia (VaD), have reported hippocampus-dependent memory impairment and associated neuropathologies. Patients with VaD also experience attentional shifting dysfunction. However, animal models of VaD have not been used to study attentional function. Therefore, the present study examined attentional function in rats with BCCAo, using attentional set-shifting task (ASST) that required rats to choose a food-baited pot from 2 possible pots. ASST included 6 consecutive sessions including simple discrimination, compound discrimination, intradimensional shifting, extradimensional shifting, and reversals. The BCCAo rats were significantly slower at learning the intradimensional set-shifting task compared to control rats. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex are critical to intradimensional and extradimensional set-shifting, respectively. Additionally, inflammatory responses and neuronal dysfunction were observed in rats with chronic BCCAo. In addition, OX-6 positive microglia significantly increased in the forceps minor white matter of BCCAo rats, and glutamate decarboxylase signals co-localized with NeuN were reduced in the anterior cingulate cortex of BCCAo rats, compared to control rats. Impaired neuronal and GABAergic neuronal integrity in the anterior cingulate cortex, damage to white matter, and attentional impairments observed in BCCAo rats suggest dysfunction of brain structures that are associated with attentional impairments observed in patients with VaD. PMID:26365458

  3. Determination of oxygen extraction fraction using magnetic resonance imaging in canine models with internal carotid artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fei-Yan; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Xie, Sheng; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-Xia; Wang, Wu; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Perfusion of the penumbra tissue below the flow threshold for functional disturbance but above that for the maintenance of morphological integrity is the target for therapy in acute ischaemic stroke. The measurement of the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) may provide a direct assessment of tissue viability, so that irreversible tissue damage and penumbra can be reliably identified. By using an asymmetric spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging (ASE-SSEPI) sequence, the quantitative OEF was obtained in the ischaemic brain tissues of canine models with internal carotid artery occlusion. TTC staining, which delineated the regions of infarct and penumbra, was used for defining the corresponding regions on OEF maps. The threshold of the OEF to discriminate the infarct cores and penumbral tissues was then determined according to the OEF values at different times. With repeated-measures ANOVA, the OEF of the infarcted regions was found to be time dependent. An OEF greater than 0.48 best predicted cortical infarction at 1.5 hr, with an area under the receiving operating characteristic curve of 0.968, a sensitivity of 97.5%, and a specificity of 92.5%. Our results may be helpful in the evaluation of tissue viability during stroke events. PMID:27443195

  4. Determination of oxygen extraction fraction using magnetic resonance imaging in canine models with internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fei-Yan; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Xie, Sheng; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-Xia; Wang, Wu; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Perfusion of the penumbra tissue below the flow threshold for functional disturbance but above that for the maintenance of morphological integrity is the target for therapy in acute ischaemic stroke. The measurement of the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) may provide a direct assessment of tissue viability, so that irreversible tissue damage and penumbra can be reliably identified. By using an asymmetric spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging (ASE-SSEPI) sequence, the quantitative OEF was obtained in the ischaemic brain tissues of canine models with internal carotid artery occlusion. TTC staining, which delineated the regions of infarct and penumbra, was used for defining the corresponding regions on OEF maps. The threshold of the OEF to discriminate the infarct cores and penumbral tissues was then determined according to the OEF values at different times. With repeated-measures ANOVA, the OEF of the infarcted regions was found to be time dependent. An OEF greater than 0.48 best predicted cortical infarction at 1.5 hr, with an area under the receiving operating characteristic curve of 0.968, a sensitivity of 97.5%, and a specificity of 92.5%. Our results may be helpful in the evaluation of tissue viability during stroke events. PMID:27443195

  5. Syncope in Patient with Bilateral Severe Internal Carotid Arteries Stenosis/Near Occlusion: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Miran, Muhammad Shah; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Ahmad, Aamir; Suri, Mariam K.; Basreen, Rabia; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncope is commonly worked up for carotid stenosis, but only rarely attributed to it. Considering paucity of such cases in literature, we report a case and discuss the pathophysiology. Design/methods We report a patient with high-grade bilateral severe internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis who presented with syncopal episodes in the absence of stroke, orthostatic hypotension, significant cardiovascular disease, or vasovagal etiology. We reviewed all literature pertaining to syncope secondary to carotid stenosis and other cerebrovascular disease. Results A 67-year-old man presented with two brief syncopal episodes. History and physical examination was not suggestive of seizure or vasovagal syncope. Other workup was negative for any stroke or syncope secondary to cardiac or vasovagal etiology. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed bilateral ICA severe stenosis. This was confirmed by transfemoral carotid vessels angiography. Internal carotid angioplasty and stenting was performed on one side. After this, the patient remained asymptomatic. After one month, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) of contralateral side was performed. Patient remained symptom free after that. On review of literature, we identified only 12 cases of syncope attributable to carotid stenosis and reviewed 24 cases attributable to other cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion Syncope secondary to carotid stenosis, especially in the absence of any focal ischemic events is rare. It can only be expected in those patients who have bilateral hemodynamically significant carotid disease, which is unlikely in the absence of any focal ischemic events. PMID:27403223

  6. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  7. Hemodynamic study of internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion: value of combined isotopic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow and blood volume

    SciTech Connect

    Derlon, J.M.; Bouvard, G.; Lechevalier, B.; Dupuy, B.; Maiza, D.; Hubert, P.; Courtheoux, P.; Peres, J.C.; Houtteville, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The assessment of the intracranial hemodynamic consequences of obstructive lesions of the carotid artery by measuring resting rCBF is inadequate because cerebral blood flow may remain constant in spite of significant drops in the intraluminal pressure due to autoregulation. Moreover, flow may be permanently decreased following cerebral infarction, even if the arterial anatomical conditions have resumed their normal state because of the decreased metabolic demand of an infarcted area. Measurement of the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) helps with the hemodynamic assessment of these conditions, since there is a linear and inverse relationship between intraarterial pressure and intracranial blood volume. In 24 patients exhibiting various carotid and ischemic brain lesions we studied both rCBF and rCBV. The latter is a comparative measure between hemispheres obtained by single photon emission tomography after autotransfusion of 99mTechnetium labeled erythrocytes. There was no correlation between rCBF and clinical status, CT scan or arterial lesions. There was no correlation between rCBV and clinical status or CT scan. There was, however, an interesting correlation between rCBV and the severity of the arterial lesion. The rCBV was symmetrical in all patients with normal or moderately stenotic carotid arteries before and after operation. In some patients with severe unilateral stenosis or occlusion, there was a significant relative increase of rCBV in the hemisphere downstream from the lesion, which disappeared after surgery (endarterectomy or extra-intracranial bypass). In some patients with severe and bilateral carotid lesions, we noted an asymmetry in rCBV that disappeared after a unilateral operation. Other patients with similar lesions develop asymmetry only after an operation that resulted in a relative increase in rCBV in the hemisphere supplied by the non-operated artery.

  8. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  9. Calibrated MRI to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in patients with an internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, Jill B; Petersen, Esben T; Bhogal, Alex; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Klijn, Catharina JM; Kappelle, L J; Hendrikse, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether calibrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify regional variances in cerebral hemodynamics caused by vascular disease. For this, arterial spin labeling (ASL)/blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI was performed in 11 patients (65±7 years) and 14 controls (66±4 years). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), ASL cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), BOLD CVR, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were evaluated. The CBF was 34±5 and 36±11 mL/100 g per minute in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory of the patients and the controls. Arterial spin labeling CVR was 44±20 and 53±10% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2 in patients and controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the patients compared with the controls (1.3±0.8 versus 2.2±0.4% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). The OEF was 41±8% and 38±6%, and the CMRO2 was 116±39 and 111±40 μmol/100 g per minute in the patients and the controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral MCA territory of the patients (1.2±0.6 versus 1.6±0.5% per 10 mmHg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). Analysis was hampered in three patients due to delayed arrival time. Thus, regional hemodynamic impairment was identified with calibrated MRI. Delayed arrival artifacts limited the interpretation of the images in some patients. PMID:25712500

  10. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin and heart disease Butter, margarine, and cooking oils Carotid artery surgery - discharge Cholesterol and ... by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and Immediate Past President of the ...

  11. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  12. Perfusion-CT compared to H215O/O15O PET in Patients with Chronic Cervical Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Amita; Smith, Wade S.; Powers, William J.; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Chien, Jeffrey D.; Videen, Tom; Lawton, Michael T.; Finley, Bruce; Dillon, William P.; Wintermark, Max

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose As part of the Carotid Occlusion Surgery Study (COSS), patients with chronic cervical carotid artery occlusive disease are selected for extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery based on the results of 15O2/H215O PET imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of Perfusion-CT (PCT) with those of 15O2/H215O PET in a subset of COSS patients. Materials & Methods Six patients enrolled in COSS underwent a standard-of-care PCT in addition to the 15O2/H215O PET study used for determining study eligibility. PCT and PET studies were coregistered and then processed separately by different radiologists. Relative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) without arterial sampling were calculated from two PET scans, one for O15O inhalation and one for H215O injection. PCT datasets were processed using different arterial input functions (AIF), on the side of the carotid occlusion (“ischemic” inputs) and on the contralateral side (“nonischemic” inputs). The same sets of symmetric regions of interests (anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery distribution) were drawn on both hemispheres on matching slices from both imaging modalities (PCT and PET). Relative PCT and PET CBF values (“ischemic” side divided by “nonischemic” side) were compared using linear regression model, in order to determine the most appropriate arterial input function for PCT. As a secondary analysis, PCT values of relative CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) using the most accurate arterial input function were evaluated for linear regression with respect to relative PET OEF values, which are used for determining study eligibility in COSS. Results The most accurate PCT relative CBF maps with respect to the gold standard PET CBF, were obtained when CBF values for each arterial territory are calculated using a dedicated AIF for each territory (ACA AIF for ACA territory, right MCA AIF for right

  13. Vertebrobasilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Jessica C.; Boysen, Megan M.; Warren, Chase R.; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion varies with the cause of occlusion and location of ischemia. This often results in delay in diagnosis. Areas of the brain supplied by the posterior circulation are difficult to visualize and usually require angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Intravenous thrombolysis and local-intra arterial thrombolysis are the most common treatment approaches used. Recanalization of the occluded vessel significantly improves morbidity and mortality. Here we present a review of the literature and a case of a patient with altered mental status caused by vertebrobasilar artery occlusion. PMID:21691534

  14. Intervention versus standard medical treatment in patients with symptomatic occlusion of the internal carotid artery: a randomised oxygen-15 PET study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this randomised pilot study was to investigate the haemodynamic effects measured by oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (PET) of interventional treatment consisting of either endarterectomy or endovascular treatment of stenosed cerebropetal arteries, or tapering of antihypertensive medication in comparison with standard medical treatment alone in patients with symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. Methods Twenty-three patients with symptomatic ICA occlusion underwent PET scanning at baseline and after 3 months. Twelve patients were randomised to intervention (either endarterectomy or endovascular treatment of stenosed cerebropetal arteries, or tapering of antihypertensive medication) and 11 to standard medical treatment alone. Primary outcome was a change in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and/or oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) after 3 months measured by PET. Results There were no differences in changes in CBF, CBV or OEF between the two groups. Only patients with compromised perfusion at presentation showed a borderline significant increase in CBF of 2.8 mL/min/100 mL (95% confidence interval 0.0 to 5.7) after intervention (n = 7). Conclusion This pilot study shows that in patients with symptomatic ICA occlusion, oxygen-15 PET did not detect differences in improvement of CBF, CBV or OEF between interventional and standard treatment. PMID:24308868

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, Ryo Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  16. [COMPARATIVE CEREBROPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF PREVENTIVE ADMINISTRATION OF MAGNESIUM HYDROXYBUTYRATE VERSUS MAGNESIUM SULFATE AND CAVINTON IN RATS WITH COMMON CAROTID ARTERY OCCLUSION].

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Litvinov, A A; Kurkin, D V; Volotova, E V; Darmanyan, A P; Ozerov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Dose-dependent cerebroprotective effect of magnesium hydroxybutyrate (MHB) on common carotid artery occlusion model in rats was established. Administration of 150 mg/kg MHB led to significant decrease in animal mortality (up to 9.3 times) in comparison to control (p < 0.05). This MHB dose also produced significant decrease of neurological deficit on the McGraw scale in comparison to control and magnesium sulfate (50% and 20%, respectively). The MHB treated animals also showed improved locomotor and exploratory performance in the open-field test and retained memory performance in the passive avoidance test and extrapolation escape task test. The administration of 150 mg/kg MHB produced three-fold (p < 0.05) decrease of brain edema in animals with cerebral blood flow impairment in comparison to animals treated with magnesium sulfate and cavinton. PMID:27455571

  17. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  18. Preliminary study on safe thresholds for temporary internal carotid artery occlusion in aneurysm surgery based on motor-evoked potential monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Jun; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The study aims were to clarify safe duration for temporary vessel occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) during aneurysm surgery as exactly as possible. We examined safe time duration (STD), where brain tissue exposed to ischemia will never fall into even the ischemic penumbra using intraoperative motor-evoked potential (MEP). Methods: In 45 patients, temporary occlusion of the ICA was performed with MEP. We measured STD as the duration of temporary vessel occlusion during which MEP changes did not occur. To estimate average STD, we calculated the 95% confidence interval for the population mean from sample data for STD in patients with MEP changes and in patients without changes. Results: In the proximal-control group, 4 of 38 patients (10.5%) developed intraoperative MEP changes. In 4 patients, the time to MEP change (i.e. STD) was 6.0 ± 2.5 min. STD was 3.8 ± 1.6 min in the 34 patients without changes. The average STD was 4.0 ± 0.6 min. In the trap group (proximal and distal flow control), five of seven patients (60.0%) experienced intraoperative MEP changes (STD, 2.3 ± 1.0 min). All patients in the trap group who developed MEP changes showed involvement of the anterior choroidal artery (AchA) in the trapped segment. Average STD was 2.3 ± 1.1 min when trapping involving the AchA. Conclusions: Although the study is preliminary based on the limited number of the patients, the 95% upper confidence limit for average STD was 4.6 min when the ICA was occluded proximal to the aneurysm, 3.4 min when the ICA was trapped involving the AchA. PMID:24818054

  19. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  20. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  1. Double steal phenomenon secondary to innominate artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Esen, Kaan; Yilmaz, Cengiz; Kaya, Omer; Soker, Gokhan; Gulek, Bozkurt; Sahin, Durmus Yildiray

    2016-07-01

    Innominate artery steno-occlusive disease is a relatively rare clinical entity and may cause cerebrovascular symptoms. Herein, we report a 50-year-old male patient who presented with recurrent syncopal episodes and cerebrovascular ischemia. Color Doppler sonography revealed a distinctive flow pattern with partial and total flow reversal in the right internal carotid artery and vertebral artery, respectively. Further angiographic evaluation revealed complete occlusion of the innominate artery. Endovascular stenting was successful and enabled normal antegrade flow in the right common carotid and vertebral artery. PMID:27107766

  2. Intravenous thrombolysis or endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke associated with cervical internal carotid artery occlusion: the ICARO-3 study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Inzitari, Domenico; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Caso, Valeria; Balucani, Clotilde; Grotta, James C; Sarraj, Amrou; Sung-Il, Sohn; Chamorro, Angel; Urra, Xabier; Leys, Didier; Henon, Hilde; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Dequatre, Nelly; Aguettaz, Pierre; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Zini, Andrea; Vallone, Stefano; Dell'Acqua, Maria Luisa; Menetti, Federico; Nencini, Patrizia; Mangiafico, Salvatore; Barlinn, Kristian; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Bovi, Paolo; Cappellari, Manuel; Linfante, Italo; Dabus, Guilherme; Marcheselli, Simona; Pezzini, Alessandro; Padovani, Alessandro; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Sessa, Maria; Giacalone, Giacomo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Lanari, Alessia; Ciccone, Alfonso; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Saletti, Andrea; Fainardi, Enrico; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Silvestrini, Mauro; Ferrarese, Carlo; Beretta, Simone; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vasdekis, Spyros N; Consoli, Domenico; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Luda, Emilio; Varbella, Ferdinando; Galletti, Giampiero; Invernizzi, Paolo; Donati, Edoardo; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Corea, Francesco; Sette, Massimo Del; Monaco, Serena; Riva, Maurizio; Tassinari, Tiziana; Scoditti, Umberto; Toni, Danilo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the ICARO-3 study was to evaluate whether intra-arterial treatment, compared to intravenous thrombolysis, increases the rate of favourable functional outcome at 3 months in acute ischemic stroke and extracranial ICA occlusion. ICARO-3 was a non-randomized therapeutic trial that performed a non-blind assessment of outcomes using retrospective data collected prospectively from 37 centres in 7 countries. Patients treated with endovascular treatment within 6 h from stroke onset (cases) were matched with patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 h from symptom onset (controls). Patients receiving either intravenous or endovascular therapy were included among the cases. The efficacy outcome was disability at 90 days assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), dichotomized as favourable (score of 0-2) or unfavourable (score of 3-6). Safety outcomes were death and any intracranial bleeding. Included in the analysis were 324 cases and 324 controls: 105 cases (32.4 %) had a favourable outcome as compared with 89 controls (27.4 %) [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.79, p = 0.1]. In the adjusted analysis, treatment with intra-arterial procedures was significantly associated with a reduction of mortality (OR 0.61, 95 % CI 0.40-0.93, p = 0.022). The rates of patients with severe disability or death (mRS 5-6) were similar in cases and controls (30.5 versus 32.4 %, p = 0.67). For the ordinal analysis, adjusted for age, sex, NIHSS, presence of diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation, the common odds ratio was 1.15 (95 % IC 0.86-1.54), p = 0.33. There were more cases of intracranial bleeding (37.0 versus 17.3 %, p = 0.0001) in the intra-arterial procedure group than in the intravenous group. After the exclusion of the 135 cases treated with the combination of I.V. thrombolysis and I.A. procedures, 67/189 of those treated with I.A. procedures (35.3 %) had a favourable outcome, compared to 89/324 of

  3. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of internal carotid arterial Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya; Güler, Inan

    2006-06-01

    In this study, internal carotid arterial Doppler signals recorded from 130 subjects, where 45 of them suffered from internal carotid artery stenosis, 44 of them suffered from internal carotid artery occlusion and the rest of them were healthy subjects, were classified using wavelet-based neural network. Wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals. Multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis and occlusion in internal carotid arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform (WT). The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All these data sets were obtained from internal carotid arteries of healthy subjects, subjects suffering from internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. The correct classification rate was 96% for healthy subjects, 96.15% for subjects having internal carotid artery stenosis and 96.30% for subjects having internal carotid artery occlusion. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. PMID:16848135

  4. Evaluation of the cerebral vasodilatory capacity by the acetazolamide test before EC-IC bypass surgery in patients with occlusion of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Vorstrup, S; Brun, B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by xenon-133 inhalation tomography in 18 patients with cerebrovascular disease before and 4 months after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery. Only patients who showed a reduced CBF in areas that were intact on the CT scan and relevant to the clinical and angiographical findings were operated. The majority of the patients had suffered a minor stroke with or without subsequent transient ischemic attacks. They were studied at least 6 weeks following the stroke. All patients had an occlusion of the relevant internal carotid artery. To identify preoperatively the patients with a compromised collateral circulation and hence reduced CBF due to reduced perfusion pressure, a cerebral vasodilatory stress test was performed using acetazolamide (Diamox). In normal subjects, Diamox has been shown to increase tomographic CBF without change of the flow distribution. In the present series 9 patients showed a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the non-occluded side ("positive" Diamox test). Two of these 9 patients showed even a paradoxical decrease in focal CBF preoperatively, i.e., a "steal" effect. These 2 patients were the only patients who improved in focal CBF after shunting. The remaining 9 patients all showed uniform flow responses ("negative" Diamox test), and none of these increased in focal CBF postoperatively. The finding of an unchanged flow map postoperatively confirmed that the low flow areas were not due to restricted flow via collateral pathways. However, an increase in the regional vasodilatory capacity was observed postoperatively in the majority of patients. PMID:3492787

  5. Evaluation of the cerebral vasodilatory capacity by the acetazolamide test before EC-IC bypass surgery in patients with occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Vorstrup, S.; Brun, B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1986-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by xenon-133 inhalation tomography in 18 patients with cerebrovascular disease before and 4 months after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery. Only patients who showed a reduced CBF in areas that were intact on the CT scan and relevant to the clinical and angiographical findings were operated. The majority of the patients had suffered a minor stroke with or without subsequent transient ischemic attacks. They were studied at least 6 weeks following the stroke. All patients had an occlusion of the relevant internal carotid artery. To identify preoperatively the patients with a compromised collateral circulation and hence reduced CBF due to reduced perfusion pressure, a cerebral vasodilatory stress test was performed using acetazolamide (Diamox). In normal subjects, Diamox has been shown to increase tomographic CBF without change of the flow distribution. In the present series 9 patients showed a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the non-occluded side (positive Diamox test). Two of these 9 patients showed even a paradoxical decrease in focal CBF preoperatively, i.e., a steal effect. These 2 patients were the only patients who improved in focal CBF after shunting. The remaining 9 patients all showed uniform flow responses (negative Diamox test), and none of these increased in focal CBF postoperatively. The finding of an unchanged flow map postoperatively confirmed that the low flow areas were not due to restricted flow via collateral pathways. However, an increase in the regional vasodilatory capacity was observed postoperatively in the majority of patients.

  6. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  7. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  8. Subclavian steal and rest pain in a case of brachiocephalic artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kapa, Suraj; Adams, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    A patient with multiple vessel disease presented with symptoms of significant bilateral upper extremity pain and weakness that was more significant on the right side. On carotid duplex scanning, brachiocephalic artery occlusion with retrograde flow was noted through the right common carotid and right vertebral arteries at rest. Furthermore, 50% to 90% occlusion of the left internal carotid was noted. Filling of the right subclavian artery was noted to be through the right vertebral and right common carotid arteries. Unlike isolated subclavian steal syndrome, brachiocephalic artery occlusion induces significant hemodynamic alterations in extracranial arterial flow, which normally produces no symptoms at rest, but may produce symptoms with exercise. The occurrence of subclavian steal phenomenon in the presence of brachiocephalic occlusion is extremely rare. The present case is the first to report a patient presenting with bilateral upper extremity rest pain in the presence of brachiocephalic artery occlusive disease. PMID:22477423

  9. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  10. The effects of high- and low-risk environments on cognitive function in rats following 2-vessel occlusion of the carotid arteries: a behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Thompson, Charlie; Hakim, Antoine; Greenwood, Carol

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study of environmental factors affecting cognitive recovery from stroke, adult male rats were reared for 3 months in a high-risk (relatively isolated, low activity, high-fat diet, high-stress) or low-risk (social, healthy diet, low-stress, physically active) environment. They then received cognitive testing to assess various aspects of learning and memory before undergoing 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) of the carotid arteries, or sham surgery. Rats were returned to their respective environments post-operatively. Relative to pre-operative levels, 2VO rats exhibited significant cognitive losses that were consistently greater in the high-risk group than its low-risk counterpart. As well, the high-risk 2VO group was impaired, relative to the low-risk 2VO group on tests of new learning introduced post-operatively. At 3-month follow-up testing, rats that had undergone 2VO surgery exhibited further decline on some tests but recovery on others, with recovery generally slower in the high-risk 2VO group. The high-risk environment also affected rats' pre-operative cognitive performance and, to a lesser extent, their performance following sham surgery. Overall, the study shows that rats experiencing cerebral ischemia are more likely to experience severe cognitive deficits if exposed to a high-risk environment and recover more slowly than ischemic rats in a more favorable environment. The results underscore the importance of lifestyle factors with respect to the impact of stroke on cognition and in assessing prospects for recovery of function. PMID:23742800

  11. Effect of acute administration of Pistacia lentiscus L. essential oil on rat cerebral cortex following transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion leads to inflammation and oxidative stress which damages membrane highly polyunsaturated fatty acids (HPUFAs) and eventually induces neuronal death. This study evaluates the effect of the administration of Pistacia lentiscus L. essential oil (E.O.), a mixture of terpenes and sesquiterpenes, on modifications of fatty acid profile and endocannabinoid (eCB) congener concentrations induced by transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in the rat frontal cortex and plasma. Methods Adult Wistar rats underwent BCCAO for 20 min followed by 30 min reperfusion (BCCAO/R). 6 hours before surgery, rats, randomly assigned to four groups, were gavaged either with E.O. (200 mg/0.45 ml of sunflower oil as vehicle) or with the vehicle alone. Results BCCAO/R triggered in frontal cortex a decrease of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the membrane highly polyunsaturated fatty acid most susceptible to oxidation. Pre-treatment with E.O. prevented this change and led further to decreased levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), as assessed by Western Blot. In plasma, only after BCCAO/R, E.O. administration increased both the ratio of DHA-to-its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and levels of palmytoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA). Conclusions Acute treatment with E.O. before BCCAO/R elicits changes both in the frontal cortex, where the BCCAO/R-induced decrease of DHA is apparently prevented and COX-2 expression decreases, and in plasma, where PEA and OEA levels and DHA biosynthesis increase. It is suggested that the increase of PEA and OEA plasma levels may induce DHA biosynthesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha activation, protecting brain tissue from ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:22239952

  12. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  13. Study on cerebroprotective actions of Clerodendron glandulosumleaves extract against long term bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Saritha; Prakash, T; Ansari, MdAsif; Manjunath, Pm; Kotresha, D; Goli, Divakar

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. The resulting burden on the society continues to grow, with increase in the incidence of stroke. Oxidative stress has been involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases including acute stroke.Focal and global cerebral ischemia represents diseases that are common in the human population.In recent years much attention is being paid towards the exploration of herbal preparation, antioxidant agents and combination therapies including COX-2 inhibitors in experimental model of stroke.Possible effect of a hydroalcoholic leaf extract of Clerodendron glandulosumColeb (C. glandulosum)on oxidant-antioxidant status in ischemia-hypoperfusion injury in the rat forebrain has been investigated.Healthy adult male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups (n=8). Group I was served as Sham control (normal saline 1ml/kg, orally), group II was served hypoperfusion control (normal saline 1ml/kg, orally), group III, group IV were served as hydroalcoholic extract treated (200 and 400mg/kg, orally) and group V was treated with Quercetin (10mg/kg, orally) for 14days to assess preventive and curative effects of C. glandulosum. Flavonoid and phenolic compounds exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activity, including antioxidant. C. glandulosum extract (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o) was administered orally, once daily for a period of 2 weeks after the occlusion of BCCA. After 14th days rats were subjected to behavioral studies. After behavioral studies animals were sacrificed and brain was removed and homogenized. Estimation of Lipid peroxidation (LPO) Myeloperoxidase (MPO), estimation of protein levels and the activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), were performed. Infarct size and histopathological changes were observed in treated groups. PMID:27133043

  14. Life-threatening common carotid artery blowout: rescue treatment with a newly designed self-expanding covered nitinol stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Lee, D H; Kim, H J; Kim, S J; Kim, W; Kim, S Y; Suh, D C

    2006-03-01

    Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck malignancy. A covered stent offers an alternative to treatment of a carotid blowout patient thought to be at high risk for surgery or carotid occlusion. Stent placement in the common carotid artery or carotid bulb is a technical challenge because of large luminal diameter and luminal calibre discrepancy between internal carotid artery and common carotid artery. We present four patients with common carotid rupture and massive bleeding who were treated with self-expanding covered stents, among them, two cases were treated with newly designed self-expanding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stents. PMID:16498035

  15. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  16. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  17. Endovascular exclusion of an external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm using a covered stent.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Mendes, Robert R; Mauro, Matthew A; Farber, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Aneurysmal lesions of the external carotid artery are extremely rare. A case is presented of a 3.8 cm right external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm treated by transluminal exclusion using an endovascular stent-graft. Following stent-graft placement, complete occlusion of the aneurysmal sac and main vessel lumen patency was successfully demonstrated. This report demonstrates the technical feasibility of utilizing stent-grafts to treat aneurysmal lesions involving the external carotid artery. PMID:17497068

  18. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a different location to better see an area of concern. Doppler sonography and Carotid IMT US are performed using the ...

  19. Urgent Intracranial Carotid Artery Decompression after Penetrating Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of intracranial carotid artery occlusion due to penetrating craniofacial injury by high velocity foreign body that was relieved by decompressive surgery. A 46-year-old man presented with a penetrating wound to his face. A piece of an electric angular grinder disc became lodged in the anterior skull base. Computed tomography revealed that the disc had penetrated the unilateral paraclinoid and suprasellar areas without flow of the intracranial carotid artery on the lesion side. The cavernous sinus was also compromised. Removal of the anterior clinoid process reopened the carotid blood flow, and the injection of glue into the cavernous sinus restored complete hemostasis during extraction of the fragment from the face. Digital subtraction angiography revealed complete recanalization of the carotid artery without any evidence of dissection. Accurate diagnosis regarding the extent of the compromised structures and urgent decompressive surgery with adequate hemostasis minimized the severity of penetrating damage in our patient. PMID:23634269

  20. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  1. Lessons learnt from carotid artery trials.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, H; Limet, R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the authors is to assess the natural history of carotid artery disease and the role of carotid intervention in preventing ipsilateral stroke. The development of endovascular techniques for correction of carotid artery stenoses made this less invasive technique very popular, with an inherent risk of unregulated overuse by a variety of medical specialists, who are not always well informed on the natural history of carotid artery disease. It re-opened the discussion on the value of carotid endarterectomy for stroke prophylaxis. This ongoing debate offers the opportunity to distil evidence-based guidelines for the management of extracranial carotid artery stenoses. In recent papers, some authors expressed doubts on the validity and general applicability of the results of the pivotal randomised trials of carotid endarterectomy. The excellent results in terms of operative outcome and long term stroke prevention would, according to certain comments, not be attainable in routine practice. Another criticism of carotid endarterectomy is its higher operative morbidity in terms of cranial nerve lesions and myocardial infarctions, compared to endovascular procedures. This consideration is, for some authors, the main reason to espouse carotid artery stenting as a better alternative to carotid endarterectomy. Any evidence supporting this point of view is missing. The supposed equivalence or non-inferiority of carotid artery stenting is purely speculative. The aim of this review paper is to summarize the crude data of carotid surgery trials. The authors aim to answer four questions. For which lesions is carotid endarterectomy most beneficial ? Are the results of randomised carotid surgery trials biased by the selection of patients ? Is operative morbidity, other than stroke, under-estimated ? Is carotid artery stenting safe and efficacious ? An in-depth review with a critical analysis is made of recently published and on-going trials, comparing carotid surgery

  2. An Experimental and Computational Study of Blunt Carotid Artery Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gayzik, F. Scott; Bostrom, Ola; Örtenwall, Per; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    A carotid artery dissection begins as a tear or defect of the intimal lining of the artery, and can lead to luminal occlusion and ultimately cerebral ischemia. Our aim is to conduct an organ level validation of a finite element model of the carotid artery using an experiment designed to elicit internal layer failure within fluid-filled carotid artery samples. A 2.4-kg beveled guillotine is dropped from three heights (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m) onto fluid-filled porcine carotid arteries and resulting damage is recorded. These events are modeled using finite element analysis. Stress, strain and strain rate are correlated to experimental outcome. Internal layer damage is reported in half of the experiments, with damage occurring with 100% frequency at a drop height of 0.7 m. Simulations of this experiment result in maximum principal stress and strain values of 1.43 MPa and 46.2% respectively. The strain level predicted by the model for this impact scenario approaches the strain to intimal failure level for porcine arteries found in the literature. The results of this study represent an important step in validating this finite element carotid artery model at the organ level. PMID:16968627

  3. Brainstem infarction in a patient with internal carotid dissection and persistent trigeminal artery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most commonly described fetal anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Case presentation We report a 42-year-old patient presenting with internal carotid dissection, and imaging features of brainstem infarction. Conclusion Based on the imaging studies we presume occlusive carotid dissection with extensive thrombosis within a persistent trigeminal artery as the cause of this brainstem ischemia. PMID:20598138

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  5. Anomalous course of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    The course and the branching patterns of the external carotid artery were investigated macroscopically in a total of 550 bodies or 1100 head sides of Japanese subjects, donated for student dissection at Kumamoto University from 1994 to 2014. With the exception of 14 head sides, the external carotid arteries running between the posterior belly of the digastric and stylohyoid muscles were found in 42 (3.87 %) out of 1086 head sides. Strictly speaking, they passed between the stylohyoid muscle and the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve in 23 out of these 42 head sides. In the remaining 19 instances, the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve was cut and its relationship to the external carotid artery was not clear. The external carotid artery running lateral to the intact stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve, medial to the digastric muscle was not found. The external carotid arteries running lateral to the digastric muscle were found in 4 (0.37 %) out of 1086 head sides. As a result, it is proposed that plural, potential courses of the external carotid artery originally exist and that some parts of such potential courses remain as branches of the external carotid artery in the usual instance, while the anomalous courses of the external carotid artery are induced mainly by anastomosis between the muscular branches supplying the wall of the head and neck in contrast to the usual external carotid artery induced mainly by the branches originally supplying the pharynx. PMID:26439732

  6. Cervical carotid pseudoaneurysm: A carotid artery stenting complication

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Jair; Darwich, Rogerio; Ornellas, Carlos; Cariri, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background: As carotid artery stenting becomes increasingly used, more complications are likely to occur. We present a case of Staphylococcus septicemia and pseudoaneurysm arising in the neck portion of the carotid artery after stenting. Case Description: A 51-year-old man was admitted with mild left hemiparesis. CT and MRI showed right hemisphere ischemia. Duplex Scan and MRA showed bilateral severe stenosis of the carotid arteries in the neck. A percutaneous angioplasty with stenting of the left carotid artery was performed. Two weeks after the procedure, he developed fever and swelling in the right leg and shoulder. An abscess, near where the groin had been punctured for the angioplasty was surgically drained. Blood samples were positive for S. aureus. After treatment the patient complained of a painful bulky pulsatile left cervical mass. Duplex scan and MRA showed a pseudoaneurysm of the left carotid artery. We excised the pseudoaneurysm and rebuilt the carotid artery with a saphenous vein graft. The postoperative period was uneventful, and the MRA revealed a patent saphenous graft. Conclusion: Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery is a rare complication of percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. Surgical treatment with saphenous vein graft is the treatment of choice. PMID:21748038

  7. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  8. Vertebral artery occlusion and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed Central

    Ask-Upmark, E; Bickerstaff, E R

    1976-01-01

    If vertebral artery occlusion occurs in degenerative arterial disease it is almost invariably left-sided, but in vertebral artery deficiency syndromes associated with oral contraceptives a striking preponderance of right-sided involvement has been shown. This observation adds support to the view that causes other than changes in the wall of the vessel at the site of occlusion must be sought as an explanation of the occlusion. PMID:1252812

  9. Concomitant Carotid and Coronary Artery Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Craver, Joseph M.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Jones, Ellis L.; Curling, Patrick E.; Bone, David K.; Smith, Robert B.; Perdue, Garland D.; Hatcher, Charles R.; Kandrach, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on 68 patients who underwent concomitant carotid endarterectomy (CE) and coronary artery bypass surgery (CAB) at Emory University Hospital from January 1974 to February 1981. This group is then compared with a randomly selected, matched population without known carotid disease who underwent CAB alone. Asymptomatic bruit was the reason for investigation in 40 patients (59%); another 23 patients (34%) experienced transient cerebral ischemic attacks (TIAs); and five patients (7%) had TIA and prior stroke. Carotid stenoses (>75% luminal narrowing) were demonstrated as follows: isolated left, 24 patients; isolated right, 27 patients; and bilateral lesions, 16 patients. One patient had innominate artery stenosis. Associated total occlusion of one or both vertebral arteries was demonstrated in six patients. Ninety-seven per cent of patients had disabling angina pectoris prior to operation; the angina was unstable in 57%, 15% had congestive heart failure, and 54% had had at least one prior myocardial infarction (MI). Single-vessel coronary disease was present in 12.5% of patients, double in 37.5%, triple in 41.1%, and left main stenosis in 9%; 43% of patients had abnormal ventricular contractility. CE was performed on 67 patients (36 left and 31 right); aortocarotid bypass was performed on one. The CE procedures were performed immediately prior to the sternotomy for CAB under the same anesthesia. CAB consisted of single bypass in eight patients (11.8%); double in 16 patients (23.5%); triple in 22 patients (32.4%); and quadruple or more in 22 patients (32.4%) (mean = 2.9 grafts per patient). There was no hospital mortality. Perioperative MI occurred in 2.0% and stroke with residual deficit in 1.3%. Cumulative survival is 98.5% at two years. Sixty-three patients (92%) reported improvement or elimination of anginal symptoms after operation. Rehospitalization for stroke was necessary in 3.7% patients. Postoperative activity levels are; self-care only, 3

  10. Bilateral mechanical rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dargon, Phong T; Liang, Conrad W; Kohal, Anmol; Dogan, Aclan; Barnwell, Stanley L; Landry, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, or bow hunter's stroke, is reversible, positional symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischemia. The typical mechanism of action is obstruction of a dominant vertebral artery with contralateral head rotation in the setting of baseline ipsilateral vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Here we present a rare case of mechanical occlusion of bilateral patent vertebral arteries manifesting as near syncope with rightward head rotation. Diagnostic cerebral angiography showed dynamic right C5 vertebral occlusion and left C2 vertebral occlusion. The patient underwent right C4/5 transverse process decompression. Postoperative angiogram showed patent flow through the right vertebral artery in neutral position and with head turn with resultant resolution of symptoms. PMID:23465174

  11. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients. PMID:25917634

  12. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Brajesh K.; Beach, Kirk W.; Roubin, Gary S.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Moore, Wesley S.; Malas, Mahmoud B.; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Burke, J. Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R.; Weaver, Fred A.; Narins, Craig R.; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Meschia, James F.; Bergelin, Robert O.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Methods Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. Findings 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63–1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25–2

  13. Differentiating Carotid Terminus Occlusions into Two Distinct Populations Based on Willisian Collateral Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Hong, Ji Man; Kim, Sun Yong; Bang, Oh Young; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The outcomes of acute internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus occlusions are poor. We classified ICA terminus occlusions into 2 groups according to the occlusion pattern of the circle of Willis and hypothesized that clinical outcomes would significantly differ between them. Methods Consecutive patients with acute ICA terminus occlusions evaluated by baseline computed tomographic angiography were enrolled. We investigated the occlusion patterns in the circle of Willis, retrospectively classified patients into simple ICA terminus occlusion (STO; with good Willisian collaterals from neighboring cerebral circulation) and complex ICA terminus occlusion (CTO; with one or more of A2 anterior cerebral artery, fetal posterior cerebral artery occlusion, or hypoplastic/absent contralateral A1; or with poor collaterals from anterior communicating artery) groups, and compared their baseline characteristics and outcomes. Results The STO group (n=58) showed smaller infarct volumes at 72 hours than the CTO group (n=34) (median, 81 mL [interquartile range, 38-192] vs. 414 mL [193-540], P<0.001) and more favorable outcomes (3-month modified Rankin Scale 0-3, 44.8% vs. 8.8%, P<0.001; 3-month mortality, 24.1% vs. 67.6%, P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, STO remained an independent predictor for favorable outcomes (odds ratio 6.1, P=0.010). Conclusions Favorable outcomes in STO group suggested that the outcomes of acute ICA terminus occlusions depend on Willisian collateral status. Documenting the subtypes on computed tomographic angiography would help predict patient outcome. PMID:26915505

  14. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  15. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  16. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  17. Cavernous carotid artery pseudo-aneurysm treated by stenting in acromegalic patient.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Domingues, Flavio S; Espinosa, Gaudencio; Gadelha, Monica

    2003-06-01

    We report on a case of endovascular management of pseudoaneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery with covered stent reconstruction. A 36 years-old woman with a history of previous transsphenoidal approach for pituitary macroadenoma and false aneurysma formation was studied in a protocol that included balloon test occlusion and cerebral blood flow evaluation. An endovascular covered stent deployment in the area of the carotid laceration was performed with isolation of the aneurysm from the circulation and maintenance of the carotid flow. Helical angio-CT and cerebral digital subtraction angiography showed the carotid preservation without stenosis in the stented area. In conclusion, endovascular stent reconstruction for post-transsphenoidal carotid artery laceration and false aneurysm is demonstrated as useful technical adjunct in the management strategy and with the potential for carotid sacrifice morbidity avoidance. PMID:12894285

  18. Internal carotid pseudo-occlusion: early and late results.

    PubMed

    Pulli, R; Frosini, P; Gatti, M; Narcetti, S; Bernacchi, R; Pratesi, C

    1997-02-01

    Internal carotid pseudo-occlusion (ICP) is a pathology of difficult diagnostic evaluation and treatment in the group of extracranial carotid diseases. The authors report the results of 24 ICP(S) surgically treated in the last five years. No perioperative death was reported. The neurological morbility rate was as low as 4% (1/24), which is quite a good results for this high-risk pathology. Clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed (at 1-3-6-12-24 months from surgery). Six early asymptomatic thromboses (25%) were observed, and the remaining patients showed patent vessels and no symptoms at all. In conclusion surgical treatment of ICP is often able to prevent cerebral ischaemia, and the high rate of early occlusion should not limit surgical indication. PMID:9128116

  19. Immediate surgery for acute internal carotid artery dissection and thrombosis during filter deployment prior to stenting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tolva, V; Bertoni, G B; Bianchi, P G; Keller, G C; Casana, R

    2013-08-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a validated option in the treatment of selected extracranial carotid artery stenosis. Carotid artery dissection during CAS is a rare but potentially devastating complication. We report a case of acute dissection and thrombosis of the left internal carotid artery during filter tip wire engaging maneuvers, complicated by intraoperative complete blindness of the left eye. Immediate conversion to carotid endarterectomy was performed under general anesthesia with electroencephalographic monitoring. The patient was discharged home symptomless and remains asymptomatic eight months after the operation, with normal left internal carotid patency and fully recovered eyesight. In conclusion, the management of acute carotid occlusion during CAS requires emergent evaluation and definitive endovascular or open surgical repair to minimize neurologic morbidity. We advocate that all endovascular procedures are carried out in a well-established surgical environment. PMID:23579380

  20. Retained subintimal pellet in a carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Manousi, Maria; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Papadoulas, Spyros; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kakkos, Stavros K; Lampropoulos, George; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2011-06-01

    A shotgun pellet is depicted in the present image in a carotid artery under the intima, which remained intact without local complications for up to six months. There is lack of data regarding the natural history of such a carotid pellet, but the experience from the myocardium is that, in the absence of infection, completely embedded missiles are usually asymptomatic, tolerated well and may be left in place. PMID:21860728

  1. Carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is time-dependent, with the best outcomes resulting from the earliest interventions. However, for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, despite maximal medical treatment, an effective intervention to improve their neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. There are two major concerns: first, cerebral revascularization in the acute stage remains challenging because of the possibility that hemorrhagic infarction or hyperperfusion syndrome will occur after revascularization; second, alarms about carotid artery stenting in patients with acute symptoms are related to the fact that, while with carotid endarterectomy the plaque is completely removed, after stenting it is only remodelled and its stabilization is essential to avoid embolic events during the procedure and in the post-operative period. Although level 1 evidence seems clearly in favor of carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients, carotid stenting has been proposed as a possible alternative in selected cases if the procedure is performed in high-volume center with documented low perioperative stroke and death rates. This review summarizes indications and results for carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients. PMID:23296417

  2. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Köklü, Erkan Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  3. Regional cerebral palmitate incorporation following transient bilateral carotid occlusion in awake gerbils

    SciTech Connect

    Tone, O.; Miller, J.C.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-11-01

    (/sup 14/C)Palmitate was injected intravenously in awake gerbils at various times after 5 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or a sham operation. Regional rates of incorporation of plasma palmitate into the hippocampus and other regions of the anterior circulation were determined relative to the mean rate of incorporation into regions of the posterior circulation using quantitative autoradiography and a ratio method of analysis. One day after bilateral carotid occlusion, relative palmitate incorporation was elevated significantly by 16% in the CA4 pyramidal cell layer and by 20% in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared with sham-operated gerbils. At 3 days, significant elevations of this magnitude were found in the CA3 and CA4 cell layers, whereas relative incorporation was reduced by 26% in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. At 7 days, the only significant difference from control was a 15% elevated incorporation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. Histologic examination indicated substantial cell death in the CA1 pyramidal layer at 3 days, with extensive glial reaction and phagocytic invasion at 7 days. Our results suggest that the turnover of palmitate-containing lipids is reduced in the CA1 layer of the gerbil hippocampus but that lipid synthesis is stimulated in hippocampal regions (CA3, CA4, dentate gyrus) affected by but recovering from transient bilateral carotid occlusion.

  4. [Traumatic dissection of the internal carotid artery by a safety belt: a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, M; Ballesteros-Sanz, M A; Pérez-Ceballos, A; González-Fernández, C; López-Espadas, F

    2009-10-01

    Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection secondary to blunt trauma is a rare event accounting for 0.08 to 0.4% of all traumatic lesions. The spectrum of traumatic lesions that can affect the internal carotid artery includes minor lesions like spasm, intimal tears, or mural contusions and serious lesions like pseudoaneurysms and complete occlusion. Delayed clinical presentation is typical and can include headache, hemiparesis, partial Horner's syndrome, and cranial nerve palsy. Embolization secondary to the dissection can have devastating effects because it may cause ischemic stroke. Traumatic internal carotid artery dissection after safety belt trauma is very rare; it is usually due to direct cervical trauma on the side of the shoulder fixation point, which causes external bruising along the pathway of the safety belt. We present two cases of traumatic internal carotid artery dissection with concomitant cerebral infarcts caused by safety belts; we discuss the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this lesion. PMID:19828398

  5. Fatal Intraventricular Hemorrhage After the Extracranial Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Krajickova, Dagmar Krajina, Antonin; Nova, Marketa; Raupach, Jan

    2005-05-15

    We report on a 72-year-old female with an unusual intracranial bleeding complication after an extracranial carotid artery stenting procedure performed for a tight left ICA stenosis associated with contralateral carotid occlusion. Two hours after the procedure, the initial signs of intracranial bleeding appeared that led to the patient's demise 5 days later. A brain CT showed and autopsy proved massive intraventricular bleeding. To our knowledge, our case is only the second report of isolated reperfusion intraventricular hemorrhage post-CAS.

  6. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  7. Statistics over features for internal carotid arterial disorders detection.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to extract the representative features of the internal carotid arterial (ICA) Doppler ultrasound signals and to present the accurate classification model. This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the extracted features (Lyapunov exponents and the power levels of the power spectral density estimates obtained by the eigenvector methods) in order to reduce the dimensionality of the extracted feature vectors. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Mixture of experts (ME) and modified mixture of experts (MME) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of arterial disorders. Three types of ICA Doppler signals (Doppler signals recorded from healthy subjects, subjects having stenosis, and subjects having occlusion) were classified. The classification results confirmed that the proposed ME and MME has potential in detecting the arterial disorders. PMID:18179791

  8. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  9. Nonvisualization of the Internal Carotid Artery on Computed Tomography Angiography: Discussion of Two Cases with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saran, Sonal; Rajagopal, Rengarajan; Khera, Pushpinder S.; Mehta, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Nonvisualization of the internal carotid artery (ICA) on cross-sectional imaging studies can be due to congenital (dysgenesis of the ICA) or acquired (complete occlusion of ICA) causes. We report two cases, one with absent carotid canal on bone window setting of computed tomography (CT) suggestive of congenital cause and the other with normal carotid canal, suggesting acquired cause. Development of aortic arches with six pathways of collateral circulation in brain is also discussed. PMID:27298744

  10. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Brzost, Jacek; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  11. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  12. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion

    PubMed Central

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G.; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. Presentation of case A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Conclusion Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. PMID:26255001

  13. Dual Antiplatelet Regime Versus Acetyl-acetic Acid for Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Dalainas, Ilias Nano, Giovanni; Bianchi, Paolo; Stegher, Silvia; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G.

    2006-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting has been proposed as an option treatment of carotid artery stenosis. The aim of this single-institution study is to compare the dual-antiplatelet treatment and heparin combined with acetyl-acetic acid, in patients who underwent carotid artery stenting. We compared 2 groups of 50 patents each who underwent carotid artery stenting for primary atherosclerotic disease. Group A received heparin for 24 h combined with 325 mg acetyl-acetic acid and group B received 250 mg ticlopidine twice a day combined with 325 mg acetyl-acetic acid. Outcome measurements included 30-day bleeding and neurological complications and 30-day thrombosis/occlusion rates. The neurological complications were 16% in group A and 2% in group B (p < 0.05). Bleeding complications occurred in 4% in group A and 2% in group B (p > 0.05). The 30-day thrombosis/occlusion rate was 2% in group A and 0% in group B (p > 0.05). Dual antiplatelet treatment is recommended in all patients undergoing carotid artery stenting.

  14. Concurrence of the tortuosity of bilateral common and left internal carotid arteries in a case with common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sema; Cece, Hasan; Karayol, Sibel; Ziylan, Zeki

    2010-10-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arterial system, which are not infrequently encountered, have great impact on the surgical approaches of the neck. Although few reports on common carotid artery tortuosity have been published, no case of symptomatic concurrent common carotid and internal carotid artery tortuosity has been reported. Herein, we report the first case with concurrent common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery and common and internal carotid artery tortuosity presenting with an oropharyngeal mass. PMID:20407773

  15. Carotid artery rupture and cervicofacial actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Anne; Lhermitte, Benoît; Ödman, Micaela; Grabherr, Silke; Mangin, Patrice; Palmiere, Cristian

    2012-11-01

    Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon, progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus. Actinomyces are common commensal saprophytes in the oral cavity which may have medical importance as facultative pathogens. Subsequent to local injuries to the oral mucosa, they may penetrate the deep tissues and be responsible for suppurative or granulomatous infections. We herein report a case of a 65-year-old man who underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a tonsillar carcinoma. An ulcerous lesion in the base of the tongue developed and spread to the carotid artery wall. The man died of a massive hemorrhage due to left carotid artery rupture. Postmortem computed tomography angiography performed prior to autopsy allowed the precise localization of the source of bleeding to be detected. Postmortem biochemical investigations confirmed the presence of inflammation associated with local bacterial infection. Histological investigations revealed the rupture of the left carotid artery surrounded by numerous colonies of Actinomyces. Acute and chronic inflammation with tissue necrosis as well as post-actinic, fibrotic changes were also found in the tissues surrounding the ruptured artery wall. PMID:22819527

  16. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 60. Silva MB Jr., Choi L, Cheng CC. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease. In: Townsend CM Jr., Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL. ...

  17. Arterial gas occlusions in operating heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of noncondensable gases on high performance arterial heat pipes has been investigated both analytically and experimentally. Models have been generated which characterize the dissolution of gases in condensate and the diffusional loss of dissolved gases from condensate in arterial flow. These processes, and others, have been used to postulate stability criteria for arterial heat pipes. Experimental observations of gas occlusions were made using a stainless steel heat pipe equipped with viewing ports, and the working fluids methanol and ammonia with the gas additives helium, argon, and xenon. Observations were related to gas transport models.

  18. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p . 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  19. Carotid artery aneurysm: last among equals.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ajit Kaur; Rowlands, Timothy; McMahon, Greg

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented initially with a swelling in the left side of the neck, which was confirmed to be a carotid artery aneurysm on ultrasonography. He was subsequently admitted reporting intermittent episodes of visual loss in the left eye and right arm weakness. Further imaging confirmed multiple, small acute infarcts in the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient underwent open repair of the aneurysm and made an uncomplicated recovery with no persisting neurological deficit. PMID:27190119

  20. Successful Reconstruction of Asymptomatic Bilateral External Carotid Artery Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Loja, Melissa N; Pevec, William C

    2016-04-01

    True aneurysms of the external carotid artery (ECA) are extremely rare with an unknown incidence and natural history. We present the successful operative management of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man found to have bilateral internal carotid artery stenosis and bilateral ECA aneurysms. His bilateral carotid arteries were reconstructed with bifurcated interposition grafts in a staged fashion. The patient recovered without sequelae and continues to be asymptomatic 1 year after reconstruction. We present the operative management of this rare case. PMID:26802292

  1. Anterior segment ischemia secondary to carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Mills, R P

    1989-09-01

    The ischemic signs of carotid occlusive disease in the anterior segment can be summarized as follows: vasodilation in the conjunctiva, episclera, and iris; neovascularization in the iris and the anterior chamber angle with consequent neovascular glaucoma, with or without elevation of intraocular pressure; and noninflammatory uveitis with corneal edema, keratitic precipitates, flare and cells in the anterior chamber, and late development of cataract. A questionnaire was sent to neuro-ophthalmology and glaucoma specialists regarding their perceptions of this condition. On average, approximately 1 case per specialist per year was seen. One third of the respondents had seen significant ocular pressure increase in patients with rubeosis following successful vascular surgery. Most felt that panretinal photocoagulation, though not as effective as in diabetic rubeosis, did cause regression of iris and angle neovascularization. The visual prognosis following all types of treatment was not good and was insufficient to justify a clear recommendation about the advisability of aggressive management of this condition. PMID:2529282

  2. Increased release of norepinephrine and dopamine from canine kidney during bilateral carotid occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, T.; Hjemdahl, P.; DiBona, G.F.

    1987-02-01

    The renal overflow of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) to plasma from the innervated kidney was studied at rest and during sympathetic nervous system activation by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCO) in vagotomized dogs under barbiturate or barbiturate/nitrous oxide anesthesia. BCO elevated arterial pressure and the arterial plasma concentration of NE, DA, and epinephrine (Epi). Renal vascular resistance (renal arterial pressure kept constant) increased by 15 +/- 7% and the net renal venous outflows (renal veno-arterial concentration difference x renal plasma flow) of NE and DA were enhanced. To obtain more correct estimates of the renal contribution to the renal venous catecholamine outflow, they corrected for the renal extraction of arterial catecholamines, assessed as the extractions of (/sup 3/H)NE, (/sup 3/H)DA, or endogenous Epi. The (/sup 3/H)NE corrected renal NE overflow to plasma increased from 144 +/- 40 to 243 +/- 64 pmol-min/sup -1/ during BCO, which, when compared with a previous study of the (/sup 3/H)NE corrected renal NE overflow to plasma evoked by electrical renal nerve stimulation, corresponds to a 40% increase in nerve impulse frequency from approx. 0.6 Hz. If the renal catecholamine extraction was not taken into account the effect of BCO was underestimated. The renal DA overflow to plasma was about one-fifth of the NE overflow both at rest and during BCO, indicating that there was no preferential activation of noradrenergic or putative dopaminergic nerves by BCO.

  3. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  4. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  5. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  6. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  7. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  8. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  9. The use of telescoped flow diverters as an endovascular bypass in the management of symptomatic chronic carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2012-07-01

    Flow diverters constitute a new generation of flexible self-expanding, stent-like devices with a high-metal surface-area coverage for the endovascular management of wide-necked, fusiform, large, and giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms. They achieve aneurysm occlusion through endoluminal reconstruction of the dysplastic segment of the parent artery that gives rise to the aneurysm. To our knowledge, there is no report on the use of flow diverters for the management of occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We describe the novel use of telescoped flow diverters in a construct that acts as an endovascular bypass for the management of symptomatic chronic carotid occlusion. In long carotid occlusions with a burden of extensive clots and atherosclerotic plaque, we found that the reduced porosity of the diverter mesh serves as an effective barrier to in-stent clot protrusion and distal embolization. Diverter implantation allows subsequent angioplasty. With this patient report, we propose a new potential application for flow diverters in the management of occlusive cerebrovascular disease. The optimal application of these devices will continue to be defined as clinical experience evolves. PMID:22555126

  10. Carotid stent infection: a rare but potentially fatal complication of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungnam; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Oh Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Infections involving endovascular devices are rare and, to our knowledge, only three cases of infection with an inserted carotid stent have ever been reported. A 68-year-old man underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS) of the left proximal internal carotid artery. Two days after CAS the patient developed a high fever and investigation showed that the inserted carotid stent was infected. The infection could not be controlled despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Eventually a rupture of the carotid artery occurred and the patient underwent emergency resection of the left carotid bifurcation in addition to stent removal and reconstruction with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The patient recovered fully without any neurological sequelae. PMID:24688061

  11. Tasting arterial blood: what do the carotid chemoreceptors sense?

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakhar, Nanduri R.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose, and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO)-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K+ channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca2+ influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signaling is an area of ongoing study. PMID:25642193

  12. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p < 0.001). There was a good coleration between the extent of expansion and expected histological findings. All conplications were two cases of small cerebral infarction and a case of bleeding from the complicated lung cancer. The protection at prePTA lead to no complications in case of acute cerebral infarctions. It is very important to check the histological specimen carefully for safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  13. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  14. Spontaneous recanalization of occluded internal carotid artery after minor stroke. The role of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Adovasio, R; Ziani, B; Settembre, N; Bussani, R; Zamolo, F

    2008-10-01

    Late spontaneous recanalization of internal carotid artery is a very rare event. We describe three cases which came to our observation in which the occlusion was demonstrated both by angiography and Doppler ultrasound. Two of them had surgical treatment and the histological exam of the plaque showed multiple recanalization foci. Our experience confirmed the possibility of a successful surgical treatment that offers a good patency in the short and medium term. PMID:19597408

  15. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia.

  16. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  17. [A Novel, Less Invasive Protection Method for Carotid Artery Stenting].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Imai, Tasuku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel, less invasive protection method for carotid artery stenting. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presented with symptomatic severe left carotid artery stenosis. A transfemoral approach was dangerous because of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 6Fr Axcelguide Simmonds catheter was inserted into the right brachial artery, and advanced into the left common carotid artery. Next, a 6Fr Optimo 100-cm catheter was coaxially navigated into the left common carotid artery. A PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was coaxially navigated into the left external carotid artery. Under flow reversal with the 2 balloons, another PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was navigated into the distal left internal carotid artery through the lesion. After both PercuSurge GuardWire balloons were inflated, the 6Fr Optimo was deflated and retrieved using a catheter exchange technique. Then, under distal double-balloon protection, routine stenting was performed. Conclusions: This technique is safer and less invasive than previous methods, especially in cases with difficult femoral access and vulnerable carotid plaque. PMID:27384116

  18. Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula of an Adult-Type Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery with Multiple Vascular Variations

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  19. Direct carotid cavernous fistula of an adult-type persistent primitive trigeminal artery with multiple vascular variations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Kwon, Do Hoon; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  20. Postoperative internal carotid artery restenosis after local anesthesia: presence of risk factors versus intraoperative shunt.

    PubMed

    Hudorovic, Narcis; Lovricevic, Ivo; Hajnic, Hrvoje; Ahel, Zaky

    2010-08-01

    Published data suggest that the regional anesthetic technique used for carotid endarterectomy (CEA) increases the systolic arterial blood pressure and heart rate. At the same time local anesthesia reduced the shunt insertion rate. This study aimed to analyze risk factors and ischemic symptomatology in patients with postoperative internal carotid artery restenosis. The current retrospective study was undertaken to assess the results of CEA in 8000 patients who were operated during a five-year period in six regional cardiovascular centers. Carotid color coded flow imaging, medical history, clinical findings and atherosclerotic risk factors were analyzed. Among them, there were 33 patients (0.4%) with postoperative re-occlusion after CEA. The patients with restenosis were re-examined with carotid color coded flow imaging and data were compared with 33 consecutive patients with satisfactory postoperative findings to serve as a control group. In the restenosis group eight risk factors were analyzed (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, history of stroke, transitory ischemic attack, heart attack and coronary disease), and compared with risk factors in control group. Study results suggested that early postoperative internal carotid artery restenosis was not caused by atherosclerosis risk factors but by intraoperative shunt usage. PMID:20439301

  1. Carotid artery dissection due to elongated styloid process: a self-stabbing phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Razak, Anmar; Short, Jody L; Hussain, Syed I

    2014-01-01

    Elongated styloid process (ESP) is an anatomical variant that has been described as the cause of Eagle syndrome. Until recently, the styloid process has not been appreciated as a significant contributor to carotid artery dissection (CAD), which is not part of Eagle syndrome. We present a case of a 41-year-old male who presented with acute right middle cerebral artery occlusion and was found to have ESP projecting to and abutting the lateral wall of a dissected right internal carotid artery (ICA). Forced sustained head turning with maximal muscle contraction was the initiating event driving the styloid process into the wall of the ICA in a manner that can be likened to being stabbed with a pointed object. Knowing the association between ESP, Eagle syndrome, and CAD shall lead to increased awareness and appropriate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23163559

  2. De novo giant A2 aneurysm following anterior communicating artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Tarik F.; Hafez, Ahmad; Andrade-Barazarte, Hugo; Raj, Rahul; Niemela, Mika; Lehto, Hanna; Numminen, Jussi; Jarvelainen, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Background: De novo intracranial aneurysms are reported to occur with varying incidence after intracranial aneurysm treatment. They are purported to be observed, however, with increased incidence after Hunterian ligation; particularly in cases of carotid artery occlusion for giant or complex aneurysms deemed unclippable. Case Description: We report a case of right-sided de novo giant A2 aneurysm 6 years after an anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm clipping. We believe this de novo aneurysm developed in part due to patient-specific risk factors but also a significant change in cerebral hemodynamics. The ACoA became occluded after surgery that likely altered the cerebral hemodynamics and contributed to the de novo aneurysm. We believe this to be the first reported case of a giant de novo aneurysm in this location. Following parent vessel occlusion (mostly of the carotid artery), there are no reports of any de novo aneurysms in the pericallosal arteries let alone a giant one. The patient had a dominant right A1 and the sudden increase in A2 blood flow likely resulted in increased wall shear stress, particularly in the medial wall of the A2 where the aneurysm occurred 2 mm distal to the A1-2 junction. Conclusion: ACoA preservation is a key element of aneurysm surgery in this location. Suspected occlusion of this vessel may warrant closer radiographic follow-up in patients with other risk factors for aneurysm development. PMID:26664872

  3. Access to the carotid artery bifurcation: Cadaveric study with application to nasotracheal intubation as a technique to improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Harrigan, Mark R; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-12-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a common and efficacious surgical procedure for the prevention of ischemic stroke due to atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A high common carotid artery bifurcation can make CEA technically difficult due to limited carotid artery exposure. A cadaveric study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of nasotracheal intubation for improving access to a high carotid artery bifurcation. Based on this study, nasotracheal intubation does not improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation as compared with orotracheal intubation. PMID:26312946

  4. Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenting in Surgically High-Risk Patients Using the Carotid Wallstent Endoprosthesis:Midterm Clinical and Ultrasound Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, Geert Bernaerts, Pauwel; Thijs, Vincent; Daenens, Kim; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Fourneau, Inge; Nevelsteen, Andre

    2003-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and midterm outcome of elective implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) in patients considered to be at high surgical risk. In a prospective study, 54 carotid artery stenoses in 51 patients were stented over a 24-month period. Three patients underwent bilateral carotid artery stenting. Institutional inclusion criteria for invasive treatment of carotid occlusive disease (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) are patients presenting with a 70% or more symptomatic stenosis and those with an 80% or more asymptomatic stenosis having a life-expectancy of more than 1 year. All patients treated by carotid artery stenting were considered at high risk for carotid endarterectomy because of a hostile neck (17 patients-31.5%) or because of severe comorbidities (37 patients-68.5%). No cerebral protection device was used. Of the 54 lesions, 33 (61.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (38.8%) were asymptomatic. Follow-up was performed by physical examination and by duplex ultrasonography at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the procedure. All 54 lesions could be stented successfully without periprocedural stroke. Advert events during follow-up (mean 13.9 {+-} 5.7 months) were non-stroke-related death in 6 patients (11.1%), minor stroke in 4 stented hemispheres(7.4%), transient ipsilateral facial pain in 1 patient (1.8%),infection of the stented surgical patch in 1 patient (1.8%) and asymptomatic in stent restenosis in 4 patients (7.4%). The percutaneous implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) , even without cerebral protection device, appears to be a safe procedure with acceptable clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up results in patients at high surgical risk. But some late adverse events such as ipsilateral recurrence of non-disabling (minor) stroke or in stent restenosis still remain real challenging problems.

  5. Complete occlusion of the proximal subclavian artery post-CABG: Presentation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Mouhannad M; Ravindran, Aravindhan; Marcuzzi, Daniel W; Chisholm, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the proximal left subclavian artery is an uncommon cause of angina in the post-coronary artery bypass graft patient, and is termed coronary-subclavian steal syndrome. Typical manifestations include cardiac symptoms of angina and noncardiac symptoms of lightheadedness, left arm numbness or weakness, and a difference in blood pressure of more than 20 mmHg between both arms. A case of complete proximal occlusion of the subclavian artery is reported. The clinical picture, investigations and treatment are described. Historical treatments of occlusive disease include surgical bypass graft and, more recently, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The patient underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting by a retrograde approach, with an excellent short-term response, but ultimately required a carotid subclavian bypass due to restenosis. PMID:18612504

  6. Human-derived nanoparticles and vascular response to injury in rabbit carotid arteries: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maria A K; Lieske, John C; Kumar, Vivek; Farell-Baril, Gerard; Miller, Virginia M

    2008-01-01

    Self-calcifying, self-replicating nanoparticles have been isolated from calcified human tissues. However, it is unclear if these nanoparticles participate in disease processes. Therefore, this study was designed to preliminarily test the hypothesis that human-derived nanoparticles are causal to arterial disease processes. One carotid artery of 3 kg male rabbits was denuded of endothelium; the contralateral artery remained unoperated as a control. Each rabbit was injected intravenously with either saline, calcified, or decalcified nanoparticles cultured from calcified human arteries or kidney stones. After 35 days, both injured and control arteries were removed for histological examination. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with saline showed minimal, eccentric intimal hyperplasia. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with calcified kidney stone- and arterial-derived nanoparticles occluded, sometimes with canalization. The calcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles caused calcifications within the occlusion. Responses to injury in rabbits injected with decalcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles were similar to those observed in saline-injected animals. However, decalcified arterial-derived nanoparticles produced intimal hyperplasia that varied from moderate to occlusion with canalization and calcification. This study offers the first evidence that there may be a causal relationship between human-derived nanoparticles and response to injury including calcification in arteries with damaged endothelium. PMID:18686783

  7. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET.

    PubMed

    Junck, L; Koeppe, R A; Greenberg, H S

    1989-10-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip. PMID:2789230

  8. Mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the extracranial carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Desimpelaere, J; Seynaeve, P; Kockx, M; Appel, B; Gyselinck, J; Mortelmans, L

    1997-08-01

    A rare case of mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the common carotid artery as a complication in an immunosuppressed paediatric patient is presented. Treatment of pseudo-aneurysms of the common carotid artery is generally considered to be an emergency, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. In patients with septicemia, angiography has to be avoided. We were able to provide the surgeon with the exact diagnosis and accurate topographical information with helical CT with 3D reformation. PMID:9351308

  9. Is Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis an Avoidable Complication?

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-10-01

    The most serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is acute carotid artery stent thrombosis (ACAST). ACAST is a very rare complication, but it may lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. The most important cause is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. It is very important to identify, before CAS, those patients who might be candidates for ACAST and to start antiplatelet therapy for them. Testing patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may prevent this complication. PMID:26303788

  10. Carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  11. Retinal arterial occlusive disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gold, D; Feiner, L; Henkind, P

    1977-09-01

    Four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed an unusual form of occlusive retinal arterial disease. The most prominent clinical features of this disorder were deposition of yellow-white material in retinal arterial walls and evidence of multifocal retinal arterial occlusion. Fluorescein angiographic findings included nonperfusion of the obstructed arteries and the retinal capillary beds fed by them, and fluorescein leakage at the sites of involvement of the retinal arteries. This ocular complication of SLE is presumably a manifestation of the widespread systemic vascular problems seen in this disorder. It may be more common in patients with lupus involving the CNS. PMID:901267

  12. A surgical case of paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with ipsilateral cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Wada, Kojiro; Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a 60-year-old with a large paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with cervical interal carotid artery (ICA) dissection (CICAD). She had a fall while riding a bicycle and hit her head on the ground. Computed tomography scan done at another facility showed a round mass lesion near the sella. Her medical history revealed gradual decrease in left eye vision since two years. Left carotid artery digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a CICAD with an intimal flap and a large paraclinoid aneurysm (15.5 mm in size). She underwent a high-flow bypass with a so-called double-insurance bypass and proximal ligation of the cervical ICA and the postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged without any new neurological deficits. We suggest that the possible nature of carotid artery dissection (CAD)-related hemodynamic changes should be taken into consideration in cases of intracranial aneurysm associated with CAD. PMID:23135031

  13. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  14. Meningioma and occlusive vasculopathy: coexisting complications of past extracranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Montanera, W.; Chui, M.; Hudson, A.

    1985-07-01

    Two cases are reported in which a meningioma and occlusion of the internal carotid artery with development of transdural collateral circulation coexisted following extracranial radiation in childhood.

  15. Congenital Absence of Internal Carotid Artery with Rare Type of Intercavernous Anastamosis and Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Alurkar, Anand; Oak, Sagar; Kori, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) is a rare anomaly seen in <0.01% of the population. Various collateral circulations develop in these cases to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. High incidence of aneurysms is reported in these cases. Complete evaluation is required to detect other abnormalities usually seen in these patients. We report a case of congenital absence of right ICA in a 39-year-old female who presented with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SAH) and had a Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm (MCA). The right MCA got supply from the intercavernous communication from the left internal carotid artery. Skull base Computed Tomogram (CT) confirmed the congenital absence of right ICA. She underwent successful surgical clipping for the aneurysm. The high incidence of aneurysms, collateral circulations, embryological development and postulated mechanisms of this anomaly were discussed. The exact aetiology behind the absence of ICA remains unclear. It is important to differentiate this condition from acquired stenosis/occlusion due to atherosclerosis and carotid dissection. Recognising the anomaly is important and gains even more significance during surgical planning in cases of direct aneurysm clipping, carotid endarterectomy and transphenoidal surgeries. PMID:27190916

  16. Experimental determination of circumferential properties of fresh carotid artery plaques.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Michael G; O'Donnell, Michael R; O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is currently accepted as the gold standard for interventional revascularisation of diseased arteries belonging to the carotid bifurcation. Despite the proven efficacy of CEA, great interest has been generated in carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) as an alternative to open surgical therapy. CAS is less invasive compared with CEA, and has the potential to successfully treat lesions close to the aortic arch or distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Following promising results from two recent trials (CREST; Carotid revascularisation endarterectomy versus stenting trial, and ICSS; International carotid stenting study) it is envisaged that there will be a greater uptake in carotid stenting, especially amongst the group who do not qualify for open surgical repair, thus creating pressure to develop computational models that describe a multitude of plaque models in the carotid arteries and their reaction to the deployment of such interventional devices. Pertinent analyses will require fresh human atherosclerotic plaque material characteristics for different disease types. This study analysed atherosclerotic plaque characteristics from 18 patients tested on site, post-surgical revascularisation through endarterectomy, with 4 tissue samples being excluded from tensile testing based on large width-length ratios. According to their mechanical behaviour, atherosclerotic plaques were separated into 3 grades of stiffness. Individual and group material coefficients were then generated analytically using the Yeoh strain energy function. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each sample was also recorded, showing large variation across the 14 atherosclerotic samples tested. Experimental Green strains at rupture varied from 0.299 to 0.588 and the Cauchy stress observed in the experiments was between 0.131 and 0.779 MPa. It is expected that this data may be used in future design optimisation of next generation interventional medical devices for the

  17. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... (the principal artery in the neck that supplies blood to the brain) and has a removable...

  2. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  3. The vasa vasorum of the rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, S G; Causton, B E; Baskerville, P A; Gent, S; Martin, J F

    1992-01-01

    The anatomy of the vasa vasorum of the carotid arteries was assessed by light and electron microscopy in a series of 25 New Zealand White male rabbits. The low viscosity acrylic resin, LR White, was used to cast the microvasculature. The carotid artery was found to have an endothelial monolayer placed directly upon a broad fenestrated internal elastic lamina. The media consisted of 12-18 laminae comprised of smooth muscle cells, elastin, collagen and ground substance. Vasa vasorum were confined to the adventitial layer, with no penetration into the media. They arose directly from the lumen of the carotid artery in addition to the arterial branching points. The potential role of the vasa vasorum in the aetiology of atherosclerotic plaques is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1506278

  4. Pseudo-Orbital Apex Syndrome in the Acute Trauma Setting Due to Ipsilateral Dissection of Internal Carotid Artery.

    PubMed

    Anders, Ursula M; Taylor, Elise J; Martel, Joseph R; Martel, James B

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic causes of orbital apex and superior orbital fissure syndrome are uncommon. The authors present the first case of a traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome simulating orbital apex syndrome, with loss of vision from posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A 35-year-old man was initially felt to have a right orbital apex syndrome with left craniofacial and orbital trauma. CT revealed left orbital fractures, a right superior orbital fissure fracture, a retained metallic foreign body in the right sphenoid sinus, and a right frontoparietal subdural hematoma. CT angiography showed a secondary dissection and occlusion of the right internal carotid artery from osseous erosion of the posterolateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. Internal carotid artery dissection is a possible, though rare, cause of ischemic optic neuropathy. The right pseudo-orbital apex syndrome resulted from a mechanical superior orbital fissure syndrome and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy from an internal carotid artery dissection. PMID:25216200

  5. Ocular neovascularization in eyes with a central retinal artery occlusion or a branch retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Mason, John O; Patel, Shyam A; Feist, Richard M; Albert, Michael A; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Thomley, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the ocular neovascularization (ONV) rate in eyes with a branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) or a central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), and to study factors that may influence the ONV rate secondary to CRAO. Methods This was a retrospective case series of consecutive patients (286 total eyes: 83 CRAOs and 203 BRAOs) who were diagnosed with a retinal artery occlusion from 1998 to 2013 at the Retina Consultants of Alabama and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the association between hypothesized risk factors and ONV development. Results Twelve (14.5%) of the 83 eyes with a CRAO developed ONV. Eleven of 12 eyes (91.7%) had iris neovascularization, ten of 12 eyes (83.3%) had neovascular glaucoma, and two of 12 eyes (16.7%) had neovascularization of the optic disc. The average time for ONV development secondary to CRAO was 30.7 days, ranging from the date of presentation to 137 days. Only two (<1.0%) of the 203 eyes with a BRAO developed iris neovascularization. Diabetes mellitus type 2 was a risk factor for ONV development following a CRAO with an adjusted odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–19.8) (P=0.02). Conclusion ONV is an important complication of CRAO and is a less-frequent complication of BRAO. Patients with a CRAO, especially those with diabetes mellitus type 2, should be closely monitored for the first 6 months for ONV. PMID:26089631

  6. Assessment of Carotid Artery Stenosis and the Use of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Whayne, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    General thinking has previously centered on managing carotid artery stenosis (CAS) by carotid endarterectomy and subsequently, stenting for higher risk patients. However for CAS and other forms of vascular disease, especially when asymptomatic, there is new emphasis on defining underlying mechanisms. Knowledge of these mechanisms can lead to medical treatments that result in possible atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, and even plaque regression, including in the patient with CAS. For now, the key medication class for a medical approach are the statins. Their use is supported by good cardiovascular clinical trial evidence including some directed carotid artery studies, especially with a demonstrated decrease in carotid intima-media thickness. Procedural controversy still exists but the current era in medicine offers significant support for medical management of asymptomatic CAS while techniques to recognize the vulnerable plaque evolve. If CAS converts to a symptomatic status, early referral for endarterectomy or stenting is indicated. PMID:26417184

  7. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  8. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females) who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR), 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI), 1.010 - 1.059), HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225), and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051) were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22230558

  9. Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-C is Up-Regulated in the Intima of Advanced Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Mohamed A; Harring, Scott D; Abendschein, Dana R; Vemuri, Chandu; Lu, Dongsi; Detering, Lisa; Liu, Yongjian; Woodard, Pamela K

    2016-01-01

    Objective Natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C/NPR-3) is a cell surface protein involved in vascular remodelling that is up-regulated in atherosclerosis. NPR-C expression has not been well characterized in human carotid artery occlusive lesions. We hypothesized that NPR-C expression correlates with intimal features of vulnerable atherosclerotic carotid artery plaque. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated NPR-C expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens isolated from 18 patients. The grade, location, and co-localization of NPR-C in CEA specimens were evaluated using two tissue analysis techniques. Results Relative to minimally diseased CEA specimens, we observed avid NPR-C tissue staining in the intima of maximally diseased CEA specimens (65%; p=0.06). Specifically, maximally diseased CEA specimens demonstrated increased NPR-C expression in the superficial intima (61%, p=0.17), and deep intima (138% increase; p=0.05). In the superficial intima, NPR-C expression significantly co-localized with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages. The intensity of NPR-C expression was also higher in the superficial intima plaque shoulder and cap regions, and significantly correlated with atheroma and fibroatheroma vulnerable plaque regions (β=1.04, 95% CI=0.46, 1.64). Conclusion These findings demonstrate significant NPR-C expression in the intima of advanced carotid artery plaques. Furthermore, NPR-C expression was higher in vulnerable carotid plaque intimal regions, and correlate with features of advanced disease. Our findings suggest that NPR-C may serve as a potential biomarker for carotid plaque vulnerability and progression, in patients with advanced carotid artery occlusive disease. PMID:27547837

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Iatrogenic and Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Stefan; Donas, Konstantinos P. Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Horsch, Svante

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the early and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute carotid artery dissections, its specific problems, and its limitations. We encountered seven patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, three cases of which occurred after carotid endarterectomy, two after carotid angioplasty and stenting, and two after trauma. Balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents were placed using a transfemoral approach. Success in restoring the carotid lumen was achieved in all patients. No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients experienced significant clinical improvement while in the hospital and achieved complete long-term recovery. At follow-up (mean, 22.4 months), good luminal patency of the stented segments was observed. In conclusion, in this small series, primary stent-supported angioplasty seems to be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of selected patients having acute traumatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, with excellent early and midterm results. Larger series and longer-term follow-up are required before definitive recommendations can be made.

  11. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  12. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). In total, 29 patients with PAOD from the leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44–1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58–1.95). The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population. PMID:26986166

  13. Delayed Axillary Artery Occlusion after Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heitmiller, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Axillary artery injury has been associated with shoulder dislocation and surgery. We describe a case of delayed axillary artery occlusion after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The injury was confirmed by Doppler and angiography and was treated with angioplasty and stenting. Early recognition and treatment of this injury are mandatory for patients' recovery. PMID:27555975

  14. Spontaneous Recanalization of Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion Following Angioplasty and Stenting of Inferior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Erhan Cil, Barbaros E.; Arat, Anil; Baykal, Atac; Karaman, Kerem; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2006-02-15

    An 84-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and coronary artery disease was admitted with a progressively worsening diffuse abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and angiography revealed occlusion of the origin and proximal portion of superior mesenteric artery. Aortography also showed severe origin stenosis of inferior mesenteric artery and that the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery was supplied by a prominent marginal artery of Drummond. Patient was effectively treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of the inferior mesenteric artery. Follow-up imaging studies demonstrated patency of the stent and spontaneous recanalization of superior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  15. Chronic Total Artery Occlusions in Noninfarct-Related Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Ozcan; Gungor, Mutlu; Topaloglu, Serkan; Aras, Dursun; Ozer, Can

    2014-01-01

    It has been rarely encountered some patients in clinical practice with coronary artery chronic total occlusion (CTO) on angiography but no any clinical history or electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, or left ventriculographic evidence of previous myocardial infarction. These noninfarct-related artery CTO (non-IRA CTO) lesions may be used as a clinical role model of endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms in addition to continuing the process of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical characteristics of patients with non-IRA CTO patients and compared them to those with infarct-related CTO (IRA-CTO). We reviewed our invasive cardiology database searching for the CTO of any major coronary arteries, and assessed whether or not they have the clinical history or electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, and left ventriculographic evidence of previous myocardial infarction. Interestingly, we detected that all these patients with non-IRA CTO had diabetes mellitus, and the clinical and demographic features of these non-IRA CTO patients were compared with age- and sex-matched diabetic IRA-CTO patients with regard to conventional coronary risk factors and the angiographic collateral grading system. There were total 99 CTO patients (49 patients with non-IRA CTO and 50 patients with IRA-CTO).All patients with non-IRA CTO had better collateral circulation (96 vs. 40% p < 0.001) compared with those having IRA-CTO. The only significant difference between the groups was the status of current smoking (4 vs. 88%; p < 0.001). The present study showed that the non-IRA CTOs were associated with diabetes mellitus and better collateral development compared with IRA-CTO. In diabetic patients, the concomitant smoking use may be harmful by preventing endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms. PMID:24627613

  16. Successful Corticosteroid Treatment of Refractory Spontaneous Vasoconstriction of Extracranial Internal Carotid and Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kozue; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous vasoconstriction of the extracranial internal carotid artery (SVEICA) is a rare cause of cerebral infarction. Most patients with SVEICA suffer recurrent attacks of vasoconstriction. The standard treatment for this condition has not been established and its long-term prognosis is unclear. Case Report: A 25-year-old man with a history of refractory vasospasm angina presented with transient alternating hemiplegia in both the right and left side. Serial carotid ultrasonography examinations showed severe transient stenosis or occlusion of cervical internal carotid arteries on 1 or both sides, with and without neurological symptoms. This condition resolved completely within 1 day to 1 week. The patient did not present any other risk factors for atherosclerosis and was diagnosed with SVEICA. The treatment with calcium antagonists and nitrates did not prevent the attacks. Administration of a corticosteroid substantially reduced the vasospasm attacks. Conclusions: SVEICA is intractable and difficult to diagnose. It has been reported that SVEICA sometimes complicates coronary artery disease, as observed in this case. The present case demonstrated the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatment against this disease. Serial ultrasonography examinations helped us to diagnose and follow-up the vasospasm attacks. PMID:27348139

  17. Otorrhagia as the initial presentation of an internal carotid artery aneurysm in the middle ear. Case presentation

    PubMed Central

    PETRI, MARIA; DINESCU, VERONICA; NECULA, VIOLETA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2016-01-01

    Middle ear aneurysms are rare and difficult to treat. The case of a 50-year-old female who presented with left otorrhagia caused by an internal carotid aneurysm is reported. She had no medical history of tinnitus, vertigo, otalgia or otorrhea. Middle ear surgery was effective in resolving bleeding and did not cause any permanent neurological deficit. High resolution computed tomography angiography is the technique of choice and, in some cases, can be complemented with a magnetic resonance angiography. Misdiagnosis of the internal carotid artery aneurysm may lead to serious morbidity because of bleeding or vascular occlusion. The use of modern imaging techniques explain the current relative increase in frequency. PMID:27152084

  18. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  19. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  20. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  1. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  2. Surgical Exposure to Control the Distal Internal Carotid Artery at the Base of the Skull during Carotid Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Davis, Laura; Zeitouni, Anthony; Makhoul, Nicholas; Steinmetz, Oren K

    2016-07-01

    Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms are rare. Treatment options for these lesions include endovascular interventions, such as coiling and stenting, or surgical reconstruction, such as resection and primary reanastomosis, or interposition bypass grafting. In this report, we describe the surgical technique used to perform surgical repair of an internal carotid artery aneurysm extending up to the base of the skull. Anterior exposure of the infratemporal fossa and distal control of the carotid artery at the level of the carotid canal was achieved through a transcervical approach, performing double mandibular osteotomies with superior reflection of the middle mandibular section. PMID:26902936

  3. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  4. Surgical flow modification of the anterior cerebral artery-anterior communicating artery complex in the management of giant aneurysms of internal carotid artery bifurcation: An alternative for a difficult clip reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Felix Hendrik; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Beer-Furlan, André Luiz; Rotta, José Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internal carotid artery bifurcation (ICAb) aneurysms account for about 2–15% of all intracranial aneurysms. In giant and complex cases, treatment may be difficult and dangerous, once some aneurysms have wide neck and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) may arise from the aneurysm itself. Clip reconstruction may be difficult in such cases. Whenever possible, the occlusion of ACA transform the bifurcation in a single artery reconstruction (ICA to MCA), much easier than a bifurcation reconstruction. Methods: In patients with giant and complex ICAb aneurysms, we propose routine preoperative angiography with anatomical evaluation of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) patency during cervical common carotid compression with concomitant contralateral carotid artery injection. This allowed visualization of the expected reversal of flow in the A1 segment–ACoA complex. When test is positive, we can perform ipsilateral ACA (A1 segment) clip occlusion and flow modification of the ACA-ACoA complex transforming a three vessel (ICA, ACA, and MCA) reconstruction into a two vessel (ICA and MCA) reconstruction. Results: Two patients were treated, with 100% of occlusion and good outcome. Conclusions: Surgical treatment of giant and complex ICAb may be achieved with acceptable morbidity. PMID:27313968

  5. Carotid artery stenting and patient outcomes: The CABANA surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, L Nelson; White, Christopher J; Foster, Malcolm T; Powell, Richard J; Zemel, Gerald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized CABANA study was to evaluate periprocedural clinical outcomes in high surgical risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Carotid WALLSTENT plus FilterWire EZ Embolic Protection System by a diverse group of clinicians. Background There is a need for additional evidence evaluating carotid artery stenting (CAS) performed by operators with various experience and training levels. Methods The study enrolled symptomatic (≥50% carotid artery stenosis) and asymptomatic (≥80% carotid stenosis) patients at high risk for carotid endarterectomy. Study centers were grouped into three tiers based on previous CAS experience while individual operators were grouped by their CAS training. The primary endpoint was the 30-day composite of major adverse events [MAEs; including stroke, death, and myocardial infarction (MI)]. Individual event rates were evaluated across the overall study, and by center experience and physician training tier. Results Of 1,097 enrolled patients, 1,025 were evaluable for 30-day MAE rate. The stroke rate (3.3%) was a major contributing factor in the overall MAE rate (4.6%). Mortality was 1.3% and the MI rate was 0.5%. There was no statistically significant association between MAE rates among the center experience tiers (P = 0.61) nor among the operator training categories (P = 0.26). Conclusions CAS with the Carotid WALLSTENT and FilterWire EZ yielded a low 30-day MAE rate that did not differ significantly across operator experience and training levels. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00741091. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24948033

  6. Vascular balloon injury and intraluminal administration in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The carotid artery balloon injury model in rats has been well established for over two decades. It remains an important method to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation, neointima formation and vascular remodeling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are the most frequently employed animals for this model. Female rats are not preferred as female hormones are protective against vascular diseases and thus introduce a variation into this procedure. The left carotid is typically injured with the right carotid serving as a negative control. Left carotid injury is caused by the inflated balloon that denudes the endothelium and distends the vessel wall. Following injury, potential therapeutic strategies such as the use of pharmacological compounds and either gene or shRNA transfer can be evaluated. Typically for gene or shRNA transfer, the injured section of the vessel lumen is locally transduced for 30 min with viral particles encoding either a protein or shRNA for delivery and expression in the injured vessel wall. Neointimal thickening representing proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells usually peaks at 2 weeks after injury. Vessels are mostly harvested at this time point for cellular and molecular analysis of cell signaling pathways as well as gene and protein expression. Vessels can also be harvested at earlier time points to determine the onset of expression and/or activation of a specific protein or pathway, depending on the experimental aims intended. Vessels can be characterized and evaluated using histological staining, immunohistochemistry, protein/mRNA assays, and activity assays. The intact right carotid artery from the same animal is an ideal internal control. Injury-induced changes in molecular and cellular parameters can be evaluated by comparing the injured artery to the internal right control artery. Likewise, therapeutic modalities can be evaluated by comparing the injured and treated artery to the

  7. Central retinal artery pressure and carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RAN; PENG, XIAO-YAN; YOU, QI-SHENG; JIAO, LI-QUN; JONAS, JOST B.

    2016-01-01

    The central retinal artery (CRA), which can be non-invasively examined with ophthalmoscopy, may be regarded as an extracranial part of the cerebrovascular system. Assessment of CRA pressure may be of help in assessing the impediment of the intracranial blood circulation in patients with a carotid artery stenosis (CAS). The aim of this study was to explore the potential associations between diastolic central retinal artery pressure (diastCRAP) and CAS. The prospective longitudinal clinical observational study included patients with CAS and a control group without CAS. diastCRAP was assessed using ophthalmodynamometry. The study group consisted of 95 patients with CAS (50 of whom had >75%CAS and underwent surgery; the surgical study group) and a control group of 64 individuals without CAS. In all study participants, a lower diastCRAP was significantly associated with a higher degree of CAS (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that a higher CAS degree was significantly (correlation coefficient: r=0.75) associated with a higher brachial diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001) and lower diastCRAP (P<0.001). Within the surgical study group at the baseline of the study, diastCRAP was significantly lower at the surgical side than at the contralateral side (P=0.02). The diastCRAP on the surgical side increased significantly (P<0.001) after surgery. In the surgical study group at baseline, diastCRAP on the surgical side was not significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.22), whereas after surgery, diastCRAP was significantly associated with brachial diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001). DiastCRAP was found to be significantly and linearly correlated with the degree of CAS in intra-individual inter-eye, inter-individual and intra-individual follow-up comparisons. The strong and linear association between diastCRAP and the degree of CAS suggest that diastCRAP should be explored further for use as an indicator of cerebrovascular status. PMID:26998005

  8. Bilateral carotid and bilateral vertebral artery dissection following facial massage.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Andrea L; Zink, Walter; Zimmerman, Robert; Riina, Howard; Benitez, Ronald

    A 50-year-old woman underwent facial massage. After 13 days, she experienced left retro-orbital pain, ptosis, and miosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed stenotic dissection of bilateral cervical internal carotid and vertebral arteries. The intracranial vasculature was intact. She was treated conservatively with long-term oral anticoagulation and remains asymptomatic 18 months later. PMID:18388028

  9. Readmissions after Carotid Artery Revascularization in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Damluji, Mohammed Salim; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Zhang, Weiwei; Geary, Lori; Stilp, Erik; Dardik, Alan; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In appropriately selected patients with severe carotid stenosis, carotid revascularization reduces ischemic stroke. Prior clinical research has focused on the efficacy and safety of carotid revascularization, but few investigators have considered readmission as a clinically important outcome. Objectives To examine frequency, timing, and diagnoses of 30-day readmission following carotid revascularization; to assess differences in 30-day readmission between patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS); to describe hospital variation in risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRR); and to examine whether hospital variation in procedural choice (CEA vs. CAS) was associated with differences in RSRRs. Methods We used Medicare fee-for-service administrative claims data to identify acute care hospitalizations for CEA and CAS from 2009–2011. We calculated crude 30-day all-cause hospital readmissions following carotid revascularization. To assess differences in readmission after CAS compared with CEA, we used Kaplan-Meier survival curves and fitted mixed-effect logistic regression. We estimated hospital RSRRs using hierarchical generalized logistic regression. We stratified hospitals into 5 groups by their proportional CAS use and compared hospital group median RSRRs. Results Of 180,059 revascularizations from 2,287 hospitals, CEA and CAS were performed in 81.5% and 18.5% of cases, respectively. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate following carotid revascularization was 9.6%. Readmission risk after CAS was higher than after CEA. There was modest hospital-level variation in 30-day RSRRs (Median: 9.5%, Range: 7.5%–12.5%). Variation in proportional use of CAS was not associated with differences in hospital RSRR (range of median RSRR across hospital quartiles: 9.49%–9.55%, P 0.771). Conclusions Almost 10% of Medicare patients undergoing carotid revascularization were readmitted within 30-days of discharge. Compared with CEA

  10. Stenting versus Endarterectomy for Treatment of Carotid-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brott, Thomas G.; Hobson, Robert W.; Howard, George; Roubin, Gary S.; Clark, Wayne M.; Brooks, William; Mackey, Ariane; Hill, Michael D.; Leimgruber, Pierre P.; Sheffet, Alice J.; Howard, Virginia J.; Moore, Wesley S.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Cutlip, Donald E.; Cohen, David J.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Ferguson, Robert D.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Blackshear, Joseph L.; Silver, Frank L.; Mohr, J.P.; Lal, Brajesh K.; Meschia, James F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carotid-artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy are both options for treating carotid-artery stenosis, an important cause of stroke. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis to undergo carotid-artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. The primary composite end point was stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from any cause during the periprocedural period or any ipsilateral stroke within 4 years after randomization. RESULTS For 2502 patients over a median follow-up period of 2.5 years, there was no significant difference in the estimated 4-year rates of the primary end point between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group (7.2% and 6.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.51; P = 0.51). There was no differential treatment effect with regard to the primary end point according to symptomatic status (P = 0.84) or sex (P = 0.34). The 4-year rate of stroke or death was 6.4% with stenting and 4.7% with endarterectomy (hazard ratio, 1.50; P = 0.03); the rates among symptomatic patients were 8.0% and 6.4% (hazard ratio, 1.37; P = 0.14), and the rates among asymptomatic patients were 4.5% and 2.7% (hazard ratio, 1.86; P = 0.07), respectively. Periprocedural rates of individual components of the end points differed between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group: for death (0.7% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.18), for stroke (4.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.01), and for myocardial infarction (1.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.03). After this period, the incidences of ipsilateral stroke with stenting and with endarterectomy were similarly low (2.0% and 2.4%, respectively; P = 0.85). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis, the risk of the composite primary outcome of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death did not differ significantly in the group undergoing carotid-artery stenting and the group undergoing carotid endarterectomy. During the

  11. Successful Cross-circulation Stent-Retriever Embolectomy Through Posterior Communicating Artery for Acute MCA Occlusion by Using Trevo XP ProVue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seul Kee; Baek, Byung Hyun; Heo, Tae Wook; Yoon, Woong

    2016-03-01

    Acute ischemic stroke due to embolic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in patients with chronic ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is quite rare. Several previous reports demonstrated that intra-arterial (IA) thrombolytic therapy or aspiration thrombectomy using the cross-circulation technique via an alternative collateral pathway is feasible in acute stroke patients with an unfavorable direct route to the occluded sites. However, stent-retriever embolectomy via the cross-circulation approach has not been reported in the literature. The present paper reports the first case of successful stent-retriever embolectomy for acute MCA occlusion via the patent posterior communicating artery (PComA) by using Trevo XP ProVue stent-retriever in a patient with acute MCA stroke and chronic occlusion at the origin site of the ipsilateral ICA. PMID:26958415

  12. Successful Cross-circulation Stent-Retriever Embolectomy Through Posterior Communicating Artery for Acute MCA Occlusion by Using Trevo XP ProVue

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul Kee; Baek, Byung Hyun; Heo, Tae Wook

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke due to embolic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in patients with chronic ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is quite rare. Several previous reports demonstrated that intra-arterial (IA) thrombolytic therapy or aspiration thrombectomy using the cross-circulation technique via an alternative collateral pathway is feasible in acute stroke patients with an unfavorable direct route to the occluded sites. However, stent-retriever embolectomy via the cross-circulation approach has not been reported in the literature. The present paper reports the first case of successful stent-retriever embolectomy for acute MCA occlusion via the patent posterior communicating artery (PComA) by using Trevo XP ProVue stent-retriever in a patient with acute MCA stroke and chronic occlusion at the origin site of the ipsilateral ICA. PMID:26958415

  13. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  14. METABOLIC SYNDROME INCREASES CAROTID ARTERY STIFFNESS: THE NORTHERN MANHATTAN STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Della-Morte, David; Gardener, Hannah; Denaro, Federica; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Rundek, Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Background Arterial Stiffness, an intermediate pre-clinical marker of atherosclerosis, has been associated with an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The metabolic syndrome and its components are established CVD risk factors and may also increase arterial stiffness, but data on this potential relationship is limited. The goal of this study was to determine the association between the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and carotid artery stiffness (STIFF) in an elderly multi-ethnic cohort. Methods STIFF was assessed by carotid ultrasound as part of the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), a prospective population-based cohort of stroke-free individuals. STIFF was calculated as [ln(systolicBP/diastolicBP)/Strain], where Strain was [(Systolic Diameter Diastolic Diameter)/Diastolic Diameter]. MetSyn was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program: Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria. LogSTIFF was analyzed as the dependent variable in linear regression models, adjusting for demographics, education, current smoking, presence of carotid plaque and intima-media thickness. Results STIFF was analyzed in 1133 NOMAS subjects (mean age 65±9 years; 61% women; 58% Hispanic, 22% Black, 20% White). The prevalence of MetSyn was 49%. The mean LogSTIFF was 2.01±0.61 among those with and 1.90±0.59 among those without MetSyn (p=0.003). MetSyn was significantly associated with increased logSTIFF in the final adjusted model (parameter estimate β=0.100, p=0.01). Among individual MetSyn components, waist circumference and elevated blood pressure were most significantly associated with a mean increase in logSTIFF (p<0.01). Conclusion MetSyn is significantly associated with increased carotid artery stiffness in a multiethnic population. Increased carotid artery stiffness may, in part, explain a high risk of stroke among individuals with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:20536608

  15. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of carotid arterial wall in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, W; Abendschein, D R; Haacke, E M

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of contrast agents on MR images of balloon-injured carotid arteries containing atherosclerotic-like lesions. We have evaluated an intravascular contrast agent, MS-325 (METASYN INC., Cambridge, MA) and an extravascular contrast agent, Optimark, (Mallinckrodt Medical Inc., St. Louis, MO) on MR angiograms obtained 4 weeks after balloon hyperinflation-induced injury of the left common carotid artery in 12 hypercholesterolemic minipigs. High in-plane resolution (.8 x .4 mm2), thin slice (1 mm) time-of-flight gradient echo sequences were used to acquire the MR angiographic images. Vascular lumen definition was compared before and after a single bolus intravenous injection of a contrast agent. Digital subtraction angiograms were obtained from all pigs after MR imaging. High grade stenosis developed in 1 of the 12 pigs and five pigs had complete occlusion of the injured vessel. The remaining pigs exhibited essentially no visible stenoses as assessed either by MR angiography or digital subtraction angiography. The vessel walls of the stenosed and occluded vessels were visible after the injection of either intravascular or extravascular contrast agent. Histologic analyses showed well developed neovascularization in the neointima or occlusive thrombosis. We conclude that the observed contrast-enhanced vessel wall is caused by an increased vascular supply associated with thrombosis and neointimal thickening that leads to an accumulation of contrast agent in the abnormal vessel walls after the injection of the T1-shortening paramagnetic contrast agent. PMID:9039613

  16. Lower body positive pressure application with an antigravity suit in acute carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Karine; Lukaszewicz, Anne Claire; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Payen, Didier

    2010-01-01

    The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at "venous" pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion. PMID:20798842

  17. A cohort study of duplex Doppler examinations of the carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmion, Vincent J; Aldoori, Munther I; Woodcock, John P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the possibility of pathological change in the common carotid artery at the bifurcation and in the internal carotid artery beyond the bifurcation which could contribute to a reduced diastolic pressure as observed in primary open angle glaucoma. Design Duplex ultrasonic examinations of carotid bifurcations were conducted on 80 patients. Carotid artery defects were allocated into three types: no demonstrable flow defects, internal carotid artery abnormalities and disease in the carotid bulb. Setting Bristol Royal Infirmary Vascular Laboratory. Participants Eighty patients (mean age 69.6 years) providing a total of 160 sides to the analysis. Main outcome measures An estimated central retinal artery pressure, intraocular pressure and field loss were recorded for each side measured. Results Doppler investigations revealed significant levels of pathological change in the internal carotid distinct from changes at the carotid bulb. The disease revealed in the internal carotid artery was significantly associated with intraocular pressure (p = 0.032), with an effect small to medium in magnitude. The Q2 measure, derived from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure, was also substantively associated with disease in the internal carotid artery. Both intraocular pressure and the Q2 measure effectively discriminated between groups, with field loss providing rather less discriminating capability. There was a strong trend towards a higher intraocular pressures and a greater visual field loss with internal carotid artery disease. Conclusions Pathological changes in the extra cranial carotid artery in primary open angle glaucoma exceed those in the arteries classified as normal. The presence of disease specifically in the internal carotid artery emphasised the need for a mechanism for the evaluation of the internal carotid apart from the carotid bulb. A basis for clarifying the presence of an ischaemic zone is proposed. PMID:25289141

  18. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population. PMID:15803810

  19. Monofilament intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Clark, W M; Lessov, N S; Dixon, M P; Eckenstein, F

    1997-12-01

    The rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with an intraluminal filament is well characterized with a two hour period of occlusion in widespread use. The recent availability of transgenic animals has led to an interest in adapting the MCA model in the mouse. To date the model has not been well characterized in the mouse. We performed the present study to compare different durations of MCA occlusion and to validate new functional assessments in this model. The MCA occlusion model (5-0 filament) was used. Swiss-Webster mice, 24-44 g, were randomly assigned to four groups: one hour of occlusion; two hours of occlusion; three hours of occlusion; or permanent occlusion. At 48 hours post-ischemia, the animals were rated on three neurologic function scales, and then the brains were removed for lesion size determination. Overall, there was a significant difference in lesion volume (p < 0.001) between the groups. In the permanent group of mice, the average lesion volume was 78.41 +/- 17.47 mm (n = 12); two and three hours of ischemia produced 51.29 +/- 29.82 mm3 (n = 11) and 54.85 mm3 (n = 13), respectively, significantly different than the one hour group 14.84 +/- 31.34 mm3 (n = 11). All three functional scoring systems found significant overall differences between the four groups with our detailed General and Focal scores producing more robust between group treatment differences and showing correlation coefficients of r = 0.766 and r = 0.788, respectively to infarct volume. The MCA filament occlusion model can be successfully adapted in the mouse with either two or three hour occlusions producing reliable infarcts. New functional scoring systems unique to the mouse appear to add additional information. PMID:9427967

  20. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  1. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery.

    PubMed

    Imahori, Taichiro; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  2. Transposition of great arteries is associated with increased carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mersich, Beatrix; Studinger, Peter; Lenard, Zsuzsanna; Kadar, Krisztina; Kollai, Mark

    2006-06-01

    Transposition of great arteries is the consequence of abnormal aorticopulmonary septation. Animal embryonic data indicate that septation and elastogenesis are related events, but human and clinical data are not available. We tested the hypothesis that large artery elastic function was impaired in patients with transposition of great arteries. We studied 34 patients aged 9 to 19 years, 12+/-3 years after atrial switch operation; 14 patients aged 7 to 9 years, 8+/-1 years after arterial switch operation; and 108 healthy control subjects matched for age. Carotid artery diastolic diameter and pulsatile distension were determined by echo wall-tracking; carotid blood pressure was measured by tonometry. Systolic pressure was higher and diastolic pressure was lower in patients than in controls. Patients with atrial and arterial switch repair were compared with their respective controls by 2-factor ANOVA. For patients with atrial switch repair versus control, stiffness index beta was 4.9+/-1.5 versus 3.1+/-1.0 (P<0.001); for patients witch arterial switch versus control, stiffness index beta was 3.8+/-1.1 versus 2.1+/-0.6 (P<0.001). Similar differences were observed for carotid compliance, distensibility, and incremental elastic modulus as well. The interaction term was not significant for any of the elastic variables, indicating that carotid stiffening was a characteristic of the condition and not the consequence of different hemodynamics. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in patients, suggesting that impaired elastogenesis may constitute part of the congenital abnormality. Since carotid artery stiffness has been established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, this condition may have consequences in the clinical management of these patients. PMID:16618837

  3. [CHANGES OF CAROTID AND VERTEBRAL ARTERIES IN PATENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND HEPATOBILIARY PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Polyakov, V Ya; Nikolaev, Yu A; Pegova, S V; Matsievskaya, T R; Obukhov, I V

    2016-01-01

    The study included 1172 patients (410 men and 762 women) at the mean age of 60.3 ± 10.4 years with grade I-II (stage I-II) arterial hypertension (AH) admitted to the clinic of Institute of Experimental Medicine. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on the results of clinical and laboratory diagnostics. Group 1 (n = 525) included patients with AH and hepatobiliary system (HBS) diseases, group 2 (n = 647) patients with AH without HBS diseases. The patients group 1 had a thicker intima-media complex of carotid arteries, higher peak systolic bloodflow rate in the internal and vertebral carotid arteries, more pronounced coiling of internal carotid arteries than patients of group 2. Patients with AH and HBS diseases exhibited correlation between bloodflow rate in external carotid arteries and atherogenicity coefficient. Duplex scanning of neck vessels of in patients with AH without HBS diseases revealed peculiar changes of the intima-media thickness and hemodynamically significant changes of the blood flow in the internal carotid arteries that may be of prognostic value in this nosological syntropy and require the personified approach to diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of these conditions. PMID:27172721

  4. Stent-Graft Treatment of Late Stenosis of the Left Common Carotid Artery Following Thoracic Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Medda, Massimo; Lioupis, Christos Mollichelli, Nadia; Fantoni, Cecilia; Inglese, Luigi

    2008-03-15

    We report the case of a patient with subtotal occlusion of the origin of the left common carotid artery (CCA) following thoracic graft placement. Retrograde endovascular placement of a stent-graft by minimal cervical access was undertaken to repair the occlusive lesion of the left CCA and prevent future complications of endoluminal thoracic reconstruction. The retrograde endovascular repair of CCA lesions, as other authors have already suggested, may be the treatment of choice in 'high-surgical-risk' patients. In these cases where the ostium of supra-aortic trunks is compromised following thoracic aorta stent-graft migration, endoluminal placement of a stent-graft in the CCA can guarantee both maintenance of carotid flow and thoracic stent-graft fixation.

  5. The transclival artery: a variant persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis not previously reported.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Jared D; Dahlin, Brian C; O'Brien, William T

    2016-01-01

    During embryological development, primitive anastomoses exist between the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries. These anastomoses typically regress or are incorporated into the developing vasculature. Persistence beyond fetal development, however, results in vascular anomalies that alter haemodynamic flow with a predisposition for aneurysm formation. The carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses mirror the primitive communications and include (from most to least common) the trigeminal, hypoglossal, proatlantal and otic arteries. The hypoglossal and proatlantal variants extend through the hypoglossal canal or foramen magnum, respectively. We present a previously undescribed variant of these persistent fetal anastomoses, the 'transclival artery', which courses through its own transclival skull base canal/foramen. PMID:27413022

  6. Ultrasound common carotid artery segmentation based on active shape model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  7. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  8. Dynamic changes in blood flow of a bypassed superficial temporal artery with unstable internal carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Atsushi; Matsuo, Seigo; Asakuno, Keizoh; Yoshimoto, Haruko; Shiramizu, Hideki; Niimura, Kaku; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited indications for superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA–MCA) bypass in the treatment of cerebral atherosclerotic disease. However, recent reports emphasize that STA–MCA bypass may be beneficial for select patients. In this report, we describe a case in which a flow-dependent STA–MCA bypass was achieved in a patient with unstable internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. Case Description: A 51-year-old woman presented with left ICA occlusion. A severely elongated mean transit time (MTT) indicated misery perfusion. STA–MCA bypass was performed immediately and blood flow through the graft appeared excellent on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Two weeks later, MRA revealed normal anterograde ICA blood flow and the bypass graft was not visible. Three years later, the left ICA stenosis again became severe and the patient developed contralateral hemiparesis. She underwent endovascular surgery and the ipsilateral MCA became occluded during the procedure. The STA–MCA bypass graft appeared immediately after the MCA occlusion and became a major provider of blood flow to the ipsilateral MCA area. She recovered with almost no deficit. Conclusion: This is a rare case which shows that dynamic flow changes through an STA–MCA bypass can occur with variable ICA blood flow. STA–MCA bypass can be beneficial for the treatment of unstable ICA stenosis. PMID:22439111

  9. Computational modeling of hypertensive growth in the human carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Pablo; Peña, Estefania; Martínez, Miguel Angel; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a chronic medical condition associated with an elevated blood pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension initiates a series of events, which are known to collectively initiate arterial wall thickening. However, the correlation between macrostructural mechanical loading, microstructural cellular changes, and macrostructural adaptation remains unclear. Here, we present a microstructurally motivated computational model for chronic arterial hypertension through smooth muscle cell growth. To model growth, we adopt a classical concept based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic part and a growth part. Motivated by clinical observations, we assume that the driving force for growth is the stretch sensed by the smooth muscle cells. We embed our model into a finite element framework, where growth is stored locally as an internal variable. First, to demonstrate the features of our model, we investigate the effects of hypertensive growth in a real human carotid artery. Our results agree nicely with experimental data reported in the literature both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  10. Carotid Artery Stenting Trials: Conduct, Results, Critique, and Current Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira

    2012-02-15

    The carotid stenting trialists have demonstrated persistence and determination in comparing an evolving technique, carotid artery stenting (CAS), against a mature and exacting standard for carotid revascularisation, carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This review focuses on their endeavours. A total of 12 1-on-1 randomised trials comparing CAS and CEA have been reported; 6 of these can be considered major, and 5 of these reflect (in part) current CAS standards of practice and form the basis of this review. At least 18 meta-analyses seeking to compare CAS and CEA exist. These are limited by the quality and heterogeneity of the data informing them (e.g., five trials were stopped prematurely such that they collectively failed to reach recruitment target by >4000 patients). The Carotid Stenting Trialists' Collaboration Publication represents a prespecified meta-analysis of European trials that were sufficiently similar to allow valid conclusions to be drawn; these trials and conclusions will be explored. When the rate of myocardial infarction (MI) is rigorously assessed, CAS and CEA are equivalent for the composite end point of stroke/death and MI, with more minor strokes for CAS and more MIs for CEA. These outcomes have a discrepant impact on quality of life and subsequent mortality. The all-stroke death outcomes for patients <70 years old are equivalent, with more minor strokes occurring in the elderly during CAS than CEA. There are significantly more severe haematomas and cranial nerve injuries after CEA. The influence of experience on outcome cannot be underestimated.

  11. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  12. Image-Guided Thromboembolectomy of Acute Arterial Occlusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Sang-Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is rare in childhood, but this medical emergency requires immediate treatment. Described herein are separate instances of lower extremity ATE in 2 children, both of whom were successfully managed through image-guided thromboembolectomy (IGT). One patient, a 34-month-old female child with nephrotic syndrome, developed bilateral iliac and popliteal thromboembolic arterial occlusions after high-dose steroid therapy. Another 9-year-old girl suffered an embolism of left popliteal artery due to infectious endocarditis. Both patients underwent IGT using over-the-wire Fogarty catheters. During follow-up, presenting symptoms resolved without significant complications. PMID:27177711

  13. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  14. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-01-01

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe. PMID:26167713

  15. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 'black blood' technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  16. Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: A Different Entity without Specific Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Filis, Konstantinos; Sigala, Fragiska; Sianou, Argiri

    2016-01-01

    According to literature data, there are no distinct guidelines regarding the proper diagnostic and therapeutic management of traumatic carotid artery dissection (TCAD). Although most of cases evaluated in research studies refer to spontaneous carotid artery dissection, traumatic cases demand special considerations as far as diagnosis and treatment are concerned. Although both types of dissection share some common characteristics, a patient with TCAD usually presents with several concomitant injuries as well as a higher bleeding risk, thus complicating decision making in such patients. Therefore, aim of this review is to present available data regarding epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment strategy in cases with TCAD in order to produce useful conclusions for everyday clinical practice. PMID:27051653

  17. Carotid Artery Stenting: Single-Center Experience Over 11 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Nolz, Richard Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Cejna, Manfred; Schernthaner, Melanie Lammer, Johannes Schoder, Maria

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the results of carotid artery stenting during an 11-year period. Data from 168 carotid artery stenting procedures (symptomatic, n = 55; asymptomatic, n = 101; symptoms not accessible, n = 12) were retrospectively collected. Primary technical success rate, neurological events in-hospital, access-site complications, and contrast-induced nephropathy (n = 118) were evaluated. To evaluate the influence of experience in carotid artery stenting on intraprocedural neurologic complications, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included the first 80 treated patients, and group 2 the remainder of the patients (n = 88). In-stent restenoses at last-follow-up examinations (n = 89) were assessed. The overall primary technical success rate was 95.8%. The in-hospital stroke-death rate was 3.0% (n = 5; symptomatic, 5.4%; asymptomatic, 2.0%; p = 0.346). Neurologic complications were markedly higher in group 1 (4.2%; three major strokes; symptomatic, 2.8%, asymptomatic, 1.4%) compared to group 2 (2.4%; one major and one minor stroke-symptomatic, 1.2%, asymptomatic 1.2%), but this was not statistically significant. Further complications were access-site complications in 12 (7.1%), with surgical revision required in 1 (0.6%) and mild contrast-induced nephropathy in 1 (0.85%). Twenty-one (23.6%) patients had >50% in-stent restenosis during a mean follow-up of 28.2 months. In conclusion, advanced experience in carotid artery stenting leads to an acceptable periprocedural stroke-death rate. In-stent restenosis could be a critical factor during the follow-up course.

  18. [Ectopic internal carotid artery of the oropharynx: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Xie, Sanlin; Chen, Shiyan; Chen, Xianming

    2016-02-01

    Ectopic internal carotid artery (ICA) is a very rare congenital variation. Unless the diagnosis is made before neck or tonsil surgery, massive hemorrhage and even death may result from injury to the vessel. Therefore, knowledge of the presence of ectopic ICAs may be important. We report two cases suffering from dysphagia associated with ectopic ICA manifesting itself as a pulsative protruding of the right lateral wall of the oropharynx. PMID:27373046

  19. Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Tonsillectomy Treated by Endovascular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Raffin, C.N.; Montovani, J.C.; Neto, J.M.P.; Campos, C.M.S.; Piske, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Summary Surgery on the head and neck region may be complicated by vascular trauma, caused by direct injury on the vascular wall. Lesions of the arteries are more dangerous than the venous one. The traumatic lesion may cause laceration of the artery wall, spasm, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, occlusion or pseudoaneurysm. We present a case of a child with a giant ICA pseudoaneurysm after tonsillectomy, manifested by pulsing mass and respiratory distress, which was treated by endovascular approach, occluding the lesion and the proximal artery with Histoacryl. We reinforce that the endovascular approach is the better way to treat most of the traumatic vascular lesions. PMID:20594516

  20. Suppression of ischemia in arterial occlusive disease by JNK-promoted native collateral artery development

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Kasmir; Sugamura, Koichi; Craige, Siobhan; Keaney, John F; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial occlusive diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Blood flow to the affected tissue must be restored quickly if viability and function are to be preserved. We report that disruption of the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) - cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in endothelial cells causes severe blockade of blood flow and failure to recover in the murine femoral artery ligation model of hindlimb ischemia. We show that the MLK-JNK pathway is required for the formation of native collateral arteries that can restore circulation following arterial occlusion. Disruption of the MLK-JNK pathway causes decreased Dll4/Notch signaling, excessive sprouting angiogenesis, and defects in developmental vascular morphogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that the MLK-JNK signaling pathway is a key regulatory mechanism that protects against ischemia in arterial occlusive disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18414.001 PMID:27504807

  1. Coarctation of the aorta associated with agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Ding, Shiao; Xu, Gaojun; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy with coarctation of the aorta complicated by innominate artery stenosis and agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. The patient was treated with an interposition graft between the ascending and descending aorta. The right subclavian was revascularized with another graft from the interposition graft to the distal right subclavian. This is a rare case of the combination of coarctation of the aorta and other vascular malformations. PMID:27162694

  2. Coarctation of the aorta associated with agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ding, Shiao; Xu, Gaojun; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy with coarctation of the aorta complicated by innominate artery stenosis and agenesis of left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery. The patient was treated with an interposition graft between the ascending and descending aorta. The right subclavian was revascularized with another graft from the interposition graft to the distal right subclavian. This is a rare case of the combination of coarctation of the aorta and other vascular malformations. PMID:27162694

  3. Evaluation of Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness in Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Akçay, Betül İlkay Sezgin; Kardeş, Esra; Maçin, Sultan; Ünlü, Cihan; Özgürhan, Engin Bilge; Maçin, Aydın; Bozkurt, Tahir Kansu; Ergin, Ahmet; Surmeli, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) in the elderly population. Methods. A total of 42 eyes of 21 patients with more than 70% ICA stenosis (Group 1) on one side and less than 70% stenosis (Group 2) on the other side were recruited for this study. ICA stenosis was diagnosed using both the B-mode and Doppler ultrasound. The two groups were compared in terms of the percentage of stenosis, SFCT measurements, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, refractive error, and peak systolic velocity. Eyes were examined with the RTVue-100 OCT device by the EDI-OCT technique. Results. The mean age of the patients was 71.9 ± 10.8 years. The mean percentage of ICA stenosis was 74 ± 4.9% in Group 1 and 47.5 ± 7.7% in Group 2. The mean SFCT was 231.9 ± 44.6 μm in Group 1 and 216.2 ± 46.8 μm in Group 2, which was significantly lower (P = 0.028). A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of internal carotid artery stenosis and SFCT (r = 0896, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Compensatory SFCT increase can be seen in ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 70%. PMID:26989500

  4. Use of Absorbable Sutures in Canine Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Alejandro R.; Carrillo-Farga, Joaquin; Velasco, Carlos O.; Valencia, Martin O.V.

    1990-01-01

    To study the functional and microstructural characteristics of polydioxanone sutures in vascular surgery, we created 48 vascular anastomoses in the right and left common carotid arteries of 24 mongrel dogs. In each animal, polydioxanone sutures were used in 1 carotid artery, and polypropylene sutures were used in the contralateral carotid artery. Twelve groups of 2 animals each were then formed. The 1st group was observed for 1 month, the 2nd for 2 months, the 3rd for 3 months, and so on until the 12th group, which was observed for 12 months. At the end of each observation period, reoperation was undertaken to evaluate the vascular anastomoses by means of angiography and microscopy. The polypropylene anastomoses showed a marked deformity, with tissue retraction and a foreign body reaction. In contrast, the polydioxanone anastomoses exhibited satisfactory healing, without deformity, and were well tolerated histologically. We believe that polydioxanone may be a useful, alternative vascular suture material. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:99-102) Images PMID:15227391

  5. Wave transmission characteristics and anisotropy of canine carotid arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moritz, W. E.; Anliker, M.

    1974-01-01

    A method was developed to generate and record three types of small amplitude waves (pressure, torsion and axial) in the exposed carotid artery of anesthetized dogs. The pressure waves were studied with the aid of miniature pressure transducers; electro-optical tracking units monitored the axial and circumferential surface displacements. Results from 6 dogs are presented in the form of the phase velocities and attenuation of three types of waves. The data demonstrate incompatibility with an isotropic elastic model for the mechanical behavior of the artery. The measured damping appears to be primarily due to the viscoelastic properties of the vessel wall material.

  6. Cognitive impairment induced by permanent bilateral common carotid occlusion exacerbates depression-related behavioral, biochemical, immunological and neuronal markers.

    PubMed

    Khojasteh, Fatemeh; Nahavandi, Arezo; Mehrpouya, Sara; Homberg, Judith R; Mirzamohammadi, Solmaz; Raufi, Safoora; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Barati, Mahmood

    2015-01-30

    There is a strong link between cognitive impairment and depression, but up to date it is not clear whether cognitive impairment is 'cause' or 'consequence' of depression. Therefore, we here examined the effect of cognitive impairment induced by permanent occlusion of common carotid arteries, a model known as two-vessel occlusion (2VO), on chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depression-related markers in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2VO or sham surgery. Sixty days after the surgery, the cognitive function of the rats was tested using the radial arm maze task measuring working and reference memory. Subsequently, the animals were randomly assigned to undergo 21 days of CUS or to stay non-stressed. One week after the last stressor, psychomotor retardation, a feature of depression-like behavior, was assessed using the forced swim test (FST) by measuring time spent on immobility. Plasma amino acid (glutamine, glutamate and glycine) and serum pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin 6) levels, and hippocampus CA1 neuronal damage were measured 24h after FST exposure. Results show that 2VO increased immobility in the FST only when rats had been exposed to CUS. In addition, 2VO surgery intensified the effect of CUS on IL-6, glutamate and glycine levels and increased CA1 hippocampal damage. In conclusion, our findings show that cognitive impairment may predispose to depression by intensifying the effect of stress on depression-related behavioral, biochemical, immunological and neuronal markers. PMID:25446000

  7. Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion from an aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms are a rare type of visceral artery aneurysm, whose rupture is associated with high mortality. These aneurysms are of particular interest because local haemodynamic change caused by coeliac artery obstruction plays an important role in their development. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of coeliac artery obstruction is not completely understood. Pressure from the median arcuate ligament is most frequently reported cause. Although it is well-known that stenosis or occlusion of the visceral vessels may be caused by aortic syndrome, reports of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion due to aortic syndrome are extremely rare. Our case indicates a new aetiology for a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm and demonstrates the rapid deterioration of the patient affected. PMID:27122676

  8. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T.; Zhang, Dao P.; Zhang, Shu L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  9. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with monocular blindness and external carotid-vertebral artery anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Suo; Zhang, Hong T; Zhang, Dao P; Zhang, Shu L

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present 2 rare cases of persistent embryonic anastomoses. In one case, the patient presented with persistent trigeminal artery along with multiple foci of cerebral infarction as well as central retinal artery thrombosis. In the other case, the patient had direct anastomosis of the vertebral artery with ipsilateral external carotid artery as well as pontine infarction, aneurysm, and unilateral hypoplasia of the vertebral artery. The findings in these cases may shed light on the clinical presentation of such persistent anastomoses and aid their detection in clinical settings. PMID:25935186

  10. Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Carotid Artery in an Infant due to Swallowed Fish Bone

    PubMed Central

    Jean Roger, Moulion Tapouh; Marcus, Fokou; Emmanuel, Fongang; Boniface, Moifo; Alain Georges, Juimo

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, particularly in the paediatric population. Only about 30 cases of carotid artery aneurysms in infants have been published until now. This paper reports the case of a giant pseudoaneurysm of the left common carotid artery due to swallowed fish bone by an 8-year-old boy. This pseudoaneurysm was 5.5 cm transverse-diameter and resulted in severe respiratory distress. It was treated by resection and end-to-end anastomosis with satisfactory outcome after one-year follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest carotid artery pseudoaneurysm ever described in children. PMID:26783485

  11. Endovascular Mechanical Recanalisation of Acute Carotid-T Occlusions: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fesl, Gunther; Wiesmann, Martin; Patzig, Maximilian; Holtmannspoetter, Markus; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Dichgans, Martin; Brueckmann, Hartmut

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Acute carotid-T occlusion generally responds poorly to thrombolysis. Endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) seems to be a promising alternative. However, there are few data on EMT in carotid-T occlusions. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data of 14 consecutive patients with acute carotid-T occlusions treated with mechanical recanalisation devices. A clot separation/aspiration system was used in 11 patients; different other mechanical retriever devices were used in seven patients; and stents were used in four patients. Modified Rankin Scale scores at 90 days were recorded to assess functional outcome. Results: Six women and eight men were included in the study. Mean patient age was 59.2 years; median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score on admission was 19; and mean time to treatment was 4.2 h. Successful recanalisation (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] score II and III) was achieved in 11 patients (78.6%). Seven patients (50.0%) were treated with more than one device, leading to successful recanalisation in six of these patients (85.7%). Subarachnoid haemorrhage and large space-occupying bleedings occurred in one (7.1%) and three (21.4%) patients, respectively. At follow-up, three patients (21.4%) were functionally independent, and six (42.9%) had died. Conclusion: When applying different mechanical devices, we found a high recanalisation rate. However, discrepancy between recanalisation and clinical outcome remained. More data are needed to assess the effect of the different methods on the prognoses of stroke patients.

  12. Identification of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Carotid Artery by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Rick; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Silveira, Landulfo; Costa, Maricília Silva; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Brugnera, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid artery using the Fluorescence Spectroscopy. The most important pathogeny in the cardiovascular disorders is the atherosclerosis, which may affect even younger individuals. With approximately 1.2 million heart attacks and 750,000 strokes afflicting an aging American population each year, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death. Carotid artery samples were obtained from the Autopsy Service at the University of São Paulo (São Paulo, SP, Brazil) taken from cadavers. After a histopathological analysis the 60 carotid artery samples were divided into two groups: normal (26) and atherosclerotic plaques (34). Samples were irradiated with the wavelength of 488 nm from an Argon laser. A 600 μm core optical fiber, coupled to the Argon laser, was used for excitation of the sample, whereas another 600 optical fiber, coupled to the spectrograph entrance slit, was used for collecting the fluorescence from the sample. Measurements were taken at different points on each sample and then averaged. Fluorescence spectra showed a single broad line centered at 549 nm. The fluorescence intensity for each sample was calculated by subtracting the intensity at the peak (550 nm) and at the bottom (510 nm) and then data were statistically analyzed, looking for differences between both groups of samples. ANOVA statistical test showed a significant difference (p<0,05) between both types of tissues, with regard to the fluorescence peak intensities. Our results indicate that this technique could be used to detect the presence of the atherosclerotic in carotid tissue.

  13. Internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongzhou; Li, Liang; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of internal carotid artery agenesis with stenosed intercavernous anastomosis. A 59-year-old male patient presented with a new infarction in the left basal ganglia. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography showed that the right internal carotid artery disappeared from the origin to the foramen lacerum segment, and there was an anastomotic artery with severe stenosis passed through the floor of the sella and in front of the cavernous sinus. The right A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery was absent and A2 segment was supplied by the normal contralateral internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. PMID:27231043

  14. Internal and external carotid artery embolism following facial injection of autologous fat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Autologous fat injection is a common aesthetic procedure for soft-tissue augmentation of the face. Although this procedure is generally regarded as safe, several patients have experienced acute visual loss or cerebral infarction after these injections. We describe a case of internal and external carotid artery fat embolism that occurred following injection of autologous fat into the face. It appeared that the injected fat entered a branch of the left external carotid artery and that the embolus likely migrated into the left internal carotid artery and distally into the left ophthalmic artery, left anterior artery, and middle cerebral artery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: PMID:24936097

  15. Acute Bilateral Internal Carotid Occlusion from Embolization of Left Atrial Thrombus During Transesophageal Echocardiography: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Syed Saad; Manjila, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Xavier, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a relatively safe imaging modality used to visualize intracardiac thrombus. Summary of case: We report on a unique, fatal complication during TEE of embolization of a pre-existing “smoking” left atrial thrombus causing acute bilateral internal carotid occlusion, confirmed on angiogram. Conclusions: Patients with history of lung pathology, such as COPD, who experience retching and cough during transesophageal echocardiography may be more susceptible to embolization of pre-existing thrombi. A need exists to risk stratify such patients. PMID:27403219

  16. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS. PMID:27061654

  17. Atherosclerosis and flow in carotid arteries with authentic geometries.

    PubMed

    Goubergrits, L; Affeld, K; Fernandez-Britto, J; Falcon, L

    2002-01-01

    The influence of blood flow on the depositions and development of atherosclerotic lesions have been observed and described since the 19th century. Observations have shown that depositions correlate with regions of low wall shear stress. However, the exact correlations between depositions, vessel geometry and flow parameters are not yet known. The purpose of this study was the quantification of atherosclerosis risk factors in carotid bifurcation. This artery has attracted particular interest because lesions are often found in this bifurcation. Post mortem, the arteries are excised and vessel casts are produced. Afterwards, the arteries are analyzed morphometrically. The vessel casts are used for the assessment of some geometrical parameters. 31 carotid bifurcations were analyzed in this study. Eight vessel casts were digitized and rendered three-dimensional mathematical models of the arteries. These data were imported by the computational fluid dynamics program FLUENT. Further, the blood flow was reconstructed in a computer model based on the individual vessel geometry. The flow parameters, such as velocity, pressure and wall shear stress were computed. At the same time the geometrical parameters and wall alterations are known. This permits the comparison of the anatomical shape and its flow with the distribution and level of the wall alterations. PMID:12122275

  18. Deaths from Occlusive Arterial Disease in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ibels, L. S.; Stewart, J. H.; Mahony, J. F.; Sheil, A. G. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths. PMID:4606408

  19. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  20. Difference in carotid artery elasticity in subjects with different brachial artery kinetic of vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Tripolino, C; Gnasso, A; Carallo, C; Scavelli, F B; Irace, C

    2016-08-01

    Increased carotid stiffness and impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) associate with cardiovascular events. We have previously reported three FMD patterns based on the time of maximal dilatation. The aim of the present study was to verify whether different FMD patterns associate with carotid artery stiffness. In all, 133 subjects were enrolled. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, blood sampling and ultrasound study. FMD was used as a measure of endothelial function. Based on the maximal brachial artery FMD, subjects were divided into Early dilators (peak FMD at 50 s), Late dilators (peak FMD over 50 s) and No dilators. Echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries was performed in order to calculate elastic indexes (strain, β-stiffness index and distensibility). In all, 64 subjects were classified as Early FMD, 36 as Late FMD and 33 as No dilators. Age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors were comparable among three groups. Early FMD had higher values of strain compared with both Late and no Dilators (P<0.001). Furthermore, Early dilators showed a significantly lower stiffness and higher distensibility compared with Late and No dilators. No significant differences between Late FMD and No Dilators were detected. Our results demonstrate that common carotid artery elasticity indexes significantly differ among Early, Late and No dilators. Subjects with delayed or absent brachial artery dilatation have stiffer common carotid arteries compared with subjects with early dilatation. In conclusion, our research suggests that the assessment of the kinetics of FMD in a clinical setting might represent a useful screening tool to improve the cardiovascular risk stratification. PMID:26467820

  1. Left main coronary artery occlusion after percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Bartorelli, Antonio L; Andreini, Daniele; Sisillo, Erminio; Tamborini, Gloria; Fusari, Melissa; Biglioli, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Left main coronary artery occlusion occurred immediately after transfemoral aortic valve implantation in an 87-year-old woman, which resulted in ventricular fibrillation and hemodynamic collapse. This life-threatening complication was promptly diagnosed with transesophageal echocardiography, which showed the disappearance of diastolic left main coronary artery jet flow and was confirmed with aortic root angiography. After prompt defibrillation, hemodynamic support was obtained with intra-aortic balloon pump and inotropic drugs. Functional recovery and survival were achieved with coronary stenting. This report highlights the importance of an integrated team approach of highly skilled specialists for these novel interventions. PMID:20172163

  2. Strategies to prevent radial artery occlusion after transradial PCI.

    PubMed

    Pancholy, Samir B

    2014-07-01

    Radial artery occlusion (RAO) is the most common structural consequence of transradial access (TRA) with an estimated incidence ranging from 2-10 %. Its occurrence is free of any major clinical consequences, especially at rest, with most if not all cases of digital ischemia occurring as a result of embolization, rather than RAO. The incidence of RAO is unacceptably high if "best practices" are not followed. Strategies to prevent RAO need to be implemented to preserve radial artery patency in order to exploit other benefits of TRA. PMID:24890765

  3. Autonomic and myocardial changes in middle cerebral artery occlusion: stroke models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cechetto, D F; Wilson, J X; Smith, K E; Wolski, D; Silver, M D; Hachinski, V C

    1989-11-20

    Stroke models in larger animals such as the cat, dog and monkey are becoming increasingly more expensive and less readily available. However, the rat is an excellent model for focal cerebral ischemia. Rats are readily available, inexpensive and their neuroanatomy and brain function have been studied extensively. Increases in plasma catecholamines and myocardial damage have been observed in clinical stroke. We examined autonomic and myocardial changes in two rat stroke models. In one model only the middle cerebral artery was occluded (MCAO) while the other model involved occlusion of both the MCA and the common carotid artery (MCAO/CCAO). Arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously in 25 male rats (326-430 g) that underwent one of the following procedures: (1) MCAO only; (2) MCAO/CCAO; (3) CCAO only; and (4) sham occlusions (SHAM). Arterial blood samples (0.5 ml) for radioenzymatic assay of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) were taken twice before the occlusions and at 90 and 180 min after the occlusions. The animals were perfused at the end of the experiment and the heart removed and examined histologically. Tetrazolium salts were reacted with oxidative enzymes to delineate the region of inadequate perfusion. The mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the SHAM, MCAO/CCAO and CCAO groups significantly declined from initial values (from an average of 78 to 53 mm Hg) during the course of the experiment. However, the mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the MCAO rats did not change during the experiment, so that the final mean blood pressure and pulse pressure were significantly higher than in the other 3 groups. The levels of both NE and E increased significantly (NE, 1443 +/- 285.9 to 4095 +/- 929 pg/ml; E, 2402 +/- 623 to 3741 +/- 1166 pg/ml) following occlusion in the MCAO group only while the other 3 groups did not change. Four of 6 hearts in the MCAO group were abnormal, showing evidence of subendocardial hemorrhage, ischemic

  4. Laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion combined with myomectomy for uterine myomas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongping; Yang, Weihong; Dai, Hong; Hu, Liping; Qu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Le

    2008-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the clinical feasibility and mid- to long-term effects of laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion before myomectomy in the treatment of uterine myomas. A total of 566 patients with uterine myoma were treated by laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion before myomectomy from October 2001 through July 2007. Mean blood loss was 88.2 +/- 52.7 mL (95% CI 82.7-93.8). The highest postoperative temperature was 37.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C, and the postoperative morbidity was 5.7% (32/566). Number of days to the return of bowel movement was 1.9 +/- 0.5d and in hospital stay after surgery was 7.7 +/- 2.5d. Complications included 2 instances of subcutaneous emphysema, 1 of vaginal bleeding, and 3 of mild intestinal obstruction. At a median of 26.3 months (range 6-69 months) of follow-up, the rate of myoma recurrence was 3.0% (15/517), uterus volume reduction was 48.9%, and correction of menstruation abnormality was 97.1% (502/517). Laparoscopic uterine artery occlusion before myomectomy can expand myomectomy indications with better results. PMID:18439509

  5. A Novel Canine Model of Acute Vertebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Jin, Min; Du, Bin; Lin, Hao; Xu, Chengyong; Jiang, Weijian; Jia, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Background The extended time window and theoretic reduction in hemorrhage make mechanical strategies an attractive approach for the treatment of patients with ischemic stroke. However, a limited availability of suitable animal models of cerebrovascular thrombosis has hampered the study of novel endovascular interventions. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique for site-specific placement of a thrombus in a canine model that would allow for the evaluation of mechanical thrombectomy and clot retrieval methods and the visualization of thrombus dislocation or fragmentation during angiographic manipulation. Methods Angiography and embolization with a preformed thrombus were performed in 12 canines. Under fluoroscopic guidance, an embolism protection device (EPD) was anchored to the middle segment of the left vertebral artery (VA) via the left femoral arterial sheath. A preformed radiopaque clot was injected through the guide catheter into the left VA, via the contralateral femoral artery, proximal to the EPD. After 15 min of occlusion, the EPD was removed and persistent occlusion of the VA was documented angiographically. Results Angiography performed during the observation period confirmed the persistence of VA occlusion in each case, and displacement of the radiopaque clots did not occur during the 3-hour observation period. The technique allowed selective embolization of targeted vessels without thrombus fragmentation. Conclusion This study demonstrates, for the first time, a canine model of post-circulation embolism induced by autologous blood clot placement. This model can be rapidly formed and easily operated, and the site of thrombosis can be readily controlled. PMID:26545253

  6. Retrospective study of threshold time for the conventional treatment of branch retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Daisuke; Minezaki, Teruumi; Tsubota, Kinya; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the medical backgrounds of patients and the treatment periods from the onset of branch retinal artery occlusion to obtaining improved final visual acuity. Methods This was a retrospective case series study. A total of 68 consecutive patients (69 eyes) with branch retinal artery occlusion who visited Tokyo Medical University Hospital from 2007 to 2012 were included in this study. All patients underwent ophthalmic examinations and visual acuity tests. We reviewed their medical records for systemic conditions, as well as the periods from onset of symptoms to treatment. Participants were categorized into 2 groups: group A (n=36), which received any treatment within 24 hours from onset, and group B (n=33), which visited our hospital after 24 hours from onset. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) changes from the first to final visit and the relationships between systemic condition and visiting time to BCVA were assessed. Results At the first visit, 59% of the patients had BCVA over 20/40; the ratio was increased to 74% at the final visit. BCVA improved more than 2 lines for 35% of the patients and was unchanged for 57% of those receiving conventional treatment. BCVA over 20/40 was significantly lower in hyperlipidemia patients. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and significant carotid stenosis were not correlated. The mean BCVA at baseline (0.91±1.03) significantly recovered to 0.35±0.91 after treatment in group A (P<0.001, Student’s t-test). The mean BCVA at baseline (0.30±0.64) was 0.25±0.61 at the final visit in group B (no significant change). Conclusion Conventional treatment within 24 hours from onset was acceptable for branch retinal artery occlusion. PMID:25284974

  7. Intra-arterial thrombolysis of embolic proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion from presumed atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Wallace, R C; Powers, J; Ratliff, N B; Furlan, A J

    1997-08-01

    The role of thrombolysis in brain ischemia in patients with atrial myxoma is unknown. A patient with acute brain ischemia and previously undiagnosed atrial myxoma recanalized an occluded middle cerebral artery with intra-arterial thrombolysis. Arterial occlusion from presumed myxoma may be amenable to fibrinolysis. Angiography before treatment in patients with atrial myxoma excludes a myxomatous pseudoaneurysm and permits site-specific thrombolytic instillment. PMID:9270611

  8. Mechanical Testing of Mouse Carotid Arteries: from Newborn to Adult

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Mazyar; Le, Victoria P.; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2012-01-01

    The large conducting arteries in vertebrates are composed of a specialized extracellular matrix designed to provide pulse dampening and reduce the work performed by the heart. The mix of matrix proteins determines the passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall1. When the matrix proteins are altered in development, aging, disease or injury, the arterial wall remodels, changing the mechanical properties and leading to subsequent cardiac adaptation2. In normal development, the remodeling leads to a functional cardiac and cardiovascular system optimized for the needs of the adult organism. In disease, the remodeling often leads to a negative feedback cycle that can cause cardiac failure and death. By quantifying passive arterial mechanical properties in development and disease, we can begin to understand the normal remodeling process to recreate it in tissue engineering and the pathological remodeling process to test disease treatments. Mice are useful models for studying passive arterial mechanics in development and disease. They have a relatively short lifespan (mature adults by 3 months and aged adults by 2 years), so developmental3 and aging studies4 can be carried out over a limited time course. The advances in mouse genetics provide numerous genotypes and phenotypes to study changes in arterial mechanics with disease progression5 and disease treatment6. Mice can also be manipulated experimentally to study the effects of changes in hemodynamic parameters on the arterial remodeling process7. One drawback of the mouse model, especially for examining young ages, is the size of the arteries. We describe a method for passive mechanical testing of carotid arteries from mice aged 3 days to adult (approximately 90 days). We adapt a commercial myograph system to mount the arteries and perform multiple pressure or axial stretch protocols on each specimen. We discuss suitable protocols for each age, the necessary measurements and provide example data. We also include

  9. Pathophysiology and management of reperfusion injury and hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Goshgarian, Christopher; Min, Jiangyong; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion is a relatively rare syndrome with significant and potentially preventable clinical consequences. The pathophysiology of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may involve dysregulation of the cerebral vascular system and hypertension, in the setting of increase in cerebral blood flow. The early recognition of CHS is important to prevent complications such as intracerebral hemorrhage. This review will focus on CHS following carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. We will discuss the typical clinical features of CHS, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnostic modalities for detection, identification of patients at risk, and prevention and treatment. Although currently there are no specific guidelines for the management of CHS, identification of patients at risk for CHS and aggressive treatment of hypertension are recommended. PMID:27602202

  10. The antithrombotic effect of melagatran in combination with clopidogrel and/or aspirin (carotid artery primary thrombosis study).

    PubMed

    Hong, Ting-Ting; Huang, Jinbao; Driscoll, Edward; Lucchesi, Benedict R

    2005-10-01

    Melagatran with aspirin and/or clopidogrel was evaluated for prevention of arterial thrombosis in a model of vessel wall injury. Thirty-five dogs were randomized to receive placebo (n=14), aspirin (7 to 8 mg/kg, p.o. q12 h for three doses with the last dose administered 12 hours before surgery, n=7), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg p.o. QDx3, n=7), or aspirin+clopidogrel (n=7). The right carotid artery (RCA) was the control vessel, whereas the left carotid artery (LCA) was subjected to injury after administration of Melagatran (0.033 mg/kg i.v.+0.1 mg/kg/h). Clopidogrel, but not aspirin pretreatment, increased time (135.6+/-13.5 vs. 116.1+/-27.8 minutes) to RCA thrombosis versus placebo (88.1+/-10.5 minutes). Melagatran prolonged time to occlusion (min) in the LCA (192.4+/-10.9) versus the placebo-treated RCA (88.1+/-10.5). Addition of Melagatran plus aspirin or clopidogrel prevented formation of occlusive thrombosis, in all LCAs. A two-fold increase in tongue bleeding time was observed after aspirin+Melagatran (178.6+/-14.7 to 347.1+/-87.3 seconds) or clopidogrel+Melagatran (279.9+/-97.3 to 437.1+/-142.5 seconds). However, the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel prevented occlusive thrombosis in the RCA and the subsequent addition of Melagatran did not further increase bleeding time. The combination of Melagatran+aspirin or clopidogrel can reduce formation of occlusive arterial thrombosis without eliciting a significant increase in bleeding-time. PMID:16160608