Science.gov

Sample records for cartesian coordinate grid

  1. Grid refinement in Cartesian coordinates for groundwater flow models using the divergence theorem and Taylor's series.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M M; Spink, A E F

    2013-01-01

    Grid refinement is introduced in a numerical groundwater model to increase the accuracy of the solution over local areas without compromising the run time of the model. Numerical methods developed for grid refinement suffered certain drawbacks, for example, deficiencies in the implemented interpolation technique; the non-reciprocity in head calculations or flow calculations; lack of accuracy resulting from high truncation errors, and numerical problems resulting from the construction of elongated meshes. A refinement scheme based on the divergence theorem and Taylor's expansions is presented in this article. This scheme is based on the work of De Marsily (1986) but includes more terms of the Taylor's series to improve the numerical solution. In this scheme, flow reciprocity is maintained and high order of refinement was achievable. The new numerical method is applied to simulate groundwater flows in homogeneous and heterogeneous confined aquifers. It produced results with acceptable degrees of accuracy. This method shows the potential for its application to solving groundwater heads over nested meshes with irregular shapes. PMID:22409243

  2. The 3D Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 3-dimensional Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the design cycle; Cartesian grid strategy; structured body fit; grid generation; prolate spheroid; and ONERA M6 wing.

  3. Conversion of Cartesian coordinates from and to Generalized Balanced Ternary addresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Roessel, Jan W.

    1988-01-01

    Hexagonal grids have several advantages over square grids, such as a greater angular resolution and unambiguous connectivity. The Generalized Balanced Ternary (GBT) system is a spatial addressing method for hexagonal grids in which the hexagons are arranged in hierarchical aggregates, and which accommodates vector operations in GBT space. Efficient algorithms for converting Cartesian coordinates from and to GBT addresses are based on the dual representation of the hexagonal tessellation. The GBT-to-Cartesian algorithm is an order of magnitude faster than the Cartesian-to-GBT algorithm, the latter requiring interpolation and GBT addition for each digit of the generated GBT address.

  4. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics An Overset Adaptive Cartesian/Prism Grid Method for

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 An Overset Adaptive Cartesian/Prism Grid.e., the use of overset adaptive Cartesian/prism grids. Semi-structured prism grids are generated around solid walls. These prism grids then overlap a single adaptive Cartesian background grid. With the adaptive

  5. A Cartesian grid approach with hierarchical refinement for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Many numerical studies of flows that involve complex geometries are limited by the difficulties in generating suitable grids. We present a Cartesian boundary scheme for two-dimensional, compressible flows that is unfettered by the need to generate a computational grid and so it may be used, routinely, even for the most awkward of geometries. In essence, an arbitrary-shaped body is allowed to blank out some region of a background Cartesian mesh and the resultant cut-cells are singled out for special treatment. This is done within a finite-volume framework and so, in principle, any explicit flux-based integration scheme can take advantage of this method for enforcing solid boundary conditions. For best effect, the present Cartesian boundary scheme has been combined with a sophisticated, local mesh refinement scheme, and a number of examples are shown in order to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined algorithm for simulations of shock interaction phenomena.

  6. Efficient Fluid Dynamic Design Optimization Using Cartesian Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, A.; Grossman, B.; Sellers, Bill (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This report is subdivided in three parts. The first one reviews a new approach to the computation of inviscid flows using Cartesian grid methods. The crux of the method is the curvature-corrected symmetry technique (CCST) developed by the present authors for body-fitted grids. The method introduces ghost cells near the boundaries whose values are developed from an assumed flow-field model in vicinity of the wall consisting of a vortex flow, which satisfies the normal momentum equation and the non-penetration condition. The CCST boundary condition was shown to be substantially more accurate than traditional boundary condition approaches. This improved boundary condition is adapted to a Cartesian mesh formulation, which we call the Ghost Body-Cell Method (GBCM). In this approach, all cell centers exterior to the body are computed with fluxes at the four surrounding cell edges. There is no need for special treatment corresponding to cut cells which complicate other Cartesian mesh methods.

  7. The Numerical Simulation of Ship Waves Using Cartesian Grid Methods

    E-print Network

    Sussman, Mark

    The Numerical Simulation of Ship Waves Using Cartesian Grid Methods M. Sussman (Florida State-dimensional spray sheet. 1 Introduction At moderate to high speed, the turbulent flow along the hull of a ship, and complex interac- tions between the ship hull and the free surface, such as transom-stern flows

  8. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Aftosmis, Michael J. (San Mateo, CA) [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E. (Hollister, CA) [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J. (New York, NY) [New York, NY

    2002-09-03

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  9. Triangle Geometry Processing for Surface Modeling and Cartesian Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J. (Inventor); Melton, John E. (Inventor); Berger, Marsha J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  10. GSRP/David Marshall: Fully Automated Cartesian Grid CFD Application for MDO in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    With the renewed interest in Cartesian gridding methodologies for the ease and speed of gridding complex geometries in addition to the simplicity of the control volumes used in the computations, it has become important to investigate ways of extending the existing Cartesian grid solver functionalities. This includes developing methods of modeling the viscous effects in order to utilize Cartesian grids solvers for accurate drag predictions and addressing the issues related to the distributed memory parallelization of Cartesian solvers. This research presents advances in two areas of interest in Cartesian grid solvers, viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization. The development of viscous effects modeling using solely Cartesian grids has been hampered by the widely varying control volume sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the cut cells associated with the solid surface. This problem is being addressed by using physically based modeling techniques to update the state vectors of the cut cells and removing them from the finite volume integration scheme. This work is performed on a new Cartesian grid solver, NASCART-GT, with modifications to its cut cell functionality. The development of MPI parallelization addresses issues associated with utilizing Cartesian solvers on distributed memory parallel environments. This work is performed on an existing Cartesian grid solver, CART3D, with modifications to its parallelization methodology.

  11. Nested Cartesian grid method in incompressible viscous fluid flow Yih-Ferng Peng a,*, Rajat Mittal b

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Rajat

    Nested Cartesian grid method in incompressible viscous fluid flow Yih-Ferng Peng a,*, Rajat Mittal form 16 April 2010 Accepted 28 May 2010 Available online 8 June 2010 Keywords: Nested Cartesian grid procedure is focused by using a nested Cartesian grid formulation. The method is developed for simulating

  12. AN ADAPTIVE CARTESIAN GRID METHOD FOR UNSTEADY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW IN IRREGULAR REGIONS \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    in irregular regions. In this approach a body is treated as an interface embedded in a regular Cartesian meshAN ADAPTIVE CARTESIAN GRID METHOD FOR UNSTEADY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW IN IRREGULAR REGIONS \\Lambda to cells at the boundary. The discretization near the fluid­body interface is based on a volume

  13. NEW CARTESIAN GRID METHODS FOR INTERFACE PROBLEMS USING THE FINITE ELEMENT FORMULATION

    E-print Network

    NEW CARTESIAN GRID METHODS FOR INTERFACE PROBLEMS USING THE FINITE ELEMENT FORMULATION ZHILIN LI, TAO LIN, AND XIAOHUI WU Abstract. New finite element methods based on Cartesian triangulations to be second order accurate in the maximum norm. The conforming finite element method has been shown

  14. A second order accurate level set method on non-graded adaptive cartesian grids

    E-print Network

    Smereka, Peter

    - face under mean curvature. Combined, we obtain a level set method on adaptive Cartesian grids to demonstrate the accuracy of the method. Ó 2006 Published by Elsevier Inc. Keywords: Level set method; Ghost

  15. An Investigation of Two-Dimensional CAD Generated Models with Body Decoupled Cartesian Grids for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    OTAHAL,THOMAS J.; GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; BARTEL,TIMOTHY J.

    2000-06-27

    This paper presents an investigation of a technique for using two-dimensional bodies composed of simple polygons with a body decoupled uniform Cmtesian grid in the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The method employs an automated grid pre-processing scheme beginning form a CAD geometry definition file, and is based on polygon triangulation using a trapezoid algorithm. A particle-body intersection time comparison is presented between the Icarus DSMC code using a body-fitted structured grid and using a structured body-decoupled Cartesian grid with both linear and logarithmic search techniques. A comparison of neutral flow over a cylinder is presented using the structured body fitted grid and the Cartesian body de-coupled grid.

  16. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  17. AN ADAPTIVE CARTESIAN GRID METHOD FOR UNSTEADY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW IN IRREGULAR REGIONS \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    flow in irregular regions. In this approach a body is treated as an interface embedded in a regularAN ADAPTIVE CARTESIAN GRID METHOD FOR UNSTEADY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW IN IRREGULAR REGIONS \\Lambda by a corrector applied to cells at the boundary. The discretization near the fluid­body interface is based

  18. Development and application of a 3D Cartesian grid Euler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Wong, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes recent progress in the development and application of 3D Cartesian grid generation and Euler flow solution techniques. Improvements to flow field grid generation algorithms, geometry representations, and geometry refinement criteria are presented, including details of a procedure for correctly identifying and resolving extremely thin surface features. An initial implementation of automatic flow field refinement is also presented. Results for several 3D multi-component configurations are provided and discussed.

  19. An adaptive discretization of compressible flow using a multitude of moving Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Linhai; Lu, Wenlong; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method for simulating compressible flow on a multitude of Cartesian grids that can rotate and translate. Following previous work, we split the time integration into an explicit step for advection followed by an implicit solve for the pressure. A second order accurate flux based scheme is devised to handle advection on each moving Cartesian grid using an effective characteristic velocity that accounts for the grid motion. In order to avoid the stringent time step restriction imposed by very fine grids, we propose strategies that allow for a fluid velocity CFL number larger than 1. The stringent time step restriction related to the sound speed is alleviated by formulating an implicit linear system in order to find a pressure consistent with the equation of state. This implicit linear system crosses overlapping Cartesian grid boundaries by utilizing local Voronoi meshes to connect the various degrees of freedom obtaining a symmetric positive-definite system. Since a straightforward application of this technique contains an inherent central differencing which can result in spurious oscillations, we introduce a new high order diffusion term similar in spirit to ENO-LLF but solved for implicitly in order to avoid any associated time step restrictions. The method is conservative on each grid, as well as globally conservative on the background grid that contains all other grids. Moreover, a conservative interpolation operator is devised for conservatively remapping values in order to keep them consistent across different overlapping grids. Additionally, the method is extended to handle two-way solid fluid coupling in a monolithic fashion including cases (in the appendix) where solids in close proximity do not properly allow for grid based degrees of freedom in between them.

  20. Euler Technology Assessment program for preliminary aircraft design employing SPLITFLOW code with Cartesian unstructured grid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents results from the Euler Technology Assessment program. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of Euler computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for use in preliminary aircraft design. Both the accuracy of the predictions and the rapidity of calculations were to be assessed. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Fort Worth Company, using a recently developed in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages for this study, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaptation of the volume grid during the solution convergence to resolve high-gradient flow regions. This proved beneficial in resolving the large vortical structures in the flow for several configurations examined in the present study. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of the configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design analysis, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles of attack. The time required to generate the results from initial surface definition is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  1. A cartesian grid embedded boundary method for the heat equationand poisson's equation in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Barad, Michael; Colella, Phillip; Ligocki, Terry

    2004-11-02

    We present an algorithm for solving Poisson's equation and the heat equation on irregular domains in three dimensions. Our work uses the Cartesian grid embedded boundary algorithm for 2D problems of Johansen and Colella (1998, J. Comput. Phys. 147(2):60-85) and extends work of McCorquodale, Colella and Johansen (2001, J. Comput. Phys. 173(2):60-85). Our method is based on a finite-volume discretization of the operator, on the control volumes formed by intersecting the Cartesian grid cells with the domain, combined with a second-order accurate discretization of the fluxes. The resulting method provides uniformly second-order accurate solutions and gradients and is amenable to geometric multigrid solvers.

  2. Grid-coordinate generation program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, Oliver J.; Horwich, Esther

    1974-01-01

    This program description of the grid-coordinate generation program is written for computer users who are familiar with digital aquifer models. The program computes the coordinates for a variable grid -used in the 'Pinder Model' (a finite-difference aquifer simulator), for input to the CalComp GPCP (general purpose contouring program). The program adjusts the y-value by a user-supplied constant in order to transpose the origin of the model grid from the upper left-hand corner to the lower left-hand corner of the grid. The user has the options of, (1.) choosing the boundaries of the plot; (2.) adjusting the z-values (altitudes) by a constant; (3.) deleting superfluous z-values and (4.) subtracting the simulated surfaces from each other to obtain the decline. Output of this program includes the fixed format CNTL data cards and the other data cards required for input to GPCP. The output from GPCP then is used to produce a potentiometric map or a decline map by means of the CalComp plotter.

  3. Handling complex boundaries on a Cartesian grid using surface singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revstedt, Johan; Fuchs, Laszlo

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers flow around arbitrarily shaped objects. The boundary conditions on the solid boundaries have been applied by replacing the boundary with a surface force distribution on the surface, such that the required boundary conditions are satisfied. The velocity on the boundary is determined by interpolation or by local (Gaussian space) average. The source terms are determined iteratively as part of the solution. They are then averaged and are smoothed out to nearby computational grid points. The method has been applied both to test problems as well as to more complex engineering problems, where there are not many real competitive alternatives to the proposed method. Simulations of creeping flow around a sphere were studied in order to evaluate the performance of different, competitive approaches of imposing boundary conditions. Using local averaging first-order accuracy is obtained; this can be improved by using a Lagrangian polynomial instead, although the convergence is then considerably slower. Simulations of flows around spheres in the Reynolds number range 1-1000 have been carried out. Finally, the approach was used to describe the impellers in a turbine agitated mixer. For these cases, the results show overall good agreement with other computational and experimental results. Copyright

  4. On the diffuse interface method using a dual-resolution Cartesian grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang; Yuan, Cheng-jun

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the applicability and performance of diffuse interface methods on a dual-resolution grid in solving two-phase flows. In the diffuse interface methods, the interface thickness represents a cut-off length scale in resolving the interfacial dynamics, and it was found that an apparent loss of mass occurs when the interface thickness is comparable to the length scale of flows [24]. From the accuracy and mass conservation point of view, it is desirable to have a thin interface in simulations. We propose to use a dual-resolution Cartesian grid, on which a finer resolution is applied to the volume fraction C than that for the velocity and pressure fields. Because the computation of C field is rather inexpensive compared to that required by velocity and pressure fields, dual-resolution grids can significantly increase the resolution of the interface with only a slight increase of computational cost, as compared to the single-resolution grid. The solution couplings between the fine grid for C and the coarse grid (for velocity and pressure) are delicately designed, to make sure that the interpolated velocity is divergence-free at a discrete level and that the mass and surface tension force are conserved. A variety of numerical tests have been performed to validate the method and check its performance. The dual-resolution grid appears to save nearly 70% of the computational time in two-dimensional simulations and 80% in three-dimensional simulations, and produces nearly the same results as the single-resolution grid. Quantitative comparisons are made with previous studies, including Rayleigh Taylor instability, steadily rising bubble, and partial coalescence of a drop into a pool, and good agreement has been achieved. Finally, results are presented for the deformation and breakup of three-dimensional drops in simple shear flows.

  5. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for the heat equation on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip; Johansen, Hans

    2001-03-14

    We present an algorithm for solving the heat equation on irregular time-dependent domains. It is based on the Cartesian grid embedded boundary algorithm of Johansen and Colella (J. Comput. Phys. 147(2):60--85) for discretizing Poisson's equation, combined with a second-order accurate discretization of the time derivative. This leads to a method that is second-order accurate in space and time. For the case where the boundary is moving, we convert the moving-boundary problem to a sequence of fixed-boundary problems, combined with an extrapolation procedure to initialize values that are uncovered as the boundary moves. We find that, in the moving boundary case, the use of Crank--Nicolson time discretization is unstable, requiring us to use the L{sub 0}-stable implicit Runge--Kutta method of Twizell, Gumel, and Arigu.

  6. Cartesian-Grid Simulations of a Canard-Controlled Missile with a Free-Spinning Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a series of simulations of a geometrically complex, canard-controlled, supersonic missile with free-spinning tail fins. Time-dependent simulations were performed using an inviscid Cartesian-grid-based method with results compared to both experimental data and high-resolution Navier-Stokes computations. At fixed free stream conditions and canard deflections, the tail spin rate was iteratively determined such that the net rolling moment on the empennage is zero. This rate corresponds to the time-asymptotic rate of the free-to-spin fin system. After obtaining spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients for the missile, the investigation seeks a fixed-tail approximation to the spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients, and examines the validity of this approximation over a variety of freestream conditions.

  7. Multidimensional ALI Radiative Transfer in Cartesian, Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, M.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T.

    2003-01-01

    A new Radiative Transfer code that can calculate the non-LTE line transfer problem in a two-level atom formulation in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems is presented. The transfer equation is solved using the ALI and the short characteristics methods, while allowing for an arbitrary 3-dimensional velocity field. The code is modularised so that changing geometry can be accomplished by simply setting a switch, and parallelised for use on a networked PC cluster to increase computational speed. The spatial parallelization method is employed. It is found to be robust and efficient, while not relying heavily on fast communication. The internal accuracy of the code is tested extensively in all three geometries and is shown to be in good agreement with appropriate 1-D solutions.

  8. A Computer Program To Increase Comprehension of the Cartesian Rectangular Coordinate System in High School Pre-Algebra Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exley, I. Sheck

    The high percentage of high school pre-algebra students having difficulty learning the abstract concept of graphing ordered pairs on the Cartesian rectangular coordinate system was addressed by the creation and implementation of a computer-managed instructional program. Modules consisted of a pretest, instruction, two practice sessions, and a…

  9. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design: Compressibility Predictions by Employing the Cartesian Unstructured Grid SPLITFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.; Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the second phase of the Euler Technology Assessment program was to evaluate the ability of Euler computational fluid dynamics codes to predict compressible flow effects over a generic fighter wind tunnel model. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, using an in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaption of the volume grid during the solution to resolve high-gradient regions. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles-of-attack. The transonic pressure prediction capabilities of SPLITFLOW are shown to be improved over subsonic comparisons. The time required to generate the results from initial surface data is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  10. A non-iterative and non-singular perturbation solution for transforming Cartesian to geodetic coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James D.

    2009-02-01

    The Cartesian-to-Geodetic coordinate transformation is re-cast as a minimization algorithm for the height of the Satellite above the reference Earth surface. Optimal necessary conditions are obtained that fix the satellite ground track vector components in the Earth surface. The introduction of an artificial perturbation variable yields a rapidly converging second order power series solution. The initial starting guess for the solution provides 3-4 digits of precision. Convergence of the perturbation series expansion is accelerated by replacing the series solution with a Padé approximation. For satellites with heights < 30,000 km the second-order expansions yields ~mm satellite geodetic height errors and ~10-12 rad errors for the geodetic latitude. No quartic or cubic solutions are required: the algorithm is both non-iterative and non-singular. Only two square root and two arc-tan calculations are required for the entire transformation. The proposed algorithm has been measured to be ~41% faster than the celebrated Bowring method. Several numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm.

  11. A Domain-Decomposed Multilevel Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary verification and validation of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries is presented. The parallel, multilevel method makes use of a new on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition strategy based upon the use of space-filling curves, and automatically generates a sequence of coarse meshes for processing by the multigrid smoother. The coarse mesh generation algorithm produces grids which completely cover the computational domain at every level in the mesh hierarchy. A series of examples on realistically complex three-dimensional configurations demonstrate that this new coarsening algorithm reliably achieves mesh coarsening ratios in excess of 7 on adaptively refined meshes. Numerical investigations of the scheme's local truncation error demonstrate an achieved order of accuracy between 1.82 and 1.88. Convergence results for the multigrid scheme are presented for both subsonic and transonic test cases and demonstrate W-cycle multigrid convergence rates between 0.84 and 0.94. Preliminary parallel scalability tests on both simple wing and complex complete aircraft geometries shows a computational speedup of 52 on 64 processors using the run-time mesh partitioner.

  12. A Domain-Decomposed Multi-Level Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The work presents a new method for on-the-fly domain decomposition technique for mapping grids and solution algorithms to parallel machines, and is applicable to both shared-memory and message-passing architectures. It will be demonstrated on the Cray T3E, HP Exemplar, and SGI Origin 2000. Computing time has been secured on all these platforms. The decomposition technique is an outgrowth of techniques used in computational physics for simulations of N-body problems and the event horizons of black holes, and has not been previously used by the CFD community. Since the technique offers on-the-fly partitioning, it offers a substantial increase in flexibility for computing in heterogeneous environments, where the number of available processors may not be known at the time of job submission. In addition, since it is dynamic it permits the job to be repartitioned without global communication in cases where additional processors become available after the simulation has begun, or in cases where dynamic mesh adaptation changes the mesh size during the course of a simulation. The platform for this partitioning strategy is a completely new Cartesian Euler solver tarcreted at parallel machines which may be used in conjunction with Ames' "Cart3D" arbitrary geometry simulation package.

  13. Cartesian Methods for the Shallow Water Equations on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.

    2000-02-14

    The shallow water equations in a spherical geometry are solved using a 3-dimensional Cartesian method. Spatial discretization of the 2-dimensional, horizontal differential operators is based on the Cartesian form of the spherical harmonics and an icosahedral (spherical) grid. Computational velocities are expressed in Cartesian coordinates so that a problem with a singularity at the pole is avoided. Solution of auxiliary elliptic equations is also not necessary. A comparison is made between the standard form of the Cartesian equations and a rotational form using a standard set of test problems. Error measures and conservation properties of the method are reported for the test problems.

  14. CARTESIAN GRID SOLUTION OF THE EULER EQUATIONS USING A GRIDLESS BOUNDARY CONDITION TREATMENT

    E-print Network

    Liu, Feng

    be especially problematic for "thin body" regions such as airfoils, turning vanes, or fins, in which the body squares fitting of the conserved flux variables using a cloud of nodes in the vicinity of the body body geometry are alleviated, establishing an advantage over other Cartesian mesh methodologies

  15. Characterization of genome-wide ordered sequence-tagged Mycobacterium mutant libraries by Cartesian Pooling-Coordinate Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vandewalle, Kristof; Festjens, Nele; Plets, Evelyn; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Saeys, Yvan; Callewaert, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetics research approaches require the availability of methods to rapidly generate specific mutants. Alternatively, where these methods are lacking, the construction of pre-characterized libraries of mutants can be extremely valuable. However, this can be complex, expensive and time consuming. Here, we describe a robust, easy to implement parallel sequencing-based method (Cartesian Pooling-Coordinate Sequencing or CP-CSeq) that reports both on the identity as well as on the location of sequence-tagged biological entities in well-plate archived clone collections. We demonstrate this approach using a transposon insertion mutant library of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain, providing the largest resource of mutants in any strain of the M. tuberculosis complex. The method is applicable to any entity for which sequence-tagged identification is possible. PMID:25960123

  16. A particle-level set-based sharp interface cartesian grid method for impact, penetration, and void collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. B.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    An Eulerian, sharp interface, Cartesian grid method is developed for the numerical simulation of the response of materials to impact, shocks and detonations. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved along with evolution equations for deviatoric stresses and equivalent plastic strain. These equations are cast in Eulerian conservation law form. The Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is used to obtain pressure and the material is modeled as a Johnson-Cook solid. The ENO scheme is employed to capture shocks in combination with a hybrid particle level set technique to evolve sharp immersed boundaries. The numerical technique is able to handle collisions between multiple materials and can accurately compute the dynamics of the immersed boundaries. Results of calculations for axisymmetric Taylor bar impact and penetration of a Tungsten rod into steel plate show good agreement with moving finite element solutions and experimental results. Qualitative agreement with theory is shown for the void collapse phenomenon in an impacted material containing a spherical void.

  17. Direct vibro-elastography FEM inversion in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinate systems without the local homogeneity assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, M.; Lobo, J.; Mohareri, O.; Salcudean, S. E.; Rohling, R.

    2015-05-01

    To produce images of tissue elasticity, the vibro-elastography technique involves applying a steady-state multi-frequency vibration to tissue, estimating displacements from ultrasound echo data, and using the estimated displacements in an inverse elasticity problem with the shear modulus spatial distribution as the unknown. In order to fully solve the inverse problem, all three displacement components are required. However, using ultrasound, the axial component of the displacement is measured much more accurately than the other directions. Therefore, simplifying assumptions must be used in this case. Usually, the equations of motion are transformed into a Helmholtz equation by assuming tissue incompressibility and local homogeneity. The local homogeneity assumption causes significant imaging artifacts in areas of varying elasticity. In this paper, we remove the local homogeneity assumption. In particular we introduce a new finite element based direct inversion technique in which only the coupling terms in the equation of motion are ignored, so it can be used with only one component of the displacement. Both Cartesian and cylindrical coordinate systems are considered. The use of multi-frequency excitation also allows us to obtain multiple measurements and reduce artifacts in areas where the displacement of one frequency is close to zero. The proposed method was tested in simulations and experiments against a conventional approach in which the local homogeneity is used. The results show significant improvements in elasticity imaging with the new method compared to previous methods that assumes local homogeneity. For example in simulations, the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for the region with spherical inclusion increases from an average value of 1.5-17 after using the proposed method instead of the local inversion with homogeneity assumption, and similarly in the prostate phantom experiment, the CNR improved from an average value of 1.6 to about 20.

  18. Computing UV/vis spectra from the adiabatic and vertical Franck-Condon schemes with the use of Cartesian and internal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Götze, Jan P.; Karasulu, Bora; Thiel, Walter

    2013-12-21

    We address the effects of using Cartesian or internal coordinates in the adiabatic Franck-Condon (AFC) and vertical Franck-Condon (VFC) approaches to electronic spectra. The adopted VFC approach is a simplified variant of the original approach [A. Hazra, H. H. Chang, and M. Nooijen, J. Chem. Phys. 151, 2125 (2004)], as we omit any contribution from normal modes with imaginary frequency. For our test molecules ranging from ethylene to flavin compounds, VFC offers several advantages over AFC, especially by preserving the properties of the FC region and by avoiding complications arising from the crossing of excited-state potential surfaces or from the failure of the harmonic approximation. The spectral quality for our target molecules is insensitive to the chosen approach. We also explore the effects of Duschinsky rotation and relate the need for internal coordinates to the absence of symmetry elements. When using Duschinsky rotation and treating larger systems without planar symmetry, internal coordinates are found to outperform Cartesian coordinates in the AFC spectral calculations.

  19. Coordination of Cloud Computing and Smart Power Grids

    E-print Network

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Coordination of Cloud Computing and Smart Power Grids Amir-Hamed Mohsenian-Rad and Alberto Leon.mohsenian.rad, alberto.leongarcia}@utoronto.ca Abstract--The emergence of cloud computing has established a trend towards increasing the load at locations where they are built. However, data centers and cloud computing also provide

  20. Recognizing Patterns In Log-Polar Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1992-01-01

    Log-Hough transform is basis of improved method for recognition of patterns - particularly, straight lines - in noisy images. Takes advantage of rotational and scale invariance of mapping from Cartesian to log-polar coordinates, and offers economy of representation and computation. Unification of iconic and Hough domains simplifies computations in recognition and eliminates erroneous quantization of slopes attributable to finite spacing of Cartesian coordinate grid of classical Hough transform. Equally efficient recognizing curves. Log-Hough transform more amenable to massively parallel computing architectures than traditional Cartesian Hough transform. "In-place" nature makes it possible to apply local pixel-neighborhood processing.

  1. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for solving the Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, R. K.; Colella, P.; Graves, D. T.

    2011-04-01

    We present a method for solving Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in two- and three-dimensions. It uses a Cartesian cut-cell/embedded boundary method to represent the interface between materials, as described in Johansen and Colella (1998). Matching conditions across the interface are enforced using an approximation to fluxes at the boundary. Overall second order accuracy is achieved, as indicated by an array of tests using non-trivial interface geometries. Both the elliptic and heat solvers are shown to remain stable and efficient for material coefficient contrasts up to 10 6, thanks in part to the use of geometric multigrid. A test of accuracy when adaptive mesh refinement capabilities are utilized is also performed. An example problem relevant to nuclear reactor core simulation is presented, demonstrating the ability of the method to solve problems with realistic physical parameters.

  2. A Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for solving the Poisson and heat equations with discontinuous coefficients in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Robert; Graves, Daniel; Colella, Phillip

    2009-10-23

    We present a method for solving Poisson and heat equations with discon- tinuous coefficients in two- and three-dimensions. It uses a Cartesian cut-cell/embedded boundary method to represent the interface between materi- als, as described in Johansen& Colella (1998). Matching conditions across the interface are enforced using an approximation to fluxes at the boundary. Overall second order accuracy is achieved, as indicated by an array of tests using non-trivial interface geometries. Both the elliptic and heat solvers are shown to remain stable and efficient for material coefficient contrasts up to 106, thanks in part to the use of geometric multigrid. A test of accuracy when adaptive mesh refinement capabilities are utilized is also performed. An example problem relevant to nuclear reactor core simulation is presented, demonstrating the ability of the method to solve problems with realistic physical parameters.

  3. Parallelization of TWOPORFLOW, a Cartesian Grid based Two-phase Porous Media Code for Transient Thermo-hydraulic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trost, Nico; Jiménez, Javier; Imke, Uwe; Sanchez, Victor

    2014-06-01

    TWOPORFLOW is a thermo-hydraulic code based on a porous media approach to simulate single- and two-phase flow including boiling. It is under development at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR) at KIT. The code features a 3D transient solution of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for two inter-penetrating fluids with a semi-implicit continuous Eulerian type solver. The application domain of TWOPORFLOW includes the flow in standard porous media and in structured porous media such as micro-channels and cores of nuclear power plants. In the latter case, the fluid domain is coupled to a fuel rod model, describing the heat flow inside the solid structure. In this work, detailed profiling tools have been utilized to determine the optimization potential of TWOPORFLOW. As a result, bottle-necks were identified and reduced in the most feasible way, leading for instance to an optimization of the water-steam property computation. Furthermore, an OpenMP implementation addressing the routines in charge of inter-phase momentum-, energy- and mass-coupling delivered good performance together with a high scalability on shared memory architectures. In contrast to that, the approach for distributed memory systems was to solve sub-problems resulting by the decomposition of the initial Cartesian geometry. Thread communication for the sub-problem boundary updates was accomplished by the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard.

  4. Multidimensional Non-LTE Radiative Transfer. I. A Universal Two-dimensional Short-Characteristics Scheme for Cartesian, Spherical, and Cylindrical Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, Michiel; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    We have developed an efficient and robust two-dimensional non-LTE radiation transfer solver appropriate for line transfer in the equivalent two-level atom formalism. The numerical method applies the accelerated lambda iteration technique together with the short-characteristics scheme. The code presented in this paper incorporates all three standard geometries (Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical) in a transparent way while allowing for arbitrary (three-dimensional) velocity fields. The geometry-specific parts of the radiative transfer solver are modularized so that the change of geometry is accomplished by simply setting the appropriate switch. We have also developed a parallel version of the code, in which we use a parallelization in spatial subdomains, and showed that such a scheme is sufficiently robust. We have performed a number of tests of the performance of the solver in all three geometries. Finally, we discuss the internal accuracy of the transfer solutions depending on the number of spatial, angular, and frequency grid points.

  5. A three-dimensional sharp interface Cartesian grid method for solving high speed multi-material impact, penetration and fragmentation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapahi, A.; Sambasivan, S.; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional, Eulerian, sharp interface, Cartesian grid technique for simulating the response of elasto-plastic solid materials to hypervelocity impact, shocks and detonations. The mass, momentum and energy equations are solved along with evolution equations for deviatoric stress and plastic strain using a third-order finite difference scheme. Material deformation occurs with accompanying nonlinear stress wave propagation; in the Eulerian framework the boundaries of the deforming material are tracked in a sharp fashion using level-sets and the conditions on the immersed boundaries are applied by suitable modifications of a ghost fluid approach. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model is employed to characterize the material response due to rate-dependent plastic deformation. Details are provided on the treatment of the deviatoric stress ghost state so that physically correct boundary conditions can be applied at the material interfaces. An efficient parallel algorithm is used to handle computationally intensive three-dimensional problems. The results demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate high-speed impact, penetration and fragmentation phenomena in three dimensions.

  6. Coordination of the Smart Grid and Distributed Data Centers: A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    Coordination of the Smart Grid and Distributed Data Centers: A Nested Game-Based Optimization pricing policies in the recently proposed smart grid technology can incentivize the cloud computing. On the other hand, distributed data centers also provide opportunities to help the smart grid to improve load

  7. A non-staggered grid, fractional step method for time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, Yan; Street, R.L.; Koseff, J.R. )

    1994-09-01

    A numerical method for solving three-dimensional, time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates is presented. The non-staggered-grid method originally developed by C. M. Rhie and W. L. Chow for steady state problems is extended to compute unsteady flows. In the computational space, the Cartesian velocity components and the pressure are defined at the center of a control volume, while the volume fluxes are defined at the mid-point on their corresponding cell faces. The momentum equations are integrated semi-implicitly by the approximate factorization technique. The intermediate velocities are interpolated onto the faces of the control volume to form the source terms of the pressure Poisson equation, which is solved iteratively with a multigrid method. The compatibility condition of the pressure Poisson equation is satisfied in the same manner as in a staggered-grid method; mass conservation can be satisfied to machine accuracy. The pressure boundary condition is derived from the momentum equations. Solutions of both steady and unsteady problems including the large eddy simulation of a rotating and stratified upwelling flow in an irregular container established the favorable accuracy and efficiency of the present method.

  8. Heuristic Algorithm for Coordinating Smart Houses in MicroGrid.

    E-print Network

    Zito, Michele

    behaviour. The concept of Smart Grid is relatively new. The Smart Grid is an enhanced electrical grid1 , and Michele Zito 1 1 Department of Computer Science, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom seen as independent agents with their specific goals. In particular houses have the option to buy

  9. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...sharing among Federal agencies and non-Federal participants with interests and responsibility for middleware, Grid, and cloud projects. The MAGIC Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The...

  10. 77 FR 58416 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...sharing among Federal agencies and non-Federal participants with interests and responsibility for middleware, Grid, and cloud projects. The MAGIC Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The...

  11. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...sharing among Federal agencies and non-Federal participants with interests and responsibility for middleware, Grid, and cloud projects. The MAGIC Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The...

  12. Filling the Void: Interpolating in Cartesian Cut Cells A. Hendriks*

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    1 Filling the Void: Interpolating in Cartesian Cut Cells A. Hendriks* Massachusetts Institute visualization algorithms are finite-element based. For Cartesian meshes, the definition of the boundary visualization data near the body. The 3D grid consists of tetrahedral cells, and it matches to all of the nodes

  13. GRID3C: Computer program for generation of C type multilevel, three dimensional and boundary conforming periodic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer program, GRID3C, was developed for accurately generating periodic, boundary conforming, three dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to realistic axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using two functions to generate two dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These boundary fitted grids are of the C type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality and geometric periodicity. The built in nonorthogonal coordinate stretchings and shearings cause the grid clustering in the regions of interest. The stretching parameters are part of the input to GRID3C. In its present version GRID3C can generate and store a maximum of four consecutively refined three dimensional grids. The output grid coordinates can be calculated either in the Cartesian or in the cylindrical coordinate system.

  14. An Automated, Adaptive, Unstructured, Cartesian-Prism-Based Technique for Moving-Boundary

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    An Automated, Adaptive, Unstructured, Cartesian- Prism-Based Technique for Moving-stretched, extruded Prism grid which is allowed to move and deform with the boundary. A single, stationary Cartesian and Prism grids while ensuring smoothness across grid interfaces are developed and compared. A second

  15. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The... Miller at miller@nitrd.gov or (703) 292-4873. Date/Location: The MAGIC Team meetings are held on the... MAGIC Team Web site for updates. Magic Web site: The agendas, minutes, and other meeting materials...

  16. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The... MAGIC Team meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month, 2:00-4:00 pm, at the National Science... meeting. Please reference the MAGIC Team Web site for updates. Magic Web site: The agendas, minutes,...

  17. 77 FR 58416 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The... CONTACT: Dr. Grant Miller at miller@nitrd.gov or (703) 292-4873. Dates/Location: The MAGIC Team meetings.... Please reference the MAGIC Team Web site for updates. Magic Web site: The agendas, minutes, and...

  18. Automatic off-body overset adaptive Cartesian mesh method based on an octree approach

    SciTech Connect

    Peron, Stephanie; Benoit, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for generating adaptive structured Cartesian grids within a near-body/off-body mesh partitioning framework for the flow simulation around complex geometries. The off-body Cartesian mesh generation derives from an octree structure, assuming each octree leaf node defines a structured Cartesian block. This enables one to take into account the large scale discrepancies in terms of resolution between the different bodies involved in the simulation, with minimum memory requirements. Two different conversions from the octree to Cartesian grids are proposed: the first one generates Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) type grid systems, and the second one generates abutting or minimally overlapping Cartesian grid set. We also introduce an algorithm to control the number of points at each adaptation, that automatically determines relevant values of the refinement indicator driving the grid refinement and coarsening. An application to a wing tip vortex computation assesses the capability of the method to capture accurately the flow features.

  19. Accelerating NLTE radiative transfer by means of the Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration: A two-level atom line formation in 2D Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mili?, Ivan; Atanackovi?, Olga

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art methods in multidimensional NLTE radiative transfer are based on the use of local approximate lambda operator within either Jacobi or Gauss-Seidel iterative schemes. Here we propose another approach to the solution of 2D NLTE RT problems, Forth-and-Back Implicit Lambda Iteration (FBILI), developed earlier for 1D geometry. In order to present the method and examine its convergence properties we use the well-known instance of the two-level atom line formation with complete frequency redistribution. In the formal solution of the RT equation we employ short characteristics with two-point algorithm. Using an implicit representation of the source function in the computation of the specific intensities, we compute and store the coefficients of the linear relations J=a+bS between the mean intensity J and the corresponding source function S. The use of iteration factors in the ‘local’ coefficients of these implicit relations in two ‘inward’ sweeps of 2D grid, along with the update of the source function in other two ‘outward’ sweeps leads to four times faster solution than the Jacobi’s one. Moreover, the update made in all four consecutive sweeps of the grid leads to an acceleration by a factor of 6-7 compared to the Jacobi iterative scheme.

  20. Development and Applications of 3D Cartesian CFD Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Berger, Marsha J.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The urgent need for dramatic reductions in aircraft design cycle time is focusing scrutiny upon all aspects of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These reductions will most likely come not from increased reliance upon user-interactive (and therefore time-expensive) methods, but instead from methods that can be fully automated and incorporated into 'black box' solutions. In comparison with tetrahedral methods, three-dimensional Cartesian grid approaches are in relative infancy, but initial experiences with automated Cartesian techniques are quite promising. Our research is targeted at furthering the development of Cartesian methods so that they can become key elements of a completely automatic grid generation/flow solution procedure applicable to the Euler analysis of complex aircraft geometries.

  1. Multi-Agent Based Techniques for Coordinating the Distribution of Electricity in a Micro-Grid Environment

    E-print Network

    Southampton, University of

    vehicles, to ultra-low carbon vehicles (ULCV) such as hybrids, electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell to the current national grid, the in- creasing demand for electricity will only result in more car- bon emissionsMulti-Agent Based Techniques for Coordinating the Distribution of Electricity in a Micro

  2. Coordinated learning of grid cell and place cell spatial and temporal properties: Multiple scales, attention, and oscillations

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    1 Coordinated learning of grid cell and place cell spatial and temporal properties: Multiple scales, attention, and oscillations Stephen Grossberg and Praveen K. Pilly Center for Adaptive Systems, Graduate Stephen Grossberg Center for Adaptive Systems Boston University 677 Beacon Street Boston, MA 02215 Phone

  3. Rapid Structured Volume Grid Smoothing and Adaption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, structured volume grid smoothing and adaption technique, based on signal processing methods, was developed and applied to the Shuttle Orbiter at hypervelocity flight conditions in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation. Because of the fast pace of the investigation, computational aerothermodynamicists, applying hypersonic viscous flow solving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, refined and enhanced a grid for an undamaged baseline vehicle to assess a variety of damage scenarios. Of the many methods available to modify a structured grid, most are time-consuming and require significant user interaction. By casting the grid data into different coordinate systems, specifically two computational coordinates with arclength as the third coordinate, signal processing methods are used for filtering the data [Taubin, CG v/29 1995]. Using a reverse transformation, the processed data are used to smooth the Cartesian coordinates of the structured grids. By coupling the signal processing method with existing grid operations within the Volume Grid Manipulator tool, problems related to grid smoothing are solved efficiently and with minimal user interaction. Examples of these smoothing operations are illustrated for reductions in grid stretching and volume grid adaptation. In each of these examples, other techniques existed at the time of the Columbia accident, but the incorporation of signal processing techniques reduced the time to perform the corrections by nearly 60%. This reduction in time to perform the corrections therefore enabled the assessment of approximately twice the number of damage scenarios than previously possible during the allocated investigation time.

  4. Software for Automated Generation of Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Melton, John E.; Berger, Marshal J.

    2006-01-01

    Cart3D is a collection of computer programs for generating Cartesian meshes [for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other applications] in volumes bounded by solid objects. Aspects of Cart3D at earlier stages of development were reported in "Robust and Efficient Generation of Cartesian Meshes for CFD" (ARC-14275), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 8 (August 1999), page 30. The geometric input to Cart3D comprises surface triangulations like those commonly generated by computer-aided-design programs. Complexly shaped objects can be represented as assemblies of simpler ones. Cart3D deletes all portions of such an assembled object that are not on the exterior surface. Intersections between components are preserved in the resulting triangulation. A tie-breaking routine unambiguously resolves geometric degeneracies. Then taking the intersected surface triangulation as input, the volume mesh is generated through division of cells of an initially coarse hexahedral grid. Cells are subdivided to refine the grid in regions of increased surface curvature and/or increased flow gradients. Cells that become split into multiple unconnected regions by thin pieces of surface are identified.

  5. Transmission of a Cartesian Frame by a Quantum System

    E-print Network

    Asher Peres; Petra F. Scudo

    2001-05-06

    A single quantum system, such as a hydrogen atom, can transmit a Cartesian coordinate frame (three axes). For this it has to be prepared in a superposition of states belonging to different irreducible representations of the rotation group. The algorithm for decoding such a state is presented, and the fidelity of transmission is evaluated.

  6. Enabling Design-Oriented Fluid Simulations: Verification with Discontinuous Manufactured Solutions and Automatic Grid Generation with Moving Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, C. Nathan

    Computer simulations of complex mathematical models are a powerful tool for design, but they introduce uncertainties which can lead to poor design choices when simulation data is all that is available. Additionally, computational grid generation can dramatically increases the costs associated with initializing numerical simulations. Proper verification can help quantify the uncertainty in numerical simulations, and a new form of code verification is presented. This is based on the method of manufactured solutions for integral equations, which allows MMS to be used to verify shock-capturing codes. A procedure is presented for numerically evaluating the required integrals, and it is found to completely eliminate numerical error resulting from discontinuous integrand functions. Integral MMS is demonstrated, and it is found to yield convergence rates that differ by less than 5% from those obtained using differential MMS, and which match precisely with the theoretical rates for discontinuous solutions. This indicates that integral MMS can be used for code verification in place of differential MMS, which cannot be used with discontinuous solutions. Moving grids can be used to allow computed fluid motion to generate the computational grid automatically. The unique challenges associated with grid motion are explored, and multiple implementations are discussed. A software library for fluid-mechanical simulation in unsteady coordinates is also introduced. Preliminary verification of both the method and the library is discussed. The use of unsteady coordinates affects accuracy and grid convergence rates in complex ways. This work lays the foundation for future work on the use of moving grids in order to reduce the grid-generation burden for design-oriented computational fluid dynamics.

  7. Interconversion between truncated Cartesian and polar expansions of images.

    PubMed

    Park, Wooram; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion of data between Cartesian and polar coordinates, when the data is sampled from a 2-D real-valued function (a mapping: R2 --> R) expressed as a particular kind of truncated expansion. We use Laguerre functions and the Fourier basis for the polar coordinate expression. Hermite functions are used for the Cartesian coordinate expression. A finite number of coefficients for the truncated expansion specifies the function in each coordinate system. We derive the relationship between the coefficients for the two coordinate systems. Based on this relationship, we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion between the two coordinate systems. Resampling can be used to evaluate a truncated expansion on the complementary coordinate system without computing a new set of coefficients. The resampled data is used to compute the new set of coefficients to avoid the numerical instability associated with direct conversion of the coefficients. In order to apply our algorithm to discrete image data, we propose a method to optimally fit a truncated expression to a given image. We also quantify the error that this filtering process can produce. Finally the algorithm is applied to solve the polar-Cartesian interpolation problem. PMID:17688200

  8. Interconversion between Truncated Cartesian and Polar Expansions of Images

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wooram; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion of data between Cartesian and polar coordinates, when the data is sampled from a two dimensional real-valued function (a mapping : ?2 ? ?) expressed as a particular kind of truncated expansion. We use Laguerre functions and the Fourier basis for the polar coordinate expression. Hermite functions are used for the Cartesian coordinate expression. A finite number of coefficients for the truncated expansion specifies the function in each coordinate system. We derive the relationship between the coefficients for the two coordinate systems. Based on this relationship, we propose an algorithm for lossless conversion between the two coordinate systems. Resampling can be used to evaluate a truncated expansion on the complementary coordinate system without computing a new set of coefficients. The resampled data is used to compute the new set of coefficients to avoid the numerical instability associated with direct conversion of the coefficients. In order to apply our algorithm to discrete image data, we propose a method to optimally fit a truncated expression to a given image. We also quantify the error that this filtering process can produce. Finally the algorithm is applied to solve the polar-Cartesian interpolation problem. PMID:17688200

  9. A Cartesian embedded boundary method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, N A

    2006-12-04

    The authors develop an embedded boundary finite difference technique for solving the compressible two- or three-dimensional Euler equations in complex geometries on a Cartesian grid. The method is second order accurate with an explicit time step determined by the grid size away from the boundary. Slope limiters are used on the embedded boundary to avoid non-physical oscillations near shock waves. They show computed examples of supersonic flow past a cylinder and compare with results computed on a body fitted grid. Furthermore, they discuss the implementation of the method for thin geometries, and show computed examples of transonic flow past an airfoil.

  10. 3D finite volume groundwater and heat transport modeling with non-orthogonal grids, using a coordinate transformation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, W.; Rath, V.; Wolf, A.; Clauser, C.

    2008-03-01

    Many popular groundwater modeling codes are based on the finite differences or finite volume method for orthogonal grids. In cases of complex subsurface geometries this type of grid either leads to coarse geometric representations or to extremely fine meshes. We use a coordinate transformation method (CTM) to circumvent this shortcoming. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), this method has been applied successfully to the general Navier-Stokes equation. The method is based on tensor analysis and performs a transformation of a curvilinear into a rectangular unit grid, on which a modified formulation of the differential equations is applied. Therefore, it is not necessary to reformulate the code in total. We applied the CTM to an existing three-dimensional code (SHEMAT), a simulator for heat conduction and advection in porous media. The finite volume discretization scheme for the non-orthogonal, structured, hexahedral grid leads to a 19-point stencil and a correspondingly banded system matrix. The implementation is straightforward and it is possible to use some existing routines without modification. The accuracy of the modified code is demonstrated for single phase flow on a two-dimensional analytical solution for flow and heat transport. Additionally, a simple case of potential flow is shown for a two-dimensional grid which is increasingly deformed. The result reveals that the corresponding error increases only slightly. Finally, a thermal free-convection benchmark is discussed. The result shows, that the solution obtained with the new code is in good agreement with the ones obtained by other codes.

  11. Two-Liquid Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Kos, M.; Jerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    It is quite easy to make a version of the well known Cartesian diver experiment that uses two immiscible liquids. This allows students to test their knowledge of density and pressure in explaining the diver's behaviour. Construction details are presented here together with a mathematical model to explain the observations.

  12. Spherical polar co-ordinate calculations of induced fields in the retina and head for applied magnetic fields at 50 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2011-07-01

    This paper sets out to explore the effects of voxel resolution, from 2 mm down to 0.1 mm for Cartesian co-ordinates and the differences between Cartesian and spherical polar co-ordinates for a standardized test-bed model of the eye. This model was taken from the work of Yoriyaz et al (2005 Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 115 316-9) who have developed a detailed geometric description of the eye including choroid, retina, sclera, lens, cornea, anterior chamber, vitreous humour and optic nerve for ophthalmic brachytherapy. The spherical co-ordinate model has radial and angular steplengths of 0.1 mm and 0.25°, respectively. The current density averaged over 1 cm2 and the 99th percentile value of the induced electric field have been calculated in the retina and central nervous system for uniform magnetic fields. The Cartesian co-ordinate calculations proceed in a sequence of grids at 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2 and 0.1 mm resolution with the potentials from the previous calculation at a coarser grid providing the boundary conditions on the finer grid. The 0.2 mm grid provides the boundary conditions for the spherical polar calculations. Comparisons are made with the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference levels.

  13. A Cartesian Reflex Assessment of Face Processing

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    3 A Cartesian Reflex Assessment of Face Processing Robert J. Polewan Christopher M. Vigorito. The one introduced here involves what we refer to as a Cartesian reflex paradigm (CRP). With it, we report responses, or more properly, Cartesian reflexes (CRs). As in classical conditioning protocols, response

  14. Off-Grid DOA Estimation Using Alternating Block Coordinate Descent in Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Qu, Xinggen; Qu, Zhiyu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel off-grid direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method to achieve the superior performance in compressed sensing (CS), in which DOA estimation problem is cast as a sparse reconstruction. By minimizing the mixed k-l norm, the proposed method can reconstruct the sparse source and estimate grid error caused by mismatch. An iterative process that minimizes the mixed k-l norm alternately over two sparse vectors is employed so that the nonconvex problem is solved by alternating convex optimization. In order to yield the better reconstruction properties, the block sparse source is exploited for off-grid DOA estimation. A block selection criterion is engaged to reduce the computational complexity. In addition, the proposed method is proved to have the global convergence. Simulation results show that the proposed method has the superior performance in comparisons to existing methods. PMID:26343658

  15. 76 FR 72203 - Voltage Coordination on High Voltage Grids; Notice of Reliability Workshop Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ...existing and emerging software to improve coordination and optimization of the Bulk-Power System from a reliability and economic...or minimize production costs?) b. Describe the system optimization software products currently used or tested in...

  16. NPSS on NASA's Information Power Grid: Using CORBA and Globus to Coordinate Multidisciplinary Aeroscience Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Isaac; Follen, Gregory J.; Gutierrez, Richard; Foster, Ian; Ginsburg, Brian; Larsson, Olle; Martin, Stuart; Tuecke, Steven; Woodford, David

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a project to evaluate the feasibility of combining Grid and Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) technologies, with a view to leveraging the numerous advantages of commodity technologies in a high-performance Grid environment. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center and Argonne National Laboratory has been studying three problems: a desktop-controlled parameter study using Excel (Microsoft Corporation); a multicomponent application using ADPAC, NPSS, and a controller program-, and an aviation safety application running about 100 jobs in near real time. The team has successfully demonstrated (1) a Common-Object- Request-Broker-Architecture- (CORBA-) to-Globus resource manager gateway that allows CORBA remote procedure calls to be used to control the submission and execution of programs on workstations and massively parallel computers, (2) a gateway from the CORBA Trader service to the Grid information service, and (3) a preliminary integration of CORBA and Grid security mechanisms. We have applied these technologies to two applications related to NPSS, namely a parameter study and a multicomponent simulation.

  17. Non-Cartesian Parallel Imaging Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Katherine L.; Hamilton, Jesse I.; Griswold, Mark A.; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Non-Cartesian parallel imaging has played an important role in reducing data acquisition time in MRI. The use of non-Cartesian trajectories can enable more efficient coverage of k-space, which can be leveraged to reduce scan times. These trajectories can be undersampled to achieve even faster scan times, but the resulting images may contain aliasing artifacts. Just as Cartesian parallel imaging can be employed to reconstruct images from undersampled Cartesian data, non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods can mitigate aliasing artifacts by using additional spatial encoding information in the form of the non-homogeneous sensitivities of multi-coil phased arrays. This review will begin with an overview of non-Cartesian k-space trajectories and their sampling properties, followed by an in-depth discussion of several selected non-Cartesian parallel imaging algorithms. Three representative non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods will be described, including Conjugate Gradient SENSE (CG SENSE), non-Cartesian GRAPPA, and Iterative Self-Consistent Parallel Imaging Reconstruction (SPIRiT). After a discussion of these three techniques, several potential promising clinical applications of non-Cartesian parallel imaging will be covered. PMID:24408499

  18. Coordinating the Global Information Grid Initiative with the NG9-1-1 Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schmitt

    2008-05-01

    As the Department of Defense develops the Global Information Grid, the Department of Transportation develops the Next Generation 9-1-1 system. Close examinations of these initiatives show that the two are similar in architectures, applications, and communications interoperability. These similarities are extracted from the lowest user level to the highest commander rank that will be involved in each network. Once the similarities are brought into perspective, efforts should be made to collaborate between the two departments.

  19. A NEW THREE-DIMENSIONAL SOLAR WIND MODEL IN SPHERICAL COORDINATES WITH A SIX-COMPONENT GRID

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Man; Zhou, Yufen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics numerical model to simulate the steady state ambient solar wind from the solar surface to 215 R {sub s} or beyond, and the model adopts a splitting finite-volume scheme based on a six-component grid system in spherical coordinates. By splitting the magnetohydrodynamics equations into a fluid part and a magnetic part, a finite volume method can be used for the fluid part and a constrained-transport method able to maintain the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field can be used for the magnetic induction part. This new second-order model in space and time is validated when modeling the large-scale structure of the solar wind. The numerical results for Carrington rotation 2064 show its ability to produce structured solar wind in agreement with observations.

  20. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation.

  1. CUDA accelerated uniform re-sampling for non-Cartesian MR reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaolu; Zhao, Dazhe

    2015-08-17

    A grid-driven gridding (GDG) method is proposed to uniformly re-sample non-Cartesian raw data acquired in PROPELLER, in which a trajectory window for each Cartesian grid is first computed. The intensity of the reconstructed image at this grid is the weighted average of raw data in this window. Taking consider of the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) property of the proposed GDG, a CUDA accelerated method is then proposed to improve the performance of the proposed GDG. Two groups of raw data sampled by PROPELLER in two resolutions are reconstructed by the proposed method. To balance computation resources of the GPU and obtain the best performance improvement, four thread-block strategies are adopted. Experimental results demonstrate that although the proposed GDG is more time consuming than traditional DDG, the CUDA accelerated GDG is almost 10 times faster than traditional DDG. PMID:26406102

  2. Feature-Driven Cartesian Adaptive Mesh Refinement in the Helios Code

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    unstructured meshes in the near-body region and adaptive Cartesian meshes in the off-body region. The resultant of the methods and by applying appropriate threshold values to identify specific regions for mesh refinement the entire computational domain since a large proportion of grid points would be wasted in regions

  3. A New Grid Structure for Domain Extension Stanford University

    E-print Network

    Fedkiw, Ron

    and Realism--Animation Keywords: fluid simulation, grids, boundary conditions Links: DL PDF e-mail: {boolzhu a number of Cartesian u- niform grids. Similarly, the FLIP and PIC methods [Zhu and Brid- son 2005; Losasso

  4. Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot

    E-print Network

    Reynoso, Alfonso Garcia

    1985-10-01

    Methods are developed for predicting vibration response characteristics of systems which change configuration during operation. A cartesian robot, an example of such a position-dependent system, served as a test case ...

  5. An overlapping Yin-Yang grid method for global geomagnetic induction modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical modeling of whole-Earth electromagnetic response to space weather is an essential element for interpretation of ground-based and satellite-based magnetic field observations in terms of mantle conductivity, a physical property whose estimates offer powerful constraints on geodynamics and mantle evolution. Whereas staggered grid finite difference methods for computational electromagnetics are well-known for their efficiency in Cartesian geometries, mapping them to the sphere is problematic due to grid convergence near the poles. Alternate discretizations based on nested, triangulated spherical shells avoid the pole problem, but suffer from substantial computational overhead and a reduced-order polynomial accuracy. Presented here are results from a new approach to the global geomagnetic induction modeling problem, an approach first developed for massively parallel and global scale CFD calculations: the overlapping Yin-Yang grid. Based on the staggered grid scheme, the Yin-Yang grid takes a conformal mapping of the Cartesian grid onto a mid-latitude lat/lon grid spanning 270 degrees in longitude and +/- 45 degrees in latitude, thus preserving well-shaped and nearly uniform grid cells. Two such mappings are required to cover the sphere. The "Yin" grid is oriented in geographic coordinates, and its complement, the "Yang" grid is oriented with such that its North pole lies on the equator at 90 deg East. Hence, the sphere is covered with minimal overlap between the two grids and the polar regions are represented by the nearly-rectilinear cells of the Yang grid. The global induction problem is formulated here in the frequency domain as the solution to Maxwell's equations in terms of the Lorenz-gauged magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials over each of the overlapping grids, coupled through simple linear interpolation over their respective boundary elements. Computational efficiency of the method is maintained through recycling of finite difference and interpolation templates over each the grids, as well as the relatively simple coordinate transformation from one grid to the other. Ilustration of the overlapping Yin-Yang grid and color-coded Earth conductivity, with the reference crustal conductance map of Everett et al., (2003).

  6. Comparison of iterative and direct solution methods for viscous flow calculations in body-fitted co-ordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, M. E.; Shyy, W.

    1986-06-01

    The computational efficiency of iterative and direct solution methods in viscous flows calculated on curvilinear coordinate systems is studied for cases including a series of two-dimensional planar channels with progressive skewness of the grid system and a kidney-shaped channel. The iterative method convergence rate, less rapid than that of the direct method, decreases monotonically with increasing global mesh skewness and Reynolds number, while the direct method is seen as insensitive to these variables. It is shown that the increased complexity of the equations in curvilinear coordinates causes the storage requirements and cost per iteration of the direct method to be higher than in corresponding Cartesian coordinate methods. Therefore, increases in grid size increase CPU time and computer storage needs of the direct method more severely than the iterative method.

  7. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks.

    PubMed

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  8. Turing instabilities on Cartesian product networks

    PubMed Central

    Asllani, Malbor; Busiello, Daniel M.; Carletti, Timoteo; Fanelli, Duccio; Planchon, Gwendoline

    2015-01-01

    The problem of Turing instabilities for a reaction-diffusion system defined on a complex Cartesian product network is considered. To this end we operate in the linear regime and expand the time dependent perturbation on a basis formed by the tensor product of the eigenvectors of the discrete Laplacian operators, associated to each of the individual networks that build the Cartesian product. The dispersion relation which controls the onset of the instability depends on a set of discrete wavelengths, the eigenvalues of the aforementioned Laplacians. Patterns can develop on the Cartesian network, if they are supported on at least one of its constitutive sub-graphs. Multiplex networks are also obtained under specific prescriptions. In this case, the criteria for the instability reduce to compact explicit formulae. Numerical simulations carried out for the Mimura-Murray reaction kinetics confirm the adequacy of the proposed theory. PMID:26245138

  9. Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers exemplified in Zn(II)/Co(II) coordination polymers with dual linear ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guang-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xin, Ling-Yun; Li, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Li-Ya

    2013-07-15

    Diverse (4,4) grid layers are exemplified in five two-dimensional coordination polymers with dual µ{sub 2}-bridged ligands, namely, ([Zn(cbaa)(bpp)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), [Zn{sub 2}(cbaa){sub 2}(bpy)]{sub n} (2), [Co{sub 2}(cbaa){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}]{sub n} (3), [Co(cbaa)(bpp)]{sub n} (4), and [Co(bdaa)(bpp)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (5) (H{sub 2}cbaa=4-carboxybenzeneacetic acid, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane, bpy=4,4?-bipyridyl, and H{sub 2}bdaa=1,4-benzenediacrylic acid). For 1, two (4,4) grid layers with [ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 2}] tetrahedron as the node are held together by lattice water forming a H-bonding bilayer. Individual (4,4) grid layer in 2 is based on (Zn{sub 2}(OCO){sub 4}) paddlewheel unit as the node. Two (4,4) grid layers with (Co{sub 2}O(OCO){sub 2}) dimer as the node are covalently interconnected by organic ligands affording a thick bilayer of 3 with new framework topology. The different entanglements between two coincident (4,4) grid layers with [CoN{sub 2}O{sub 4}] octahedron as the node leads to two 2D?2D interpenetrated structures for 4 and 5. Furthermore, fluorescent properties of 1 and 2 as well as magnetic properties of 3 are investigated. - Graphical abstract: Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers with different network nodes forms five coordination polymers that are well characterized by IR, TGA, element analysis, fluorescent and magnetic measurement. - Highlights: • Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers with different structural units as the nodes. • A new topology type with the uninodal 6-connected net of (4{sup 12}.5{sup 2}.6) is found. • Intense fluorescence emissions with a rare blue-shift of 55 nm compared to free carboxylate ligand.

  10. Polar Coordinates Introduction

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    coordinates of a point P are (x, y) then P can be located on a Cartesian plane as indicated in Figure 1(a). xx y y O P r xx y y O P (a) (b) Figure 1. However, the same point P can be located by using polar (VERSION 1: March 18, 2004): Workbook Level 1 17.2: Polar Coordinates #12;x y a P + 2 + k x x y y P P

  11. ... And now a suspended Cartesian diver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be held suspended in a liquid in which there is a density gradient decreasing from bottom to the top if the density of the diver is between those of the liquid at the top and the bottom. This article adds to a number of Cartesian diver activities published in TPT. In a tall beaker of water, a large amount of sugar is added to the bottom. As the sugar dissolves at the bottom, a density gradient, decreasing from bottom to the top, is set up.

  12. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  13. Development of a grid-independent approximate Riemannsolver. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher Lockwood

    1991-01-01

    A grid-independent approximate Riemann solver for use with the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations was introduced and explored. The two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are described in Cartesian and generalized coordinates, as well as the traveling wave form of the Euler equations. The spatial and temporal discretization are described for both explicit and implicit time-marching schemes. The grid-aligned flux function of Roe is outlined, while the 5-wave grid-independent flux function is derived. The stability and monotonicity analysis of the 5-wave model are presented. Two-dimensional results are provided and extended to three dimensions. The corresponding results are presented.

  14. Typed Cartesian Genetic Programming for Image Classification

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    to a machine learning algorithm will not necessary improve classification accuracy rates; it is the quality, not the size, of the feature set which most strongly influences the accuracy rate of a machine learningTyped Cartesian Genetic Programming for Image Classification Phil T. Cattani and Colin G. Johnson

  15. Edinburgh Research Explorer Cartesian closed categories of separable Scott domains

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Cartesian closed categories of separable Scott domains Citation for published version: Bauer, A, Plotkin, GD & Scott, DS 2014, 'Cartesian closed categories of separable Scott and investigate your claim. Download date: 07. Jul. 2015 #12;Cartesian Closed Categories of Separable Scott

  16. How do spatial learning and memory occur in the brain? Coordinated learning of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    learning; spatial memory; grid cells; place cells; entorhinal cortex; hippocampus; learning; self-organizing map; path integration; spatial navigation; episodic memory; attention; temporal memory; adaptive. The hippocampus and medial entorhinal cortex are key brain areas for spatial learning and memory. Place cells

  17. A Cartesian Adaptive Level Set Method for Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, F.; Young, Y.-N.

    2003-01-01

    In the present contribution we develop a level set method based on local anisotropic Cartesian adaptation as described in Ham et al. (2002). Such an approach should allow for the smallest possible Cartesian grid capable of resolving a given flow. The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. In section 2 the level set formulation for free surface calculations is presented and its strengths and weaknesses relative to the other free surface methods reviewed. In section 3 the collocated numerical method is described. In section 4 the method is validated by solving the 2D and 3D drop oscilation problem. In section 5 we present some results from more complex cases including the 3D drop breakup in an impulsively accelerated free stream, and the 3D immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Conclusions are given in section 6.

  18. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  19. TWO-DIMENSIONAL SLOPE LIMITERS FOR FINITE VOLUME SCHEMES ON NON-COORDINATE-ALIGNED MESHES

    E-print Network

    Berger, Marsha J.

    TWO-DIMENSIONAL SLOPE LIMITERS FOR FINITE VOLUME SCHEMES ON NON-COORDINATE-ALIGNED MESHES SANDRA limiter, Cartesian cut cell method, finite volume scheme, linear programming AMS subject classifications for finite volume schemes on non-coordinate-aligned meshes, with focus on Cartesian embedded boundary meshes

  20. A Coupled Model For The North Sea and The Baltic Sea With General Vertical Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, H.; Bolding, K.; Hansen, C.; Mattsson, J.

    A new three-dimensional baroclinic circulation model, originally developed for sim- ulating tidal flow in wadden sea areas, is applied for reproducing the annual cycle in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea with realistic forcing. This so-called General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM), which is based on the primitive equations, pro- vides a choice between several high-order turbulence closure models since the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is linked to GETM. The main numerical features of GETM are the mode splitting technique allowing for different time steps for the barotropic and the baroclinic mode, the terrain-following general vertical coordinate providing horizontally homogeneous layer thicknesses near the surface and the bed, and positive-definite high-order advection schemes based on the Total Variation Di- minishing (TVD) principle. In the horizontal, curvilinear grids may be used, which includes Cartesian and spherical coordinates as special cases. Several annual simulations on Cartesian grids with horizontal resolutions of 3 nm and 6 nm will be presented. At the open boundaries, tidal elevations from the TOPEX- POSEIDON data set, and temperature and salinity profiles from the monthly mean climatology (Janssen et al. 1999) are used. As surface forcing meteorological parame- ters from the ECMWF re-analysis are used. River run-off data are provided by SMHI. The monthly mean climatology is also used for initial conditions for temperature and salinity. The advantages and drawbacks of this approach will be discussed. Here, the focus will be on the use of the general vertical coordinate as contrasted to the more common geopotential coordinate and the coordinate.

  1. Grid-based methods for diatomic quantum scattering problems III: Double photoionization of molecular hydrogen in prolate spheroidal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Liang; McCurdy, Bill; Rescigno, Tom

    2010-06-10

    Our previously developed finite-element/ discrete variable representation in prolate spheroidal coordinates is extended to two-electron systems with a study of double ionization of H$_2$ with fixed-nuclei. Particular attention is paid to the development of fast and accurate methods for treating the electron-electron interaction. The use of exterior complex scaling in the implementation offers a simple way of enforcing Coulomb boundary conditions for the electronic double continuum. While the angular distributions calculated in this study are found to be completely consistent with our earlier treatments that employed single-center expansions in spherical coordinates, we find that the magnitude of the integrated cross sections are sensitive to small changes in the initial-state wave function. The present formulation offers significant advantages with respect to convergence and efficiency and opens the way to calculations on more complicated diatomic targets.

  2. Grid-based methods for diatomic quantum scattering problems. III. Double photoionization of molecular hydrogen in prolate spheroidal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Liang; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2010-08-01

    Our previously developed finite-element discrete-variable representation in prolate spheroidal coordinates is extended to two-electron systems with a study of double ionization of H2 with fixed nuclei. Particular attention is paid to the development of fast and accurate methods for treating the electron-electron interaction. The use of exterior complex scaling in the implementation offers a simple way of enforcing Coulomb boundary conditions for the electronic double continuum. While the angular distributions calculated in this study are found to be completely consistent with our earlier treatments that employed single-center expansions in spherical coordinates, we find that the magnitude of the integrated cross sections are sensitive to small changes in the initial-state wave function. The present formulation offers significant advantages with respect to convergence and efficiency and opens the way to calculations on more complicated diatomic targets.

  3. Evaluation of gridded Scanning ARM Cloud Radar reflectivity observations and vertical Doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR's) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a common scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range Height Indicator - CWRHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Oklahoma (SGP) and Cape-Cod (PVC) sites are post-processed (detection mask, velocity de-aliasing and gaseous attenuation correction). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimension. The Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are next decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D clouds dynamical representations up to 25-30° off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics, anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  4. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  5. Adaptively Refined Euler and Navier-Stokes Solutions with a Cartesian-Cell Based Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian-cell based scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions has been developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies were generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells were created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid was stored in a binary-tree data structure which provided a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were solved on the resulting grids using an upwind, finite-volume formulation. The inviscid fluxes were found in an upwinded manner using a linear reconstruction of the cell primitives, providing the input states to an approximate Riemann solver. The viscous fluxes were formed using a Green-Gauss type of reconstruction upon a co-volume surrounding the cell interface. Data at the vertices of this co-volume were found in a linearly K-exact manner, which ensured linear K-exactness of the gradients. Adaptively-refined solutions for the inviscid flow about a four-element airfoil (test case 3) were compared to theory. Laminar, adaptively-refined solutions were compared to accepted computational, experimental and theoretical results.

  6. Tolerating Correlated Failures for Generalized Cartesian Distributions via Bipartite Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Nawab; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2011-05-05

    Faults are expected to play an increasingly important role in how algorithms and applications are designed to run on future extreme-scale systems. A key ingredient of any approach to fault tolerance is effective support for fault tolerant data storage. A typical application execution consists of phases in which certain data structures are modified while others are read-only. Often, read-only data structures constitute a large fraction of total memory consumed. Fault tolerance for read-only data can be ensured through the use of checksums or parities, without resorting to expensive in-memory duplication or checkpointing to secondary storage. In this paper, we present a graph-matching approach to compute and store parity data for read-only matrices that are compatible with fault tolerant linear algebra (FTLA). Typical approaches only support blocked data distributions with each process holding one block with the parity located on additional processes. The matrices are assumed to be blocked by a cartesian grid with each block assigned to a process. We consider a generalized distribution in which each process can be assigned arbitrary blocks. We also account for the fact that multiple processes might be part of the same failure unit, say an SMP node. The flexibility enabled by our novel application of graph matching extends fault tolerance support to data distributions beyond those supported by prior work. We evaluate the matching implementations and cost to compute the parity and recover lost data, demonstrating the low overhead incurred by our approach.

  7. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    E-print Network

    Mignone, A

    2014-01-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruct...

  8. FIDDLE: A Computer Code for Finite Difference Development of Linear Elasticity in Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical solver based on finite-difference solution of three-dimensional elastodynamic equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates has been developed and used to generate data such as radial and tangential stresses over various gear component geometries under rotation. The geometries considered are an annulus, a thin annular disk, and a thin solid disk. The solution is based on first principles and does not involve lumped parameter or distributed parameter systems approach. The elastodynamic equations in the velocity-stress formulation that are considered here have been used in the solution of problems of geophysics where non-rotating Cartesian grids are considered. For arbitrary geometries, these equations along with the appropriate boundary conditions have been cast in generalized curvilinear coordinates in the present study.

  9. Grid-based Methods in Relativistic Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, José María; Müller, Ewald

    2015-12-01

    An overview of grid-based numerical methods used in relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) and magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) is presented. Special emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical methods are compared in an attempt to assess the present capabilities and limits of the various numerical strategies. Applications to three astrophysical phenomena are briefly discussed to motivate the need for and to demonstrate the success of RHD and RMHD simulations in their understanding. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of the Riemann problem in RMHD, and to simulate 1D RMHD flows in Cartesian coordinates.

  10. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  11. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: a gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  12. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  13. THE PHH NORMS ON CARTESIAN POWERS AND SEQUENCE SPACES

    E-print Network

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    THE P­HH NORMS ON CARTESIAN POWERS AND SEQUENCE SPACES EDER KIKIANTY AND GORD SINNAMON Abstract. A new family of norms is defined on the Cartesian product of n copies of a given normed space. The new norms are related to the hypergeo- metric means but are not restricted to the positive real numbers

  14. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A software library based on this algorithm has been implemented in C++11 and has been released.

  15. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid

    E-print Network

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Future Power Grid Control Paradigm OBJECTIVE This project line power) after contingencies - Coordinate voltage resources to improve voltage security margin) to quickly stabilize system - Modify AGC to only focus on restoring tie line power to scheduled values

  16. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented an effective optimization framework that incorporates a direct-CAD interface. In this work, we enhance the capabilities of this framework with efficient gradient computations using the discrete adjoint method. We present details of the adjoint numerical implementation, which reuses the domain decomposition, multigrid, and time-marching schemes of the flow solver. Furthermore, we explain and demonstrate the use of CAD in conjunction with the Cartesian adjoint approach. The final paper will contain a number of complex geometry, industrially relevant examples with many design variables to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adjoint method on Cartesian meshes.

  17. OVERGRID: A Unified Overset Grid Generation Graphical Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Akien, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a unified graphical interface and gridding strategy for performing overset grid generation. The interface called OVERGRID has been specifically designed to follow an efficient overset gridding strategy, and contains general grid manipulation capabilities as well as modules that are specifically suited for overset grids. General grid utilities include functions for grid redistribution, smoothing, concatenation, extraction, extrapolation, projection, and many others. Modules specially tailored for overset grids include a seam curve extractor, hyperbolic and algebraic surface grid generators, a hyperbolic volume grid generator, and a Cartesian box grid generator, Grid visualization is achieved using OpenGL while widgets are constructed with Tcl/Tk. The software is portable between various platforms from UNIX workstations to personal computers.

  18. Bondage number of grid graphs

    E-print Network

    Dettlaff, Magda; Yero, Ismael G

    2012-01-01

    The bondage number $b(G)$ of a nonempty graph $G$ is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from $G$ results in a graph with domination number greater than the domination number of $G$. Here we study the bondage number of some grid-like graphs. In this sense, we obtain some bounds or exact values of the bondage number of some Cartesian product, strong product or direct product of two paths.

  19. A finite volume Fokker-Planck collision operator in constants-of-motion coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Xu, X. Q.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Kerbel, G.; Nevins, W. M.; Rognlien, T.

    2006-04-01

    TEMPEST is a 5D gyrokinetic continuum code for edge plasmas. Constants of motion, namely, the total energy E and the magnetic moment ?, are chosen as coordinate s because of their advantage in minimizing numerical diffusion in advection operato rs. Most existing collision operators are written in other coordinates; using them by interpolating is shown to be less satisfactory in maintaining overall numerical accuracy and conservation. Here we develop a Fokker-Planck collision operator directly in (E,?) space usin g a finite volume approach. The (E, ?) grid is Cartesian, and the turning point boundary represents a straight line cutting through the grid that separates the ph ysical and non-physical zones. The resulting cut-cells are treated by a cell-mergin g technique to ensure a complete particle conservation. A two dimensional fourth or der reconstruction scheme is devised to achieve good numerical accuracy with modest number of grid points. The new collision operator will be benchmarked by numerical examples.

  20. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of ?-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string. PMID:24729762

  1. Conservation equations of gasdynamics in curvilinear coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1974-01-01

    Description of a new method of writing the conservation equations of gasdynamics in curvilinear coordinates which eliminates undifferentiated terms. It is thus possible to readily apply difference schemes derived for Cartesian coordinates which conserve mass, momentum, and energy in the total flow field. The method is derived for orthogonal coordinates, and then extended to cover the most general class of coordinate transformations, using general tensor analysis. Several special features of the equations are discussed.

  2. Applications of Space-Filling-Curves to Cartesian Methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Murman, S. M.; Berger, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of novel uses of space-filling-curves (SFCs) for Cartesian mesh methods in CFD. While these techniques will be demonstrated using non-body-fitted Cartesian meshes, many are applicable on general body-fitted meshes-both structured and unstructured. We demonstrate the use of single theta(N log N) SFC-based reordering to produce single-pass (theta(N)) algorithms for mesh partitioning, multigrid coarsening, and inter-mesh interpolation. The intermesh interpolation operator has many practical applications including warm starts on modified geometry, or as an inter-grid transfer operator on remeshed regions in moving-body simulations Exploiting the compact construction of these operators, we further show that these algorithms are highly amenable to parallelization. Examples using the SFC-based mesh partitioner show nearly linear speedup to 640 CPUs even when using multigrid as a smoother. Partition statistics are presented showing that the SFC partitions are, on-average, within 15% of ideal even with only around 50,000 cells in each sub-domain. The inter-mesh interpolation operator also has linear asymptotic complexity and can be used to map a solution with N unknowns to another mesh with M unknowns with theta(M + N) operations. This capability is demonstrated both on moving-body simulations and in mapping solutions to perturbed meshes for control surface deflection or finite-difference-based gradient design methods.

  3. Applications of Space-Filling-Curves to Cartesian Methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Murman, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a variety novel uses of Space-Filling-Curves (SFCs) for Cartesian mesh methods in 0. While these techniques will be demonstrated using non-body-fitted Cartesian meshes, most are applicable on general body-fitted meshes -both structured and unstructured. We demonstrate the use of single O(N log N) SFC-based reordering to produce single-pass (O(N)) algorithms for mesh partitioning, multigrid coarsening, and inter-mesh interpolation. The intermesh interpolation operator has many practical applications including warm starts on modified geometry, or as an inter-grid transfer operator on remeshed regions in moving-body simulations. Exploiting the compact construction of these operators, we further show that these algorithms are highly amenable to parallelization. Examples using the SFC-based mesh partitioner show nearly linear speedup to 512 CPUs even when using multigrid as a smoother. Partition statistics are presented showing that the SFC partitions are, on-average, within 10% of ideal even with only around 50,000 cells in each subdomain. The inter-mesh interpolation operator also has linear asymptotic complexity and can be used to map a solution with N unknowns to another mesh with M unknowns with O(max(M,N)) operations. This capability is demonstrated both on moving-body simulations and in mapping solutions to perturbed meshes for finite-difference-based gradient design methods.

  4. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback Based on Polyphase Difference Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-05-01

    A modified Cartesian feedback method called "frequency-offset Cartesian feedback" and based on polyphase difference amplifiers is described that significantly reduces the problems associated with quadrature errors and DC-offsets in classic Cartesian feedback power amplifier control systems.In this method, the reference input and feedback signals are down-converted and compared at a low intermediate frequency (IF) instead of at DC. The polyphase difference amplifiers create a complex control bandwidth centered at this low IF, which is typically offset from DC by 200-1500 kHz. Consequently, the loop gain peak does not overlap DC where voltage offsets, drift, and local oscillator leakage create errors. Moreover, quadrature mismatch errors are significantly attenuated in the control bandwidth. Since the polyphase amplifiers selectively amplify the complex signals characterized by a +90° phase relationship representing positive frequency signals, the control system operates somewhat like single sideband (SSB) modulation. However, the approach still allows the same modulation bandwidth control as classic Cartesian feedback.In this paper, the behavior of the polyphase difference amplifier is described through both the results of simulations, based on a theoretical analysis of their architecture, and experiments. We then describe our first printed circuit board prototype of a frequency-offset Cartesian feedback transmitter and its performance in open and closed loop configuration. This approach should be especially useful in magnetic resonance imaging transmit array systems. PMID:20814450

  5. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  6. ASAM v2.7: a compressible atmospheric model with a Cartesian cut cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Knoth, O.; König, M.; Vogelsberg, U.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the fully compressible, three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic atmospheric model called All Scale Atmospheric Model (ASAM) is presented. A cut cell approach is used to include obstacles and orography into the Cartesian grid. Discretization is realized by a mixture of finite differences and finite volumes and a state limiting is applied. Necessary shifting and interpolation techniques are outlined. The method can be generalized to any other orthogonal grids, e.g., a lat-long grid. A linear implicit Rosenbrock time integration scheme ensures numerical stability in the presence of fast sound waves and around small cells. Analyses of five two-dimensional benchmark test cases from the literature are carried out to show that the described method produces meaningful results with respect to conservation properties and model accuracy. The test cases are partly modified in a way that the flow field or scalars interact with cut cells. To make the model applicable for atmospheric problems, physical parameterizations like a Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model, a two-moment bulk microphysics scheme, and precipitation and surface fluxes using a sophisticated multi-layer soil model are implemented and described. Results of an idealized three-dimensional simulation are shown, where the flow field around an idealized mountain with subsequent gravity wave generation, latent heat release, orographic clouds and precipitation are modeled.

  7. Generalized and efficient algorithm for computing multipole energies and gradients based on Cartesian tensors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dejun

    2015-09-21

    Accurate representation of intermolecular forces has been the central task of classical atomic simulations, known as molecular mechanics. Recent advancements in molecular mechanics models have put forward the explicit representation of permanent and/or induced electric multipole (EMP) moments. The formulas developed so far to calculate EMP interactions tend to have complicated expressions, especially in Cartesian coordinates, which can only be applied to a specific kernel potential function. For example, one needs to develop a new formula each time a new kernel function is encountered. The complication of these formalisms arises from an intriguing and yet obscured mathematical relation between the kernel functions and the gradient operators. Here, I uncover this relation via rigorous derivation and find that the formula to calculate EMP interactions is basically invariant to the potential kernel functions as long as they are of the form f(r), i.e., any Green's function that depends on inter-particle distance. I provide an algorithm for efficient evaluation of EMP interaction energies, forces, and torques for any kernel f(r) up to any arbitrary rank of EMP moments in Cartesian coordinates. The working equations of this algorithm are essentially the same for any kernel f(r). Recently, a few recursive algorithms were proposed to calculate EMP interactions. Depending on the kernel functions, the algorithm here is about 4-16 times faster than these algorithms in terms of the required number of floating point operations and is much more memory efficient. I show that it is even faster than a theoretically ideal recursion scheme, i.e., one that requires 1 floating point multiplication and 1 addition per recursion step. This algorithm has a compact vector-based expression that is optimal for computer programming. The Cartesian nature of this algorithm makes it fit easily into modern molecular simulation packages as compared with spherical coordinate-based algorithms. A software library based on this algorithm has been implemented in C++11 and has been released. PMID:26395695

  8. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible subsonic duct flow analysis for use with constructed coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Mcdonald, H.; Briley, W. R.; Kreskovsky, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    An approximate analysis is presented which is applicable to nonorthogonal coordinate systems having a curved centerline and planar transverse coordinate surfaces normal to the centerline. The primary flow direction is taken to coincide with the local direction of the duct centerline and is hence normal to transverse coordinate planes. The formulation utilizes vector components (velocity, vorticity, transport equations) defined in terms of local Cartesian directions aligned with the centerline tangent, although the governing equations themselves are expressed in general nonorthogonal coordinates. For curved centerlines, these vector quantities are redefined in new local Cartesian directions at each streamwise location. The use of local Cartesian variables and fluxes leads to governing equations which require only first derivatives of the coordinate transformation, and this provides for the aforementioned ease in using constructed coordinates.

  9. A Lot of Good Physics in the Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, Roberto; Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The Cartesian diver experiment certainly occupies a place of honour in old physics textbooks as a vivid demonstration of Archimedes' buoyancy. The original experiment, as described in old textbooks, shows Archimedes buoyancy qualitatively: when the increased weight of the diver is not counterbalanced by Archimedes' buoyancy, the diver sinks. When…

  10. Improving Non-Cartesian MRI Reconstruction through Discontinuity Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing Huo

    2006-01-01

    Non-Cartesian sampling is widely used for fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and fast image reconstruction from non-Cartesian k-space data becomes a challenge and gains a lot of attention. Images provided by conventional direct reconstruction methods usually bear ringing, streaking, and other leakage artifacts caused by discontinuous structures. In this paper, we tackle these problems by analyzing the principal point spread function (PSF) of non-Cartesian reconstruction and propose a leakage reduction reconstruction scheme based on discontinuity subtraction. Data fidelity in k-space is enforced during each iteration. Multidimensional nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithms are utilized to simulate the k-space samples as well as to reconstruct images. The proposed method is compared to the direct reconstruction method on computer-simulated phantoms and physical scans. Non-Cartesian sampling trajectories including 2D spiral, 2D and 3D radial trajectories are studied. The proposed method is found useful on reducing artifacts due to high image discontinuities. It also improves the quality of images reconstructed from undersampled data. PMID:23165054

  11. The Structure of Integral Dimensions: Contrasting Topological and Cartesian Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Matt; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse evidence shows that perceptually integral dimensions, such as those composing color, are represented holistically. However, the nature of these holistic representations is poorly understood. Extant theories, such as those founded on multidimensional scaling or general recognition theory, model integral stimulus spaces using a Cartesian

  12. Highly Fault-Tolerant Routings in Some Cartesian Product Digraphs

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jun-Ming

    Highly Fault-Tolerant Routings in Some Cartesian Product Digraphs Xiang-Feng Pana , Meijie Mab faults F might occur. A routing , i.e. a fixed path between each pair of vertices, for the network must minimal routing when the number of faults is less than some integer. This result is also useful

  13. The Cartesian Diver, Surface Tension and the Cheerios Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Tung; Lee, Wen-Tang; Kao, Sung-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be used to measure the surface tension of a liquid to a certain extent. The surface tension measurement is related to the two critical pressures at which the diver is about to sink and about to emerge. After sinking because of increasing pressure, the diver is repulsed to the centre of the vessel. After the pressure is…

  14. The Cartesian Diver as an Aid for Teaching Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Greg K.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism by which air enters the mammalian lung is difficult for many students of physiology. In particular, some students have trouble seeing how pressure can be transmitted through a fluid such as the intrapleural fluid and how the magnitude of that pressure can change. A Cartesian diver, an old-time child's toy, may be used as a visual aid…

  15. Crystal structure of a two-dimensional grid-type iron(II) coordination polymer: poly[[di-aqua-tetra-?-cyanido-diargentate(I)iron(II)] trans-1,2-bis(pyridin-2-yl)ethyl-ene disolvate].

    PubMed

    Othong, Jintana; Wannarit, Nanthawat; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Youngme, Sujittra

    2014-08-01

    In the title compound, {[Ag2Fe(CN)4(H2O)2]·2C12H10N2} n , the asymmetric unit contains one Fe(II) cation, two water mol-ecules, two di-cyanido-argentate(I) anions and two uncoordinating 1,2-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)ethyl-ene (2,2'-bpe) mol-ecules. Each Fe(II) atom is six-coordinated in a nearly regular octa-hedral geometry by four N atoms from di-cyanido-argentate(I) bridges and two coordinating water mol-ecules. The Fe(II) atoms are bridged by di-cyanido-argentate(I) units to give a two-dimensional layer with square-grid spaces. The inter-grid spaces with inter-layer distance of 6.550?(2)?Å are occupied by 2,2'-bpe guest mol-ecules which form O-H?N hydrogen bonds to the host layers. This leads to an extended three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture. The structure of the title compound is compared with some related compounds containing di-cyanido-argentate(I) ligands and N-donor organic co-ligands. PMID:25249868

  16. Optimal Choice of Grid Points in Multidimensional Pseudospectral Fourier Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisseling, R. H.; Kosloff, R.

    1988-06-01

    The optimal choice of grid points for the multi-dimensional pseudospectral Fourier method is investigated. Optimal sampling is obtained by looking for the most isotropic sampling grid in momentum space. The points of this grid are found to be positioned at the center of densely packed hard spheres forming an oblique grid. It is found that by using this oblique grid the sampling efficiency can be enhanced, compared to a rectangular grid, by a factor ranging from 1.4 for three dimensions to 16 for eight dimensions. The method is checked in five dimensions by calculating the Laplacian in an oblique and in a Cartesian grid. The oblique grid was found to have superior accuracy using a factor of 2.5 less grid points. The method is also illustrated in six dimensions by a calculation of the ground and first excited states of two interacting triplet hydrogen atoms.

  17. Polar versus Cartesian velocity models for maneuvering target tracking with IMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laneuville, Dann

    This paper compares various model sets in different IMM filters for the maneuvering target tracking problem. The aim is to see whether we can improve the tracking performance of what is certainly the most widely used model set in the literature for the maneuvering target tracking problem: a Nearly Constant Velocity model and a Nearly Coordinated Turn model. Our new challenger set consists of a mixed Cartesian position and polar velocity state vector to describe the uniform motion segments and is augmented with the turn rate to obtain the second model for the maneuvering segments. This paper also gives a general procedure to discretize up to second order any non-linear continuous time model with linear diffusion. Comparative simulations on an air defence scenario with a 2D radar, show that this new approach improves significantly the tracking performance in this case.

  18. Compact-range coordinate system established using a laser tracker.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, Floyd H.; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

    2006-12-01

    Establishing a Cartesian coordinate reference system for an existing Compact Antenna Range using the parabolic reflector is presented. A SMX (Spatial Metrix Corporation) M/N 4000 laser-based coordinate measuring system established absolute coordinates for the facility. Electric field characteristics with positional movement correction are evaluated. Feed Horn relocation for alignment with the reflector axis is also described. Reference points are established for follow-on non-laser alignments utilizing a theodolite.

  19. MHD modeling on geodesic grids

    E-print Network

    Florinski, V; Balsara, D S; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional "Cartesian" frame. The code employs HLL-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a sim...

  20. General noncommuting curvilinear coordinates and fluid Mechanics

    E-print Network

    S. A. Alavi

    2006-08-16

    We show that restricting the states of a charged particle to the lowest Landau level introduces noncommutativity between general curvilinear coordinate operators. The cartesian, circular cylindrical and spherical polar coordinates are three special cases of our quite general method. The connection between U(1) gauge fields defined on a general noncommuting curvilinear coordinates and fluid mechanics is explained. We also recognize the Seiberg-Witten map from general noncommuting to commuting variables as the quantum correspondence of the Lagrange to Euler map in fluid mechanics.

  1. SU-E-I-41: Non-Cartesian MR Image Reconstruction with Integrated Gradient Non-Linearity Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, S; Trzasko, JD; Polley, TW; Shu, Y; Bernstein, MA

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Nonlinearities in the spatial encoding gradients of MRI systems cause geometric distortion in images. Typically, this is retrospectively corrected via image-domain interpolation (a.k.a., “gradwarp”) albeit with a loss of spatial resolution. For non-Cartesian MRI, the latter problem is exaggerated by noise and undersampling artifact. In this study, we describe a novel correction strategy that accounts for gradient nonlinearities during — rather than after — non-Cartesian MRI reconstruction, and demonstrate that this approach mitigates the resolution loss that can occur with standard methods. Methods: To test the proposed method, the American College of Radiology (ACR) quality control phantom was scanned on at 1.5 T (General Electric, v16.0, “zoom” gradient) using a 1.6x undersampled 3D non- Cartesian Shells trajectory (GRE, FOV=24 cm3, 120 shells, 16552 shots, 512 readout, matrix=2403). Image reconstruction was first performed via standard k-space density-compensated gridding and retrospectively corrected via cubic spline interpolation. Image reconstruction was then separately performed using a k-space and image-domain densitycompensated type-3 non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT), which provides a direct mapping between non-Cartesian k-space samples and warped image space voxel locations. Thus, no separate distortion correction procedure is needed for the proposed approach. The gradient distortion field was determined using vendor provided calibration data. Results: Phantom scan results show that both processing approaches successfully correct geometric distortion. However, visual inspection of the ACR phantom spatial resolution inserts shows that the proposed strategy preserves the resolution of the nominal (uncorrected) reconstruction while “gradwarp” imparts marked spatial blurring (especially for the 1.0 and 1.1 mm inserts) and thus resolution loss. Conclusion: We've presented a novel reconstruction strategy for non-Cartesian MRI that corrects for gradient nonlinearities during — rather than after — reconstruction, and thus better preserves image resolution than traditional interpolation-based methods. This approach is expected to be especially advantageous when imaging with non-standard magnet geometries. NIH RR018898; NIH EB10065.

  2. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  3. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics: a foundation for multiscale dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Jain, Abhinandan

    2015-01-29

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  4. Nonlinear Accelerator with Transverse Motion Integrable in Normalized Polar Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Kharkov, Y.; Morozov, I.A.; Zolkin, T.V.; /Chicago U.

    2012-05-01

    Several families of nonlinear accelerator lattices with integrable transverse motion were suggested recently. One of the requirements for the existence of two analytic invariants is a special longitudinal coordinate dependence of fields. This paper presents the particle motion analysis when a problem becomes integrable in the normalized polar coordinates. This case is distinguished from the others: it yields an exact analytical solution and has a uniform longitudinal coordinate dependence of the fields (since the corresponding nonlinear potential is invariant under the transformation from the Cartesian to the normalized coordinates). A number of interesting features are revealed: while the frequency of radial oscillations is independent of the amplitude, the spread of angular frequencies in a beam is absolute. A corresponding spread of frequencies of oscillations in the Cartesian coordinates is evaluated via the simulation of transverse Schottky noise.

  5. Simulations of 6-DOF Motion with a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Coupled 6-DOF/CFD trajectory predictions using an automated Cartesian method are demonstrated by simulating a GBU-32/JDAM store separating from an F-18C aircraft. Numerical simulations are performed at two Mach numbers near the sonic speed, and compared with flight-test telemetry and photographic-derived data. Simulation results obtained with a sequential-static series of flow solutions are contrasted with results using a time-dependent flow solver. Both numerical methods show good agreement with the flight-test data through the first half of the simulations. The sequential-static and time-dependent methods diverge over the last half of the trajectory prediction. after the store produces peak angular rates. A cost comparison for the Cartesian method is included, in terms of absolute cost and relative to computing uncoupled 6-DOF trajectories. A detailed description of the 6-DOF method, as well as a verification of its accuracy, is provided in an appendix.

  6. A Cartesian Mesh Method for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Freund, Jonathan; Moser, Robert

    2006-11-01

    Flow-structure interaction with finite solid deformation, of the kind common in biological systems, is well known to be challenging to simulate. There are fundamental differences in the material properties that make coupling difficult at the interface, whose position is not generally known a priori. The characteristics of solids and fluids are such that fluids are more naturally represented by an Eulerian formulation, and solids, because the referential state is important, are more naturally represented by a Lagrangian formulation. We have developed a Cartesian mesh method to simulate the combined system that preserves the attractive aspects of each formulation. The solid motion is tracked as in any Lagrangian formulation, while the momentum equations for both the solid and fluid are solved on a uniform Cartesian mesh. The solid stresses are computed on an unstructured mesh by using a finite element discretization and are distributed to the Cartesian mesh with conservative interpolation. Both fluids and solids are incompressible, as appropriate for biological systems. This condition is enforced via constraints. No artificial bulk modulus is employed. Convergence results are presented, as well as example simulation results for an advected deformable body, a very flexible leaflet, and a swimming jellyfish. Research supported by DOE.

  7. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback for MRI Power Amplifier Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta Gaia; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John Mark; Scott, Greig Cameron

    2011-01-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and DC offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than DC, so that quadrature ghosts and DC errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  8. Quality-based generation of weather radar Cartesian products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O?ródka, K.; Szturc, J.

    2014-11-01

    Weather radar data volumes are commonly processed to obtain various 2-D Cartesian products based on the transfer from polar to Cartesian representations through a certain interpolation method. In this research, an algorithm of the spatial interpolation of polar reflectivity data with respect to QI (quality index) data is applied to find the Cartesian reflectivity as PPI (plan position indicator) product and generate a corresponding QI field. On this basis, quality-based versions of standard algorithms for the generation of the following products have been developed: ETOP (echo top), MAX (maximum of reflectivity), and VIL (vertically integrated liquid water). Moreover, as an example of a higher-level product, a CONVECTION (detection of convection) has been defined as a specific combination of the above-listed standard products. A corresponding QI field is determined for each generated product, taking into account the quality of the pixels from which a given product was determined and how large a fraction of the investigated heights was scanned. Examples of such quality-based products are presented in the paper.

  9. Extending geometric conservation law to cell-centered finite difference methods on moving and deforming grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fei; Ye, Zhengyin

    2015-12-01

    Despite significant progress in recent computational techniques, the accurate numerical simulations, such as direct-numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation, are still challenging. For accurate calculations, the high-order finite difference method (FDM) is usually adopted with coordinate transformation from body-fitted grid to Cartesian grid. But this transformation might lead to failure in freestream preservation with the geometric conservation law (GCL) violated, particularly in high-order computations. GCL identities, including surface conservation law (SCL) and volume conservation law (VCL), are very important in discretization of high-order FDM. To satisfy GCL, various efforts have been made. An early and successful approach was developed by Thomas and Lombard [6] who used the conservative form of metrics to cancel out metric terms to further satisfy SCL. Visbal and Gaitonde [7] adopted this conservative form of metrics for SCL identities and satisfied VCL identity through invoking VCL equation to acquire the derivative of Jacobian in computation on moving and deforming grids with central compact schemes derived by Lele [5]. Later, using the metric technique from Visbal and Gaitonde [7], Nonomura et al. [8] investigated the freestream and vortex preservation properties of high-order WENO and WCNS on stationary curvilinear grids. A conservative metric method (CMM) was further developed by Deng et al. [9] with stationary grids, and detailed discussion about the innermost difference operator of CMM was shown with proof and corresponding numerical test cases. Noticing that metrics of CMM is asymmetrical without coordinate-invariant property, Deng et al. proposed a symmetrical CMM (SCMM) [12] by using the symmetric forms of metrics derived by Vinokur and Yee [10] to further eliminate asymmetric metric errors with stationary grids considered only. The research from Abe et al. [11] presented new asymmetric and symmetric conservative forms of time metrics and Jacobian on three-dimensional moving and deforming mesh. Moreover, Abe et al. [14] discussed the symmetrical and asymmetrical geometric interpretations of metrics and Jacobian. By deriving sufficient conditions for the conservative form of VCL, Sjögreen et al. [13] generalized their previous GCL treatment for stationary grids to moving and deforming grids with a new form of time metrics and Jacobian. Recently, Liao et al. [1] focused on the discretization and geometric interpretations of metrics and Jacobian in cell-centered finite difference methods (CCFDM), where the geometric conservation of multiblock interfaces, the treatment of singular axis and simplification of multiblock boundary condition are discussed in detail.

  10. Some studies on generalized coordinate sets for polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2015-12-14

    Generalized coordinates are widely used in various analyses of the trajectories of polyatomic molecules from molecular dynamics simulations, such as normal mode analysis and force distribution analysis. Here, we presented detailed discussions on the properties of some specific sets of generalized coordinates, which separate translational, rotational, and vibrational motions of a molecule from one another once the trajectories of dynamical systems are known. Efficient methods were suggested for estimating the transformation matrix between generalized and Cartesian coordinates. Some properties of the well-known BAT coordinates (bond length, angle, and torsional coordinates) were discussed as well. PMID:26671354

  11. The total bondage number of grid graphs

    E-print Network

    Hu, Fu-Tao; Xu, Jun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The total domination number of a graph $G$ without isolated vertices is the minimum number of vertices that dominate all vertices in $G$. The total bondage number $b_t(G)$ of $G$ is the minimum number of edges whose removal enlarges the total domination number. This paper considers grid graphs. An $(n,m)$-grid graph $G_{n,m}$ is defined as the cartesian product of two paths $P_n$ and $P_m$. This paper determines the exact values of $b_t(G_{n,2})$ and $b_t(G_{n,3})$, and establishes some upper bounds of $b_t(G_{n,4})$.

  12. A flux-coordinate independent field-aligned approach to plasma turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, F.; Ottaviani, M.

    2013-11-01

    This work illustrates a new approach to field-aligned coordinates for plasma turbulence simulations which is not based on flux variables. The method employs standard Cartesian or polar coordinates to discretize the fields. Parallel derivatives are computed directly along a coordinate that follows the local field, and poloidal derivatives are computed in the original Cartesian frame. Several advantages of this approach are presented. The tests on a drift-wave model demonstrate that the method is well suited to exploit the flute property of small parallel gradients by minimizing the number of degrees of freedom needed to treat a given problem in an accurate and efficient manner.

  13. An Adaptively-Refined, Cartesian, Cell-Based Scheme for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William John

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based scheme for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal 'cut' cells are created. The geometry of the cut cells is computed using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded, with a limited linear reconstruction of the primitive variables used to provide input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. A multi-stage time-stepping scheme is used to reach a steady-state solution. Validation of the Euler solver with benchmark numerical and exact solutions is presented. An assessment of the accuracy of the approach is made by uniform and adaptive grid refinements for a steady, transonic, exact solution to the Euler equations. The error of the approach is directly compared to a structured solver formulation. A non smooth flow is also assessed for grid convergence, comparing uniform and adaptively refined results. Several formulations of the viscous terms are assessed analytically, both for accuracy and positivity. The two best formulations are used to compute adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions are compared to each other, to experimental results and/or theory for a series of low and moderate Reynolds numbers flow fields. The most suitable viscous discretization is demonstrated for geometrically-complicated internal flows. For flows at high Reynolds numbers, both an altered grid-generation procedure and a different formulation of the viscous terms are shown to be necessary. A hybrid Cartesian/body-fitted grid generation approach is demonstrated. In addition, a grid-generation procedure based on body-aligned cell cutting coupled with a viscous stensil-construction procedure based on quadratic programming is presented.

  14. The Overgrid Interface for Computational Simulations on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational simulations using overset grids typically involve multiple steps and a variety of software modules. A graphical interface called OVERGRID has been specially designed for such purposes. Data required and created by the different steps include geometry, grids, domain connectivity information and flow solver input parameters. The interface provides a unified environment for the visualization, processing, generation and diagnosis of such data. General modules are available for the manipulation of structured grids and unstructured surface triangulations. Modules more specific for the overset approach include surface curve generators, hyperbolic and algebraic surface grid generators, a hyperbolic volume grid generator, Cartesian box grid generators, and domain connectivity: pre-processing tools. An interface provides automatic selection and viewing of flow solver boundary conditions, and various other flow solver inputs. For problems involving multiple components in relative motion, a module is available to build the component/grid relationships and to prescribe and animate the dynamics of the different components.

  15. TIGGERC: Turbomachinery Interactive Grid Generator for 2-D Grid Applications and Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block grid generator has been developed for a new design and analysis system for studying multiple blade-row turbomachinery problems. TIGGERC is a mouse driven, interactive grid generation program which can be used to modify boundary coordinates and grid packing and generates surface grids using a hyperbolic tangent or algebraic distribution of grid points on the block boundaries. The interior points of each block grid are distributed using a transfinite interpolation approach. TIGGERC can generate a blocked axisymmetric H-grid, C-grid, I-grid or O-grid for studying turbomachinery flow problems. TIGGERC was developed for operation on Silicon Graphics workstations. Detailed discussion of the grid generation methodology, menu options, operational features and sample grid geometries are presented.

  16. Exact Integrations of Polynomials and Symmetric Quadrature Formulas over Arbitrary Polyhedral Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with two important elements in the high-order accurate spatial discretization of finite volume equations over arbitrary grids. One element is the integration of basis functions over arbitrary domains, which is used in expressing various spatial integrals in terms of discrete unknowns. The other consists of quadrature approximations to those integrals. Only polynomial basis functions applied to polyhedral and polygonal grids are treated here. Non-triangular polygonal faces are subdivided into a union of planar triangular facets, and the resulting triangulated polyhedron is subdivided into a union of tetrahedra. The straight line segment, triangle, and tetrahedron are thus the fundamental shapes that are the building blocks for all integrations and quadrature approximations. Integrals of products up to the fifth order are derived in a unified manner for the three fundamental shapes in terms of the position vectors of vertices. Results are given both in terms of tensor products and products of Cartesian coordinates. The exact polynomial integrals are used to obtain symmetric quadrature approximations of any degree of precision up to five for arbitrary integrals over the three fundamental domains. Using a coordinate-free formulation, simple and rational procedures are developed to derive virtually all quadrature formulas, including some previously unpublished. Four symmetry groups of quadrature points are introduced to derive Gauss formulas, while their limiting forms are used to derive Lobatto formulas. Representative Gauss and Lobatto formulas are tabulated. The relative efficiency of their application to polyhedral and polygonal grids is detailed. The extension to higher degrees of precision is discussed.

  17. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are determined automatically as part of the solution of the defining PDEs. Depending on the shape of the boundary segments and the physical nature of the problem to be solved on the grid, the solution of the defining PDEs may provide for rates of decay to vary along and among the boundary segments and may lend itself to interpretation in terms of one or more physical quantities associated with the problem.

  18. Constructing the ASCI computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    BEIRIGER,JUDY I.; BIVENS,HUGH P.; HUMPHREYS,STEVEN L.; JOHNSON,WILBUR R.; RHEA,RONALD E.

    2000-06-01

    The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) computational grid is being constructed to interconnect the high performance computing resources of the nuclear weapons complex. The grid will simplify access to the diverse computing, storage, network, and visualization resources, and will enable the coordinated use of shared resources regardless of location. To match existing hardware platforms, required security services, and current simulation practices, the Globus MetaComputing Toolkit was selected to provide core grid services. The ASCI grid extends Globus functionality by operating as an independent grid, incorporating Kerberos-based security, interfacing to Sandia's Cplant{trademark},and extending job monitoring services. To fully meet ASCI's needs, the architecture layers distributed work management and criteria-driven resource selection services on top of Globus. These services simplify the grid interface by allowing users to simply request ''run code X anywhere''. This paper describes the initial design and prototype of the ASCI grid.

  19. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.

    2014-08-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruction schemes, namely, the piecewise linear method (PLM), third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). The performance of the improved reconstruction schemes is investigated in a number of selected numerical benchmarks involving the solution of both scalar and systems of nonlinear equations (such as the equations of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics) in cylindrical and spherical geometries in one and two dimensions. Results confirm that the proposed approach yields considerably smaller errors, higher convergence rates and it avoid spurious numerical effects at a symmetry axis.

  20. A HYBRID SOLAR WIND MODEL OF THE CESE+HLL METHOD WITH A YIN-YANG OVERSET GRID AND AN AMR GRID

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xueshang; Zhang Shaohua; Xiang Changqing; Yang Liping; Jiang Chaowei; Wu, S. T.

    2011-06-10

    A hybrid three-dimensional (3D) MHD model for solar wind study is proposed in the present paper with combined grid systems and solvers. The computational domain from the Sun to Earth space is decomposed into the near-Sun and off-Sun domains, which are respectively constructed with a Yin-Yang overset grid system and a Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grid system and coupled with a domain connection interface in the overlapping region between the near-Sun and off-Sun domains. The space-time conservation element and solution element method is used in the near-Sun domain, while the Harten-Lax-Leer method is employed in the off-Sun domain. The Yin-Yang overset grid can avoid well-known singularity and polar grid convergence problems and its body-fitting property helps achieve high-quality resolution near the solar surface. The block structured AMR Cartesian grid can automatically capture far-field plasma flow features, such as heliospheric current sheets and shock waves, and at the same time, it can save significant computational resources compared to the uniformly structured Cartesian grid. A numerical study of the solar wind structure for Carrington rotation 2069 shows that the newly developed hybrid MHD solar wind model successfully produces many realistic features of the background solar wind, in both the solar corona and interplanetary space, by comparisons with multiple solar and interplanetary observations.

  1. Orbital Stability for Rotating Planar Vortex Filaments in the Cartesian and Arclength Forms of the Local Induction Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2013-09-01

    The local induction approximation (LIA) is commonly used to study the motion of a vortex filament in a fluid. The fully nonlinear form of the LIA is equivalent to a type of derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, and stationary solutions of this equation correspond to rotating planar vortex filaments. Such solutions were first discussed in the plane by Hasimoto [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31 (1971) 293], and have been described both in Cartesian three-space and in the arclength formulation in subsequent works. Despite their interest, fully analytical stability results have been elusive. In the present paper, we present elegant and simple proofs of the orbital stability for the stationary solutions to the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations governing the self-induced motion of a vortex filament under the LIA, in both the extrinsic (Cartesian) and intrinsic (arclength) coordinate representations. Such results constitute an exact criterion for the orbital stability of rotating planar vortex filament solutions for the vortex filament problem under the LIA.

  2. Euler calculations with embedded Cartesian grids and small-perturbation boundary conditions

    E-print Network

    Liu, Feng

    flow computations. The surface boundary conditions are imposed by reflected points. A cloud of nodes, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 17-perturbation boundary condition method can be used. To ensure computational efficiency, multigrid solution is made via

  3. Multi-moment advection schemes for Cartesian grids and cut cells 

    E-print Network

    Ferrier, Richard James

    2014-11-27

    Computational fluid dynamics has progressed to the point where it is now possible to simulate flows with large eddy turbulence, free surfaces and other complex features. However, the success of these models often depends ...

  4. Cartesian grid simulations of bubbling fluidized beds with a horizontal tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Dietiker, Jean-Francois; Zhang, Yongmin; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the flow hydrodynamics in a bubbling fluidized bed with submerged horizontal tube bundle was numerically investigated with an open-source code: Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX). A newly implemented cut-cell technique was employed to deal with the curved surface of submerged tubes. A series of 2D simulations were conducted to study the effects of gas velocity and tube arrangement on the flow pattern. Hydrodynamic heterogeneities on voidage, particle velocity, bubble fraction, and frequency near the tube circumferential surface were successfully predicted by this numerical method, which agrees qualitatively with previous experimental findings and contributes to a sounder understanding of the non-uniform heat transfer and erosion around a horizontal tube. A 3D simulation was also conducted. Significant differences between 2D and 3D simulations were observed with respect to bed expansion, bubble distribution, voidage, and solids velocity profiles. Hence, the 3D simulation is needed for quantitative prediction of flow hydrodynamics. On the other hand, the flow characteristics and bubble behavior at the tube surface are similar under both 2D and 3D simulations as far as the bubble frequency and bubble phase fraction are concerned. Comparison with experimental data showed that qualitative agreement was obtained in both 2D and 3D simulations for the bubble characteristics at the tube surface.

  5. ADAPTIVE CARTESIAN GRID METHODS FOR REPRESENTING GEOMETRY IN INVISCID COMPRESSmLE FLOW*

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Mary R.

    . Pember:f: Lawrence Livermore Natibnal Laboratory Livennore. CA 94550 John B. Bellt Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore. CA 94550 Phillip Colella§ University of California Berkeley Berkeley. CA 94720 William Y. Crutchfield:j: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore. CA 94550 Michael L

  6. Extending a CAD-Based Cartesian Mesh Generator for the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, J Nathan; Inclan, Eric J; Joshi, Abhijit S; Popov, Emilian L; Jain, Prashant K

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a custom preprocessor for the PaRAllel Thermal Hydraulics simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic methods (PRATHAM) code based on an open-source mesh generator, CartGen [1]. PRATHAM is a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) based parallel flow simulation software currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The LBM algorithm in PRATHAM requires a uniform, coordinate system-aligned, non-body-fitted structured mesh for its computational domain. CartGen [1], which is a GNU-licensed open source code, already comes with some of the above needed functionalities. However, it needs to be further extended to fully support the LBM specific preprocessing requirements. Therefore, CartGen is being modified to (i) be compiler independent while converting a neutral-format STL (Stereolithography) CAD geometry to a uniform structured Cartesian mesh, (ii) provide a mechanism for PRATHAM to import the mesh and identify the fluid/solid domains, and (iii) provide a mechanism to visually identify and tag the domain boundaries on which to apply different boundary conditions.

  7. Efficient grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seki, Rycichi

    1989-01-01

    Because the governing equations in fluid dynamics contain partial differentials and are too difficult in most cases to solve analytically, these differentials are generally replaced by finite difference terms. These terms contain terms in the solution at nearby states. This procedure discretizes the field into a finite number of states. These states, when plotted, form a grid, or mesh, of points. It is at these states, or field points, that the solution is found. The optimum choice of states, the x, y, z coordinate values, minimizes error and computational time. But the process of finding these states is made more difficult by complex boundaries, and by the need to control step size differences between the states, that is, the need to control the spacing of field points. One solution technique uses a different set of state variables, which define a different coordinate system, to generate the grid more easily. A new method, developed by Dr. Joseph Steger, combines elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations into a mapping function between the physical and computational coordinate systems. This system of equations offers more control than either equation provides alone. The Steger algorithm was modified in order to allow bodies with stronger concavities to be used, offering the possibility of generating a single grid about multiple bodies. Work was also done on identifying areas where grid breakdown occurs.

  8. Elegant Cartesian Laguerre-Hermite-Gaussian laser cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Cunzhi, Sun; Pu, Jixiong; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino

    2015-03-15

    In this work, we present a new family of modes of confocal resonators eigenfunctions of the Fraunhofer diffraction integral, the elegant Cartesian Laguerre-Hermite-Gaussian modes. We show that these modes can be single-pass or round-trip eigenmodes of the resonator depending on the focal distance of the mirrors and their separation. We study their properties and compare them to the well known normal and elegant Hermite and Laguerre-Gauss modes of laser resonators. The new family of modes are not structurally stable on propagation as normal Gaussian modes nor present a monotonic intensity evolution as the normal and elegant Gaussian modes. We also demonstrate that on propagation, they present the self-healing property. PMID:25768193

  9. Adaptive Learning in Cartesian Product of Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel adaptive learning algorithm based on iterative orthogonal projections in the Cartesian product of multiple reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHSs). The task is estimating/tracking nonlinear functions which are supposed to contain multiple components such as (i) linear and nonlinear components, (ii) high- and low- frequency components etc. In this case, the use of multiple RKHSs permits a compact representation of multicomponent functions. The proposed algorithm is where two different methods of the author meet: multikernel adaptive filtering and the algorithm of hyperplane projection along affine subspace (HYPASS). In a certain particular case, the sum space of the RKHSs is isomorphic to the product space and hence the proposed algorithm can also be regarded as an iterative projection method in the sum space. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is shown by numerical examples.

  10. Multi-fault Tolerance for Cartesian Data Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Nawab; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2013-06-01

    Faults are expected to play an increasingly important role in how algorithms and applications are designed to run on future extreme-scale sys- tems. Algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT) is a promising approach that involves modications to the algorithm to recover from faults with lower over- heads than replicated storage and a signicant reduction in lost work compared to checkpoint-restart techniques. Fault-tolerant linear algebra (FTLA) algo- rithms employ additional processors that store parities along the dimensions of a matrix to tolerate multiple, simultaneous faults. Existing approaches as- sume regular data distributions (blocked or block-cyclic) with the failures of each data block being independent. To match the characteristics of failures on parallel computers, we extend these approaches to mapping parity blocks in several important ways. First, we handle parity computation for generalized Cartesian data distributions with each processor holding arbitrary subsets of blocks in a Cartesian-distributed array. Second, techniques to handle corre- lated failures, i.e., multiple processors that can be expected to fail together, are presented. Third, we handle the colocation of parity blocks with the data blocks and do not require them to be on additional processors. Several al- ternative approaches, based on graph matching, are presented that attempt to balance the memory overhead on processors while guaranteeing the same fault tolerance properties as existing approaches that assume independent fail- ures on regular blocked data distributions. The evaluation of these algorithms demonstrates that the additional desirable properties are provided by the pro- posed approach with minimal overhead.

  11. GridPV Toolbox

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feedermore »on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.« less

  12. GridPV Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories -Grid Integration Collaborations Sandia conducts its grid integration research in partnership with industry, academia,

    E-print Network

    , and stakeholder groups. Current collaborations include: Integrators - SunPower - FirstSolar StandardsSandia National Laboratories - Grid Integration Collaborations Sandia conducts its grid integration Coordinating Council Stakeholder Groups - Solar Electric Power Association - Utility Wind Interest Group

  14. Polar Coordinates and Multiplication In the last chapter we wrote complex numbers in the form x + iy where x

    E-print Network

    Wortman, Kevin

    by a pair of coordinates: a number in the unit circle, and a norm. 365 e (os(e)#jsin(e)) cos()l'c #12;APolar Coordinates and Multiplication In the last chapter we wrote complex numbers in the form x + iy where x and y are real numbers. We can think of this as writing complex numbers using Cartesian

  15. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics AERODYNAMIC SHAPE OPTIMIZATION USING UNSTRUCTURED GRID METHODS

    E-print Network

    Jameson, Antony

    generation methods. AIRPLANE utilizes a tetra- hedral mesh whereas FLOWCART uses a hexahedral Cartesian mesh- niques to the AIRPLANE method. The AIRPLANE multigridding approach was proven to be accurate the grid generation wall clock time by 70%. Detailed results of the AIRPLANE-based optimization technique

  16. Smoothing an Overlay Grid to Minimize Linear Distortion in Texture Mapping

    E-print Network

    de Sturler, Eric

    in the plane is computed by applying weighted Laplacian smoothing to a Cartesian grid covering the planar is an essential component of computer generated models. For a texture mapping procedure to be effective it has distortion. In this paper we introduce a new procedure for reducing length distortion of an existing

  17. Accurate direct georeferencing of aerial imagery in national coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiang; Zhang, Yongjun; Li, Qingquan

    2015-07-01

    In aerial photogrammetry, data products are commonly needed in national coordinates, and, in practice, the georeferencing is often performed in the required national map projection frame directly. However, as a map projection frame is not Cartesian, some additional corrections are necessary in the georeferencing process to take account of various map projection distortions. This paper presents a new map projection correction method for the direct georeferencing of aerial images in national coordinates, which comprises of three consecutive steps: (1) a rough intersection to predict ground point coordinates in the Cartesian space; (2) calculating map projection corrections; and (3) a fine intersection. Benefiting from the explicit estimation of ground positions in the Cartesian space, our new method can directly adopt the accurate map projection distortion model that was previously developed for the direct georeferencing of airborne LiDAR data in national coordinates. Simulations show that the correction residuals of our new method are smaller by one order of magnitude than those of the previous best approach while their computational costs are at the same level, and even in an extreme scenario of 8000 m flight height above ground, the maximum error of our method is only several centimeters, which can be safely neglected in practical applications.

  18. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary, Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-of-freedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves a nonlinear, aerostructural system of equations using a loosely-coupled strategy. An open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine is utilized to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The coupling interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. After verifying the structural model with comparisons to Euler beam theory, two applications of the analysis method are presented as validation. The first is a relatively stiff, transport wing model which was a subject of a recent workshop on aeroelasticity. The second is a very flexible model recently tested in a low speed wind tunnel. Both cases show that the aeroelastic analysis method produces results in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  19. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  20. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  1. Johannes Swartenhengst (1644-1711): a Dutch Cartesian in the heat of battle 

    E-print Network

    Bertrand, Ester

    2015-06-30

    This dissertation discusses the life and the writings of the seventeenth-century Dutch Cartesian Johannes Swartenhengst (1644-1711). Thus far Swartenhengst has always been an obscure and little-noticed figure in the ...

  2. ANALYSIS OF A CARTESIAN PML APPROXIMATION TO ACOUSTIC SCATTERING PROBLEMS IN R2

    E-print Network

    Pasciak, Joseph

    . BRAMBLE AND JOSEPH E. PASCIAK Abstract. We consider the application of a perfectly matched layer (PML, Perfectly matched layer, Cartesian PML, variational stability. 1 #12;2 JAMES H. BRAMBLE AND JOSEPH E

  3. Grid technologies empowering drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Chien, Andrew; Foster, Ian; Goddette, Dean

    2002-10-15

    Grid technologies enable flexible coupling and sharing of computers, instruments and storage. Grids can provide technical solutions to the volume of data and computational demands associated with drug discovery by delivering larger computing capability (flexible resource sharing), providing coordinated access to large data resources and enabling novel online exploration (coupling computing, data and instruments online). Here, we illustrate this potential by describing two applications: the use of desktop PC grid technologies for virtual screening, and distributed X-ray structure reconstruction and online visualization. PMID:12546902

  4. Overture: The grid classes

    SciTech Connect

    Brislawn, K.; Brown, D.; Chesshire, G.; Henshaw, W.

    1997-01-01

    Overture is a library containing classes for grids, overlapping grid generation and the discretization and solution of PDEs on overlapping grids. This document describes the Overture grid classes, including classes for single grids and classes for collections of grids.

  5. The National Grid Project: A system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaither, Adam; Gaither, Kelly; Jean, Brian; Remotigue, Michael; Whitmire, John; Soni, Bharat; Thompson, Joe; Dannenhoffer,, John; Weatherill, Nigel

    1995-01-01

    The National Grid Project (NGP) is a comprehensive numerical grid generation software system that is being developed at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center (ERC) for Computational Field Simulation (CFS) at Mississippi State University (MSU). NGP is supported by a coalition of U.S. industries and federal laboratories. The objective of the NGP is to significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to generate a numerical grid for complex geometries and to increase the quality of these grids to enable computational field simulations for applications in industry. A geometric configuration can be discretized into grids (or meshes) that have two fundamental forms: structured and unstructured. Structured grids are formed by intersecting curvilinear coordinate lines and are composed of quadrilateral (2D) and hexahedral (3D) logically rectangular cells. The connectivity of a structured grid provides for trivial identification of neighboring points by incrementing coordinate indices. Unstructured grids are composed of cells of any shape (commonly triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra and hexahedra), but do not have trivial identification of neighbors by incrementing an index. For unstructured grids, a set of points and an associated connectivity table is generated to define unstructured cell shapes and neighboring points. Hybrid grids are a combination of structured grids and unstructured grids. Chimera (overset) grids are intersecting or overlapping structured grids. The NGP system currently provides a user interface that integrates both 2D and 3D structured and unstructured grid generation, a solid modeling topology data management system, an internal Computer Aided Design (CAD) system based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS), a journaling language, and a grid/solution visualization system.

  6. Reaction paths and free energy profiles for conformational transitions: An internal coordinate approach

    E-print Network

    Lazaridis, Themis

    Reaction paths and free energy profiles for conformational transitions: An internal coordinate to study in Cartesian space. A procedure to obtain reaction paths and free energy profiles in solution is also proposed. The free energy profile along the path in solution is calculated utilizing a free energy

  7. A Coding of Real Null Four-Momenta into World-Sheet Co-ordinates

    E-print Network

    David B. Fairlie

    2008-05-15

    The results of minimizing the action for string-like systems on a simply-connected world sheet are shown to encode the Cartesian components of real null momentum four-vectors into co-ordinates on the world sheet. This identification arises consistently from different approaches to the problem.

  8. Simplified Cartesian basis model for intrapolyad emission intensities in the bent-to-linear electronic transition of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Steeves, Adam H; Baraban, Joshua H; Field, Robert W

    2015-02-01

    The acetylene emission spectrum from the trans-bent electronically excited à state to the linear ground electronic X? state has attracted considerable attention because it grants Franck–Condon access to local bending vibrational levels of the X? state with large-amplitude motion along the acetylene ? vinylidene isomerization coordinate. For emission from the ground vibrational level of the à state, there is a simplifying set of Franck–Condon propensity rules that gives rise to only one zero-order bright state per conserved vibrational polyad of the X? state. Unfortunately, when the upper level involves excitation in the highly admixed ungerade bending modes, ?4? and ?6?, the simplifying Franck–Condon propensity rule breaks down--as long as the usual polar basis (with v and l quantum numbers) is used to describe the degenerate bending vibrations of the X? state--and the intrapolyad intensities result from complicated interference patterns between many zero-order bright states. In this article, we show that, when the degenerate bending levels are instead treated in the Cartesian two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis (with vx and vy quantum numbers), the propensity for only one zero-order bright state (in the Cartesian basis) is restored, and the intrapolyad intensities are simple to model, as long as corrections are made for anharmonic interactions. As a result of trans ? cis isomerization in the à state, intrapolyad emission patterns from overtones of ?4? and ?6? evolve as quanta of trans bend (?3?) are added, so the emission intensities are not only relevant to the ground-state acetylene ? vinylidene isomerization, they are also a direct reporter of isomerization in the electronically excited state. PMID:25625552

  9. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, MI 48824

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace–Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the polarized curvature, for the prediction of protein binding sites.

  10. Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K. (editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop on Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software was conducted for NASA to assess its unstructured grid activities, improve the coordination among NASA centers, and promote technology transfer to industry. The proceedings represent contributions from Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, and the Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Centers. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop.

  11. Numerical solution of the full potential equation using a chimera grid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical scheme utilizing a chimera zonal grid approach for solving the full potential equation in two spatial dimensions is described. Within each grid zone a fully-implicit approximate factorization scheme is used to advance the solution one interaction. This is followed by the explicit advance of all common zonal grid boundaries using a bilinear interpolation of the velocity potential. The presentation is highlighted with numerical results simulating the flow about a two-dimensional, nonlifting, circular cylinder. For this problem, the flow domain is divided into two parts: an inner portion covered by a polar grid and an outer portion covered by a Cartesian grid. Both incompressible and compressible (transonic) flow solutions are included. Comparisons made with an analytic solution as well as single grid results indicate that the chimera zonal grid approach is a viable technique for solving the full potential equation.

  12. A mixed volume grid approach for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1996-01-01

    An approach for solving the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations upon meshes composed of nearly arbitrary polyhedra is described. Each polyhedron is constructed from an arbitrary number of triangular and quadrilateral face elements, allowing the unified treatment of tetrahedral, prismatic, pyramidal, and hexahedral cells, as well the general cut cells produced by Cartesian mesh approaches. The basics behind the numerical approach and the resulting data structures are described. The accuracy of the mixed volume grid approach is assessed by performing a grid refinement study upon a series of hexahedral, tetrahedral, prismatic, and Cartesian meshes for an analytic inviscid problem. A series of laminar validation cases are made, comparing the results upon differing grid topologies to each other, to theory, and experimental data. A computation upon a prismatic/tetrahedral mesh is made simulating the laminar flow over a wall/cylinder combination.

  13. An assessment of unstructured grid technology for timely CFD analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Tom A.; Schabowski, Deanne M.

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of two unstructured methods is presented in this paper. A tetrahedral unstructured method USM3D, developed at NASA Langley Research Center is compared to a Cartesian unstructured method, SPLITFLOW, developed at Lockheed Fort Worth Company. USM3D is an upwind finite volume solver that accepts grids generated primarily from the Vgrid grid generator. SPLITFLOW combines an unstructured grid generator with an implicit flow solver in one package. Both methods are exercised on three test cases, a wing, and a wing body, and a fully expanded nozzle. The results for the first two runs are included here and compared to the structured grid method TEAM and to available test data. On each test case, the set up procedure are described, including any difficulties that were encountered. Detailed descriptions of the solvers are not included in this paper.

  14. An assessment of unstructured grid technology for timely CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinard, Tom A.; Schabowski, Deanne M.

    1995-03-01

    An assessment of two unstructured methods is presented in this paper. A tetrahedral unstructured method USM3D, developed at NASA Langley Research Center is compared to a Cartesian unstructured method, SPLITFLOW, developed at Lockheed Fort Worth Company. USM3D is an upwind finite volume solver that accepts grids generated primarily from the Vgrid grid generator. SPLITFLOW combines an unstructured grid generator with an implicit flow solver in one package. Both methods are exercised on three test cases, a wing, and a wing body, and a fully expanded nozzle. The results for the first two runs are included here and compared to the structured grid method TEAM and to available test data. On each test case, the set up procedure are described, including any difficulties that were encountered. Detailed descriptions of the solvers are not included in this paper.

  15. A formulation for the boundary-layer equations in general coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, Joseph L.; Vandalsem, William R.; Panaras, Argyris G.; Rao, K. V.

    1988-01-01

    This is a working paper in which a formulation is given for solving the boundary-layer equations in general body-fitted curvilinear coordinates while retaining the original Cartesian dependent variables. The solution procedure does not require that any of the coordinates be orthogonal, and much of the software developed for many Navier-Stokes schemes can be readily used. A limited number of calculations has been undertaken to validate the approach.

  16. Advanced Fluid Dynamics 2014 Navier Stokes equation in curvilinear coordinate systems

    E-print Network

    Hogg, Andrew

    . Cylindrical polar coordinates (r, , z) The cylindrical polar system is related to Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z) by x = r cos and y = r sin , where r > 0 and 0 r, , z) and the velocity field u = ur^r + u + uz^z, we find that · (x, y, z) (r, , z) = r. · F = ^r F r + ^ 1 r F + ^z F z

  17. Grids = Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrington, Linda; Carter, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that narrow columns provide a flexible system of organization for designers. Notes that grids serve the content on the pages, help to develop a layout that will clearly direct the reader to information; and prevent visual monotony. Concludes when grid layouts are used, school publications look as good as professional ones. (PM)

  18. Radiation heat transfer model using Monte Carlo ray tracing method on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes and non-uniform rational basis spline surfaces for description of boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczy?ski, Pawe?; Bia?ecki, Ryszard

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with a solution of radiation heat transfer problems in enclosures filled with nonparticipating medium using ray tracing on hierarchical ortho-Cartesian meshes. The idea behind the approach is that radiative heat transfer problems can be solved on much coarser grids than their counterparts from computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The resulting code is designed as an add-on to OpenFOAM, an open-source CFD program. Ortho-Cartesian mesh involving boundary elements is created based upon CFD mesh. Parametric non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) surfaces are used to define boundaries of the enclosure, allowing for dealing with domains of complex shapes. Algorithm for determining random, uniformly distributed locations of rays leaving NURBS surfaces is described. The paper presents results of test cases assuming gray diffusive walls. In the current version of the model the radiation is not absorbed within gases. However, the ultimate aim of the work is to upgrade the functionality of the model, to problems in absorbing, emitting and scattering medium projecting iteratively the results of radiative analysis on CFD mesh and CFD solution on radiative mesh.

  19. Determination of Ship Approach Parameters in the Polar Coordinates System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banachowicz, Andrzej; Wolski, Adam

    2014-06-01

    An essential aspect of the safety of navigation is avoiding collisions with other vessels and natural or man made navigational obstructions. To solve this kind of problem the navigator relies on automatic anti-collision ARPA systems, or uses a geometric method and makes radar plots. In both cases radar measurements are made: bearing (or relative bearing) on the target position and distance, both naturally expressed in the polar coordinates system originating at the radar antenna. We first convert original measurements to an ortho-Cartesian coordinate system. Then we solve collision avoiding problems in rectangular planar coordinates, and the results are transformed to the polar coordinate system. This article presents a method for an analysis of a collision situation at sea performed directly in the polar coordinate system. This approach enables a simpler geometric interpretation of a collision situation

  20. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  1. A computer program for converting rectangular coordinates to latitude-longitude coordinates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program was developed for converting the coordinates of any rectangular grid on a map to coordinates on a grid that is parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. Using this program in conjunction with groundwater flow models, the user can extract data and results from models with varying grid orientations and place these data into grid structure that is oriented parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. All cells in the rectangular grid must have equal dimensions, and all cells in the latitude-longitude grid measure one minute by one minute. This program is applicable if the map used shows lines of equal latitude as arcs and lines of equal longitude as straight lines and assumes that the Earth 's surface can be approximated as a sphere. The program user enters the row number , column number, and latitude and longitude of the midpoint of the cell for three test cells on the rectangular grid. The latitude and longitude of boundaries of the rectangular grid also are entered. By solving sets of simultaneous linear equations, the program calculates coefficients that are used for making the conversion. As an option in the program, the user may build a groundwater model file based on a grid that is parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. The program reads a data file based on the rectangular coordinates and automatically forms the new data file. (USGS)

  2. On deriving nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    E-print Network

    Adrian Sescu

    2015-01-20

    In this work, nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized three-dimensional curvilinear coordinates are derived, relying on the original analysis that was done in Cartesian two-dimensional coordinates by Giles (AIAA Journal, 28.12, 2050-2058, 1990). A thorough Fourier analysis of the linearized Euler equation is performed to determine the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors that are then used to derive the appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The analysis lacks rigorous proof of the well-posedness in the general case, which is open to investigation (a weak assumption is introduced here to complete the boundary conditions). The boundary conditions derived here are not tested on specific applications.

  3. Algorithm For Modeling Coordinates Of Corners Of Buildings Determined With RTN GNSS Technology Using Vectors Translation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzy?ek, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents an innovative solution which increases the reliability of determining the coordinates of corners of building structures in the RTN GNSS mode. Having performed the surveys of the base points in real time, it is proposed to use the method of line-line intersection, which results in capturing the Cartesian coordinates X, Y of the corners of buildings. The coordinates which were obtained in this way, are subjected to an innovative solution called the method of vectors translation. This method involves modeling the coordinates obtained by the algorithm developed by the author. As a result, we obtain the Cartesian coordinates X and Y of the corners of building structures, the accuracy and reliability of determining which is on a very high level.

  4. COMPARISON OF THE ACCURACY OF VARIOUS SPATIAL DISCRETIZATION SCHEMES OF THE DISCRETE ORDINATES EQUATIONS IN 2D CARTESIAN GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Schunert; Yousry Y. Azmy; Damien Fournier

    2011-05-01

    We present a comprehensive error estimation of four spatial discretization schemes of the two-dimensional Discrete Ordinates (SN) equations on Cartesian grids utilizing a Method of Manufactured Solution (MMS) benchmark suite based on variants of Larsen’s benchmark featuring different orders of smoothness of the underlying exact solution. The considered spatial discretization schemes include the arbitrarily high order transport methods of the nodal (AHOTN) and characteristic (AHOTC) types, the discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DGFEM) and the recently proposed higher order diamond difference method (HODD) of spatial expansion orders 0 through 3. While AHOTN and AHOTC rely on approximate analytical solutions of the transport equation within a mesh cell, DGFEM and HODD utilize a polynomial expansion to mimick the angular flux profile across each mesh cell. Intuitively, due to the higher degree of analyticity, we expect AHOTN and AHOTC to feature superior accuracy compared with DGFEM and HODD, but at the price of potentially longer grind times and numerical instabilities. The latter disadvantages can result from the presence of exponential terms evaluated at the cell optical thickness that arise from the semianalytical solution process. This work quantifies the order of accuracy and the magnitude of the error of all four discretization methods for different optical thicknesses, scattering ratios and degrees of smoothness of the underlying exact solutions in order to verify or contradict the aforementioned intuitive expectation.

  5. An accuracy assessment of Cartesian-mesh approaches for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A critical assessment of the accuracy of Cartesian-mesh approaches for steady, transonic solutions of the Euler equations of gas dynamics is made. An exact solution of the Euler equations (Ringleb's flow) is used not only to infer the order of the truncation error of the Cartesian-mesh approaches, but also to compare the magnitude of the discrete error directly to that obtained with a structured mesh approach. Uniformly and adaptively refined solutions using a Cartesian-mesh approach are obtained and compared to each other and to uniformly refined structured mesh results. The effect of cell merging is investigated as well as the use of two different K-exact reconstruction procedures. The solution methodology of the schemes is explained and tabulated results are presented to compare the solution accuracies.

  6. TIGGERC: Turbomachinery interactive grid generator energy distributor and restart code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional multi-block grid generator was developed for a new design and analysis system for studying multi-blade row turbomachinery problems with an axisymmetric viscous/inviscid 'average passage' through flow code. TIGGERC is a mouse driven, fully interactive grid generation program which can be used to modify boundary coordinates and grid packing. TIGGERC generates grids using a hyperbolic tangent or algebraic distribution of grid points on the block boundaries and the interior points of each block grid are distributed using a transfinite interpolation approach. TIGGERC generates a blocked axisymmetric H grid, C grid, I grid, or O grid for studying turbomachinery flow problems. TIGGERC was developed for operation on small high speed graphic workstations.

  7. Renatus renatus: the Cartesian tradition in British neuroscience and the neurophilosophy of John Carew Eccles.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U

    2001-08-01

    J. C. Eccles (1903-1997) had a highly distinguished career in neurophysiology, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology in 1963. This paper sets him within the Cartesian tradition of British neurophysiology initiated by Thomas Henry Huxley in the mid-19th century. It shows how the mind-brain problematique of the Cartesian tradition troubled him throughout his career, leading him finally to a solution in terms of quantum microphysics and microphysiology. This position, which has subsequently become fashionable, is discussed and shown (at least in the form Eccles espoused) to provide no solution to the problem posed by Descartes in the early 17th century. PMID:11487286

  8. Random subspaces for encryption based on a private shared Cartesian frame

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Stephen D.; Hayden, Patrick; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2005-11-15

    A private shared Cartesian frame is a novel form of private shared correlation that allows for both private classical and quantum communication. Cryptography using a private shared Cartesian frame has the remarkable property that asymptotically, if perfect privacy is demanded, the private classical capacity is three times the private quantum capacity. We demonstrate that if the requirement for perfect privacy is relaxed, then it is possible to use the properties of random subspaces to nearly triple the private quantum capacity, almost closing the gap between the private classical and quantum capacities.

  9. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  10. Technology for a NASA Space-Based Science Operations Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Redman, Sandra H.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of a proposal to develop a space-based operations grid in support of space-based science experiments. The development of such a grid would provide a dynamic, secure and scalable architecture based on standards and next-generation reusable software and would enable greater science collaboration and productivity through the use of shared resources and distributed computing. The authors propose developing this concept for use on payload experiments carried aboard the International Space Station. Topics covered include: grid definitions, portals, grid development and coordination, grid technology and potential uses of such a grid.

  11. * To appear: Intl J. Supercomputer Applications, 2001. The Anatomy of the Grid

    E-print Network

    Newhall, Tia

    * To appear: Intl J. Supercomputer Applications, 2001. The Anatomy of the Grid Enabling Scalable problem" and hence a need for new "Grid technologies"? If so, what is the nature of these technologies Anatomy of the Grid 2 The real and specific problem that underlies the Grid concept is coordinated

  12. Development of a fractional-step method for the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe; Kwak, Dochan; Vinokur, Marcel

    1992-01-01

    A fractional step method is developed for solving the time-dependent three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems. The primitive variable formulation uses the pressure, defined at the center of the computational cell, and the volume fluxes across the faces of the cells as the dependent variables, instead of the Cartesian components of the velocity. This choice is equivalent to using the contravariant velocity components in a staggered grid multiplied by the volume of the computational cell. The governing equations are discretized by finite volumes using a staggered mesh system. The solution of the continuity equation is decoupled from the momentum equations by a fractional step method which enforces mass conservation by solving a Poisson equation. This procedure, combined with the consistent approximations of the geometric quantities, is done to satisfy the discretized mass conservation equation to machine accuracy, as well as to gain the favorable convergence properties of the Poisson solver. The momentum equations are solved by an approximate factorization method, and a novel ZEBRA scheme with four-color ordering is devised for the efficient solution of the Poisson equation. Several two- and three-dimensional laminar test cases are computed and compared with other numerical and experimental results to validate the solution method. Good agreement is obtained in all cases.

  13. An analysis of a collision situation in polar coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolski, Adam; Banachowicz, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    Avoiding collisions with other vessels and natural or artificial navigational obstructions is an important element of navigation safety. This problem is automatically solved in anti-collision ARPA systems, or geometrically as radar plots. In both cases we use radar measurements: bearing (or relative bearing) on the target position and distance, both naturally localized in the polar coordinates system with the origin at the radar antenna. We convert original measurements to an ortho-Cartesian coordinate system. Then we solve a collision avoiding problem in the new system, and then transform the results to the polar coordinate system. This article presents a method for an analysis of a collision situation performed directly in the polar coordinate system. This approach enables a simpler geometric interpretation of a collision situation.

  14. [Doctor Albert Kyper, his anti-Cartesian speech on method (1643) and odontology].

    PubMed

    Gysel, C

    1990-01-01

    Young ambitious Lutheran, and then converted to Calvinism, Albert Kyper was opposed to Cartesianism, telling that "this was harmful towards Faculty of Medicine." He recognized decadent scolastic method and that it was just necessary to follow the ancients' ways. He wanted to ignore Fallope, Vesale, Eustache, Fernet, minor authors. PMID:2200101

  15. A Cartesian Robot for RFID Signal Distribution Model Verification Aliasgar Kutiyanawala and Vladimir Kulyukin

    E-print Network

    Kulyukin, Vladimir

    A Cartesian Robot for RFID Signal Distribution Model Verification Aliasgar Kutiyanawala instrumentation cost, i.e., a minimum number of surface-embedded passive RFID transponders. Our previous results were based on the assumption that the signal distribution model of an individual RFID transponder can

  16. Real-time cartesian force feedback control of a teleoperated robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Perry

    1989-01-01

    Active cartesian force control of a teleoperated robot is investigated. An economical microcomputer based control method was tested. Limitations are discussed and methods of performance improvement suggested. To demonstrate the performance of this technique, a preliminary test was performed with success. A general purpose bilateral force reflecting hand controller is currently being constructed based on this control method.

  17. AIAA-2004-0082 The Level Set Method on Adaptive Cartesian

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    Cartesian mesh generation. Following ideas from the finite volume method for hyperbolic conservation laws the past decade2,3 . Successful examples include the finite difference method4 , high-order ENO schemes , high-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes by Zhang and Shu8 et al. Meanwhile

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Solar System Processes on Geodesic Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional "Cartesian" frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  19. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES ON GEODESIC GRIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional 'Cartesian' frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support ?, isentropic ? vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  1. Proc. ICDM 2008, RMSLecture Notes Series No. 13, 2010, pp. 171--177. Recent Developments on the Structure of Cartesian Products

    E-print Network

    Klavzar, Sandi

    on the Structure of Cartesian Products of Graphs Sandi KlavŸzar Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University. The Cartesian product of graphs was introduced more than 50 years ago and many fundamental results were obtained since then. Nevertheless, in the last years several basic problems on the Cartesian product were solved

  2. Proc. ICDM 2008, RMS-Lecture Notes Series No. 13, 2010, pp. 171177. Recent Developments on the Structure of Cartesian Products

    E-print Network

    Klavzar, Sandi

    on the Structure of Cartesian Products of Graphs Sandi Klavzar Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University. The Cartesian product of graphs was introduced more than 50 years ago and many fundamental results were obtained since then. Nevertheless, in the last years several basic problems on the Cartesian product were solved

  3. Coordinates Constellations

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    AST 105 The Sky Coordinates and Constellations #12;Early evening August 2014 40o N #12;Constellations · There are about 6000 stars visible to the naked eye under good conditions · About 2000://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~kaler/sow/const.html) #12;Scorpius #12;Patterns in the Sky Many societies have identified constellations Sumer (4000 BCE): 6

  4. COORDINATED AV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLEAVES, PAUL C.; AND OTHERS

    THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER IS LOCATED IN THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPPLIES ALL SCHOOLS IN THE AREA. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT ORDERS, AFTER SELECTIONS ARE MADE BY THE CLASSROOM TEACHER, ARE PROCESSED BY THE CENTER, CONFIRMED AND DELIVERED BY TRUCK THREE TIMES EACH WEEK. EACH SCHOOL HAS A BUILDING COORDINATOR WHO CHECKS THE ORDERS INTO THE…

  5. An update on the classical and quantum harmonic oscillators on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane in polar coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesne, C.

    2015-08-01

    A simple derivation of the classical solutions of a nonlinear model describing a harmonic oscillator on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane is presented in polar coordinates. These solutions are then related to those in cartesian coordinates, whose form was previously guessed. In addition, the nature of the classical orthogonal polynomials entering the bound-state radial wavefunctions of the corresponding quantum model is identified.

  6. An update on the classical and quantum harmonic oscillators on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane in polar coordinates

    E-print Network

    C. Quesne

    2015-05-08

    A simple derivation of the classical solutions of a nonlinear model describing a harmonic oscillator on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane is presented in polar coordinates. These solutions are then related to those in cartesian coordinates, whose form was previously guessed. In addition, the nature of the classical orthogonal polynomials entering the bound-state radial wavefunctions of the corresponding quantum model is identified.

  7. Solving for MHD Equilibrium on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael; Freidberg, Jeffrey

    1999-11-01

    The present work describes a method for determining the MHD equilibrium in an axi-symmetric torus using two-dimensional finite elements on an unstructured triangular grid. This work is motivated by the proposed development of an adaptive mesh stability code that will solve the ideal linearized stability problem with a resistive wall. In order to create an automatically adapting grid, an unstructured triangular grid is initially generated for the equilibrium evaluation. The Grad-Shafronov equation is modified to accommodate a static toroidal flow velocity. The resulting equation is then solved on the generated grid in the natural cylindrical (R, ?, Z) coordinate system. By working in the natural coordinate system, there are no singular points to be dealt with in the system. However, there are several numerical problems associated with solving the system of equations that are presented. Benchmark results against the Solov’ev equilibrium as well as the PEST and HELENA codes are also presented.

  8. A practical adaptive-grid method for complex fluid-flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakahashi, K.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    A practical solution, adaptive-grid method utilizing a tension and torsion spring analogy is proposed for multidimensional fluid flow problems. The tension spring, which connects adjacent grid points to each other, controls grid spacings. The torsion spring, which is attached to each grid node, controls inclinations of coordinate lines and grid skewness. A marching procedure was used that results in a simple tridiagonal system of equations at each coordinate line to determine grid-point distribution. Multidirectional adaptation is achieved by successive applications of one-dimensional adaptation. Examples of applications for axisymmetric afterbody flow fields and two dimensional transonic airfoil flow fields are shown.

  9. Extending Diffusion Monte Carlo to Internal Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Andrew S.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2013-06-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) is a powerful technique for studying the properties of molecules and clusters that undergo large-amplitude, zero-point vibrational motions. However, the overall applicability of the method is limited by the need to work in Cartesian coordinates and therefore have available a full-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). As a result, the development of a reduced-dimensional DMC methodology has the potential to significantly extend the range of problems that DMC can address by allowing the calculations to be performed in the subset of coordinates that is physically relevant to the questions being asked, thereby eliminating the need for a full-dimensional PES. As a first step towards this goal, we describe here an internal coordinate extension of DMC that places no constraints on the choice of internal coordinates other than requiring them all to be independent. Using H_3^+ and its isotopologues as model systems, we demonstrate that the methodology is capable of successfully describing the ground state properties of highly fluxional molecules as well as, in conjunction with the fixed-node approximation, the ?=1 vibrationally excited states. The calculations of the fundamentals of H_3^+ and its isotopologues provided general insights into the properties of the nodal surfaces of vibrationally excited states. Specifically, we will demonstrate that analysis of ground state probability distributions can point to the set of coordinates that are less strongly coupled and therefore more suitable for use as nodal coordinates in the fixed-node approximation. In particular, we show that nodal surfaces defined in terms of the curvilinear normal mode coordinates are reasonable for the fundamentals of H_2D^+ and D_2H^+ despite both molecules being highly fluxional.

  10. caGrid 1.0 : an enterprise Grid infrastructure for biomedical research.

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, S.; Langella, S.; Hastings, S.; Ervin, D.; Madduri, R.; Phillips, J.; Kurc, T.; Siebenlist, F.; Covitz, P.; Shanbhag, K.; Foster, I.; Saltz, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; The Ohio State Univ.; National Cancer Inst. Centerfor Bioinformatics; SemanticBits

    2008-03-01

    To develop software infrastructure that will provide support for discovery, characterization, integrated access, and management of diverse and disparate collections of information sources, analysis methods, and applications in biomedical research. Design: An enterprise Grid software infrastructure, called caGrid version 1.0 (caGrid 1.0), has been developed as the core Grid architecture of the NCI-sponsored cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG{trademark}) program. It is designed to support a wide range of use cases in basic, translational, and clinical research, including (1) discovery, (2) integrated and large-scale data analysis, and (3) coordinated study. Measurements: The caGrid is built as a Grid software infrastructure and leverages Grid computing technologies and the Web Services Resource Framework standards. It provides a set of core services, toolkits for the development and deployment of new community provided services, and application programming interfaces for building client applications. Results: The caGrid 1.0 was released to the caBIG community in December 2006. It is built on open source components and caGrid source code is publicly and freely available under a liberal open source license. The core software, associated tools, and documentation can be downloaded from the following URL: Grid>.

  11. GEOMETRIA 1 -geometria proiettiva -primo luglio 2015 Nel piano euclideo siano (x, y) coordinate cartesiane ortogonali monometriche, e siano

    E-print Network

    Cornalba, Maurizio

    distinte coniche reali non degeneri, se i loro supporti hanno un punto reale in comune e in quel punto hanno la stessa retta tangente, non possono avere altri punti reali in comune. 2. Date due distinte coniche reali, i loro supporti non possono avere infiniti punti reali comuni. #12;

  12. On the Use of Parmetric-CAD Systems and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Automated, high-fidelity tools for aerodynamic design face critical issues in attempting to optimize real-life geometry arid in permitting radical design changes. Success in these areas promises not only significantly shorter design- cycle times, but also superior and unconventional designs. To address these issues, we investigate the use of a parmetric-CAD system in conjunction with an embedded-boundary Cartesian method. Our goal is to combine the modeling capabilities of feature-based CAD with the robustness and flexibility of component-based Cartesian volume-mesh generation for complex geometry problems. We present the development of an automated optimization frame-work with a focus on the deployment of such a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment.

  13. Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for the Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package of Aftosmis et al. We evaluate and characterize the following modules within the new optimization framework: (1) A component-based geometry parameterization approach using a CAD solid representation and the CAPRI interface. (2) The use of Cartesian methods in the development Optimization techniques using a genetic algorithm. The discussion and investigations focus on several real world problems of the optimization process. We examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute nodes. In addition, we study the influence of noise on the performance of optimization techniques, and the overall efficiency of the optimization process for aerodynamic design of complex three-dimensional configurations. of automated optimization tools. rithm and a gradient-based algorithm.

  14. A Quick Introduction To CamGrid

    E-print Network

    Calleja, Mark; Mazumdar, Paul

    2011-09-09

    stream_source_info ucs.ppt.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2363 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ucs.ppt.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 A quick introduction to CamGrid University Computing Service Mark... Calleja CamGrid : a federated collection of computers CamGrid in a nutshell: A few hundred machines, giving ~1,200 cores, spread around the university. Coordinated by the University Computing Service (UCS). Uses the Condor software to weave the machines...

  15. Computer coordination of limb motion for a three-legged walking robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, C. A.; Patterson, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Coordination of the limb motion of a vehicle which could perform assembly and maintenance operations on large structures in space is described. Manipulator kinematics and walking robots are described. The basic control scheme of the robot is described. The control of the individual arms are described. Arm velocities are generally described in Cartesian coordinates. Cartesian velocities are converted to joint velocities using the Jacobian matrix. The calculation of a trajectory for an arm given a sequence of points through which it is to pass is described. The free gait algorithm which controls the lifting and placing of legs for the robot is described. The generation of commanded velocities for the robot, and the implementation of those velocities by the algorithm are discussed. Suggestions for further work in the area of robot legged locomotion are presented.

  16. Security in Service-oriented Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranova, R.

    2008-10-01

    Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is the most common used approach for building architectural decisions of a system. SOA is an architectural model for developing reliable distributed systems, which functionality is provided as services. Features from this approach are services' interoperability, loose-coupling, reusability and discoverability. Grid is a new technology for using computers, network and devices. The Grid is infrastructure for coordinate use of distributed resources, shared by different institutes, computational centers and organizations. Grid is dynamic and heterogeneous system, beyond any institutional or organization boundaries. Considering this, the development and integration of Gird application in such dynamic and heterogeneous environment is a great challenge. Something more developing of Grid application is still tightly related with the underlying middleware and its security. Service-oriented Grids are one step further in integration of Grid application, because of the SOA features. These benefits from Grid and SOA however will require and new security approaches for building application. In this article, we will briefly describe some known security approaches in SOA and Grid and how they are applied in security models of two well known service-oriented grid architectures—OGSA and EGA.

  17. Augmented Lagrangian with Variable Splitting for Faster Non-Cartesian L1-SPIRiT MR Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Daniel S.; Ramani, Sathish; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    SPIRiT (iterative self-consistent parallel imaging reconstruction), and its sparsity-regularized variant L1-SPIRiT, are compatible with both Cartesian and non-Cartesian MRI sampling trajectories. However, the non-Cartesian framework is more expensive computationally, involving a nonuniform Fourier transform with a nontrivial Gram matrix. We propose a novel implementation of the regularized reconstruction problem using variable splitting, alternating minimization of the augmented La-grangian, and careful preconditioning. Our new method based on the alternating direction method of multipliers converges much faster than existing methods because of the preconditioners' heightened effectiveness. We demonstrate such rapid convergence substantially improves image quality for a fixed computation time. Our framework is a step forward towards rapid non-Cartesian L1-SPIRiT reconstructions. PMID:24122551

  18. Grid metastructures for ultrabroadband acoustic cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernokozhin, E. V.; Boag, A.

    2013-09-01

    Structural grids (grid metastructures) supporting discrete pressure waves similar to the pressure waves in continuous media are considered. The grids consist of links capable of transmitting longitudinal pressure waves and nodes providing equal pressures on the ends of outgoing links. The pressures in the nodes are governed by finite-difference equations approximating, under certain conditions, the wave equation in free space. It is shown that the pressures in the nodes are determined by the acoustic velocities and impedances of links rather than by the coordinates of the nodes and the link lengths. Therefore, a grid approximating pressure waves in a region of uniform homogeneous space can be replaced by an equivalent "deformed" grid with other spatial coordinates of nodes but the same pressure waves in the nodes. In particular, a locally "stretched" equivalent grid can be found that, theoretically, provides a sufficiently large region free from nodes and links. This property makes it possible to use these grids to construct ultrabroadband acoustic cloaks.

  19. Documentation of program AFTBDY to generate coordinate system for 3D after body using body fitted curvilinear coordinates, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, D.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program AFTBDY generates a body fitted curvilinear coordinate system for a wedge curved after body. This wedge curved after body is being used in an experimental program. The coordinate system generated by AFTBDY is used to solve 3D compressible N.S. equations. The coordinate system in the physical plane is a cartesian x,y,z system, whereas, in the transformed plane a rectangular xi, eta, zeta system is used. The coordinate system generated is such that in the transformed plane coordinate spacing in the xi, eta, zeta direction is constant and equal to unity. The physical plane coordinate lines in the different regions are clustered heavily or sparsely depending on the regions where physical quantities to be solved for by the N.S. equations have high or low gradients. The coordinate distribution in the physical plane is such that x stays constant in eta and zeta direction, whereas, z stays constant in xi and eta direction. The desired distribution in x and z is input to the program. Consequently, only the y-coordinate is solved for by the program AFTBDY.

  20. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ? 20

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, J. Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ? 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily forl ? 4. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 l ? 7.more »In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle–Coppens method in the Wolfram Mathematicasoftware to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ? 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics.« less

  1. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic oscillator basis. (I) The method

    E-print Network

    J. Dobaczewski; J. Dudek

    1996-11-17

    We describe a method of solving the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock problem by using a deformed Cartesian harmonic oscillator basis. The complete list of expressions required to calculate local densities, total energy, and self-consistent fields is presented, and an implementation of the self-consistent symmetries is discussed. Formulas to calculate matrix elements in the Cartesian harmonic oscillator basis are derived for the nuclear and Coulomb interactions.

  2. Simplified Cartesian Basis Model for Intrapolyad Emission Intensities in the tilde{A}?tilde{X} Bent-To Transition of Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Barratt; Steeves, Adam H.; Baraban, Joshua H.; Field, Robert W.

    2015-06-01

    The acetylene emission spectrum from the trans-bent electronically excited tilde{A} state to the linear ground electronic tilde{X} state has attracted considerable attention because it grants Franck-Condon access to local bending vibrational levels of the tilde{X} state with large-amplitude motion along the acetylene rightleftharpoons vinylidene isomerization coordinate. For emission from the ground vibrational level of the tilde{A} state, there is a simplifying set of Franck-Condon propensity rules that gives rise to only one zero-order bright state per conserved vibrational polyad of the tilde{X} state. Unfortunately, when the upper level involves excitation in the highly admixed ungerade bending modes, ?_4' and ?_6', the simplifying Franck-Condon propensity rule breaks down--so long as the usual polar basis (with v and l quantum numbers) is used to describe the degenerate bending vibrations of the tilde{X} state--and the intrapolyad intensities result from complicated interference patterns between many zero-order bright states. We show that when the degenerate bending levels are instead treated in the Cartesian two-dimensional harmonic oscillator basis (with v_x and v_y quantum numbers), the propensity for only one zero-order bright state (in the Cartesian basis) is restored, and the intrapolyad intensities are simple to model, so long as corrections are made for anharmonic interactions. As a result of transrightleftharpoons cis isomerization in the tilde{A} state, intrapolyad emission patterns from overtones of ?_4' and ?_6' evolve as quanta of trans bend (?_3') are added, so the emission intensities are not only relevant to the ground-state acetylene rightleftharpoons vinylidene isomerization--they are also a direct reporter of isomerization in the electronically-excited state.

  3. GridMan: A grid manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Wang, Zhu

    1992-01-01

    GridMan is an interactive grid manipulation system. It operates on grids to produce new grids which conform to user demands. The input grids are not constrained to come from any particular source. They may be generated by algebraic methods, elliptic methods, hyperbolic methods, parabolic methods, or some combination of methods. The methods are included in the various available structured grid generation codes. These codes perform the basic assembly function for the various elements of the initial grid. For block structured grids, the assembly can be quite complex due to a large number of clock corners, edges, and faces for which various connections and orientations must be properly identified. The grid generation codes are distinguished among themselves by their balance between interactive and automatic actions and by their modest variations in control. The basic form of GridMan provides a much more substantial level of grid control and will take its input from any of the structured grid generation codes. The communication link to the outside codes is a data file which contains the grid or section of grid.

  4. Anisotropy of the Reynolds stress tensor in the wakes of wind turbine arrays in Cartesian arrangements with counter-rotating rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2015-01-01

    A 4 × 3 wind turbine array in a Cartesian arrangement was constructed in a wind tunnel setting with four configurations based on the rotational sense of the rotor blades. The fourth row of devices is considered to be in the fully developed turbine canopy for a Cartesian arrangement. Measurements of the flow field were made with stereo particle-image velocimetry immediately upstream and downstream of the selected model turbines. Rotational sense of the turbine blades is evident in the mean spanwise velocity W and the Reynolds shear stress - v w ¯ . The flux of kinetic energy is shown to be of greater magnitude following turbines in arrays where direction of rotation of the blades varies. Invariants of the normalized Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor (? and ?) are plotted in the Lumley triangle and indicate that distinct characters of turbulence exist in regions of the wake following the nacelle and the rotor blade tips. Eigendecomposition of the tensor yields principle components and corresponding coordinate system transformations. Characteristic spheroids representing the balance of components in the normalized anisotropy tensor are composed with the eigenvalues yielding shapes predicted by the Lumley triangle. Rotation of the coordinate system defined by the eigenvectors demonstrates trends in the streamwise coordinate following the rotors, especially trailing the top-tip of the rotor and below the hub. Direction of rotation of rotor blades is shown by the orientation of characteristic spheroids according to principle axes. In the inflows of exit row turbines, the normalized Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor shows cumulative effects of the upstream turbines, tending toward prolate shapes for uniform rotational sense, oblate spheroids for streamwise organization of rotational senses, and a mixture of characteristic shapes when the rotation varies by row. Comparison between the invariants of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor and terms from the mean mechanical energy equation indicate correlation between the degree of anisotropy and the regions of the wind turbine wakes where turbulence kinetic energy is produced. The flux of kinetic energy into the momentum-deficit area of the wake from above the canopy is associated with prolate characteristic spheroids. Flux upward into the wake from below the rotor area is associated with oblate characteristic spheroids. Turbulence in the region of the flow directly following the nacelle of the wind turbines demonstrates greater isotropy than regions following the rotor blades. The power and power coefficients for wind turbines indicate that flow structures on the order of magnitude of the spanwise turbine spacing that increase turbine efficiency depending on particular array configuration.

  5. Smart Grid Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad Lopez, Carlos Adrian

    Current electricity infrastructure is being stressed from several directions -- high demand, unreliable supply, extreme weather conditions, accidents, among others. Infrastructure planners have, traditionally, focused on only the cost of the system; today, resilience and sustainability are increasingly becoming more important. In this dissertation, we develop computational tools for efficiently managing electricity resources to help create a more reliable and sustainable electrical grid. The tools we present in this work will help electric utilities coordinate demand to allow the smooth and large scale integration of renewable sources of energy into traditional grids, as well as provide infrastructure planners and operators in developing countries a framework for making informed planning and control decisions in the presence of uncertainty. Demand-side management is considered as the most viable solution for maintaining grid stability as generation from intermittent renewable sources increases. Demand-side management, particularly demand response (DR) programs that attempt to alter the energy consumption of customers either by using price-based incentives or up-front power interruption contracts, is more cost-effective and sustainable in addressing short-term supply-demand imbalances when compared with the alternative that involves increasing fossil fuel-based fast spinning reserves. An essential step in compensating participating customers and benchmarking the effectiveness of DR programs is to be able to independently detect the load reduction from observed meter data. Electric utilities implementing automated DR programs through direct load control switches are also interested in detecting the reduction in demand to efficiently pinpoint non-functioning devices to reduce maintenance costs. We develop sparse optimization methods for detecting a small change in the demand for electricity of a customer in response to a price change or signal from the utility, dynamic learning methods for scheduling the maintenance of direct load control switches whose operating state is not directly observable and can only be inferred from the metered electricity consumption, and machine learning methods for accurately forecasting the load of hundreds of thousands of residential, commercial and industrial customers. These algorithms have been implemented in the software system provided by AutoGrid, Inc., and this system has helped several utilities in the Pacific Northwest, Oklahoma, California and Texas, provide more reliable power to their customers at significantly reduced prices. Providing power to widely spread out communities in developing countries using the conventional power grid is not economically feasible. The most attractive alternative source of affordable energy for these communities is solar micro-grids. We discuss risk-aware robust methods to optimally size and operate solar micro-grids in the presence of uncertain demand and uncertain renewable generation. These algorithms help system operators to increase their revenue while making their systems more resilient to inclement weather conditions.

  6. A Grid portal for Earth Observation community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, G.; Cafaro, M.; Cartenì, G.; Epicoco, I.; Quarta, G.

    2005-03-01

    Earth Observation techniques offer many powerful instruments for Earth planet study, urban development planning, military intelligence helping and so on. Terabytes of EO and geospatial data about lands, oceans, glaciers, cities, etc. are continuously downloaded through remote-sensing infrastructures and stored into heterogeneous, distributed repositories usually belonging to different virtual organizations. A problem-solving environment can be a viable solution to handle, coordinate and share heterogeneous and distributed resources. Moreover, grid computing is an emerging technology to solve large-scale problems in dynamic, multi-institutional Virtual Organizations coordinated by sharing resources such as high-performance computers, observation devices, data and databases over high-speed networks, etc. In this paper we present the Italian Grid for Earth Observation (I-GEO) project, a pervasive environment based on grid technology to help the integration and processing of Earth Observation data, providing a tool to share and access data, applications and computational resources among several organizations.

  7. Rapid gridding reconstruction with a minimal oversampling ratio.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Philip J; Nishimura, Dwight G; Pauly, John M

    2005-06-01

    Reconstruction of magnetic resonance images from data not falling on a Cartesian grid is a Fourier inversion problem typically solved using convolution interpolation, also known as gridding. Gridding is simple and robust and has parameters, the grid oversampling ratio and the kernel width, that can be used to trade accuracy for computational memory and time reductions. We have found that significant reductions in computation memory and time can be obtained while maintaining high accuracy by using a minimal oversampling ratio, from 1.125 to 1.375, instead of the typically employed grid oversampling ratio of two. When using a minimal oversampling ratio, appropriate design of the convolution kernel is important for maintaining high accuracy. We derive a simple equation for choosing the optimal Kaiser-Bessel convolution kernel for a given oversampling ratio and kernel width. As well, we evaluate the effect of presampling the kernel, a common technique used to reduce the computation time, and find that using linear interpolation between samples adds negligible error with far less samples than is necessary with nearest-neighbor interpolation. We also develop a new method for choosing the optimal presampled kernel. Using a minimal oversampling ratio and presampled kernel, we are able to perform a three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction in one-eighth the time and requiring one-third the computer memory versus using an oversampling ratio of two and a Kaiser-Bessel convolution kernel, while maintaining the same level of accuracy. PMID:15959939

  8. Comprehensive Smart Grid Planning in a Regulated Utility Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew; Liao, Yuan; Du, Yan

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the tools and exercises used during the Kentucky Smart Grid Roadmap Initiative in a collaborative electric grid planning process involving state regulators, public utilities, academic institutions, and private interest groups. The mandate of the initiative was to assess the existing condition of smart grid deployments in Kentucky, to enhance understanding of smart grid concepts by stakeholders, and to develop a roadmap for the deployment of smart grid technologies by the jurisdictional utilities of Kentucky. Through involvement of many important stakeholder groups, the resultant Smart Grid Deployment Roadmap proposes an aggressive yet achievable strategy and timetable designed to promote enhanced availability, security, efficiency, reliability, affordability, sustainability and safety of the electricity supply throughout the state while maintaining Kentucky's nationally competitive electricity rates. The models and methods developed for this exercise can be utilized as a systematic process for the planning of coordinated smart grid deployments.

  9. From Cartesian to polar: a new POLICRYPS geometry for realizing circular optical diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto; Umeton, Cesare

    2014-11-01

    We report on the realization of a liquid crystal (LC)-based optical diffraction grating showing a polar symmetry of the director alignment. This has been obtained as a natural evolution of the POLICRYPS technique, which enables the realization of highly efficient, switchable, planar diffraction gratings. Performances exhibited in the Cartesian geometry are extended to the polar one by exploiting the spherical aberration produced by simple optical elements. This enables producing the required highly stable polar pattern that allows fabricating a circular optical diffraction grating. Results are promising for their possible application in fields in which a rotational structure of the optical beam is needed. PMID:25361314

  10. A review of "Cartesian Metaphysics: The Late Scholastic Origins of Modern Philosophy." by Jorge Secada 

    E-print Network

    Luciano Boschiero

    2002-01-01

    of knowledge. Throughout his early works, Descartes suggested that our knowledge of na- ture is independent of our sensory skills; that ?the Cartesian way to knowledge starts with the unveiling of a world of essences which exists within the mind and which..., made by the end of Secada?s first chapter, ?affords us a tool for the examination of Descartes? metaphysics and for the fruitful articulation of its relations to Late Scholasticism? (26). With this in mind, Secada provides an account of the math...

  11. Parallel adaptive Cartesian upwind methods for shock-driven multiphysics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded thin-walled structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. By combining a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation a generic software framework for such flow solvers has been constructed that allows easy exchange of the specific hydrodynamic finite volume upwind scheme and coupling to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers. The paper gives an overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that couple the software to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D.

  12. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach. Thereafter, we focus on a shape optimization problem for an Apollo-like reentry capsule. The optimization seeks to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio of the capsule by modifyjing the shape of its heat-shield in conjunction with a center-of-gravity (c.g.) offset. This multipoint and multi-objective optimization problem is used to demonstrate the overall effectiveness of the Cartesian adjoint method for addressing the issues of complex aerodynamic design. This abstract presents only a brief outline of the numerical method and results; full details will be given in the final paper.

  13. CAD-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A modular framework for aerodynamic optimization of complex geometries is developed. By working directly with a parametric CAD system, complex-geometry models are modified nnd tessellated in an automatic fashion. The use of a component-based Cartesian method significantly reduces the demands on the CAD system, and also provides for robust and efficient flowfield analysis. The optimization is controlled using either a genetic or quasi-Newton algorithm. Parallel efficiency of the framework is maintained even when subject to limited CAD resources by dynamically re-allocating the processors of the flow solver. Overall, the resulting framework can explore designs incorporating large shape modifications and changes in topology.

  14. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  15. Operational and convolution properties of three-dimensional Fourier transforms in spherical polar coordinates.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Natalie

    2010-10-01

    For functions that are best described with spherical coordinates, the three-dimensional Fourier transform can be written in spherical coordinates as a combination of spherical Hankel transforms and spherical harmonic series. However, to be as useful as its Cartesian counterpart, a spherical version of the Fourier operational toolset is required for the standard operations of shift, multiplication, convolution, etc. This paper derives the spherical version of the standard Fourier operation toolset. In particular, convolution in various forms is discussed in detail as this has important consequences for filtering. It is shown that standard multiplication and convolution rules do apply as long as the correct definition of convolution is applied. PMID:20922005

  16. Parallel Grid Manipulations in Earth Science Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W.; Lucchesi, R.; daSilva, A.; Takacs, L. L.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the Goddard Space Flight Center is moving its data assimilation system to massively parallel computing platforms. This parallel implementation of GEOS DAS will be used in the DAO's normal activities, which include reanalysis of data, and operational support for flight missions. Key components of GEOS DAS, including the gridpoint-based general circulation model and a data analysis system, are currently being parallelized. The parallelization of GEOS DAS is also one of the HPCC Grand Challenge Projects. The GEOS-DAS software employs several distinct grids. Some examples are: an observation grid- an unstructured grid of points at which observed or measured physical quantities from instruments or satellites are associated- a highly-structured latitude-longitude grid of points spanning the earth at given latitude-longitude coordinates at which prognostic quantities are determined, and a computational lat-lon grid in which the pole has been moved to a different location to avoid computational instabilities. Each of these grids has a different structure and number of constituent points. In spite of that, there are numerous interactions between the grids, e.g., values on one grid must be interpolated to another, or, in other cases, grids need to be redistributed on the underlying parallel platform. The DAO has designed a parallel integrated library for grid manipulations (PILGRIM) to support the needed grid interactions with maximum efficiency. It offers a flexible interface to generate new grids, define transformations between grids and apply them. Basic communication is currently MPI, however the interfaces defined here could conceivably be implemented with other message-passing libraries, e.g., Cray SHMEM, or with shared-memory constructs. The library is written in Fortran 90. First performance results indicate that even difficult problems, such as above-mentioned pole rotation- a sparse interpolation with little data locality between the physical lat-lon grid and a pole rotated computational grid- can be solved efficiently and at the GFlop/s rates needed to solve tomorrow's high resolution earth science models. In the subsequent presentation we will discuss the design and implementation of PILGRIM as well as a number of the problems it is required to solve. Some conclusions will be drawn about the potential performance of the overall earth science models on the supercomputer platforms foreseen for these problems.

  17. Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability and Implementing NIST's Interoperability Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Basso,T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2010-04-01

    The IEEE American National Standards project P2030TM addressing smart grid interoperability and the IEEE 1547 series of standards addressing distributed resources interconnection with the grid have been identified in priority action plans in the Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap. This paper presents the status of the IEEE P2030 development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards publications and drafts, and provides insight on systems integration and grid infrastructure. The P2030 and 1547 series of standards are sponsored by IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21.

  18. Variational formulation of curved beams in global coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.; Larsson, Karl

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we derive a variational formulation for the static analysis of a linear curved beam natively expressed in global Cartesian coordinates. Using an implicit description of the beam midline during derivation we eliminate the need for local coordinates. The only geometrical information appearing in the final expressions for the governing equations is the tangential direction. As a consequence, zero or discontinuous curvature, for example at inflection points, pose no difficulty in this formulation. Kinematic assumptions encompassing both Timoshenko and Euler-Bernoulli beam theories are considered. With the exception of truly three-dimensional formulations, models for curved beams found in the literature are typically derived in the local Frenet frame. We implement finite element methods with global degrees of freedom and discuss curvature coupling effects and locking. Numerical comparisons with classical solutions for straight and curved cantilever beams under tip load are given, as well as numerical examples illustrating curvature coupling effects.

  19. A New Method for Accurate Treatment of Flow Equations in Cylindrical Coordinates Using Series Expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, G.S.; Lele, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    The motivation of this work is the ongoing effort at the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) to use large eddy simulation (LES) techniques to calculate the noise radiated by jet engines. The focus on engine exhaust noise reduction is motivated by the fact that a significant reduction has been achieved over the last decade on the other main sources of acoustic emissions of jet engines, such as the fan and turbomachinery noise, which gives increased priority to jet noise. To be able to propose methods to reduce the jet noise based on results of numerical simulations, one first has to be able to accurately predict the spatio-temporal distribution of the noise sources in the jet. Though a great deal of understanding of the fundamental turbulence mechanisms in high-speed jets was obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) at low Reynolds numbers, LES seems to be the only realistic available tool to obtain the necessary near-field information that is required to estimate the acoustic radiation of the turbulent compressible engine exhaust jets. The quality of jet-noise predictions is determined by the accuracy of the numerical method that has to capture the wide range of pressure fluctuations associated with the turbulence in the jet and with the resulting radiated noise, and by the boundary condition treatment and the quality of the mesh. Higher Reynolds numbers and coarser grids put in turn a higher burden on the robustness and accuracy of the numerical method used in this kind of jet LES simulations. As these calculations are often done in cylindrical coordinates, one of the most important requirements for the numerical method is to provide a flow solution that is not contaminated by numerical artifacts. The coordinate singularity is known to be a source of such artifacts. In the present work we use 6th order Pade schemes in the non-periodic directions to discretize the full compressible flow equations. It turns out that the quality of jet-noise predictions using these schemes is especially sensitive to the type of equation treatment at the singularity axis. The objective of this work is to develop a generally applicable numerical method for treating the singularities present at the polar axis, which is particularly suitable for highly accurate finite-differences schemes (e.g., Pade schemes) on non-staggered grids. The main idea is to reinterpret the regularity conditions developed in the context of pseudo-spectral methods. A set of exact equations at the singularity axis is derived using the appropriate series expansions for the variables in the original set of equations. The present treatment of the equations preserves the same level of accuracy as for the interior scheme. We also want to point out the wider utility of the method, proposed here in the context of compressible flow equations, as its extension for incompressible flows or for any other set of equations that are solved on a non-staggered mesh in cylindrical coordinates with finite-differences schemes of various level of accuracy is straightforward. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed technique is assessed by comparing results from simulations of laminar forced-jets and turbulent compressible jets using LES with similar calculations in which the equations are solved in Cartesian coordinates at the polar axis, or in which the singularity is removed by employing a staggered mesh in the radial direction without a mesh point at r = 0.

  20. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-print Network

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  1. Static Analysis of Large-Scale Multibody System Using Joint Coordinates and Spatial Algebra Operator

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Initial transient oscillations inhibited in the dynamic simulations responses of multibody systems can lead to inaccurate results, unrealistic load prediction, or simulation failure. These transients could result from incompatible initial conditions, initial constraints violation, and inadequate kinematic assembly. Performing static equilibrium analysis before the dynamic simulation can eliminate these transients and lead to stable simulation. Most exiting multibody formulations determine the static equilibrium position by minimizing the system potential energy. This paper presents a new general purpose approach for solving the static equilibrium in large-scale articulated multibody. The proposed approach introduces an energy drainage mechanism based on Baumgarte constraint stabilization approach to determine the static equilibrium position. The spatial algebra operator is used to express the kinematic and dynamic equations of the closed-loop multibody system. The proposed multibody system formulation utilizes the joint coordinates and modal elastic coordinates as the system generalized coordinates. The recursive nonlinear equations of motion are formulated using the Cartesian coordinates and the joint coordinates to form an augmented set of differential algebraic equations. Then system connectivity matrix is derived from the system topological relations and used to project the Cartesian quantities into the joint subspace leading to minimum set of differential equations. PMID:25045732

  2. Noniterative three-dimensional grid generation using parabolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A new algorithm for generating three-dimensional grids has been developed and implemented which numerically solves a parabolic partial differential equation (PDE). The solution procedure marches outward in two coordinate directions, and requires inversion of a scalar tridiagonal system in the third. Source terms have been introduced to control the spacing and angle of grid lines near the grid boundaries, and to control the outer boundary point distribution. The method has been found to generate grids about 100 times faster than comparable grids generated via solution of elliptic PDEs, and produces smooth grids for finite-difference flow calculations.

  3. Smart Grid Communications: Overview of Research Challenges, Solutions, and Standardization Activities

    E-print Network

    Fan, Zhong; Gormus, Sedat; Efthymiou, Costas; Kalogridis, Georgios; Sooriyabandara, Mahesh; Zhu, Ziming; Lambotharan, Sangarapillai; Chin, Woon Hau

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of energy consumption in future intelligent energy networks (or Smart Grids) will be based on grid-integrated near-real-time communications between various grid elements in generation, transmission, distribution and loads. This paper discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of communications research in the areas of smart grid and smart metering. In particular, we focus on some of the key communications challenges for realizing interoperable and future-proof smart grid/metering networks, smart grid security and privacy, and how some of the existing networking technologies can be applied to energy management. Finally, we also discuss the coordinated standardization efforts in Europe to harmonize communications standards and protocols.

  4. Visual SLAM Using Variance Grid Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Marks, Tim K.

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm denoted Gamma-SLAM performs further processing, in real time, of preprocessed digitized images acquired by a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard an off-road robotic ground vehicle to build accurate maps of the terrain and determine the location of the vehicle with respect to the maps. Part of the name of the algorithm reflects the fact that the process of building the maps and determining the location with respect to them is denoted simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Most prior real-time SLAM algorithms have been limited in applicability to (1) systems equipped with scanning laser range finders as the primary sensors in (2) indoor environments (or relatively simply structured outdoor environments). The few prior vision-based SLAM algorithms have been feature-based and not suitable for real-time applications and, hence, not suitable for autonomous navigation on irregularly structured terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm incorporates two key innovations: Visual odometry (in contradistinction to wheel odometry) is used to estimate the motion of the vehicle. An elevation variance map (in contradistinction to an occupancy or an elevation map) is used to represent the terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm makes use of a Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) from Bayesian estimation theory for maintaining a distribution over poses and maps. The core idea of the RBPF approach is that the SLAM problem can be factored into two parts: (1) finding the distribution over robot trajectories, and (2) finding the map conditioned on any given trajectory. The factorization involves the use of a particle filter in which each particle encodes both a possible trajectory and a map conditioned on that trajectory. The base estimate of the trajectory is derived from visual odometry, and the map conditioned on that trajectory is a Cartesian grid of elevation variances. In comparison with traditional occupancy or elevation grid maps, the grid elevation variance maps are much better for representing the structure of vegetated or rocky terrain.

  5. Decentralized Service Allocation in a Broker Overlay Based Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azab, Abdulrahman; Meling, Hein

    Grid computing is based on coordinated resource sharing in a dynamic environment of multi-institutional virtual organizations. Data exchanges, and service allocation, are challenging problems in the field of Grid computing. This is due to the decentralization of Grid systems. Building decentralized Grid systems with efficient resource management and software component mechanisms is a need for achieving the required efficiency and usability of Grid systems. In this work, a decentralized Grid system model is presented in which, the system is divided into virtual organizations each controlled by a broker. An overlay network of brokers is responsible for global resource management and managing allocation of services. Experimental results show that, the system achieves dependable performance with various loads of services, and broker failures.

  6. Parallel grid population

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  7. Hybrid Grid Generation Using NW Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Oliveira, Janet B.; Oliveira, Joseph S.; Trease, Lynn L.; Trease, Harold E.; B.K. Soni, J. Hauser, J.F. Thompson, P.R. Eiseman

    2000-09-01

    We describe the development and use of a hybrid n-dimensional grid generation system called NWGRID. The Applied Mathematics Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing this tool to support the Laboratory's computational science efforts in chemistry, biology, engineering and environmental (subsurface and atmospheric) modeling. NWGRID is the grid generation system, which is designed for multi-scale, multi-material, multi-physics, time-dependent, 3-D, hybrid grids that are either statically adapted or evolved in time. NWGRID'S capabilities include static and dynamic grids, hybrid grids, managing colliding surfaces, and grid optimization[using reconnections, smoothing, and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms]. NWGRID'S data structure can manage an arbitrary number of grid objects, each with an arbitrary number of grid attributes. NWGRID uses surface geometry to build volumes by using combinations of Boolean operators and order relations. Point distributions can be input, generated using either ray shooting techniques or defined point-by-point. Connectivity matrices are then generated automatically for all variations of hybrid grids.

  8. DOMINO: A fast 3D cartesian discrete ordinates solver for reference PWR simulations and SPN validation

    SciTech Connect

    Courau, T.; Moustafa, S.; Plagne, L.; Poncot, A.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its activity, EDF R and D is developing a new nuclear core simulation code named COCAGNE. This code relies on DIABOLO, a Simplified PN (SPN) method to compute the neutron flux inside the core for eigenvalue calculations. In order to assess the accuracy of SPN calculations, we have developed DOMINO, a new 3D Cartesian SN solver. The parallel implementation of DOMINO is very efficient and allows to complete an eigenvalue calculation involving around 300 x 10{sup 9} degrees of freedom within a few hours on a single shared-memory supercomputing node. This computation corresponds to a 26-group S{sub 8} 3D PWR core model used to assess the SPN accuracy. At the pin level, the maximal error for the SP{sub 5} DIABOLO fission production rate is lower than 0.2% compared to the S{sub 8} DOMINO reference for this 3D PWR core model. (authors)

  9. Validation of Inlet and Exhaust Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involved in the modeling of engine details and flow physics. However, the omission is often improper since inlet or plume flows may have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A method for modeling the effect of inlets and exhaust plumes using boundary conditions within an inviscid Cartesian flow solver is presented. This approach couples with both CAD systems and legacy geometry to provide an automated tool suitable for parameter studies. The method is validated using two and three-dimensional test problems which are compared with both theoretical and experimental results. The numerical results demonstrate excellent agreement with theory and available data, even for extremely strong jets and very sensitive inlets.

  10. Investigation of Radar Propagation in Buildings: A 10 Billion Element Cartesian-Mesh FETD Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M L; Fasenfest, B J; White, D A

    2008-01-14

    In this paper large scale full-wave simulations are performed to investigate radar wave propagation inside buildings. In principle, a radar system combined with sophisticated numerical methods for inverse problems can be used to determine the internal structure of a building. The composition of the walls (cinder block, re-bar) may effect the propagation of the radar waves in a complicated manner. In order to provide a benchmark solution of radar propagation in buildings, including the effects of typical cinder block and re-bar, we performed large scale full wave simulations using a Finite Element Time Domain (FETD) method. This particular FETD implementation is tuned for the special case of an orthogonal Cartesian mesh and hence resembles FDTD in accuracy and efficiency. The method was implemented on a general-purpose massively parallel computer. In this paper we briefly describe the radar propagation problem, the FETD implementation, and we present results of simulations that used over 10 billion elements.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Rolling-Airframes Using a Multi-Level Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A supersonic rolling missile with two synchronous canard control surfaces is analyzed using an automated, inviscid, Cartesian method. Sequential-static and time-dependent dynamic simulations of the complete motion are computed for canard dither schedules for level flight, pitch, and yaw maneuver. The dynamic simulations are compared directly against both high-resolution viscous simulations and relevant experimental data, and are also utilized to compute dynamic stability derivatives. The results show that both the body roll rate and canard dither motion influence the roll-averaged forces and moments on the body. At the relatively, low roll rates analyzed in the current work these dynamic effects are modest, however the dynamic computations are effective in predicting the dynamic stability derivatives which can be significant for highly-maneuverable missiles.

  12. Domination Number of Cartesian Products of Graphs problem 1 posed by Robert Rubalcaba and Peter Slater presented by Adam Jobson

    E-print Network

    Kostochka, Alexandr V.

    Domination Number of Cartesian Products of Graphs problem 1 posed by Robert Rubalcaba and Peter .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ¨G Ck References [1] Robert R. Rubalcaba and Peter J. Slater, Efficient (j, k)-domination, Discuss Mathematics 1 #12;The Row Space of an Adjacency Matrix problem 2 posed by Akbari, Cameron, and Khosrovshahi

  13. Neural Force/Position Control in Cartesian Space for a 6DOF Industrial Robot: Concept and First Results

    E-print Network

    Behnke, Sven

    object ex- emplified by screw manipulation. a screw movingwith unknown velocity ( g. 1), the tool is to be kept in line with the screw, while a de ned contact force against the screw head is maintained the required trajectories in cartesian space or joint angle space cannot be predicted. In the screw

  14. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridOPTICSTM

    E-print Network

    for integrating novel new operations and planning technologies with external power grid systems, including energy of high frequency data access from analytical tools running on platforms from Windows workstations to high-generation concepts and tools for grid operation and planning and ensure a more secure, efficient and reliable future

  15. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  16. IPG Power Grid Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will describe what is meant by grids and then cover the current state of the IPG. This will include an overview of the middleware that is key to the operation of the grid. The presentation will then describe some of the future directions that are planned for the IPG. Finally the presentation will conclude with a brief overview of the Global Grid Forum, which is a key activity that will contribute to the successful availability of grid components.

  17. A Highly Accurate Technique for the Treatment of Flow Equations at the Polar Axis in Cylindrical Coordinates using Series Expansions. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, George S.; Lele, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical methods for solving the flow equations in cylindrical or spherical coordinates should be able to capture the behavior of the exact solution near the regions where the particular form of the governing equations is singular. In this work we focus on the treatment of these numerical singularities for finite-differences methods by reinterpreting the regularity conditions developed in the context of pseudo-spectral methods. A generally applicable numerical method for treating the singularities present at the polar axis, when nonaxisymmetric flows are solved in cylindrical, coordinates using highly accurate finite differences schemes (e.g., Pade schemes) on non-staggered grids, is presented. Governing equations for the flow at the polar axis are derived using series expansions near r=0. The only information needed to calculate the coefficients in these equations are the values of the flow variables and their radial derivatives at the previous iteration (or time) level. These derivatives, which are multi-valued at the polar axis, are calculated without dropping the accuracy of the numerical method using a mapping of the flow domain from (0,R)*(0,2pi) to (-R,R)*(0,pi), where R is the radius of the computational domain. This allows the radial derivatives to be evaluated using high-order differencing schemes (e.g., compact schemes) at points located on the polar axis. The proposed technique is illustrated by results from simulations of laminar-forced jets and turbulent compressible jets using large eddy simulation (LES) methods. In term of the general robustness of the numerical method and smoothness of the solution close to the polar axis, the present results compare very favorably to similar calculations in which the equations are solved in Cartesian coordinates at the polar axis, or in which the singularity is removed by employing a staggered mesh in the radial direction without a mesh point at r=0, following the method proposed recently by Mohseni and Colonius (1). Extension of the method described here for incompressible flows or for any other set of equations that are solved on a non-staggered mesh in cylindrical or spherical coordinates with finite-differences schemes of various level of accuracy is immediate.

  18. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE GridPACK: Grid Parallel Advanced

    E-print Network

    customized for the Power Grid domain. Users will be able to combine these modules to produce custom the lab's inception in 1965. For more information, please visit the FPGI website or contact: gridoptics

  19. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  20. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  1. Hand Eye Coordination

    E-print Network

    Speckert, Glen

    This paper describes a simple method of converting visual coordinates to arm coordinates which does not require knowledge of the position of the camera(s). Comparisons are made to other methods and two camera, three ...

  2. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design variables such as the free stream parameters and the planform shape of an isolated wing. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Factors under consideration include the computation of mesh sensitivities that provide a reliable approximation of the objective function gradient, as well as the computation of surface shape sensitivities based on a direct-CAD interface. We present detailed gradient verification studies and then focus on a shape optimization problem for an Apollo-like reentry vehicle. The goal of the optimization is to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio of the capsule by modifying the shape of its heat-shield in conjunction with a center-of-gravity (c.g.) offset. This multipoint and multi-objective optimization problem is used to demonstrate the overall effectiveness of the Cartesian adjoint method for addressing the issues of complex aerodynamic design.

  3. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology providers involved in the Smart Grid and provides profiles on them including contact information, company overviews, technology reviews, and key Smart Grid activities.

  4. New iterative gridding algorithm using conjugate gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuguang; Thedens, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Non-uniformly sampled data in MRI applications must be interpolated onto a regular Cartesian grid to perform fast image reconstruction using FFT. The conventional method for this is gridding, which requires a density compensation function (DCF). The calculation of DCF may be time-consuming, ambiguously defined, and may not be always reusable due to changes in k-space trajectories. A recently proposed reconstruction method that eliminates the requirement of DCF is block uniform resampling (BURS) which uses singular value decomposition (SVD). However, the SVD is still computationally intensive. In this work, we present a modified BURS algorithm using conjugate gradient method (CGM) in place of direct SVD calculation. Calculation of a block of grid point values in each iteration further reduces the computational load. The new method reduces the calculation complexity while maintaining a high-quality reconstruction result. For an n-by-n matrix, the time complexity per iteration is reduced from O(n*n*n) in SVD to O(n*n) in CGM. The time can be further reduced when we stop the iteration in CGM earlier according to the norm of the residual vector. Using this method, the quality of the reconstructed image improves compared to regularized BURS. The reduced time complexity and improved reconstruction result make the new algorithm promising in dealing with large-sized images and 3D images.

  5. Processing Coordination Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Paul E.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    We examined temporarily ambiguous coordination structures such as "put the butter in the bowl and the pan on the towel." Minimal Attachment predicts that the ambiguous noun phrase "the pan" will be interpreted as a noun-phrase coordination structure because it is syntactically simpler than clausal coordination. Constraint-based theories assume…

  6. LCLS Undulator Coordinate System

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, E.

    2005-01-31

    This note defines the LCLS undulator coordinate system and relates that coordinate system to the linear accelerator coordinate system. The slight downward pitch of the SLAC linac and the finite radius of the Earth necessitate some choices and definitions for the undulator layout which is described here. The layout described is consistent with the LCLS optics MAD file ''LCLS13APR04''.

  7. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE, Self Adaptive Grid codE, is a flexible tool for adapting and restructuring both 2D and 3D grids. Solution-adaptive grid methods are useful tools for efficient and accurate flow predictions. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, strong gradient regions such as shocks, contact discontinuities, shear layers, etc., require careful distribution of grid points to minimize grid error and produce accurate flow-field predictions. SAGE helps the user obtain more accurate solutions by intelligently redistributing (i.e. adapting) the original grid points based on an initial or interim flow-field solution. The user then computes a new solution using the adapted grid as input to the flow solver. The adaptive-grid methodology poses the problem in an algebraic, unidirectional manner for multi-dimensional adaptations. The procedure is analogous to applying tension and torsion spring forces proportional to the local flow gradient at every grid point and finding the equilibrium position of the resulting system of grid points. The multi-dimensional problem of grid adaption is split into a series of one-dimensional problems along the computational coordinate lines. The reduced one dimensional problem then requires a tridiagonal solver to find the location of grid points along a coordinate line. Multi-directional adaption is achieved by the sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The tension forces direct the redistribution of points to the strong gradient region. To maintain smoothness and a measure of orthogonality of grid lines, torsional forces are introduced that relate information between the family of lines adjacent to one another. The smoothness and orthogonality constraints are direction-dependent, since they relate only the coordinate lines that are being adapted to the neighboring lines that have already been adapted. Therefore the solutions are non-unique and depend on the order and direction of adaption. Non-uniqueness of the adapted grid is acceptable since it makes possible an overall and local error reduction through grid redistribution. SAGE includes the ability to modify the adaption techniques in boundary regions, which substantially improves the flexibility of the adaptive scheme. The vectorial approach used in the analysis also provides flexibility. The user has complete choice of adaption direction and order of sequential adaptions without concern for the computational data structure. Multiple passes are available with no restraint on stepping directions; for each adaptive pass the user can choose a completely new set of adaptive parameters. This facility, combined with the capability of edge boundary control, enables the code to individually adapt multi-dimensional multiple grids. Zonal grids can be adapted while maintaining continuity along the common boundaries. For patched grids, the multiple-pass capability enables complete adaption. SAGE is written in FORTRAN 77 and is intended to be machine independent; however, it requires a FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST input. It has been successfully implemented on Sun series computers, SGI IRIS's, DEC MicroVAX computers, HP series computers, the Cray YMP, and IBM PC compatibles. Source code is provided, but no sample input and output files are provided. The code reads three datafiles: one that contains the initial grid coordinates (x,y,z), one that contains corresponding flow-field variables, and one that contains the user control parameters. It is assumed that the first two datasets are formatted as defined in the plotting software package PLOT3D. Several machine versions of PLOT3D are available from COSMIC. The amount of main memory is dependent on the size of the matrix. The standard distribution medium for SAGE is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. It is also available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format or on a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. SAGE was developed in 1989, first released as a 2D version in 1991 and updated to 3D in 1993.

  8. Curvilinear grids for WENO methods in astrophysical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm-Strele, H.; Kupka, F.; Muthsam, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the applicability of curvilinear grids in the context of astrophysical simulations and WENO schemes. With the non-smooth mapping functions from Calhoun et al. (2008), we can tackle many astrophysical problems which were out of scope with the standard grids in numerical astrophysics. We describe the difficulties occurring when implementing curvilinear coordinates into our WENO code, and how we overcome them. We illustrate the theoretical results with numerical data. The WENO finite difference scheme works only for high Mach number flows and smooth mapping functions, whereas the finite volume scheme gives accurate results even for low Mach number flows and on non-smooth grids.

  9. Curvilinear Grids for WENO Methods in Astrophysical Simulations

    E-print Network

    Grimm-Strele, Hannes; Muthsam, Herbert J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the applicability of curvilinear grids in the context of astrophysical simulations and WENO schemes. With the non-smooth mapping functions from Calhoun et al. (2008), we can tackle many astrophysical problems which were out of scope with the standard grids in numerical astrophysics. We describe the difficulties occurring when implementing curvilinear coordinates into our WENO code, and how we overcome them. We illustrate the theoretical results with numerical data. The WENO finite difference scheme works only for high Mach number flows and smooth mapping functions whereas the finite volume scheme gives accurate results even for low Mach number flows and on non-smooth grids.

  10. Coordinated Variable Structure Switching Attacks for Smart Grid 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Shan

    2013-02-11

    The effective modeling and analysis of large-scale power system disturbances especially those stemming from intentional attack represents an open engineering and research problem. Challenges stem from the need to develop intelligent models of cyber...

  11. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  12. Development of a new two-dimensional Cartesian geometry nodal multigroup discrete-ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Pevey, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    The purpose of this work is the development and testing of a new family of methods for calculating the spatial dependence of the neutron density in nuclear systems described in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. The energy and angular dependence of the neutron density is approximated using the multigroup and discrete ordinates techniques, respectively. The resulting FORTRAN computer code is designed to handle an arbitrary number of spatial, energy, and angle subdivisions. Any degree of scattering anisotropy can be handled by the code for either external source or fission systems. The basic approach is to (1) approximate the spatial variation of the neutron source across each spatial subdivision as an expansion in terms of a user-supplied set of exponential basis functions; (2) solve analytically for the resulting neutron density inside each region; and (3) approximate this density in the basis function space in order to calculate the next iteration flux-dependent source terms. In the general case the calculation is iterative due to neutron sources which depend on the neutron density itself, such as scattering interactions.

  13. On the Use of CAD and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, M.; Aftosmis, M. J.; Pulliam, T. H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for Curt3D, a Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package. We present the construction of a new optimization framework and we focus on the following issues: 1) Component-based geometry parameterization approach using parametric-CAD models and CAPRI. A novel geometry server is introduced that addresses the issue of parallel efficiency while only sparingly consuming CAD resources; 2) The use of genetic and gradient-based algorithms for three-dimensional aerodynamic design problems. The influence of noise on the optimization methods is studied. Our goal is to create a responsive and automated framework that efficiently identifies design modifications that result in substantial performance improvements. In addition, we examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute engines. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework for a design problem that features topology changes and complex geometry.

  14. Viability of Bioprinted Cellular Constructs Using a Three Dispenser Cartesian Printer.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Sarah Grace; Trusk, Thomas; Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Tan, Yu; Mei, Ying; Fann, Stephen; Markwald, Roger; Yost, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has centralized its focus on the construction of replacements for non-functional or damaged tissue. The utilization of three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering has generated new methods for the printing of cells and matrix to fabricate biomimetic tissue constructs. The solid freeform fabrication (SFF) method developed for three-dimensional bioprinting uses an additive manufacturing approach by depositing droplets of cells and hydrogels in a layer-by-layer fashion. Bioprinting fabrication is dependent on the specific placement of biological materials into three-dimensional architectures, and the printed constructs should closely mimic the complex organization of cells and extracellular matrices in native tissue. This paper highlights the use of the Palmetto Printer, a Cartesian bioprinter, as well as the process of producing spatially organized, viable constructs while simultaneously allowing control of environmental factors. This methodology utilizes computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing to produce these specific and complex geometries. Finally, this approach allows for the reproducible production of fabricated constructs optimized by controllable printing parameters. PMID:26436877

  15. Progress Towards a Cartesian Cut-Cell Method for Viscous Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Marsha; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary development of an approach for simulating high Reynolds number steady compressible flow in two space dimensions using a Cartesian cut-cell finite volume method. We consider both laminar and turbulent flow with both low and high cell Reynolds numbers near the wall. The approach solves the full Navier-Stokes equations in all cells, and uses a wall model to address the resolution requirements near boundaries and to mitigate mesh irregularities in cut cells. We present a quadratic wall model for low cell Reynolds numbers. At high cell Reynolds numbers, the quadratic is replaced with a newly developed analytic wall model stemming from solution of a limiting form of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model which features a forward evaluation for flow velocity and exactly matches characteristics of the SA turbulence model in the field. We develop multigrid operators which attain convergence rates similar to inviscid multigrid. Investigations focus on preliminary verification and validation of the method. Flows over flat plates and compressible airfoils show good agreement with both theoretical results and experimental data. Mesh convergence studies on sub- and transonic airfoil flows show convergence of surface pressures with wall spacings as large as approx.0.1% chord. With the current analytic wall model, one or two additional refinements near the wall are required to obtain mesh converged values of skin friction.

  16. 78 FR 35539 - Transforming Our Nation's Electric Grid Through Improved Siting, Permitting, and Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... transmission grid is the backbone of our economy, a key factor in future economic growth, and a critical... consumers and spur economic growth. Modernizing our Nation's electric transmission grid requires... mitigation and mitigation at the landscape or watershed scale; and (ii) facilitate coordination,...

  17. COORDINATING EUROPEAN UNION ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    COORDINATING EUROPEAN UNION ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: SHIFTING FROM PASSIVE TO ACTIVE COORDINATION in the European Union (EU). The integration (or `mainstreaming') of environmental objectives into `non coordination. Keywords: Governance; coordination; European Union; environmental policy integration

  18. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient data, simultaneously or separately, is straight forward and requires no changes to the existing algorithm. Such feature makes it ideal for inverting the multicomponent gravity gradient data from the GOCE satellite. An implementation of our adaptation is freely available in the open-source modeling and inversion package Fatiando a Terra (http://www.fatiando.org).

  19. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  20. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  1. Symmetrizing grids, radial basis functions, and Chebyshev and Zernike polynomials for the D4 symmetry group; Interpolation within a squircle, Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Boyd, John P.

    2014-02-01

    A domain is invariant under the eight-element D4 symmetry group if it is unchanged by reflection with respect to the x and y axes and also the diagonal line x=y. Previous treatments of group theory for spectral methods have generally demanded a semester's worth of group theory. We show this is unnecessary by providing explicit recipes for creating grids, etc. We show how to decompose an arbitrary function into six symmetry-invariant components, and thereby split the interpolation problem into six independent subproblems. We also show how to make symmetry-invariant basis functions from products of Chebyshev polynomials, from Zernike polynomials and from radial basis functions (RBFs) of any species. These recipes are completely general, and apply to any domain that is invariant under the dihedral group D4. These concepts are illustrated by RBF pseudospectral solutions of the Poisson equation in a domain bounded by a squircle, the square-with-rounded corners defined by x2?+y2?-1=0 where here ?=2. We also apply Chebyshev polynomials to compute eigenmodes of the Helmholtz equation on the square and show each mode belongs to one and only one of the six D4 classes. [F. Albert Cotton, in: Chemical Applications of Group Theory, John Wiley, New York, 1963, p. vii]Cartesian coordinates. Znm(x,y), the Zernike polynomials. Radial basis functions (RBFs). We shall show how to rearrange each basis into six disjoint sets which are eigenfunctions of the operations of the group. We shall then explain how the interpolation problem with N points can be split into four problems of size N/8 and two problems of size N/4 with an enormous reduction of cost.First, though, we shall provide a brief overview of the D4 symmetry group.

  2. Fully conservative finite difference scheme in cylindrical coordinates for incompressible flow simulations

    E-print Network

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    Fully conservative finite difference scheme in cylindrical coordinates for incompressible flow-uniform staggered grid in cylindrical coordinates is proposed for incom- pressible flow. The scheme conserves both momentum and kinetic energy for inviscid flow with the exception of the time marching error, provided

  3. CaGrid Workflow Toolkit: A taverna based workflow tool for cancer grid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In biological and medical domain, the use of web services made the data and computation functionality accessible in a unified manner, which helped automate the data pipeline that was previously performed manually. Workflow technology is widely used in the orchestration of multiple services to facilitate in-silico research. Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) is an information network enabling the sharing of cancer research related resources and caGrid is its underlying service-based computation infrastructure. CaBIG requires that services are composed and orchestrated in a given sequence to realize data pipelines, which are often called scientific workflows. Results CaGrid selected Taverna as its workflow execution system of choice due to its integration with web service technology and support for a wide range of web services, plug-in architecture to cater for easy integration of third party extensions, etc. The caGrid Workflow Toolkit (or the toolkit for short), an extension to the Taverna workflow system, is designed and implemented to ease building and running caGrid workflows. It provides users with support for various phases in using workflows: service discovery, composition and orchestration, data access, and secure service invocation, which have been identified by the caGrid community as challenging in a multi-institutional and cross-discipline domain. Conclusions By extending the Taverna Workbench, caGrid Workflow Toolkit provided a comprehensive solution to compose and coordinate services in caGrid, which would otherwise remain isolated and disconnected from each other. Using it users can access more than 140 services and are offered with a rich set of features including discovery of data and analytical services, query and transfer of data, security protections for service invocations, state management in service interactions, and sharing of workflows, experiences and best practices. The proposed solution is general enough to be applicable and reusable within other service-computing infrastructures that leverage similar technology stack. PMID:21044328

  4. Basal Ganglia Outputs Map Instantaneous Position Coordinates during Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barter, Joseph W.; Li, Suellen; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Rossi, Mark A.; Bartholomew, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) are implicated in many movement disorders, yet how they contribute to movement remains unclear. Using wireless in vivo recording, we measured BG output from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice while monitoring their movements with video tracking. The firing rate of most nigral neurons reflected Cartesian coordinates (either x- or y-coordinates) of the animal's head position during movement. The firing rates of SNr neurons are either positively or negatively correlated with the coordinates. Using an egocentric reference frame, four types of neurons can be classified: each type increases firing during movement in a particular direction (left, right, up, down), and decreases firing during movement in the opposite direction. Given the high correlation between the firing rate and the x and y components of the position vector, the movement trajectory can be reconstructed from neural activity. Our results therefore demonstrate a quantitative and continuous relationship between BG output and behavior. Thus, a steady BG output signal from the SNr (i.e., constant firing rate) is associated with the lack of overt movement, when a stable posture is maintained by structures downstream of the BG. Any change in SNr firing rate is associated with a change in position (i.e., movement). We hypothesize that the SNr output quantitatively determines the direction, velocity, and amplitude of voluntary movements. By changing the reference signals to downstream position control systems, the BG can produce transitions in body configurations and initiate actions. PMID:25673860

  5. The Managerial Grid; Key Orientations for Achieving Production through People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert R; Mouton, Jane S.

    The Managerial Grid arranges a concern for production on the horizontal axis and a concern for people on the vertical axis of a coordinate system: 1,1 shows minimum concern for production and people; 9,1 shows major production emphasis and minimum human considerations; 1,9 shows maximum concern for friendly working conditions and minimum…

  6. SMART GRID FOR ELECTRICITY INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wei

    SMART GRID FOR ELECTRICITY INFRASTRUCTURE Mohammad Shahidehpour Illinois Institute of Technology #12;Outline Smart Grid Technology Integration Microgrids High Reliability Distribution System, physical and cyber security, wide area measurements, PMUs Smart Grid: Energy efficiency, price response

  7. Parallel grid library for rapid and flexible simulation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkonen, I.; von Alfthan, S.; Sandroos, A.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present an easy to use and flexible grid library for developing highly scalable parallel simulations. The distributed cartesian cell-refinable grid (dccrg) supports adaptive mesh refinement and allows an arbitrary C++ class to be used as cell data. The amount of data in grid cells can vary both in space and time allowing dccrg to be used in very different types of simulations, for example in fluid and particle codes. Dccrg transfers the data between neighboring cells on different processes transparently and asynchronously allowing one to overlap computation and communication. This enables excellent scalability at least up to 32 k cores in magnetohydrodynamic tests depending on the problem and hardware. In the version of dccrg presented here part of the mesh metadata is replicated between MPI processes reducing the scalability of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to between 200 and 600 processes. Dccrg is free software that anyone can use, study and modify and is available at https://gitorious.org/dccrg. Users are also kindly requested to cite this work when publishing results obtained with dccrg. Catalogue identifier: AEOM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Lesser General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 54975 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 974015 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: PC, cluster, supercomputer. Operating system: POSIX. The code has been parallelized using MPI and tested with 1-32768 processes RAM: 10 MB-10 GB per process Classification: 4.12, 4.14, 6.5, 19.3, 19.10, 20. External routines: MPI-2 [1], boost [2], Zoltan [3], sfc++ [4] Nature of problem: Grid library supporting arbitrary data in grid cells, parallel adaptive mesh refinement, transparent remote neighbor data updates and load balancing. Solution method: The simulation grid is represented by an adjacency list (graph) with vertices stored into a hash table and edges into contiguous arrays. Message Passing Interface standard is used for parallelization. Cell data is given as a template parameter when instantiating the grid. Restrictions: Logically cartesian grid. Running time: Running time depends on the hardware, problem and the solution method. Small problems can be solved in under a minute and very large problems can take weeks. The examples and tests provided with the package take less than about one minute using default options. In the version of dccrg presented here the speed of adaptive mesh refinement is at most of the order of 106 total created cells per second. http://www.mpi-forum.org/. http://www.boost.org/. K. Devine, E. Boman, R. Heaphy, B. Hendrickson, C. Vaughan, Zoltan data management services for parallel dynamic applications, Comput. Sci. Eng. 4 (2002) 90-97. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/5992.988653. https://gitorious.org/sfc++.

  8. Security for grids

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-08-14

    Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities that need to be secured into four categories: naming and authentication; secure communication; trust, policy, and authorization; and enforcement of access control. It examines the current state of the art in securing these processes and introduces new technologies that promise to meet the security requirements of Grids more completely.

  9. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  10. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  11. Self-gravitational Force Calculation of Second-order Accuracy for Infinitesimally Thin Gaseous Disks in Polar Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Yen, David C. C.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2015-11-01

    Investigating the evolution of disk galaxies and the dynamics of proto-stellar disks can involve the use of both a hydrodynamical and a Poisson solver. These systems are usually approximated as infinitesimally thin disks using two-dimensional Cartesian or polar coordinates. In Cartesian coordinates, the calculations of the hydrodynamics and self-gravitational forces are relatively straightforward for attaining second-order accuracy. However, in polar coordinates, a second-order calculation of self-gravitational forces is required for matching the second-order accuracy of hydrodynamical schemes. We present a direct algorithm for calculating self-gravitational forces with second-order accuracy without artificial boundary conditions. The Poisson integral in polar coordinates is expressed in a convolution form and the corresponding numerical complexity is nearly linear using a fast Fourier transform. Examples with analytic solutions are used to verify that the truncated error of this algorithm is of second order. The kernel integral around the singularity is applied to modify the particle method. The use of a softening length is avoided and the accuracy of the particle method is significantly improved.

  12. Data Grid Implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Reagan W.; Studham, Ronald S.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Watson, Chip; Stockinger, Heinz; Kunszt, Peter; Charlie Catlett and Ian Foster

    2002-02-27

    Data grids link distributed, heterogeneous storage resources into a coherent data management system. From a user perspective, the data grid provides a uniform name space across the underlying storage systems, while supporting retrieval and storage of files. In the high energy physics community, at least six data grids have been implemented for the storage and distribution of experimental data. Data grids are also being used to support projects as diverse as digital libraries (National Library of Medicine Visible Embryo project), federation of multiple astronomy sky surveys (NSF National Virtual Observatory project), and integration of distributed data sets (Long Term Ecological Reserve). Data grids also form the core interoperability mechanisms for creating persistent archives, in which data collections are migrated to new technologies over time. The ability to provide a uniform name space across multiple administration domains is becoming a critical component of national-scale, collaborative projects.

  13. 1228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 3, MAY 2014 Optimal Operation of Active Distribution Grids: A

    E-print Network

    Fu, Yong

    optimization algorithm is presented to coordinate the independent systems and to find the optimal operating optimiza- tion problem, hierarchical optimization, microgrid, system of sys- tems (SoS). NOMENCLATURE1228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 3, MAY 2014 Optimal Operation of Active

  14. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  15. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community. PMID:17254294

  16. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  17. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  18. 6. Coordination and control.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Any complex operation requires a system for management. In most societies, disaster management is the responsibility of the government. Coordination and control is a system that provides the oversight for all of the disaster management functions. The roles and responsibilities of a coordination and control centre include: (1) planning; (2) maintenance of inventories; (3) activation of the disaster response plan; (4) application of indicators of function; (5) surveillance; (6) information management; (7) coordination of activities of the BSFs; (8) decision-making; (9) priority setting; (10) defining overarching goal and objectives for interventions; (11) applying indicators of effectiveness; (12) applying indicators of benefit and impact; (13) exercising authority; (14) managing resources; (15) initiating actions; (16) preventing influx of unneeded resources; (17) defining progress; (18) providing information; (19) liasing with responding organisations; and (20) providing quality assurance. Coordination and control is impossible without communications. To accomplish coordination and control, three factors must be present: (1) mandate; (2) power and authority; and (3) available resources. Coordination and control is responsible for the evaluation of the effectiveness and benefits/impacts of all interventions. Coordination and control centres (CCCs) are organised hierarchically from the on-scene CCCs (incident command) to local provincial to national CCCs. Currently, no comprehensive regional and international CCCs have been universally endorsed. Systems such as the incident command system, the unified command system, and the hospital incident command system are described as are the humanitarian reform movement and the importance of coordination and control in disaster planning and preparedness. PMID:24785803

  19. Nadia Elliott Administrative Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Karen Krumme Assistant Director New Program Coordinator Ruth Huard Dean SJSU COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL Financial Analyst Nieves Richardson College Resource Analyst New Int'l Marketing Coordinator Student Laura Schilling Enrllmnt Services Coord New Int'l Recruitment Specialist Student Assistants Student

  20. Conformational Motions and Functionally Key Residues for Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD–BtuF Revealed by Elastic Network Model with a Function-Related Internal Coordinate

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Xing-Yuan; Hou, Yan-Xue; Wu, Yi-Dong; Zhu, Jian-Zhuo; An, Hai-Long

    2015-01-01

    BtuCD–BtuF from Escherichia coli is a binding protein-dependent adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to transmit vitamin B12 across cellular membranes. Experimental studies have showed that during the transport cycle, the transporter undergoes conformational transitions between the “inward-facing” and “outward-facing” states, which results in the open–closed motions of the cytoplasmic gate of the transport channel. The opening–closing of the channel gate play critical roles for the function of the transporter, which enables the substrate vitamin B12 to be translocated into the cell. In the present work, the extent of opening of the cytoplasmic gate was chosen as a function-related internal coordinate. Then the mean-square fluctuation of the internal coordinate, as well as the cross-correlation between the displacement of the internal coordinate and the movement of each residue in the protein, were calculated based on the normal mode analysis of the elastic network model to analyze the function-related motions encoded in the structure of the system. In addition, the key residues important for the functional motions of the transporter were predicted by using a perturbation method. In order to facilitate the calculations, the internal coordinate was introduced as one of the axes of the coordinate space and the conventional Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space with linear approximation. All the calculations were carried out in this internal/Cartesian space. Our method can successfully identify the functional motions and key residues for the transporter BtuCD–BtuF, which are well consistent with the experimental observations. PMID:26247943

  1. On coordinate transformation and grid stretching for sparse grid pricing of basket options

    E-print Network

    Oosterlee, Cornelis W. "Kees"

    to buy an underlying asset S for a fixed price for multi-asset examples with up to five underlying assets in the basket. 1 Introduction The topic on more than one underlying asset. As the number of the underlying assets increases, the number

  2. Grid Data Management and Customer Demands at MeteoSwiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigo, G.; Lukasczyk, Ch.

    2010-09-01

    Data grids constitute the required input form for a variety of applications. Therefore, customers increasingly expect climate services to not only provide measured data, but also grids of these with the required configurations on an operational basis. Currently, MeteoSwiss is establishing a production chain for delivering data grids by subscription directly from the data warehouse in order to meet the demand for precipitation data grids by governmental, business and science customers. The MeteoSwiss data warehouse runs on an Oracle database linked with an ArcGIS Standard edition geodatabase. The grids are produced by Unix-based software written in R called GRIDMCH which extracts the station data from the data warehouse and stores the files in the file system. By scripts, the netcdf-v4 files are imported via an FME interface into the database. Currently daily and monthly deliveries of daily precipitation grids are available from MeteoSwiss with a spatial resolution of 2.2km x 2.2km. These daily delivered grids are a preliminary based on 100 measuring sites whilst the grid of the monthly delivery of daily sums is calculated out of about 430 stations. Crucial for the absorption by the customers is the understanding of and the trust into the new grid product. Clearly stating needs which can be covered by grid products, the customers require a certain lead time to develop applications making use of the particular grid. Therefore, early contacts and a continuous attendance as well as flexibility in adjusting the production process to fulfill emerging customer needs are important during the introduction period. Gridding over complex terrain can lead to temporally elevated uncertainties in certain areas depending on the weather situation and coverage of measurements. Therefore, careful instructions on the quality and use and the possibility to communicate the uncertainties of gridded data proofed to be essential especially to the business and science customers who require near-real-time datasets to build up trust in the product in different applications. The implementation of a new method called RSOI for the daily production allowed to bring the daily precipitation field up to the expectations of customers. The main use of the grids were near-realtime and past event analysis in areas scarcely covered with stations, and inputs for forecast tools and models. Critical success factors of the product were speed of delivery and at the same time accuracy, temporal and spatial resolution, and configuration (coordinate system, projection). To date, grids of archived precipitation data since 1961 and daily/monthly precipitation gridsets with 4h-delivery lag of Switzerland or subareas are available.

  3. GridIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alexander; Stotzka, Rainer; Jejkal, Thomas; Hartmann, Volker; Sutter, Michael; Ruiter, Nicole; Zapf, Michael

    Die vorgestellte Architektur erleichtert wissenschaftlichen Benutzern den Zugriff auf Rechenkapazitäten innerhalb eines Grid ohne Vorkenntnisse der zugrundeliegenden Techniken. GridIJ ist eine Referenzimplementierung für die Bildverarbeitung. Dem Benutzer wird eine grafische Oberfläche bereitgestellt, die einen einfachen Zugriff auf Bildverarbeitungsalgorithmen in einem Grid erlaubt. Mit einem Java Interface kann die Funktionalität erweitert werden. Um die Architektur einzurichten sind zwei zusätzliche Web-Services in einem GT4 Container notwendig. Tests zeigen, dass die Architektur einen hohen Leistungsgewinn im Vergleich zur Ausführung auf einem Einzelplatzrechner ermöglicht.

  4. Generation of orthogonal grids by boundary grid relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two elliptic grid generation schemes that yield orthogonal grids are presented (FGBR and UBGR). With the UBGR scheme, the grid points on the flow boundaries are automatically determined by the algorithm, while the FBGR scheme at most one half of the boundary grid points may be prespecified and the remainder of boundary grid points are determined automatically. Numerical examples show their capability of easy stretching, clustering and shock fitting while maintaining orthogonality of grid. The present method can be implemented into existing elliptic grid generation programs with relatively minor modifications.

  5. Exploring Hypersonic, Unstructured-Grid Issues through Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Kleb, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Pure-tetrahedral unstructured grids have been shown to produce asymmetric heat transfer rates for symmetric problems. Meanwhile, two-dimensional structured grids produce symmetric solutions and as documented here, introducing a spanwise degree of freedom to these structured grids also yields symmetric solutions. The effects of grid skewness and other perturbations of structured-grids are investigated to uncover possible mechanisms behind the unstructured-grid solution asymmetries. By using controlled experiments around a known, good solution, the effects of particular grid pathologies are uncovered. These structured-grid experiments reveal that similar solution degradation occurs as for unstructured grids, especially for heat transfer rates. Non-smooth grids within the boundary layer is also shown to produce large local errors in heat flux but do not affect surface pressures.

  6. Using Grid Benchmarks for Dynamic Scheduling of Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Navigation or dynamic scheduling of applications on computational grids can be improved through the use of an application-specific characterization of grid resources. Current grid information systems provide a description of the resources, but do not contain any application-specific information. We define a GridScape as dynamic state of the grid resources. We measure the dynamic performance of these resources using the grid benchmarks. Then we use the GridScape for automatic assignment of the tasks of a grid application to grid resources. The scalability of the system is achieved by limiting the navigation overhead to a few percent of the application resource requirements. Our task submission and assignment protocol guarantees that the navigation system does not cause grid congestion. On a synthetic data mining application we demonstrate that Gridscape-based task assignment reduces the application tunaround time.

  7. New coordinates for the amplitude parameter space of continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, John T.; Prix, Reinhard; Cutler, Curt J.; Willis, Joshua L.

    2014-03-01

    The parameter space for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) can be divided into amplitude parameters (signal amplitude, inclination and polarization angles describing the orientation of the source, and an initial phase) and phase-evolution parameters (signal frequency and frequency derivatives, and parameters such as sky position which determine the Doppler modulation of the signal). The division is useful in part because of the existence of a set of functions known as the Jaranowski-Królak-Schutz (JKS) coordinates, which are a set of four coordinates on the amplitude parameter space such that the GW signal can be written as a linear combination of four template waveforms (which depend on the phase-evolution parameters) with the JKS coordinates as coefficients. We define a new set of coordinates on the amplitude parameter space, with the same properties, which can be more closely connected to the physical amplitude parameters. These naturally divide into two pairs of Cartesian-like coordinates on two-dimensional subspaces, one corresponding to left- and the other to right-circular polarization. We thus refer to these as circular polarization factored (CPF) coordinates. The corresponding two sets of polar coordinates (known as CPF-polar) can be related in a simple way to the physical parameters. A further coordinate transformation can be made, within each subspace, between CPF and so-called root-radius coordinates, whose radial coordinate is the fourth root of the radial coordinate in CPF-polar coordinates. We illustrate some simplifying applications for these various coordinate systems, such as a calculation of the Jacobian for the transformation between JKS or CPF coordinates and the physical amplitude parameters (amplitude, inclination, polarization and initial phase); a demonstration that the Jacobian between root-radius coordinates and the physical parameters is a constant; an illustration of the signal coordinate singularities associated with left- and right-circular polarization, which correspond to the origins of the two two-dimensional subspaces; and an elucidation of the form of the log-likelihood ratio between hypotheses of Gaussian noise with and without a continuous GW signal. These are used to illustrate some of the prospects for approximate evaluation of a Bayesian detection statistic defined by marginalization over the physical parameter space. Additionally, in the presence of simplifying assumptions about the observing geometry, we are able, using CPF-polar coordinates, to explicitly evaluate the integral for the Bayesian detection statistic, and compare it to the approximate results.

  8. IEEE Smart Grid Series of Standards IEEE 2030 (Interoperability) and IEEE 1547 (Interconnection) Status: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2012-04-01

    The IEEE American National Standards smart grid publications and standards development projects IEEE 2030, which addresses smart grid interoperability, and IEEE 1547TM, which addresses distributed resources interconnection with the grid, have made substantial progress since 2009. The IEEE 2030TM and 1547 standards series focus on systems-level aspects and cover many of the technical integration issues involved in a mature smart grid. The status and highlights of these two IEEE series of standards, which are sponsored by IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21), are provided in this paper.

  9. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic oscillator basis. (II) The program HFODD

    E-print Network

    J. Dobaczewski; J. Dudek

    1996-11-17

    We describe the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock problem by using the deformed Cartesian harmonic oscillator basis. The user has a possibility of choosing among various symmetries of the nuclear HF problem for rotating or non-rotating nuclei; they vary from the non-axial parity-invariant nuclear shapes, through those also breaking the intrinsic parity, towards the least-restrictive case corresponding to only one symmetry plane. The code provides a solution for a complete superdeformed rotational band in an A~150 nucleus within one CPU hour of the CRAY C-90 supercomputer or within two-three CPU hours of a fast workstation.

  10. GRIDS: Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: The 12 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s GRIDS Project, short for “Grid-Scale Rampable Intermittent Dispatchable Storage,” are developing storage technologies that can store renewable energy for use at any location on the grid at an investment cost less than $100 per kilowatt hour. Flexible, large-scale storage would create a stronger and more robust electric grid by enabling renewables to contribute to reliable power generation.

  11. Arc Length Based Grid Distribution For Surface and Volume Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1996-01-01

    Techniques are presented for distributing grid points on parametric surfaces and in volumes according to a specified distribution of arc length. Interpolation techniques are introduced which permit a given distribution of grid points on the edges of a three-dimensional grid block to be propagated through the surface and volume grids. Examples demonstrate how these methods can be used to improve the quality of grids generated by transfinite interpolation.

  12. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  13. The BioGRID interaction database: 2015 update

    PubMed Central

    Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Oughtred, Rose; Boucher, Lorrie; Heinicke, Sven; Chen, Daici; Stark, Chris; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Kolas, Nadine; O'Donnell, Lara; Reguly, Teresa; Nixon, Julie; Ramage, Lindsay; Winter, Andrew; Sellam, Adnane; Chang, Christie; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra; Rust, Jennifer; Livstone, Michael S.; Dolinski, Kara; Tyers, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID: http://thebiogrid.org) is an open access database that houses genetic and protein interactions curated from the primary biomedical literature for all major model organism species and humans. As of September 2014, the BioGRID contains 749 912 interactions as drawn from 43 149 publications that represent 30 model organisms. This interaction count represents a 50% increase compared to our previous 2013 BioGRID update. BioGRID data are freely distributed through partner model organism databases and meta-databases and are directly downloadable in a variety of formats. In addition to general curation of the published literature for the major model species, BioGRID undertakes themed curation projects in areas of particular relevance for biomedical sciences, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and various human disease-associated interaction networks. BioGRID curation is coordinated through an Interaction Management System (IMS) that facilitates the compilation interaction records through structured evidence codes, phenotype ontologies, and gene annotation. The BioGRID architecture has been improved in order to support a broader range of interaction and post-translational modification types, to allow the representation of more complex multi-gene/protein interactions, to account for cellular phenotypes through structured ontologies, to expedite curation through semi-automated text-mining approaches, and to enhance curation quality control. PMID:25428363

  14. The anatomy of the grid : enabling scalable virtual organizations.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Kesselman, C.; Tuecke, S.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Southern California

    2001-10-01

    'Grid' computing has emerged as an important new field, distinguished from conventional distributed computing by its focus on large-scale resource sharing, innovative applications, and, in some cases, high performance orientation. In this article, the authors define this new field. First, they review the 'Grid problem,' which is defined as flexible, secure, coordinated resource sharing among dynamic collections of individuals, institutions, and resources -- what is referred to as virtual organizations. In such settings, unique authentication, authorization, resource access, resource discovery, and other challenges are encountered. It is this class of problem that is addressed by Grid technologies. Next, the authors present an extensible and open Grid architecture, in which protocols, services, application programming interfaces, and software development kits are categorized according to their roles in enabling resource sharing. The authors describe requirements that they believe any such mechanisms must satisfy and discuss the importance of defining a compact set of intergrid protocols to enable interoperability among different Grid systems. Finally, the authors discuss how Grid technologies relate to other contemporary technologies, including enterprise integration, application service provider, storage service provider, and peer-to-peer computing. They maintain that Grid concepts and technologies complement and have much to contribute to these other approaches.

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  16. Grid cell spatial tuning reduced following systemic muscarinic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ehren L; Climer, Jason R; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2014-06-01

    Grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex exhibit a periodic and stable pattern of spatial tuning that may reflect the output of a path integration system. This grid pattern has been hypothesized to serve as a spatial coordinate system for navigation and memory function. The mechanisms underlying the generation of this characteristic tuning pattern remain poorly understood. Systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine flattens the typically positive correlation between running speed and entorhinal theta frequency in rats. The loss of this neural correlate of velocity, an important signal for the calculation of path integration, raises the question of what influence scopolamine has on the grid cell tuning as a read out of the path integration system. To test this, the spatial tuning properties of grid cells were compared before and after systemic administration of scopolamine as rats completed laps on a circle track for food rewards. The results show that the spatial tuning of the grid cells was reduced following scopolamine administration. The tuning of head direction cells, in contrast, was not reduced by scopolamine. This is the first report to demonstrate a link between cholinergic function and grid cell tuning. This work suggests that the loss of tuning in the grid cell network may underlie the navigational disorientation observed in Alzheimer's patients and elderly individuals with reduced cholinergic tone. PMID:24493379

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  18. Operational and convolution properties of two-dimensional Fourier transforms in polar coordinates.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Natalie

    2009-08-01

    For functions that are best described in terms of polar coordinates, the two-dimensional Fourier transform can be written in terms of polar coordinates as a combination of Hankel transforms and Fourier series-even if the function does not possess circular symmetry. However, to be as useful as its Cartesian counterpart, a polar version of the Fourier operational toolset is required for the standard operations of shift, multiplication, convolution, etc. This paper derives the requisite polar version of the standard Fourier operations. In particular, convolution-two dimensional, circular, and radial one dimensional-is discussed in detail. It is shown that standard multiplication/convolution rules do apply as long as the correct definition of convolution is applied. PMID:19649111

  19. The gridded electromagnet probe

    E-print Network

    Shadman, K. (Khashayar), 1972-

    2003-01-01

    We attempted to measure the anisotropy in the electron distribution function in magnetized plasma by exploiting the adiabatic invariance of the electron's magnetic moment with a probe comprising a grid, a collector, and ...

  20. Grid Computing Education Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  1. Implementing Production Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Ziobarth, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have presented the essence of experience gained in building two production Grids, and provided some of the global context for this work. As the reader might imagine, there were a lot of false starts, refinements to the approaches and to the software, and several substantial integration projects (SRB and Condor integrated with Globus) to get where we are today. However, the point of this paper is to try and make it substantially easier for others to get to the point where Information Power Grids (IPG) and the DOE Science Grids are today. This is what is needed in order to move us toward the vision of a common cyber infrastructure for science. The author would also like to remind the readers that this paper primarily represents the actual experiences that resulted from specific architectural and software choices during the design and implementation of these two Grids. The choices made were dictated by the criteria laid out in section 1. There is a lot more Grid software available today that there was four years ago, and various of these packages are being integrated into IPG and the DOE Grids. However, the foundation choices of Globus, SRB, and Condor would not be significantly different today than they were four years ago. Nonetheless, if the GGF is successful in its work - and we have every reason to believe that it will be - then in a few years we will see that the 28 functions provided by these packages will be defined in terms of protocols and MIS, and there will be several robust implementations available for each of the basic components, especially the Grid Common Services. The impact of the emerging Web Grid Services work is not yet clear. It will likely have a substantial impact on building higher level services, however it is the opinion of the author that this will in no way obviate the need for the Grid Common Services. These are the foundation of Grids, and the focus of almost all of the operational and persistent infrastructure aspects of Grids.

  2. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  3. Developmental coordination disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Physical education and perceptual motor training (combining movement with tasks that require thinking, like math or reading) are the best ways to treat coordination disorder. Using a computer to ... Encouraging physical activity is important to prevent obesity.

  4. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-print Network

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  5. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011 in The Global Exploration Strategy: the Framework for Coordination, released in May 2007, space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are developing the Global

  6. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  7. GridLAB-D/SG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  8. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion. PMID:23345138

  9. The impact of approximate VSCF schemes and curvilinear coordinates on the anharmonic vibrational frequencies of formamide and thioformamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounouar, M.; Scheurer, Ch.

    2008-05-01

    The accuracy of the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method for the computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies in the infrared (IR) spectrum of formamide and thioformamide is investigated. The importance of triple potentials Vijk(3) in the commonly used hierarchical expansion of the potential energy surface (PES) is studied in detail. The PES is expanded in terms of Cartesian as well as internal coordinate normal mode displacements. It is found that triples play an important role when using rectilinear coordinates. A VSCF computation based on rectilinear displacements exhibits serious shortcomings which are only remedied by a large vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) treatment including triple potentials. These limitations are partially removed when using curvilinear coordinates. The merits and disadvantages of either type of displacements for the generation of the PES are discussed.

  10. An Approach for Dynamic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Liou, Meng-Sing; Hindman, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    An approach is presented for the generation of two-dimensional, structured, dynamic grids. The grid motion may be due to the motion of the boundaries of the computational domain or to the adaptation of the grid to the transient, physical solution. A time-dependent grid is computed through the time integration of the grid speeds which are computed from a system of grid speed equations. The grid speed equations are derived from the time-differentiation of the grid equations so as to ensure that the dynamic grid maintains the desired qualities of the static grid. The grid equations are the Euler-Lagrange equations derived from a variational statement for the grid. The dynamic grid method is demonstrated for a model problem involving boundary motion, an inviscid flow in a converging-diverging nozzle during startup, and a viscous flow over a flat plate with an impinging shock wave. It is shown that the approach is more accurate for transient flows than an approach in which the grid speeds are computed using a finite difference with respect to time of the grid. However, the approach requires significantly more computational effort.

  11. Complex Volume Grid Generation Through the Use of Grid Reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a set of surface and volume grid generation techniques which reuse existing surface and volume grids. These methods use combinations of data manipulations to reduce grid generation time, improve grid characteristics, and increase the capabilities of existing domain discretization software. The manipulation techniques utilize physical and computational domains to produce basis function on which to operate and modify grid character and smooth grids using Trans-Finite Interpolation, a vector interpolation method and parametric re-mapping technique. With these new techniques, inviscid grids can be converted to viscous grids, multiple zone grid adaption can be performed to improve CFD solver efficiency, and topological changes to improve modeling of flow fields can be done simply and quickly. Examples of these capabilities are illustrated as applied to various configurations.

  12. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wade Troxell

    2011-09-30

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation â?? all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSUâ??s overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratoryâ??s focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3) Simulation of electrical power distribution system that integrates significant quantities of renewable and distributed energy resources; (4) System dynamic modeling that considers end-user behavior, economics, security and regulatory frameworks; (5) Best practices for energy management IT control solutions for effective distributed energy integration (including security with the underlying physical power systems); (6) Experimental verification of effects of various arrangements of renewable generation, distributed generation and user load types along with conventional generation and transmission. Understanding the core technologies for enabling them to be used in an integrated fashion within a distribution network remains is a benefit to the future energy paradigm and future and present energy engineers.

  13. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  14. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  15. An adaptive grid-based all hexahedral meshing algorithm based on 2-refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Edgel, Jared; Benzley, Steven E.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-08-01

    Most adaptive mesh generation algorithms employ a 3-refinement method. This method, although easy to employ, provides a mesh that is often too coarse in some areas and over refined in other areas. Because this method generates 27 new hexes in place of a single hex, there is little control on mesh density. This paper presents an adaptive all-hexahedral grid-based meshing algorithm that employs a 2-refinement method. 2-refinement is based on dividing the hex to be refined into eight new hexes. This method allows a greater control on mesh density when compared to a 3-refinement procedure. This adaptive all-hexahedral meshing algorithm provides a mesh that is efficient for analysis by providing a high element density in specific locations and a reduced mesh density in other areas. In addition, this tool can be effectively used for inside-out hexahedral grid based schemes, using Cartesian structured grids for the base mesh, which have shown great promise in accommodating automatic all-hexahedral algorithms. This adaptive all-hexahedral grid-based meshing algorithm employs a 2-refinement insertion method. This allows greater control on mesh density when compared to 3-refinement methods. This algorithm uses a two layer transition zone to increase element quality and keeps transitions from lower to higher mesh densities smooth. Templates were introduced to allow both convex and concave refinement.

  16. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  17. Development of a Cartesian sinc DVR basis for single and double ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremiah; Haxton, Dan

    2014-05-01

    In this investigation, we explore properties of a grid-based representation designed to calculate phenomena involving single and double (auto)ionization. The method employs a powerful representation of the two-electron operator within a basis of sinc functions. It consists of a tensor decomposition of the operator such that two-electron matrix elements may be computed in O(N2) operations, as opposed to the O(N4) calculations required for the usual Gaussian basis sets used in quantum chemistry. The basis and methods are tested with the hydrogen atom and H2+.Results indicate that, in addition to being more scalable, the technique is more accurate than variational method. Work supported by USDOE, OBES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  18. Distributed Accounting on the Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thigpen, William; Hacker, Thomas J.; McGinnis, Laura F.; Athey, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    By the late 1990s, the Internet was adequately equipped to move vast amounts of data between HPC (High Performance Computing) systems, and efforts were initiated to link together the national infrastructure of high performance computational and data storage resources together into a general computational utility 'grid', analogous to the national electrical power grid infrastructure. The purpose of the Computational grid is to provide dependable, consistent, pervasive, and inexpensive access to computational resources for the computing community in the form of a computing utility. This paper presents a fully distributed view of Grid usage accounting and a methodology for allocating Grid computational resources for use on a Grid computing system.

  19. Generator Coordinate Truncations

    E-print Network

    K. Hagino; G. F. Bertsch; P. -G. Reinhard

    2003-04-17

    We investigate the accuracy of several schemes to calculate ground-state correlation energies using the generator coordinate technique. Our test-bed for the study is the $sd$ interacting boson model, equivalent to a 6-level Lipkin-type model. We find that the simplified projection of a triaxial generator coordinate state using the $S_3$ subgroup of the rotation group is not very accurate in the parameter space of the Hamiltonian of interest. On the other hand, a full rotational projection of an axial generator coordinate state gives remarkable accuracy. We also discuss the validity of the simplified treatment using the extended Gaussian overlap approximation (top-GOA), and show that it works reasonably well when the number of boson is four or larger.

  20. Pathwise Coordinate optimization

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Hoefling, Holger; Tibshirani, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We consider ``one-at-a-time'' coordinate-wise descent algorithms for a class of convex optimization problems. An algorithm of this kind has been proposed for the L_1-penalized regression (lasso) in the lterature, but it seems to hav e been largely ignored. Indeed, it seems that coordinate-wise algorithms are not often used in convex optimization. We show that this algorithm is very competitive with the well known LARS (or hom otopy) procedure in large lasso problems, and that it can be applied to related methods such as t he garotte and elastic net. It turns out that coordinate-wise descent does not work in the ``fu sed lasso'' however, so we derive a generalized algorithm that yields the solution in much less time that a standard convex optimizer. Finally we generalize the procedure to the two-dimensional fused lasso, and demonstrate its performance on some image smoothing problems.

  1. Data location-aware job scheduling in the grid. Application to the GridWay metascheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Peris, Antonio; Hernandez, Jose; Huedo, Eduardo; Llorente, Ignacio M.

    2010-04-01

    Grid infrastructures constitute nowadays the core of the computing facilities of the biggest LHC experiments. These experiments produce and manage petabytes of data per year and run thousands of computing jobs every day to process that data. It is the duty of metaschedulers to allocate the tasks to the most appropriate resources at the proper time. Our work reviews the policies that have been proposed for the scheduling of grid jobs in the context of very data-intensive applications. We indicate some of the practical problems that such models will face and describe what we consider essential characteristics of an optimum scheduling system: aim to minimise not only job turnaround time but also data replication, flexibility to support different virtual organisation requirements and capability to coordinate the tasks of data placement and job allocation while keeping their execution decoupled. These ideas have guided the development of an enhanced prototype for GridWay, a general purpose metascheduler, part of the Globus Toolkit and member of the EGEE's RESPECT program. Current GridWay's scheduling algorithm is unaware of data location. Our prototype makes it possible for job requests to set data needs not only as absolute requirements but also as functions for resource ranking. As our tests show, this makes it more flexible than currently used resource brokers to implement different data-aware scheduling algorithms.

  2. Information Power Grid Posters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2003-01-01

    This document is a summary of the accomplishments of the Information Power Grid (IPG). Grids are an emerging technology that provide seamless and uniform access to the geographically dispersed, computational, data storage, networking, instruments, and software resources needed for solving large-scale scientific and engineering problems. The goal of the NASA IPG is to use NASA's remotely located computing and data system resources to build distributed systems that can address problems that are too large or complex for a single site. The accomplishments outlined in this poster presentation are: access to distributed data, IPG heterogeneous computing, integration of large-scale computing node into distributed environment, remote access to high data rate instruments,and exploratory grid environment.

  3. The Computing Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, P.

    2009-12-01

    Since the beginning of the millennium, High Energy Physics research institutions like CERN and INFN pioneered several projects aimed at exploiting the synergy among computing power, storage and network resources, and creating an infrastructure of distributed computing on a worldwide scale. In the year 2000, after the Monarch project [ http://monarc.web.cern.ch/MONARC/], DataGrid started [ http://eu-datagrid.web.cern.ch/eu-datagrid/] aimed at providing High Energy Physics with the computing power needed for the LHC enterprise. This program evolved into the EU DataGrid project, that implemented the first actual prototype of a Grid middleware running on a testbed environment. The next step consisted in the application to the LHC experiments, with the LCG project [ http://lcg.web.cern.ch/LCG/], in turn followed by the EGEE [ http://www.eu-egee.org/] and EGEE II programs.

  4. Exploiting the Computational Grid Lecture 1 Globus and the Grid

    E-print Network

    Services ­ Grid Resource Information Protocol (GRIP) · Data Management ­ Grid FTP · Security is essential" security protects systems from users and data being corrupted by other users · The grid will also have traditional security · Required security consists of: o Privacy/Confidentiality of information o Data

  5. Journal of Grid Computing From Grids to Cloud Federations

    E-print Network

    Krintz, Chandra

    1 23 Journal of Grid Computing From Grids to Cloud Federations ISSN 1570-7873 Volume 11 Number 1 J Grid Computing (2013) 11:63-81 DOI 10.1007/s10723-012-9238-z Cloud Platform Datastore Support Navraj Computing (2013) 11:63­81 DOI 10.1007/s10723-012-9238-z Cloud Platform Datastore Support Navraj Chohan

  6. Performance Assessment Architecture for Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin; Sun, Zhili

    For the sake of simplicity in resource sharing, Grid services only expose a function access interface to users. However, some Grid users want to know more about the performance of services in planning phase. Problem emerges since the Grid simply has no means in obtaining how well the system will cope with user demands. Current Grid infrastructures do not integrate adequate performance assessment measures to meet the user’s requirement. In this paper, the architecture of Guided Subsystem Approach for Grid performance assessments is presented. We proposed an assessment infrastructure that allows the user to collect information to evaluate the performance of Grid applications. Based on this infrastructure, a user-centric performance assessment method is given. It is expected that this research will lead to some sort of extension in Grid middleware to facilitate the Grid platform the ability to handle applications with higher reliability requirements.

  7. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  8. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  9. Block coordination copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  10. Coordination of Hand Shape

    PubMed Central

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-01-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In Experiment 1, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  11. Origins of Coordinate Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the origins of post-coordinate searching and emphasizes that the focal point should be on the searcher, not on the item being indexed. Highlights include the history of the term information retrieval; edge notched punch cards; the "peek-a-boo" system; the Uniterm system; and using computers to search for information. (LRW)

  12. Manual for Youth Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Youth Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    This manual was designed primarily for use by coordinators responsible for developing comprehensive community youth opportunity programs of employment, education, and recreation, but the material may also be of assistance to community and business leaders, educators, and others involved in expanding local opportunities for young people. Contents…

  13. Sherri Snyder HR Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Residential & Auxiliary Facilities 478-5944 Custodial II Supervisors (7) Painting Supervisor II Plumber II (3) Appliances (2) Painter I (2) HVAC Supervisor (2) Custodial I (29) Assign. Clerk III (2) Telephone Clerk Information Systems Coordinator Plumber Supervisor Cherelle Pinckney, RD Kennedy 478-2039 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

  14. Information Session Student Coordinators

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    teach self advocacy and build self-esteem in a safe space. Our National Program Coordinator Mariel! #12 highly important aspects: Mentoring Art Safe Space Self Advocacy #12;How Is The Program StructuredFadden Intermediate) Work together to talk about LD/ADHD, promote self confidence and self advocacy while following

  15. Discretization on a general staggered grid

    SciTech Connect

    Sulsky, D.L. . Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics); Brackbill, J.U. )

    1991-01-01

    A discretization scheme on a general staggered grid is described. This discretization is used in conjunction with an arbitrary Lagrangean-Eulerian method that allows use of a fixed Eulerian grid, a Lagrangean grid, or an adaptive grid. 11 refs.

  16. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place, Grid will become limited to HEP; if however the current multitude of Grid-like systems will converge to a generic, modular and extensible solution, Grid will become true to its name.

  17. 2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    282 §2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that describe how a fluid behaves. A fluid continuum, like a solid, is the density of the fluid, ij is the stress tensor and bj is an external force per unit mass. In the cgs system

  18. 2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    282 §2.5 CONTINUUM MECHANICS (FLUIDS) Let us consider a fluid medium and use Cartesian tensors to derive the mathematical equations that describe how a fluid behaves. A fluid continuum, like a solid , i = 1, 2, 3 is a velocity field, # is the density of the fluid, # ij is the stress tensor and b j

  19. APEC Smart Grid Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2012-03-01

    This brief paper describes the activities of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Smart Grid Initiative (ASGI) which is being led by the U.S. and developed by the APEC Energy Working Group. In the paper, I describe the origin of the initiative and briefly mention the four major elements of the initiative along with existing APEC projects which support it.

  20. Unlocking the smart grid

    SciTech Connect

    Rokach, Joshua Z.

    2010-10-15

    The country has progressed in a relatively short time from rotary dial phones to computers, cell phones, and iPads. With proper planning and orderly policy implementation, the same will happen with the Smart Grid. Here are some suggestions on how to proceed. (author)

  1. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Rabari, Anil; Fadipe, Oloruntomi

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  2. Pedagogical tools to explore Cartesian mind-body dualism in the classroom: philosophical arguments and neuroscience illusions

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Scott; Hamilton, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental discussion in lower-level undergraduate neuroscience and psychology courses is Descartes’s “radical” or “mind-body” dualism. According to Descartes, our thinking mind, the res cogitans, is separate from the body as physical matter or substance, the res extensa. Since the transmission of sensory stimuli from the body to the mind is a physical capacity shared with animals, it can be confused, misled, or uncertain (e.g., bodily senses imply that ice and water are different substances). True certainty thus arises from within the mind and its capacity to doubt physical stimuli. Since this doubting mind is a thinking thing that is distinct from bodily stimuli, truth and certainty are reached through the doubting mind as cogito ergo sum, or the certainty of itself as it thinks: hence Descartes’s famous maxim, I think, therefore I am. However, in the last century of Western philosophy, with nervous system investigation, and with recent advances in neuroscience, the potential avenues to explore student’s understanding of the epistemology and effects of Cartesian mind-body dualism has expanded. This article further explores this expansion, highlighting pedagogical practices and tools instructors can use to enhance a psychology student’s understanding of Cartesian dualistic epistemology, in order to think more critically about its implicit assumptions and effects on learning. It does so in two ways: first, by offering instructors an alternative philosophical perspective to dualistic thinking: a mind-body holism that is antithetical to the assumed binaries of dualistic epistemology. Second, it supplements this philosophical argument with a practical component: simple mind-body illusions that instructors may use to demonstrate contrary epistemologies to students. Combining these short philosophical and neuroscience arguments thereby acts as a pedagogical tool to open new conceptual spaces within which learning may occur. PMID:26321981

  3. print_grid() add_vessel()

    E-print Network

    Sharlin, Ehud

    grid.py print_grid() add_vessel() has_overlap() GRID_WIDTH GRID_HEIGHT NUM_VESSELS B VESSEL_NAMES[] VESSEL_SIZES[] human.py get_location() get_choice() grid_defend[] grid_attack[] import grid ai.py get, return false · add_vessel(grid, row, column, size, direction) ­ Check direction ­ Single for loop (size

  4. Ion Engine Grid Gap Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, Gerge C.; Frandina, Michael M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple technique for measuring the grid gap of an ion engine s ion optics during startup and steady-state operation was demonstrated with beam extraction. The grid gap at the center of the ion optics assembly was measured with a long distance microscope that was focused onto an alumina pin that protruded through the center accelerator grid aperture and was mechanically attached to the screen grid. This measurement technique was successfully applied to a 30 cm titanium ion optics assembly mounted onto an NSTAR engineering model ion engine. The grid gap and each grid s movement during startup from room temperature to both full and low power were measured. The grid gaps with and without beam extraction were found to be significantly different. The grid gaps at the ion optics center were both significantly smaller than the cold grid gap and different at the two power levels examined. To avoid issues associated with a small grid gap during thruster startup with titanium ion optics, a simple method was to operate the thruster initially without beam extraction to heat the ion optics. Another possible method is to apply high voltage to the grids prior to igniting the discharge because power deposition to the grids from the plasma is lower with beam extraction than without. Further testing would be required to confirm this approach.

  5. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  6. A nonhydrostatic, isopycnal-coordinate ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, Sean; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2014-11-01

    We present a nonhydrostatic ocean model with an isopycnal (density-following) vertical coordinate system. The primary motivation for the model is the proper treatment of nonhydrostatic dispersion and the formation of nonlinear internal solitary waves. The nonhydrostatic, isopycnal-coordinate formulation may be preferable to nonhydrostatic formulations in z- and ? -coordinates because it improves computational efficiency by reducing the number of vertical grid points and eliminates spurious diapycnal mixing and solitary-wave amplitude loss due to numerical diffusion of scalars. The model equations invoke a mild isopycnal-slope approximation to remove small metric terms associated with diffusion and nonhydrostatic pressure from the momentum equations and to reduce the pressure Poisson equation to a symmetric linear system. Avoiding this approximation requires a costlier inversion of a non-symmetric linear system. We demonstrate that the model is capable of simulating nonlinear internal solitary waves for simplified and physically-realistic ocean-scale problems with a reduced number of layers.

  7. Wireless Communications in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovic, Zoran; Bakmaz, Bojan

    Communication networks play a crucial role in smart grid, as the intelligence of this complex system is built based on information exchange across the power grid. Wireless communications and networking are among the most economical ways to build the essential part of the scalable communication infrastructure for smart grid. In particular, wireless networks will be deployed widely in the smart grid for automatic meter reading, remote system and customer site monitoring, as well as equipment fault diagnosing. With an increasing interest from both the academic and industrial communities, this chapter systematically investigates recent advances in wireless communication technology for the smart grid.

  8. Grid generation for turbomachinery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, J.; Reddy, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a computer code to generate numerical grids for complex internal flow systems such as the fluid flow inside the space shuttle main engine is outlined. The blending technique for generating a grid for stator-rotor combination at a particular radial section is examined. The computer programs which generate these grids are listed in the Appendices. These codes are capable of generating grids at different cross sections and thus providng three dimensional stator-rotor grids for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine.

  9. Chebyshev-Fourier spectral methods in bipolar coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhu; Boyd, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar coordinates provide an efficient cartography for a variety of geometries: the exterior of two disks or cylinders, a half-plane containing a disk, an eccentric annulus with a small disk offset from the center of an outer boundary that is a large circle, and so on. A pseudospectral method that employs a tensor product basis of Fourier functions in the cyclic coordinate ? and Chebyshev polynomials in the quasi-radial coordinate ? gives easy-to-program spectral accuracy. We show, however, that as the inner disk becomes more and more offset from the center of the outer boundary circle, the grid is increasingly non-uniform, and the rate of exponential convergence increasingly slow. One-dimensional coordinate mappings significantly reduce the non-uniformity. In spite of this non-uniformity, the Chebyshev-Fourier method is quite effective in an idealized model of the wind-driven ocean circulation, resolving both internal and boundary layers. Bipolar coordinates are also a good starting point for solving problems in a domain which is not one of the "bipolar-compatible" domains listed above, but is a sufficiently small perturbation of such. This is illustrated by applying boundary collocation with bipolar harmonics to solve Laplace's equation in a perturbed eccentric annulus in which the disk-shaped island has been replaced by an island bounded by an ellipse. Similarly a perturbed bipolar domain can be mapped to an eccentric annulus by a smooth change of coordinates.

  10. Coordinating Autonomous Planning Agents

    E-print Network

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    the Collective Agent Based Systems (CABS) research group -- I won't need more than a month or two to write my in the planning of its tasks, we require that planning and coordination be separated. In the literature on multi-agent. Witteveen ir. H.J.A.M Geers ir. J.M. Valk #12;#12;Preface Sooner or later, but probably sooner, every

  11. Macrocyclic Weakly Coordinating Anions.

    PubMed

    Landskron, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Herein, the concept of macrocyclic weakly coordinating anions (M-WCAs) is introduced. Synthetic methodologies are described how to access M-WCAs by thermodynamically controlled self-assembly in high yields, in particular through condensation and alkyne metathesis reactions. The anticipated properties and applications of M-WCAs in solid state and in solution are discussed, specifically for gas storage and separation, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and as liquid and solid electrolytes. PMID:26272789

  12. Systems analysis of protection system coordination; A strategic problem for transmission and distribution reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, R.P. ); Kruse, V.J.; Rankin, G.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that protection system coordination is a strategic problem for utilities in that it affects most aspects of transmission and distribution and dramatically impacts transmission and distribution reliability. The ramifications of protection system coordination affect planning functions as well as system coordination affect planning functions as well as system operations, and the lack of coordination can have far reaching effects, even to the point of grid disturbance. For true transmission and distribution reliability, protection engineering must continue to serve an active, integrated, proactive role in all facets of the power system industry and must make use of every tool at its disposal. In this regard, computer technology has evolved such that the coordination process has been replicated, and the means for a system-wide, systematic, analytical solution to protection system coordination has been achieved.

  13. Hipparchus' coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis W.

    2002-07-01

    In his "Histoire de l'Astronomie Ancienne" Delambre concludes unequivocally that Hipparchus knew and used a definite system of celestial spherical coordinates, namely the right ascension and declination system that we use today. The basis of Delambre's conclusion was disarmingly simple: he pointed out that in the "Commentary to Aratus" Hipparchus actually quotes the positions of numerous stars directly in right ascension and declination (or more often its complement, polar distance). Nearly two centuries later, in his "A History of Ancient Mathematical Astronomy", Neugebauer not only completely ignores Delambre's conclusion on this issue, but goes further to propose his own, as we shall see quite fanciful, theory that begins "From the Commentary to Aratus, it is quite obvious that at Hipparchus' time a definite system of spherical coordinates for stellar positions did not yet exist." and concludes "...nowhere in Greek astronomy before the catalogue of stars in the Almagest is it attested that orthogonal spherical coordinates are used to determine stellar positions." Today it is clear that Neugebauer's theory is conventionally accepted. It is the purpose of this paper to offer fresh arguments that Delambre was correct.

  14. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  15. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  16. Data Management in the GridRPC GridRPC Data Management API

    E-print Network

    Caniou, Yves

    Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion GridRPC Data Management API Implementations, Le Mahec, Nakada GridRPC DM API: Implem. and Interop. Issues (1/13) #12;Data Management in the GridRPC Issues Conclusion Goal GridRPC DM types: Reminder 1 Data Management in the GridRPC Goal GridRPC DM types

  17. Grid generation in three dimensions by Poisson equations with control of cell size and skewness at boundary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.; Steger, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    An algorithm for generating computational grids about arbitrary three-dimensional bodies is developed. The elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) approach developed by Steger and Sorenson and used in the NASA computer program GRAPE is extended from two to three dimensions. Forcing functions which are found automatically by the algorithm give the user the ability to control mesh cell size and skewness at boundary surfaces. This algorithm, as is typical of PDE grid generators, gives smooth grid lines and spacing in the interior of the grid. The method is applied to a rectilinear wind-tunnel case and to two body shapes in spherical coordinates.

  18. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are discretized using the newly proposed flux scheme, AUSM+, which will be briefly described herein. Numerical tests on representative 2D inviscid flows are given for demonstration. Finally, extension to 3D is underway, only paced by the availability of the 3D unstructured grid generator.

  19. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011, and stimulating technical and commercial innovation. As more nations undertake space exploration activities established in The Global Exploration Strategy: the Framework for Coordination, released in May 2007, space

  20. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and posted for universal access at www.nreca.coop/smartgrid. This research is available for widespread distribution to both cooperative members and non-members. These reports are listed in Table 1.2. Interoperability: The deliverable in this area was the advancement of the MultiSpeak™ interoperability standard from version 4.0 to version 5.0, and improvement in the MultiSpeak™ documentation to include more than 100 use cases. This deliverable substantially expanded the scope and usability of MultiSpeak, ™ the most widely deployed utility interoperability standard, now in use by more than 900 utilities. MultiSpeak™ documentation can be accessed only at www.multispeak.org. Cyber Security: NRECA’s starting point was to develop cyber security tools that incorporated succinct guidance on best practices. The deliverables were: cyber security extensions to MultiSpeak,™ which allow more security message exchanges; a Guide to Developing a Cyber Security and Risk Mitigation Plan; a Cyber Security Risk Mitigation Checklist; a Cyber Security Plan Template that co-ops can use to create their own cyber security plans; and Security Questions for Smart Grid Vendors.

  1. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  2. Grid integrated distributed PV (GridPV).

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2013-08-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function in the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  3. TOUGH2 grid generator for simulations of geothermal heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Kyun; Bae, Gwang-Ok; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2015-04-01

    We present a method to generate an unstructured Voronoi grid for its use in TOUGH2 simulations of geothermal heat pump systems. A series of codes is developed to create Voronoi cell center points that are placed at specific positions for well- or pipe-shaped Voronoi grids, to generate a three-dimensional grid and TOUGH2 input files from generated Voronoi cell vertices, and to visualize the generated grid and simulation results by ParaView. AMESH program is used to calculate the x- and y-coordinates of the Voronoi cell vertices from the Voronoi cell center points. We show the desired form of grid from the developed series of codes and test with confidence the presented method through simulations of water production/injection from/to the various kinds of the geothermal wells.

  4. BERGMAN COORDINATES Steven R. Bell

    E-print Network

    BERGMAN COORDINATES Steven R. Bell Abstract. Various incarnations of Stefan Bergman's notion of represen- tative coordinates will be given that are useful in a variety of contexts. Bergman wanted his, however, that it is possible to define generalized Bergman coordinates that map multiply connected domains

  5. Grids, Clouds, and Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafaro, Massimo; Aloisio, Giovanni

    This chapter introduces and puts in context Grids, Clouds, and Virtualization. Grids promised to deliver computing power on demand. However, despite a decade of active research, no viable commercial grid computing provider has emerged. On the other hand, it is widely believed - especially in the Business World - that HPC will eventually become a commodity. Just as some commercial consumers of electricity have mission requirements that necessitate they generate their own power, some consumers of computational resources will continue to need to provision their own supercomputers. Clouds are a recent business-oriented development with the potential to render this eventually as rare as organizations that generate their own electricity today, even among institutions who currently consider themselves the unassailable elite of the HPC business. Finally, Virtualization is one of the key technologies enabling many different Clouds. We begin with a brief history in order to put them in context, and recall the basic principles and concepts underlying and clearly differentiating them. A thorough overview and survey of existing technologies provides the basis to delve into details as the reader progresses through the book.

  6. TRMM Gridded Text Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has many products that contain instantaneous or gridded rain rates often among many other parameters. However, these products because of their completeness can often seem intimidating to users just desiring surface rain rates. For example one of the gridded monthly products contains well over 200 parameters. It is clear that if only rain rates are desired, this many parameters might prove intimidating. In addition, for many good reasons these products are archived and currently distributed in HDF format. This also can be an inhibiting factor in using TRMM rain rates. To provide a simple format and isolate just the rain rates from the many other parameters, the TRMM product created a series of gridded products in ASCII text format. This paper describes the various text rain rate products produced. It provides detailed information about parameters and how they are calculated. It also gives detailed format information. These products are used in a number of applications with the TRMM processing system. The products are produced from the swath instantaneous rain rates and contain information from the three major TRMM instruments: radar, radiometer, and combined. They are simple to use, human readable, and small for downloading.

  7. Bio-Inspired Cyber Security for Smart Grid Deployments

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, Archibald D.; Thompson, Seth R.; Doroshchuk, Ruslan A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2013-05-01

    mart grid technologies are transforming the electric power grid into a grid with bi-directional flows of both power and information. Operating millions of new smart meters and smart appliances will significantly impact electric distribution systems resulting in greater efficiency. However, the scale of the grid and the new types of information transmitted will potentially introduce several security risks that cannot be addressed by traditional, centralized security techniques. We propose a new bio-inspired cyber security approach. Social insects, such as ants and bees, have developed complex-adaptive systems that emerge from the collective application of simple, light-weight behaviors. The Digital Ants framework is a bio-inspired framework that uses mobile light-weight agents. Sensors within the framework use digital pheromones to communicate with each other and to alert each other of possible cyber security issues. All communication and coordination is both localized and decentralized thereby allowing the framework to scale across the large numbers of devices that will exist in the smart grid. Furthermore, the sensors are light-weight and therefore suitable for implementation on devices with limited computational resources. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Digital Ants framework and then present results from test bed-based demonstrations that show that Digital Ants can identify a cyber attack scenario against smart meter deployments.

  8. Proposal of Smart Storage for Ubiquitous Power Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yutaka; Taniguchi, Haruhito; Nakajima, Tatsuhito; Liyanage, Kithsiri M.; Baba, Junpei; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    Penetrating large amount of renewable energy sources into power system, battery energy storage performs an important role for smoothing their natural intermittency, ensuring grid-wide frequency stability, and suppressing voltage rise caused by reverse power flow. The ubiquitous power grid concept has been proposed as a smart grid in Japanese context, where the total battery capacity can be optimized by coordinating renewable energy sources, controllable distributed generators, and controllable loads on demand side, for example, heat pump based water heater with heat storage, and plug-in hybrid vehicle or electric vehicle with onboard battery, and so on. In this paper, we propose an autonomous distributed vehicle-to-grid (V2G) control scheme. The proposed V2G control has droop characteristics against power system frequency measurement at 200/100V plug-in terminal, and battery state-of-charge (SOC) is balanced within designable range by restraining V2G gain according to estimated SOC. Of course, the convenience for vehicle user is considered by V1G charge, which is one-way charging control for plug-out. Self terminal frequency measurement algorithm, model based battery SOC estimation method, and the proposed autonomous distributed V2G control are implemented to automotive power electronics circuit and electric control unit. These concepts are summarized as Smart Storage in ubiquitous power grid applications.

  9. Evaluating the Information Power Grid using the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaartm Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) are a collection of synthetic distributed applications designed to rate the performance and functionality of computational grids. We compare several implementations of the NGB to determine programmability and efficiency of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), whose services are mostly based on the Globus Toolkit. We report on the overheads involved in porting existing NGB reference implementations to the IPG. No changes were made to the component tasks of the NGB can still be improved.

  10. Work Coordination Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  11. New Global Bathymetry and Topography Model Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.; Sandwell, D. T.; Marks, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    A new version of the "Smith and Sandwell" global marine topography model is available in two formats. A one-arc-minute Mercator projected grid covering latitudes to +/- 80.738 degrees is available in the "img" file format. Also available is a 30-arc-second version in latitude and longitude coordinates from pole to pole, supplied as tiles covering the same areas as the SRTM30 land topography data set. The new effort follows the Smith and Sandwell recipe, using publicly available and quality controlled single- and multi-beam echo soundings where possible and filling the gaps in the oceans with estimates derived from marine gravity anomalies observed by satellite altimetry. The altimeter data have been reprocessed to reduce the noise level and improve the spatial resolution [see Sandwell and Smith, this meeting]. The echo soundings database has grown enormously with new infusions of data from the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO), the National Geospatial-intelligence Agency (NGA), hydrographic offices around the world volunteering through the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), and many other agencies and academic sources worldwide. These new data contributions have filled many holes: 50% of ocean grid points are within 8 km of a sounding point, 75% are within 24 km, and 90% are within 57 km. However, in the remote ocean basins some gaps still remain: 5% of the ocean grid points are more than 85 km from the nearest sounding control, and 1% are more than 173 km away. Both versions of the grid include a companion grid of source file numbers, so that control points may be mapped and traced to sources. We have compared the new model to multi-beam data not used in the compilation and find that 50% of differences are less than 25 m, 95% of differences are less than 130 m, but a few large differences remain in areas of poor sounding control and large-amplitude gravity anomalies. Land values in the solution are taken from SRTM30v2, GTOPO30 and ICESAT data. GEBCO has agreed to adopt this model and begin updating it in 2009. Ongoing tasks include building an uncertainty model and including information from the latest IBCAO map of the Arctic Ocean.

  12. The Volume Grid Manipulator (VGM): A Grid Reusability Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a manual describing how to use the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) software. The code is specifically designed to alter or manipulate existing surface and volume structured grids to improve grid quality through the reduction of grid line skewness, removal of negative volumes, and adaption of surface and volume grids to flow field gradients. The software uses a command language to perform all manipulations thereby offering the capability of executing multiple manipulations on a single grid during an execution of the code. The command language can be input to the VGM code by a UNIX style redirected file, or interactively while the code is executing. The manual consists of 14 sections. The first is an introduction to grid manipulation; where it is most applicable and where the strengths of such software can be utilized. The next two sections describe the memory management and the manipulation command language. The following 8 sections describe simple and complex manipulations that can be used in conjunction with one another to smooth, adapt, and reuse existing grids for various computations. These are accompanied by a tutorial section that describes how to use the commands and manipulations to solve actual grid generation problems. The last two sections are a command reference guide and trouble shooting sections to aid in the use of the code as well as describe problems associated with generated scripts for manipulation control.

  13. Discrete variable representation in electronic structure theory: Quadrature grids for least-squares tensor hypercontraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Robert M.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Martínez, Todd J.; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the application of molecular quadratures obtained from either standard Becke-type grids or discrete variable representation (DVR) techniques to the recently developed least-squares tensor hypercontraction (LS-THC) representation of the electron repulsion integral (ERI) tensor. LS-THC uses least-squares fitting to renormalize a two-sided pseudospectral decomposition of the ERI, over a physical-space quadrature grid. While this procedure is technically applicable with any choice of grid, the best efficiency is obtained when the quadrature is tuned to accurately reproduce the overlap metric for quadratic products of the primary orbital basis. Properly selected Becke DFT grids can roughly attain this property. Additionally, we provide algorithms for adopting the DVR techniques of the dynamics community to produce two different classes of grids which approximately attain this property. The simplest algorithm is radial discrete variable representation (R-DVR), which diagonalizes the finite auxiliary-basis representation of the radial coordinate for each atom, and then combines Lebedev-Laikov spherical quadratures and Becke atomic partitioning to produce the full molecular quadrature grid. The other algorithm is full discrete variable representation (F-DVR), which uses approximate simultaneous diagonalization of the finite auxiliary-basis representation of the full position operator to produce non-direct-product quadrature grids. The qualitative features of all three grid classes are discussed, and then the relative efficiencies of these grids are compared in the context of LS-THC-DF-MP2. Coarse Becke grids are found to give essentially the same accuracy and efficiency as R-DVR grids; however, the latter are built from explicit knowledge of the basis set and may guide future development of atom-centered grids. F-DVR is found to provide reasonable accuracy with markedly fewer points than either Becke or R-DVR schemes.

  14. Discrete variable representation in electronic structure theory: quadrature grids for least-squares tensor hypercontraction.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Sherrill, C David

    2013-05-21

    We investigate the application of molecular quadratures obtained from either standard Becke-type grids or discrete variable representation (DVR) techniques to the recently developed least-squares tensor hypercontraction (LS-THC) representation of the electron repulsion integral (ERI) tensor. LS-THC uses least-squares fitting to renormalize a two-sided pseudospectral decomposition of the ERI, over a physical-space quadrature grid. While this procedure is technically applicable with any choice of grid, the best efficiency is obtained when the quadrature is tuned to accurately reproduce the overlap metric for quadratic products of the primary orbital basis. Properly selected Becke DFT grids can roughly attain this property. Additionally, we provide algorithms for adopting the DVR techniques of the dynamics community to produce two different classes of grids which approximately attain this property. The simplest algorithm is radial discrete variable representation (R-DVR), which diagonalizes the finite auxiliary-basis representation of the radial coordinate for each atom, and then combines Lebedev-Laikov spherical quadratures and Becke atomic partitioning to produce the full molecular quadrature grid. The other algorithm is full discrete variable representation (F-DVR), which uses approximate simultaneous diagonalization of the finite auxiliary-basis representation of the full position operator to produce non-direct-product quadrature grids. The qualitative features of all three grid classes are discussed, and then the relative efficiencies of these grids are compared in the context of LS-THC-DF-MP2. Coarse Becke grids are found to give essentially the same accuracy and efficiency as R-DVR grids; however, the latter are built from explicit knowledge of the basis set and may guide future development of atom-centered grids. F-DVR is found to provide reasonable accuracy with markedly fewer points than either Becke or R-DVR schemes. PMID:23697409

  15. Wind Power Integration via Aggregator-Consumer Coordination: A Game Theoretic Approach

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianwei

    Wind Power Integration via Aggregator-Consumer Coordination: A Game Theoretic Approach Chenye Wu@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract--Due to the stochastic nature of wind power, its large-scale integration into the power grid-side resources via pricing in order to tackle the intermittency and fluctuations in wind power generation

  16. Synchrony-optimized power grids

    E-print Network

    Pinto, Rafael S

    2014-01-01

    We investigate synchronization in power grids, which we assume to be modeled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with inertia. More specifically, we study the optimization of the power grid topology to favor the network synchronization. We introduce a rewiring algorithm which consists basically in a hill climb scheme where the edges of the network are swapped in order enhance the main measures of synchronization. As a byproduct of the optimization algorithm, we typically have also the anticipation of the synchronization onset for the optimized network. We perform several robustness tests for the synchrony-optimized power grids, including the impact of consumption peaks. In our analyses, we investigate synthetic random networks, which we consider as hypothetical decentralized power generation situations, and also a network based in the actual power grid of Spain, which corresponds to the current paradigm of centralized power grids. The synchrony-optimized power grids obtained by our algorithm have some intere...

  17. Hybrid code simulations of whistler mode chorus waves in one- and two-dimensinoal dipole coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Denton, R. E.; Liu, K.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    We simulate whistler mode chorus waves using a hybrid code with a dipole field in both one and two dimensions. Simulations in two dimensional Cartesian coordinates are also performed and compared with full particle simulations. There are four species in the simulations, hot ring current electrons initialized with a bi-Maxwellian distribution with Ahot=T&perp,hot/T||,hot-1>0, warm electrons, cold inertialess fluid electrons and parotons as an immobile background. The density of the hot population is a small fraction of the total plasma density. The warm electrons are used to make the dispersion relation of whistler waves in our model more accurate. Comparison between the dispersion relation of our model and other dispersion relations shows that our model is more accurate for lower frequency whistlers than for higher frequency whistlers. Simulations in 2-D Cartesian coordinates agree very well with a full particle code. In the one dimensional simulations along the dipole magnetic field, the predicted frequency and wave number are observed. Rising tones are observed in the 1/14 scale simulations that have larger than realistic inhomogeneity. However, in the full scale 1-D simulation in a dipole field, the waves are more broad-band and do not exhibit rising tones. In the 2-D simulations, the waves are generated with propagation approximately parallel to the background magnetic field. However, the wave fronts become oblique as they propagate to higher latitudes. Simulations with different plasma density profiles across L-shell are performed to study the effect of the background density on whistler propagation. With constant total density ne or total density that decreased moderately with respect to L, the waves refract toward larger L. With a steeper gradient of total density in L, the refraction is inward toward smeller L.

  18. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ``projection'' terms.

  19. Towards Grid-Wide Modeling and Simulation Y. Xie1, Y.M. Teo1,2, W. Cai3 and S.J. Turner3

    E-print Network

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    in the development process. The Grid provides a platform for coordinated resource sharing and application development on interoperability and composability of simulation components for both simulation development and execution. We also to achieve composability. Index Terms-- Modeling and simulation, Grid computing, interoperability

  20. A numerical study of hypersonic stagnation heat transfer predictions at a coordinate singularity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Francesco; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of grid induced errors associated with a coordinate singularity on heating predictions in the stagnation region of a three-dimensional body in hypersonic flow is examined. The test problem is for Mach 10 flow over an Aeroassist Flight Experiment configuration. This configuration is composed of an elliptic nose, a raked elliptic cone, and a circular shoulder. Irregularities in the heating predictions in the vicinity of the coordinate singularity, located at the axis of the elliptic nose near the stagnation point, are examined with respect to grid refinement and grid restructuring. The algorithm is derived using a finite-volume formulation. An upwind-biased total-variation diminishing scheme is employed for the inviscid flux contribution, and central differences are used for the viscous terms.

  1. 3DGRAPE - THREE DIMENSIONAL GRIDS ABOUT ANYTHING BY POISSON'S EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to treat arbitrary boundary shapes is one of the most desirable characteristics of a method for generating grids. 3DGRAPE is designed to make computational grids in or about almost any shape. These grids are generated by the solution of Poisson's differential equations in three dimensions. The program automatically finds its own values for inhomogeneous terms which give near-orthogonality and controlled grid cell height at boundaries. Grids generated by 3DGRAPE have been applied to both viscous and inviscid aerodynamic problems, and to problems in other fluid-dynamic areas. 3DGRAPE uses zones to solve the problem of warping one cube into the physical domain in real-world computational fluid dynamics problems. In a zonal approach, a physical domain is divided into regions, each of which maps into its own computational cube. It is believed that even the most complicated physical region can be divided into zones, and since it is possible to warp a cube into each zone, a grid generator which is oriented to zones and allows communication across zonal boundaries (where appropriate) solves the problem of topological complexity. 3DGRAPE expects to read in already-distributed x,y,z coordinates on the bodies of interest, coordinates which will remain fixed during the entire grid-generation process. The 3DGRAPE code makes no attempt to fit given body shapes and redistribute points thereon. Body-fitting is a formidable problem in itself. The user must either be working with some simple analytical body shape, upon which a simple analytical distribution can be easily effected, or must have available some sophisticated stand-alone body-fitting software. 3DGRAPE does not require the user to supply the block-to-block boundaries nor the shapes of the distribution of points. 3DGRAPE will typically supply those block-to-block boundaries simply as surfaces in the elliptic grid. Thus at block-to-block boundaries the following conditions are obtained: (1) grids lines will match up as they approach the block-to-block boundary from either side, (2) grid lines will cross the boundary with no slope discontinuity, (3) the spacing of points along the line piercing the boundary will be continuous, (4) the shape of the boundary will be consistent with the surrounding grid, and (5) the distribution of points on the boundary will be reasonable in view of the surrounding grid. 3DGRAPE offers a powerful building-block approach to complex 3-D grid generation, but is a low-level tool. Users may build each face of each block as they wish, from a wide variety of resources. 3DGRAPE uses point-successive-over-relaxation (point-SOR) to solve the Poisson equations. This method is slow, although it does vectorize nicely. Any number of sophisticated graphics programs may be used on the stored output file of 3DGRAPE though it lacks interactive graphics. Versatility was a prominent consideration in developing the code. The block structure allows a great latitude in the problems it can treat. As the acronym implies, this program should be able to handle just about any physical region into which a computational cube or cubes can be warped. 3DGRAPE was written in FORTRAN 77 and should be machine independent. It was originally developed on a Cray under COS and tested on a MicroVAX 3200 under VMS 5.1.

  2. Grid and Cloud for Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, Monique

    2014-05-01

    The European Grid e-infrastructure has shown the capacity to connect geographically distributed heterogeneous compute resources in a secure way taking advantages of a robust and fast REN (Research and Education Network). In many countries like in Africa the first step has been to implement a REN and regional organizations like Ubuntunet, WACREN or ASREN to coordinate the development, improvement of the network and its interconnection. The Internet connections are still exploding in those countries. The second step has been to fill up compute needs of the scientists. Even if many of them have their own multi-core or not laptops for more and more applications it is not enough because they have to face intensive computing due to the large amount of data to be processed and/or complex codes. So far one solution has been to go abroad in Europe or in America to run large applications or not to participate to international communities. The Grid is very attractive to connect geographically-distributed heterogeneous resources, aggregate new ones and create new sites on the REN with a secure access. All the users have the same servicers even if they have no resources in their institute. With faster and more robust internet they will be able to take advantage of the European Grid. There are different initiatives to provide resources and training like UNESCO/HP Brain Gain initiative, EUMEDGrid, ..Nowadays Cloud becomes very attractive and they start to be developed in some countries. In this talk challenges for those countries to implement such e-infrastructures, to develop in parallel scientific and technical research and education in the new technologies will be presented illustrated by examples.

  3. GRID3O: Computer program for fast generation of multilevel, three-dimensional boundary-conforming O-type computational grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    A fast algorithm was developed for accurately generating boundary-conforming, three-dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to arbitrary wing-body and axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using an analytic function to generate two-dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These grids are of the O-type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality, geometric periodicity, and an adequate resolution throughout the flow field. Because the built-in nonorthogonal coordinate stretching and shearing cause the grid lines leaving the blade or wing trailing edge to end at downstream infinity, the numerical treatment of the three-dimensional trailing vortex sheets is simplified.

  4. Adventures in Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sometimes one supercomputer is not enough. Or your local supercomputers are busy, or not configured for your job. Or you don't have any supercomputers. You might be trying to simulate worldwide weather changes in real time, requiring more compute power than you could get from any one machine. Or you might be collecting microbiological samples on an island, and need to examine them with a special microscope located on the other side of the continent. These are the times when you need a computational grid.

  5. Time-dependent thermocapillary convection in a Cartesian cavity - Numerical results for a moderate Prandtl number fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, L. J.; Biringen, S.

    1993-01-01

    The present numerical simulation explores a thermal-convective mechanism for oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a shallow Cartesian cavity for a Prandtl number 6.78 fluid. The computer program developed for this simulation integrates the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation by a time-accurate method on a stretched, staggered mesh. Flat free surfaces are assumed. The instability is shown to depend upon temporal coupling between large scale thermal structures within the flow field and the temperature sensitive free surface. A primary result of this study is the development of a stability diagram presenting the critical Marangoni number separating steady from the time-dependent flow states as a function of aspect ratio for the range of values between 2.3 and 3.8. Within this range, a minimum critical aspect ratio near 2.3 and a minimum critical Marangoni number near 20,000 are predicted below which steady convection is found.

  6. Is there a cartesian renaissance of the mind or is it time for a new taxonomy for low responsive states?

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sarà, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The mass media have recently pointed out the likelihood of diagnostic errors in post-coma patients. Late recoveries of consciousness, even after 20 years, might indicate hidden misdiagnoses that are not corrected over a long period of time. The rate of misdiagnoses of patients in a vegetative state is very high when based on behavioral assessment strategies alone. An extremely restrictive motor repertoire, as occurs in locked-in patients, seems to be the major factor responsible for diagnostic confusion. Functional neuroimaging techniques are regarded as promising tools in unearthing covert awareness in behaviorally unresponsive patients who are unable to produce any motor output. However, unless we believe that these patients persistently live in an unconvincing Cartesian-like state, in which thinking and acting are mutually dissociated, we have to admit that a new taxonomy for low responsive states is called for. This taxonomy should take into account the possible syndromic overlap between disorders of consciousness and locked-in syndrome. We should suspect a "locked-in state" in behaviorally unresponsive patients unless we reach strong evidence that such is not the case; this is the only way to avoid dramatic misdiagnoses. PMID:21488720

  7. ENGI 3424 Tutorial Examples for Complex Numbers Page 1 of 3 1. 1j = -. Find the square roots of j in Cartesian form z x j y= + .

    E-print Network

    George, Glyn

    ENGI 3424 Tutorial Examples for Complex Numbers Page 1 of 3 1. 1j = - . Find the square roots of j in Cartesian form z x j y= + . 2 2 0 1 0 1 1j j= + = + = and ( ) 1 0 1 arg lim tan 2 2x j n x + - = = + ( )/2 2 1 n j j e + = ( ) ( )1/2 1/2 /2 2 /2 /4 1 n j n j j e e + + = = The distinct values

  8. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee due to the Government partial shutdown... INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Program Coordinator; by phone...

  9. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-print Network

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged to the sharing of sensor resources in wireless sensor networks. There are several issues and challenges

  10. Grid Generation Techniques Utilizing the Volume Grid Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents grid generation techniques available in the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) code. The VGM code is designed to manipulate existing line, surface and volume grids to improve the quality of the data. It embodies an easy to read rich language of commands that enables such alterations as topology changes, grid adaption and smoothing. Additionally, the VGM code can be used to construct simplified straight lines, splines, and conic sections which are common curves used in the generation and manipulation of points, lines, surfaces and volumes (i.e., grid data). These simple geometric curves are essential in the construction of domain discretizations for computational fluid dynamic simulations. By comparison to previously established methods of generating these curves interactively, the VGM code provides control of slope continuity and grid point-to-point stretchings as well as quick changes in the controlling parameters. The VGM code offers the capability to couple the generation of these geometries with an extensive manipulation methodology in a scripting language. The scripting language allows parametric studies of a vehicle geometry to be efficiently performed to evaluate favorable trends in the design process. As examples of the powerful capabilities of the VGM code, a wake flow field domain will be appended to an existing X33 Venturestar volume grid; negative volumes resulting from grid expansions to enable flow field capture on a simple geometry, will be corrected; and geometrical changes to a vehicle component of the X33 Venturestar will be shown.

  11. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-print Network

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research.S. Department of Energy White Paper Team Ward Jewell, Janet Twomey and Michael Overcash Wichita State University, 2012 #12;Information about this white paper For information about this white paper contact: Ward Jewell

  12. HVEM Grid: Experiences in Constructing an Electron Microscopy Grid

    E-print Network

    Yeom, Heon Young

    HVEM Grid: Experiences in Constructing an Electron Microscopy Grid Hyuck Han1 , Hyungsoo Jung1 National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea {hhyuck, jhs, yeom}@dcslab.snu.ac.kr 2 Electron Microscopy Team-located instrument, a High Voltage Electron Microscopy (HVEM). Our architecture is designed to materialize all

  13. Propagation of experimental uncertainties from the tunnel to the body coordinate system in 3-D LDV flow field studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of experimental laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data uncertainties that propagate from measurements in the tunnel coordinate system to results in the model system are provided. Calculations of uncertainties as functions of the variables that comprise the final result requires assessment of the contribution each variable makes. Such an analysis enables and necessitates the experimentalists to identify and address the contributing error sources in the experimental measurement system. This provides an opportunity to improve the quality of data derived from experimental systems. This is especially important in experiments where small changes in test conditions are expected to produce small, detectable changes in results. In addition, the need for high-quality experimental data for CFD method validation demands a thorough assessment of experimental uncertainty. Transforming from one Cartesian coordinate system to another by three sequential rotations, equations were developed to transform the variables initially obtained in the original coordinates into variables in the final coordinate system. Based on the transformation equations, propagation equations for errors in the experimentally-derived flow quantities were derived for a model at angle of attack. Experimental uncertainties were then propagated from the tunnel coordinate system into the model system.

  14. Coordinate Reference System Metadata in Interdisciplinary Environmental Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, D. L.; Arctur, D. K.; Hnilo, J.; Danko, D. M.; Rutledge, G. K.

    2011-12-01

    For global climate modeling based on a unit sphere, the positional accuracy of transformations between "real earth" coordinates and the spherical earth coordinates is practically irrelevant due to the coarse grid and precision of global models. Consequently, many climate models are driven by data using real-earth coordinates without transforming them to the shape of the model grid. Additionally, metadata to describe the earth shape and its relationship to latitude longitude demarcations, or datum, used for model output is often left unspecified or ambiguous. Studies of weather and climate effects on coastal zones, water resources, agriculture, biodiversity, and other critical domains typically require positional accuracy on the order of several meters or less. This precision requires that a precise datum be used and accounted for in metadata. While it may be understood that climate model results using spherical earth coordinates could not possibly approach this level of accuracy, precise coordinate reference system metadata is nevertheless required by users and applications integrating climate and geographic information. For this reason, data publishers should provide guidance regarding the appropriate datum to assume for their data. Without some guidance, analysts must make assumptions they are uncomfortable or unwilling to make and may spend inordinate amounts of time researching the correct assumption to make. A consequence of the (practically justified for global climate modeling) disregard for datums is that datums are also neglected when publishing regional or local scale climate and weather data where datum information may be important. For example, observed data, like precipitation and temperature measurements, used in downscaling climate model results are georeferenced precisely. If coordinate reference system metadata are disregarded in cases like this, systematic biases in geolocation can result. Additionally, if no datum transformation was applied to input observational data, further coordinate transformations on data used by a down-workflow modeler can compound issues already in the data's geolocation. This illustrates a basic issue; coordinate reference system metadata is often disregarded on model-input data streams, or (if considered) preserved through processing to be reflected accurately in output. Whether justified for the particular application or not, accounting for datum metadata should be considered to be a requirement for all data to be shared for interdisciplinary science. This paper addresses these issues in two ways: first, to clearly demonstrate the importance of maintaining CRS with input data; and second, to show how the use of current widespread geospatial data standards and practices can be applied almost transparently to many researchers, by insertion of key standard practices as far back in the "food chain" as practical.

  15. International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities and Solutions

    E-print Network

    Aloul, Fadi

    International Journal of Smart Grid and Clean Energy Smart Grid Security: Threats, Vulnerabilities is currently evolving into the smart grid. Smart grid integrates the traditional electrical power grid, controlling and managing the demands of customers. A smart grid is a huge complex network composed of millions

  16. Network Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  17. Coordination using Implicit Communication

    E-print Network

    Cuff, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We explore a basic noise-free signaling scenario where coordination and communication are naturally merged. A random signal X_1,...,X_n is processed to produce a control signal or action sequence A_1,...,A_n, which is observed and further processed (without access to X_1,...,X_n) to produce a third sequence B_1,...,B_n. The object of interest is the set of empirical joint distributions p(x,a,b) that can be achieved in this setting. We show that H(A) >= I(X;A,B) is the necessary and sufficient condition for achieving p(x,a,b) when no causality constraints are enforced on the encoders. We also give results for various causality constraints. This setting sheds light on the embedding of digital information in analog signals, a concept that is exploited in digital watermarking, steganography, cooperative communication, and strategic play in team games such as bridge.

  18. NAS Grid Benchmarks: A Tool for Grid Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for benchmarking services provided by computational Grids. It is based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called NAS Grid Benchmark (NGB) in this paper. We present NGB as a data flow graph encapsulating an instance of an NPB code in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. These nodes may be mapped to the same or different Grid machines. Like NPB, NGB will specify several different classes (problem sizes). NGB also specifies the generic Grid services sufficient for running the bench-mark. The implementor has the freedom to choose any specific Grid environment. However, we describe a reference implementation in Java, and present some scenarios for using NGB.

  19. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    EnviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is a 4-years FP7 Project aiming to address the subjects of ecologically unsustainable development and inadequate resource management. The project develops a Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Black Sea Catchment region. The geospatial technologies offer very specialized functionality for Earth Science oriented applications as well as the Grid oriented technology that is able to support distributed and parallel processing. One challenge of the enviroGRIDS project is the interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures by providing the basic and the extended features of the both technologies. The geospatial interoperability technology has been promoted as a way of dealing with large volumes of geospatial data in distributed environments through the development of interoperable Web service specifications proposed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), with applications spread across multiple fields but especially in Earth observation research. Due to the huge volumes of data available in the geospatial domain and the additional introduced issues (data management, secure data transfer, data distribution and data computation), the need for an infrastructure capable to manage all those problems becomes an important aspect. The Grid promotes and facilitates the secure interoperations of geospatial heterogeneous distributed data within a distributed environment, the creation and management of large distributed computational jobs and assures a security level for communication and transfer of messages based on certificates. This presentation analysis and discusses the most significant use cases for enabling the OGC Web services interoperability with the Grid environment and focuses on the description and implementation of the most promising one. In these use cases we give a special attention to issues such as: the relations between computational grid and the OGC Web service protocols, the advantages offered by the Grid technology - such as providing a secure interoperability between the distributed geospatial resource -and the issues introduced by the integration of distributed geospatial data in a secure environment: data and service discovery, management, access and computation. enviroGRIDS project proposes a new architecture which allows a flexible and scalable approach for integrating the geospatial domain represented by the OGC Web services with the Grid domain represented by the gLite middleware. The parallelism offered by the Grid technology is discussed and explored at the data level, management level and computation level. The analysis is carried out for OGC Web service interoperability in general but specific details are emphasized for Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), Web Processing Service (WPS) and Catalog Service for Web (CSW). Issues regarding the mapping and the interoperability between the OGC and the Grid standards and protocols are analyzed as they are the base in solving the communication problems between the two environments: grid and geospatial. The presetation mainly highlights how the Grid environment and Grid applications capabilities can be extended and utilized in geospatial interoperability. Interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures provides features such as the specific geospatial complex functionality and the high power computation and security of the Grid, high spatial model resolution and geographical area covering, flexible combination and interoperability of the geographical models. According with the Service Oriented Architecture concepts and requirements of interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures each of the main functionality is visible from enviroGRIDS Portal and consequently, by the end user applications such as Decision Maker/Citizen oriented Applications. The enviroGRIDS portal is the single way of the user to get into the system and the portal faces a unique style of the graphical user in

  20. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  1. Grid-Enabled Measures

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.; Shaikh, Abdul R.; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-01-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment —a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute with two overarching goals: (1) Promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) Facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. This is done by creating an online venue connected to the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database, such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories— for data sharing). PMID:21521586

  2. Grids in Topographic Maps Reduce Distortions in the Recall of Learned Object Locations

    PubMed Central

    Edler, Dennis; Bestgen, Anne-Kathrin; Kuchinke, Lars; Dickmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    To date, it has been shown that cognitive map representations based on cartographic visualisations are systematically distorted. The grid is a traditional element of map graphics that has rarely been considered in research on perception-based spatial distortions. Grids do not only support the map reader in finding coordinates or locations of objects, they also provide a systematic structure for clustering visual map information (“spatial chunks”). The aim of this study was to examine whether different cartographic kinds of grids reduce spatial distortions and improve recall memory for object locations. Recall performance was measured as both the percentage of correctly recalled objects (hit rate) and the mean distance errors of correctly recalled objects (spatial accuracy). Different kinds of grids (continuous lines, dashed lines, crosses) were applied to topographic maps. These maps were also varied in their type of characteristic areas (LANDSCAPE) and different information layer compositions (DENSITY) to examine the effects of map complexity. The study involving 144 participants shows that all experimental cartographic factors (GRID, LANDSCAPE, DENSITY) improve recall performance and spatial accuracy of learned object locations. Overlaying a topographic map with a grid significantly reduces the mean distance errors of correctly recalled map objects. The paper includes a discussion of a square grid's usefulness concerning object location memory, independent of whether the grid is clearly visible (continuous or dashed lines) or only indicated by crosses. PMID:24869486

  3. Coordination of temporal plans in dynamic environments

    E-print Network

    Coordination of temporal plans in dynamic environments for mobile agents Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni planning Multi-Agent Planning & Coordination Framework 1 : multi-agent temporal planning and coordination based on Coordinated-SAPA Coordination during planning Coordination after planning P-CLAIM Framework 2

  4. Parametrization-independent elliptic surface grid generation

    E-print Network

    Rasmussen, Britt Bille

    2009-01-01

    The generation of computational grids on surfaces of three-dimensional configurations is an important component of many areas of computational research, both as a boundary grid for volume grid generation or to perform ...

  5. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipmentmore »investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.« less

  6. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    SciTech Connect

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipment investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.

  7. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  8. Smart Grid Status and Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Kirkham, Harold

    2014-07-01

    To convey progress made in achieving the vision of a smart grid, this report uses a set of six characteristics derived from the National Energy Technology Laboratory Modern Grid Strategy. It measures 21 metrics to provide insight into the grid’s capacity to embody these characteristics. This report looks across a spectrum of smart grid concerns to measure the status of smart grid deployment and impacts.

  9. Solutions to Three-Dimensional Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes Equations in Rotating Coordinates for Flow Through Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Amrit Raj

    1996-01-01

    The viscous, Navier-Stokes solver for turbomachinery applications, MSUTC has been modified to include the rotating frame formulation. The three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations have been cast in a rotating Cartesian frame enabling the freezing of grid motion. This also allows the flow-field associated with an isolated rotor to be viewed as a steady-state problem. Consequently, local time stepping can be used to accelerate convergence. The formulation is validated by running NASA's Rotor 67 as the test case. results are compared between the rotating frame code and the absolute frame code. The use of the rotating frame approach greatly enhances the performance of the code with respect to savings in computing time, without degradation of the solution.

  10. Internship Coordinators in Majors MAJOR Internship Coordinator Email Office Location

    E-print Network

    Courtier, Anna M.

    Internship Coordinators in Majors MAJOR Internship Coordinator Email Office Location internships for credit Dietetics Dr. Janet Gloeckner gloeckjw@jmu.edu HHS 3124 Earth Science L@jmu.edu Keezell Hall 407 Finance & Business Law Don't offer internships for credit Foreign

  11. Special Issue: Grid Applications and Programming Tools

    E-print Network

    Kielmann, Thilo

    the development, deployment, and implementation of grid technologies and ap- plications via the creation Distributed Generation of NASA Earth Science Data Products. In Constructing Grid Applications using Standard

  12. From the Grid to the Smart Grid, Topologically

    E-print Network

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The Smart Grid is not just about the digitalization of the Power Grid. In its more visionary acceptation, it is a model of energy management in which the users are engaged in producing energy as well as consuming it, while having information systems fully aware of the energy demand-response of the network and of dynamically varying prices. A natural question is then: to make the Smart Grid a reality will the Distribution Grid have to be updated? We assume a positive answer to the question and we consider the lower layers of Medium and Low Voltage to be the most affected by the change. In our previous work, we have analyzed samples of the Dutch Distribution Grid in our previous work and we have considered possible evolutions of these using synthetic topologies modeled after studies of complex systems in other technological domains in another previous work. In this paper, we take an extra important further step by defining a methodology for evolving any existing physical Power Grid to a good Smart Grid model th...

  13. The Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre; Wurthwein, Frank; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  14. The open science grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pordes, Ruth; OSG Consortium; Petravick, Don; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Avery, Paul; Blackburn, Kent; Wenaus, Torre; Würthwein, Frank; Foster, Ian; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; Blatecky, Alan; McGee, John; Quick, Rob

    2007-07-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support it's use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  15. Ulysses: UVCS Coordinated Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Corti, G.; Simnett, G.; Noci, G.; Romoli, M.; Kohl, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from coordinated observations in which instruments on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Ulysses were used to measure the density and flow speed of plasma at the Sun and to again measure the same properties of essentially the same plasma in the solar wind. Plasma was sampled by Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) at 3.5 and 4.5 solar radii and by Ulysses/SWOOPS at 5 AU. Data were acquired during a nearly 2 week period in May-June 1997 at a latitude of 9-10 degrees north of the equator, on the east limb and, hence, in the streamer belt and the source location of slow wind. Density and outflow speed are compared, in order to check for preservation of the near Sun characteristics in the interplanetary medium. By chance, Ulysses was at the very northern edge of the visible streamer belt. Nevertheless, no evidence of fast wind, or mixing with fast wind coming from the northern polar coronal hole, was evident at Ulysses. The morphology of the streamer belt was similar at the beginning and end of the observation period, but was markedly different during the middle of the period. A corresponding change in density (but not flow speed) was noted at Ulysses.

  16. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Baranovski, A.; Diesburg, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kurca, T.; Mhashilkar, P.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project.

  17. Coordinated Transportation: Problems and Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the legal, administrative, and logistical barriers that have prevented the wide acceptance of coordinating community and school transportation services and why these barriers may be breaking down. Two examples of successful implementation of coordinated transportation are examined: employing a single system to serve all transportation…

  18. Fuzzy coordinator in control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.; Pedrycz, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a hierarchical control structure using a fuzzy system for coordination of the control actions is studied. The architecture involves two levels of control: a coordination level and an execution level. Numerical experiments will be utilized to illustrate the behavior of the controller when it is applied to a nonlinear plant.

  19. 75 FR 55947 - Coordinated Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated Communications, 75 FR 6590 (Feb. 10, 2010). The SNPRM invited comments..., 68 FR at 427. The first content standard was satisfied if the communication was an electioneering... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated ] Communications, 70 FR 73946 (Dec. 14, 2005) (``2005 NPRM'')....

  20. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  1. GridOPTICS Software System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allowmore »power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: ? A platform to support future EMS development. ? A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. ? A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. ? Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. ? An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.« less

  2. GridOPTICS Software System

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allow power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: ? A platform to support future EMS development. ? A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. ? A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. ? Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. ? An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.

  3. A Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Foster, I.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit. The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to communicate also with the C Globus reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise, and peer-to peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop server side Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Globus jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  4. POWER GRID DYNAMICS: ENHANCING POWER SYSTEM OPERATION THROUGH PRONY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, C.; Huang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Prony Analysis is a technique used to decompose a signal into a series consisting of weighted complex exponentials and promises to be an effi cient way of recognizing sensitive lines during faults in power systems such as the U.S. Power grid. Positive Sequence Load Flow (PSLF) was used to simulate the performance of a simple two-area-four-generator system and the reaction of the system during a line fault. The Dynamic System Identifi cation (DSI) Toolbox was used to perform Prony analysis and use modal information to identify key transmission lines for power fl ow adjustment to improve system damping. The success of the application of Prony analysis methods to the data obtained from PSLF is reported, and the key transmission line for adjustment is identifi ed. Future work will focus on larger systems and improving the current algorithms to deal with networks such as large portions of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) power grid.

  5. Three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations solutions on dynamic grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belk, D. M.; Janus, J. M.; Whitfield, D. L.

    1985-07-01

    A method is presented for solving the three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations on dynamic grids based on flux vector splitting. The equations are cast in curvilinear coordinates and a finite volume discretization is used for handling arbitrary geometries. The discretized equations are solved using an explicit upwind second-order predictor corrector scheme that is stable for a CFL of 2. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and used for unsteady impermeable surfaces and for the far-field boundary. Dynamic-grid results are presented for an oscillating air-foil and for a store separating from a reflection plate. For the cases considered of stores separating from a reflection plate, the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the store are significantly different from forces obtained by steady-state aerodynamics with the body inclination angle changed to account for plunge velocity.

  6. Three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations solutions on dynamic grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belk, D. M.; Janus, J. M.; Whitfield, D. L.

    1986-04-01

    A method is presented for solving the three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations on dynamic grids based on flux vector splitting. The equations are cast in curvilinear coordinates and a finite volume discretization is used for handling arbitrary geometries. The discretized equations are solved using an explicit upwind second-order predictor corrector scheme that is stable for a CFL of 2. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and used for unsteady impermeable surfaces and for the far-field boundary. Dynamic-grid results are presented for an oscillating airfoil and for a store separating from a reflection plate. For the cases considered of stores separating from a reflection plate, the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the store are significantly different from forces obtained by steady-state aerodynamics with the body inclination angle changed to account for plunge velocity.

  7. Three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations solutions on dynamic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belk, D. M.; Janus, J. M.; Whitfield, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for solving the three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations on dynamic grids based on flux vector splitting. The equations are cast in curvilinear coordinates and a finite volume discretization is used for handling arbitrary geometries. The discretized equations are solved using an explicit upwind second-order predictor corrector scheme that is stable for a CFL of 2. Characteristic variable boundary conditions are developed and used for unsteady impermeable surfaces and for the far-field boundary. Dynamic-grid results are presented for an oscillating air-foil and for a store separating from a reflection plate. For the cases considered of stores separating from a reflection plate, the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the store are significantly different from forces obtained by steady-state aerodynamics with the body inclination angle changed to account for plunge velocity.

  8. Elliptic Grid Generation of Spiral-Bevel Pinion Gear Typical of OH-58 Helicopter Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.; Huff, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the source term treatment in the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations for an interior grid generation problem in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The geometry considered is that of a planar cross-section of a generic spiral-bevel gear tooth typical of a pinion in the OH-58 helicopter transmission. The source terms used are appropriate for an interior grid domain where all the boundaries are prescribed via a combination of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. New constraints based on the Green's Theorem are derived which uniquely determine the coefficients in the source terms. These constraints are designed for boundary clustered grids where gradients in physical quantities need to be resolved adequately. However, it is seen that the present formulation works satisfactorily for mild clustering also. Thus, a fully automated elliptic grid generation technique is made possible where there is no need for a parametric study of these parameters since the new relations fix these free parameters uniquely.

  9. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Grid Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kropski, Ben; Pratt, Rob

    2014-03-28

    This paper outlines the nature of the power grid, lists challenges and barriers to the implementation of a transactive energy ecosystem, and provides concept solutions to current technological impediments.

  10. Running medical image analysis on GridFactory desktop grid.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; Rosendahl, Peter; Müller, Henning; Waananen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    At the Geneva University Hospitals work is in progress to establish a computing facility for medical image analysis, potentially using several hundreds of desktop computers. Typically, hospitals do not have a computer infrastructure dedicated to research, nor can the data leave the hospital network for the reasons of privacy. For this purpose, a novel batch system called GridFactory has been tested along-side with the well-known batch system Condor. GridFactory's main benefits, compared to other batch systems, lie in its virtualization support and firewall friendliness. The tests involved running visual feature extraction from 50,000 anonymized medical images on a small local grid of 20 desktop computers. A comparisons with a Condor based batch system in the same computers is then presented. The performance of GridFactory is found satisfactory. PMID:19593040

  11. Grid flexibility and patching techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, T. G.; Smith, L. W.; Yung, C. N.; Barthelson, S. H.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The numerical determination of combustor flowfields is of great value to the combustor designer. An a priori knowledge of the flow behavior can speed the combustor design process and reduce the number of experimental test rigs required to arrive at an optimal design. Even 2-D steady incompressible isothermal flow predictions are of use; many codes of this kind are available, each employing different techniques to surmount the difficulties arising from the nonlinearity of the governing equations and from typically irregular combustor geometries. Mapping techniques (algebraic and elliptic PDE), and adaptive grid methods (both multi-grid and grid embedding) as applied to axisymmetric combustors are discussed.

  12. Global Ocean Prediction with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P. J.; Metzger, E. J.; Smedstad, O. M.; Hurlburt, H. E.; Cummings, J. A.; Wallcraft, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    The next generation global ocean prediction system is currently undergoing testing in an operational environment at the Naval Oceanographic Office. The circulation model within the system is based on the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) with 1/12 equatorial (~7 km mid-latitude) resolution and 32 layers. HYCOM is a generalized (hybrid isopycnal/s/z) coordinate ocean model. It is isopycnal in the stratified ocean, but reverts to a terrain-following (s) coordinate in shallow depths, and to pressure (~z-level) coordinates in the surface mixed layer. The vertical coordinate is dynamic in space and time via the layered continuity equation, which allows a dynamical transition between the coordinate types. The atmospheric forcing was from the Fleet Numerical Oceanography and Meteorology Center (FNMOC) Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) (on the 0.5° computational grid). The data assimilation methodology is based on multi-variate optimum interpolation (MVOI) within the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) system. Several observational data types can be assimilated, but those routinely assimilated include sea surface height (SSH) from satellite altimeters, sea surface temperature (SST) and temperature (T)/salinity (S) profiles. In this presentation the details of the system are presented, as well as verification results from forecast fields. Specifically, verification of 30-day forecasts of SSH are performed by comparing to unassimilated tide-gauge data using 20 forecast periods initialized during 2004 and 2005 when data from three nadir-beam altimeters were assimilated by the hindcasts. Verifications are performed using operational atmospheric forcing that gradually reverts toward climatology after 5 days as well as analysis-quality atmospheric forcing for the duration. Correlations between the forecasts and observations are examined relative to both open ocean and coastal tide gauge stations.

  13. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  14. Keep meaning in conversational coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cuffari, Elena C.

    2014-01-01

    Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making). These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination. PMID:25520693

  15. GENIUS: a web portal for the grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronico, A.; Barbera, R.; Falzone, A.; Lo Re, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Rodolico, A.

    2003-04-01

    The architecture and the current implementation of the grid portal GENIUS (Grid Enabled web environment for site Independent User job Submission), jointly developed by INFN and NICE within the context of the INFN Grid and DataGrid Project, is presented and discussed.

  16. Grid-Optimization Program for Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. E.; Lee, T. S.

    1986-01-01

    CELLOPT program developed to assist in designing grid pattern of current-conducting material on photovoltaic cell. Analyzes parasitic resistance losses and shadow loss associated with metallized grid pattern on both round and rectangular solar cells. Though performs sensitivity studies, used primarily to optimize grid design in terms of bus bar and grid lines by minimizing power loss. CELLOPT written in APL.

  17. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Brian; Burman, Kari; Davidson, Carolyn; Elchinger, Michael; Hardison, R.; Karsiwulan, D.; Castermans, B.

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  18. Application of advanced grid generation techniques for flow field computations about complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flowfields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct a boundary-fitted coordinate system. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach; its applications are investigated. The method conservative providing conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-stage Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed. The solutions include: low speed flow over a sphere, high speed flow over a slender body, supersonic flow through a duct, and supersonic internal/external flow interaction for an aircraft configuration at various angles of attack. The results demonstrate that the multiple grids approach along with the conservative interfacing is capable of computing the flows about the complex configurations where the use of a single grid system is not possible.

  19. Coordination games, anti-coordination games, and imitative learning.

    PubMed

    McCain, Roger A; Hamilton, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Bentley et al.'s scheme generates distributions characteristic of situations of high and low social influence on decisions and of high and low salience ("transparency") of rewards. Another element of decisions that may influence the placement of a decision process in their map is the way in which individual decisions interact to determine the payoffs. This commentary discusses the role of Nash equilibria in game theory, focusing especially on coordination and anti-coordination games. PMID:24572231

  20. Grid Pricing of Fed Cattle 

    E-print Network

    Schroeder, Ted C.; Hogan, Robert J.; Anderson, David P.

    2009-03-02

    There are several value-based fed cattle pricing systems, including formula pricing, price grids and alliances. This publication describes the different cattle pricing methods and helps you decide which is best for you....

  1. Quasiconformal mappings and grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Thompson, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    A finite difference scheme is developed for constructing quasiconformal mappings for arbitrary simply and doubly connected regions. Computational grids are generated to reduce elliptic equations to canonical form. Examples of conformal mappings on surfaces are also included.

  2. Introduction to FireGrid 

    E-print Network

    Welch, Stephen; Usmani, Asif; Upadhyay, Rochan; Berry, Dave; Potter, Stephen; Torero, Jose L

    2007-11-14

    FireGrid is an ambitious and innovative project, seeking to develop the technology to support a new way of managing emergency response in the modern built environment. Specific novel aspects include the integration of ...

  3. Comparing FutureGrid, Amazon EC2, and Open Science Grid for Scientific Workflows

    E-print Network

    Deelman, Ewa

    1 Comparing FutureGrid, Amazon EC2, and Open Science Grid for Scientific Workflows Gideon Juve1 cloud testbed, the Amazon EC2 commercial cloud, and the Open Science Grid. We compare and contrast Computing, Cloud Computing, Scientific Workflows, Amazon EC2, Open Science Grid, FutureGrid, Astronomy 1

  4. Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges Toward a Stronger and Smarter Grid S. Massoud Amin, D electrical energy infrastructure ­ Transforming the Network into a Smart Grid ­ Developing an Expanded be reproduced in any form without prior authorization. Enabling a Stronger and Smarter Grid ·Smart Grid

  5. How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems

    E-print Network

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    How Dynamic is the Grid? Towards a Quality Metric for Grid Information Systems Laurence Field CERN rizos@cs.man.ac.uk Abstract--Grid information systems play a core role in today's production Grid. Quality metrics for Grid information systems are required in order to compare different implementations

  6. Cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control in a smart grid environment

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Aditya; Hahn, Adam; Govindarasu, Manimaran

    2013-01-01

    Smart grid initiatives will produce a grid that is increasingly dependent on its cyber infrastructure in order to support the numerous power applications necessary to provide improved grid monitoring and control capabilities. However, recent findings documented in government reports and other literature, indicate the growing threat of cyber-based attacks in numbers and sophistication targeting the nation’s electric grid and other critical infrastructures. Specifically, this paper discusses cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control (WAMPAC) from a coordinated cyber attack perspective and introduces a game-theoretic approach to address the issue. Finally, the paper briefly describes how cyber-physical testbeds can be used to evaluate the security research and perform realistic attack-defense studies for smart grid type environments. PMID:25685516

  7. Cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control in a smart grid environment.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Aditya; Hahn, Adam; Govindarasu, Manimaran

    2014-07-01

    Smart grid initiatives will produce a grid that is increasingly dependent on its cyber infrastructure in order to support the numerous power applications necessary to provide improved grid monitoring and control capabilities. However, recent findings documented in government reports and other literature, indicate the growing threat of cyber-based attacks in numbers and sophistication targeting the nation's electric grid and other critical infrastructures. Specifically, this paper discusses cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control (WAMPAC) from a coordinated cyber attack perspective and introduces a game-theoretic approach to address the issue. Finally, the paper briefly describes how cyber-physical testbeds can be used to evaluate the security research and perform realistic attack-defense studies for smart grid type environments. PMID:25685516

  8. National transmission grid study

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Spencer

    2003-05-31

    The National Energy Policy Plan directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study to examine the benefits of establishing a national electricity transmission grid and to identify transmission bottlenecks and measures to address them. DOE began by conducting an independent analysis of U.S. electricity markets and identifying transmission system bottlenecks using DOE’s Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS). DOE’s analysis, presented in Section 2, confirms the central role of the nation’s transmission system in lowering costs to consumers through increased trade. More importantly, DOE’s analysis also confirms the results of previous studies, which show that transmission bottlenecks and related transmission system market practices are adding hundreds of millions of dollars to consumers’ electricity bills each year. A more detailed technical overview of the use of POEMS is provided in Appendix A. DOE led an extensive, open, public input process and heard a wide range of comments and recommendations that have all been considered.1 More than 150 participants registered for three public workshops held in Detroit, MI (September 24, 2001); Atlanta, GA (September 26, 2001); and Phoenix, AZ (September 28, 2001).

  9. Ion beamlet vectoring by grid translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homa, J. M.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beamlet vectoring is investigated by collecting deflection and divergence angle data for two-grid systems as a function of the relative displacement of these grids. Results show that at large displacements, accelerator grid impingement becomes a limiting factor and this determines the useful range of beamlet deflection. Beamlet deflection was shown to vary linearly with grid offset angle over this range. Values of deflection-to-offset angle ratio and useful range of deflection are presented as functions of grid-hole geometries, perveance levels, and accelerating voltages. It is found that the divergence of the beamlets is unaffected by deflection over the useful range of beamlet deflection. The grids of a typical dished-grid ion thruster are examined to determine where over the grid surface the grid offsets exceed the useful range, which indicates the regions on the surface where high accelerator grid impingment is probably occurring.

  10. Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement

    E-print Network

    Ling, Amy Poh Ai

    2011-01-01

    It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

  11. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-05-29

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  12. Reinventing Batteries for Grid Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    The City University of New York's Energy Institute, with the help of ARPA-E funding, is creating safe, low cost, rechargeable, long lifecycle batteries that could be used as modular distributed storage for the electrical grid. The batteries could be used at the building level or the utility level to offer benefits such as capture of renewable energy, peak shaving and microgridding, for a safer, cheaper, and more secure electrical grid.

  13. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  14. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-04-09

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  15. Squaring the Cartesian Circle

    E-print Network

    Huenemann, Charles

    senses often deceive him about small or distant things. But he finds that he could also doubt his sensory evidence of big or close things, were he to assume that he was similar to insane people, who "say they are dressed in purple when they are naked... understandably believed by him/* Thus Descartes cannot take seriously the doubt that he is insane, lest his whole endeavor become incoherent. So instead of supposing insanity on his part, Descartes supposes that, for all he knows, he may be dreaming while...

  16. Towards Smart Grid Dynamic Ratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Jamal; Clark, Adrian; Kilimnik, Justin; Pavlovski, Chris; Redman, David; Vu, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The energy distribution industry is giving greater attention to smart grid solutions as a means for increasing the capabilities, efficiency and reliability of the electrical power network. The smart grid makes use of intelligent monitoring and control devices throughout the distribution network to report on electrical properties such as voltage, current and power, as well as raising network alarms and events. A further aspect of the smart grid embodies the dynamic rating of electrical assets of the network. This fundamentally involves a rating of the load current capacity of electrical assets including feeders, transformers and switches. The mainstream approach to rate assets is to apply the vendor plate rating, which often under utilizes assets, or in some cases over utilizes when environmental conditions reduce the effective rated capacity, potentially reducing lifetime. Using active intelligence we have developed a rating system that rates assets in real time based upon several events. This allows for a far more efficient and reliable electrical grid that is able to extend further the life and reliability of the electrical network. In this paper we describe our architecture, the observations made during development and live deployment of the solution into operation. We also illustrate how this solution blends with the smart grid by proposing a dynamic rating system for the smart grid.

  17. AstroGrid-D: Grid technology for astronomical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enke, Harry; Steinmetz, Matthias; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Beck-Ratzka, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Brüsemeister, Thomas; Carlson, Arthur; Ensslin, Torsten; Högqvist, Mikael; Nickelt, Iliya; Radke, Thomas; Reinefeld, Alexander; Reiser, Angelika; Scholl, Tobias; Spurzem, Rainer; Steinacker, Jürgen; Voges, Wolfgang; Wambsganß, Joachim; White, Steve

    2011-02-01

    We present status and results of AstroGrid-D, a joint effort of astrophysicists and computer scientists to employ grid technology for scientific applications. AstroGrid-D provides access to a network of distributed machines with a set of commands as well as software interfaces. It allows simple use of computer and storage facilities and to schedule or monitor compute tasks and data management. It is based on the Globus Toolkit middleware (GT4). Chapter 1 describes the context which led to the demand for advanced software solutions in Astrophysics, and we state the goals of the project. We then present characteristic astrophysical applications that have been implemented on AstroGrid-D in chapter 2. We describe simulations of different complexity, compute-intensive calculations running on multiple sites (Section 2.1), and advanced applications for specific scientific purposes (Section 2.2), such as a connection to robotic telescopes (Section 2.2.3). We can show from these examples how grid execution improves e.g. the scientific workflow. Chapter 3 explains the software tools and services that we adapted or newly developed. Section 3.1 is focused on the administrative aspects of the infrastructure, to manage users and monitor activity. Section 3.2 characterises the central components of our architecture: The AstroGrid-D information service to collect and store metadata, a file management system, the data management system, and a job manager for automatic submission of compute tasks. We summarise the successfully established infrastructure in chapter 4, concluding with our future plans to establish AstroGrid-D as a platform of modern e-Astronomy.

  18. Grid-based lattice summation of electrostatic potentials by assembled rank-structured tensor approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Venera; Khoromskij, Boris N.

    2014-12-01

    Our recent method for low-rank tensor representation of sums of the arbitrarily positioned electrostatic potentials discretized on a 3D Cartesian grid reduces the 3D tensor summation to operations involving only 1D vectors however retaining the linear complexity scaling in the number of potentials. Here, we introduce and study a novel tensor approach for fast and accurate assembled summation of a large number of lattice-allocated potentials represented on 3D N×N×N grid with the computational requirements only weakly dependent on the number of summed potentials. It is based on the assembled low-rank canonical tensor representations of the collected potentials using pointwise sums of shifted canonical vectors representing the single generating function, say the Newton kernel. For a sum of electrostatic potentials over L×L×L lattice embedded in a box the required storage scales linearly in the 1D grid-size, O(N), while the numerical cost is estimated by O(NL). For periodic boundary conditions, the storage demand remains proportional to the 1D grid-size of a unit cell, n=N/L, while the numerical cost reduces to O(N), that outperforms the FFT-based Ewald-type summation algorithms of complexity O(N3logN). The complexity in the grid parameter N can be reduced even to the logarithmic scale O(logN) by using data-sparse representation of canonical N-vectors via the quantics tensor approximation. For justification, we prove an upper bound on the quantics ranks for the canonical vectors in the overall lattice sum. The presented approach is beneficial in applications which require further functional calculus with the lattice potential, say, scalar product with a function, integration or differentiation, which can be performed easily in tensor arithmetics on large 3D grids with 1D cost. Numerical tests illustrate the performance of the tensor summation method and confirm the estimated bounds on the tensor ranks.

  19. QUIP Coordinator Internship Program (QUIP)

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    QUIP Coordinator Internship Program (QUIP) Phone: 613-533-6000 Ext. 77324 Fax: 613-533-2535 Email______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Queen's Undergraduate Internship Program (QUIP) #12;JUDGEMENT Unusual ability to develop alternatives

  20. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.