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Sample records for cascade reading model

  1. Nonword Reading: Comparing Dual-Route Cascaded and Connectionist Dual-Process Models with Human Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Stephen C.; Coltheart, Max; Palethorpe, Sallyanne; Castles, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Two prominent dual-route computational models of reading aloud are the dual-route cascaded (DRC) model, and the connectionist dual-process plus (CDP+) model. While sharing similarly designed lexical routes, the two models differ greatly in their respective nonlexical route architecture, such that they often differ on nonword pronunciation. Neither…

  2. Nonword reading: comparing dual-route cascaded and connectionist dual-process models with human data.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Stephen C; Coltheart, Max; Palethorpe, Sallyanne; Castles, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Two prominent dual-route computational models of reading aloud are the dual-route cascaded (DRC) model, and the connectionist dual-process plus (CDP+) model. While sharing similarly designed lexical routes, the two models differ greatly in their respective nonlexical route architecture, such that they often differ on nonword pronunciation. Neither model has been appropriately tested for nonword reading pronunciation accuracy to date. We argue that empirical data on the nonword reading pronunciation of people is the ideal benchmark for testing. Data were gathered from 45 Australian-English-speaking psychology undergraduates reading aloud 412 nonwords. To provide contrast between the models, the nonwords were chosen specifically because DRC and CDP+ disagree on their pronunciation. Both models failed to accurately match the experiment data, and both have deficiencies in nonword reading performance. However, the CDP+ model performed significantly worse than the DRC model. CDP++, the recent successor to CDP+, had improved performance over CDP+, but was also significantly worse than DRC. In addition to highlighting performance shortcomings in each model, the variety of nonword responses given by participants points to a need for models that can account for this variety. PMID:22309087

  3. Methods of Testing and Diagnosing Model Error: Dual and Single Route Cascaded Models of Reading Aloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Brown, Gordon D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Models of visual word recognition have been assessed by both factorial and regression approaches. Factorial approaches tend to provide a relatively weak test of models, and regression approaches give little indication of the sources of models' mispredictions, especially when parameters are not optimal. A new alternative method, involving…

  4. A Dual-Route Cascaded Model of Reading by Deaf Adults: Evidence for Grapheme to Viseme Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eeva A.; Braun, Mario; Kuhlmann, Michael; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether deaf individuals access phonology when reading, and if so, what impact the ability to access phonology might have on reading achievement. However, the debate so far has been theoretically unspecific on two accounts: (a) the phonological units deaf individuals may have of oral language have not been specified and…

  5. Developmental Dyslexia and the Dual Route Model of Reading: Simulating Individual Differences and Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Johannes C.; Castel, Caroline; Pech-Georgel, Catherine; George, Florence; Alario, F-Xavier; Perry, Conrad

    2008-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia was investigated within a well-understood and fully specified computational model of reading aloud: the dual route cascaded model (DRC [Coltheart, M., Rastle, K., Perry, C., Langdon, R., & Ziegler, J.C. (2001). DRC: A dual route cascaded model of visual word recognition and reading aloud. Psychological Review, 108,…

  6. Modeling and analysis of cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F. D.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of the present status of the development of cascade solar cells. It is known that photovoltaic efficiencies can be improved through this development. The designs and calculations of the multijunction cells, however, are quite complicated. The main goal is to find a method which is a compromise between accuracy and simplicity for modeling a cascade solar cell. Three approaches are presently under way, among them (1) equivalent circuit approach, (2) numerical approach, and (3) analytical approach. Here, the first and the second approaches are discussed. The equivalent circuit approach using SPICE (Simulation Program, Integrated Circuit Emphasis) to the cascade cells and the cascade-cell array is highlighted. The methods of extracting parameters for modeling are discussed.

  7. Modeling and simulation of cascading contingencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation proposes a new approach to model and study cascading contingencies in large power systems. The most important contribution of the work involves the development and validation of a heuristic analytic model to assess the likelihood of cascading contingencies, and the development and validation of a uniform search strategy. We model the probability of cascading contingencies as a function of power flow and power flow changes. Utilizing logistic regression, the proposed model is calibrated using real industry data. This dissertation analyzes random search strategies for Monte Carlo simulations and proposes a new uniform search strategy based on the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm. The proposed search strategy is capable of selecting the most significant cascading contingencies, and it is capable of constructing an unbiased estimator to provide a measure of system security. This dissertation makes it possible to reasonably quantify system security and justify security operations when economic concerns conflict with reliability concerns in the new competitive power market environment. It can also provide guidance to system operators about actions that may be taken to reduce the risk of major system blackouts. Various applications can be developed to take advantage of the quantitative security measures provided in this dissertation.

  8. The Attention Cascade Model and Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shui-I

    2008-01-01

    An attention cascade model is proposed to account for attentional blinks in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of stimuli. Data were collected using single characters in a single RSVP stream at 10 Hz [Shih, S., & Reeves, A. (2007). "Attentional capture in rapid serial visual presentation." "Spatial Vision", 20(4), 301-315], and single words,…

  9. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  10. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jirauschek, Christian; Kubis, Tillmann

    2014-03-15

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  11. Degravitation features in the cascading gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyassari, Parvin; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2013-07-01

    We obtain the effective gravitational equations on the codimension-2 and codimension-1 branes in the cascading gravity model. We then apply our formulation to the cosmological case and obtain the effective Friedmann equations on the codimension-2 brane, which are generically given in terms of integro-differential equations. Adopting an approximation for which the thickness of the codimension-2 brane is much smaller than the Hubble horizon, we study the Minkowski and de Sitter codimension-2 brane solutions. Studying the cosmological solutions shows that the cascading model exhibits the features necessary for degravitation of the cosmological constant. We also show that only the branch which does not have the smooth limit to the self-accelerating branch in the five-dimensional model in the absence of the bulk gravity can satisfy the null energy condition as the criterion of the stability. Note that our solutions are obtained in a different setup from that of the original cascading gravity model in the sense that the codimension-1 brane contains matter fields other than the pure tension.

  12. Computational Modeling of Reading in Semantic Dementia: Comment on Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coltheart, Max; Tree, Jeremy J.; Saunders, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson (see record 2007-05396-004) reported detailed data on reading in 51 cases of semantic dementia. They simulated some aspects of these data using a connectionist parallel distributed processing (PDP) triangle model of reading. We argue here that a different model of reading, the dual route cascaded (DRC)…

  13. Cascade model for fluvial geomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. I.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Erosional landscapes are generally scale invariant and fractal. Spectral studies provide quantitative confirmation of this statement. Linear theories of erosion will not generate scale-invariant topography. In order to explain the fractal behavior of landscapes a modified Fourier series has been introduced that is the basis for a renormalization approach. A nonlinear dynamical model has been introduced for the decay of the modified Fourier series coefficients that yield a fractal spectra. It is argued that a physical basis for this approach is that a fractal (or nearly fractal) distribution of storms (floods) continually renews erosional features on all scales.

  14. Heavy quarkonium cascades in the glueball model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuk, J.; Joshi, G.C.

    1984-05-01

    The OZI ciolating two pion cascades between /sup 3/Si states of heavy quarkonium (V' ..-->.. V/sup pipi/) are studied in the Freund--Nambu model. When interpreted in the context of QCD, this model implies that OZI violation results from mixing with an intermediate glueball state. It is found that for an appropriate flavour--symmetry--breaking scheme, cascades between the same quantum numbers are satisfactorily described by varying only the quarkonium masses. Some predictions are made. But, the observed suppression of GAMMA(..gamma..'' ..-->.. ..gamma pi pi..)/GAMMA(..gamma..' ..-->.. ..gamma pi pi..)= indicates that the QQ bound state nature of heavy quarkonia is an important consideration in these decays. We show that the quarkonium couplings depend on overlap integrals between the wavefunctions of the mesons present at the decay vertex. We discuss various models that exploit the non-relativistic nature of heavy quarkonia, and from which such overlap integrals are derived in terms of ''charmonium--model'' radial wavefunctions.

  15. Modeling First Grade Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesmer, Heidi Anne E.; Williams, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a hypothesized model examining reading proficiency across first grade. It addressed how alphabetics at the beginning of the year were mediated by applied and automated skills at the middle of the year to explain actualized reading at the end of the year. The alphabetic skills of 102 first graders were measured in October and the…

  16. Cascading Walks Model for Human Mobility Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Xiang-Wen; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the mechanism behind the scaling laws and series of anomalies in human trajectories is of fundamental significance in understanding many spatio-temporal phenomena. Recently, several models, e.g. the explorations-returns model (Song et al., 2010) and the radiation model for intercity travels (Simini et al., 2012), have been proposed to study the origin of these anomalies and the prediction of human movements. However, an agent-based model that could reproduce most of empirical observations without priori is still lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, considering the empirical findings on the correlations of move-lengths and staying time in human trips, we propose a simple model which is mainly based on the cascading processes to capture the human mobility patterns. In this model, each long-range movement activates series of shorter movements that are organized by the law of localized explorations and preferential returns in prescribed region. Conclusions/Significance Based on the numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show more than five statistical characters that are well consistent with the empirical observations, including several types of scaling anomalies and the ultraslow diffusion properties, implying the cascading processes associated with the localized exploration and preferential returns are indeed a key in the understanding of human mobility activities. Moreover, the model shows both of the diverse individual mobility and aggregated scaling displacements, bridging the micro and macro patterns in human mobility. In summary, our model successfully explains most of empirical findings and provides deeper understandings on the emergence of human mobility patterns. PMID:25860140

  17. Nested Incremental Modeling in the Development of Computational Theories: The CDP+ Model of Reading Aloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Conrad; Ziegler, Johannes C.; Zorzi, Marco

    2007-01-01

    At least 3 different types of computational model have been shown to account for various facets of both normal and impaired single word reading: (a) the connectionist triangle model, (b) the dual-route cascaded model, and (c) the connectionist dual process model. Major strengths and weaknesses of these models are identified. In the spirit of…

  18. Models of the Reading Process

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Keith; Reichle, Erik D.

    2010-01-01

    Reading is a complex skill involving the orchestration of a number of components. Researchers often talk about a “model of reading” when talking about only one aspect of the reading process (for example, models of word identification are often referred to as “models of reading”). Here, we review prominent models that are designed to account for (1) word identification, (2) syntactic parsing, (3) discourse representations, and (4) how certain aspects of language processing (e.g., word identification), in conjunction with other constraints (e g., limited visual acuity, saccadic error, etc.), guide readers’ eyes. Unfortunately, it is the case that these various models addressing specific aspects of the reading process seldom make contact with models dealing with other aspects of reading. Thus, for example, the models of word identification seldom make contact with models of eye movement control, and vice versa. While this may be unfortunate in some ways, it is quite understandable in other ways because reading itself is a very complex process. We discuss prototypical models of aspects of the reading process in the order mentioned above. We do not review all possible models, but rather focus on those we view as being representative and most highly recognized. PMID:21170142

  19. Cascade Models of Turbulence and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadanoff, Leo P.

    1997-01-01

    This note describes two kinds of work on turbulence. First it describes a simplified model of turbulent energy-cascades called the GOY model. Second it mentions work on a model of mixing in fluids. In addition to a brief historical discussion, I include some mention of our own work carried on at the University of Chicago by Jane Wang, Detlef Lohse, Roberto Benzi, Norbert Schörghofer, Scott Wunsch, Tong Zhou and myself. Our own studies are in large measure the outgrowth of a paper by M. H. Jensen, G. Paladin, and A. Vulpiani [1]. I mention this connection with some sadness because I recall Paladin's recent death in a mountain accident.

  20. Modeling a mountain basin sediment cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Georgie; Molnar, Peter; McArdell, Brian; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Mountain basins are most sensitive to climate change because of the dependence of snow and ice melt processes, surface weathering and erosion on air temperature, combined with their rapid rainfall-runoff response. Consequently, sediment yield from mountain basins will also likely be related to climate variability. Constructing sediment budgets is the first step towards understanding the interaction of climate and earth-surface processes. Recently, mountain basin sediment transfer has been conceptualized as a sediment cascade in which, following erosion, sediment travels through multiple cycles of storage and remobilization before exiting the basin. However, few studies have extended this concept beyond the identification and quantification of individual processes and storage units. In this study we have developed a probabilistic sediment cascade model based on a sediment budget spanning more than 4 decades in the Illgraben, an active, debris-flow prone basin in the Swiss Alps. We use this model to investigate the role of thresholds and hydrological and sediment storage dynamics in the transformation of the observed probability distribution of slope failures into that of debris flows. The sediment cascade model consists of a hydrological and sediment module, both of which are based on a spatially lumped storage reservoir representation of the involved physical processes. Water and sediment are generated and routed according to conceptual rules and thresholds which we define and calibrate based on observations. We run simulations with stochastic sediment input drawn from the power-law distribution of slope failures and observed climatic variables (precipitation and air temperature) at the daily resolution for the period 2000-2009, and investigate the outputs of the model in terms of (1) the probability distribution and (2) the timing of sediment discharge events compared to observed debris flows. The triggering of debris flows in our model is conditioned by the

  1. Computer modeling results on all-Si cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, P. D.; Allen, F. G.; Daud, T.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of a cascade solar cell made entirely of silicon are investigated numerically with the goal of developing an optimal silicon solar cell grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The cascade cell is modeled as two standard back-surface field cells with abrupt junctions connected by a tunnel junction. A cascade cell would have approximately twice the open-circuit voltage of a single cell. If the minority carriers generated in the front cell can be reflected before reaching the tunnel junction, then the cascade cell will show an increase in efficiency over a single cell by a percentage point.

  2. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  3. Models for Shelf Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, Abraham

    1973-01-01

    Though unshelved books are a problem in every library, little systematic effort has been made to design an optimal solution. Presented here is a mathematical model that attempts to approach such a solution. (2 references) (Author/DH)

  4. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. [CASCADER Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes as they are advected and/or dispersed. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one space dimensional transport and fate model for an m-chain of radionuclides in very dry soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advocation velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The airpumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions and is barometric pressure driven. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions is used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  5. Experimental basis for the models of cascade propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The picture of the hadron nucleus collision process is presented as it emerges on the basis of newly obtained experimental data. The picture is applicable to models of cascade propagation in Earth atmosphere.

  6. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Devynck, F.; Krack, M.; Maillard, S.

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO2. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO2. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  7. Shelf Reading as a Collaborative Service Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kevin N.; Kaspar, Wendi Arant

    2006-01-01

    Shelf reading the stacks is very often not seen as scholarly work in library circles and is therefore overlooked. However, there is a very real frustration of a patron who cannot find the material they need. There are very few studies that provide a working model for shelf reading. The authors suggest a collaborative shelf reading model based on…

  8. Uncertainty propagation in a cascade modelling approach to flood mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rincón, J. P.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.; Breña Naranjo, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the propagation of meteorological uncertainty within a cascade modelling approach to flood mapping. The methodology is comprised of a Numerical Weather Prediction Model (NWP), a distributed rainfall-runoff model and a standard 2-D hydrodynamic model. The cascade of models is used to reproduce an extreme flood event that took place in the Southeast of Mexico, during November 2009. The event is selected as high quality field data (e.g. rain gauges; discharge) and satellite imagery are available. Uncertainty in the meteorological model (Weather Research and Forecasting model) is evaluated through the use of a multi-physics ensemble technique, which considers twelve parameterization schemes to determine a given precipitation. The resulting precipitation fields are used as input in a distributed hydrological model, enabling the determination of different hydrographs associated to this event. Lastly, by means of a standard 2-D hydrodynamic model, hydrographs are used as forcing conditions to study the propagation of the meteorological uncertainty to an estimated flooded area. Results show the utility of the selected modelling approach to investigate error propagation within a cascade of models. Moreover, the error associated to the determination of the runoff, is showed to be lower than that obtained in the precipitation estimation suggesting that uncertainty do not necessarily increase within a model cascade.

  9. Understanding patterns and processes in models of trophic cascades

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Michael R; Speirs, Douglas C; Steele, John H; Lafferty, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Climate fluctuations and human exploitation are causing global changes in nutrient enrichment of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and declining abundances of apex predators. The resulting trophic cascades have had profound effects on food webs, leading to significant economic and societal consequences. However, the strength of cascades–that is the extent to which a disturbance is diminished as it propagates through a food web–varies widely between ecosystems, and there is no formal theory as to why this should be so. Some food chain models reproduce cascade effects seen in nature, but to what extent is this dependent on their formulation? We show that inclusion of processes represented mathematically as density-dependent regulation of either consumer uptake or mortality rates is necessary for the generation of realistic ‘top-down’ cascades in simple food chain models. Realistically modelled ‘bottom-up’ cascades, caused by changing nutrient input, are also dependent on the inclusion of density dependence, but especially on mortality regulation as a caricature of, e.g. disease and parasite dynamics or intraguild predation. We show that our conclusions, based on simple food chains, transfer to a more complex marine food web model in which cascades are induced by varying river nutrient inputs or fish harvesting rates. PMID:24165353

  10. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  11. Phonotactic constraints: Implications for models of oral reading in Russian.

    PubMed

    Ulicheva, Anastasia; Coltheart, Max; Saunders, Steven; Perry, Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The present article investigates how phonotactic rules constrain oral reading in the Russian language. The pronunciation of letters in Russian is regular and consistent, but it is subject to substantial phonotactic influence: the position of a phoneme and its phonological context within a word can alter its pronunciation. In Part 1 of the article, we analyze the orthography-to-phonology and phonology-to-phonology (i.e., phonotactic) relationships in Russian monosyllabic words. In Part 2 of the article, we report empirical data from an oral word reading task that show an effect of phonotactic dependencies on skilled reading in Russian: humans are slower when reading words where letter-phoneme correspondences are highly constrained by phonotactic rules compared with those where there are few or no such constraints present. A further question of interest in this article is how computational models of oral reading deal with the phonotactics of the Russian language. To answer this question, in Part 3, we report simulations from the Russian dual-route cascaded model (DRC) and the Russian connectionist dual-process model (CDP++) and assess the performance of the 2 models by testing them against human data. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26641449

  12. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-07-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricité de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. Information cascade, Kirman's ant colony model, and kinetic Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model in which voters can obtain information from a finite number of previous voters. There exist three groups of voters: (i) digital herders and independent voters, (ii) analog herders and independent voters, and (iii) tanh-type herders. In our previous paper Hisakado and Mori (2011), we used the mean field approximation for case (i). In that study, if the reference number r is above three, phase transition occurs and the solution converges to one of the equilibria. However, the conclusion is different from mean field approximation. In this paper, we show that the solution oscillates between the two states. A good (bad) equilibrium is where a majority of r select the correct (wrong) candidate. In this paper, we show that there is no phase transition when r is finite. If the annealing schedule is adequately slow from finite r to infinite r, the voting rate converges only to the good equilibrium. In case (ii), the state of reference votes is equivalent to that of Kirman's ant colony model, and it follows beta binomial distribution. In case (iii), we show that the model is equivalent to the finite-size kinetic Ising model. If the voters are rational, a simple herding experiment of information cascade is conducted. Information cascade results from the quenching of the kinetic Ising model. As case (i) is the limit of case (iii) when tanh function becomes a step function, the phase transition can be observed in infinite size limit. We can confirm that there is no phase transition when the reference number r is finite.

  14. Tropospheric energy cascades in a global circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sebastian; Becker, Erich

    2010-05-01

    The global horizontal kinetic energy (KE) spectrum and its budget are analyzed using results from a mechanistic GCM. The model has a standard spectral dynamical core with very high vertikal resolution up to the middle stratosphere (T330/L100). As a turbulence model we combine the Smagorinsky scheme with an energy conserving hyperdiffusion that is applied for the very smallest resolved scales. The simulation confirms a slope of the KE spectrum close to -3 in the synoptic regime where the KE is dominated by vortical modes. Towards the mesoscales the spectrum flattens and assumes a slope close to -5/3. Here divergent modes become increasingly important and even dominate the KE. Our complete analysis of the sinks and sources in the spectral KE budget reveals the overall energy fluxes through the spectrum. For the upper troposphere, the change of KE due to horizontal advection is negative for large synoptic scales. It is positive for the planetary scale, as expected, and for the mesoscales as well. This implies that the mesoscales, which include the dynamical sources of tropospheric gravity waves, are in fact sustained by the energy injection at the baroclinic scale (forward energy cascade). We find an enstrophy cascade in accordance with 2D turbulence, but zero downscaling of energy due to the vortical modes alone. In other words, the forward energy cascade in the synoptic and mesoscale regime is solely due to the divergent modes and their nonlinear interaction with the vortical modes. This picture, derived form a mechanistic model, not only lends further evidence for a generally forward energy cascade in the upper tropospheric away from the baroclinic scale. It also extends the picture proposed earlier by Tung and Orlando: The transition from a -3 to a -5/3 slope in the tropospheric macroturbulence spectrum reflects the fact, that the energy cascade due to the horizontally divergent (3D) modes is hidden behind the (2D) enstrophy cascade in the synoptic regime but

  15. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Raster Datasets and Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes maps of the spatial distribution of basaltic, and felsic rocks in the Oregon Cascades. It also includes a final Play Fairway Analysis (PFA) model, with the heat and permeability composite risk segments (CRS) supplied separately. Metadata for each raster dataset can be found within the zip files, in the TIF images

  16. Cascade modeling of single and two-phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    The analysis of turbulent two-phase flows requires closure models in order to perform reliable computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CFMD) analyses. A turbulence cascade model, which tracks the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the various eddy sizes, has been developed for the analysis of the single and bubbly two-phase turbulence. Various flows are considered including the decay of isotropic grid-induced turbulence, uniform shear flow and turbulent channel flow. The model has been developed using a "building block" approach by moving from modeling of simpler turbulent flows (i.e., homogeneous, isotropic decay) to more involved turbulent flows (i.e., non-homogeneous channel flow). The spectral cascade-transport model's performance has been assessed against a number of experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) results.

  17. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  18. A novel information cascade model in online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chao; He, Wenbo; Niu, Jianwei; Xie, Zhongyu

    2016-02-01

    The spread and diffusion of information has become one of the hot issues in today's social network analysis. To analyze the spread of online social network information and the attribute of cascade, in this paper, we discuss the spread of two kinds of users' decisions for city-wide activities, namely the "want to take part in the activity" and "be interested in the activity", based on the users' attention in "DouBan" and the data of the city-wide activities. We analyze the characteristics of the activity-decision's spread in these aspects: the scale and scope of the cascade subgraph, the structure characteristic of the cascade subgraph, the topological attribute of spread tree, and the occurrence frequency of cascade subgraph. On this basis, we propose a new information spread model. Based on the classical independent diffusion model, we introduce three mechanisms, equal probability, similarity of nodes, and popularity of nodes, which can generate and affect the spread of information. Besides, by conducting the experiments in six different kinds of network data set, we compare the effects of three mechanisms above mentioned, totally six specific factors, on the spread of information, and put forward that the node's popularity plays an important role in the information spread.

  19. Cascading rainfall uncertainties into 2D inundation impact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignet, Maxime; de Almeida, Gustavo; Champion, Adrian; Garcia Pintado, Javier; Neal, Jeff; Freer, Jim; Cloke, Hannah; Odoni, Nick; Coxon, Gemma; Bates, Paul; Mason, David

    2013-04-01

    Existing precipitation products show differences in their spatial and temporal distribution and several studies have presented how these differences influence the ability to predict hydrological responses. However, an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic uncertainty cascade is seldom explored and how, importantly, input uncertainties propagate through this cascade is still poorly understood. Such a project requires a combination of modelling capabilities, runoff generation predictions based on those rainfall forecasts, and hydraulic flood wave propagation based on the runoff predictions. Accounting for uncertainty in each component is important in decision making for issuing flood warnings, monitoring or planning. We suggest a better understanding of uncertainties in inundation impact modelling must consider these differences in rainfall products. This will improve our understanding of the input uncertainties on our predictive capability. In this paper, we propose to address this issue by i) exploring the effects of errors in rainfall on inundation predictive capacity within an uncertainty framework, i.e. testing inundation uncertainty against different comparable meteorological conditions (i.e. using different rainfall products). Our method cascades rainfall uncertainties into a lumped hydrologic model (FUSE) within the GLUE uncertainty framework. The resultant prediction uncertainties in discharge provide uncertain boundary conditions, which are cascaded into a simplified shallow water 2D hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP). Rainfall data captured by three different measurement techniques - rain gauges, gridded data and numerical weather predictions (NWP) models are used to assess the combined input data and model parameter uncertainty. The study is performed in the Severn catchment over the period between June and July 2007, where a series of rainfall events causing record floods in the study area). Changes in flood area extent are compared and the uncertainty envelope is

  20. "Serial" Effects in Parallel Models of Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Furber, Steve; Welbourne, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence showing that the time to read a word out loud is influenced by an interaction between orthographic length and lexicality. Given that length effects are interpreted by advocates of dual-route models as evidence of serial processing this would seem to pose a serious challenge to models of single word reading which…

  1. Cascading rainfall uncertainty into flood inundation impact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignet, Maxime; Freer, Jim E.; de Almeida, Gustavo A. M.; Coxon, Gemma; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Champion, Adrian J.; Cloke, Hannah L.; Bates, Paul D.

    2014-05-01

    Observed and numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulated precipitation products typically show differences in their spatial and temporal distribution. These differences can considerably influence the ability to predict hydrological responses. For flood inundation impact studies, as in forecast situations, an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic model chain is needed to quantify the extent of flood risk. Uncertainties cascaded through the model chain are seldom explored, and more importantly, how potential input uncertainties propagate through this cascade, and how best to approach this, is still poorly understood. This requires a combination of modelling capabilities, the non-linear transformation of rainfall to river flow using rainfall-runoff models, and finally the hydraulic flood wave propagation based on the runoff predictions. Improving the characterisation of uncertainty, and what is important to include, in each component is important for quantifying impacts and understanding flood risk for different return periods. In this paper, we propose to address this issue by i) exploring the effects of errors in rainfall on inundation predictive capacity within an uncertainty framework by testing inundation uncertainty against different comparable meteorological conditions (i.e. using different rainfall products) and ii) testing different techniques to cascade uncertainties (e.g. bootstrapping, PPU envelope) within the GLUE (generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation) framework. Our method cascades rainfall uncertainties into multiple rainfall-runoff model structures using the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE). The resultant prediction uncertainties in upstream discharge provide uncertain boundary conditions that are cascaded into a simplified shallow water hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP). Rainfall data captured by three different measurement techniques - rain gauges, gridded radar data and numerical weather predictions (NWP) models are evaluated

  2. Attack robustness of cascading load model in interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Wu, Yuedan; Li, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Considering the weight of a node and the coupled strength of two interdependent nodes in the different networks, we propose a method to assign the initial load of a node and construct a new cascading load model in the interdependent networks. Assuming that a node in one network will fail if its degree is 0 or its dependent node in the other network is removed from the network or the load on it exceeds its capacity, we study the influences of the assortative link (AL) and the disassortative link (DL) patterns between two networks on the robustness of the interdependent networks against cascading failures. For better evaluating the network robustness, from the local perspective of a node we present a new measure to qualify the network resiliency after targeted attacks. We show that the AL patterns between two networks can improve the robust level of the entire interdependent networks. Moreover, we obtain how to efficiently allocate the initial load and select some nodes to be protected so as to maximize the network robustness against cascading failures. In addition, we find that some nodes with the lower load are more likely to trigger the cascading propagation when the distribution of the load is more even, and also give the reasonable explanation. Our findings can help to design the robust interdependent networks and give the reasonable suggestion to optimize the allocation of the protection resources.

  3. Computational modeling of leukocyte adhesion cascade (LAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2005-11-01

    In response to an inflammation in the body, leukocytes (white blood cell) interact with the endothelium (interior wall of blood vessel) through a series of steps--capture, rolling, adhesion and transmigration--critical for proper functioning of the immune system. We are numerically simulating this process using a Front-tracking finite-difference method. The viscoelastcity of the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus are incorporated and allowed to change with time in response to the cell surface molecular chemistry. The molecular level forces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions are accounted for by stochastic spring-peeling model. Even though leukocyte rolling has been investigated through various models, the transitioning through subsequent steps, specifically firm adhesion and transmigration through endothelial layer, has not been modeled. The change of viscoelastic properties due to the leukocyte activation is observed to play a critical role in mediating the transition from rolling to transmigration. We will provide details of our approach and discuss preliminary results.

  4. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  5. The reading efficiency model: an extension of the componential model of reading.

    PubMed

    Høien-Tengesdal, Ingjerd; Høien, Torleiv

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: First, the authors investigated if an extended version of the component model of reading (CMR; Model 2), including decoding rate and oral vocabulary comprehension, accounted for more of the variance in reading comprehension than the commonly used measures of the cognitive factors in the CMR. Second, the authors investigated the fitness of a new model, titled the reading efficiency model (REM), which deviates from earlier models regarding how reading is defined. In the study, 780 Norwegian students from Grades 6 and 10 were recruited. Here, hierarchical regression analyses showed that the extended model did not account for more of the variance in reading comprehension than the traditional CMR model (Model 1). In the second part of the study the authors used structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore the REM. The results showed that the REM explained an overall larger amount of variance in reading ability, compared to Model 1 and Model 2. This result is probably the result of the new definition of reading applied in the REM. The authors believe their model will more fully reflects students' differentiated reading skills by including reading fluency in the definition of reading. PMID:22293685

  6. Cascades in the Threshold Model for varying system sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-03-01

    A classical model in opinion dynamics is the Threshold Model (TM) aiming to model the spread of a new opinion based on the social drive of peer pressure. Under the TM a node adopts a new opinion only when the fraction of its first neighbors possessing that opinion exceeds a pre-assigned threshold. Cascades in the TM depend on multiple parameters, such as the number and selection strategy of the initially active nodes (initiators), and the threshold distribution of the nodes. For a uniform threshold in the network there is a critical fraction of initiators for which a transition from small to large cascades occurs, which for ER graphs is largerly independent of the system size. Here, we study the spread contribution of each newly assigned initiator under the TM for different initiator selection strategies for synthetic graphs of various sizes. We observe that for ER graphs when large cascades occur, the spread contribution of the added initiator on the transition point is independent of the system size, while the contribution of the rest of the initiators converges to zero at infinite system size. This property is used for the identification of large transitions for various threshold distributions. Supported in part by ARL NS-CTA, ARO, ONR, and DARPA.

  7. Nested incremental modeling in the development of computational theories: the CDP+ model of reading aloud.

    PubMed

    Perry, Conrad; Ziegler, Johannes C; Zorzi, Marco

    2007-04-01

    At least 3 different types of computational model have been shown to account for various facets of both normal and impaired single word reading: (a) the connectionist triangle model, (b) the dual-route cascaded model, and (c) the connectionist dual process model. Major strengths and weaknesses of these models are identified. In the spirit of nested incremental modeling, a new connectionist dual process model (the CDP+ model) is presented. This model builds on the strengths of 2 of the previous models while eliminating their weaknesses. Contrary to the dual-route cascaded model, CDP+ is able to learn and produce graded consistency effects. Contrary to the triangle and the connectionist dual process models, CDP+ accounts for serial effects and has more accurate nonword reading performance. CDP+ also beats all previous models by an order of magnitude when predicting individual item-level variance on large databases. Thus, the authors show that building on existing theories by combining the best features of previous models--a nested modeling strategy that is commonly used in other areas of science but often neglected in psychology--results in better and more powerful computational models. PMID:17500628

  8. The Collisional Cascade Model For Saturn's Ring Spokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Jontof-Hutter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dust particles are ubiquitous in the saturnian system, spewing forth from the geysers of Enceladus and lurking as mysterious wedge-shaped spokes in the planet's main rings. The smallest dust grains are strongly influenced by electromagnetic forces arising from the motions of charged dust particles relative to Saturn's rotating magnetic field while large dust grains follow Keplerian paths determined by the planet's gravity. The most interesting dynamics result when the two forces have similar strengths, typically for particles ~100 nanometer in size. Differences between the motions of dust grains and much larger ring particles provides a free energy source that powers spoke formation. Most observations of ongoing spoke formation can be understood in the context of a Collisional Cascade model in which a hail of rapidly-moving ~50nm dust grains rain down upon more massive ring particles. After leaving the ring plane en masse from the site of an initial disturbance, these mid-sized grains are accelerated by the magnetic field to high speeds relative to ring particles. When they return to the ring plane - nearly simultaneously over a large radial range - they strike dust-coated fluffy ring particles, freeing both visible 0.5 micron spoke particles and additional 50nm debris that goes on to continue the cascade. The Collisional Cascade model can account for the rapid onset of spokes, their hour-long active phases, and the propensity of spokes to prefer certain magnetic longitudes.

  9. Boolean Models of Biological Processes Explain Cascade-Like Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Guanyu; Simha, Rahul; Du, Chenghang; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Biological networks play a key role in determining biological function and therefore, an understanding of their structure and dynamics is of central interest in systems biology. In Boolean models of such networks, the status of each molecule is either "on" or "off" and along with the molecules interact with each other, their individual status changes from "on" to "off" or vice-versa and the system of molecules in the network collectively go through a sequence of changes in state. This sequence of changes is termed a biological process. In this paper, we examine the common perception that events in biomolecular networks occur sequentially, in a cascade-like manner, and ask whether this is likely to be an inherent property. In further investigations of the budding and fission yeast cell-cycle, we identify two generic dynamical rules. A Boolean system that complies with these rules will automatically have a certain robustness. By considering the biological requirements in robustness and designability, we show that those Boolean dynamical systems, compared to an arbitrary dynamical system, statistically present the characteristics of cascadeness and sequentiality, as observed in the budding and fission yeast cell- cycle. These results suggest that cascade-like behavior might be an intrinsic property of biological processes. PMID:26821940

  10. Ability paradox of cascading model based on betweenness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Xu, Bo; Wu, Yuedan

    2015-01-01

    Must Investing more resources to protect every node in a network improve the robustness of the whole network subject to target attacks? To answer this question, we investigate the cascading dynamics in some typical networks. In real networks, the load on a node is generally correlated with the betweenness. Considering the weight of a node, we give a new method to define the initial load on a node by the revised betweenness. Then we present a simple cascading model. We investigate the cascading dynamics by disabling a single key node with the highest load. We find that in BA scale-free networks, the bigger the capacity of every node, the stronger the robustness of the whole network. However, in WS networks and some random networks, when we increase the capacity of every node, instead, the robustness of the whole network is weaker. In US power grid and the China power grid, we also observe this counterintuitive phenomenon. We give a reasonable explanation by a simple illusion. By the analysis, we think that resurrections of some nodes in a ring network structure after removing a node may be the reason of this phenomenon. PMID:26353903

  11. Ability paradox of cascading model based on betweenness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Xu, Bo; Wu, Yuedan

    2015-09-01

    Must Investing more resources to protect every node in a network improve the robustness of the whole network subject to target attacks? To answer this question, we investigate the cascading dynamics in some typical networks. In real networks, the load on a node is generally correlated with the betweenness. Considering the weight of a node, we give a new method to define the initial load on a node by the revised betweenness. Then we present a simple cascading model. We investigate the cascading dynamics by disabling a single key node with the highest load. We find that in BA scale-free networks, the bigger the capacity of every node, the stronger the robustness of the whole network. However, in WS networks and some random networks, when we increase the capacity of every node, instead, the robustness of the whole network is weaker. In US power grid and the China power grid, we also observe this counterintuitive phenomenon. We give a reasonable explanation by a simple illusion. By the analysis, we think that resurrections of some nodes in a ring network structure after removing a node may be the reason of this phenomenon.

  12. Modified gravity, the Cascading DGP model and its critical tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the presence of instabilities in the Cascading DGP model. We start by discussing the problem of the cosmological late time acceleration, and we introduce the modified gravity approach. We then focus on brane induced gravity models and in particular on the Cascading DGP model. We consider configurations of the latter model where the source term is given simply by vacuum energy (pure tension), and we study perturbations at first order around these configurations. We perform a four-dimensional scalar-vector-tensor decomposition of the perturbations, and show that, regarding the scalar sector, the dynamics in a suitable limit can be described by a master equation. This master equation contains an energy scale (critical tension) which is related in a lion-trivial way to the parameters of the model. We give a geometrical interpretation of why this scale emerges, and explain its relevance for the presence of ghost instabilities in the theory. We comment on the difference between our result, and the one present in the literature, and stress its importance regarding the phenomenological viability of the model. We finally provide a numerical check which confirms the validity of our analysis.

  13. Emotional intelligence: an integrative meta-analysis and cascading model.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dana L; Newman, Daniel A

    2010-01-01

    Research and valid practice in emotional intelligence (EI) have been impeded by lack of theoretical clarity regarding (a) the relative roles of emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion regulation facets in explaining job performance; (b) conceptual redundancy of EI with cognitive intelligence and Big Five personality; and (c) application of the EI label to 2 distinct sets of constructs (i.e., ability-based EI and mixed-based EI). In the current article, the authors propose and then test a theoretical model that integrates these factors. They specify a progressive (cascading) pattern among ability-based EI facets, in which emotion perception must causally precede emotion understanding, which in turn precedes conscious emotion regulation and job performance. The sequential elements in this progressive model are believed to selectively reflect Conscientiousness, cognitive ability, and Neuroticism, respectively. "Mixed-based" measures of EI are expected to explain variance in job performance beyond cognitive ability and personality. The cascading model of EI is empirically confirmed via meta-analytic data, although relationships between ability-based EI and job performance are shown to be inconsistent (i.e., EI positively predicts performance for high emotional labor jobs and negatively predicts performance for low emotional labor jobs). Gender and race differences in EI are also meta-analyzed. Implications for linking the EI fad in personnel selection to established psychological theory are discussed. PMID:20085406

  14. Model for vacancy-loop nucleation in displacement cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinos, V. G.; Bacon, D. J.

    1995-08-01

    A model is proposed for the nucleation of collapsed vacancy clusters in irradiated metals, based on the principle that a vacancy loop may be nucleated in a cascade which has melted and recrystallized. The equation of thermal conduction is solved using the discretization method and initial temperature and vacancy distributions given by the marlowe code. The model simulates the processes of heat propagation, local melting, absorption and release of latent heat, and the redistribution of the density within the melt. Under the influence of the temperature gradient, the concentration of vacancies in the depleted zone increases. Simulation of hundreds of cascades gives the distribution of zones as a function of vacancy concentration and number of vacancies in them, and it is assumed that critical values Ccr and Ncrv have to be achieved to produce a visible vacancy loop. However, if the concentration exceeds a value Camv under sufficiently fast cooling, for example under strong electron-phonon coupling (EPC), the melted zone cannot crystallize completely and solidifies instead to a semiamorphous core. This prevents collapse to a vacancy loop. The model has been used to calculate the yield and mean size of vacancy loops in ion-irradiated Cu, Ni, and Cu-Ge and Cu-Ni alloys. Physically reasonable values of Ccr, Ncr, and Camv have been obtained to give good agreement with experimental values of yield and size. Furthermore, the trends with alloy content can be explained, and it is found that EPC can have a strong influence on loop yield.

  15. "Serial" effects in parallel models of reading.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Furber, Steve; Welbourne, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    There is now considerable evidence showing that the time to read a word out loud is influenced by an interaction between orthographic length and lexicality. Given that length effects are interpreted by advocates of dual-route models as evidence of serial processing this would seem to pose a serious challenge to models of single word reading which postulate a common parallel processing mechanism for reading both words and nonwords (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; Rastle, Havelka, Wydell, Coltheart, & Besner, 2009). However, an alternative explanation of these data is that visual processes outside the scope of existing parallel models are responsible for generating the word-length related phenomena (Seidenberg & Plaut, 1998). Here we demonstrate that a parallel model of single word reading can account for the differential word-length effects found in the naming latencies of words and nonwords, provided that it includes a mapping from visual to orthographic representations, and that the nature of those orthographic representations are not preconstrained. The model can also simulate other supposedly "serial" effects. The overall findings were consistent with the view that visual processing contributes substantially to the word-length effects in normal reading and provided evidence to support the single-route theory which assumes words and nonwords are processed in parallel by a common mechanism. PMID:22343366

  16. Analytical model for electromagnetic cascades in rotating electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    Electromagnetic cascades attract a lot of attention as an important quantum electrodynamics effect that will reveal itself in various electromagnetic field configurations at ultrahigh intensities. We study cascade dynamics in rotating electric field analytically and numerically. The kinetic equations for the electron-positron plasma and gamma-quanta are formulated. The scaling laws are derived and analyzed. For the cascades arising far above the threshold the dependence of the cascade parameters on the field frequency is derived. The spectra of high-energy cascade particles are calculated. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  17. Some Text-Level Considerations for a Model of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Janet H.

    Models of reading have been proposed to guide researchers and educators in their theoretical research and instructional planning. The models specify important properties of the material to be read and processes the learner uses while reading. Two separate models of reading by K.S. Goodman and D. Rumelhart are similar in that they describe reading…

  18. The development of reading impairment: a cognitive neuroscience model.

    PubMed

    McCandliss, Bruce D; Noble, Kimberly G

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses recent cognitive neuroscience investigations into the biological bases of developmental dyslexia, a common disorder impacting approximately 5 to 17 percent of the population. Our aim is to summarize central findings from several lines of evidence that converge on pivotal aspects of the brain bases of developmental dyslexia. We highlight ways in which the approaches and methodologies of developmental cognitive neuroscience that are addressed in this special issue-including neuroimaging, human genetics, refinement of cognitive and biological phenotypes, neural plasticity and computational model-can be employed in uncovering the biological bases of this disorder. Taking a developmental perspective on the biological bases of dyslexia, we propose a simple cascading model for the developmental progression of this disorder, in which individual differences in brain areas associated with phonological processing might influence the specialization of visual areas involved in the rapid processing of written words. We also discuss recent efforts to understand the impact of successful reading interventions in terms of changes within cortical circuits associated with reading ability. PMID:12953299

  19. Towards a Universal Model of Reading

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Ram

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding, have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter-order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the special way in which the human brain encodes the position of letters in printed words. The present paper discusses the theoretical shortcomings and misconceptions of this approach to visual word recognition. A systematic review of data obtained from a variety of languages demonstrates that letter-order insensitivity is not a general property of the cognitive system, neither it is a property of the brain in encoding letters. Rather, it is a variant and idiosyncratic characteristic of some languages, mostly European, reflecting a strategy of optimizing encoding resources, given the specific structure of words. Since the main goal of reading research is to develop theories that describe the fundamental and invariant phenomena of reading across orthographies, an alternative approach to model visual word recognition is offered. The dimensions of a possible universal model of reading, which outlines the common cognitive operations involved in orthographic processing in all writing systems, are discussed. PMID:22929057

  20. Spoke Formation in Saturn's Ring: The Collisional Cascade Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2014-11-01

    The mysterious wedge-shaped spokes in Saturn's main rings have defied explanation ever since their discovery during the Voyager flybys of the early 1980s. No earlier model can explain the three disparate timescales over which spokes evolve: i) the 10-minute formation time for a new spoke, ii) the hour-long period over which a spoke's radial edge remains active, and iii) the day-long timescale over which the magnetic longitude of earlier spoke activity is preferentially repopulated with subsequent spokes. This and other observations of ongoing spoke formation can be understood in the context of a Collisional Cascade model in which a hail of rapidly-moving submicron dust grains rain down upon more massive ring particles. Tiny ~0.1 micron grains leave the ring plane en masse from the site of an initial disturbance (likely a meteoroid impact) and are accelerated by the magnetic field to high speeds relative to more massive ring particles. When the dust returns to the ring plane -nearly simultaneously over a large radial range - they strike fluffy dust-coated ring particles at km/s speeds, freeing both visible 0.5 micron spoke particles and additional submicron debris. Differences between the motions of the 0.1 micron dust grains and the much larger ring particles provides a potent free energy source that powers spoke formation. The onset of this hail of tiny energetic impactors can account for the observed rapid formation of spokes and, as the hail continues to fall, for the hour-long active periods over which some spoke edges remains nearly radial. The hour-long timescale is controlled by differences in initial launch velocities and different grain charge-to-mass ratios which strongly affect vertical motions. Additional tiny grains liberated in the first hailstorm go on to continue the cascade, returning to strike the same magnetic longitude in the ring hours to days later and stirring up more micron-sized spoke particles. This continuing cascade nicely accounts for

  1. Teacher Modeling: Its Impact on an Extensive Reading Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loh, Jason Kok Khiang

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigates whether teachers model reading in 1 Singapore primary school during an exercise called "uninterrupted sustained silent reading" (USSR) carried out in the classroom. Even though reading is an important determinant of a student's growth in language skills and ability, and modeling the act of reading is essential in…

  2. MODELING COLLISIONAL CASCADES IN DEBRIS DISKS: THE NUMERICAL METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Andras; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Rieke, George H.; Cooney, Alan E-mail: dpsaltis@as.arizona.edu E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu

    2012-04-10

    We develop a new numerical algorithm to model collisional cascades in debris disks. Because of the large dynamical range in particle masses, we solve the integro-differential equations describing erosive and catastrophic collisions in a particle-in-a-box approach, while treating the orbital dynamics of the particles in an approximate fashion. We employ a new scheme for describing erosive (cratering) collisions that yields a continuous set of outcomes as a function of colliding masses. We demonstrate the stability and convergence characteristics of our algorithm and compare it with other treatments. We show that incorporating the effects of erosive collisions results in a decay of the particle distribution that is significantly faster than with purely catastrophic collisions.

  3. Reduced-order models of the coagulation cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kirk B.; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models of flow-mediated thrombogenesis have generally included the transport and reaction of dozens of biochemical species involved in the coagulation cascade. Researchers have shown, however, that thrombin generation curves can be accurately reproduced by a significantly smaller system of reactions. These reduced-order models are based on the system of ordinary differential equations representative of a well-mixed system, however, not the system of advection-diffusion-reaction equations required to model the flow-mediated case. Additionally, they focus solely on reproducing the thrombin generation curve, although accurate representation of certain intermediate species may be required to model additional aspects of clot formation, e.g. interactions with activated and non-activated platelets. In this work, we develop a method to reduce the order of a coagulation model through optimization techniques. The results of this reduced-order model are then compared to those of the full system in several representative cardiovascular flows. This work was supported by NSF grant 1354541, the NSF GRFP, and NIH grant HL108272.

  4. Testing the inhibitory cascade model in Mesozoic and Cenozoic mammaliaforms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Much of the current research in the growing field of evolutionary development concerns relating developmental pathways to large-scale patterns of morphological evolution, with developmental constraints on variation, and hence diversity, a field of particular interest. Tooth morphology offers an excellent model system for such ‘evo-devo’ studies, because teeth are well preserved in the fossil record, and are commonly used in phylogenetic analyses and as ecological proxies. Moreover, tooth development is relatively well studied, and has provided several testable hypotheses of developmental influences on macroevolutionary patterns. The recently-described Inhibitory Cascade (IC) Model provides just such a hypothesis for mammalian lower molar evolution. Derived from experimental data, the IC Model suggests that a balance between mesenchymal activators and molar-derived inhibitors determines the size of the immediately posterior molar, predicting firstly that molars either decrease in size along the tooth row, or increase in size, or are all of equal size, and secondly that the second lower molar should occupy one third of lower molar area. Here, we tested the IC Model in a large selection of taxa from diverse extant and fossil mammalian groups, ranging from the Middle Jurassic (~176 to 161 Ma) to the Recent. Results Results show that most taxa (~65%) fell within the predicted areas of the Inhibitory Cascade Model. However, members of several extinct groups fell into the regions where m2 was largest, or rarely, smallest, including the majority of the polyphyletic “condylarths”. Most Mesozoic mammals fell near the centre of the space with equality of size in all three molars. The distribution of taxa was significantly clustered by diet and by phylogenetic group. Conclusions Overall, the IC Model was supported as a plesiomorphic developmental system for Mammalia, suggesting that mammal tooth size has been subjected to this developmental constraint at

  5. A simple model of global cascades on random networks

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    The origin of large but rare cascades that are triggered by small initial shocks is a phenomenon that manifests itself as diversely as cultural fads, collective action, the diffusion of norms and innovations, and cascading failures in infrastructure and organizational networks. This paper presents a possible explanation of this phenomenon in terms of a sparse, random network of interacting agents whose decisions are determined by the actions of their neighbors according to a simple threshold rule. Two regimes are identified in which the network is susceptible to very large cascades—herein called global cascades—that occur very rarely. When cascade propagation is limited by the connectivity of the network, a power law distribution of cascade sizes is observed, analogous to the cluster size distribution in standard percolation theory and avalanches in self-organized criticality. But when the network is highly connected, cascade propagation is limited instead by the local stability of the nodes themselves, and the size distribution of cascades is bimodal, implying a more extreme kind of instability that is correspondingly harder to anticipate. In the first regime, where the distribution of network neighbors is highly skewed, it is found that the most connected nodes are far more likely than average nodes to trigger cascades, but not in the second regime. Finally, it is shown that heterogeneity plays an ambiguous role in determining a system's stability: increasingly heterogeneous thresholds make the system more vulnerable to global cascades; but an increasingly heterogeneous degree distribution makes it less vulnerable. PMID:16578874

  6. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  7. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  8. Extending the Compensatory Model of Second Language Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Levi

    2012-01-01

    Bernhardt (2005) proposed a compensatory model of second language reading. This model predicted that 50% of second language (L2) reading scores are attributed to second language knowledge and first-language (L1) reading ability. In this model, these two factors compensate for deficiencies in each other. Although this model explains a significant…

  9. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  10. The Minimalist Reading Model: Rethinking Reading Lists in Arts and Education Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piscioneri, Matthew; Hlavac, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Despite reading being recognized as a core academic skill, surprisingly little research has been undertaken into university lecture reading requirements. This article reports on the trial and evaluation of a minimalist reading model developed for students in arts and education subjects. Comprising annotated extracts from full texts…

  11. Talking about Reading as Thinking: Modeling the Hidden Complexities of Online Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coiro, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights four cognitive processes key to online reading comprehension and how one might begin to transform existing think-aloud strategy models to encompass the challenges of reading for information on the Internet. Informed by principles of cognitive apprenticeship and an emerging taxonomy of online reading comprehension…

  12. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  13. The critical tension in the Cascading DGP model

    SciTech Connect

    Sbisà, Fulvio; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in the 6D Cascading DGP model using a bulk-based approach. To deal with the ambiguity in the thin limit of branes of codimension higher than one, we consider a specific regularization of the internal structure of the branes where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We consider the solutions corresponding to pure tension sources on the 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. We adopt a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition, and focus on the scalar sector of perturbations. We show that, in a suitable 4D limit, the trace part of the 4D metric perturbations obeys a decoupled equation which suggests that it is a ghost for background tensions smaller than a critical tension, while it is a healthy field otherwise. We give a geometrical interpretation of the existence of the critical tension and of the reason why the relevant field is a ghost or not depending on the background tension. We however find a value of the critical tension which is different from the one already found in the literature. Differently from the results in the literature, our analysis implies that, choosing the background tension suitably, we can construct ghost-free models for any value of the free parameters of the theory. We suggest that the difference lies in the procedure used to evaluate the pillbox integration across the codimension-2 brane. We confirm the validity of our analysis by performing numerically the integration in a particular case where the solution inside the thick cod-2 brane is known exactly. We stress that the singular structure of the perturbation fields in the nested branes set-ups is very subtle, and that great care has to be taken when deriving the codimension-2 junction conditions.

  14. Modeling self-sustained activity cascades in socio-technical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, P.; Borge-Holthoefer, J.; Moreno, Y.; Arenas, A.

    2013-11-01

    The ability to understand and eventually predict the emergence of information and activation cascades in social networks is core to complex socio-technical systems research. However, the complexity of social interactions makes this a challenging enterprise. Previous works on cascade models assume that the emergence of this collective phenomenon is related to the activity observed in the local neighborhood of individuals, but do not consider what determines the willingness to spread information in a time-varying process. Here we present a mechanistic model that accounts for the temporal evolution of the individual state in a simplified setup. We model the activity of the individuals as a complex network of interacting integrate-and-fire oscillators. The model reproduces the statistical characteristics of the cascades in real systems, and provides a framework to study the time evolution of cascades in a state-dependent activity scenario.

  15. Toward Modeling Reading Comprehension and Reading Fluency in English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaghoub Zadeh, Zohreh; Farnia, Fataneh; Geva, Esther

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the adequacy of an expanded simple view of reading (SVR) framework for English language learners (ELLs), using mediation modeling approach. The proposed expanded SVR included reading fluency as an outcome and phonological awareness and naming speed as predictors. To test the fit of the proposed mediation model, longitudinal…

  16. Testing bedrock incision models: Holocene channel evolution, High Cascades, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, K. E.; Roering, J. J.; Fonstad, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is abundant field evidence that sediment supply controls the incision of bedrock channels by both protecting the bed from incision and providing tools to incise the bed. Despite several theoretical models for sediment-dependent bedrock abrasion, many investigations of natural channel response to climatic, lithologic, or tectonic forcing rely on the stream power model, which does not consider the role of sediment. Here, we use a well-constrained fluvial channel cut into a Holocene lava flow in the High Cascades, Oregon to compare incision predictions of the stream power model and of the full physics of theoretical models for saltation-abrasion incision by bedload and suspended load. The blocky andesite of Collier lava flow erupted from Collier Cone ~1500 years ago, paving over the existing landscape and erasing fine-scale landscape dissection. Since the eruption, a 6 km stream channel has been incised into the lava flow. The channel is comprised of three alluvial reaches with sediment deposits up to 2 m thick and two bedrock gorges with incision of up to 8 m, with larger magnitude incision in the upstream gorge. Abraded forms such as flutes are present in both gorges. Given the low magnitude and duration of modern snowmelt flow in the channel, it is likely that much of the incision was driven by sediment-laden outburst floods from the terminus of Collier Glacier, which is situated just upstream of the lava flow and has produced two outburst floods in the past 100 years. This site is well suited for comparing incision models because of the relatively uniform lithology of the lava flow and our ability to constrain the timing and depth of incision using the undissected lava surface above the channel as an initial condition. Using a simple finite difference scheme with airborne-Lidar-derived pre-incision topography as an initial condition, we predict incision in the two gorges through time with both stream power and sediment-dependent models. Field observations

  17. Predicting reading success in a multilevel schoolwide reading model: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chard, David J; Stoolmiller, Mike; Harn, Beth A; Wanzek, Jeanne; Vaughn, Sharon; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Kame'enui, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent research findings that implicate a long list of student variables that predict reading success or failure, these predictor variables have not been considered in the context of contemporary models of multitiered schoolwide reading intervention. This longitudinal, retrospective study follows 668 kindergarten and first-grade students identified as at risk for later reading difficulties through third grade. Key predictor variables were examined to determine their validity for predicting initial status and growth on oral reading fluency, third-grade oral reading fluency, and third-grade performance on a standardized test of reading. Results are provided in light of the instructional model provided. Implications for instruction and assessment are discussed. PMID:18354936

  18. Does Writing Modeled after Children's Picture Books Improve Reading Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmer, Jean E.

    A study examined whether writing modeled from children's picture books would improve reading comprehension of fourth and fifth graders as much as traditional skills instruction. Subjects, 69 children reading at least one year below grade level from six Chapter 1 Colorado schools, were pretested for reading comprehension levels. Subjects were then…

  19. Motivating Boys to Read: Inquiry, Modeling, and Choice Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of attention is being paid to the lack of reading and academic success for adolescent males. In this article, we discuss three structures in a school where boys read (and perform) as well as girls. When instruction is guided by inquiry, when teachers model their thinking while reading, and when book choices are honored, all students…

  20. A Time for Heresy: A Molar Reading Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Leon E.

    A survey of the literature concerning the mental processes used in reading reveals a proliferation of molecular theories which explain only a small (and frequently neurological) component of the reading act. Enough information exists, however, to sketch an integrated, molar model of the reading process, which stresses the interrelationships…

  1. Incorporating RTI in a Hybrid Model of Reading Disability.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Mercedes; Wagner, Richard K; Schatschneider, Christopher; Quinn, Jamie; Lopez, Danielle; Petscher, Yaacov

    2014-08-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate a hybrid model of identification that incorporates response-to-intervention (RTI) as a one of the key symptoms of reading disability. The one-year stability of alternative operational definitions of reading disability was examined in a large scale sample of students who were followed longitudinally from first to second grade. The results confirmed previous findings of limited stability for single-criterion based operational definitions of reading disability. However, substantially greater stability was obtained for a hybrid model of reading disability that incorporates RTI with other common symptoms of reading disability. PMID:25422531

  2. SIMULATION MODELING OF AN ENHANCED LOW-EMISSION SWIRL-CASCADE BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2004-04-01

    Based on the physical and computational models outlined in the previous technical progress reports, Natural gas jet diffusion flames in baseline, cascade, swirl, and swirlcascade burners were numerically modeled. The thermal, composition, and flow (velocity) fields were simulated. The temperature, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} concentrations, as well as the axial and radial velocity profiles were computed and analyzed. The numerical results showed that swirl and cascade burners have a more efficient fuel/air mixing, a shorter flame, and a lower NOx emission levels, compared to the baseline case. The results also revealed that the optimal configurations of the cascaded and swirling flames have not produced an improved performance when combined together in a ''swirl-cascade burner''.

  3. Model of mass transfer processes in the cascade of centrifugal extractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenetskaya, E. P.; Goryunov, A. G.; Daneikina, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes a mathematical model of mass transfer processes in a cascade of reverse-flow centrifugal extractors. Model of operation of each extractor is given as tightly coupled system of mixing and separating chambers. All model units are represented by systems of differential equations. The article presents the results of testing of the developed model, which confirmed the validity of the assumptions made in the model. The authors assessed the impact of the overflow of dense phase level on the hydrostatic position of phase interface level in the extractor. The research showed that a change in the volume of dense and light phases occurs in each apparatus of a cascade even in the steady mode. Operation of the cascade consisting of 12 series-connected centrifugal extractors was simulated in order to verify the model. Computer simulation results confirm the adequacy of the developed model.

  4. Simulation Modeling of an Enhanced Low-Emission Swirl-Cascade Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2004-09-01

    ''Cascade-burners'' is a passive technique to control the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. Cascade-burners have shown advantages over other techniques; its reliability, flexibility, safety, and cost makes it more attractive and desirable. On the other hand, the application of ''Swirl-burners'' has shown superiority in producing a stable flame under a variety of operating conditions and fuel types. The basic idea is to impart swirl to the air or fuel stream, or both. This not only helps to stabilize the flame but also enhances mixing in the combustion zone. As a result, nonpremixed (diffusion) swirl burners have been increasingly used in industrial combustion systems such as gas turbines, boilers, and furnaces, due to their advantages of safety and stability. Despite the advantages of cascade and swirl burners, both are passive control techniques, which resulted in a moderate pollutant emissions reduction compared to SCR, SNCR and FGR (active) methods. The present investigation will study the prospects of combining both techniques in what to be named as ''an enhanced swirl-cascade burner''. Natural gas jet diffusion flames in baseline, cascade, swirl, and swirl-cascade burners were numerically modeled using CFDRC package. The thermal, composition, and flow (velocity) fields were simulated. The numerical results showed that swirl and cascade burners have a more efficient fuel/air mixing, a shorter flame, and a lower NOx emission levels, compared to the baseline case. The results also revealed that the optimal configurations of the cascaded and swirling flames have not produced an improved performance when combined together in a ''swirl-cascade burner''. The non-linearity and complexity of the system accounts for such a result, and therefore, all possible combinations, i.e. swirl numbers (SN) versus venturi diameter ratios (D/d), need to be considered.

  5. An exploration of the emotional cascade model in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Anestis, Michael D; Bender, Theodore W; Joiner, Thomas E

    2009-05-01

    The emotional cascade model proposes that the emotional and behavioral dysregulation of individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) may be fundamentally linked through emotional cascades, vicious cycles of intense rumination and negative affect that may induce aversive emotional states. In order to reduce this aversive emotion, dysregulated behaviors such as non-suicidal self-injury may then be used as distractions from intense rumination. This study explored emotional cascades in a sample enriched with participants meeting diagnostic criteria for BPD. The first part of the study explored a structural equation model that examined the mediational effects of emotional cascades on the relationship between BPD symptoms and dysregulated behavior and found evidence for full mediation, even after controlling for symptoms of depression and other Cluster B disorders. The second part of the study examined the effects of a rumination induction conducted with the intention of eliciting emotional cascades in those diagnosed with BPD. The results demonstrated that individuals with BPD experienced greater reactivity and intensity of negative affect, but not of positive affect, following the procedure-even when controlling for current depressive symptoms. Future directions and clinical implications for the emotional cascade model are discussed. PMID:19413411

  6. Applicability of dual-route reading models to Spanish.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Cuetos, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Two opposing points of view have been presented with regard to the applicability of the dual-route reading models  Spanish. Some authors maintain that, given the transparency of the reading system, non-lexical reading is the strategy followed predominantly by Spanish readers and for that reason these models are not appropriate to explain alexias (acquired dyslexias) in Spanish. Other authors, consider that since several cases of phonological, surface and deep alexia have been reported, dual-route reading models are applicable to Spanish in the same way that to the irregular writing systems. In order to contrast these two points of view, an analysis of the two main factors that influence the reading is made: characteristics of the Spanish orthography and characteristics of the Spanish readers. It is conclude that, (1) Due to its transparency, non-lexical reading represents –as in other transparent orthographies-- the initial reading strategy in Spanish; (2) the “reading threshold” (i.e., time required to become literate) is lower in Spanish because there are no irregular words to learn; (3) as reading experience increases, speed increases and lexical reading becomes used more; (4) Given the characteristics of the Spanish reading system, it is understandable that frequency of deep dyslexia is so low. PMID:26820427

  7. Multifractal-cascade model for inertial and dissipation ranges based on the wavelet reconstruction method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long; Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The discrete wavelet is introduced to construct the turbulent velocity fields. The simple binary cascade model p model is served as the inertial range model for velocity increments. The dissipation model, which follows Foias et al. [Phys. Fluids A 2, 464 (1990)] takes the form of exp(-gk). The length of inertial and dissipation ranges is computed according to the different construction levels. Based on the binary cascade theory and the proposed dissipation model, the Reynolds number regarding to the cascade process can be estimated. The dissipation rate calculated from the proposed model not only agrees with the existing experiment data, but also suggests that the dissipation rate is not an independent variable with respect to the Reynolds number. PMID:26274272

  8. Can cognitive models explain brain activation during word and pseudoword reading? A meta-analysis of 36 neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J S H; Rastle, Kathleen; Davis, Matthew H

    2013-07-01

    Reading in many alphabetic writing systems depends on both item-specific knowledge used to read irregular words (sew, yacht) and generative spelling-sound knowledge used to read pseudowords (tew, yash). Research into the neural basis of these abilities has been directed largely by cognitive accounts proposed by the dual-route cascaded and triangle models of reading. We develop a framework that enables predictions for neural activity to be derived from cognitive models of reading using 2 principles: (a) the extent to which a model component or brain region is engaged by a stimulus and (b) how much effort is exerted in processing that stimulus. To evaluate the derived predictions, we conducted a meta-analysis of 36 neuroimaging studies of reading using the quantitative activation likelihood estimation technique. Reliable clusters of activity are localized during word versus pseudoword and irregular versus regular word reading and demonstrate a great deal of convergence between the functional organization of the reading system put forward by cognitive models and the neural systems activated during reading tasks. Specifically, left-hemisphere activation clusters are revealed reflecting orthographic analysis (occipitotemporal cortex), lexical and/or semantic processing (anterior fusiform, middle temporal gyrus), spelling-sound conversion (inferior parietal cortex), and phonological output resolution (inferior frontal gyrus). Our framework and results establish that cognitive models of reading are relevant for interpreting neuroimaging studies and that neuroscientific studies can provide data relevant for advancing cognitive models. This article thus provides a firm empirical foundation from which to improve integration between cognitive and neural accounts of the reading process. PMID:23046391

  9. SIMULATION MODELING OF AN ENHANCED LOW-EMISSION SWIRL-CASCADE BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2003-04-01

    The research team was formed. The advanced CFDRC-CHEMKIN software package was installed on a SUN-SPARC dual processor workstation. The literature pertinent to the project was collected. The physical model was set and all parameters and variables were identified. Based on the physical model, the geometric modeling and grid generation processes were performed using the CFD-GEOM (Interactive Geometric Modeling and Grid Generation software). A total number of 11160 cells (248 x 45) were generated to numerically model the baseline, cascaded, swirling, and swirling-cascaded flames. With the cascade being added to the jet, the geometric complexity of the problem increased; which required multi-domain structured grid systems to be connected and matched on the boundaries.

  10. Generalized vortex model for the inverse cascade of two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, R.

    2013-11-01

    We generalize Kirchhoff's point vortex model of two-dimensional fluid motion to a rotor model which exhibits an inverse cascade by the formation of rotor clusters. A rotor is composed of two vortices with like-signed circulations glued together by an overdamped spring. The model is motivated by a treatment of the vorticity equation representing the vorticity field as a superposition of vortices with elliptic Gaussian shapes of variable widths, augmented by a suitable forcing mechanism. The rotor model opens up the way to discuss the energy transport in the inverse cascade on the basis of dynamical systems theory.

  11. Generalized vortex model for the inverse cascade of two-dimensional turbulence.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, J; Friedrich, R

    2013-11-01

    We generalize Kirchhoff's point vortex model of two-dimensional fluid motion to a rotor model which exhibits an inverse cascade by the formation of rotor clusters. A rotor is composed of two vortices with like-signed circulations glued together by an overdamped spring. The model is motivated by a treatment of the vorticity equation representing the vorticity field as a superposition of vortices with elliptic Gaussian shapes of variable widths, augmented by a suitable forcing mechanism. The rotor model opens up the way to discuss the energy transport in the inverse cascade on the basis of dynamical systems theory. PMID:24329361

  12. Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Jeremy, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    A collection of articles reflecting the underlying concern of British contributors with continuity--conceiving reading and learning as a whole throughout the school years--comprises this special issue of "English in Education." Specific topics treated are: "What Children Learn in Learning to Read" by R. Morris; "Reading without Primers" by W.…

  13. Developing a structural model of reading: the role of hearing status in reading development over time.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Karien M; Tellings, Agnes; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a structural model of reading based on the Lexical Quality Hypothesis (Perfetti & Hart, 2002). Data from a 4-year longitudinal study of Dutch primary school children with and without hearing loss were used to conduct an exploratory analysis of how lexical components (i.e., decoding skills, lexical decision, and lexical use) relate to one another and to reading comprehension. Our structural model supports a positive role of the quality of the mental lexicon for reading comprehension. Furthermore, it was possible to apply the same conceptual model of reading development to both groups of children when incorporating hearing status as a grouping variable. However, a multigroup comparison model showed that the predictive values of the relations between the different tasks differed for the two groups. PMID:23686229

  14. Evaluating Individualized Reading Programs: A Bayesian Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Martha

    Simple Bayesian approaches can be applied to answer specific questions in evaluating an individualized reading program. A small reading and study skills program located in the counseling center of a major research university collected and compiled data on student characteristics such as class, number of sessions attended, grade point average, and…

  15. Event-specific multiplicative cascade models and an application to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CâRsteanu, Alin; Venugopal, V.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    1999-01-01

    Multiplicative cascades offer parsimonious models capable of capturing the scale-invariant (multifractal scaling) behavior of some geophysical phenomena, such as rainfall, over a large range of scales. While these models achieve a remarkable degree of universality, it is still unclear how to characterize individual events within this framework. The present work offers an event description based on a few most important (amplitude-wise) branchings of the event's multiplicative cascade generator. The proposed method is based on the modulus extrema of wavelet transforms and indexes the branches (or generator weights in the multiplicative cascade model) such that their number at each branching, magnitude, and the relative scales at which they occur can be extracted and memorized. In this way, a particular event can be characterized in a multiplicative cascade framework by only a few significant weights and their respective positioning within the cascade. The application of the present model to rainfall is supported by the evidence of branching of the wavelet modulus extrema as well as by the findings [Venugopal and Foufoula-Georgiou, 1996; Cârsteanu et al., 1997] that an important part of the signal energy of temporal rainfall events can be recovered from a few wavelet-packet components.

  16. Does the PMSP Connectionist Model of Single Word Reading Learn to Read in the Same Way as a Child?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Daisy; Plaut, David; Funnell, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    The Plaut, McClelland, Seidenberg and Patterson (1996) connectionist model of reading was evaluated at two points early in its training against reading data collected from British children on two occasions during their first year of literacy instruction. First, the network's non-word reading was poor relative to word reading when compared with the…

  17. An Evolutionary Cascade Model for Sauropod Dinosaur Gigantism - Overview, Update and Tests

    PubMed Central

    Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades (“Reproduction”, “Feeding”, “Head and neck”, “Avian-style lung”, and “Metabolism”). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait “Very high body mass”. Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size. PMID:24205267

  18. Modeling of self-healing against cascading overload failures in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Fu, Bowen; Yang, Shunkun; Wang, Yunpeng; Lu, Guangquan

    2014-09-01

    The development of online prognostic and fast-recovery technology promotes the realization of self-healing techniques. Considering the cascading overload failures as one of the major failure modes in real networks, we introduce a model for self-healing against overload propagation in complex networks due to malicious attack. Especially, we study the role of basic quantities (restoration timing and resource) in general self-healing restoration against cascading overload failures in network models of homogeneous (Erdős-Rényi) and heterogeneous (scale-free) networks. We demonstrate how networks during cascading failures can be saved from the brink of collapse by proper combination of both restoration timing and resource. And we find that optimal restoration timing for the model and realistic networks exists at a given restoration resource in the self-healing process.

  19. Performance of a model cascade thrust reverser for short-haul applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are presented for a cowlmounted, model cascade thrust reverser suitable for short-haul aircraft. Thrust reverser efficiency and the influence on fan performance were determined from isolated fan-driven models under static and forward velocity conditions. Cascade reverser noise characteristics were determined statically in an isolated pipe-flow test, while aerodynamic installation effects were determined with a wind-tunnel, fan-powered airplane model. Application of test results to short-haul aircraft calculations demonstrated that such a cascade thrust reverser may be able to meet both the performance and noise requirements for short-haul aircraft operation. However, aircraft installation effects can be quite significant.

  20. Analysis of car-following model with cascade compensation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Xing; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Cascade compensation mechanism was designed to improve the dynamical performance of traffic flow system. Two compensation methods were used to study unit step response in time domain and frequency characteristics with different parameters. The overshoot and phase margins are proportional to the compensation parameter in an underdamped condition. Through the comparison we choose the phase-lead compensation method as the main strategy in suppressing the traffic jam. The simulations were conducted under two boundary conditions to verify the validity of the compensator. The conclusion can be drawn that the stability of the system is strengthened with increased phase-lead compensation parameter. Moreover, the numerical simulation results are in good agreement with analytical results.

  1. Modelling of multijunction cascade photovoltaics for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Educato, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative class of photovoltaics was presented, which is designed to overcome two problem areas with conventional cascade designs: poor upper subcell performance and lossy intercell ohmic contact (IOC). It was shown that upper subcell quality can be improved by incorporating additional junctions into the upper subcell and that the problems with monolithic IOCs may be circumvented by using complementary pairs of three-terminal cells or a 1 x 2 voltage-matched configuration. Realistic simulations show that AlGaAs-GaAs and AlGaAs-InGaAs multijunction, multiband-gap solar cells (MJSC) may achieve benginning-of-life (BOL) one-sun, AMO efficiencies of 26 and 28 percent, respectively. Complementary cells made in the AlGaAs-InGaAs system can achieve BOL one-sun AMO efficiencies in excess of 27 percent. Seven-layer MJSCs are most advantageous for space applications due to their superior tolerance to radiation degradation.

  2. Modeling of fissile material diversion in solvent extraction cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.; Carlson, R.W.

    1980-05-22

    Changes were calculated for measurable parameters of a solvent extraction section of a reprocessing plant resulting from postulated fissile material diversion actions. The computer program SEPHIS was modified to calculate the time-dependent concentrations of uranium and plutonium in each stage of a cascade. The calculation of the inventories of uranium and plutonium in each contactor was also included. The concentration and inventory histories were computed for a group of four sequential columns during start-up and for postulated diversion conditions within this group of columns. Monitoring of column exit streams or of integrated column inventories for fissile materials could provide qualitative indications of attempted diversions. However, the time delays and resulting changes are complex and do not correlate quantitatively with the magnitude of the initiating event.

  3. Modeling the dental development of fossil hominins through the inhibitory cascade.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Kes; Wood, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitory cascade is a mathematical model for interpreting the relative size of the occlusal surfaces of mammalian molars in terms of developmental mechanisms. The cascade is derived from experimental studies of mouse molars developed in culture, and has been tested and applied to the dentitions of rodents, ungulates, carnivores, and platyrrhines. Results from such applications have provided new information regarding the origins of plesiomorphic traits in mammalian clade and how derived morphologies may arise. In this study we apply the inhibitory cascade model to the postcanine dentition of a sample of Old World primates that includes fossil hominins. The results of this study suggest that the inhibitory cascade (i.e. M1 < M2 < M3 ) describes the relative sizes of the molar occlusal areas of Old World primates and is likely the plesiomorphic condition for this clade. Within that clade, whereas most Old World monkeys have a M1 < M2 < M3 pattern, most apes have a M1 < M2 ≈ M3 pattern. This modified cascade suggests that greater levels of inhibition (or less activation) are acting on the posterior molars of apes, thus facilitating the reduction of M3 s within the apes. With the exception of the baboon genus Papio, extant congeners typically share the same molar inhibitory cascade. The differences in the relative size relationships observed in the molar and premolar-molar cascades of the species included in the fossil hominin genus Paranthropus suggest that although large postcanine teeth are a shared derived trait within this genus, the developmental basis for postcanine megadontia may not be the same in these two Paranthropus taxa. Our results show that phenotypic characters such as postcanine megadontia may not reflect common development. PMID:25420453

  4. General model of a cascade of reactions with time delays: Global stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Marek

    2015-07-01

    The problem considered in this paper consists of a cascade of reactions with discrete as well as distributed delays, which arose in the context of Hes1 gene expression. For the abstract general model sufficient conditions for global stability are presented. Then the abstract result is applied to the Hes1 model.

  5. ARRA: Reconfiguring Power Systems to Minimize Cascading Failures - Models and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Ian; Hiskens, Ian; Linderoth, Jeffrey; Wright, Stephen

    2013-12-16

    Building on models of electrical power systems, and on powerful mathematical techniques including optimization, model predictive control, and simluation, this project investigated important issues related to the stable operation of power grids. A topic of particular focus was cascading failures of the power grid: simulation, quantification, mitigation, and control. We also analyzed the vulnerability of networks to component failures, and the design of networks that are responsive to and robust to such failures. Numerous other related topics were investigated, including energy hubs and cascading stall of induction machines

  6. Charm quark energy loss in infinite QCD matter using a parton cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Bass, Steffen A.; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2015-02-01

    We utilize the parton cascade model to study the evolution of charm quarks propagating through a thermal brick of QCD matter. We determine the energy loss and the transport coefficient q ̂ for charm quarks. The calculations are done at a constant temperature of 350 MeV and the results are compared to analytical calculations of heavy-quark energy loss in order to validate the applicability of using a parton cascade model for the study of heavy-quark dynamics in hot and dense QCD matter.

  7. Reading and a Diffusion Model Analysis of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed. PMID:22612543

  8. Schools as host environments: toward a schoolwide reading improvement model.

    PubMed

    Kame'enui, E J; Simmons, D C; Coyne, M D

    2000-01-01

    Despite vast differences among school districts across the country, all students must learn how to read in a complex "host-environment" called a school. A challenge in beginning reading, therefore, is to transcend these differences and focus, instead, on the essential task of teaching reading in schools. Teaching reading involves attending to what we know about beginning reading and the alphabetic writing system, the difficulties of reading, and the challenges associated with dyslexia. Teaching reading in a school requires that interventions be tailored to the unique needs of an individual school and implemented and sustained at the school building level. In this article, we outline the Schoolwide Reading Improvement Model (SRIM). This model is characterized by the strategic integration of research-based practices in assessment, instructional design, and beginning reading instruction. Additionally, the SRIM acknowledges the specific needs of individual schools and is customized to provide the best fit with each unique "host-environment." First we provide a description of each major stage of the SRIM and then an example of its application in a school district in western Oregon. PMID:20563779

  9. Incorporating RTI in a Hybrid Model of Reading Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mercedes; Wagner, Richard K.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Quinn, Jamie M.; Lopez, Danielle; Petscher, Yaacov

    2014-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate a hybrid model of identification that incorporates response to instruction and intervention (RTI) as one of the key symptoms of reading disability. The 1-year stability of alternative operational definitions of reading disability was examined in a large-scale sample of students who were followed longitudinally…

  10. Cascading failures in bi-partite graphs: model for systemic risk propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008-2011. PMID:23386974

  11. Cascading Failures in Bi-partite Graphs: Model for Systemic Risk Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008–2011. PMID:23386974

  12. Cumulative Risk Disparities in Children's Neurocognitive Functioning: A Developmental Cascade Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Mark; Browne, Dillon T.; Plamondon, Andre; Daniel, Ella; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the role of cumulative social risk on children's theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF) across early development. Further, we also tested a cascade model of development in which children's social cognition at 18 months was hypothesized to predict ToM and EF at age 4.5 through intermediary…

  13. A NEW MODEL FOR GAMMA-RAY CASCADES IN EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Huan, H.; Weisgarber, T.; Wakely, S. P.; Arlen, T.

    2011-07-10

    Very high energy (VHE, E {approx}> 100 GeV) gamma rays emitted by extragalactic sources, such as blazars, initiate electromagnetic cascades in the intergalactic medium. The cascade photons arrive at the Earth with angular and temporal distributions correlated with the extragalactic magnetic field (EGMF). We have developed a new semi-analytical model of the cascade properties which is more accurate than previous analytic approaches and faster than full Monte Carlo simulations. Within its range of applicability, our model can quickly generate cascade spectra for a variety of source emission models, EGMF strengths, and assumptions about the source livetime. In this Letter, we describe the properties of the model and demonstrate its utility by exploring the gamma-ray emission from the blazar RGB J0710+591. In particular, we predict, under various scenarios, the VHE and high-energy (100 MeV {approx}< E {approx}< 300 GeV) fluxes detectable with the VERITAS and Fermi Large Area Telescope observatories. We then develop a systematic framework for comparing the predictions to published results, obtaining constraints on the EGMF strength. At a confidence level of 95%, we find the lower limit on the EGMF strength to be {approx}2 x 10{sup -16} G if no limit is placed on the livetime of the source or {approx}3 x 10{sup -18} G if the source livetime is limited to the past {approx}3 years during which Fermi observations have taken place.

  14. SPATIAL FOREST SOIL PROPERTIES FOR ECOLOGICAL MODELING IN THE WESTERN OREGON CASCADES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate objective of this work is to provide a spatially distributed database of soil properties to serve as inputs to model ecological processes in western forests at the landscape scale. The Central Western Oregon Cascades are rich in biodiversity and they are a fascinati...

  15. Using the Cascade Model to Improve Antenatal Screening for the Hemoglobin Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Dinah; Papadopoulos, Irena; Kelly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The inherited hemoglobin disorders constitute a major public health problem. Facilitators (experienced hemoglobin counselors) were trained to deliver knowledge and skills to "frontline" practitioners to enable them to support parents during antenatal screening via a cascade (train-the-trainer) model. Objectives of evaluation were to…

  16. Temperament Pathways to Childhood Disruptive Behavior and Adolescent Substance Abuse: Testing a Cascade Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Michelle M.; Pierce, Laura; Nigg, Joel T.; Jester, Jennifer M.; Adams, Kenneth; Puttler, Leon I.; Buu, Anne; Fitzgerald, Hiram; Zucker, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Temperament traits may increase risk for developmental psychopathology like Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and disruptive behaviors during childhood, as well as predisposing to substance abuse during adolescence. In the current study, a cascade model of trait pathways to adolescent substance abuse was examined. Component…

  17. Cascade stability of the debris catalog under a two-component flux model

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Stability is analyzed with a two component model. The critical densities derived are in agreement with other estimates in the appropriate limits. The current catalog is stable for nominal decay parameters, although further growth or cascade coefficients higher than nominal could be causes for concern. Sources reduce stability, which is more of a problem at high altitudes than low.

  18. Testing an Idealized Dynamic Cascade Model of the Development of Serious Violence in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kenneth A.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Malone, Patrick S.

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic cascade model of development of serious adolescent violence was proposed and tested through prospective inquiry with 754 children (50% male; 43% African American) from 27 schools at 4 geographic sites followed annually from kindergarten through Grade 11 (ages 5-18). Self, parent, teacher, peer, observer, and administrative reports…

  19. The Difference Model: A New Explanation for Some Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Ward

    1970-01-01

    Four models for accounting for reading difficulties are described: defect, deficit, disruption, and difference. Poor readers fitting two of these (difference and deficit) are compared with each other and with good readers. (Author)

  20. Modeling cascading failures with the crisis of trust in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chengqi; Bao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Jingchi; Xue, Yibo

    2015-10-01

    In social networks, some friends often post or disseminate malicious information, such as advertising messages, informal overseas purchasing messages, illegal messages, or rumors. Too much malicious information may cause a feeling of intense annoyance. When the feeling exceeds a certain threshold, it will lead social network users to distrust these friends, which we call the crisis of trust. The crisis of trust in social networks has already become a universal concern and an urgent unsolved problem. As a result of the crisis of trust, users will cut off their relationships with some of their untrustworthy friends. Once a few of these relationships are made unavailable, it is likely that other friends will decline trust, and a large portion of the social network will be influenced. The phenomenon in which the unavailability of a few relationships will trigger the failure of successive relationships is known as cascading failure dynamics. To our best knowledge, no one has formally proposed cascading failures dynamics with the crisis of trust in social networks. In this paper, we address this potential issue, quantify the trust between two users based on user similarity, and model the minimum tolerance with a nonlinear equation. Furthermore, we construct the processes of cascading failures dynamics by considering the unique features of social networks. Based on real social network datasets (Sina Weibo, Facebook and Twitter), we adopt two attack strategies (the highest trust attack (HT) and the lowest trust attack (LT)) to evaluate the proposed dynamics and to further analyze the changes of the topology, connectivity, cascading time and cascade effect under the above attacks. We numerically find that the sparse and inhomogeneous network structure in our cascading model can better improve the robustness of social networks than the dense and homogeneous structure. However, the network structure that seems like ripples is more vulnerable than the other two network

  1. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 2, User`s manual for CASCADR8

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas.

  2. A cascade model connecting life stress to risk behavior among rural African American emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Brody, Gene H; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    A three-wave cascade model linking life stress to increases in risk behavior was tested with 347 African American emerging adults living in the rural South. Data analyses using structural equation modeling and latent growth curve modeling demonstrated that life stress was linked to increases in risk behavior as African Americans transitioned out of secondary school. The cascade model indicated that life stress fostered increases in negative emotions. Negative emotions, in turn, were linked to increases in affiliations with deviant peers and romantic partners; this forecast increases in risk behavior. The findings supported a stress proliferation framework, in which primary stressors affect increases in secondary stressors that carry forward to influence changes in risk behaviors that can potentially compromise mental health. PMID:20576186

  3. Lumley's energy cascade dissipation rate model for boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    True dissipation occurs mainly at the highest wavenumbers where the eddy sizes are comparatively small. These high wavenumbers receive their energy through the spectral cascade of energy starting with the largest eddies spilling energy into the smaller eddies, passing through each wavenumber until it is dissipated at the microscopic scale. However, a small percentage of the energy does not spill continuously through the cascade but is instantly passed to the higher wavenumbers. Consequently, the smallest eddies receive a certain amount of energy almost immediately. As the spectral energy cascade continues, the highest wavenumber needs a certain time to receive all the energy which has been transferred from the largest eddies. As such, there is a time delay, of the order of tau, between the generation of energy by the largest eddies and the eventual dissipation of this energy. For equilibrium turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, there is a wide range where energy is neither produced by the large eddies nor dissipated by viscosity, but is conserved and passed from wavenumber to higher wavenumbers. The rate at which energy cascades from one wavenumber to another is proportional to the energy contained within that wavenumber. This rate is constant and has been used in the past as a dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. However, this is true only in steady, equilibrium turbulence. Most dissipation models contend that the production of dissipation is proportional to the production of energy and that the destruction of dissipation is proportional to the destruction of energy. In essence, these models state that the change in the dissipation rate is proportional to the change in the kinetic energy. This assumption is obviously incorrect for the case where there is no production of turbulent energy, yet energy continues to cascade from large to small eddies. If the time lag between the onset on the energy cascade to the destruction of energy at the microscale can be

  4. Reading Comprehension of Scientific Text: A Domain-Specific Test of the Direct and Inferential Mediation Model of Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromley, Jennifer G.; Snyder-Hogan, Lindsey E.; Luciw-Dubas, Ulana A.

    2010-01-01

    Reading comprehension is strongly associated with academic achievement, including science achievement. A better understanding of reading comprehension processes in science text might hold promise for improving science achievement in the long run. We tested the fit of the direct and inferential mediation (DIME) model of reading comprehension…

  5. Observed and NWP simulated rainfall uncertainty cascading into rainfall-runoff and flood inundation impact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignet, M.; Freer, J. E.; de Almeida, G. A.; Coxon, G.; Neal, J. C.; Champion, A.; Cloke, H. L.; Bates, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observed and numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulated precipitation products typically show differences in their spatial and temporal distribution. These differences can considerably influence the ability to predict hydrological responses. For flood inundation impact studies, as in forecast situations, an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic model chain is needed to quantify the extent of flood risk. Uncertainties cascaded through the model chain are seldom explored, and more importantly, how potential input uncertainties propagate through this cascade is still poorly understood. Such a project requires a combination of modelling capabilities, the non-linear transformation of rainfall to river flow using rainfall-runoff models, and hydraulic flood wave propagation based on the runoff predictions. Accounting for uncertainty in each component is important for quantifying impacts and understanding flood risk for different return periods. In this paper, we propose to address this issue by i) exploring the effects of errors in rainfall on inundation predictive capacity within an uncertainty framework by testing inundation uncertainty against different comparable meteorological conditions (i.e. using different rainfall products) and ii) testing different techniques to cascade uncertainties (e.g. bootstrapping, PPU envelope) within the GLUE (generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation) framework. Our method cascades rainfall uncertainties into multiple rainfall-runoff model structures as part of the Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE). The resultant prediction uncertainties in upstream discharge provide uncertain boundary conditions which are cascaded into a simplified shallow water hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP). Rainfall data captured by three different measurement techniques - rain gauges, gridded radar data and numerical weather predictions (NWP) models are evaluated. The study is performed in the Severn catchment over summer 2007, where a series of

  6. Nuclear Reactions X-Sections By Evaporation Model, Gamma-Cascades

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-06-27

    Calculation of energy-averaged cross sections for nuclear reactions with emission of particles and gamma rays and fission. The models employed are the evaporation model with inclusion of pre-equilibrium decay and gamma ray cascade model. Angular momentum and parity conservation are accounted for. Major improvement to the 1976 STAPRE program (NEA 0461) relates to level density approach, implemwnted in subroutine ZSTDE. Generalized superfluid model is incorporated, Boltzman-gas modelling of intrinsic state density and semi-empirical modelling ofmore » a few quasiparticle effects in total level density in equilibrium and saddle deformations of actinide nuclei.« less

  7. Glacier modeling in support of field observations of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, Edward G.; Bidlake, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The long-term USGS measurement and reporting of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier was assisted in balance years 2006 and 2007 by a new mass balance model. The model incorporates a temperature-index melt computation and accumulation is modeled from glacier air temperature and gaged precipitation at a remote site. Mass balance modeling was used with glaciological measurements to estimate dates and magnitudes of critical mass balance phenomena. In support of the modeling, a detailed analysis was made of the "glacier cooling effect" that reduces summer air temperature near the ice surface as compared to that predicted on the basis of a spatially uniform temperature lapse rate. The analysis was based on several years of data from measurements of near-surface air temperature on the glacier. The 2006 and 2007 winter balances of South Cascade Glacier, computed with this new, model-augmented methodology, were 2.61 and 3.41 mWE, respectively. The 2006 and 2007 summer balances were -4.20 and -3.63 mWE, respectively, and the 2006 and 2007 net balances were -1.59 and -0.22 mWE. PDF version of a presentation on the mass balance of South Cascade Glacier in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  8. Distributed energy balance modeling of South Cascade Glacier, Washington and assessment of model uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anslow, Faron S.; Hostetler, S.; Bidlake, W.R.; Clark, P.U.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a physically based, distributed surface energy balance model to simulate glacier mass balance under meteorological and climatological forcing. Here we apply the model to estimate summer ablation on South Cascade Glacier, Washington, for the 2004 and 2005 mass balance seasons. To arrive at optimal mass balance simulations, we investigate and quantify model uncertainty associated with selecting from a range of physical parameter values that are not commonly measured in glaciological mass balance field studies. We optimize the performance of the model by varying values for atmospheric transmissivity, the albedo of surrounding topography, precipitation-elevation lapse rate, surface roughness for turbulent exchange of momentum, and snow albedo aging coefficient. Of these the snow aging parameter and precipitation lapse rates have the greatest influence on the modeled ablation. We examined model sensitivity to varying parameters by performing an additional 103 realizations with parameters randomly chosen over a ??5% range centered about the optimum values. The best fit suite of model parameters yielded a net balance of -1.69??0.38 m water equivalent (WE) for the 2004 water year and -2.10??0.30 m WE up to 11 September 2005. The 2004 result is within 3% of the measured value. These simulations account for 91% and 93% of the variance in measured ablation for the respective years. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. A Model of Reading Teaching for University EFL Students: Need Analysis and Model Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamra, Arifuddin; Syatriana, Eny

    2012-01-01

    This study designed a model of teaching reading for university EFL students based on the English curriculum at the Faculty of Languages and Literature and the concept of the team-based learning in order to improve the reading comprehension of the students. What kind of teaching model can help students to improve their reading comprehension? The…

  10. Integrated snow and hydrology modeling for climate change impact assessment in Oregon Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeeq, M.; Grant, G.; Lewis, S.; Nolin, A. W.; Hempel, L. A.; Cooper, M.; Tague, C.

    2014-12-01

    In the Pacific Northwest (PNW), increasing temperatures are expected to alter the hydrologic regimes of streams by shifting precipitation from snow to rain and forcing earlier snowmelt. How are such changes likely to affect peak flows across the region? Shifts in peak flows have obvious implications for changing flood risk, but are also likely to affect channel morphology, sediment transport, aquatic habitat, and water quality, issues with potentially high economic and environmental cost. Our goal, then, is to rigorously evaluate sensitivity to potential peak flow changes across the PNW. We address this by developing a detailed representation of snowpack and streamflow evolution under varying climate scenarios using a cascade-modeling approach. We have identified paired watersheds located on the east (Metolius River) and west (McKenzie River) sides of the Cascades, representing dry and wet climatic regimes, respectively. The tributaries of these two rivers are comprised of contrasting hydrologic regimes: surface-runoff dominated western cascades and deep-groundwater dominated high-cascades systems. We use a detailed hydro-ecological model (RHESSys) in conjunction with a spatially distributed snowpack evolution model (SnowModel) to characterize the peak flow behavior under present and future climate. We first calibrated and validated the SnowModel using observed temperature, precipitation, snow water equivalent, and manual snow survey data sets. We then employed a multi-objective calibration strategy for RHESSys using the simulated snow accumulation and melt from SnowModel and observed streamflow. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency between observed and simulated streamflow varies between 0.5 in groundwater and 0.71 in surface-runoff dominated systems. The initial results indicate enhanced peak flow under future climate across all basins, but the magnitude of increase varies by the level of snowpack and deep-groundwater contribution in the watershed. Our continuing effort

  11. A minimal cascade model for the mitotic oscillator involving cyclin and cdc2 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeter, A

    1991-01-01

    A minimal model for the mitotic oscillator is presented. The model, built on recent experimental advances, is based on the cascade of post-translational modification that modulates the activity of cdc2 kinase during the cell cycle. The model pertains to the situation encountered in early amphibian embryos, where the accumulation of cyclin suffices to trigger the onset of mitosis. In the first cycle of the bicyclic cascade model, cyclin promotes the activation of cdc2 kinase through reversible dephosphorylation, and in the second cycle, cdc2 kinase activates a cyclin protease by reversible phosphorylation. That cyclin activates cdc2 kinase while the kinase triggers the degradation of cyclin has suggested that oscillations may originate from such a negative feedback loop [Félix, M. A., Labbé, J. C., Dorée, M., Hunt, T. & Karsenti, E. (1990) Nature (London) 346, 379-382]. This conjecture is corroborated by the model, which indicates that sustained oscillations of the limit cycle type can arise in the cascade, provided that a threshold exists in the activation of cdc2 kinase by cyclin and in the activation of cyclin proteolysis by cdc2 kinase. The analysis shows how miototic oscillations may readily arise from time lags associated with these thresholds and from the delayed negative feedback provided by cdc2-induced cyclin degradation. A mechanism for the origin of the thresholds is proposed in terms of the phenomenon of zero-order ultrasensitivity previously described for biochemical systems regulated by covalent modification. PMID:1833774

  12. Effective Reading and Writing Instruction: A Focus on Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Kelley; Berkeley, Sheri

    2012-01-01

    When providing effective reading and writing instruction, teachers need to provide explicit modeling. Modeling is particularly important when teaching students to use cognitive learning strategies. Examples of how teachers can provide specific, explicit, and flexible instructional modeling is presented in the context of two evidence-based…

  13. SWIFT: a dynamical model of saccade generation during reading.

    PubMed

    Engbert, Ralf; Nuthmann, Antje; Richter, Eike M; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2005-10-01

    Mathematical models have become an important tool for understanding the control of eye movements during reading. Main goals of the development of the SWIFT model (R. Engbert, A. Longtin, & R. Kliegl, 2002) were to investigate the possibility of spatially distributed processing and to implement a general mechanism for all types of eye movements observed in reading experiments. The authors present an advanced version of SWIFT that integrates properties of the oculomotor system and effects of word recognition to explain many of the experimental phenomena faced in reading research. They propose new procedures for the estimation of model parameters and for the test of the model's performance. They also present a mathematical analysis of the dynamics of the SWIFT model. Finally, within this framework, they present an analysis of the transition from parallel to serial processing. PMID:16262468

  14. Hydraulic modeling for lahar hazards at cascades volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The National Weather Service flood routing model DAMBRK is able to closely replicate field-documented stages of historic and prehistoric lahars from Mt. Rainier, Washington, and Mt. Hood, Oregon. Modeled time-of-travel of flow waves are generally consistent with documented lahar travel-times from other volcanoes around the world. The model adequately replicates a range of lahars and debris flows, including the 230 million km3 Electron lahar from Mt. Rainier, as well as a 10 m3 debris flow generated in a large outdoor experimental flume. The model is used to simulate a hypothetical lahar with a volume of 50 million m3 down the East Fork Hood River from Mt. Hood, Oregon. Although a flow such as this is thought to be possible in the Hood River valley, no field evidence exists on which to base a hazards assessment. DAMBRK seems likely to be usable in many volcanic settings to estimate discharge, velocity, and inundation areas of lahars when input hydrographs and energy-loss coefficients can be reasonably estimated.

  15. An equivalent circuit model for terahertz quantum cascade lasers: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chen; Xu, Tian-Hong; Wan, Wen-Jian; Zhu, Yong-Hao; Cao, Jun-Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz QCLs) emitted at 4.4 THz are fabricated and characterized. An equivalent circuit model is established based on the five-level rate equations to describe their characteristics. In order to illustrate the capability of the model, the steady and dynamic performances of the fabricated THz QCLs are simulated by the model. Compared to the sophisticated numerical methods, the presented model has advantages of fast calculation and good compatibility with circuit simulation for system-level designs and optimizations. The validity of the model is verified by the experimental and numerical results. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339803), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010205), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61131006, 61321492, and 61404149), the Major National Development Project of Scientific Instrument and Equipment, China (Grant No. 2011YQ150021), the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX02707), the Major Project, China (Grant No. YYYJ-1123-1), the International Collaboration and Innovation Program on High Mobility Materials Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Shanghai Municipal Commission of Science and Technology, China (Grant Nos. 14530711300).

  16. Cascaded Network Body Channel Model for Intrabody Communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Tang, Xian; Choy, Chiu Sing; Sobelman, Gerald E

    2016-07-01

    Intrabody communication has been of great research interest in recent years. This paper proposes a novel, compact but accurate body transmission channel model based on RC distribution networks and transmission line theory. The comparison between simulation and measurement results indicates that the proposed approach accurately models the body channel characteristics. In addition, the impedance-matching networks at the transmitter output and the receiver input further maximize the power transferred to the receiver, relax the receiver complexity, and increase the transmission performance. Based on the simulation results, the power gain can be increased by up to 16 dB after matching. A binary phase-shift keying modulation scheme is also used to evaluate the bit-error-rate improvement. PMID:26111404

  17. Effects of temporal correlations on cascades: Threshold models on temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backlund, Ville-Pekka; Saramäki, Jari; Pan, Raj Kumar

    2014-06-01

    A person's decision to adopt an idea or product is often driven by the decisions of peers, mediated through a network of social ties. A common way of modeling adoption dynamics is to use threshold models, where a node may become an adopter given a high enough rate of contacts with adopted neighbors. We study the dynamics of threshold models that take both the network topology and the timings of contacts into account, using empirical contact sequences as substrates. The models are designed such that adoption is driven by the number of contacts with different adopted neighbors within a chosen time. We find that while some networks support cascades leading to network-level adoption, some do not: the propagation of adoption depends on several factors from the frequency of contacts to burstiness and timing correlations of contact sequences. More specifically, burstiness is seen to suppress cascade sizes when compared to randomized contact timings, while timing correlations between contacts on adjacent links facilitate cascades.

  18. Modeling elephant-mediated cascading effects of water point closure.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Jelle P; Van Langevelde, Frank; Prins, Herbert H T; Grant, C C; Peel, Mike J S; Coughenour, Michael B; De Knegt, Henrik J; Slotow, Rob; Smit, Izak P J; Kiker, Greg A; De Boer, Willem F

    2015-03-01

    Wildlife management to reduce the impact of wildlife on their habitat can be done in several ways, among which removing animals (by either culling or translocation) is most often used. There are, however, alternative ways to control wildlife densities, such as opening or closing water points. The effects of these alternatives are poorly studied. In this paper, we focus on manipulating large herbivores through the closure of water points (WPs). Removal of artificial WPs has been suggested in order to change the distribution of African elephants, which occur in high densities in national parks in Southern Africa and are thought to have a destructive effect on the vegetation. Here, we modeled the long-term effects of different scenarios of WP closure on the spatial distribution of elephants, and consequential effects on the vegetation and other herbivores in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using a dynamic ecosystem model, SAVANNA, scenarios were evaluated that varied in availability of artificial WPs; levels of natural water; and elephant densities. Our modeling results showed that elephants can indirectly negatively affect the distributions of meso-mixed feeders, meso-browsers, and some meso-grazers under wet conditions. The closure of artificial WPs hardly had any effect during these natural wet conditions. Under dry conditions, the spatial distribution of both elephant bulls and cows changed when the availability of artificial water was severely reduced in the model. These changes in spatial distribution triggered changes in the spatial availability of woody biomass over the simulation period of 80 years, and this led to changes in the rest of the herbivore community, resulting in increased densities of all herbivores, except for giraffe and steenbok, in areas close to rivers. The spatial distributions of elephant bulls and cows showed to be less affected by the closure of WPs than most of the other herbivore species. Our study contributes to ecologically

  19. Confronting Galactic center and dwarf spheroidal gamma-ray observations with cascade annihilation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Ghosh, Tathagata; Strigari, Louis E.

    2015-10-01

    Many particle dark matter models predict that the dark matter undergoes cascade annihilations, i.e. the annihilation products are 4-body final states. In the context of model-independent cascade annihilation processes, we study the compatibility of the dark matter interpretation of the Fermi-LAT Galactic center gamma-ray emission with null detections from dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For canonical values of the Milky Way density profile and the local dark matter density, we find that the dark matter interpretation to the Galactic center emission is strongly constrained. However, uncertainties in the dark matter distribution weaken the constraints and leave open dark matter interpretations over a wide range of mass scales.

  20. A Simple Model of Cross-Field Diffusion in Hall Thrusters based on Turbulence Energy Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.; Cha, Eunsun; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    We present a Hall plasma thruster model based on turbulence energy cascade to smaller scales characterized by the electrons gyro-radius. We employ scaling arguments originally developed for viscous energy dissipation in turbulent fluid mechanics with the assumption that the electron scattering rate is expected to scale as the strain-rate in the electron fluid, and that the size of the largest turbulent eddies scale as the electron gyro-radius and local drift velocity. Using this framework, expressions are derived for the entropy production rate which can be used in an independent entropy transport equation from which the transport coefficient can be derived. Alternatively, if one assumes that the main source of electron energy dissipation is turbulent energy cascade, then the energy dissipation replaces the Ohmic heating term in the electron energy equation. We will present the general results of this analysis, as well as initial results obtained from 2-D hybrid simulations that incorporate this model and its variants.

  1. Effects of two-temperature model on cascade evolution in Ni and NiFe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Xue, Haizhou; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.

    2016-07-05

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of Ni ion cascades in Ni and equiatomic NiFe under the following conditions: (a) classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations without consideration of electronic energy loss, (b) classical MD simulations with the electronic stopping included, and (c) using the coupled two-temperature MD (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions. Our results indicate that the electronic e ects are more profound in the higher energy cascades and that the 2T-MD model results in a smaller amount of surviving damage and smaller defect clusters, while less damage is produced in NiFe than inmore » Ni.« less

  2. From child maltreatment to adolescent cannabis abuse and dependence: A developmental cascade model

    PubMed Central

    Rogosch, Fred A.; Oshri, Assaf; Cicchetti, Dante

    2010-01-01

    A developmental cascade model tested associations among child maltreatment, internalizing and externalizing psychopathology, social competence, and cannabis abuse and dependence symptoms in a longitudinal cohort (N = 415). Nested structural equation models evaluated continuity and cross-domain influences among broad multi-informant constructs across four developmental periods: age 7 to 9, 10 to 12, 13 to 15, and 15 to 18. Results indicated significant paths from child maltreatment to early externalizing and internalizing problems and social competence, as well as to cannabis abuse and dependence (CAD) symptoms in adolescence. Youth CAD symptoms were primarily related directly to child maltreatment and externalizing problems. Childhood internalizing symptoms contributed to later childhood decreases in social competence, which predicted increases in late adolescent externalizing problems. Using a developmental psychopathology framework, results are discussed in relation to cascade and transactional effects and the interplay between problem behaviors during childhood and development of CAD symptoms during early and late adolescence. PMID:20883588

  3. “Serial” effects in parallel models of reading

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Furber, Steve; Welbourne, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence showing that the time to read a word out loud is influenced by an interaction between orthographic length and lexicality. Given that length effects are interpreted by advocates of dual-route models as evidence of serial processing this would seem to pose a serious challenge to models of single word reading which postulate a common parallel processing mechanism for reading both words and nonwords (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; Rastle, Havelka, Wydell, Coltheart, & Besner, 2009). However, an alternative explanation of these data is that visual processes outside the scope of existing parallel models are responsible for generating the word-length related phenomena (Seidenberg & Plaut, 1998). Here we demonstrate that a parallel model of single word reading can account for the differential word-length effects found in the naming latencies of words and nonwords, provided that it includes a mapping from visual to orthographic representations, and that the nature of those orthographic representations are not preconstrained. The model can also simulate other supposedly “serial” effects. The overall findings were consistent with the view that visual processing contributes substantially to the word-length effects in normal reading and provided evidence to support the single-route theory which assumes words and nonwords are processed in parallel by a common mechanism. PMID:22343366

  4. Cascade model for particle concentration and enstrophy in fully developed turbulence with mass-loading feedback.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R C; Cuzzi, J N

    2007-05-01

    A cascade model is described based on multiplier distributions determined from three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent particle laden flows, which include two-way coupling between the phases at global mass loadings equal to unity. The governing Eulerian equations are solved using psuedospectral methods on up to 512(3) computional grid points. DNS results for particle concentration and enstrophy at Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers in the range 34-170 were used to directly determine multiplier distributions on spatial scales three times the Kolmogorov length scale. The multiplier probability distribution functions (PDFs) are well characterized by the beta distribution function. The width of the PDFs, which is a measure of intermittency, decreases with increasing mass loading within the local region where the multipliers are measured. The functional form of this dependence is not sensitive to Reynolds numbers in the range considered. A partition correlation probability is included in the cascade model to account for the observed spatial anticorrelation between particle concentration and enstrophy. Joint probability distribution functions of concentration and enstrophy generated using the cascade model are shown to be in excellent agreement with those derived directly from our 3D simulations. Probabilities predicted by the cascade model are presented at Reynolds numbers well beyond what is achievable by direct simulation. These results clearly indicate that particle mass loading significantly reduces the probabilities of high particle concentration and enstrophy relative to those resulting from unloaded runs. Particle mass density appears to reach a limit at around 100 times the gas density. This approach has promise for significant computational savings in certain applications. PMID:17677162

  5. Overall picture of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances within a modified practical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovoj, A. M.; Mitsyna, L. V.; Jovancevic, N.

    2016-05-01

    The intensities of two-step cascades in 43 nuclei of mass number in the range of 28 ≤ A ≤ 200 were approximated to a high degree of precision within a modified version of the practical cascade-gammadecay model introduced earlier. In this version, the rate of the decrease in the model-dependent density of vibrational levels has the same value for any Cooper pair undergoing breakdown. The most probable values of radiative strength functions both for E1 and for M1 transitions are determined by using one or two peaks against a smooth model dependence on the gamma-transition energy. The statement that the thresholds for the breaking of Cooper pairs are higher for spherical than for deformed nuclei is a basic result of the respective analysis. The parameters of the cascade-decay process are now determined to a precision that makes it possible to observe the systematic distinctions between them for nuclei characterized by different parities of neutrons and protons.

  6. Modeling Snowcover Sensitivity to Warming Temperature Across a Climatic Gradient in the Oregon Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M. G.; Sproles, E.; Nolin, A. W.; Rittger, K. E.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Warming winter temperatures will continue to shift precipitation from snow to rain, decreasing mountain snowpacks in temperature-sensitive regions such as the Pacific Northwest. Snow in the Oregon Cascades is particularly at risk because it falls at temperatures close to the melting point. The west side of the Oregon Cascades receives significantly more winter precipitation than the east side (2000 mm vs. 600 mm). While previous studies have focused on the west side of the Oregon Cascades, to date, no study has examined effects of warming temperature on snow over both the east and west sides of this mountain range. This study examines the effect of warming temperatures on present day and future patterns of snowpack accumulation and ablation in the headwater catchments of McKenzie (west side) and Metolius (east side) River Basins of the Oregon Cascades. This study employs a process-based, spatially distributed model, SnowModel, to quantify snow accumulation and ablation. We run the model at 100-m spatial scale on a daily time step, driving the model using spatially distributed meteorological data from stations in and around the sub-basins. The modeling period covers 1989-2009, during which time the region experienced high, low, and average snow water equivalent (SWE). For each basin, we quantify the date and magnitude of peak SWE, the date of snow disappearance, the ratio of SWE to winter precipitation (SWE:P), and the snow-covered area (SCA) at peak SWE for each year. We validate our model results using available SWE measurements and snow extent from Landsat remote sensing imagery. SnowModel is then run using perturbed meteorological input data (+1°C, +2°C, +3°C, +4°C and ×10% precipitation) to evaluate the potential effects of a warmer, wetter/drier winter climate on snowpack accumulation and melt in the watersheds. Simulations of SWE, precipitation, and temperature in the McKenzie Basin for the study period have Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies of 0.83, 0.97, and

  7. Examining the Simple View of Reading Model for United States High School Spanish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Richard; Patton, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The Simple View of Reading (SVR) model, which posits that reading comprehension is the product of word decoding and language comprehension that make independent contributions to reading skill, has been found to explain the acquisition of first language (L1) reading and second language (L2) reading in young English language learners (ELLs).…

  8. SWIFT: A Dynamical Model of Saccade Generation during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbert, Ralf; Nuthmann, Antje; Richter, Eike M.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical models have become an important tool for understanding the control of eye movements during reading. Main goals of the development of the SWIFT model (R. Engbert, A. Longtin, & R. Kliegl, 2002) were to investigate the possibility of spatially distributed processing and to implement a general mechanism for all types of eye movements…

  9. Equivalent circuit-level model and improvement of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhou; Shaobin Liu; Jie Wu; Xiaoliu Zhang; Wu Tang

    2014-04-28

    An equivalent circuit-level model of terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is developed by using rate equations. This model can be employed to investigate the characteristics of THz QCLs accurately and to improve their design. We use the circuit-level model to analyse a new active structure, which can improve the performance of THz QCLs by means of enhancing carrier injection. The simulation result shows that THz QCLs with the new active structure have a much higher performance compared with conventional THz QCLs. The high-performance THz QCLs are expected to be operated at higher temperatures. (lasers)

  10. Monte Carlo Modeling of Cascade Gamma Rays in 86Y PET imaging: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-01-01

    86Y is a PET agent that could be used as an ideal surrogate to allow personalized dosimetry in 90Y radionuclide therapy. However, 86Y also emits cascade gamma rays. We have developed a Monte Carlo program based on SimSET to model cascade gamma rays in PET imaging. The new simulation was validated with the GATE simulation package. Agreements within 15% were found in spatial resolution, apparent scatter fraction (ratio of coincidences outside peak regions in line source sinograms), singles and coincidences statistics and detected photons energy distribution within the PET energy window. A 20% discrepancy was observed in the absolute scatter fraction, likely caused by differences in the tracking of higher-energy cascade gamma photons. On average the new simulation is 6 times faster than GATE, and the computing time can be further improved by using variance reduction techniques currently available in SimSET. Comparison with phantom acquisitions showed agreements in spatial resolutions and the general shape of projection profiles; however, the standard scatter correction method on the scanner is not directly applicable for 86Y PET as it leads to incorrect scatter fractions. The new simulation was used to characterize 86Y PET. Compared with conventional 18F PET, in which major contamination at low count rates comes from scattered events, cascade gamma-involved events are more important in 86Y PET. The two types of contaminations have completely different distribution patterns, which should be considered for the corrections of their effects. Our approach will be further improved in the future in the modeling of random coincidences and tracking of high energy photons, and simulation results will be used for the development of correction methods in 86Y PET. PMID:19521011

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of cascade gamma rays in 86Y PET imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuping; El Fakhri, Georges

    2009-07-01

    86Y is a PET agent that could be used as an ideal surrogate to allow personalized dosimetry in 90Y radionuclide therapy. However, 86Y also emits cascade gamma rays. We have developed a Monte Carlo program based on SimSET (Simulation System for Emission Tomography) to model cascade gamma rays in PET imaging. The new simulation was validated with the GATE simulation package. Agreements within 15% were found in spatial resolution, apparent scatter fraction (ratio of coincidences outside peak regions in line source sinograms), single and coincidence statistics and detected photons energy distribution within the PET energy window. A discrepancy of 20% was observed in the absolute scatter fraction, likely caused by differences in the tracking of higher energy cascade gamma photons. On average, the new simulation is 6 times faster than GATE, and the computing time can be further improved by using variance reduction techniques currently available in SimSET. Comparison with phantom acquisitions showed agreements in spatial resolutions and the general shape of projection profiles; however, the standard scatter correction method on the scanner is not directly applicable to 86Y PET as it leads to incorrect scatter fractions. The new simulation was used to characterize 86Y PET. Compared with conventional 18F PET, in which major contamination at low count rates comes from scattered events, cascade gamma-involved events are more important in 86Y PET. The two types of contaminations have completely different distribution patterns, which should be considered for the corrections of their effects. Our approach will be further improved in the future in the modeling of random coincidences and tracking of high-energy photons, and simulation results will be used for the development of correction methods in 86Y PET.

  12. Developmental, Component-Based Model of Reading Fluency: An Investigation of Predictors of Word-Reading Fluency, Text-Reading Fluency, and Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk Grace

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal was to expand our understanding of text-reading fluency (efficiency or automaticity): how its relation to other constructs (e.g., word-reading fluency, reading comprehension) changes over time and how it is different from word-reading fluency and reading comprehension. The study examined (a) developmentally changing relations…

  13. CRT--Cascade Routing Tool to define and visualize flow paths for grid-based watershed models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henson, Wesley R.; Medina, Rose L.; Mayers, C. Justin; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Cascade Routing Tool (CRT) is a computer application for watershed models that include the coupled Groundwater and Surface-water FLOW model, GSFLOW, and the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). CRT generates output to define cascading surface and shallow subsurface flow paths for grid-based model domains. CRT requires a land-surface elevation for each hydrologic response unit (HRU) of the model grid; these elevations can be derived from a Digital Elevation Model raster data set of the area containing the model domain. Additionally, a list is required of the HRUs containing streams, swales, lakes, and other cascade termination features along with indices that uniquely define these features. Cascade flow paths are determined from the altitudes of each HRU. Cascade paths can cross any of the four faces of an HRU to a stream or to a lake within or adjacent to an HRU. Cascades can terminate at a stream, lake, or HRU that has been designated as a watershed outflow location.

  14. Ecological, psychological, and cognitive components of reading difficulties: testing the component model of reading in fourth graders across 38 countries.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming Ming; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the component model of reading (CMR) among 186,725 fourth grade students from 38 countries (45 regions) on five continents by analyzing the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study data using measures of ecological (country, family, school, teacher), psychological, and cognitive components. More than 91% of the differences in student difficulty occurred at the country (61%) and classroom (30%) levels (ecological), with less than 9% at the student level (cognitive and psychological). All three components were negatively associated with reading difficulties: cognitive (student's early literacy skills), ecological (family characteristics [socioeconomic status, number of books at home, and attitudes about reading], school characteristics [school climate and resources]), and psychological (students' attitudes about reading, reading self-concept, and being a girl). These results extend the CMR by demonstrating the importance of multiple levels of factors for reading deficits across diverse cultures. PMID:22183193

  15. An information propagation model considering incomplete reading behavior in microblog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qiang; Huang, Jiajia; Zhao, Xiande

    2015-02-01

    Microblog is one of the most popular communication channels on the Internet, and has already become the third largest source of news and public opinions in China. Although researchers have studied the information propagation in microblog using the epidemic models, previous studies have not considered the incomplete reading behavior among microblog users. Therefore, the model cannot fit the real situations well. In this paper, we proposed an improved model entitled Microblog-Susceptible-Infected-Removed (Mb-SIR) for information propagation by explicitly considering the user's incomplete reading behavior. We also tested the effectiveness of the model using real data from Sina Microblog. We demonstrate that the new proposed model is more accurate in describing the information propagation in microblog. In addition, we also investigate the effects of the critical model parameters, e.g., reading rate, spreading rate, and removed rate through numerical simulations. The simulation results show that, compared with other parameters, reading rate plays the most influential role in the information propagation performance in microblog.

  16. How to generate continuous cascade models with zero values: theory and simulations for a continuous beta-multifractal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Multiplicative cascade models, when densified (continuous scale invariance) correspond to the exponential of a linear process. Hence this cannot generate zero values. Such framework is not complete and not purely multiplicative. We present here a stochastic framework which stays in the multiplicative realm and can be used to generate zero values. The multiplicative continuous model for multifractal fields with zero values is built using infinitely multiplicative random variables, the multiplicative analog to infinitely divisible distributions for addition. It also needs stochastic multiplicative measures and multiplicative stochastic integrals. The model hence generates continuous multiplicative cascades. The model produced possesses as special case a continuous generalization of the classical discrete beta-model. Applications are numerous in many fields of applied sciences, including smallscale rainfall, soil sciences. The theory is first proposed, then simulation algorithm is presented and simulations are shown in 1D and in 2D. Figure: a continuous lognormal multifractal with zero values (512x512).

  17. Displacement cascades in Fesbnd Nisbnd Mnsbnd Cu alloys: RVP model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Zinovev, A.; Bonny, G.

    2016-07-01

    Primary damage due to displacement cascades (10-100 keV) has been assessed in Fesbnd 1%Mnsbnd 1%Ni-0.5%Cu and its binary alloys by molecular dynamics (MD), using a recent interatomic potential, specially developed to address features of the Fesbnd Mnsbnd Nisbnd Cu system in the dilute limit. The latter system represents the model matrix for reactor pressure vessel steels. The applied potential reproduces major interaction features of the solutes with point defects in the binary, ternary and quaternary dilute alloys. As compared to pure Fe, the addition of one type of a solute or all solutes together does not change the major characteristics of primary damage. However, the chemical structure of the self-interstitial defects is strongly sensitive to the presence and distribution of Mn and Cu in the matrix. 20 keV cascades were also studied in the Fesbnd Nisbnd Mnsbnd Cu matrix containing <100> dislocation loops (with density of 1024 m-3 and size 2 nm). Two solute distributions were investigated, namely: a random one and one obtained by Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations from our previous work. The presence of the loops did not affect the defect production efficiency but slightly reduced the fraction of isolated self-interstitials and vacancies. The cascade event led to the transformation of the loops into ½<111> glissile configurations with a success rate of 10% in the matrix with random solute distribution, while all the pre-created loops remain stable if the alloy's distribution was applied using the Monte-Carlo method. This suggests that solute segregation to loops "stabilizes" the pre-existing loops against transformation or migration induced by collision cascades.

  18. A cascade model of information processing and encoding for retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Guan-Xin; Hao, Bo; Qiao, Qing-Li; Ai, Hui-Jian

    2016-04-01

    Retinal prosthesis offers a potential treatment for individuals suffering from photoreceptor degeneration diseases. Establishing biological retinal models and simulating how the biological retina convert incoming light signal into spike trains that can be properly decoded by the brain is a key issue. Some retinal models have been presented, ranking from structural models inspired by the layered architecture to functional models originated from a set of specific physiological phenomena. However, Most of these focus on stimulus image compression, edge detection and reconstruction, but do not generate spike trains corresponding to visual image. In this study, based on state-of-the-art retinal physiological mechanism, including effective visual information extraction, static nonlinear rectification of biological systems and neurons Poisson coding, a cascade model of the retina including the out plexiform layer for information processing and the inner plexiform layer for information encoding was brought forward, which integrates both anatomic connections and functional computations of retina. Using MATLAB software, spike trains corresponding to stimulus image were numerically computed by four steps: linear spatiotemporal filtering, static nonlinear rectification, radial sampling and then Poisson spike generation. The simulated results suggested that such a cascade model could recreate visual information processing and encoding functionalities of the retina, which is helpful in developing artificial retina for the retinally blind. PMID:27212929

  19. A cascade model of information processing and encoding for retinal prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhi-jun; Gao, Guan-xin; Hao, Bo; Qiao, Qing-li; Ai, Hui-jian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis offers a potential treatment for individuals suffering from photoreceptor degeneration diseases. Establishing biological retinal models and simulating how the biological retina convert incoming light signal into spike trains that can be properly decoded by the brain is a key issue. Some retinal models have been presented, ranking from structural models inspired by the layered architecture to functional models originated from a set of specific physiological phenomena. However, Most of these focus on stimulus image compression, edge detection and reconstruction, but do not generate spike trains corresponding to visual image. In this study, based on state-of-the-art retinal physiological mechanism, including effective visual information extraction, static nonlinear rectification of biological systems and neurons Poisson coding, a cascade model of the retina including the out plexiform layer for information processing and the inner plexiform layer for information encoding was brought forward, which integrates both anatomic connections and functional computations of retina. Using MATLAB software, spike trains corresponding to stimulus image were numerically computed by four steps: linear spatiotemporal filtering, static nonlinear rectification, radial sampling and then Poisson spike generation. The simulated results suggested that such a cascade model could recreate visual information processing and encoding functionalities of the retina, which is helpful in developing artificial retina for the retinally blind. PMID:27212929

  20. Teaching Science through Pictorial Models during Read-Alouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Rivera, Seema; Glass, Rory; Mastroianni, Michael; Wizner, Francine; Amodeo, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how three elementary teachers refer to pictorial models (photographs, drawings, and cartoons) during science read-alouds. While one teacher used realistic photographs for the purpose of visually verifying facts about crystals, another employed analytical diagrams as heuristic tools to help students visualize complex target…

  1. The construction of visual-spatial situation models in children's reading and their relation to reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Marcia A; Raghubar, Kimberly P; Faulkner, Heather; Denton, Carolyn A

    2014-03-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text to comprehend what they read, updating these situation models based on explicitly described and inferred information about causal, temporal, and spatial relations. Fluent adult readers update their situation models while reading narrative text based in part on spatial location information that is consistent with the perspective of the protagonist. The current study investigated whether children update spatial situation models in a similar way, whether there are age-related changes in children's formation of spatial situation models during reading, and whether measures of the ability to construct and update spatial situation models are predictive of reading comprehension. Typically developing children from 9 to 16 years of age (N=81) were familiarized with a physical model of a marketplace. Then the model was covered, and children read stories that described the movement of a protagonist through the marketplace and were administered items requiring memory for both explicitly stated and inferred information about the character's movements. Accuracy of responses and response times were evaluated. Results indicated that (a) location and object information during reading appeared to be activated and updated not simply from explicit text-based information but from a mental model of the real-world situation described by the text; (b) this pattern showed no age-related differences; and (c) the ability to update the situation model of the text based on inferred information, but not explicitly stated information, was uniquely predictive of reading comprehension after accounting for word decoding. PMID:24315376

  2. The Construction of Visual-spatial Situation Models in Children's Reading and Their Relation to Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Marcia A.; Raghubar, Kimberly P.; Faulkner, Heather; Denton, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text to comprehend what they read, updating these situation models based on explicitly described and inferred information about causal, temporal, and spatial relations. Fluent adult readers update their situation models while reading narrative text based in part on spatial location information that is consistent with the perspective of the protagonist. The current study investigates whether children update spatial situation models in a similar way, whether there are age-related changes in children's formation of spatial situation models during reading, and whether measures of the ability to construct and update spatial situation models are predictive of reading comprehension. Typically-developing children from ages 9 through 16 years (n=81) were familiarized with a physical model of a marketplace. Then the model was covered, and children read stories that described the movement of a protagonist through the marketplace and were administered items requiring memory for both explicitly stated and inferred information about the character's movements. Accuracy of responses and response times were evaluated. Results indicated that: (a) location and object information during reading appeared to be activated and updated not simply from explicit text-based information but from a mental model of the real world situation described by the text; (b) this pattern showed no age-related differences; and (c) the ability to update the situation model of the text based on inferred information, but not explicitly stated information, was uniquely predictive of reading comprehension after accounting for word decoding. PMID:24315376

  3. Simple models for reading neuronal population codes.

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H S; Sompolinsky, H

    1993-01-01

    In many neural systems, sensory information is distributed throughout a population of neurons. We study simple neural network models for extracting this information. The inputs to the networks are the stochastic responses of a population of sensory neurons tuned to directional stimuli. The performance of each network model in psychophysical tasks is compared with that of the optimal maximum likelihood procedure. As a model of direction estimation in two dimensions, we consider a linear network that computes a population vector. Its performance depends on the width of the population tuning curves and is maximal for width, which increases with the level of background activity. Although for narrowly tuned neurons the performance of the population vector is significantly inferior to that of maximum likelihood estimation, the difference between the two is small when the tuning is broad. For direction discrimination, we consider two models: a perceptron with fully adaptive weights and a network made by adding an adaptive second layer to the population vector network. We calculate the error rates of these networks after exhaustive training to a particular direction. By testing on the full range of possible directions, the extent of transfer of training to novel stimuli can be calculated. It is found that for threshold linear networks the transfer of perceptual learning is nonmonotonic. Although performance deteriorates away from the training stimulus, it peaks again at an intermediate angle. This nonmonotonicity provides an important psychophysical test of these models. PMID:8248166

  4. Hamiltonian-Based Model to Describe the Nonlinear Physics of Cascading Failures in Power-Grid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson

    A local disturbance to the state of a power-grid system can trigger a protective response that disables some grid components, which leads to further responses, and may finally result in large-scale failures. In this talk, I will introduce a Hamiltonian-like model of cascading failures in power grids. This model includes the state variables of generators, which are determined by the nonlinear swing equations and power-flow equations, as well as the on/off status of the network components. This framework allows us to view a cascading failure in the power grid as a phase-space transition from a fixed point with high energy to a fixed point with lower energy. Using real power-grid networks, I will demonstrate that possible cascade outcomes can be predicted by analyzing the stability of the system's equilibria. This work adds an important new dimension to the current understanding of cascading failures.

  5. The Short Circuit Model of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lueers, Nancy M.

    The name "short circuit" has been given to this model because, in many ways, it adequately describes what happens bioelectrically in the brain. The "short-circuiting" factors include linguistic, sociocultural, attitudinal and motivational, neurological, perceptual, and cognitive factors. Research is reviewed on ways in which each one affects any…

  6. Propagation of hydro-meteorological uncertainty in a model cascade framework to inundation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rincón, J. P.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.; Breña-Naranjo, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    This investigation aims to study the propagation of meteorological uncertainty within a cascade modelling approach to flood prediction. The methodology was comprised of a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, a distributed rainfall-runoff model and a 2-D hydrodynamic model. The uncertainty evaluation was carried out at the meteorological and hydrological levels of the model chain, which enabled the investigation of how errors that originated in the rainfall prediction interact at a catchment level and propagate to an estimated inundation area and depth. For this, a hindcast scenario is utilised removing non-behavioural ensemble members at each stage, based on the fit with observed data. At the hydrodynamic level, an uncertainty assessment was not incorporated; instead, the model was setup following guidelines for the best possible representation of the case study. The selected extreme event corresponds to a flood that took place in the southeast of Mexico during November 2009, for which field data (e.g. rain gauges; discharge) and satellite imagery were available. Uncertainty in the meteorological model was estimated by means of a multi-physics ensemble technique, which is designed to represent errors from our limited knowledge of the processes generating precipitation. In the hydrological model, a multi-response validation was implemented through the definition of six sets of plausible parameters from past flood events. Precipitation fields from the meteorological model were employed as input in a distributed hydrological model, and resulting flood hydrographs were used as forcing conditions in the 2-D hydrodynamic model. The evolution of skill within the model cascade shows a complex aggregation of errors between models, suggesting that in valley-filling events hydro-meteorological uncertainty has a larger effect on inundation depths than that observed in estimated flood inundation extents.

  7. Influence of Reading Attitude on Reading Achievement: A Test of the Temporal-Interaction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Rebecca S.; Aricak, O. Tolga; Jewell, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Despite widespread efforts to prevent reading problems and an abundance of research about best practices in remediating reading skills deficits, reading continues to be exceptionally difficult for many students. Researchers have become interested in investigating the degree to which affective factors such as reading attitude relates to reading…

  8. Model Programs: Reading. The Topeka Reading Clinic, Centers, and Services, Topeka, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    The Topeka Reading Clinic, Centers, and Services provides help for disabled readers in the Topeka, Kansas, elementary and junior high schools. The professional staff of the clinic diagnoses reading disabilities and designs remedial programs. The remedial reading teachers affiliated with the clinic offer reading classes in the schools for grade 4…

  9. Extended Intranuclear Cascade model for pickup reactions induced by 50-MeV-range protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uozumi, Yusuke; Mori, Taiki; Sonoda, Akifumi; Nakano, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    The intranuclear cascade model was investigated to explain (p, dx) and (p, ax) reactions at incident energies of around 50 MeV. Since these reactions are governed mainly by the direct pickup process, the model was expanded to include exclusive pickup processes leading to hole-state-excitations. The energy of the outgoing clusters is determined with single-particle energies of transferred nucleons, the reaction Q-value, and the recoil of the residual nucleus. The rescattering of the produced cluster inside the nucleus is treated within the intranuclear cascade model. The emission angle is given by the sum of momentum vectors of transferred nucleons in addition to the deflection at the nuclear surface, which was introduced to explain angular distributions of elastic scattering. Double differential cross sections of reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data. The proposed model showed a high predictive power over the wide range of emission energies and angles. The treatment ofthe cluster transport inside the nucleus was also verified.

  10. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.; Donahue, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. CASCADER is a gas-phase, one-space dimensional transport and fate model for M-chain radionuclides in very dry homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. This model contains barometric pressure-induced advection and diffusion together with linear irreversible and linear reversible sorption for each radionuclide. The advection velocity is derived from an embedded air-pumping submodel. The air-pumping submodel is based on an assumption of isothermal conditions, which is driven by barometric pressure. CASCADER allows the concentration of source radionuclides to decay via the classical Bateman chain of simple, first-order kinetic processes. The transported radionuclides also decay via first-order processes while in the soil. A mass conserving, flux-type inlet and exit set of boundary conditions are used. The user must supply the initial distribution for the parent radionuclide in the soil. The initial daughter distribution is found using equilibrium rules. The model is user friendly as it uses a prompt-driven, free-form input. The code is ANSI standard Fortran 77.

  11. Modulation transfer function cascade model for a sampled IR imaging system.

    PubMed

    de Luca, L; Cardone, G

    1991-05-01

    The performance of the infrared scanning radiometer (IRSR) is strongly stressed in convective heat transfer applications where high spatial frequencies in the signal that describes the thermal image are present. The need to characterize more deeply the system spatial resolution has led to the formulation of a cascade model for the evaluation of the actual modulation transfer function of a sampled IR imaging system. The model can yield both the aliasing band and the averaged modulation response for a general sampling subsystem. For a line scan imaging system, which is the case of a typical IRSR, a rule of thumb that states whether the combined sampling-imaging system is either imaging-dependent or sampling-dependent is proposed. The model is tested by comparing it with other noncascade models as well as by ad hoc measurements performed on a commercial digitized IRSR. PMID:20700340

  12. Toward a Tripartite Model of L2 Reading Strategy Use, Motivations, and Learner Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Hiromori, Tomohito; Nakayama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The present study proposes a tripartite model of L2 reading strategy use, reading motivations, and general learner beliefs by examining the relationships among them in an L2 context. Reading strategy instruction was performed for 360 first-year university students enrolled in a reading-based course, in expectation of affecting their motivations…

  13. Scaffolding in L2 Reading: How Repetition and an Auditory Model Help Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Etsuo; Gorsuch, Greta; Lems, Kristin; Rosszell, Rory

    2016-01-01

    Reading fluency research and practice have recently undergone some changes. While past studies and interventions focused on reading speed as their main goal, now more emphasis is being placed on exploring the role prosody plays in reading, and how listening to an audio model of a text while reading may act as a form of scaffolding, or aid, to…

  14. Modelling on dynamics properties of a stationary argon cascaded arc plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G. D.; Qi, X.; Yang, L.

    2014-03-15

    The gas dynamics properties of a stationary arc plasma flows are studied through the numerical simulations. A two dimensional axis-symmetric turbulent magneto-hydrodynamic plasma model is developed with the commercial code ANSYS FLUENT. The reliable κ-ε model is used to account for turbulence. In this paper, the plasma is assumed to be a fluid following Navier–Stokes equations, respecting local thermodynamic equilibrium, and described by only one temperature. Distributions of the pressure, velocity, temperature, density, and electric potential inside of thus cascaded arc are obtained for an arc current density of 10{sup 6} A/m{sup 2}. The pressure inside the arc varies from 10{sup 5} Pa to 100 Pa. The temperature at the arc axis can reach as high as 13 600 K. The electric potential drops uniformly along the axis with a magnitude of 160 V. In addition, distributions of the sonic velocity and Mach number are shown to describe supersonic behavior of thus cascaded arc, which have a good agreement with the analytical formula.

  15. Modelling on dynamics properties of a stationary argon cascaded arc plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, G. D.; Qi, X.; Yang, L.

    2014-03-01

    The gas dynamics properties of a stationary arc plasma flows are studied through the numerical simulations. A two dimensional axis-symmetric turbulent magneto-hydrodynamic plasma model is developed with the commercial code ANSYS FLUENT. The reliable κ-ɛ model is used to account for turbulence. In this paper, the plasma is assumed to be a fluid following Navier-Stokes equations, respecting local thermodynamic equilibrium, and described by only one temperature. Distributions of the pressure, velocity, temperature, density, and electric potential inside of thus cascaded arc are obtained for an arc current density of 106 A/m2. The pressure inside the arc varies from 105 Pa to 100 Pa. The temperature at the arc axis can reach as high as 13 600 K. The electric potential drops uniformly along the axis with a magnitude of 160 V. In addition, distributions of the sonic velocity and Mach number are shown to describe supersonic behavior of thus cascaded arc, which have a good agreement with the analytical formula.

  16. Modeling vibroacoustic systems involving cascade open cavities and micro-perforated panels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Cheng, Li; Guyader, Jean-Louis

    2014-08-01

    While the structural-acoustic coupling between flexible structures and closed acoustic cavities has been extensively studied in the literature, the modeling of structures coupled through open cavities, especially connected in cascade, is still a challenging task for most of the existing methods. The possible presence of micro-perforated panels (MPPs) in such systems adds additional difficulties in terms of both modeling and physical understanding. In this study, a sub-structuring methodology based on the Patch Transfer Function (PTF) approach with a Compound Interface treatment technique, referred to as CI-PTF method, is proposed, for dealing with complex systems involving cascade open/closed acoustic cavities and MPPs. The co-existence of apertures and solid/flexible/micro-perforated panels over a mixed separation interface is characterized using a compound panel subsystem, which enhances the systematic coupling feature of the PTF framework. Using several typical configurations, the versatility and efficiency of the proposed method is illustrated. Numerical studies highlight the physical understanding on the behavior of MPP inside a complex vibroacoustic environment, thus providing guidance for the practical design of such systems. PMID:25096101

  17. Sediment cascade modelling for stochastic torrential sediment transfers forecasting in a changing alpine climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudaz, Benjamin; Bardou, Eric; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Alpine ephemeral streams act as links between high altitude erosional processes, slope movements and valley-floor fluvial systems or fan storage. Anticipating future mass wasting from these systems is crucial for hazard mitigation measures. Torrential activity is highly stochastic, with punctual transfers separating long periods of calm, during which the system evolves internally and recharges. Changes can originate from diffuse (rock faces, sheet erosion of bared moraines), concentrated external sources (rock glacier front, slope instabilities) or internal transfers (bed incision or aggradation). The proposed sediment cascade model takes into account those different processes and calculates sediment transfer from the slope to the channel reaches, and then propagates sediments downstream. The two controlling parameters are precipitation series (generated from existing rain gauge data using Gumbel and Extreme Probability Distribution functions) and temperature (generated from local meteorological stations data and IPCC scenarios). Snow accumulation and melting, and thus runoff can then be determined for each subsystem, to account for different altitudes and expositions. External stocks and sediment sources have each a specific response to temperature and precipitation. For instance, production from rock faces is dependent on frost-thaw cycles, in addition to precipitations. On the other hand, landslide velocity, and thus sediment production is linked to precipitations over longer periods of time. Finally, rock glaciers react to long-term temperature trends, but are also prone to sudden release of material during extreme rain events. All those modules feed the main sediment cascade model, constructed around homogeneous torrent reaches, to and from which sediments are transported by debris flows and bedload transport events. These events are determined using a runoff/erosion curve, with a threshold determining the occurrence of debris flows in the system. If a debris

  18. An upgraded issue of the parton and hadron cascade model, PACIAE 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dai-Mei; Yan, Yu-Liang; Li, Xing-Long; Li, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Bao-Guo; Cai, Xu; Sa, Ben-Hao

    2015-08-01

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE 2.1 (cf. Comput. Phys. Commun. 184 (2013) 1476) has been upgraded to the new issue of PACIAE 2.2. By this new issue the lepton-nucleon and lepton-nucleus (inclusive) deep inelastic scatterings can also be investigated. As an example, the PACIAE 2.2 model is enabled to calculate the specific charged hadron multiplicity in the e-+p and e-+D semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at 27.6 GeV electron beam energy. The calculated results are well comparing with the corresponding HERMES data. Additionally, the effect of model parameters α and β in the Lund string fragmentation function on the multiplicity is studied.

  19. Enhanced modeling of band nonparabolicity with application to a mid-IR quantum cascade laser structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, N.; Radovanovic, J.; Milanovic, V.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the influence of conduction-band nonparabolicity on bound electronic states in the active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). Our model assumes expansion of the conduction-band dispersion relation up to a fourth order in wavevector and use of a suitable second boundary condition at the interface of two III-V semiconductor layers. Numerical results, obtained by the transfer matrix method, are presented for two mid-infrared GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As QCL active regions, and they are in very good agreement with experimental data found in the literature. Comparison with a different nonparabolicity model is presented for the example of a GaAs/Al0.38Ga0.62As-based mid-IR QCL. Calculations have also been carried out for one THz QCL structure to illustrate the possible application of the model in the terahertz part of the spectrum.

  20. Testing a developmental cascade model of emotional and social competence and early peer acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Blandon, Alysia Y.; Calkins, Susan D.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Keane, Susan P.; O’Brien, Marion

    2011-01-01

    A developmental cascade model of early emotional and social competence predicting later peer acceptance was examined in a community sample of 440 children across the ages of 2 to 7. Children’s externalizing behavior, emotion regulation, social skills within the classroom and peer acceptance were examined utilizing a multitrait-multimethod approach. A series of longitudinal cross-lag models that controlled for shared rater variance were fit using structural equation modeling. Results indicated there was considerable stability in children’s externalizing behavior problems and classroom social skills over time. Contrary to expectations, there were no reciprocal influences between externalizing behavior problems and emotion regulation, though higher levels of emotion regulation were associated with decreases in subsequent levels of externalizing behaviors. Finally, children’s early social skills also predicted later peer acceptance. Results underscore the complex associations among emotional and social functioning across early childhood. PMID:20883578

  1. The cascade of uncertainty in modeling the impacts of climate change on Europe's forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Christopher; Lasch-Born, Petra; Suckow, Felicitas; Gutsch, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Projecting the impacts of global change on forest ecosystems is a cornerstone for designing sustainable forest management strategies and paramount for assessing the potential of Europe's forest to contribute to the EU bioeconomy. Research on climate change impacts on forests relies to a large extent on model applications along a model chain from Integrated Assessment Models to General and Regional Circulation Models that provide important driving variables for forest models. Or to decision support systems that synthesize findings of more detailed forest models to inform forest managers. At each step in the model chain, model-specific uncertainties about, amongst others, parameter values, input data or model structure accumulate, leading to a cascade of uncertainty. For example, climate change impacts on forests strongly depend on the in- or exclusion of CO2-effects or on the use of an ensemble of climate models rather than relying on one particular climate model. In the past, these uncertainties have not or only partly been considered in studies of climate change impacts on forests. This has left managers and decision-makers in doubt of how robust the projected impacts on forest ecosystems are. We deal with this cascade of uncertainty in a structured way and the objective of this presentation is to assess how different types of uncertainties affect projections of the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems. To address this objective we synthesized a large body of scientific literature on modeled productivity changes and the effects of extreme events on plant processes. Furthermore, we apply the process-based forest growth model 4C to forest stands all over Europe and assess how different climate models, emission scenarios and assumptions about the parameters and structure of 4C affect the uncertainty of the model projections. We show that there are consistent regional changes in forest productivity such as an increase in NPP in cold and wet regions while

  2. Components of Reading Ability: Multivariate Evidence for a Convergent Skills Model of Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vellutino, Frank R.; Tunmer, William E.; Jaccard, James J.; Chen, RuSan

    2007-01-01

    Elementary and middle school children were given a large battery of tests evaluating reading subskills and reading-related cognitive abilities. These measures were used to define latent representing skills and abilities believed to be important components of reading comprehension. Hypothesized relationships among these constructs were specified…

  3. Time to smell: a cascade model of human olfactory perception based on response-time (RT) measurement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jonas K.

    2014-01-01

    The timing of olfactory behavioral decisions may provide an important source of information about how the human olfactory-perceptual system is organized. This review integrates results from olfactory response-time (RT) measurements from a perspective of mental chronometry. Based on these findings, a new cascade model of human olfaction is presented. Results show that main perceptual decisions are executed with high accuracy within about 1~s of sniff onset. The cascade model proposes the existence of distinct processing stages within this brief time-window. According to the cascade model, different perceptual features become accessible to the perceiver at different time-points, and the output of earlier processing stages provides the input for later processing stages. The olfactory cascade starts with detecting the odor, which is followed by establishing an odor object. The odor object, in turn, triggers systems for determining odor valence and edibility. Evidence for the cascade model comes from studies showing that RTs for odor valence and edibility assessment are predicted by the shorter RTs needed to establish the odor object. Challenges for future research include innovative task designs for olfactory RT experiments and the integration of the behavioral processing sequence into the underlying cortical processes using complementary RT measures and neuroimaging methods. PMID:24550861

  4. Developmental models of learning to read Chinese words.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiuli; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    What is the nature of learning to read Chinese across grade levels? This study tested 199 kindergartners, 172 second graders, and 165 fifth graders on 12 different tasks purportedly tapping constructs representing phonological awareness, morphological awareness, orthographic processing, and subcharacter processing. Confirmatory factor analyses comparing alternative models of these 4 constituents of Chinese word reading revealed different patterns of metalinguistic underpinnings of children's word recognition across grade levels: The best-fitting model for kindergartners represented a print-nonprint dichotomy of constructs. In contrast, 2nd graders showed a fine-grained sensitivity to all 4 hypothesized constructs. Finally, the best-fitting model for 5th graders consisted of a phonological sensitivity construct and a broad lexical morphological-orthographic processing construct. Findings suggest that Hong Kong Chinese children progress from a basic understanding of print versus nonprint to a diversified sensitivity to varied word-reading skills, to a focus on meaning-based word recognition, to the relative exclusion of phonological sensitivity in more advanced readers. PMID:20836598

  5. Psycholinguistic Theory of Learning to Read Compared to the Traditional Theory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Robert F.

    A comparison of two models of the reading process--the psycholinguistic model, in which learning to read is seen as a top-down, holistic procedure, and the traditional theory model, in which learning to read is seen as a bottom-up, atomistic procedure--is provided in this paper. The first part of the paper provides brief overviews of the following…

  6. Expanding the Four Resources Model: Reading Visual and Multi-Modal Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Freebody and Luke proffered an expanded conceptualization of the resources readers utilize when reading and the roles readers adopt during the act of reading. The four resources model, and its associated four roles of the reader, expanded the definition of reading from a simple model of decoding printed texts to a model of constructing meaning and…

  7. Electron–phonon coupling in Ni-based binary alloys with application to displacement cascade modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Béland, L. K.; Stocks, G. M.; Stoller, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    Energy transfer between lattice atoms and electrons is an important channel of energy dissipation during displacement cascade evolution in irradiated materials. On the assumption of small atomic displacements, the intensity of this transfer is controlled by the strength of electron–phonon (el–ph) coupling. The el–ph coupling in concentrated Ni-based alloys was calculated using electronic structure results obtained within the coherent potential approximation. It was found that Ni0.5Fe0.5, Ni0.5Co0.5 and Ni0.5Pd0.5 are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas Ni0.5Cr0.5 is nonmagnetic. Since the magnetism in these alloys has a Stoner-type origin, the magnetic ordering is accompanied by a decrease of electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which in turn reduces the el–ph coupling. Thus, the el–ph coupling values for all alloys are approximately 50% smaller in the magnetic state than for the same alloy in a nonmagnetic state. As the temperature increases, the calculated coupling initially increases. After passing the Curie temperature, the coupling decreases. The rate of decrease is controlled by the shape of the density of states above the Fermi level. Introducing a two-temperature model based on these parameters in 10 keV molecular dynamics cascade simulation increases defect production by 10–20% in the alloys under consideration.

  8. Electron phonon coupling in Ni-based binary alloys with application to displacement cascade modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-04-01

    Energy transfer between lattice atoms and electrons is an important channel of energy dissipation during displacement cascade evolution in irradiated materials. On the assumption of small atomic displacements, the intensity of this transfer is controlled by the strength of electron–phonon (el–ph) coupling. The el–ph coupling in concentrated Ni-based alloys was calculated using electronic structure results obtained within the coherent potential approximation. It was found that Ni0.5Fe0.5, Ni0.5Co0.5 and Ni0.5Pd0.5 are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas Ni0.5Cr0.5 is nonmagnetic. Since the magnetism in these alloys has a Stoner-type origin, the magnetic ordering is accompanied by a decrease of electronic density of states atmore » the Fermi level, which in turn reduces the el–ph coupling. Thus, the el–ph coupling values for all alloys are approximately 50% smaller in the magnetic state than for the same alloy in a nonmagnetic state. As the temperature increases, the calculated coupling initially increases. After passing the Curie temperature, the coupling decreases. The rate of decrease is controlled by the shape of the density of states above the Fermi level. Introducing a two-temperature model based on these parameters in 10 keV molecular dynamics cascade simulation increases defect production by 10–20% in the alloys under consideration.« less

  9. Electron-phonon coupling in Ni-based binary alloys with application to displacement cascade modeling.

    PubMed

    Samolyuk, G D; Béland, L K; Stocks, G M; Stoller, R E

    2016-05-01

    Energy transfer between lattice atoms and electrons is an important channel of energy dissipation during displacement cascade evolution in irradiated materials. On the assumption of small atomic displacements, the intensity of this transfer is controlled by the strength of electron-phonon (el-ph) coupling. The el-ph coupling in concentrated Ni-based alloys was calculated using electronic structure results obtained within the coherent potential approximation. It was found that Ni0.5Fe0.5, Ni0.5Co0.5 and Ni0.5Pd0.5 are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas Ni0.5Cr0.5 is nonmagnetic. Since the magnetism in these alloys has a Stoner-type origin, the magnetic ordering is accompanied by a decrease of electronic density of states at the Fermi level, which in turn reduces the el-ph coupling. Thus, the el-ph coupling values for all alloys are approximately 50% smaller in the magnetic state than for the same alloy in a nonmagnetic state. As the temperature increases, the calculated coupling initially increases. After passing the Curie temperature, the coupling decreases. The rate of decrease is controlled by the shape of the density of states above the Fermi level. Introducing a two-temperature model based on these parameters in 10 keV molecular dynamics cascade simulation increases defect production by 10-20% in the alloys under consideration. PMID:27033732

  10. Transonic viscous flow calculations for a turbine cascade with a two equation turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretti, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method for the study of steady, transonic, turbulent viscous flow through plane turbine cascades is presented. The governing equations are written in Favre-averaged form and closed with a first order model. The turbulent quantities are expressed according to a two-equation kappa-epsilon model where low Reynolds number and compressibility effects are included. The solution is obtained by using a pseudo-unsteady method with improved perturbation propagation properties. The equations are discretized in space by using a finite volume formulation. An explicit multistage dissipative Runge-Kutta algorithm is then used to advance the flow equations in the pseudo-time. First results of calculations compare fairly well with experimental data.

  11. Eating and digesting "Lestrygonians": a physiological model of reading.

    PubMed

    Yared, Aida

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I propose that, beneath a deceptively simple story-line, "Lestrygonians" functions like a living entity, one through which Bloom unknowingly traverses. First, there is Joyce's familiar Dublin, on a macroscopic level, and, second, there is the episode's narrative, personified by a gigantic female organism, in whose digestive tract Bloom has been reduced to Lilliputian size. Some critics have noted the importance of the physiological details of digestion here; no one, however, has noted to what extent the structure of the episode is represented by the digestive model. My final claim about the episode's digestive proclivities concerns its effects on the reader. If "Lestrygonians" replicates alimentary functions by propelling both its characters and the reading process along, it also elicits, in the reader, the synesthesia of reading with autonomic sensations. PMID:20836271

  12. Evaluation of random cascade hierarchical and statistical arrangement model in disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, M.; Magagi, R.; Goita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology that can be derived from remote sensing. In different studies, it was shown that optical-thermal, active and passive microwave remote sensing data can be used for soil moisture estimation. However, the most promising approach to estimate soil moisture in large areas is passive microwave radiometry. Global estimation of soil moisture is now operational by using remote sensing techniques. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave radiometers that were lunched on 2002 and 2009 respectively along with the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite that was planned to be lunched in the time frame of 2014-2015 make remote sensing to be more useful in soil moisture estimation. However, the spatial resolutions of AMSR-E, SMOS and SMAP are 60 km, 40 km and 10 km respectively. These very low spatial resolutions can not show the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture in field or small scales. So, using disaggregation methods is required to efficiently using the passive microwave derived soil moisture information in different scales. The low spatial resolutions of passive microwave satellites can be improved by using disaggregation methods. Random Cascade (RC) model (Over and Gupta, 1996) is used in this research to downscale the 40 km resolution of SMOS satellite. By using this statistical method, the SMOS soil moisture resolutions are improved to 20 km, 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km, respectively. The data that were measured during Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) field campaign are used to do the experiments. Totally the ground data and SMOS images that were obtained during 13 different days from 7-June-2012 to 13-July-2012 are used. By comparison with ground soil moisture, it is observed that the SMOS soil moisture is underestimated for all the images and so bias amounts

  13. Nelder-Mead simplex method for modeling of cascaded continuous-wave multiple-Stokes Raman fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Chun Ho; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry Ping; Wu, Rui Fen

    2010-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate an effective and computationally compact Nelder-Mead simplex method for the design and modeling of cw cascaded Raman fiber lasers. The Nelder-Mead method is efficient for finding a local minimum of a function of several variables. We employ this classical powerful local descent algorithm to solve the multidimensional problem for the modeling of n'th-order cascaded Raman fiber lasers. With our proposed method, we investigate a linear cascaded Raman fiber laser with a pump wavelength of 1064 nm. The convergence of the proposed method solving the rate equations with boundary conditions is easily and correctly achieved. Our simulation results verify that the proposed method has good computational speed without losing simulation accuracy.

  14. Sequenced Contractions and Abbreviations for Model 2 Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronnell, Bruce

    The nature and use of contractions and abbreviations in beginning reading is discussed and applied to the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Mod 2 Reading Program, a four-year program (K-3) for teaching reading skills to primary-grade children. The contractions and abbreviations are listed and sequenced for the reading program. The results of…

  15. Impaired Oral Reading in Two Atypical Dyslexics: A Comparison with a Computational Lexical-Analogy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Y.; Friedman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A computational model of reading was developed based upon the notion that the structural relationship between orthography and phonology is of greater importance than the dimension of semantics for the reading aloud of single words. Degradation of this model successfully simulated the reading performance of two patients with atypical acquired…

  16. Modified energy cascade model adapted for a multicrop Lunar greenhouse prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, G.; Kacira, M.; Patterson, L.; Giacomelli, G.; Sadler, P.; Furfaro, R.; Lobascio, C.; Lamantea, M.; Grizzaffi, L.

    2012-10-01

    Models are required to accurately predict mass and energy balances in a bioregenerative life support system. A modified energy cascade model was used to predict outputs of a multi-crop (tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce and strawberries) Lunar greenhouse prototype. The model performance was evaluated against measured data obtained from several system closure experiments. The model predictions corresponded well to those obtained from experimental measurements for the overall system closure test period (five months), especially for biomass produced (0.7% underestimated), water consumption (0.3% overestimated) and condensate production (0.5% overestimated). However, the model was less accurate when the results were compared with data obtained from a shorter experimental time period, with 31%, 48% and 51% error for biomass uptake, water consumption, and condensate production, respectively, which were obtained under more complex crop production patterns (e.g. tall tomato plants covering part of the lettuce production zones). These results, together with a model sensitivity analysis highlighted the necessity of periodic characterization of the environmental parameters (e.g. light levels, air leakage) in the Lunar greenhouse.

  17. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Osetsky, Y. N.; Stoller, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascade production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (∼0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential. The Gao-Weber potential appears to give a more realistic description of cascade dynamics in SiC, but still has some shortcomings when the defect migration barriers are compared to the ab initio results.

  18. Model for transport and reaction of defects and carriers within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R. Myers, Samuel M.

    2015-01-28

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at evolving displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with the details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers, and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster of defects. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were determined through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to displacement damage from energetic particle irradiation.

  19. Model for transport and reaction of defects and carriers within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at evolving displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with the details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers, and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster of defects. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were determined through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to displacement damage from energetic particle irradiation.

  20. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel M.

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  1. Brain-Based Reading Model for Students Who Struggle with Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Wanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite educational reforms to increase standards, many American children fail to read at levels that will enable them to compete in higher education and in the global economy. Standardized testing has reported a gradual decline in the reading scores of local second grade elementary students. The purpose of this project study was to create a…

  2. A Prediction Model of Foreign Language Reading Proficiency Based on Reading Time and Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotani, Katsunori; Yoshimi, Takehiko; Isahara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    In textbooks, foreign (second) language reading proficiency is often evaluated through comprehension questions. In case, authentic texts are used as reading material, such questions should be prepared by teachers. However, preparing appropriate questions may be a very demanding task for teachers. This paper introduces a method for automatically…

  3. Teaching Science Through Pictorial Models During Read-Alouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Rivera, Seema; Glass, Rory; Mastroianni, Michael; Wizner, Francine; Amodeo, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    This study examines how three elementary teachers refer to pictorial models (photographs, drawings, and cartoons) during science read-alouds. While one teacher used realistic photographs for the purpose of visually verifying facts about crystals, another employed analytical diagrams as heuristic tools to help students visualize complex target systems (rainbow formation and human eye functioning). Another teacher used fictional cartoons to engage students in analogical storytelling, communicating animal camouflage as analogous to human "blending in." However, teachers did not always explicitly convey the representational nature of pictorial models (analog and target as separate entities). It is argued that teachers need to become more aware of how they refer to pictorial models in children's science books and how to promote student visual literacy.

  4. A plate-driven model for enigmatic volcanic history of the Cascades-Yellowstone System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaja, S.; Kincaid, C. R.; Druken, K. A.; MacDougall, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascades subduction system in the Pacific Northwest (USA) represents a complex tectonic setting, where rollback subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath the North American plate, back-arc extension, and a possible mantle plume have been proposed to explain the complicated volcanic trends observed over the past 20 Ma. Plume and non-plume models have been developed to reconcile the voluminous Columbia River/Steens Flood Basalts (CSFB) (~20 Ma), the age progressive (15 Ma to present) Snake River Plain (SRP) that terminates at Yellowstone and the opposite, or westward trending High Lava Plains (HLP) volcanic track of eastern/central Oregon. We present results from laboratory experiments designed to test a plate-driven model for reproducing gross spatial-temporal characteristics of these three magmatic features. Models use a glucose fluid with temperature dependent viscosity in representing Earth's mantle and continuous rubber belts that kinematically reproduce subduction trends for the Cascades system. Experiments begin at 20 Ma with a volume of mantle residuum in the Cascades wedge that is elongated and restricted in the trench-parallel and trench-normal directions, respectively. The underlying assumption is that residuum was created in the wedge during an earlier plate steepening event that caused the flood basalts. Our models characterize dispersion patterns for the melt residuum material as it deforms within four-dimensional wedge circulation fields driven by rollback subduction (e.g. with a translational component of motion). Results show that residuum viscosity, relative to the ambient fluid, determines whether anomalous fluid can evolve to a morphology that matches the SRP/HLP tracks over ~15-20Ma. A weak residuum (e.g. retained partial melt) deforms over this time scale from the initial north-south oriented feature to an east-west trending morphology that is thin in both depth and north-south extent, material initially beneath CSFB is offset to the

  5. Genetic and Environmental Bases of Reading and Spelling: A Unified Genetic Dual Route Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.; Castles, Anne; Luciano, Michelle; Wright, Margaret J.; Coltheart, Max; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2007-01-01

    We develop and test a dual-route model of genetic effects on reading aloud and spelling, based on irregular and non-word reading and spelling performance assessed in 1382 monozygotic and dizygotic twins. As in earlier research, most of the variance in reading was due to genetic effects. However, there were three more specific conclusions: the…

  6. Exploring Gains in Reading and Mathematics Achievement among Regular and Exceptional Students Using Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Tacksoo; Davison, Mark L.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Chan, Chi-Keung; Heistad, David

    2013-01-01

    Using four-wave longitudinal reading and mathematics data (4th to 7th grades) from a large urban school district, growth curve modeling was used as a tool for examining three research questions: Are achievement gaps closing in reading and mathematics? What are the associations between prior-achievement and growth across the reading and mathematics…

  7. Modeling Reading Vocabulary Learning in Deaf Children in Bilingual Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    The acquisition of reading vocabulary is one of the major challenges for deaf children in bilingual education programs. Deaf children have to acquire a written lexicon that can effectively be used in reading. In this paper, we present a developmental model that describes reading vocabulary acquisition of deaf children in bilingual education…

  8. Influence maximization in social networks under an independent cascade-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyao; Jin, Yuehui; Lin, Zhen; Cheng, Shiduan; Yang, Tan

    2016-02-01

    The rapid growth of online social networks is important for viral marketing. Influence maximization refers to the process of finding influential users who make the most of information or product adoption. An independent cascade-based model for influence maximization, called IMIC-OC, was proposed to calculate positive influence. We assumed that influential users spread positive opinions. At the beginning, users held positive or negative opinions as their initial opinions. When more users became involved in the discussions, users balanced their own opinions and those of their neighbors. The number of users who did not change positive opinions was used to determine positive influence. Corresponding influential users who had maximum positive influence were then obtained. Experiments were conducted on three real networks, namely, Facebook, HEP-PH and Epinions, to calculate maximum positive influence based on the IMIC-OC model and two other baseline methods. The proposed model resulted in larger positive influence, thus indicating better performance compared with the baseline methods.

  9. Developing new theoretical models of the formation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids

    SciTech Connect

    Metelkin, E. V.; Ryazanov, A. I. Semenov, E. V.

    2008-09-15

    A new theoretical model is developed for the investigation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids consisting of atoms of a single type. The model is based on an analytical description of the elastic collisions between moving atoms knocked out of the crystal lattice sites and the immobile atoms of the lattice. The description is based on the linear kinetic Boltzmann equation describing the retardation of primary recoil atoms (PRAs) in irradiated solids. The laws of conservation for the total number and the kinetic energy of moving atoms, which follow from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, are analyzed using the proposed model. An analytical solution is obtained for the stationary kinetic Boltzmann equation, which describes the retardation of PRAs for a given source responsible for their production. A kinetic equation for the moving atoms and the corresponding laws of conservation are also analyzed with allowance for the binding energy of atoms at the crystal lattice sites. A criterion for determining the threshold energy of subcascade formation in irradiated solids is formulated. Based on this criterion, the threshold energy of subcascade formation is calculated using the Thomas-Fermi potential. Formulas are presented for determining the mean size and number of subcascades formed in a solid as functions of the PRA energy.

  10. Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.

    SciTech Connect

    Sprigg, James A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

  11. A dynamic cascade model of the development of substance-use onset.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Kenneth A; Malone, Patrick S; Lansford, Jennifer E; Miller, Shari; Pettit, Gregory S; Bates, John E

    2009-01-01

    Although the onset of illicit substance use during adolescence can hit parents abruptly like a raging flood, its origins likely start as a trickle in early childhood. Understanding antecedent factors and how they grow into a stream that leads to adolescent drug use is important for theories of social development as well as policy formulations to prevent onset. Based on a review of the extant literature, we posited a dynamic cascade model of the development of adolescent substance-use onset, specifying that (1) temporally distinct domains of biological factors, social ecology, early parenting, early conduct problems, early peer relations, adolescent parenting, and adolescent peer relations would predict early substance-use onset; (2) each domain would predict the temporally next domain; (3) each domain would mediate the impact of the immediately preceding domain on substance use; and (4) each domain would increment the previous domain in predicting substance use. The model was tested with a longitudinal sample of 585 boys and girls from the Child Development Project, who were followed from prekindergarten through Grade 12. Multiple variables in each of the seven predictor domains were assessed annually through direct observations, testing, peer nominations, school records, and parent-, teacher-, and self-report. Partial least-squares analyses tested hypotheses. Of the sample, 5.2% had engaged in substance use by Grade 7, and 51.3% of the sample had engaged in substance use by Grade 12. Five major empirical findings emerged: (1) Most variables significantly predicted early substance-use onset; (2) predictor variables were significantly related to each other in a web of correlations; (3) variables in each domain were significantly predicted by variables in the temporally prior domain; (4) each domain's variables significantly mediated the impact of the variables in the temporally prior domain on substance-use outcomes; and (5) variables in each domain significantly

  12. Reading-Enhanced Word Problem Solving: A Theoretical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Robert M.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Rupley, William H.

    2012-01-01

    There is a reciprocal relationship between mathematics and reading cognition. Metacognitive training within reading-enhanced problem solving should facilitate students developing an awareness of what good readers do when reading for meaning in solving mathematical problems enabling them to apply these strategies. The constructs for each cognitive…

  13. A Model of Reading Comprehension in Chinese Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Pui-sze; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa; Wong, Yau-kai

    2013-01-01

    The relationships of reading-related skills (rapid naming, morphological awareness, syntactic skills, discourse skills, and verbal working memory) and word reading to reading comprehension were examined among 248 Chinese fourth graders in Hong Kong. Multiple regression analysis results showed that syntactic skills (word order knowledge,…

  14. Lithium deintercalation in LiFePO4 nanoparticles via a domino-cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, C.; Maccario, M.; Croguennec, L.; Le Cras, F.; Weill, F.

    2008-08-01

    Lithium iron phosphate is one of the most promising positive-electrode materials for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries that will be used in electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Lithium deintercalation (intercalation) proceeds through a two-phase reaction between compositions very close to LiFePO4 and FePO4. As both endmember phases are very poor ionic and electronic conductors, it is difficult to understand the intercalation mechanism at the microscopic scale. Here, we report a characterization of electrochemically deintercalated nanomaterials by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that shows the coexistence of fully intercalated and fully deintercalated individual particles. This result indicates that the growth reaction is considerably faster than its nucleation. The reaction mechanism is described by a `domino-cascade model' and is explained by the existence of structural constraints occurring just at the reaction interface: the minimization of the elastic energy enhances the deintercalation (intercalation) process that occurs as a wave moving through the entire crystal. This model opens new perspectives in the search for new electrode materials even with poor ionic and electronic conductivities.

  15. Parallelizing Backpropagation Neural Network Using MapReduce and Cascading Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Jing, Weizhe; Xu, Lixiong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is a widely used algorithm in pattern recognition, classification, and prediction fields. Among a number of neural networks, backpropagation neural network (BPNN) has become the most famous one due to its remarkable function approximation ability. However, a standard BPNN frequently employs a large number of sum and sigmoid calculations, which may result in low efficiency in dealing with large volume of data. Therefore to parallelize BPNN using distributed computing technologies is an effective way to improve the algorithm performance in terms of efficiency. However, traditional parallelization may lead to accuracy loss. Although several complements have been done, it is still difficult to find out a compromise between efficiency and precision. This paper presents a parallelized BPNN based on MapReduce computing model which supplies advanced features including fault tolerance, data replication, and load balancing. And also to improve the algorithm performance in terms of precision, this paper creates a cascading model based classification approach, which helps to refine the classification results. The experimental results indicate that the presented parallelized BPNN is able to offer high efficiency whilst maintaining excellent precision in enabling large-scale machine learning. PMID:27217823

  16. Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ``Heavy Ion Physics``; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository.

  17. Parallelizing Backpropagation Neural Network Using MapReduce and Cascading Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jing, Weizhe; Xu, Lixiong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is a widely used algorithm in pattern recognition, classification, and prediction fields. Among a number of neural networks, backpropagation neural network (BPNN) has become the most famous one due to its remarkable function approximation ability. However, a standard BPNN frequently employs a large number of sum and sigmoid calculations, which may result in low efficiency in dealing with large volume of data. Therefore to parallelize BPNN using distributed computing technologies is an effective way to improve the algorithm performance in terms of efficiency. However, traditional parallelization may lead to accuracy loss. Although several complements have been done, it is still difficult to find out a compromise between efficiency and precision. This paper presents a parallelized BPNN based on MapReduce computing model which supplies advanced features including fault tolerance, data replication, and load balancing. And also to improve the algorithm performance in terms of precision, this paper creates a cascading model based classification approach, which helps to refine the classification results. The experimental results indicate that the presented parallelized BPNN is able to offer high efficiency whilst maintaining excellent precision in enabling large-scale machine learning. PMID:27217823

  18. A flare-induced cascade model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the source of gamma ray bursts as a stellar flare in the magnetosphere of a neutron star. It is suggested that the loss of energy through synchrotron radiation experienced by electrons moving through a sufficiently strong magnetic field at a large pitch angle may not be regained. Instead, pulsar theory is applied to show that the acceleration of electrons in an electric field parallel to the magnetic field will rapidly be inhibited by curvature radiation as the loop experiences a reconnection. It is shown that electrons passing through a curvature with a radius of one million with an electric field strength of 10 billion e.s.u. will emit photons with energies of up to 10 to the 12.6 eV by curvature radiation. The photons, gamma rays, would annihilate in the magnetosphere, which they cannot escape. The resulting cascade of electron-positron particles would eventually produce photons of sufficiently low energy to escape. Upper and low bounds are estimated for the resulting emission spectrum, which would vary according to the magnetic field geometry. The model explains the observed 511 keV annihilation line and the optical radiation which at times accompanies gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Improved Dynamic Modeling of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem and Analysis of Factors Affecting Its Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Bruce A.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2015-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) is a rotary multistage distiller being developed to serve as the primary processor for wastewater recovery during long-duration space missions. The CDS could be integrated with a system similar to the International Space Station Water Processor Assembly to form a complete water recovery system for future missions. A preliminary chemical process simulation was previously developed using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM), but it could not simulate thermal startup and lacked detailed analysis of several key internal processes, including heat transfer between stages. This paper describes modifications to the ACM simulation of the CDS that improve its capabilities and the accuracy of its predictions. Notably, the modified version can be used to model thermal startup and predicts the total energy consumption of the CDS. The simulation has been validated for both NaC1 solution and pretreated urine feeds and no longer requires retuning when operating parameters change. The simulation was also used to predict how internal processes and operating conditions of the CDS affect its performance. In particular, it is shown that the coefficient of performance of the thermoelectric heat pump used to provide heating and cooling for the CDS is the largest factor in determining CDS efficiency. Intrastage heat transfer affects CDS performance indirectly through effects on the coefficient of performance.

  20. Model for a pulsed terahertz quantum cascade laser under optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Gary; Grier, Andrew; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alexander; Dean, Paul; Cooper, Jonathan; Khanna, Suraj P; Lachab, Mohammad; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Harrison, Paul; Indjin, Dragan; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2016-09-01

    Optical feedback effects in lasers may be useful or problematic, depending on the type of application. When semiconductor lasers are operated using pulsed-mode excitation, their behavior under optical feedback depends on the electronic and thermal characteristics of the laser, as well as the nature of the external cavity. Predicting the behavior of a laser under both optical feedback and pulsed operation therefore requires a detailed model that includes laser-specific thermal and electronic characteristics. In this paper we introduce such a model for an exemplar bound-to-continuum terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL), illustrating its use in a selection of pulsed operation scenarios. Our results demonstrate significant interplay between electro-optical, thermal, and feedback phenomena, and that this interplay is key to understanding QCL behavior in pulsed applications. Further, our results suggest that for many types of QCL in interferometric applications, thermal modulation via low duty cycle pulsed operation would be an alternative to commonly used adiabatic modulation. PMID:27607659

  1. Lithium deintercalation in LiFePO4 nanoparticles via a domino-cascade model.

    PubMed

    Delmas, C; Maccario, M; Croguennec, L; Le Cras, F; Weill, F

    2008-08-01

    Lithium iron phosphate is one of the most promising positive-electrode materials for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries that will be used in electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. Lithium deintercalation (intercalation) proceeds through a two-phase reaction between compositions very close to LiFePO(4) and FePO(4). As both endmember phases are very poor ionic and electronic conductors, it is difficult to understand the intercalation mechanism at the microscopic scale. Here, we report a characterization of electrochemically deintercalated nanomaterials by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that shows the coexistence of fully intercalated and fully deintercalated individual particles. This result indicates that the growth reaction is considerably faster than its nucleation. The reaction mechanism is described by a 'domino-cascade model' and is explained by the existence of structural constraints occurring just at the reaction interface: the minimization of the elastic energy enhances the deintercalation (intercalation) process that occurs as a wave moving through the entire crystal. This model opens new perspectives in the search for new electrode materials even with poor ionic and electronic conductivities. PMID:18641656

  2. Cooperative Learning Model toward a Reading Comprehensions on the Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtono

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this research are: (1) description of reading skill the students who join in CIRC learning model, Jigsaw learning model, and STAD learning model; (2) finding out the effective of learning model cooperative toward a reading comprehensions between the students who have high language logic and low language logic; and (3) finding out…

  3. Quantum mechanical model of the upper bounds of the cascading contribution to the second hyperpolarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Anderson, Benjamin R.; Schei, Jennifer L.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2011-10-15

    Microscopic cascading of second-order nonlinearities between two molecules has been proposed to yield an enhanced third-order molecular nonlinear-optical response. In this contribution, we investigate the two-molecule cascaded second hyperpolarizability and show that it will never exceed the fundamental limit of a single molecule with the same number of electrons as the two-molecule system. We show the apparent divergence behavior of the cascading contribution to the second hyperpolarizability vanishes when properly taking into account the intermolecular interactions. Although cascading can never lead to a larger nonlinear-optical response than a single molecule, it provides alternative molecular design configurations for creating materials with large third-order susceptibilities that may be difficult to design into a single molecule.

  4. Classical model of the upper bounds of the cascading contribution to the second hyperpolarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Anderson, Benjamin R.; Schei, Jennifer L.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate whether microscopic cascading of second-order nonlinearities of two molecules in the side-by-side configuration can lead to a third-order molecular nonlinear-optical response that exceeds the fundamental limit. We find that for large values of the second hyperpolarizability, the side-by-side configuration has a cascading contribution that lowers the direct contribution. However, we do find that there is a cascading contribution to the second hyperpolarizability when there is no direct contribution. Thus, while cascading can never lead to a larger nonlinear-optical response than for a single molecule with the same number of electrons, it may provide design flexibility in making large third-order susceptibility materials when the molecular second hyperpolarizability vanishes.

  5. Modeling strategic competition in hydro-thermal electricity generation markets with cascaded reservoir-hydroelectric generation plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluca, Basak

    This dissertation aims to achieve two goals. The first is to model the strategic interactions of firms that own cascaded reservoir-hydro plants in oligopolistic and mixed oligopolistic hydrothermal electricity generation markets. Although competition in thermal generation has been extensively modeled since the beginning of deregulation, the literature on competition in hydro generation is still limited; in particular, equilibrium models of oligopoly that study the competitive behavior of firms that own reservoir-hydro plants along the same river in hydrothermal electricity generation markets are still under development. In competitive markets, when the reservoirs are located along the same river, the water released from an upstream reservoir for electricity generation becomes input to the immediate downstream reservoir, which may be owned by a competitor, for current or future use. To capture the strategic interactions among firms with cascaded reservoir-hydro plants, the Upstream-Conjecture approach is proposed. Under the Upstream-Conjecture approach, a firm with an upstream reservoir-hydro plant assumes that firms with downstream reservoir-hydro plants will respond to changes in the upstream firm's water release by adjusting their water release by the same amount. The results of the Upstream Conjecture experiments indicate that firms that own upstream reservoirs in a cascade may have incentive to withhold or limit hydro generation, forcing a reduction in the utilization of the downstream hydro generation plants that are owned by competitors. Introducing competition to hydroelectricity generation markets is challenging and ownership allocation of the previously state-owned cascaded reservoir-hydro plants through privatization can have significant impact on the competitiveness of the generation market. The second goal of the dissertation is to extract empirical guidance about best policy choices for the ownership of the state-owned generation plants, including the

  6. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascade production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.

  7. Electromagnetic cascades in the magnetosphere of a very young pulsar - A model for the positron production near the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Brecher, Kenneth; Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed model for positron production by a young pulsar is presented. It is shown that electromagnetic cascades can develop in a young pulsar's magnetosphere, and the model results are applied to the pulsar which is hypothesized to lie near the Galactic center. It is found that such a pulsar would be expected to produce relatively low energy electron-positron pairs with an efficiency rating high enough to explain the observed luminosity of the Galactic center annihilation line. Virtually all of the gamma ray continuum radiation produced in the cascades would be beamed along the magnetic poles of the neutron star, and therefore probably would not be observed from earth. Some observational predictions generated by the proposed model for the Galactic center positron source are given.

  8. Improved Dynamic Modeling of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem and Integration with Models of Other Water Recovery Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) is a rotary multistage distiller being developed to serve as the primary processor for wastewater recovery during long-duration space missions. The CDS could be integrated with a system similar to the International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) to form a complete Water Recovery System (WRS) for future missions. Independent chemical process simulations with varying levels of detail have previously been developed using Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) to aid in the analysis of the CDS and several WPA components. The existing CDS simulation could not model behavior during thermal startup and lacked detailed analysis of several key internal processes, including heat transfer between stages. The first part of this paper describes modifications to the ACM model of the CDS that improve its capabilities and the accuracy of its predictions. Notably, the modified version of the model can accurately predict behavior during thermal startup for both NaCl solution and pretreated urine feeds. The model is used to predict how changing operating parameters and design features of the CDS affects its performance, and conclusions from these predictions are discussed. The second part of this paper describes the integration of the modified CDS model and the existing WPA component models into a single WRS model. The integrated model is used to demonstrate the effects that changes to one component can have on the dynamic behavior of the system as a whole.

  9. Evaluation of the Interactionist Model of Socioeconomic Status and Problem Behavior: A Developmental Cascade across Generations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Monica J.; Conger, Rand D.; Schofield, Thomas J.; Dogan, Shannon J.; Widaman, Keith F.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Neppl, Tricia K.

    2010-01-01

    The current multigenerational study evaluates the utility of the Interactionist Model of Socioeconomic Influence on human development (IMSI) in explaining problem behaviors across generations. The IMSI proposes that the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and human development involves a dynamic interplay that includes both social causation (SES influences human development) and social selection (individual characteristics affect SES). As part of the developmental cascade proposed by the IMSI, the findings from this investigation showed that G1 adolescent problem behavior predicted later G1 SES, family stress, and parental emotional investments, as well as the next generation of children's problem behavior. These results are consistent with a social selection view. Consistent with the social causation perspective, we found a significant relation between G1 SES and family stress, and in turn, family stress predicted G2 problem behavior. Finally, G1 adult SES predicted both material and emotional investments in the G2 child. In turn, emotional investments predicted G2 problem behavior, as did material investments. Some of the predicted pathways varied by G1 parent gender. The results are consistent with the view that processes of both social selection and social causation account for the association between SES and human development. PMID:20576188

  10. Cascade model of gamma-ray bursts: Power-law and annihilation-line components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Sturrock, P. A.; Daugherty, J. K.

    1988-01-01

    If, in a neutron star magnetosphere, an electron is accelerated to an energy of 10 to the 11th or 12th power eV by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, motion of the electron along the curved field line leads to a cascade of gamma rays and electron-positron pairs. This process is believed to occur in radio pulsars and gamma ray burst sources. Results are presented from numerical simulations of the radiation and photon annihilation pair production processes, using a computer code previously developed for the study of radio pulsars. A range of values of initial energy of a primary electron was considered along with initial injection position, and magnetic dipole moment of the neutron star. The resulting spectra was found to exhibit complex forms that are typically power law over a substantial range of photon energy, and typically include a dip in the spectrum near the electron gyro-frequency at the injection point. The results of a number of models are compared with data for the 5 Mar., 1979 gamma ray burst. A good fit was found to the gamma ray part of the spectrum, including the equivalent width of the annihilation line.

  11. Ericksen number and Deborah number cascade predictions of a model for liquid crystalline polymers for simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, D. Harley; Leal, L. Gary; García-Cervera, Carlos J.; Ceniceros, Hector D.

    2007-02-01

    We consider the behavior of the Doi-Marrucci-Greco (DMG) model for nematic liquid crystalline polymers in planar shear flow. We found the DMG model to exhibit dynamics in both qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations reported by Larson and Mead [Liq. Cryst. 15, 151 (1993)] for the Ericksen number and Deborah number cascades. For increasing shear rates within the Ericksen number cascade, the DMG model displays three distinct regimes: stable simple shear, stable roll cells, and irregular structure accompanied by disclination formation. In accordance with experimental observations, the model predicts both ±1 and ±1/2 disclinations. Although ±1 defects form via the ridge-splitting mechanism first identified by Feng, Tao, and Leal [J. Fluid Mech. 449, 179 (2001)], a new mechanism is identified for the formation of ±1/2 defects. Within the Deborah number cascade, with increasing Deborah number, the DMG model exhibits a streamwise banded texture, in the absence of disclinations and roll cells, followed by a monodomain wherein the mean orientation lies within the shear plane throughout the domain.

  12. First-Grade Teachers' Response to Three Models of Professional Development in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Joanne F.; Cortina, Kai Schnabel; Katz, Lauren A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 1st-grade teachers' responses to professional development (PD) programs in reading that differed in means and degree of support for teachers' learning and efforts to improve their reading instruction. We compared 3 models of PD: the 1st model provided only seminars for the teachers, the 2nd model provided…

  13. Modelling Normal and Impaired Letter Recognition: Implications for Understanding Pure Alexic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Furber, Steve; Welbourne, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Letter recognition is the foundation of the human reading system. Despite this, it tends to receive little attention in computational modelling of single word reading. Here we present a model that can be trained to recognise letters in various spatial transformations. When presented with degraded stimuli the model makes letter confusion errors…

  14. Newly Constructed Network Models of Different WNT Signaling Cascades Applied to Breast Cancer Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Frank; Pukrop, Tobias; Beißbarth, Tim; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction WNT signaling is a complex process comprising multiple pathways: the canonical β-catenin-dependent pathway and several alternative non-canonical pathways that act in a β-catenin-independent manner. Representing these intricate signaling mechanisms through bioinformatic approaches is challenging. Nevertheless, a simplified but reliable bioinformatic WNT pathway model is needed, which can be further utilized to decipher specific WNT activation states within e.g. high-throughput data. Results In order to build such a model, we collected, parsed, and curated available WNT signaling knowledge from different pathway databases. The data were assembled to construct computationally suitable models of different WNT signaling cascades in the form of directed signaling graphs. This resulted in four networks representing canonical WNT signaling, non-canonical WNT signaling, the inhibition of canonical WNT signaling and the regulation of WNT signaling pathways, respectively. Furthermore, these networks were integrated with microarray and RNA sequencing data to gain deeper insight into the underlying biology of gene expression differences between MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, representing weakly and highly invasive breast carcinomas, respectively. Differential genes up-regulated in the MDA-MB-231 compared to the MCF-7 cell line were found to display enrichment in the gene set originating from the non-canonical network. Moreover, we identified and validated differentially regulated modules representing canonical and non-canonical WNT pathway components specific for the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrated that these newly constructed WNT networks reliably reflect distinct WNT signaling processes. Using transcriptomic data, we shaped these networks into comprehensive modules of the genes implicated in the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype and demonstrated that non-canonical WNT signaling is

  15. Comparative analysis of quantum cascade laser modeling based on density matrices and non-equilibrium Green's functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindskog, M. Wacker, A.; Wolf, J. M.; Liverini, V.; Faist, J.; Trinite, V.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M.; Aidam, R.; Ostendorf, R.

    2014-09-08

    We study the operation of an 8.5 μm quantum cascade laser based on GaInAs/AlInAs lattice matched to InP using three different simulation models based on density matrix (DM) and non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formulations. The latter advanced scheme serves as a validation for the simpler DM schemes and, at the same time, provides additional insight, such as the temperatures of the sub-band carrier distributions. We find that for the particular quantum cascade laser studied here, the behavior is well described by simple quantum mechanical estimates based on Fermi's golden rule. As a consequence, the DM model, which includes second order currents, agrees well with the NEGF results. Both these simulations are in accordance with previously reported data and a second regrown device.

  16. Testing the generality of a trophic-cascade model for plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collinge, S.K.; Johnson, W.C.; Ray, C.; Matchett, R.; Grensten, J.; Cully, J.F., Jr.; Gage, K.L.; Kosoy, M.Y.; Loye, J.E.; Martin, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Climate may affect the dynamics of infectious diseases by shifting pathogen, vector, or host species abundance, population dynamics, or community interactions. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are highly susceptible to plague, yet little is known about factors that influence the dynamics of plague epizootics in prairie dogs. We investigated temporal patterns of plague occurrence in black-tailed prairie dogs to assess the generality of links between climate and plague occurrence found in previous analyses of human plague cases. We examined long-term data on climate and plague occurrence in prairie dog colonies within two study areas. Multiple regression analyses revealed that plague occurrence in prairie dogs was not associated with climatic variables in our Colorado study area. In contrast, plague occurrence was strongly associated with climatic variables in our Montana study area. The models with most support included a positive association with precipitation in April-July of the previous year, in addition to a positive association with the number of "warm" days and a negative association with the number of "hot" days in the same year as reported plague events. We conclude that the timing and magnitude of precipitation and temperature may affect plague occurrence in some geographic areas. The best climatic predictors of plague occurrence in prairie dogs within our Montana study area are quite similar to the best climatic predictors of human plague cases in the southwestern United States. This correspondence across regions and species suggests support for a (temperature-modulated) trophic-cascade model for plague, including climatic effects on rodent abundance, flea abundance, and pathogen transmission, at least in regions that experience strong climatic signals. ?? 2005 EcoHealth Journal Consortium.

  17. Mathematical modelling of a steady flow of a heat conductive incompressible fluid through the cascade of profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustupa, T.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical model of a steady flow of a heat-conductive incompressible viscous fluid through a spatially periodic plane profile cascade. The corresponding boundary value problem is reduced to one spatial period. We prove the existence of a weak solution of a coupled problem, with various boundary conditions on the parts of the boundary. Particularly, the condition on the outflow is a variant of the so called "do nothing" boundary condition.

  18. Hadronic event generation for hadron cascade calculations and detector simulation, Part IV: The application of the intranuclear cascade model to reactions of pions, nucleons, kaons, and their antiparticles with nuclei below 6 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Haenbssgen, K.

    1987-02-01

    An extension of the intranuclear cascade model is described. The primary hadrons may be pions, kaons, nucleons, and their antiparticles. Secondary particles produced include hyperons or antihyperons. A large amount of experimental data is described by the model. The model is constructed via the Monte Carlo generation of complete events, based on a model of the nucleus structure and the hadron/nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. Calculated average multiplicities and single and double differential cross sections are compared with experimental data.

  19. SPONTANEOUS CURRENT-LAYER FRAGMENTATION AND CASCADING RECONNECTION IN SOLAR FLARES. I. MODEL AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Miroslav; Buechner, Joerg; Karlicky, Marian; Skala, Jan

    2011-08-10

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered to be a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question of how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales, we address this question by means of a high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutively smaller and smaller flux ropes (plasmoids), analogous to the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) 'fragmenting coalescence' processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) into smaller elements. At the later stages, a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical of cascading processes. It is shown that cascading reconnection also addresses other open issues in solar-flare research, such as the duality between the regular large-scale picture of (eruptive) flares and the observed signatures of fragmented (chaotic) energy release, as well as the huge number of accelerated particles. Indeed, spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and the formation of multiple channelized dissipative/acceleration regions embedded in the current layer appear to be intrinsic to the cascading process. The multiple small-scale current sheets may also facilitate the acceleration of a large number of particles. The structure, distribution, and dynamics of the embedded potential acceleration regions in a current layer fragmented by cascading reconnection are studied and discussed.

  20. Small-Group Reading Instruction: A Differentiated Teaching Model for Intermediate Readers, Grades 3-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner, Beverly; Green, Sharon E.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers at the intermediate level can now take advantage of the small-group differentiated reading model introduced to the early learning community in Beverly Tyner's bestseller of 2004. This classroom-tested, research-based model supports reading, writing, and spelling as integrated processes. Differentiated instruction can help the reader meet…

  1. An Anatomically Constrained, Stochastic Model of Eye Movement Control in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Scott A.; Carpenter, R. H. S.; Shillcock, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents SERIF, a new model of eye movement control in reading that integrates an established stochastic model of saccade latencies (LATER; R. H. S. Carpenter, 1981) with a fundamental anatomical constraint on reading: the vertically split fovea and the initial projection of information in either visual field to the contralateral…

  2. White House Suggests Model Used in Reading to Elevate Math Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the Bush administration's aim to improve mathematics education through a suggested reading model. The White House is focusing on research to shape how students across the country are taught the most basic mathematical concepts. This undertaking would be modeled on the government's action toward reading, which includes the…

  3. A Model for Describing, Analysing and Investigating Cultural Understanding in EFL Reading Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a model used to explore cultural understanding in English as a foreign language reading in a developing country, namely Argentina. The model is designed to investigate, analyse and describe EFL readers' processes of cultural understanding in a specific context. Cultural understanding in reading is typically investigated…

  4. Cumulative risk disparities in children's neurocognitive functioning: a developmental cascade model.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mark; Browne, Dillon T; Plamondon, Andre; Daniel, Ella; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2016-03-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the role of cumulative social risk on children's theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF) across early development. Further, we also tested a cascade model of development in which children's social cognition at 18 months was hypothesized to predict ToM and EF at age 4.5 through intermediary language skills at age 3. We then examined whether this developmental mechanism varied as a function of social risk status. Participants were 501 children recruited when they were newborns, at which point eight psychosocial risk factors were assessed and combined into a metric of cumulative social disadvantage. Families were followed up at 18 months, at which point four social-cognitive skills were assessed using developmentally sensitive tasks: joint attention, empathy, cooperation, and self-recognition. Language was measured at age 3 using a standardized measure of receptive vocabulary. At age 3 and 4.5, EF and ToM were measured using previously validated tasks. Results showed that there were notable cumulative risk disparities in overall neurocognitive skill development, and these effects became more differentiated over time. Support was also found for a developmental mechanism wherein the effect of social cognition at 18 months on ToM and EF in the preschool period operated specifically through children's receptive language ability at age 3. This pathway functioned similarly for children with both low- and high-risk backgrounds. These results extend previous findings by documenting the role of cumulative social disadvantage on children's neurocognition and the pathways that link key neurocognitive abilities across early development. PMID:25845409

  5. Developmental Relations Between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first grade students (N = 316, mean age = 7.05 at first test) through fourth grade to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension to test for the presence of leading and lagging influences. Univariate models indicated growth in vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension was determined by two parts: constant yearly change and change proportional to the previous level of the variable. Bivariate models indicated previous levels of vocabulary knowledge acted as leading indicators of reading comprehension growth, but the reverse relation was not found. Implications for theories of developmental relations between vocabulary and reading comprehension are discussed. PMID:25201552

  6. Multiple regression analysis of reading performance data from twin pairs with reading difficulties and nontwin siblings: the augmented model.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Sally J; Olson, Richard K; Willcutt, Erik G; DeFries, John C

    2012-02-01

    The augmented multiple regression model for the analysis of data from selected twin pairs was extended to facilitate analyses of data from twin pairs and nontwin siblings. Fitting this extended model to data from both selected twin pairs and siblings yields direct estimates of heritability (h2) and the difference between environmental influences shared by members of twin pairs and those of sib or twin-sib pairs (i.e., c2(t) - c2 (s)). When this model was fitted to reading performance data from 293 monozygotic and 436 dizygotic pairs selected for reading difficulties, and 291 of their nontwin siblings, h2 = .48 ± .22, p = .03, and c2 (t) - c2 (s) = .22 ± .12, p = .06. Although the test for differential shared environmental influences is only marginally significant, the results of this analysis suggest that environmental influences on reading performance that are shared by members of twin pairs (.36) may be substantially greater than those for less contemporaneous twin-sibling pairs (.14). PMID:22784461

  7. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascademore » production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.« less

  8. Cognitive component of componential model of reading applied to different orthographies.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R Malatesha; Tao, Sha; Aaron, P G; Quiroz, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Whether the simple view of reading (SVR) as incorporated in the componential model of reading (CMR) is applicable to other orthographies than English was explored in this study. Spanish, with transparent orthography and Chinese, with opaque orthography were selected because of their diverse characteristics. The first part reports a study of students from grades 2 and 3, whose home language and medium of instruction was Spanish, and were administered tests of decoding, listening, and reading comprehension. A comparison group of 49 children from Grade 2, 54 children from Grade 3, and 55 children from Grade 4, whose home language and instruction was English, were also administered tests of decoding, listening, and reading comprehension. Multiple regression analysis showed that approximately 60% of the variance in reading comprehension of Spanish participants and 50% of the variance in reading comprehension of English participants were explained by decoding and listening comprehension. Furthermore, the performance of third grade Spanish participants resembled that of fourth grade English-speaking participants. In the second study, 102 Chinese students from Grade 2 and 106 students from Grade 4 were administered tasks of Chinese character recognition, reading fluency, listening, and reading comprehension. Multiple regression analyses showed character recognition and listening comprehension accounted for 25% and 42% of the variance in Chinese reading comprehension at Grades 2 and 4 respectively. These results indicate that the simple view of reading is applicable to writing systems other than that of English. PMID:22293686

  9. When Interrupted Intervention Leads to Failure: A Correlation Study of the Three-Tiered Reading Model in Grades K-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Beverly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The three-tiered reading model is a widely practiced instructional scheme that moves students in and out of reading intervention groups during the school year. Though designed to treat students who need extra help learning to read, this interruption of reading interventions may hinder some students' progress. The purpose of this study was to…

  10. The Prevention Science of Reading Research within a Response-to-Intervention Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembke, Erica S.; McMaster, Kristen L.; Stecker, Pamela M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe research-based reading intervention within a Response-to-Intervention (RTI) model, using prevention science as a context. First, RTI is defined and a rationale is provided for its use in improving the reading performance of all students, particularly those students identified as at risk for…