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Sample records for casimir experiments showing

  1. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  2. The Casimir force between real materials: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2009-10-15

    The physical origin of the Casimir force is connected with the existence of zero-point and thermal fluctuations. The Casimir effect is very general and finds applications in various fields of physics. This review is limited to the rapid progress at the intersection of experiment and theory that has been achieved in the last few years. It includes a critical assessment of the proposed approaches to the resolution of the puzzles arising in the applications of the Lifshitz theory of the van der Waals and Casimir forces to real materials. All the primary experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force between macroscopic bodies and the Casimir-Polder force between an atom and a wall that have been performed in the last decade are reviewed, including the theory needed for their interpretation. The methodology for the comparison between experiment and theory in the force-distance measurements is presented. The experimental and theoretical results described here provide a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of dispersion forces in real materials and offer guidance for the application of the Lifshitz theory to the interpretation of the measurement results.

  3. Tuning the mass of chameleon fields in Casimir force experiments.

    PubMed

    Brax, Ph; van de Bruck, C; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-06-18

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long-range Casimir force experiments. PMID:20867290

  4. Gedanken experiments with Casimir forces and vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclay, G. Jordan

    2010-09-15

    Gedanken experiments are used to explore properties of quantum vacuum energy that are currently challenging to explore experimentally. A constant lateral Casimir force is predicted to exist between two overlapping finite parallel plates at 0 K; otherwise it would be possible to extract an arbitrary amount of energy from the quantum vacuum. A rigid unpowered object cannot be accelerated by the quantum vacuum because of the translational symmetry of space. By considering systems in which vacuum energy and other forms of energy are exchanged, we demonstrate that a change {Delta}E in vacuum energy, whether positive or negative with respect to the free field, corresponds to an equivalent inertial mass and equivalent gravitational mass {Delta}M={Delta}E/c{sup 2}. We consider the possibility of a gravitational shield and show that, if it exists, the energy to operate it would have to cancel the net energy extracted from the gravitational field; otherwise we could extract an arbitrary amount of energy from the field.

  5. Casimir force between liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.; Escobar, J. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the Casimir force between liquid metals at room temperature using as case studies mercury (Hg) and eutectic indium gallium (EInGa). The surface tension of the liquids creates surfaces of zero roughness that are truly equipotential, an ideal characteristic for Casimir force experiments. As we show the dielectric properties of Au, EInGa and Hg are very similar and the difference on the Casimir force between Au and EInGa and Au and Hg is less than 4%. Based on these results, a modification of the IUPUI experiment for detecting deviations of Newtonian gravity is proposed.

  6. Comparison of hydrodynamic model of graphene with recent experiment on measuring the Casimir interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the reflection coefficients from a graphene sheet deposited on a material substrate under a condition that graphene is described by the hydrodynamic model. Using these coefficients, the gradient of the Casimir force in the configuration of a recent experiment is calculated in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the hydrodynamic model is excluded by the measurement data at a 99% confidence level over a wide range of separations. From the fact that the same data are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions of the Dirac model of graphene, the low-energy character of the Casimir interaction is confirmed.

  7. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  8. Theoretical ingredients of a Casimir analog computer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a correspondence between the contour integration of the Casimir stress tensor in the complex-frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite real-frequency bandwidth. The consequences of this correspondence are at least threefold: First, the correspondence makes it easier to understand Casimir systems from the perspective of conventional classical electromagnetism, based on real-frequency responses, in contrast to the standard imaginary-frequency point of view based on Wick rotations. Second, it forms the starting point of finite-difference time-domain numerical techniques for calculation of Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. Finally, this correspondence is also key to a technique for computing quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop (e.g., centimeter) scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. Superficially, relationships between the Casimir force and the classical electromagnetic Green’s function are well known, so one might expect that any experimental measurement of the Green’s function would suffice to calculate the Casimir force. However, we show that the standard forms of this relationship lead to infeasible experiments involving infinite bandwidth or exponentially growing fields, and a fundamentally different formulation is therefore required. PMID:20460309

  9. Mechanical temporal fluctuation induced distance and force systematic errors in Casimir force experiments.

    PubMed

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Wong, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    The basic theory of temporal mechanical fluctuation induced systematic errors in Casimir force experiments is developed and applications of this theory to several experiments is reviewed. This class of systematic error enters in a manner similar to the usual surface roughness correction, but unlike the treatment of surface roughness for which an exact result requires an electromagnetic mode analysis, time dependent fluctuations can be treated exactly, assuming the fluctuation times are much longer than the zero point and thermal fluctuation correlation times of the electromagnetic field between the plates. An experimental method for measuring absolute distance with high bandwidth is also described and measurement data presented. PMID:25965319

  10. Mechanical temporal fluctuation induced distance and force systematic errors in Casimir force experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Wong, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    The basic theory of temporal mechanical fluctuation induced systematic errors in Casimir force experiments is developed and applications of this theory to several experiments is reviewed. This class of systematic error enters in a manner similar to the usual surface roughness correction, but unlike the treatment of surface roughness for which an exact result requires an electromagnetic mode analysis, time dependent fluctuations can be treated exactly, assuming the fluctuation times are much longer than the zero point and thermal fluctuation correlation times of the electromagnetic field between the plates. An experimental method for measuring absolute distance with high bandwidth is also described and measurement data presented.

  11. Force sensor for chameleon and Casimir force experiments with parallel-plate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasi, Attaallah; Brax, Philippe; Iannuzzi, Davide; Sedmik, René I. P.

    2015-05-01

    The search for non-Newtonian forces has been pursued following many different paths. Recently it was suggested that hypothetical chameleon interactions, which might explain the mechanisms behind dark energy, could be detected in a high-precision force measurement. In such an experiment, interactions between parallel plates kept at constant separation could be measured as a function of the pressure of an ambient gas, thereby identifying chameleon interactions by their unique inverse dependence on the local mass density. During the past years we have been developing a new kind of setup complying with the stringent requirements of the proposed experiment. In this article we present the first and most important part of this setup—the force sensor. We discuss its design, fabrication, and characterization. From the results of the latter, we derive limits on chameleon interaction parameters that could be set by the forthcoming experiment. Finally, we describe the opportunity to use the same setup to measure Casimir forces at large surface separations with unprecedented accuracy, thereby potentially giving unambiguous answers to long-standing open questions.

  12. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  13. Casimir force measurements in Au-Au and Au-Si cavities at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, J.; Sellier, H.; Mosset, A.; Huant, S.; Chevrier, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the Casimir force in a sphere-plane geometry using a cryogenic force microscope to move the force probe in situ over different materials. We show how the electrostatic environment of the interacting surfaces plays an important role in weak force measurements and can overcome the Casimir force at large distance. After minimizing these parasitic forces, we measure the Casimir force between a gold-coated sphere and either a gold-coated or a heavily doped silicon surface in the 100-400 nm distance range. We compare the experimental data with theoretical predictions and discuss the consequence of a systematic error in the scanner calibration on the agreement between experiment and theory. The relative force over the two surfaces compares favorably with theory at short distance, showing that this Casimir force experiment is sensitive to the dielectric properties of the interacting surfaces.

  14. Experiments on Sphere Cylinder Geometry Dependence in the Electromagnetic Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Noruzifar, Ehsan; Wagner, Jeffrey; Zandi, Roya; Mohideen, Umar

    2013-03-01

    We report on ongoing experimental investigations on the geometry dependence of the electromagnetic Casimir force in the sphere-cylinder configuration. A gold coated hollow glass sphere which forms one surface is attached to a Silicon AFM cantilever. The cylinder, which is constructed from tapered optical fiber is also gold coated. The resonance frequency shift of the cantilever is measured as a function of the sphere-cylinder surface separation. The sphere-cylinder electrostatic force is used for alignment of the sphere and the cylinder and also for calibrating the system. The results are compared to numerical simulations in the framework of the Proximity Force Approximation (PFA).

  15. Optical and Casimir effects in topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin H.

    Two major electromagnetic phenomena, magneto-optical effects and the Casimir effect, have seen much theoretical and experimental use for many years. On the other hand, recently there has been an explosion of theoretical and experimental work on so-called topological materials, and a natural question to ask is how such electromagnetic phenomena change with these novel materials. Specifically, we will consider are topological insulators and Weyl semimetals. When Dirac electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are gapped or Weyl fermions in the bulk of a Weyl semimetal appear due to time-reversal symmetry breaking, there is a resulting quantum anomalous Hall effect (2D in one case and bulk 3D in the other, respectively). For topological insulators, we investigate the role of localized in-gap states which can leave their own fingerprints on the magneto-optics and can therefore be probed. We have shown that these states resonantly contribute to the Hall conductivity and are magneto-optically active. For Weyl semimetals we investigate the Casimir force and show that with thickness, chemical potential, and magnetic field, a repulsive and tunable Casimir force can be obtained. Additionally, various values of the parameters can give various combinations of traps and antitraps. We additionally probe the topological transition called a Lifshitz transition in the band structure of a material and show that in a Casimir experiment, one can observe a non-analytic "kink'' in the Casimir force across such a transition. The material we propose is a spin-orbit coupled semiconductor with large g-factor that can be magnetically tuned through such a transition. Additionally, we propose an experiment with a two-dimensional metal where weak localization is tuned with an applied field in order to definitively test the effect of diffusive electrons on the Casimir force---an issue that is surprisingly unresolved to this day. Lastly, we show how the time-continuous coherent state

  16. Correlation Between Plasma and Temperature Corrections to the Casimir Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Cyriaque; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    When comparing experimental results with theoretical predictions of the Casimir force, the accuracy of the theory is as important as the precision of experiments. Here we evaluate the Casimir force when finite conductivity of the reflectors and finite temperature are simultaneously taken into account. We show that these two corrections are correlated, i.e. that they can not, in principle, be evaluated separately and simply multiplied. We estimate the correlation factor which measures the deviation from this common approximation. We focus our attention on the case of smooth and plane plates with a metallic optical response modeled by a plasma model.

  17. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  18. Resource Letter CF-1: Casimir Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1999-10-01

    This resource letter provides an introductory guide to the literature on the Casimir force. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: introductory articles and books, calculations, dynamical Casimir effect, mechanical analogs, applications, and experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.}

  19. Noncontact Casimir rack and pinion as an excitable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, Zahra; Miri, MirFaez

    2015-10-01

    We study the influence of thermal noise on the rack and pinion coupled by the lateral Casimir force. The pinion position versus time exhibits a sequence of spikes. We identify the Casimir machine as an excitable system equivalent to the Adler system. We show that the interspike time distribution can be analyzed to access the Casimir and friction forces. The inherent susceptibility of nanomachines to the thermal noise can be utilized to measure weak Casimir forces.

  20. Casimir forces in a plasma: possible connections to Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninham, Barry W.; Boström, Mathias; Persson, Clas; Brevik, Iver; Buhmann, Stefan Y.; Sernelius, Bo E.

    2014-10-01

    We present theoretical and numerical results for the screened Casimir effect between perfect metal surfaces in a plasma. We show how the Casimir effect in an electron-positron plasma can provide an important contribution to nuclear interactions. Our results suggest that there is a connection between Casimir forces and nucleon forces mediated by mesons. Correct nuclear energies and meson masses appear to emerge naturally from the screened Casimir-Lifshitz effect.

  1. Worldwide experience shows horizontal well success

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, H.; Bitto, R.

    1989-03-01

    The convergence of technology and experience has made horizontal drilling an important tool in increasing production and solving a variety of completion problems. Since the early 1980s, horizontal drilling has been used to improve production on more than 700 oil and gas wells throughout the world. Approximately 200 horizontal wells were drilled in 1988 alone. Interest in horizontal drilling has been accelerating rapidly as service companies have developed and offered new technology for drilling and producing horizontal wells. Simultaneously, oil companies have developed better methods for evaluating reservoirs for potential horizontal applications, while their production departments have gained experience at completing and producing them. To date, most horizontal wells have been drilled in the United States. A major application is to complete naturally fractured formations, such as the Austin chalk in Texas, the Bakken shale in the Williston basin, the Spraberry in West Texas and the Devonian shale in the Eastern states. In addition, many horizontal wells have been drilled to produce the Niagaran reefs and the irregular Antrim shale reservoirs in Michigan.

  2. Children's Art Show: An Educational Family Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakerlis, Julienne

    2007-01-01

    In a time of seemingly rampant budget cuts in the arts in school systems throughout the country, a children's art show reaps many rewards. It can strengthen family-school relationships and community ties and stimulate questions and comments about the benefits of art and its significance in the development of young children. In this photo essay of…

  3. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  4. Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides.

    PubMed

    de Man, S; Heeck, K; Wijngaarden, R J; Iannuzzi, D

    2009-07-24

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals. PMID:19659332

  5. Nonanalytic behavior of the Casimir force across a Lifshitz transition in a spin-orbit-coupled material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, Andrew A.; Wilson, Justin H.; Galitski, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The Casimir effect is a fascinating phenomenon where quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field give rise to measurable forces between macroscopic systems. Here we propose that the Casimir effect can be used as a tool to detect changes in electronic structures. In particular, we focus here on the Lifshitz transition—a topological change in the Fermi surface—in a planar spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor in a magnetic field and calculate the Casimir force between the semiconductor and another probe system across the magnetic-field-tuned transition. We show that the Casimir force experiences a sharp kink at the topological transition and provide numerical estimates indicating that the effect is well within experimental reach. The simplest experimental realization of the proposed effect would involve a metal-coated sphere suspended from a microcantilever above a thin layer of InSb (or another semiconductor with a large g factor).

  6. Fluctuations of the Casimir-like force between two membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dommersnes, Paul G; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-05-01

    Although Casimir forces are inseparable from their fluctuations, little is known about these fluctuations in soft matter systems. We use the membrane stress tensor to study the fluctuations of the membrane-mediated Casimir-like force. This method enables us to recover the Casimir force between two inclusions and to calculate its variance. We show that the Casimir force is dominated by its fluctuations. Furthermore, when the distance d between the inclusions is decreased from infinity, the variance of the Casimir force decreases as -1/d2. This distance dependence shares a common physical origin with the Casimir force itself. PMID:20866178

  7. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  8. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, C; Soto, R

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies. PMID:25122386

  9. Casimir effect in swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the Casimir effect can emerge in microswimmer suspensions. In principle, two effects conspire against the development of Casimir effects in swimmer suspensions. First, at low Reynolds number, the force on any closed volume vanishes, but here the relevant effect is the drag by the flow produced by the swimmers, which can be finite. Second, the fluid velocity and the pressure are linear on the swimmer force dipoles, and averaging over the swimmer orientations would lead to a vanishing effect. However, being that the suspension is a discrete system, the noise terms of the coarse-grained equations depend on the density, which itself fluctuates, resulting in effective nonlinear dynamics. Applying the tools developed for other nonequilibrium systems to general coarse-grained equations for swimmer suspensions, the Casimir drag is computed on immersed objects, and it is found to depend on the correlation function between the rescaled density and dipolar density fields. By introducing a model correlation function with medium-range order, explicit expressions are obtained for the Casimir drag on a body. When the correlation length is much larger than the microscopic cutoff, the average drag is independent of the correlation length, with a range that depends only on the size of the immersed bodies.

  10. On the Relation Between Casimir Forces and Bulk Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiórkowski, Marek; Piasecki, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    Within a microscopic approach we show that in the case of an ideal quantum gas enclosed in a slit the Casimir force can be simply expressed in terms of the bulk one-particle density matrix. The corresponding formula, which holds both for bosons and fermions, allows to relate the range of the Casimir force to the bulk correlation length. The low-temperature behavior of the Casimir forces is derived.

  11. Phononic Thermal Conduction Engineering for Bolometers: From Phononic Crystals to Radial Casimir Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, I. J.; Puurtinen, T. A.; Tian, Y.; Geng, Z.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss two alternative and complementary means of controlling radial phonon conduction for bolometers in two dimensions: by using phononic crystals or by roughening the surface of the membranes (Casimir limit). For phononic crystals, we present new experiments with a modified geometry and a larger hole periodicity than before, achieving a low thermal conductance {˜ }2 pW/K at 150 mK. Calculations in the Casimir limit, on the other hand, show that for small detector dimensions thermal conductance below 1 fW/K seems achievable.

  12. Isoelectronic apparatus to probe the thermal Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Isoelectronic differential force measurements provide a unique opportunity to probe controversial features of the thermal Casimir effect that are still much debated in the current literature. Isolectronic setups offer two major advantages over conventional Casimir setups. On the one hand, they are immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces that plague present Casimir experiments, especially for separations in the micron range. On the other hand, they can strongly enhance the discrepancy between alternative theoretical models that have been proposed to estimate the thermal Casimir force for metallic and magnetic surfaces. Thanks to these two features, isoelectronic differential experiments should allow one to establish conclusively which among these models correctly describes the thermal Casimir force.

  13. Three-dimensional Casimir piston for massive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S.C. Teo, L.P.

    2009-08-15

    We consider Casimir force acting on a three-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massive scalar field subject to periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Exponential cut-off method is used to derive the Casimir energy. It is shown that the divergent terms do not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus render a finite well-defined Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit expressions for the total Casimir force acting on the piston is derived, which show that the Casimir force is always attractive for all the different boundary conditions considered. As a function of a - the distance from the piston to the opposite wall, it is found that the magnitude of the Casimir force behaves like 1/a{sup 4} when a{yields}0{sup +} and decays exponentially when a{yields}{infinity}. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force is always a decreasing function of a. On the other hand, passing from massless to massive, we find that the effect of the mass is insignificant when a is small, but the magnitude of the force is decreased for large a in the massive case.

  14. Casimir effect: An avatar of the quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, Kuloth V.

    constituting the parallel plates, each of which is divergent. The third term which is finite is interpreted to arise due to the interaction between the two plates. The Casimir force on a single plate is evaluated to be zero. This is expected because we do not change the energy by shifting a single plate due to translational symmetry. The same argument applies for the two divergent terms associated with the single plates forming the parallel plates. But the third finite term does contribute to a change in the energy when the distance between the plates is changed. We derive an explicit expression for the Casimir force between parallel plates for arbitrary couplings to the delta-function potentials. In the strong coupling limit we recover the Casimir force in the Dirichlet limit for the case of scalar fields. Even though the divergent terms in the total energy associated with the single plates constituting two parallel plates do not contribute to the Casimir force, the situation still appears unsatisfactory. Any form of energy acts as a 'source' in the Einstein's equation and thus falls under gravity. The classic example is that of bending of light around a planet. How do the divergent terms associated with single plates interact with gravity? In chapter 4 we consider parallel plates falling in a weak gravitational field described by a space-time given in terms of Rindler coordinates. For the case of parallel plates we show that all the three terms contributing to the total energy interact with a weak gravitational field exactly like a conventional mass. We interpret this as meaning that the divergent terms associated with the single plates serve to renormalize the bare masses of the single plates. In chapter 5 we generalize our results for other inertial forces. In particular we demonstrate that the results of chapter 4 hold for the case of two parallel plates rotating with a constant angular speed. We show that exactly as in the case of Rindler acceleration, the Casimir energy

  15. Quantized Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the Casimir effect between two-dimensional electron systems driven to the quantum Hall regime by a strong perpendicular magnetic field. In the large-separation (d) limit where retardation effects are essential, we find (i) that the Casimir force is quantized in units of 3ħcα(2)/8π(2)d(4) and (ii) that the force is repulsive for mirrors with the same type of carrier and attractive for mirrors with opposite types of carrier. The sign of the Casimir force is therefore electrically tunable in ambipolar materials such as graphene. The Casimir force is suppressed when one mirror is a charge-neutral graphene system in a filling factor ν=0 quantum Hall state. PMID:23368242

  16. Repulsive Casimir force between Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin H.; Allocca, Andrew A.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Weyl semimetals are a class of topological materials that exhibit a bulk Hall effect due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. We show that for the idealized semi-infinite case, the Casimir force between two identical Weyl semimetals is repulsive at short range and attractive at long range. Considering plates of finite thickness, we can reduce the size of the long-range attraction even making it repulsive for all distances when thin enough. In the thin-film limit, we study the appearance of an attractive Casimir force at shorter distances due to the longitudinal conductivity. Magnetic field, thickness, and chemical potential provide tunable nobs for this effect, controlling the Casimir force: whether it is attractive or repulsive, the magnitude of the effect, and the positions and existence of a trap and antitrap.

  17. Critical Casimir forces in a magnetic system: An experimental protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Jacquin, Hugo; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2014-11-01

    We numerically test an experimentally realizable method for the extraction of the critical Casimir force based on its thermodynamic definition as the derivative of the excess free energy with respect to system size. Free energy differences are estimated for different system sizes by integrating the order parameter along an isotherm. The method could be developed for experiments on magnetic systems and could give access to the critical Casimir force for any universality class. By choosing an applied field that opposes magnetic ordering at the boundaries, the Casimir force is found to increase by an order of magnitude over zero-field results.

  18. Modal approach to Casimir forces in periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravaia, F.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2010-12-15

    We present a modal approach to calculate finite-temperature Casimir interactions between two periodically modulated surfaces. The scattering formula is used and the reflection matrices of the patterned surfaces are calculated by decomposing the electromagnetic field into the natural modes of the structures. The Casimir force gradient from a deeply etched silicon grating is evaluated using the modal approach and compared to experiment for validation. The Casimir force involving a two-dimensional periodic structure is computed and deviations from the proximity force approximation are examined.

  19. Demonstration of the lateral casimir force.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Mohideen, U; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2002-03-11

    The lateral Casimir force between a sinusoidally corrugated gold coated plate and large sphere was measured for surface separations between 0.2 to 0.3 microm using an atomic force microscope. The measured force shows the required periodicity corresponding to the corrugations. It also exhibits the necessary inverse fourth power distance dependence. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement with a complete theory taking into account the imperfectness of the boundary metal. This demonstration opens new opportunities for the use of the Casimir effect for lateral translation in microelectromechanical systems. PMID:11909341

  20. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David S.; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A. C.; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory.

  1. Nonequilibrium Tuning of the Thermal Casimir Effect.

    PubMed

    Dean, David S; Lu, Bing-Sui; Maggs, A C; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-17

    In net-neutral systems correlations between charge fluctuations generate strong attractive thermal Casimir forces and engineering these forces to optimize nanodevice performance is an important challenge. We show how the normal and lateral thermal Casimir forces between two plates containing Brownian charges can be modulated by decorrelating the system through the application of an electric field, which generates a nonequilibrium steady state with a constant current in one or both plates, reducing the ensuing fluctuation-generated normal force while at the same time generating a lateral drag force. This hypothesis is confirmed by detailed numerical simulations as well as an analytical approach based on stochastic density functional theory. PMID:27367374

  2. Graphene Casimir Interactions and Some Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh D.

    Scientific development requires profound understandings of micromechanical and nanomechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) due to their applications not only in the technological world, but also for scientific understanding. At the micro- or nano-scale, when two objects are brought close together, the existence of stiction or adhesion is inevitable and plays an important role in the behavior operation of these systems. Such effects are due to surface dispersion forces, such as the van der Waals or Casimir interactions. The scientific understanding of these forces is particularly important for low-dimensional materials. In addition, the discovery of materials, such as graphitic systems has provided opportunities for new classes of devices and challenging fundamental problems. Therefore, investigations of the van der Waals or Caismir forces in graphene-based systems, in particular, and the solution generating non-touching systems are needed. In this study, the Casimir force involving 2D graphene is investigated under various conditions. The Casimir interaction is usually studied in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. According to this theory, it is essential to know the frequency-dependent reflection coefficients of materials. Here, it is found that the graphene reflection coefficients strongly depend on the optical conductivity of graphene, which is described by the Kubo formalism. When objects are placed in vacuum, the Casimir force is attractive and leads to adhesion on the surface. We find that the Casimir repulsion can be obtained by replacing vacuum with a suitable liquid. Our studies show that bromobenzene is the liquid providing this effect. We also find that this long-range force is temperature dependent and graphene/bromobenzene/metal substrate configuration can be used to demonstrate merely thermal Casimir interaction at room temperature and micrometer distances. These findings would provide good guidance and predictions for practical studies.

  3. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work. PMID:27627286

  4. Casimir entropy for magnetodielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Korikov, C. C.

    2015-06-01

    We find the analytic expressions for the Casimir free energy, entropy and pressure at low temperature in the configuration of two parallel plates made of magnetodielectic material. The cases of constant and frequency-dependent dielectic permittivity and magnetic permeability of the plates are considered. Special attention is paid to the account of dc conductivity. It is shown that in the case of finite static dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability the Nernst heat theorem for the Casimir entropy is satisfied. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy goes to a positive nonzero limit depending on the parameters of a system when the temperature vanishes, i.e. the Nernst theorem is violated. The experimental situation is also discussed.

  5. An experimental apparatus for Casimir torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    We have developed an experiment to measure the Casimir torque. In our experiment, a solid birefringent crystal causes a nematic liquid crystal director to rotate such that the extraordinary axes are aligned. A transparent and isotropic dielectric spacer layer is used to separate the two birefringent materials and an all-optical technique is used for detection. In this talk, we report on the progress of this experiment. Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics.

  6. Casimir force between parallel plates separated by anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Gang; Tan, Bao-Hua; Pei, Ling; Hu, Ni; Zhu, Jin-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel plates separated by anisotropic media is investigated. We theoretically calculate the Casimir force between two parallel plates when the interspace between the plates is filled with anisotropic media. Our result shows that the anisotropy of the material between the plates can significantly affect the Casimir force, especially the direction of the force. If ignoring the anisotropy of the in-between material makes the force repulsive (attractive), by contrast taking the anisotropy into account may produce an extra attractive (repulsive) force. The physical explanation for this phenomenon is also discussed.

  7. Quantum mechanical actuation of microelectromechanical systems by the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Chan, H B; Aksyuk, V A; Kleiman, R N; Bishop, D J; Capasso, F

    2001-03-01

    The Casimir force is the attraction between uncharged metallic surfaces as a result of quantum mechanical vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. We demonstrate the Casimir effect in microelectromechanical systems using a micromachined torsional device. Attraction between a polysilicon plate and a spherical metallic surface results in a torque that rotates the plate about two thin torsional rods. The dependence of the rotation angle on the separation between the surfaces is in agreement with calculations of the Casimir force. Our results show that quantum electrodynamical effects play a significant role in such microelectromechanical systems when the separation between components is in the nanometer range. PMID:11239149

  8. Measuring the conductivity dependence of the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Schafer, Robert; Banishev, Alexandr; Mohideen, Umar

    2015-03-01

    The strength and distance dependence of the Casimir force can be controlled through the conductivity of the material bodies, with lower conductivity in general leading to lower Casimir forces. However low conductivity, large bandgap materials which are insulating, have drawbacks as any surface electrostatic charges cannot be easily compensated. This restricts experiments to metallic or highly doped semiconductor materials. We will report on measurements of the Casimir force gradient using the frequency shift technique. Improvements in the measurement technique will be discussed. Measurements of the Casimir force gradient using low and high conductivity silicon surfaces will be reported. The authors thank G.L. Klimchitskaya and V.M. Mostepanenko for help with the theory and the US National Science Foundation for funding the research.

  9. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  10. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  11. Casimir forces in systems near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José

    Casimir forces arise when long-ranged fluctuations are geometrically confined between two surfaces. In most cases these fluctuations are quantum or thermal in nature, such as those near a classical critical point, yet this is not a requirement. The T = 0 jamming transition in frictionless, granular systems shares many properties with classical critical points, such as a diverging correlation length, although it has recently been identified as a unique example of a random first-order transition (RFOT). Here we show the existence of Casimir forces between two pinned particles immersed in systems near the frictionless jamming transition. We observe two components to the total force: a short-ranged, depletion force and a long-ranged, repulsive Casimir force. The Casimir force dominates when the pinned particles are much larger than the ambient jammed particles. In this case, we find that particles with the largest forces have the least number of contacts, and that these particles are clustered between the pinned particles, giving rise to a repulsive force which is independent of system preparation and inter-particle potential. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1455086.

  12. Casimir energy in Kerr space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, F.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the vacuum energy of a scalar massless field confined in a Casimir cavity moving in a circular equatorial orbit in the exact Kerr space-time geometry. We find that both the orbital motion of the cavity and the underlying space-time geometry conspire in lowering the absolute value of the (renormalized) Casimir energy ⟨ɛvac⟩ren , as measured by a comoving observer, with respect to whom the cavity is at rest. This, in turn, causes a weakening in the attractive force between the Casimir plates. In particular, we show that the vacuum energy density ⟨ɛvac⟩ren→0 when the orbital path of the Casimir cavity comes close to the corotating or counter-rotating circular null orbits (possibly geodesic) allowed by the Kerr geometry. Such an effect could be of some astrophysical interest on relevant orbits, such as the Kerr innermost stable circular orbits, being potentially related to particle confinement (as in some interquark models). The present work generalizes previous results obtained by several authors in the weak field approximation.

  13. First-order correction to the Casimir force within an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Fanglin; Luo, Bin; He, Sailing

    2015-06-01

    For the Casimir piston filled with an inhomogeneous medium, we regularized and expressed the Casimir energy with cylinder kernel coefficients by using the first-order perturbation theory. When the refractive index of the medium is smoothly inhomogeneous (i.e., derivatives of all orders exist), a logarithmically cutoff-dependent term and a quadratically cutoff-dependent term in the Casimir energy are found. We show that in the piston model these terms vanish in the force and thus the Casimir force is always cutoff independent, but these terms will remain in the force in the half-space model and must be removed by additional regularizations. We give explicit benchmark solutions to the first-order corrections of both Casimir energy and Casimir force for an exponentially decaying profile. The present method can be extended to other inhomogeneous profiles. Our results should be useful for future relevant calculations and experimental studies.

  14. Casimir energies of cavities: The geometry question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalo, Iroko Komi Elom

    The question of how the Casimir effect relates to a system's geometry is of fundamental interest. In this thesis, we present new results for interior Casimir self-energies of various integrable geometries and show interesting systematic relations between these energies. In particular, we consider prisms with triangular cross sections (equilateral, hemiequilateral, and right isosceles triangles), triangular polygons of the same cross sections, and three tetrahedra. The triangular prisms are of infinite or finite lengths. These geometries are integrable and unique in the sense that the Laplacian eigenvalues may be found using the method of images. We obtain interior Casimir energies for these cavities subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. In addition to these boundary conditions, we also obtain electromagnetic Casimir energies for the infinite prisms. These energies are regularized using various consistent methods, one of which is regularization by point-splitting. Summing these modes explicitly using a cylinder kernel formulation, we show that the correct Weyl divergences are obtained. We also give closed-form results for the infinite triangular prisms. In order to understand the geometry dependence of these energies, we rederive well-known results for rectangular parallelepipeds (including the cube) and infinite rectangular prisms. The analysis of these self-energies yields intriguing results. By plotting the scaled energies against the appropriately chosen isoperimetric or isoareal quotients, we observe interesting patterns, which hint towards a systematic functional dependence. In addition to the calculation of new Casimir energies, this constitutes a significant contribution to the theoretical understanding of self-energies and has interesting implications.

  15. Controlling colloidal phase transitions with critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Duc; Faber, Suzanne; Hu, Zhibing; Wegdam, Gerard H; Schall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The critical Casimir force provides a thermodynamic analogue of the quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of electromagnetic field fluctuations. In its thermodynamic analogue, two surfaces immersed in a critical solvent mixture attract each other due to confinement of solvent concentration fluctuations. Here, we demonstrate the active assembly control of colloidal equilibrium phases using critical Casimir forces. We guide colloidal particles into analogues of molecular liquid and solid phases via exquisite control over their interactions. By measuring the critical Casimir pair potential directly from density fluctuations in the colloidal gas, we obtain insight into liquefaction at small scales. We apply the van der Waals model of molecular liquefaction and show that the colloidal gas-liquid condensation is accurately described by the van der Waals theory, even on the scale of a few particles. These results open up new possibilities in the active assembly control of micro and nanostructures. PMID:23481392

  16. Perfect magnetic conductor Casimir piston in d+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Edery, Ariel; Marachevsky, Valery

    2008-07-15

    Perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) boundary conditions are dual to the more familiar perfect electric conductor (PEC) conditions and can be viewed as the electromagnetic analog of the boundary conditions in the bag model for hadrons in QCD. Recent advances and requirements in communication technologies have attracted great interest in PMC's, and Casimir experiments involving structures that approximate PMC's may be carried out in the not-too-distant future. In this paper, we make a study of the zero-temperature PMC Casimir piston in d+1 dimensions. The PMC Casimir energy is explicitly evaluated by summing over p+1-dimensional Dirichlet energies where p ranges from 2 to d inclusively. We derive two exact d-dimensional expressions for the Casimir force on the piston and find that the force is negative (attractive) in all dimensions. Both expressions are applied to the case of 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions. A spin-off from our work is a contribution to the PEC literature: we obtain a useful alternative expression for the PEC Casimir piston in 3+1 dimensions and also evaluate the Casimir force per unit area on an infinite strip, a geometry of experimental interest.

  17. How does Casimir energy fall? III. Inertial forces on vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajesh, K. V.; Milton, Kimball A.; Parashar, Prachi; Wagner, Jeffrey A.

    2008-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Casimir energy due to parallel plates, including its divergent parts, falls like conventional mass in a weak gravitational field. The divergent parts were suitably interpreted as renormalizing the bare masses of the plates. Here, we corroborate our result regarding the inertial nature of Casimir energy by calculating the centripetal force on a Casimir apparatus rotating with constant angular speed. We show that the centripetal force is independent of the orientation of the Casimir apparatus in a frame whose origin is at the center of inertia of the apparatus.

  18. Casimir effect with rough metallic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, Paulo A. Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2005-07-15

    We calculate the second-order roughness correction to the Casimir energy for two parallel metallic mirrors. Our results may also be applied to the plane-sphere geometry used in most experiments. The metallic mirrors are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the mirror separation, and the roughness correlation length, with the roughness amplitude remaining the smallest length scale for perturbation theory to hold. From the analysis of the intracavity field fluctuations, we obtain the Casimir energy correction in terms of generalized reflection operators, which account for diffraction and polarization coupling in the scattering by the rough surfaces. We present simple analytical expressions for several limiting cases, as well as numerical results that allow for a reliable calculation of the roughness correction in real experiments. The correction is larger than the result of the proximity force approximation, which is obtained from our theory as a limiting case (very smooth surfaces)

  19. What is Credible and what is Incredible in the Measurements of the Casimir Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    We comment on progress in measurements of the Casimir force and discuss what is the actual reliability of different experiments. In this connection a more rigorous approach to the usage of such concepts as accuracy, precision, and measure of agreement between experiment and theory, is presented. We demonstrate that all measurements of the Casimir force employing spherical lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii are fundamentally flawed due to the presence of bubbles and pits on their surfaces. The commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is shown to be inapplicable for centimeter-size lenses. New expressions for the Casimir force are derived taking into account surface imperfections. Uncontrollable deviations of the Casimir force from the values predicted using the assumption of perfect sphericity vary by a few tens of percent within the separation region from 1 to 3μm. This makes impractical further use of centimeter-size lenses in experiments on measuring the Casimir force.

  20. What is Credible and what is Incredible in the Measurements of the Casimir Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-06-01

    We comment on progress in measurements of the Casimir force and discuss what is the actual reliability of different experiments. In this connection a more rigorous approach to the usage of such concepts as accuracy, precision, and measure of agreement between experiment and theory, is presented. We demonstrate that all measurements of the Casimir force employing spherical lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii are fundamentally flawed due to the presence of bubbles and pits on their surfaces. The commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is shown to be inapplicable for centimeter-size lenses. New expressions for the Casimir force are derived taking into account surface imperfections. Uncontrollable deviations of the Casimir force from the values predicted using the assumption of perfect sphericity vary by a few tens of percent within the separation region from 1 to 3 μm. This makes impractical further use of centimeter-size lenses in experiments on measuring the Casimir force.

  1. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-27

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  2. Isotopic dependence of the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Krause, Dennis E; Fischbach, Ephraim

    2002-11-01

    We calculate the dependence of the Casimir force on the isotopic composition of the interacting objects. This dependence arises from the subtle influence of the nuclear masses on the electronic properties of the bodies. We discuss the relevance of these results to current experiments utilizing the isoelectronic effect to search at very short separations for new weak forces suggested by various unification theories. PMID:12443107

  3. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force.

    PubMed

    Obrecht, J M; Wild, R J; Antezza, M; Pitaevskii, L P; Stringari, S; Cornell, E A

    2007-02-01

    We report on the first measurement of a temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force. This measurement was obtained by positioning a nearly pure 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate a few microns from a dielectric substrate and exciting its dipole oscillation. Changes in the collective oscillation frequency of the magnetically trapped atoms result from spatial variations in the surface-atom force. In our experiment, the dielectric substrate is heated up to 605 K, while the surrounding environment is kept near room temperature (310 K). The effect of the Casimir-Polder force is measured to be nearly 3 times larger for a 605 K substrate than for a room-temperature substrate, showing a clear temperature dependence in agreement with theory. PMID:17358936

  4. Casimir-Polder effect with thermally excited surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laliotis, A.; Ducloy, M.

    2015-05-01

    We take a closer look at the fundamental Casimir-Polder (CP) interaction between quantum particles and dispersive dielectric surfaces with surface polariton or plasmon resonances. Linear response theory shows that in the near-field, van der Waals regime the free-energy shift of a particle contains a thermal component that depends exclusively on the excitation of the evanescent surface polariton (plasmon or phonon) modes. Our work makes evident the link between particle surface interaction and near-field thermal emission and demonstrates how this can be used to engineer Casimir-Polder forces. We also examine how the exotic effects of surface waves are washed out as the distance from the surface increases. In the case of molecules or excited-state atoms, far-field approximations result in a classical dipole-dipole interaction which depends on the surface reflectivity and the mean number of photons at the frequency of the atomic or molecular transition. Finally we present numerical results for the CP interaction between Cs atoms and various dielectric surfaces with a single polariton resonance and discuss the implications of temperature and retardation effects for specific spectroscopic experiments.

  5. Nonequilibrium Casimir-Polder plasmonic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Messina, Riccardo; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Intravaia, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how the combination of nonequilibrium effects and material properties impacts on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a surface. By addressing systems with temperature inhomogeneities and laser interactions, we show that nonmonotonous energetic landscapes can be produced where barriers and minima appear. Our treatment provides a self-consistent quantum theoretical framework for investigating the properties of a class of nonequilibrium atom-surface interactions.

  6. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces between metallic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Passante, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    We consider the Casimir-Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir-Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed.

  7. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia Neto, Paulo; Ether, Diney; Pires, Luis; Ayala, Yareni; Rosa, Felipe; Umrath, Stefan; Ingold, Gert; Viana, Nathan; Nussenzveig, Moyses

    2015-03-01

    Optical tweezers (OT) are single-beam laser traps for neutral particles, usually applied to dielectric microspheres immersed in a fluid. The stiffness is proportional to the trapping beam power, and hence can be tuned to very small values, allowing one to measure femtonewton forces, once the device is carefully calibrated. We employ OT to measure the Casimir (or retarded van der Waals) force between polystyrene beads in ethanol, for distances between 50 nanometers and 1 micrometer. The spherical beads have diameters ranging from 3 to 7 micrometers. We find a rather large correction to the widely employed Proximity Force approximation (PFA), since the ratio between distances and sphere radii is much larger than the typical values probed in recent experiments. For the comparison with experimental data, we compute the Casimir force using the scattering approach applied to the spherical geometry, including the contribution of double-layer forces. We also present experimental results for the total force between a mercury microdroplet and a polystyrene bead immersed in ethanol, with similar distances and diameters. In short, we probe the Casimir force with different materials in a regime far from the validity of PFA, such that the spherical geometry plays a non-trivial role.

  8. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  9. The Casimir Effect at Finite Temperature in a Six-Dimensional Vortex Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongbo

    2016-03-01

    The Casimir effect for parallel plates satisfying the Dirichlet boundary condition in the context of effective QED coming from a six-dimensional Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution of the Abelian Higgs model with fermions coupled to gravity is studied at finite temperature. We find that the sign of the Casimir energy remains negative under the thermal influence. It is also shown that the Casimir force between plates will be weaker in the higher-temperature surroundings while keeps attractive. This Casimir effect involving the thermal influence is still inconsistent with the known experiments. We find that the thermal correction can not compensate or even reduce the modification from this kind of vortex model to make the Casimir force to be in less conflict with the measurements.

  10. Nonlinear Actuation Dynamics of Driven Casimir Oscillators with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Waalkens, Holger; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Knoester, Jasper; Palasantzas, George

    2015-11-01

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron-size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to a malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, stiction is of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  11. Nonequilibrium critical Casimir effect in binary fluids.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akira; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tanaka, Hajime

    2013-08-01

    Colloids immersed in a critical binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces (CCFs) because they confine its concentration fluctuations and influence the latter via effective surface fields. To date, CCFs have been primarily studied in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, due to the critical slowing down, the order parameter around a particle can easily be perturbed by any motion of the colloid or by solvent flow. This leads to significant but largely unexplored changes in the CCF. Here we study the drag force on a single colloidal particle moving in a near-critical fluid mixture and the relative motion of two colloids due to the CCF acting on them. In order to account for the kinetic couplings among the order parameter field, the solvent velocity field, and the particle motion, we use a fluid particle dynamics method. These studies extend the understanding of CCFs from thermal equilibrium to nonequilibrium processes, which are relevant to current experiments, and show the emergence of significant effects near the critical point. PMID:23952419

  12. Casimir free energy and pressure for magnetic metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the Casimir free energy and pressure of magnetic metal films, which are free standing in vacuum, sandwiched between two dielectric plates and deposited on either nonmagnetic or magnetic metallic plates. All calculations are performed using both the Drude and plasma model approaches to the Lifshitz theory. According to our results, the Casimir free energies and pressures calculated using both theoretical approaches are significantly different in the magnitude and sign even for thin films of several tens of nanometers thickness. Thus, for the Ni film of 47 nm thickness deposited on a Fe plate the obtained magnitudes of the Casimir free energy differ by the factor of 5866. We show that the Casimir free energy and pressure of a magnetic film calculated using the plasma model approach do not possess the classical limit but exponentially fast drop to zero with increasing film thickness. If the Drude model approach is used, the classical limit is reached for magnetic films of about 150 nm thickness, but the Casimir free energy remains nonzero in the limit of ideal metal, contrary to expectations. For the plasma model approach the Casimir free energy of a film vanishes in this case. Numerical computations are performed for the magnetic films made of Ni, nonmagnetic plates made of Cu and Al, and magnetic plates made of Fe using the tabulated optical data for the complex indexes of refraction of all metals. The obtained results can be used for a discrimination between the plasma and Drude model approaches in the Casimir physics and in the investigation of stability of thin films.

  13. Does the transverse electric zero mode contribute to the Casimir effect for a metal?

    PubMed

    Høye, J S; Brevik, I; Aarseth, J B; Milton, K A

    2003-05-01

    The finite-temperature Casimir free energy, entropy, and internal energy are considered anew for a conventional parallel-plate configuration, in the light of current discussions in the literature. In the case of an "ideal" metal, characterized by a refractive index equal to infinity for all frequencies, we recover, via a somewhat unconventional method, conventional results for the temperature dependence, meaning that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode contributes the same as the transverse magnetic mode. For a real metal, however, approximately obeying the Drude dispersive model at low frequencies, we find that the zero-frequency transverse electric mode does not contribute at all. This would appear to lead to an observable temperature dependence and a violation of the third law of thermodynamics. It had been suggested that the source of the difficulty was the behavior of the reflection coefficient for perpendicular polarization but we show that this is not the case. By introducing a simplified model for the Casimir interaction, consisting of two harmonic oscillators interacting via a third one, we illustrate the behavior of the transverse electric field. Numerical results are presented based on the refractive index for gold. A linear temperature correction to the Casimir force between parallel plates is indeed found which should be observable in room-temperature experiments, but this does not entail any thermodynamic inconsistency. PMID:12786229

  14. Apparatus for measuring the thermal Casimir force at large distances.

    PubMed

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-12

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions. PMID:25541756

  15. Apparatus for Measuring the Thermal Casimir Force at Large Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions.

  16. Enhancing Casimir repulsion via topological insulator multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ran; Chen, Liang; Nie, Wenjie; Bi, Meihua; Yang, Yaping; Zhu, Shiyao

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe the enhanced Casimir repulsion between two parallel multilayer walls made of alternating layers of a topological insulator (TI) and a normal insulator. Based on the transfer matrix method, the Fresnel coefficients matrix is generalized to apply to the TI multilayer structure. The Casimir repulsion under the influence of the magnetization orientation in the magnetic coatings on TI layer surfaces, the layer thicknesses, and the topological magnetoelectric polarizability, is investigated. We show that, for the multilayer structures with parallel magnetization on the TI layer surfaces, it is possible to enhance the repulsion by increasing the TI layer number, which is due to the accumulation of the contribution to the repulsion from the polarization rotation effect occurring on each TI layer surface. Generally, in the distance region where there is Casimir attraction between semi-infinite TIs, the force may turn into repulsion in TI multilayer structure, and in the region of repulsion for semi-infinite TI, the repulsive force can be enhanced in magnitude, the enhancement tends to a maximum while the structure contains sufficiently many layers.

  17. Tunable Casimir-Polder Forces and Spontaneous Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Felipe; Kort-Kamp, Wilton; Pinheiro, Felipe; Cysne, Tarik; Oliver, Diego; Farina, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dispersive Casimir-Polder interaction between a Rubidium atom and a graphene sheet subjected to an external magnetic field B. We demonstrate that this concrete physical system allows for a high degree of control of dispersive interactions at micro and nanoscales. Indeed, we show that the application of an external magnetic field can induce a 80 % reduction of the Casimir-Polder energy relative to its value without the field. We also show that sharp discontinuities emerge in the Casimir-Polder interaction energy for certain values of the applied magnetic field at low temperatures. In addition, we also show that atomic spontaneous emission rates can be greatly modified by the action of the magnetic field, with an order of magnitude enhancement or suppression depending on the dipole's moment orientation.

  18. Repulsive Casimir force: Sufficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Luigi; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2010-09-15

    In this paper the Casimir energy of two parallel plates made by materials of different penetration depth and no medium in between is derived. We study the Casimir force density and derive analytical constraints on the two penetration depths which are sufficient conditions to ensure repulsion. Compared to other methods our approach needs no specific model for dielectric or magnetic material properties and constitutes a complementary analysis.

  19. On the possibility of Casimir repulsion using metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the Casimir force between two half-spaces is dictated by their electromagnetic properties. In particular, when one of the half-spaces is mainly metallic or dielectric and the other is mainly magnetic, it is possible to show that the force is repulsive. This has attracted lots of interest towards the study of metamaterials (MMs) in the context of Casimir effect, as their magnetic activity might help bring the idea of Casimir repulsion from the theoretical realm to experimental verification. In this paper we investigate the possibility of repulsion when the MM magnetic permeability is given not by a Drude-Lorentz behavior, but by a model put forward by Pendry et al. [16]. After introducing the model and deriving the necessary formulas, we show that it is impossible to achieve repulsion with such a model and present a qualitative discussion of why this is so.

  20. Enhanced Casimir effect for doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Fialkovskiy, I.; Vassilevich, D.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the Casimir interaction of doped graphene. To this end we derive a simple expression for the finite-temperature polarization tensor with a chemical potential. It is found that doping leads to a strong enhancement of the Casimir force, reaching almost 60 % in quite realistic situations. This result should be important for planning and interpreting Casimir measurements, especially taking into account that the Casimir interaction of undoped graphene is rather weak.

  1. Casimir free energy at high temperatures: Grounded versus isolated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, C. D.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.

    2016-06-01

    We evaluate the difference between the Casimir free energies corresponding to either grounded or isolated perfect conductors, at high temperatures. We show that a general and simple expression for that difference can be given, in terms of the electrostatic capacitance matrix for the system of conductors. For the case of close conductors, we provide approximate expressions for that difference, by evaluating the capacitance matrix using the proximity force approximation. Since the high-temperature limit for the Casimir free energy for a medium described by a frequency-dependent conductivity diverging at zero frequency coincides with that of an isolated conductor, our results may shed light on the corrections to the Casimir force in the presence of real materials.

  2. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  3. Interplay between geometry and temperature for inclined Casimir plates

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2009-09-15

    We provide further evidence for the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect. We investigate the temperature dependence of the Casimir force between an inclined semi-infinite plate above an infinite plate in D dimensions using the worldline formalism. Whereas the high-temperature behavior is always found to be linear in T in accordance with dimensional-reduction arguments, different power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. Unlike the case of infinite parallel plates, which shows the well-known T{sup D} behavior of the force, we find a T{sup D-1} behavior for inclined plates, and a {approx}T{sup D-0.3} behavior for the edge effect in the limit where the plates become parallel. The strongest temperature dependence {approx}T{sup D-2} occurs for the Casimir torque of inclined plates. Numerical as well as analytical worldline results are presented.

  4. Remarks on a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Mota, H. F.; Muniz, C. R.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Casimir effect, by calculating the Casimir energy and its corrections for nonzero temperatures, of a massless scalar field in the spacetime with topology S3 × R1 (Einstein universe) containing an idealized cosmic string. The obtained results confirm the role played by the identifications imposed on the quantum field by boundary conditions arising from the topology of the gravitational field under consideration and illustrate a realization of a gravitational analogue of the Casimir effect. In this backgorund, we show that the vacuum energy can be written as a term which corresponds to the vacuum energy of the massless scalar field in the Einstein universe added by another term that formally corresponds to the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in the Einstein universe, multiplied by a parameter associated with the presence of the cosmic string, namely, λ = (1/α) ‑ 1, where α is a constant related to the cosmic string tension, Gμ.

  5. The repulsive Casimir effect in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin; Allocca, Andrew; Galitski, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Weyl semimetals are a proposed topological material with broken time-reversal symmetry. Due to this, they experience a particular bulk Hall effect as well as a weak longitudinal conductance. In such a situation, one can see a repulsive Casimir effect between two Weyl semimetals (similar to what has been studied for topological insulators and quantum hall materials), and the effect can be tuned from attractive to repulsive with chemical potential or magnetic field. We consider, separately, a simplified bulk description and a thin film geometry taking into account the band structure. This work is supported by JQI-PFC.

  6. Achieving a Strongly Temperature-Dependent Casimir Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Woolf, David; Capasso, Federico; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-06

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2 nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied.

  7. Casimir force in a cylinder-plane configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Hayes, Michael; Middleman, Scott; Kim, Woo-Joong; Dalvit, Diego; Mazzitelli, Francisco; Onofrio, Roberto

    2006-05-01

    We have developed and tested an apparatus [1] to measure the Casimir force in a cylinder-plane configuration, which is a compromise between the parallel plane and sphere-plane configurations, with intermediate advantages. Preliminary calibrations with electrostatic forces show that the Casimir forces should be detectable in a range large enough to observe the expected thermal corrections. [1] M. Brown-Hayes, D.A.R. Dalvit, F.D. Mazzitelli, W.J. Kim, and R. Onofrio, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052102 (2005).

  8. Nonmonotonic thermal Casimir force from geometry-temperature interplay.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2010-07-23

    The geometry dependence of Casimir forces is significantly more pronounced in the presence of thermal fluctuations due to a generic geometry-temperature interplay. We show that the thermal force for standard sphere-plate or cylinder-plate geometries develops a nonmonotonic behavior already in the simple case of a fluctuating Dirichlet scalar. In particular, the attractive thermal force can increase for increasing distances below a critical temperature. This anomalous behavior is triggered by a reweighting of relevant fluctuations on the scale of the thermal wavelength. The essence of the phenomenon becomes transparent within the worldline picture of the Casimir effect. PMID:20867823

  9. Lateral Casimir force beyond the proximity-force approximation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robson B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-03-17

    We argue that the appropriate variable to study a nontrivial geometry dependence of the Casimir force is the lateral component of the Casimir force, which we evaluate between two corrugated metallic plates outside the validity of the proximity-force approximation. The metallic plates are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the plate separation, and the corrugation period, the corrugation amplitude remaining the smallest length scale. Our analysis shows that in realistic experimental situations the proximity-force approximation overestimates the force by up to 30%. PMID:16605712

  10. Computing the Casimir force using regularized boundary integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilen, Isak; Jakobsen, Per Kristen

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we use a novel regularization procedure to reduce the calculation of the Casimir force for 2D scalar fields between compact objects to the solution of a classical integral equation defined on the boundaries of the objects. The scalar fields are subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the object boundaries. We test the integral equation by comparing with what we get for parallel plates, concentric circles and adjacent circles using mode summation and the functional integral method. We show how symmetries in the shapes and configuration of boundaries can easily be incorporated into our method and that it leads to fast evaluation of the Casimir force for symmetric situations.

  11. Nonmonotonic Thermal Casimir Force from Geometry-Temperature Interplay

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2010-07-23

    The geometry dependence of Casimir forces is significantly more pronounced in the presence of thermal fluctuations due to a generic geometry-temperature interplay. We show that the thermal force for standard sphere-plate or cylinder-plate geometries develops a nonmonotonic behavior already in the simple case of a fluctuating Dirichlet scalar. In particular, the attractive thermal force can increase for increasing distances below a critical temperature. This anomalous behavior is triggered by a reweighting of relevant fluctuations on the scale of the thermal wavelength. The essence of the phenomenon becomes transparent within the worldline picture of the Casimir effect.

  12. Demonstration of non-additivity and asymmetry in the lateral Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih

    2009-10-01

    The Casimir effect is a purely quantum mechanical phenomenon which has drawn extensive attention in the last decade. With the rapid development of modern scientific instruments, it has been demonstrated and measured with unprecedented precision. Because of its unique dependence on the separation and geometry, the Casimir force is expected to play an important role in modern nano-electro-mechanical systems. An understanding of the shape dependence of the Casimir force and its control has become a very important research topic for the future nano-technology. Since the demonstration of the lateral Casimir force in 2002 at UC Riverside, this special effect has inspired a lot of theoretical research. The asymmetry of the lateral Casimir has been predicted and exact theories which take into account diffraction-like correlation effect between the scattered zero point photons from the boundaries have been proposed. We improved the experimental setup and experimental conditions (grating period of order of the separation distance) to study these new phenomenon. In this research, we demonstrate the asymmetrical lateral Casimir force for the first time. The experimental results show very good agreement with a recently developed exact theory based on the scattering approach with no tting parameters. The measured force also show the expected deviation from the commonly used proximity force approximation. The results provide a further understanding of the shape dependence of the Casimir force and will enhance the capabilities for its application in nano technology, especially for the frictionless transmission of lateral motion.

  13. ``Casimir effect'' with active swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dipanjan; Lopatina, Lena; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, active matter has increasingly found applications in nanoengineering.[1] Here we show using molecular dynamics simulations that the natural motion of ``run-and-tumble'' bacteria will push together two parallel walls arranged in a Casimir geometry. This effect is robust as long as the wall separation is comparable to or smaller than the bacterial run-length, so that the bacterial motion is not Brownian on the length scale of the walls. The magnitude of the attractive force between the walls exhibits an unusual exponential dependence on the wall separation. The attraction arises from a depleted concentration of bacteria in the region between the plates; this is caused by the tendency of the bacteria to slide along the walls, which breaks time-reversal symmetry and allows a density difference to develop. The same mechanism was used recently to explain bacterial rectification.[2] The inclusion of steric interactions between the bacteria reduces the attraction between the plates but does not eliminate it.

  14. Casimir forces and graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2010-10-15

    The Casimir force between two infinitely thin parallel sheets in a setting of N such sheets is found. The finite two-dimensional conductivities, which describe the dispersive and absorptive properties of each sheet, are taken into account, whereupon the theory is applied to interacting graphenes. By exploring similarities with in-plane optical spectra for graphite, the conductivity of graphene is modeled as a combination of Lorentz-type oscillators. We find that the graphene transparency and the existence of a universal constant conductivity e{sup 2}/(4({h_bar}/2{pi})) result in the graphene/graphene Casimir interaction at large separations to have the same distance dependence as the one for perfect conductors but with much smaller magnitude. The Casimir force is also studied when the graphene system is above a substrate or immersed in a medium. It is found that the response properties of the environmental materials can strongly affect the graphene interaction.

  15. Observability of the bulk Casimir effect: Can the dynamical Casimir effect be relevant to sonoluminescence?

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, K.A.; Jack Ng, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The experimental observation of intense light emission by acoustically driven, periodically collapsing bubbles of air in water (sonoluminescence) has yet to receive an adequate explanation. One of the most intriguing ideas is that the conversion of acoustic energy into photons occurs quantum mechanically, through a dynamical version of the Casimir effect. We have argued elsewhere that in the adiabatic approximation, which should be reliable here, Casimir or zero-point energies cannot possibly be large enough to be relevant. (About 10 MeV of energy is released per collapse.) However, there are sufficient subtleties involved that others have come to opposite conclusions. In particular, it has been suggested that bulk energy, that is, simply the naive sum of (1) /(2) {h_bar}{omega}, which is proportional to the volume, could be relevant. We show that this cannot be the case, based on general principles as well as specific calculations. In the process we further illuminate some of the divergence difficulties that plague Casimir calculations, with an example relevant to the bag model of hadrons. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Using the Casimir Force to Measure the Gravitational Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, F.

    1998-01-01

    I show that the dynamics of two coupled torsion pendulums is drastically affected by their mutual Casimir surface interaction if the masses involved are relatively close to each other. The effect is directly related to the ratio of the masses used to the Planck mass.

  17. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano

    2015-02-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  18. Demonstration of the difference in the Casimir force for samples with different charge-carrier densities.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U

    2006-10-27

    A measurement of the Casimir force between a gold coated sphere and two Si plates of different carrier densities is performed using a high vacuum based atomic force microscope. The results are compared with the Lifshitz theory and good agreement is found. Our experiment demonstrates that by changing the carrier density of the semiconductor plate by several orders of magnitude it is possible to modify the Casimir interaction. This result may find applications in nanotechnology. PMID:17155446

  19. Perturbative Casimir Energies of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    The Casimir energies of single bodies (as opposed to the interaction between mutually disjoint bodies) have accumulated deceptive folklore which this talk will try to exorcise, by mean of calculations for atomic solids that, though optically dilute, are realistically dispersive. This is easy, because quantum electrodynamics then yields identically the same energy as one gets from the properly retarded interatomic potentials. The problem of regularizing (nominal) divergences turns out to be quite distinct from the appropriate process of renormalization: simply discarding all nominally divergent contributions would prevent one from understanding the physics. Contrary to legend, the pertinent Casimir energies for dielectric spheres are attractive.

  20. Experimental investigation of the Casimir force beyond the proximity-force approximation.

    PubMed

    Krause, D E; Decca, R S; López, D; Fischbach, E

    2007-02-01

    The analysis of all Casimir force experiments using a sphere-plate geometry requires the use of the proximity-force approximation (PFA) to relate the Casimir force between a sphere and a flat plate to the Casimir energy between two parallel plates. Because it has been difficult to assess the PFA's range of applicability theoretically, we have conducted an experimental search for corrections to the PFA by measuring the Casimir force and force gradient between a gold-coated plate and five gold-coated spheres with different radii using a microelectromechanical torsion oscillator. For separations z<300 nm, we find that the magnitude of the fractional deviation from the PFA in the force gradient measurement is, at the 95% confidence level, less than 0.4z/R, where R is the radius of the sphere. PMID:17358830

  1. Casimir interaction between a sphere and a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2013-02-01

    We study the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a cylinder both subjected to Dirichlet, Neumann, or perfectly conducting boundary conditions. Generalizing the operator approach developed by Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 36, 1078 (1988)IETPAK0018-926X], we compute the scalar and vector translation matrices between a sphere and a cylinder, and thus write down explicitly the exact TGTG formula for the Casimir interaction energy. In the scalar case, the formula shows manifestly that the Casimir interaction force is attractive at all separations. The large separation leading term of the Casimir interaction energy is computed directly from the exact formula. It is of order ˜ℏcR1/[L2ln⁡(L/R2)], ˜ℏcR13R22/L6, and ˜ℏcR13/[L4ln⁡(L/R2)], respectively, for Dirichlet, Neumann, and perfectly conducting boundary conditions, where R1 and R2 are, respectively, the radii of the sphere and the cylinder, and L is the distance between their centers.

  2. Casimir dynamics: Interactions of surfaces with codimension >1 due to quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Scardicchio, A.

    2005-09-15

    We study the Casimir force between defects (branes) of codimension larger than 1 due to quantum fluctuations of a scalar field {phi} living in the bulk. We show that the Casimir force is attractive and that it diverges as the distance between the branes approaches a critical value L{sub c}. Below this critical distance L{sub c} the vacuum state {phi}=0 of the theory is unstable, due to the birth of a tachyon, and the field condenses.

  3. The quantum Casimir operators of {U}_q{(\\mathfrak {gl}_{n})} and their eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junbo

    2010-08-01

    We show that the quantum Casimir operators of the quantum linear group constructed in early work of Bracken, Gould and Zhang together with one obvious central element generate the entire center of {U}_q{(\\mathfrak {gl}_{n})}. As a byproduct of the proof, we obtain intriguing new formulae for eigenvalues of these quantum Casimir operators, which are expressed in terms of the characters of a class of finite-dimensional irreducible representations of the classical general linear algebra.

  4. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a periodic nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Yannopapas, V.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-04-15

    We present a theory for the calculation of the Casimir-Polder potential experienced by an atom near the surface of a nanostructure. The potential is found by means of the electrodynamic Green's tensor based on a layer-multiple-scattering method. We calculate the distance law of the Casimir-Polder potential for a monolayer of metallic and dielectric nanospheres arranged periodically on a square lattice. We find, in particular, that the Casimir-Polder potential for a metallic nanostructure is practically independent of the type of the metal from which the nanostructure is made. Also, the Casimir-Polder potential shows an exponential decay close to the nanostructure and an inverse power-law decrease away from it wherein the exponent depends on the size of the spheres of the nanostructure.

  5. Thermal fluctuations and stability of a particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force in a liquid.

    PubMed

    Inui, Norio; Goto, Kosuke

    2013-11-01

    We study the vertical Brownian motion of a gold particle levitated by a repulsive Casimir force to a silica plate immersed in bromobenzene. The time evolution of the particle distribution starting from an equilibrium position, where the Casimir force and gravitational force are balanced, is considered by solving the Langevin equation using the Monte Carlo method. When the gold particle is very close to the silica plate, the Casimir force changes from repulsive to attractive, and the particle eventually sticks to the surface. The escape rate from a metastable position is calculated by solving the Fokker-Plank equation; it agrees with the value obtained by Kramers' escape theory. The duration of levitation increases as the particle radius increases up to around 2.3 μm. As an example, we show that a 1-μm-diameter gold particle can be levitated for a significantly long time by the repulsive Casimir force at room temperature. PMID:24329240

  6. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  7. Casimir-Polder forces on moving atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2009-10-15

    Polarizable atoms and molecules experience the Casimir-Polder force near magnetoelectric bodies, a force that is induced by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the matter. Atoms and molecules in relative motion to a magnetoelectric surface experience an additional velocity-dependent force. We present a full quantum-mechanical treatment of this force and identify a generalized Doppler effect, the time delay between photon emission and reabsorption, and the Roentgen interaction as its three sources. For ground-state atoms, the force is very small and always decelerating, hence commonly known as quantum friction. For atoms and molecules in electronically excited states, on the contrary, both decelerating and accelerating forces can occur depending on the magnitude of the atomic transition frequency relative to the surface-plasmon frequency.

  8. The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Andrew S.I.D.

    2005-10-01

    The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect between parallel plates is studied. Calculations are performed for both the massless scalar field and the electromagnetic field cases, first using a spectral weight function, and then via the Fourier transform of the renormalized expectation of the Casimir energy-momentum operator. The Casimir force is calculated using the spectrum for two plates which are perfectly transparent in a frequency band. The result of this calculation suggests a way to detect the frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect.

  9. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  10. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface.

    PubMed

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate. PMID:25966039

  11. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.

  12. Reply to "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the "Comment on `Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors.' " We believe the comment misrepresents our papers, and fails to provide a plausible resolution to the conflict between theory and experiment.

  13. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  14. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces.

  15. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  16. Casimir effect on graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigated the influence of the Casimir effect on mechanical properties of a graphene resonator, where a graphene sheet is located in parallel with a perfectly conducting plate. The Casimir force arising from this effect strongly attracts a graphene sheet to a perfectly conducting plate and increases the tension of a graphene sheet as the separation distance between them decreases. The maximum vertical displacement of a graphene sheet to the substrate increases obeying a power law of a separation distance with an exponent of 4/3 as the separation distance decreases. For small separation distances, the Casimir force is excessively strong for the graphene sheet to maintain a free-standing shape, consequently resulting in the adhesion of the sheet to the substrate below a critical separation distance. The resonant frequency increases over a wide range as the separation distance decreases for large separation distances. However, it then rapidly decreases for small separations and converges to zero at a critical separation. These various behaviors enable the control of a graphene resonator.

  17. STS-42 closeup view shows SE 81-09 Convection in Zero Gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 closeup view shows Student Experiment 81-09 (SE 81-09), Convection in Zero Gravity experiment, with radial pattern caused by convection induced by heating an oil and aluminum powder mixture in the weightlessness of space. While the STS-42 crewmembers activated the Shuttle Student Involvement Program (SSIP) experiment on Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, middeck, Scott Thomas, the student who designed the experiment, was able to observe the procedures via downlinked television (TV) in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC). Thomas, now a physics doctoral student at the University of Texas, came up with the experiment while he participated in the SSIP as a student at Richland High School in Johnstown, Pennsylvia.

  18. Casimir stress in an inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T.G. Xiong, C.; Leonhardt, U.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir effect in an inhomogeneous dielectric is investigated using Lifshitz's theory of electromagnetic vacuum energy. A permittivity function that depends continuously on one Cartesian coordinate is chosen, bounded on each side by homogeneous dielectrics. The result for the Casimir stress is infinite everywhere inside the inhomogeneous region, a divergence that does not occur for piece-wise homogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries. A Casimir force per unit volume can be extracted from the infinite stress but it diverges on the boundaries between the inhomogeneous medium and the homogeneous dielectrics. An alternative regularization of the vacuum stress is considered that removes the contribution of the inhomogeneity over small distances, where macroscopic electromagnetism is invalid. The alternative regularization yields a finite Casimir stress inside the inhomogeneous region, but the stress and force per unit volume diverge on the boundaries with the homogeneous dielectrics. The case of inhomogeneous dielectrics with planar boundaries thus falls outside the current understanding of the Casimir effect.

  19. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  20. Casimir Forces On A Silicon Micromechanical Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, J.; Marset, zsolt; Rodriguez, A.W.; Reid, M. T.H.; McCauley, A. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Bao, Y.; Johnson, S. G.; Chan, Ho Bun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations give rise to van der Waals and Casimir forces that dominate the interaction between electrically neutral objects at sub-micron separations. Under the trend of miniaturization, such quantum electrodynamical effects are expected to play an important role in micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Nevertheless, so far the Casimir force has been experimentally observed only in situations involving an external object manually positioned close to a micromechanical element on a silicon chip. Here, we demonstrate the Casimir effect between two silicon components on the same substrate. In addition to providing an integrated and compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens the possibility of tailoring the Casimir force using lithographically defined components of non-conventional shapes on a single micromechanical chip.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Casimir Force between Vibrating Plates

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  2. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed. PMID:23326401

  3. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrecht, John Michael

    A measurement of the temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder force is presented along with subsequent measurements of electric fields near surfaces. These measurements were obtained by studying the effects of surface forces on the collective oscillations of a magnetically trapped 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). In the first part of this thesis, the measurement of the Casimir-Polder force is described. In this experiment, the BEC was placed a few microns from a dielectric substrate and excited into its dipole oscillation. Changes in the collective oscillation frequency resulted from spatial variations in the surface-atom force. The temperature dependence of this force was observed as a threefold increase in its strength as the substrate was heated from 300 K to 600 K, in agreement with theory. The second part of this thesis deals with measurements that were made of electric fields emanating from surface adsorbates. An alternating external electric field was applied that adds to (or subtracts from) the adsorbate's field in such a way as to resonantly drive the BEC into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the adsorbate's field gradient. Using this technique, we were able to reconstruct vectorially the electric field produced by surface contaminants and account for their systematic effects. Lastly, we show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbates, and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  4. Casimir force at a knife's edge

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Noah; Shpunt, Alexander; Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2010-03-15

    The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are available, is another case where such a calculation is possible. We compute the interaction energy of a parabolic cylinder and an infinite plate (both perfect mirrors), as a function of their separation and inclination, H and {theta}, and the cylinder's parabolic radius R. As H/R{yields}0, the proximity force approximation becomes exact. The opposite limit of R/H{yields}0 corresponds to a semi-infinite plate, where the effects of edge and inclination can be probed.

  5. One-loop radiative corrections to the QED Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzemi, Reza; Mojavezi, Amirhosein

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate one-loop radiative corrections to the Casimir energy in the presence of two perfectly conducting parallel plates for QED theory within the renormalized perturbation theory. In fact, there are three contributions for radiative corrections to the Casimir energy, up to order α . Only the two-loop diagram, which is of order α , has been computed by Bordag et. al (Ann. Phys. 165:192, 1985), approximately. Here, up to this order, we consider corrections due to two one-loop terms, i.e., photonic and fermionic loop corrections resulting from renormalized QED Lagrangian, more precisely. Our results show that only the fermionic loop has a very minor correction and the correction of photonic loop vanishes.

  6. Probing the strong boundary shape dependence of the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Emig, T; Hanke, A; Golestanian, R; Kardar, M

    2001-12-24

    We study the geometry dependence of the Casimir energy for deformed metal plates by a path integral quantization of the electromagnetic field. For the first time, we give a complete analytical result for the deformation induced change in Casimir energy delta E in an experimentally testable, nontrivial geometry, consisting of a flat and a corrugated plate. Our results show an interesting crossover for delta E as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H, to the corrugation length lambda: For lambdaH. PMID:11800828

  7. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palasantzas, G.; Zwol, P. J. van; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer ({approx}1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations based on the Lifshitz theory give very good agreement with the experiment in the absence of any water layer for surface separations d > or approx. 10 nm. However, a layer of thickness h < or approx. 1.5 nm is allowed by the error margin in force measurements. At shorter separations, d < or approx. 10 nm, the water layer can have a strong influence as calculations show for flat surfaces. Nonetheless, in reality the influence of surface roughness must also be considered, and it can overshadow any water layer influence at separations comparable to the total sphere-plate rms roughness w{sub shp}+w.

  8. Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates

    SciTech Connect

    Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran

    2003-02-01

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<show to be valid only for {lambda}>>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

  9. Casimir-force-driven ratchets.

    PubMed

    Emig, T

    2007-04-20

    We explore the nonlinear dynamics of two parallel periodically patterned metal surfaces that are coupled by the zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field between them. The resulting Casimir force generates for asymmetric patterns with a time periodically driven surface-to-surface distance a ratchet effect, allowing for directed lateral motion of the surfaces in sizable parameter ranges. It is crucial to take into account inertia effects and hence chaotic dynamics which are described by Langevin dynamics. Multiple velocity reversals occur as a function of driving, mean surface distance, and effective damping. These transport properties are shown to be stable against weak ambient noise. PMID:17501407

  10. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-30

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  11. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  12. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-25

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  13. Dynamical Casimir effect and quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, I.; Milton, K. A.; Odintsov, S. D.; Osetrin, K. E.

    2000-09-01

    We apply the background field method and the effective action formalism to describe the four-dimensional dynamical Casimir effect. Our picture corresponds to the consideration of quantum cosmology for an expanding FRW universe (the boundary conditions act as a moving mirror) filled by a quantum massless GUT which is conformally invariant. We consider cases in which the static Casimir energy is attractive and repulsive. Inserting the simplest possible inertial term, we find, in the adiabatic (and semiclassical) approximation, the dynamical evolution of the scale factor and the dynamical Casimir stress analytically and numerically [for SU(2) super Yang-Mills theory]. Alternative kinetic energy terms are explored in the Appendix.

  14. Effect of the heterogeneity of metamaterials on the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Azari, Arash; Golestanian, Ramin; Miri, MirFaez

    2010-09-15

    The Casimir-Lifshitz interaction between metamaterials is studied using a model that takes into account the structural heterogeneity of the dielectric and magnetic properties of the bodies. A recently developed perturbation theory for the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction between arbitrary material bodies is generalized to include nonuniform magnetic permeability profiles and used to study the interaction between the magneto-dielectric heterostructures within the leading order. The metamaterials are modeled as two-dimensional arrays of domains with varying permittivity and permeability. In the case of two semi-infinite bodies with flat boundaries, the patterned structure of the material properties is found to cause the normal Casimir-Lifshitz force to develop an oscillatory behavior when the distance between the two bodies is comparable to the wavelength of the patterned features in the metamaterials. The nonuniformity also leads to the emergence of lateral Casimir-Lifshitz forces, which tend to strengthen as the gap size becomes smaller. Our results suggest that the recent studies on Casimir-Lifshitz forces between metamaterials, which have been performed with the aim of examining the possibility of observing the repulsive force, should be revisited to include the effect of the patterned structure at the wavelength of several hundred nanometers that coincides with the relevant gap size in the experiments.

  15. Casimir effect for parallel metallic plates in cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.; Grigoryan, A. Kh

    2012-09-01

    We evaluate the renormalized vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of electric and magnetic field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field in the geometry of two parallel conducting plates on the background of cosmic string spacetime. On the basis of these results, the Casimir-Polder force acting on a polarizable particle and the Casimir forces acting on the plates are investigated. The VEVs are decomposed into the pure string and plate-induced parts. The VEV of the electric field squared is negative for points with the radial distance to the string smaller than the distance to the plates, and positive for the opposite situation. On the other hand, the VEV for the magnetic field squared is negative everywhere. The boundary-induced part in the VEV of the energy-momentum tensor is different from zero in the region between the plates only. Moreover, this part only depends on the distance from the string. The boundary-induced part in the vacuum energy density is positive for points with a distance to the string smaller than the distance to the plates and negative in the opposite situation. The Casimir stresses on the plates depend non-monotonically on the distance from the string. We show that the Casimir forces acting on the plates are always attractive. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  16. Onsager-Casimir relations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmer, G.F.; Titulaer, U.M.

    1987-10-01

    The authors study the fate of the Onsager-Casimir reciprocity relations for a continuous system when some of its variables are eliminated adiabatically. Just as for discrete systems, deviations appear in correction terms to the reduced evolution equation that are of higher order in the time scale ratio. The deviations are not removed by including correction terms to the coarse-grained thermodynamic potential. However, via a reformulation of the theory, in which the central role of the thermodynamic potential is taken over by an associated Lagrangian-type expression, they arrive at a modified form of the Onsager-Casimir relations that survives the adiabatic elimination procedure. There is a simple relation between the time evolution of the redefined thermodynamic forces and that of the basic thermodynamic variables; this relation also survives the adiabatic elimination. The formalism is illustrated by explicit calculations for the Klein-Kramers equation, which describes the phase space distribution of Brownian particles, and for the corrected Smoluchowski equation derived from it by adiabatic elimination of the velocity variable. The symmetry relation for the latter leads to a simple proof that the reality of the eigenvalues of the simple Smoluchowski equation is not destroyed by the addition of higher order corrections, at least not within the framework of a formal perturbation expansion in the time scale ratio.

  17. Casimir energy for perturbed surfaces of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Almazan, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the zeta function arising from a small perturbation on a surface of revolution and the effect of this on the functional determinant and on the change of the Casimir energy associated with the surface.

  18. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  19. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  20. Casimir force between integrable and chaotic pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.; Wisniacki, Diego A.; Monastra, Alejandro G.

    2010-11-15

    We have computed numerically the Casimir force between two identical pistons inside a very long cylinder, considering different shapes for the pistons. The pistons can be considered quantum billiards, whose spectrum determines the vacuum force. The smooth part of the spectrum fixes the force at short distances and depends only on geometric quantities like the area or perimeter of the piston. However, correcting terms to the force, coming from the oscillating part of the spectrum which is related to the classical dynamics of the billiard, could be qualitatively different for classically integrable or chaotic systems. We have performed a detailed numerical analysis of the corresponding Casimir force for pistons with regular and chaotic classical dynamics. For a family of stadium billiards, we have found that the correcting part of the Casimir force presents a sudden change in the transition from regular to chaotic geometries. This suggests that there could be signatures of quantum chaos in the Casimir effect.

  1. Constraints on axion-nucleon coupling constants from measuring the Casimir force between corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2014-09-01

    We obtain stronger laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. For this purpose, the normal and lateral additional forces arising in the experimental configurations due to the two-axion exchange between protons and neutrons are calculated. Our constraints following from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces are stronger than the laboratory constraints reported so far for masses of axion-like particles larger than 11 and 8 eV, respectively. A comparison between various laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons obtained from the magnetometer measurements, Eötvos- and Cavendish-type experiments, and from the Casimir effect is performed over the wide range of masses of axion-like particles from 10-10 to 20 eV.

  2. Casimir interaction between a microscopic dipole oscillator and a macroscopic solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, R.; Dechoum, K.; França, H. M.; Santos, E.

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the interaction between a microscopic electric dipole oscillator and a long solenoid which are separated by a small distance. The solenoid belongs to a simple RLC circuit and the zero point and thermal current fluctuations within the solenoid coils are taken into account. We describe how they affect the equilibrium state and the excited states of the oscillator, thus providing a description of the Casimir interaction of the system. We calculate the modification in the lifetime of the oscillator excited states as a function of the parameters of the circuit, the dipole orientation, and the distance between the dipole and the solenoid. The Casimir force between the solenoid and the electric dipole is calculated, and it is shown that this Casimir interaction always exists, that is, it occurs even when the macroscopic current in the solenoid is zero. We suggest experiments which can exhibit these effects related to the electromagnetic interactions between atoms or molecules and simple circuits.

  3. Thermodynamic Casimir effect for films in the three-dimensional Ising universality class: Symmetry-breaking boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenbusch, Martin

    2010-09-01

    We study the thermodynamic Casimir force for films in the three-dimensional Ising universality class with symmetry-breaking boundary conditions. To this end we simulate the improved Blume-Capel model on the simple cubic lattice. We study the two cases ++ , where all spins at the boundary are fixed to +1 and +- , where the spins at one boundary are fixed to +1 while those at the other boundary are fixed to -1 . An important issue in analyzing Monte Carlo and experimental data are corrections to scaling. Since we simulate an improved model, leading corrections to scaling, which are proportional to L0-ω , where L0 is the thickness of the film and ω≈0.8 , can be ignored. This allows us to focus on corrections to scaling that are caused by the boundary conditions. The analysis of our data shows that these corrections can be accounted for by an effective thickness L0,eff=L0+Ls . Studying the correlation length of the films, the energy per area, the magnetization profile, and the thermodynamic Casimir force at the bulk critical point we find Ls=1.9(1) for our model and the boundary conditions discussed here. Using this result for Ls we find a nice collapse of the finite-size scaling curves obtained for the thicknesses L0=8.5 , 16.5, and 32.5 for the full range of temperatures that we consider. We compare our results for the finite-size scaling functions θ++ and θ+- of the thermodynamic Casimir force with those obtained in a previous Monte Carlo study, by the de Gennes-Fisher local-functional method, field theoretic methods, and an experiment with a classical binary liquid mixture.

  4. A field experiment shows that subtle linguistic cues might not affect voter behavior.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Alan S; Huber, Gregory A; Biggers, Daniel R; Hendry, David J

    2016-06-28

    One of the most important recent developments in social psychology is the discovery of minor interventions that have large and enduring effects on behavior. A leading example of this class of results is in the work by Bryan et al. [Bryan CJ, Walton GM, Rogers T, Dweck CS (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(31):12653-12656], which shows that administering a set of survey items worded so that subjects think of themselves as voters (noun treatment) rather than as voting (verb treatment) substantially increases political participation (voter turnout) among subjects. We revisit these experiments by replicating and extending their research design in a large-scale field experiment. In contrast to the 11 to 14% point greater turnout among those exposed to the noun rather than the verb treatment reported in the work by Bryan et al., we find no statistically significant difference in turnout between the noun and verb treatments (the point estimate of the difference is approximately zero). Furthermore, when we benchmark these treatments against a standard get out the vote message, we estimate that both are less effective at increasing turnout than a much shorter basic mobilization message. In our conclusion, we detail how our study differs from the work by Bryan et al. and discuss how our results might be interpreted. PMID:27298362

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Kramers Kronig relations for plasma-like permittivities and the Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kramers-Kronig relations are derived for the permittivity of the usual plasma model which neglects dissipation and of a generalized model which takes into account the interband transitions. The generalized plasma model is shown to be consistent with all precision experiments on the measurement of the Casimir force.

  6. Weak localization as a definitive test of diffusive models in the Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allocca, Andrew; Wilson, Justin; Galitski, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Results from many measurements of the Casimir effect suggest that the metallic plates in these experiments should be modeled with the plasma model of free electrons as opposed to the naive diffusive Drude model, while other experiments seem to indicate the exact opposite, with results more in line with a diffusive model. We study the Casimir effect at low temperatures between a thick disordered plate and purely two-dimensional disordered system where the Drude conductivity decreases logarithmically at low temperatures due to weak localization. This effect can be tuned with either temperature or applied magnetic field leading to a measurable change in the Casimir force. On the other hand, a ballistic model cannot experience such an effect and is only weakly dependent on temperature and magnetic field. As a result, we propose that an experiment would unambiguously differentiate between diffusive and ballistic models by measuring the effect at low temperatures with an applied magnetic field. Additionally, we calculate the impact that fluctuations in the disorder distribution have on the Casimir effect. Assuming the validity of a diffusive model, we find that the Drude model is a good approximation of a more exact treatment of disorder. This work was supported by the DOE-BES (Grant No. DESC0001911) (A.A. and V.G.), the JQI-PFC (J.W.), and the Simons Foundation.

  7. Results from electrostatic calibrations for measuring the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Onofrio, R.

    2010-05-15

    We report on measurements performed on an apparatus aimed to study the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane configuration. The electrostatic calibrations evidence anomalous behaviors in the dependence of the electrostatic force and the minimizing potential upon distance. We discuss analogies and differences of these anomalies with respect to those already observed in the sphere-plane configuration. At the smallest explored distances we observe frequency shifts of non-Coulombian nature preventing the measurement of the Casimir force in the same range. We also report on measurements performed in the parallel-plane configuration, showing that the dependence on distance of the minimizing potential, if present at all, is milder than in the sphere-plane or cylinder-plane geometries. General considerations on the interplay between the distance-dependent minimizing potential and the precision of Casimir force measurements in the range relevant to detect the thermal corrections for all geometries are finally reported.

  8. Anisotropy enhancement of the Casimir-Polder force between a nanoparticle and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biehs, S.-A.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2014-10-01

    We derive the analytical expressions for the thermal Casimir-Polder energy and force between a spheroidal nanoparticle above a semi-infinite material and a graphene covered interface. We analyze in detail the Casimir-Polder force between a gold nanoparticle and a single sheet of pristine graphene focusing on the impact of anisotropy. We show that the effect of anisotropy, i.e., the shape and orientation of the spheroidal nanoparticle, has a much larger influence on the force than the tunability of graphene. The effect of tuning and anisotropy both add up such that we observe a force between the particle and the sheet of graphene which is between 20% and 50% of that between the same particle and an ideal metal plate. Hence the observed force is much larger than the results found for the Casimir force between a metal half-space and a layer of graphene.

  9. Critical Casimir force in the presence of random local adsorption preference.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    We study the critical Casimir force for a film geometry in the Ising universality class. We employ a homogeneous adsorption preference on one of the confining surfaces, while the opposing surface exhibits quenched random disorder, leading to a random local adsorption preference. Disorder is characterized by a parameter p, which measures, on average, the portion of the surface that prefers one component, so that p=0,1 correspond to homogeneous adsorption preference. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of an improved Hamiltonian and finite-size scaling analysis, we determine the critical Casimir force. We show that by tuning the disorder parameter p, the system exhibits a crossover between an attractive and a repulsive force. At p=1/2, disorder allows to effectively realize Dirichlet boundary conditions, which are generically not accessible in classical fluids. Our results are relevant for the experimental realizations of the critical Casimir force in binary liquid mixtures. PMID:25871052

  10. Critical Casimir force in the presence of random local adsorption preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen

    2015-03-01

    We study the critical Casimir force for a film geometry in the Ising universality class. We employ a homogeneous adsorption preference on one of the confining surfaces, while the opposing surface exhibits quenched random disorder, leading to a random local adsorption preference. Disorder is characterized by a parameter p , which measures, on average, the portion of the surface that prefers one component, so that p =0 ,1 correspond to homogeneous adsorption preference. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of an improved Hamiltonian and finite-size scaling analysis, we determine the critical Casimir force. We show that by tuning the disorder parameter p , the system exhibits a crossover between an attractive and a repulsive force. At p =1 /2 , disorder allows to effectively realize Dirichlet boundary conditions, which are generically not accessible in classical fluids. Our results are relevant for the experimental realizations of the critical Casimir force in binary liquid mixtures.

  11. Apparent Endless Extraction of Energy from the Vacuum by Cyclic Manipulation of Casimir Cavity Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1983, Ambjorn and Wolfram produced plots of the energy density of the quantum mechanical electromagnetic fluctuations in a volume of vacuum bounded by perfectly conducting walls in the shape of a rectangular cavity of dimensions a(1), a(2), and a(3), as a function of the ratios a(2)/a(1) and a(3)/a(1). Portions of these plots are double-valued, in that they allow rectangular cavities with the same, value of a(2)/a(1), but different values of a(3)/a(1), to have the saint total energy. Using these double-valued regions of the plots, I show that it is possible to define a "Casimir Vacuum Energy Extraction Cycle" which apparently would allow for the endless extraction of energy from the vacuum in the Casimir cavity by cyclic manipulation of the Casimir cavity dimensions.

  12. CASIMIR Effect in a Supersymmetry-Breaking Brane-World as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P

    2004-09-29

    A new model for the origin of dark energy is proposed based on the Casimir effect in a supersymmetry-breaking brane-world. Supersymmetry is assumed to be preserved in the bulk while broken on a 3-brane. Due to the boundary conditions imposed on the compactified extra dimensions, there is an effective Casimir energy induced on the brane. The net Casimir energy contributed from the graviton and the gravitino modes as a result of supersymmetry-breaking on the brane is identified as the observed dark energy, which in our construction is a cosmological constant. We show that the smallness of the cosmological constant, which results from the huge contrast in the extra-dimensional volumes between that associated with the 3-brane and that of the bulk, is attainable under very relaxed condition.

  13. Test of Zero-point Energy Emission from Gases Flowing Through Casimir Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Moddel, Garret

    A recently issued patent [1] describes a method by which vacuum energy is extracted from gas flowing through a Casimir cavity. According to stochastic electrodynamics, the electronic orbitals in atoms are supported by the ambient zero-point (ZP) field. When the gas atoms are pumped into a Casimir cavity, where long-wavelength ZP field modes are excluded, the electrons spin down into lower energy orbitals and release energy in the process. This energy is collected in a local absorber. When the electrons exit the Casimir cavity they are re-energized to their original orbitals by the ambient ZP fields. The process is repeated to produce continuous power. In this way, the device functions like a heat pump for ZP energy, extracting it globally from the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and collecting it in a local absorber. This energy can be used for heating, or converted to electric power. We carried out a series of experiments to test whether energy is, in fact, radiated from Casimir cavities when the appropriate gas flows through them. The Casimir cavity devices we tested were nanopore polycarbonate membranes with submicron pores having a density of 3x108pores/cm2. Gas was pumped through the membranes in a stainless steel vacuum system, and emitted energy was measured using a broadband pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. Emission in the infrared was clearly observed. We analyzed the emission from different gases and cavities to determine its origin. None of the conventional thermodynamic models we applied to our data fully explain it, leaving open the possibility that it is due to Casimir-cavity-induced emission from ZP fields.

  14. Fluctuation-induced casimir forces in granular fluids.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, C; Brito, R; Marconi, U Marini Bettolo; Nori, F; Soto, R

    2006-05-01

    We numerically investigate the behavior of driven noncohesive granular media and find that two fixed large intruder particles, immersed in a sea of small particles, experience, in addition to a short-range depletion force, a long-range repulsive force. The observed long-range interaction is fluctuation-induced and we propose a mechanism similar to the Casimir effect that generates it: The hydrodynamic fluctuations are geometrically confined between the intruders, producing an unbalanced renormalized pressure. An estimation based on computing the possible Fourier modes explains the repulsive force and is in qualitative agreement with the simulations. PMID:16712336

  15. Stable suspension and dispersion-induced transitions from repulsive Casimir forces between fluid separated eccentric cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A1; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Munday, J N; Joannopoulos, J D

    2008-01-01

    Using accurate numerical methods for finite-size nonplanar objects, we demonstrate a stable mechanical suspension of a silica cylinder within a metallic cylinder separated by ethanol, via a repulsive Casimir force between the silica and the metal. We investigate cylinders with both circular and square cross sections, and show that the latter exhibit a stable orientation as well as a stable position, employing a new method to accurately compute Casimir torques for finite objects. Furthermore, the stable orientation of the square cylinder is shown to undergo an unusual 45 transition as a function of the separation lengthscale, and this transition is explained as a consequence of material dispersion.

  16. Anti-de Sitter-Space/Conformal-Field-Theory Casimir Energy for Rotating Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G.W.; Perry, M.J.; Pope, C.N.

    2005-12-02

    We show that, if one chooses the Einstein static universe as the metric on the conformal boundary of Kerr-anti-de Sitter spacetime, then the Casimir energy of the boundary conformal field theory can easily be determined. The result is independent of the rotation parameters, and the total boundary energy then straightforwardly obeys the first law of thermodynamics. Other choices for the metric on the conformal boundary will give different, more complicated, results. As an application, we calculate the Casimir energy for free self-dual tensor multiplets in six dimensions and compare it with that of the seven-dimensional supergravity dual. They differ by a factor of 5/4.

  17. Positive Casimir and Central Characters of Split Real Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ivan C. H.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the generalized Casimir operators and their actions on the positive representations {{P}_λ} of the modular double of split real quantum groups {{U}_{qtilde{q}}({g}_{R})} . We introduce the notion of virtual highest and lowest weights, and show that the central characters admit positive values for all parameters {λ} . We show that their image defines a semi-algebraic region bounded by real points of the discriminant variety independent of q, and we discuss explicit examples in the lower rank cases.

  18. Positive Casimir and Central Characters of Split Real Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ivan C. H.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the generalized Casimir operators and their actions on the positive representations {mathcal{P}_λ} of the modular double of split real quantum groups {mathcal{U}_{qtilde{q}}(mathfrak{g}_mathbb{R})}. We introduce the notion of virtual highest and lowest weights, and show that the central characters admit positive values for all parameters {λ}. We show that their image defines a semi-algebraic region bounded by real points of the discriminant variety independent of q, and we discuss explicit examples in the lower rank cases.

  19. Phenolic acids from wheat show different absorption profiles in plasma: a model experiment with catheterized pigs.

    PubMed

    Nørskov, Natalja P; Hedemann, Mette S; Theil, Peter K; Fomsgaard, Inge S; Laursen, Bente B; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2013-09-18

    The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study the absorption of phenolic acids. The difference between the artery and the vein for all phenolic acids was small, indicating that the release of phenolic acids in the large intestine was not sufficient to create a porto-arterial concentration difference. Although, the porto-arterial difference was small, their concentrations in the plasma and the absorption profiles differed between cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives. Cinnamic acids derivatives such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid had maximum plasma concentration of 82 ± 20 and 200 ± 7 nM, respectively, and their absorption profiles differed depending on the diet consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (<30 nM) and in the diets. The exception was p-hydroxybenzoic acid, with a plasma concentration (4 ± 0.4 μM), much higher than the other plant phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism. It was concluded that plant phenolic acids undergo extensive interconversion in the colon and that their absorption profiles reflected their low bioavailability in the plant matrix. PMID:23971623

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of Critical Casimir Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.

    2015-03-01

    In the vicinity of the second order phase transition point long-range critical fluctuations of the order parameter appear. The second order phase transition in a critical binary mixture in the vicinity of the demixing point belongs to the universality class of the Ising model. The superfluid transition in liquid He belongs to the universality class of the XY model. The confinement of long-range fluctuations causes critical Casimir forces acting on confining surfaces or particles immersed in the critical substance. Last decade critical Casimir forces in binary mixtures and liquid helium were studied experimentally. The critical Casimir force in a film of a given thickness scales as a universal scaling function of the ratio of the film thickness to the bulk correlation length divided over the cube of the film thickness. Using Monte Carlo simulations we can compute critical Casimir forces and their scaling functions for lattice Ising and XY models which correspond to experimental results for the binary mixture and liquid helium, respectively. This chapter provides the description of numerical methods for computation of critical Casimir interactions for lattice models for plane-plane, plane-particle, and particle-particle geometries.

  1. Thermal and dissipative effects in Casimir physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Joong; Brown-Hayes, Michael; Brownell, Hayden; Dalvit, Diego; Lombardo, Fernando; Mazzitelli, Francisco; Onofrio, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    We have developed an apparatus to assess the thermal effects in Casimir force measurement of a cylinder-plane geometry. Preliminary electrostatic calibrations imply sensitivity sufficient to observe the Casimir force with submicron separation between reflecting surfaces. Work is in progress to improve the sensitivity in order to distinguish the thermal contributions up to 3 microns separation. Another project currently underway at Dartmouth addresses an experimental strategy to verify the dynamical Casimir effect, a dissipative feature of motion in quantum vacuum. In this scheme, Casimir photons generated inside a high-Q cavity with one of the walls driven at GHz frequency [2] would stimulate superradiant emission from ultracold sodium atoms injected into the cavity. We are modeling this system in order to identify the signal features distinguishing Casimir induced superradiance from sodium superflourescence. [1] M. Brown-Hayes, D. A. R Dalvit, F. D. Mazzitelli, W. J. Kim, and R. Onofrio, Phys. Rev. A 72, 051102 (2005). [2] W. J. Kim, J. H. Brownell, and R. Onofrio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 200402 (2006).

  2. A Light Sail Inspired Model to Harness Casimir Forces for Propellantless Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, R. L.

    2010-01-28

    The model used to calculate Casimir forces for variously shaped conducting plates in this paper assumes the vacuum energy pervades all space and that photons randomly pop into and out of existence. While they exist, they possess energy and momentum that can be transferred by reflection as in a light sail. Quantum mechanics in the model is entirely bound up in the Casimir equation of force per unit area. This model is compared with two different experiments: that of Chen and Mohideen demonstrating lateral Casimir forces for sinusoidally corrugated spherical and flat plates and Lamoreaux demonstrating normal Casimir forces between a conducting sphere and flat plate. The calculated forces using this model were compared to the forces obtained in these experiments as well as with calculations using the proximity force approximation. In both cases the results (when compared to the actual plates measured and calculated using non-corrected equations) were less than a few parts per thousand different for the range of separation distances used. When the model was used to calculate forces on the opposite plates, different force magnitudes were obtained seemingly indicating prospects for propellentless propulsion but requiring skeptical verification.

  3. Isoelectronic determination of the thermal Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; López, D.; Decca, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Differential force measurements between spheres coated with either nickel or gold and rotating disks with periodic distributions of nickel and gold are reported. The rotating samples are covered by a thin layer of titanium and a layer of gold. While titanium is used for fabrication purposes, the gold layer (nominal thicknesses of 21, 37, 47, and 87 nm) provides an isoelectronic environment, and is used to nullify the electrostatic contribution but allow the passage of long wavelength Casimir photons. A direct comparison between the experimental results and predictions from Drude and plasma models for the electrical permittivity is carried out. In the models, the magnetic permeability of nickel is allowed to change to investigate its effects. Possible sources of errors, both in the experimental and theoretical sides, are taken into account. It is found that a Drude response with magnetic properties of nickel taken into account is unequivocally ruled out. The full analysis of the data indicates that a dielectric plasma response with the magnetic properties of Ni included shows good agreement with the data. Neither a Drude nor a plasma dielectric response provide a satisfactory description if the magnetic properties of nickel are disregarded.

  4. Direct simulation of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobrecht, Hendrik; Hucht, Alfred

    2014-06-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo method to calculate Casimir forces acting on objects in a near-critical fluid, considering the two basic cases of a wall and a sphere embedded in a two-dimensional Ising medium. During the simulation, the objects are moved through the system with appropriate statistical weights, and consequently are attracted or repelled from the system boundaries depending on the boundary conditions. The distribution function of the object position is utilized to obtain the residual free energy, or Casimir potential, of the configuration as well as the corresponding Casimir force. The results are in perfect agreement with known exact results. The method can easily be generalized to more complicated geometries, to higher dimensions, and also to colloidal suspensions with many particles.

  5. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  6. Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Despoja, V.; Marusic, L.

    2011-04-15

    The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

  7. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  8. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction.

    PubMed

    Lamoreaux, S K; Buttler, W T

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction. PMID:15903495

  9. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  10. Casimir forces in the time domain: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. The method involves the time evolution of electric and magnetic fields in response to a set of current sources, in a modified medium with frequency-independent conductivity. The advantage of this approach is that it allows one to exploit existing FDTD software, without modification, to compute Casimir forces. In this paper, we focus on the derivation, implementation choices, and essential properties of the time-domain algorithm, both considered analytically and illustrated in the simplest parallel-plate geometry.

  11. Repulsive and attractive Casimir interactions in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh D.; Viet, N. A.

    2011-12-15

    The Casimir interactions in solid-liquid-solid systems as a function of separation distance have been studied by the Lifshitz theory. The dielectric permittivity functions for a wide range of materials are described by Drude, Drude-Lorentz, and oscillator models. We find that the Casimir forces between gold and silica or MgO materials are both repulsive and attractive. We also find the stable forms for the systems. Our studies would provide good guidance for future experimental studies on dispersion interactions.

  12. Supersymmetric Casimir energy and the anomaly polynomial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobev, Nikolay; Bullimore, Mathew; Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    We conjecture that for superconformal field theories in even dimensions, the supersymmetric Casimir energy on a space with topology S 1 × S D-1 is equal to an equivariant integral of the anomaly polynomial. The equivariant integration is defined with respect to the Cartan subalgebra of the global symmetry algebra that commutes with a given supercharge. We test our proposal extensively by computing the supersymmetric Casimir energy for large classes of superconformal field theories, with and without known Lagrangian descriptions, in two, four and six dimensions.

  13. Lullaby Light Shows: Everyday Musical Experience among Under-Two-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on information gathered from a set of interviews carried out with 88 mothers of under-two-year-olds. The interviews enquired about the everyday musical experiences of their babies and very young children in the home. From the process of analysis, the responses to the interviews were grouped into three main areas: musical…

  14. Real Science: MIT Reality Show Tracks Experiences, Frustrations of Chemistry Lab Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    A reality show about a college course--a chemistry class no less? That's what "ChemLab Boot Camp" is. The 14-part series of short videos is being released one episode at a time on the online learning site of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The novel show follows a diverse group of 14 freshmen as they struggle to master the laboratory…

  15. Scattering theory approach to electrodynamic Casimir forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.

    2009-10-15

    We give a comprehensive presentation of methods for calculating the Casimir force to arbitrary accuracy, for any number of objects, arbitrary shapes, susceptibility functions, and separations. The technique is applicable to objects immersed in media other than vacuum, nonzero temperatures, and spatial arrangements in which one object is enclosed in another. Our method combines each object's classical electromagnetic scattering amplitude with universal translation matrices, which convert between the bases used to calculate scattering for each object, but are otherwise independent of the details of the individual objects. The method is illustrated by rederiving the Lifshitz formula for infinite half-spaces, by demonstrating the Casimir-Polder to van der Waals crossover, and by computing the Casimir interaction energy of two infinite, parallel, perfect metal cylinders either inside or outside one another. Furthermore, it is used to obtain new results, namely, the Casimir energies of a sphere or a cylinder opposite a plate, all with finite permittivity and permeability, to leading order at large separation.

  16. Ontological aspects of the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, William M. R.

    2014-11-01

    The role of the vacuum, in the Casimir Effect, is a matter of some dispute: the Casimir force has been variously described as a phenomenon resulting "from the alteration, by the boundaries, of the zero-point electromagnetic energy" (Bordag, Mohideen, & Mostepanenko, 2001), or a "van der Waals force between the metal plates" that can be "computed without reference to zero point energies" (Jaffe, 2005). Neither of these descriptions is grounded in a consistently quantum mechanical treatment of matter interacting with the electromagnetic field. However, the Casimir Effect has been canonically described within the framework of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics (Philbin, 2010). On this general account, the force is seen to arise due to the coupling of fluctuating currents to the zero-point radiation, and it is in this restricted sense that the phenomenon requires the existence of zero-point fields. The conflicting descriptions of the Casimir Effect, on the other hand, appear to arise from ontologies in which an unwarranted metaphysical priority is assigned either to the matter or the fields, and this may have a direct bearing on the problem of the cosmological constant.

  17. Electromagnetic thermal corrections to Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-07-01

    In [B. Nazari, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 31, 1650007 (2016)], we calculated finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. The calculations was done for the case a scalar field was present between the plates. Here we find the same results in the presence of an electromagnetic field.

  18. Casimir force in Schwarzschild metric: Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Munawar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I report progress on both theoretical and experimental aspects. I describe two approaches to calculating putative effects of gravitational curvature on the Casimir force. The work I describe continues the quest to answer the question: do virtual field excitations follow geodesics?

  19. The experience of Massachusetts shows that consumers will need help in navigating insurance exchanges.

    PubMed

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Soumerai, Stephen B; Lieu, Tracy; Galbraith, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In 2022 twenty-five million people are expected to purchase health insurance through exchanges to be established under the Affordable Care Act. Understanding how people seek information and make decisions about the insurance plans that are available to them may improve their ability to select a plan and their satisfaction with it. We conducted a survey in 2010 of enrollees in one plan offered through Massachusetts's unsubsidized health insurance exchange to analyze how a sample of consumers selected their plans. More than 40 percent found plan information difficult to understand. Approximately one-third of respondents had help selecting plans-most commonly from friends or family members. However, one-fifth of respondents wished they had had help narrowing plan choices; these enrollees were more likely to report negative experiences related to plan understanding, satisfaction with affordability and coverage, and unexpected costs. Some may have been eligible for subsidized plans. Exchanges may need to provide more resources and decision-support tools to improve consumers' experiences in selecting a health plan. PMID:23297274

  20. The Experience Of Massachusetts Shows That Consumers Will Need Help In Navigating Insurance Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Sinaiko, Anna D.; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Soumerai, Stephen B.; Lieu, Tracy; Galbraith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    In 2022 twenty-five million people are expected to purchase health insurance through exchanges to be established under the Affordable Care Act. Understanding how people seek information and make decisions about the insurance plans that are available to them may improve their ability to select a plan and their satisfaction with it. We conducted a survey in 2010 of enrollees in one plan offered through Massachusetts’s unsubsidized health insurance exchange to analyze how a sample of consumers selected their plans. More than 40 percent found plan information difficult to understand. Approximately one-third of respondents had help selecting plans—most commonly from friends or family members. However, one-fifth of respondents wished they had had help narrowing plan choices; these enrollees were more likely to report negative experiences related to plan understanding, satisfaction with affordability and coverage, and unexpected costs. Some may have been eligible for subsidized plans. Exchanges may need to provide more resources and decision-support tools to improve consumers’ experiences in selecting a health plan. PMID:23297274

  1. Massive scalar Casimir interaction beyond proximity force approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2015-09-01

    Since massive scalar field plays an important role in theoretical physics, we consider the interaction between a sphere and a plate due to the vacuum fluctuation of a massive scalar field. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. There is a simple prescription to obtain the functional formulas for the Casimir interaction energies, known as TGTG formula, for the massive interactions from the massless interactions. From the TGTG formulas, we discuss how to compute the small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energies up to the next-to-leading order terms. Unlike the massless case, the results could not be expressed as simple algebraic expressions, but instead could only be expressed as infinite sums over some integrals. Nonetheless, it is easy to show that one can obtain the massless limits which agree with previously established results. We also show that the leading terms agree with that derive using proximity force approximation. The dependence of the leading order terms and the next-to-leading order terms on the mass of the scalar field is studied both numerically and analytically. In particular, we derive the small mass asymptotic expansions of these terms. Surprisingly, the small mass asymptotic expansions are quite complicated as they contain terms that are of odd powers in mass as well as logarithms of mass terms.

  2. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  3. Global decomposition experiment shows soil animal impacts on decomposition are climate-dependent

    PubMed Central

    WALL, DIANA H; BRADFORD, MARK A; ST JOHN, MARK G; TROFYMOW, JOHN A; BEHAN-PELLETIER, VALERIE; BIGNELL, DAVID E; DANGERFIELD, J MARK; PARTON, WILLIAM J; RUSEK, JOSEF; VOIGT, WINFRIED; WOLTERS, VOLKMAR; GARDEL, HOLLEY ZADEH; AYUKE, FRED O; BASHFORD, RICHARD; BELJAKOVA, OLGA I; BOHLEN, PATRICK J; BRAUMAN, ALAIN; FLEMMING, STEPHEN; HENSCHEL, JOH R; JOHNSON, DAN L; JONES, T HEFIN; KOVAROVA, MARCELA; KRANABETTER, J MARTY; KUTNY, LES; LIN, KUO-CHUAN; MARYATI, MOHAMED; MASSE, DOMINIQUE; POKARZHEVSKII, ANDREI; RAHMAN, HOMATHEVI; SABARÁ, MILLOR G; SALAMON, JOERG-ALFRED; SWIFT, MICHAEL J; VARELA, AMANDA; VASCONCELOS, HERALDO L; WHITE, DON; ZOU, XIAOMING

    2008-01-01

    Climate and litter quality are primary drivers of terrestrial decomposition and, based on evidence from multisite experiments at regional and global scales, are universally factored into global decomposition models. In contrast, soil animals are considered key regulators of decomposition at local scales but their role at larger scales is unresolved. Soil animals are consequently excluded from global models of organic mineralization processes. Incomplete assessment of the roles of soil animals stems from the difficulties of manipulating invertebrate animals experimentally across large geographic gradients. This is compounded by deficient or inconsistent taxonomy. We report a global decomposition experiment to assess the importance of soil animals in C mineralization, in which a common grass litter substrate was exposed to natural decomposition in either control or reduced animal treatments across 30 sites distributed from 43°S to 68°N on six continents. Animals in the mesofaunal size range were recovered from the litter by Tullgren extraction and identified to common specifications, mostly at the ordinal level. The design of the trials enabled faunal contribution to be evaluated against abiotic parameters between sites. Soil animals increase decomposition rates in temperate and wet tropical climates, but have neutral effects where temperature or moisture constrain biological activity. Our findings highlight that faunal influences on decomposition are dependent on prevailing climatic conditions. We conclude that (1) inclusion of soil animals will improve the predictive capabilities of region- or biome-scale decomposition models, (2) soil animal influences on decomposition are important at the regional scale when attempting to predict global change scenarios, and (3) the statistical relationship between decomposition rates and climate, at the global scale, is robust against changes in soil faunal abundance and diversity.

  4. Casimir piston for massless scalar fields in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Edery, Ariel

    2007-05-15

    We study the Casimir piston for massless scalar fields obeying Dirichlet boundary conditions in a three-dimensional cavity with sides of arbitrary lengths a, b, and c where a is the plate separation. We obtain an exact expression for the Casimir force on the piston valid for any values of the three lengths. As in the electromagnetic case with perfect-conductor conditions, we find that the Casimir force is negative (attractive) regardless of the values of a, b, and c. Though cases exist where the interior contributes a positive (repulsive) Casimir force, the total Casimir force on the piston is negative when the exterior contribution is included. We also obtain an alternative expression for the Casimir force that is useful computationally when the plate separation a is large.

  5. Pest control experiments show benefits of complexity at landscape and local scales.

    PubMed

    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Kremen, Claire

    2012-10-01

    Farms benefit from pest control services provided by nature, but management of these services requires an understanding of how habitat complexity within and around the farm impacts the relationship between agricultural pests and their enemies. Using cage experiments, this study measures the effect of habitat complexity across scales on pest suppression of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae in broccoli. Our results reveal that proportional reduction of pest density increases with complexity both at the landscape scale (measured by natural habitat cover in the 1 km around the farm) and at the local scale (plant diversity). While high local complexity can compensate for low complexity at landscape scales and vice versa, a delay in natural enemy arrival to locally complex sites in simple landscapes may compromise the enemies' ability to provide adequate control. Local complexity in simplified landscapes may only provide adequate top-down pest control in cooler microclimates with relatively low aphid colonization rates. Even so, strong natural enemy function can be overwhelmed by high rates of pest reproduction or colonization from nearby source habitat. PMID:23210310

  6. Casimir force in the presence of a medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Soltani, Morteza; Sarabadani, Jalal

    2010-05-15

    We investigate the Casimir effect in the presence of a medium by quantizing the electromagnetic field in the presence of a magnetodielectric medium using the path-integral technique. For a given medium with definite electric and magnetic susceptibilities, explicit expressions for the Casimir force are obtained. The Lifshitz formula is recovered and in the absence of a medium the results tend to the original Casimir force between two conducting parallel plates immersed in the quantum electromagnetic vacuum.

  7. Optical detection of the Casimir force between macroscopic objects.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Victor; Petrov, Mikhail; Bryksin, Valeriy; Petter, Juergen; Tschudi, Theo

    2006-11-01

    We report the optical detection of mechanical deformation of a macroscopic object induced by the Casimir force. An adaptive holographic interferometer based on a photorefractive BaTiO3:Co crystal was used to measure periodical nonlinear deformations of a thin pellicle caused by an oscillating Casimir force. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the first and second harmonics of the Casimir force oscillations has been obtained. PMID:17041670

  8. New features of the thermal Casimir force at small separations.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mohideen, U; Mostepanenko, V M

    2003-04-25

    The difference of the thermal Casimir forces at different temperatures between real metals is shown to increase with a decrease of the separation distance. This opens new opportunities for the demonstration of the thermal dependence of the Casimir force. Both configurations of two parallel plates and a sphere above a plate are considered. Different approaches to the theoretical description of the thermal Casimir force are shown to lead to different measurable predictions. PMID:12731963

  9. Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E.; Parsons, Drew F.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO2 and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface.

  10. Specific yield - laboratory experiments showing the effect of time on column drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prill, Robert C.; Johnson, A.I.; Morris, Donald Arthur

    1965-01-01

    The increasing use of ground water from many major aquifers in the United States has required a more thorough understanding of gravity drainage, or specific yield. This report describes one phase of specific yield research by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hydrologic Laboratory in cooperation with the California Department of Water Resources. An earlier phase of the research concentrated on the final distribution of moisture retained after drainage of saturated columns of porous media. This report presents the phase that concentrated on the distribution of moisture retained in similar columns after drainage for various periods of time. Five columns, about 4 cm in diameter by 170 cm long, were packed with homogenous sand of very fine, medium, and coarse sizes, and one column was packed with alternating layers of coarse and medium sand. The very fine materials were more uniform in size range than were the medium materials. As the saturated columns drained, tensiometers installed throughout the length recorded changes in moisture tension. The relation of tension to moisture content, determined for each of the materials, was then used to convert the tension readings to moisture content. Data were then available on the distribution of retained moisture for different periods of drainage from 1 to 148 hours. Data also are presented on the final distribution of moisture content by weight and volume and on the degree of saturation. The final zone of capillary saturation was approximately 12 cm for coarse sand, 13 cm for medium sand, and 52 cm for very fine sand. The data showed these zones were 92 to 100 percent saturated. Most of the outflow from the columns occurred in the earlier hours of drainage--90 percent in 1 hour for the coarse materials, 50 percent for the medium, and 60 percent for the very fine. Although the largest percentage of the specific yield was reached during the early hours of .drainage, this study amply demonstrates that a very long time would be

  11. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

  12. The Casimir Effect in Biology: The Role of Molecular Quantum Electrodynamics in Linear Aggregations of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradonjić, K.; Swain, J. D.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y. N.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the fact that red blood cells carry negative charges, under certain conditions they form cylindrical stacks, or "rouleaux". It is shown here that a form of the Casimir effect, generalizing the more well-known van der Waals forces, can provide the necessary attractive force to balance the electrostatic repulsion. Erythrocytes in plasma are modelled as negatively charged dielectric disks in an ionic solution, allowing predictions to be made about the conditions under which rouleaux will form. The results show qualitative agreement with observations which suggest that the basic idea is worth further pursuit. In addition to revealing a mechanism which may be widespread in biology at the cellular level, it also suggest new experiments and further applications to other biological systems, colloid chemistry and nanotechnology.

  13. Casimir effect for curved geometries: proximity-force-approximation validity limits.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Klingmüller, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    We compute Casimir interaction energies for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configuration induced by scalar-field fluctuations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Based on a high-precision calculation using world-line numerics, we quantitatively determine the validity bounds of the proximity-force approximation (PFA) on which the comparison between all corresponding experiments and theory are based. We observe the quantitative failure of the PFA on the 1% level for a curvature parameter a/R>0.00755. Even qualitatively, the PFA fails to predict reliably the correct sign of genuine Casimir curvature effects. We conclude that data analysis of future experiments aiming at a precision of 0.1% must no longer be based on the PFA. PMID:16803290

  14. Pseudo-casimir structural force drives spinodal dewetting in nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed

    Ziherl; Podgornik; Zumer

    2000-02-01

    We analyze theoretically the fluctuation-induced force in thin nematic films subject to competing surface interactions, and we find that the force is attractive at small distances and repulsive otherwise. The results provide a consistent interpretation of a recent study of spinodal dewetting of 5CB on a silicon wafer [F. Vandenbrouck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2693 (1999)], implying that this experiment can be regarded as the first observation of the pseudo-Casimir effect in liquid crystals. PMID:11017485

  15. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-30

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 {mu}m where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force.

  16. Casimir interactions between graphene sheets and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2011-12-15

    The Casimir force between graphene sheets and metamaterials is studied. Theoretical results based on the Lifshitz theory for layered, planar, two-dimensional systems in media are presented. We consider graphene-graphene, graphene-metamaterial, and metal-graphene-metamaterial configurations. We find that quantum effects of the temperature-dependent force are not apparent until the submicron range. In contrast to results with bulk dielectric and bulk metallic materials, no Casimir repulsion is found when graphene is placed on top of a magnetically active metamaterial substrate, regardless of the strength of the low-frequency magnetic response. In the case of the metal-graphene-metamaterial setting, repulsion between the metamaterial and the metal-graphene system is possible only when the dielectric response from the metal contributes significantly.

  17. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emig, Thorsten; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two dimensional conformal field theories (CFT) we derive exact results for the Casimir interaction for a deformed strip and for two compact objects of arbitrary shape in terms of the free energy of a standard region (circular ring or flat strip) whose dimension is determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and a purely geometric energy that is proportional to conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details. The effect of inhomogenous boundary conditions is also discussed.

  18. Casimir effect with uniformly moving mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Dittes, F.; Robaschik, D.

    1986-06-01

    We study a simple example of quantum electrodynamics with nonstationary boundary conditions in (3+1) dimensions: the problem of two parallel mirrors moving relative to each other with constant speed v. The Green functions are constructed using the reflection principle. The behavior of physical quantities like the Casimir force and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are discussed. If the motion of an arbitrary point between the mirrors is described by a straight world line, then in the local rest frame at the point in question the energy-momentum tensor has the same structure as in the standard Casimir problem with stationary mirrors. In particular, all physical quantities are smooth functions of v, so that the limit v..-->..0 leads to the expected results.

  19. Curved Casimir Operators and the BGG Machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cap, Andreas; Soucek, Vladimír

    2007-11-01

    We prove that the Casimir operator acting on sections of a homogeneous vector bundle over a generalized flag manifold naturally extends to an invariant differential operator on arbitrary parabolic geometries. We study some properties of the resulting invariant operators and compute their action on various special types of natural bundles. As a first application, we give a very general construction of splitting operators for parabolic geometries. Then we discuss the curved Casimir operators on differential forms with values in a tractor bundle, which nicely relates to the machinery of BGG sequences. This also gives a nice interpretation of the resolution of a finite dimensional representation by (spaces of smooth vectors in) principal series representations provided by a BGG sequence.

  20. Casimir microsphere diclusters and three-body effects in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Jaime; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-04-15

    Our previous paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 060401 (2010)] predicted that Casimir forces induced by the material-dispersion properties of certain dielectrics can give rise to stable configurations of objects. This phenomenon was illustrated via a dicluster configuration of nontouching objects consisting of two spheres immersed in a fluid and suspended against gravity above a plate. Here, we examine these predictions from the perspective of a practical experiment and consider the influence of nonadditive, three-body, and nonzero-temperature effects on the stability of the two spheres. We conclude that the presence of Brownian motion reduces the set of experimentally realizable silicon-teflon spherical diclusters to those consisting of layered microspheres, such as the hollow core (spherical shells) considered here.

  1. Measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Decca, R S; López, D; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E

    2003-08-01

    The first precise measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals is reported. The attractive force, between a Cu layer evaporated on a microelectromechanical torsional oscillator and an Au layer deposited on an Al2O3 sphere, was measured dynamically with a noise level of 6 fN/sqrt[Hz]. Measurements were performed for separations in the 0.2-2 micro m range. The results agree to better than 1% in the 0.2-0.5 micro m range with a theoretical model that takes into account the finite conductivity and roughness of the two metals. The observed discrepancies, which are much larger than the experimental precision, can be attributed to a lack of a complete characterization of the optical properties of the specific samples used in the experiment. PMID:12906584

  2. Quantum simulation of the dynamical Casimir effect with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Hauke, P.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations are a direct manifestation of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. The dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) allows for the observation of these vacuum fluctuations by turning them into real, observable photons. However, the observation of this effect in a cavity QED experiment would require the rapid variation of the length of a cavity with relativistic velocities, a daunting challenge. Here, we propose a quantum simulation of the DCE using an ion chain confined in a segmented ion trap. We derive a discrete model that enables us to map the dynamics of the multimode radiation field inside a variable-length cavity to radial phonons of the ion crystal. We perform a numerical study comparing the ion-chain quantum simulation under realistic experimental parameters to an ideal Fabry–Perot cavity, demonstrating the viability of the mapping. The proposed quantum simulator, therefore, allows for probing the photon (respectively phonon) production caused by the DCE on the single photon level.

  3. Measurement of the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon surface with nanoscale trench arrays.

    PubMed

    Chan, H B; Bao, Y; Zou, J; Cirelli, R A; Klemens, F; Mansfield, W M; Pai, C S

    2008-07-18

    We report measurements of the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon surface with an array of nanoscale, rectangular corrugations using a micromechanical torsional oscillator. At distances between 150 and 500 nm, the measured force shows significant deviations from the pairwise additive formulism, demonstrating the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. The observed deviation, however, is smaller than the calculated values for perfectly conducting surfaces, possibly due to the interplay between finite conductivity and geometry effects. PMID:18764238

  4. Repulsive Casimir force in chiral metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Zhou, J; Koschny, Th; Economou, E N; Soukoulis, C M

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that one can obtain repulsive Casimir forces and stable nanolevitations by using chiral metamaterials. By extending the Lifshitz theory to treat chiral metamaterials, we find that a repulsive force and a minimum of the interaction energy possibly exist for strong chirality, under realistic frequency dependencies and correct limiting values (for zero and infinite frequencies) of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral coefficients. PMID:19792309

  5. Casimir effect of massive vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2010-11-15

    We study the Casimir effect due to a massive vector field in a system of two parallel plates made of real materials, in an arbitrary magnetodielectric background. The plane waves satisfying the Proca equations are classified into transverse modes and longitudinal modes which have different dispersion relations. Transverse modes are further divided into type I and type II corresponding to TE and TM modes in the massless case. For general magnetodielectric media, we argue that the correct boundary conditions are the continuities of H{sub ||}, {phi}, A, and {partial_derivative}{sub x}A{sub x}, where x is the direction normal to the plates. Although there are type I transverse modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions, it is impossible to find type II transverse modes or longitudinal modes that satisfy all the boundary conditions. To circumvent this problem, type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes have to be considered together. We call the contribution to the Casimir energy from type I transverse modes TE contribution, and the contribution from the superposition of type II transverse modes and longitudinal modes TM contribution. Their massless limits give, respectively, the TE and TM contributions to the Casimir energy of a massless vector field. The limit where the plates become perfectly conducting is discussed in detail. For the special case where the background has a unity refractive index, it is shown that the TM contribution to the Casimir energy can be written as a sum of contributions from two different types of modes, corresponding to type II discrete modes and type III continuum modes discussed by Barton and Dombey [G. Barton and N. Dombey, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 162, 231 (1985).]. For general background, this splitting does not work. The limit where both plates become infinitely permeable and the limit where one plate becomes perfectly conducting and one plate becomes infinitely permeable are also investigated.

  6. Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-15

    Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In this article, we focus on the efficient implementation of our method for geometries of practical interest and extend our previous proof-of-concept algorithm in one dimension to problems in two and three dimensions, introducing a number of new optimizations. We consider Casimir pistonlike problems with nonmonotonic and monotonic force dependence on sidewall separation, both for previously solved geometries to validate our method and also for new geometries involving magnetic sidewalls and/or cylindrical pistons. We include realistic dielectric materials to calculate the force between suspended silicon waveguides or on a suspended membrane with periodic grooves, also demonstrating the application of perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries and/or periodic boundaries. In addition, we apply this method to a realizable three-dimensional system in which a silica sphere is stably suspended in a fluid above an indented metallic substrate. More generally, the method allows off-the-shelf FDTD software, already supporting a wide variety of materials (including dielectric, magnetic, and even anisotropic materials) and boundary conditions, to be exploited for the Casimir problem.

  7. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ether, D. S., Jr.; Pires, L. B.; Umrath, S.; Martinez, D.; Ayala, Y.; Pontes, B.; Araújo, G. R. de S.; Frases, S.; Ingold, G.-L.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Viana, N. B.; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Neto, P. A. Maia

    2015-11-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers to probe the Casimir interaction between microspheres inside a liquid medium for geometric aspect ratios far beyond the validity of the widely employed proximity force approximation. This setup has the potential for revealing unprecedented features associated to the non-trivial role of the spherical curvatures. For a proof of concept, we measure femtonewton double-layer forces between polystyrene microspheres at distances above 400 nm by employing very soft optical tweezers, with stiffness of the order of fractions of a fN/nm. As a future application, we propose to tune the Casimir interaction between a metallic and a polystyrene microsphere in saline solution from attraction to repulsion by varying the salt concentration. With those materials, the screened Casimir interaction may have a larger magnitude than the unscreened one. This line of investigation has the potential for bringing together different fields including classical and quantum optics, statistical physics and colloid science, while paving the way for novel quantitative applications of optical tweezers in cell and molecular biology.

  8. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V D; Dang, M T; Nguyen, T A; Schall, P

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26750980

  9. Critical Casimir forces for colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Dang, M. T.; Nguyen, T. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces attract increasing interest due to their opportunities for reversible particle assembly in soft matter and nano science. These forces provide a thermodynamic analogue of the celebrated quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. In its thermodynamic analogue, solvent fluctuations, confined between suspended particles, give rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the particles. Due to its unique temperature dependence, this effect allows in situ control of reversible assembly. Both the force magnitude and range vary with the solvent correlation length in a universal manner, adjusting with temperature from fractions of the thermal energy, k B T, and nanometre range to several ten kT and micrometer length scale. Combined with recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of complex particles, critical Casimir forces promise the design and assembly of complex colloidal structures, for fundamental studies of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phase behaviour. This review highlights recent developments in this evolving field, with special emphasis on the dynamic interaction control to assemble colloidal structures, in and out of equilibrium.

  10. Retardation (Casimir) effect for a multielectron core system and a Rydberg electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babb, James F.; Spruch, Larry

    1989-09-01

    Theoretical predictions for the expected Casimir or retardation energy shift ΔEret(n,l) arising from retarded two-photon exchange in a Rydberg helium atom or in Rydberg low-Z heliumlike ions have been available for some time; n and l pertain to the Rydberg electron. These systems consist of a one-electron core [nucleus and 1s electron (e-)] and a Rydberg e-. Recent experiments on the n=10 states of singly excited helium have given a weak confirmation for the presence of Casimir shifts ΔEret(n,l). High-precision confirmation is likely to come from measurements on helium, as experiments improve. Nevertheless, though probably not suitable for high-precision confirmation, a retardation effect could be very large for a system with a many-e- core, and it might then be important to be able to at least estimate that effect. It is shown that the same formalism that was previously developed for the evaluation of ΔEret(n,l) for a one-electron (He-like) core can often be used for the many-electron core. In particular, with the core property characterized by a function F(k) (where k is the wave number of a virtual photon) related to the electric dipole polarizability, if the multi-e- core is in an S state, we obtain essentially the same result as for helium; formally, one need merely replace the F(k) of He+ by the F(k) of the ion under consideration. The extension described is largely notational. Furthermore, we show that as long as the core electrons have a spherically symmetric charge density, for a given core state or for an average over a set of core states which differ only in their angular momentum projections, the result for ΔEret(n,l) is very similar to the heliumlike result. Thus, we give several methods to estimate core properties and ΔEret(n,l) for a variety of systems and use these methods to obtain rough estimates of ΔEret(n,l) for some representative Rydberg levels of Li and Na. We note that storage rings may soon make possible high-precision experiments to

  11. Thickness dependence of the Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate and a diamagnetic plate

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Norio

    2011-11-15

    This paper examines the repulsive Casimir force between a magnetodielectric plate, with static permeability greater than static permittivity, and a diamagnetic plate. As the thickness of the magnetodielectric plate is decreased, the attractive component of the Casimir force decreases more than the repulsive one. This effect makes the net Casimir force repulsive, and a larger repulsive Casimir force is generated compared to the Casimir force between the plates with infinite thickness.

  12. First-principles study of Casimir repulsion in metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yannopapas, Vassilios; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2009-09-18

    We examine theoretically the Casimir effect between a metallic plate and several types of magnetic metamaterials in pursuit of Casimir repulsion, by employing a rigorous multiple-scattering theory for the Casimir effect. We first examine metamaterials in the form of two-dimensional lattices of inherently nonmagnetic spheres such as spheres made from materials possessing phonon-polariton and exciton-polariton resonances. Although such systems are magnetically active in infrared and optical regimes, the force between finite slabs of these materials and metallic slabs is plainly attractive since the effective electric permittivity is larger than the magnetic permeability for the studied spectrum. When lattices of magnetic spheres made from superparamagnetic composites are employed, we achieve not only Casimir repulsion but almost total suppression of the Casimir effect itself in the micrometer scale. PMID:19792414

  13. Casimir force in a critical film formed from an electrolytic solution.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A; Law, B M

    2001-04-01

    We have studied the thickness of vapor adsorbed films of the critical binary liquid mixture acetic acid plus nonane adsorbed onto a silicon wafer substrate as a function of temperature near the critical temperature. This critical film possesses opposite boundary conditions (+-) at its two surfaces and, due to the dissociation of acetic acid, both the electrostatic force and the dispersion force affect the adsorbed film thickness. On approaching the critical temperature T(c), an increase in the film thickness L is observed, implying that the sign of the universal Casimir amplitude Delta(+-) is positive, consistent with theoretical predictions. However, we find quantitative discrepancies in the value of Delta(+-) and the form of the critical Casimir pressure scaling function vartheta(+-) compared with previous experimental results. We attribute these discrepancies to the complex nature of the critical system studied in this experiment. PMID:11308860

  14. Casimir Force for a Maxwell-Chern-Simons System via Model Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros Neto, J. F.; Ozela, Rodrigo F.; Correa, R. O.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2014-12-01

    We show that the Hamiltonian for a Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) model can be expressed in a diagonalized equivalent form involving only a massive scalar field variable in a three-dimensional space-time. We use this mapping between the two models, the MCS and a single massive scalar field, to understand the agreement of the Casimir force between parallel lines derived in both models. Since the Casimir force is heavily dependent on the boundary conditions (BC), we show that only certain types of BC can be considered for the two models, within the method of calculation outlined here. We also discuss the behavior of the BC with respect to the gauge symmetry present in the initial model.

  15. Constraints on Stable Equilibria with Fluctuation-Induced (Casimir) Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Kardar, Mehran; Emig, Thorsten

    2010-08-13

    We examine whether fluctuation-induced forces can lead to stable levitation. First, we analyze a collection of classical objects at finite temperature that contain fixed and mobile charges and show that any arrangement in space is unstable to small perturbations in position. This extends Earnshaw's theorem for electrostatics by including thermal fluctuations of internal charges. Quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are responsible for Casimir or van der Waals interactions. Neglecting permeabilities, we find that any equilibrium position of items subject to such forces is also unstable if the permittivities of all objects are higher or lower than that of the enveloping medium, the former being the generic case for ordinary materials in vacuum.

  16. Entangling polaritons via dynamical Casimir effect in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossatto, D. Z.; Felicetti, S.; Eneriz, H.; Rico, E.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate theoretically how the dynamical Casimir effect can entangle quantum systems in different coupling regimes of circuit quantum electrodynamics, and show the robustness of such entanglement generation against dissipative effects, considering experimental parameters of current technology. We consider two qubit-resonator systems, which are coupled by a SQUID driven with an external magnetic field, and explore the entire range of coupling regimes between each qubit and its resonator. In this scheme, we derive a semianalytic explanation for the entanglement generation between both superconducting qubits when they are coupled to their resonators in the strong coupling regime. For the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes, we design experimentally feasible theoretical protocols to generate maximally entangled polaritonic states.

  17. Disorder in Quantum Vacuum: Casimir-Induced Localization of Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G. A.; Messina, R.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Maia Neto, P. A.

    2010-11-19

    Disordered geometrical boundaries such as rough surfaces induce important modifications to the mode spectrum of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. In analogy to Anderson localization of waves induced by a random potential, here we show that the Casimir-Polder interaction between a cold atomic sample and a rough surface also produces localization phenomena. These effects, that represent a macroscopic manifestation of disorder in quantum vacuum, should be observable with Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in proximity of rough surfaces.

  18. Proximity force approximation for the Casimir energy as a derivative expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, César D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2011-11-01

    The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate the Casimir force between smooth objects at small distances. In spite of being intuitively easy to grasp, it is generally believed to be an uncontrolled approximation. Indeed, its validity has only been tested in particular examples, by confronting its predictions with the next-to-leading-order (NTLO) correction extracted from numerical or analytical solutions obtained without using the PFA. In this article we show that the PFA and its NTLO correction may be derived within a single framework, as the first two terms in a derivative expansion. To that effect, we consider the Casimir energy for a vacuum scalar field with Dirichlet conditions on a smooth curved surface described by a function ψ in front of a plane. By regarding the Casimir energy as a functional of ψ, we show that the PFA is the leading term in a derivative expansion of this functional. We also obtain the general form of the corresponding NTLO correction, which involves two derivatives of ψ. We show, by evaluating this correction term for particular geometries, that it properly reproduces the known corrections to PFA obtained from exact evaluations of the energy.

  19. Rabi interferometry and sensitive measurement of the Casimir-Polder force with ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chwedenczuk, Jan; Piazza, Francesco; Smerzi, Augusto; Pezze, Luca

    2010-09-15

    We show that Rabi oscillations of a degenerate fermionic or bosonic gas trapped in a double-well potential can be exploited for the interferometric measurement of external forces at micrometer length scales. The Rabi interferometer is less sensitive but easier to implement than the Mach-Zehnder, since it does not require dynamical beam-splitting or recombination processes. As an application we propose a measurement of the Casimir-Polder force acting between the atoms and a dielectric surface. We find that even if the interferometer is fed with a coherent state of relatively small number of atoms, and in the presence of realistic experimental noise, the force might be measured with a sensitivity sufficient to discriminate between thermal and zero-temperature regimes of the Casimir-Polder potential. Higher sensitivities can be reached with bosonic spin squeezed states.

  20. Directional spontaneous emission and lateral Casimir-Polder force on an atom close to a nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Clausen, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of an excited atom close to an optical nanofiber and the resulting scattering forces. For a suitably chosen orientation of the atomic dipole, the spontaneous emission pattern becomes asymmetric and a resonant Casimir-Polder force parallel to the fiber axis arises. For a simple model case, we show that such a lateral force is due to the interaction of the circularly oscillating atomic dipole moment with its image inside the material. With the Casimir-Polder energy being constant in the lateral direction, the predicted lateral force does not derive from a potential in the usual way. Our results have implications for optical force measurements on a substrate as well as for laser cooling of atoms in nanophotonic traps.

  1. Comment on "Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    Recently Guérout et al. [Phys. Rev. E 93, 022108 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.022108] advocated that the lossless plasma model has to be redefined as the limit of the Drude model when the relaxation parameter goes to zero. It was claimed that the previously used plasma model cannot correctly describe the Casimir pressure between two plates made of both nonmagnetic and magnetic metals and has to be replaced with the redefined one. We show that the suggested redefinition does not satisfy necessary physical requirements imposed on the dielectric permittivity. We also present a plausible explanation for the fact that the lossless plasma model describes the Casimir pressure correctly even though it does not match the optical and electrical properties of metals.

  2. Casimir energy between two parallel plates and projective representation of the Poincaré group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Takamaru; Matsunaga, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    The Casimir effect is a physical manifestation of zero point energy of quantum vacuum. In a relativistic quantum field theory, Poincaré symmetry of the theory seems, at first sight, to imply that nonzero vacuum energy is inconsistent with translational invariance of the vacuum. In the setting of two uniform boundary plates at rest, quantum fields outside the plates have (1 +2 )-dimensional Poincaré symmetry. Taking a massless scalar field as an example, we have examined the consistency between the Poincaré symmetry and the existence of the vacuum energy. We note that, in quantum theory, symmetries are represented projectively in general and show that the Casimir energy is connected to central charges appearing in the algebra of generators in the projective representations.

  3. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Decca, R. S.; Genet, C.; Jung, I. W.; Lambrecht, A.; Liscio, A.; López, D.; Reynaud, S.; Schnoering, G.; Voisin, G.; Zeng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy at normal pressure was performed by two different groups on the same Au-coated planar sample used to measure the Casimir interaction in a sphere-plane geometry. The obtained voltage distribution was used to calculate the separation dependence of the electrostatic pressure Pres(D ) in the configuration of the Casimir experiments. In the calculation it was assumed that the potential distribution in the sphere has the same statistical properties as the measured one, and that there are no correlation effects on the potential distributions due to the presence of the other surface. The result of this calculation, using the currently available knowledge, is that Pres(D ) does not explain the magnitude or the separation dependence of the difference Δ P (D ) between the measured Casimir pressure and the one calculated using a Drude model for the electromagnetic response of Au. We discuss in the conclusions the points which have to be checked out by future work, including the influence of pressure and a more accurate determination of the patch distribution, in order to confirm these results.

  4. Membrane actuation by Casimir force manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2008-04-01

    In our laboratory, we have been developing a practical demonstration of actuation by means of the Casimir force inspired by the capacitive detection approach originally described by Arnold, Hunklinger and Dransfeld (1972 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 43 584-7). In this paper, we first describe the mathematical challenges pertaining to the electrostatic calibration of our measuring device, which has been enhanced by our recently published results regarding the computation of electrostatic fields in axial systems, such as the long-standing classical circular capacitor problem. We also discuss our computational approach to the calculation of the Casimir force in our system, including our adoption of analytical descriptions of the dielectric functions of semiconductors extended to the case of axial geometries. We will illustrate how the original AHD apparatus has been drastically improved upon, for instance by means of modern nanopositioner technology, and we shall discuss our published experimental results on the dynamics of a vibrating membrane with a central disc, which have provided the first direct verification of the mechanical resonances of such a system. The emphasis of our effort is not exclusively directed to fundamental physics research but is focused on, and ultimately motivated by, our goal of identifying viable industrial applications leading to commercially marketable products based on Casimir force actuation. Therefore we conclude this paper by briefly discussing the contribution we believe these results will offer to some current technological problems, in particular in nanotechnology, including some thoughts on the possibility that dispersion forces may enable a new and rapidly expanding industry to develop in the near future.

  5. Ultrastrong optomechanics incorporating the dynamical Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Suh, J.; Blencowe, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit comprising a dc superconducting quantum interference device with a mechanically compliant arm embedded in a coplanar microwave cavity that realizes an optomechanical system with a degenerate or nondegenerate parametric interaction generated via the dynamical Casimir effect. For experimentally feasible parameters, this setup is capable of reaching the single-photon ultrastrong-coupling regime while simultaneously possessing a parametric coupling strength approaching the renormalized cavity frequency. This opens up the possibility of observing the interplay between these two fundamental nonlinearities at the single-photon level.

  6. Casimir effect for massive scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobassem, S.

    2014-10-01

    The energy-momentum tensor is used to introduce the Casimir force of the massive scalar field acting on a nonpenetrating surface. This expression can be used to evaluate the vacuum force by employing the appropriate field operators. To simplify our formalism, we also relate the vacuum force expression to the imaginary part of the Green function via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and Kubo's formula. This allows one to evaluate the vacuum force without resorting to the process of field quantization. These two approaches are used to calculate the attractive force between two nonpenetrating plates. Special attention is paid to the generalization of the formalism to D+1 spacetime dimensions.

  7. Critical Casimir force between inhomogeneous boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, Jerome; Santachiara, Raoul; Emig, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    To study the critical Casimir force between chemically structured boundaries immersed in a binary mixture at its demixing transition, we consider a strip of Ising spins subject to alternating fixed spin boundary conditions. The system exhibits a boundary phase transition as function of the relative amount of up and down boundary spins. This transition is associated with a sign change of the asymptotic force and a diverging length that sets the scale for the crossover between different universal force amplitudes. Using conformal field theory and a mapping to Majorana fermions, we obtain the universal scaling function of this crossover, and the force at short distances.

  8. Casimir Force in a One-Dimensional Cavity with Quasimode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shu-Mei; Tian, Tian; Yang, Hui; Zheng, Tai-Yu; Zhang, Xue; Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Li

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the Casimir force between a perfect reflective wall and a semitransparent wall in the laser cavity. Using the Fox—Li quasimode theory to describe the electromagnetic field in the laser cavity, the vacuum energy and the Casimir force are calculated. We compare our results to the force in the ideal situation and find it smaller in the dissipative cavity. We also find that the Casimir force decreases with the increase of the wall-wall distance and the decay rate of the quasimodes in the laser cavity.

  9. Effect of hydrogen-switchable mirrors on the Casimir force.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-23

    We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a hydrogen-switchable mirror. Hydrogen-switchable mirrors are shiny metals that can become transparent upon hydrogenation. Despite such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. This counterintuitive result can be explained by the Lifshitz theory that describes the Casimir attraction between metallic and dielectric materials. PMID:15024111

  10. Effect of hydrogen-switchable mirrors on the Casimir force

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Capasso, Federico

    2004-01-01

    We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a hydrogen-switchable mirror. Hydrogen-switchable mirrors are shiny metals that can become transparent upon hydrogenation. Despite such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. This counterintuitive result can be explained by the Lifshitz theory that describes the Casimir attraction between metallic and dielectric materials. PMID:15024111

  11. Lateral Casimir force between self-affine rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Masoudi, Amir Ali; Khorrami, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The effect of self-affine roughness on the lateral Casimir force between two plates is studied using a perturbative expansion method. The PWS (pairwise summation) method is applicable only at lateral correlation lengths much larger than the separation between two plates. The effect of the roughness parameters on the lateral Casimir force is investigated, and it is seen that this effect is significant, enabling one to tailor roughness parameters so that to obtain the desirable Casimir force and increase the yield of micro- or nano-electromechanical devices based on the vacuum fluctuations.

  12. Large-n approach to thermodynamic Casimir effects in slabs with free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H. W.; Grüneberg, Daniel; Hasenbusch, Martin; Hucht, Alfred; Rutkevich, Sergei B.; Schmidt, Felix M.

    2014-06-01

    The classical n-vector ϕ4 model with O (n) symmetrical Hamiltonian H is considered in a ∞2×L slab geometry bounded by a pair of parallel free surface planes at separation L. Standard quadratic boundary terms implying Robin boundary conditions are included in H. The temperature-dependent scaling functions of the excess free energy and the thermodynamic Casimir force are computed in the large-n limit for temperatures T at, above, and below the bulk critical temperature Tc. Their n =∞ limits can be expressed exactly in terms of the spectrum and eigenfunctions of a self-consistent one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. This equation is solved by numerical means for two distinct discretized versions of the model: in the first ("model A"), only the coordinate z across the slab is discretized and the integrations over momenta conjugate to the lateral coordinates are regularized dimensionally; in the second ("model B"), a simple cubic lattice with periodic boundary conditions along the lateral directions is used. Renormalization-group ideas are invoked to show that, in addition to corrections to scaling ∝L-1, anomalous ones ∝L-1lnL should occur. They can be considerably decreased by taking an appropriate g →∞ (Tc→∞) limit of the ϕ4 interaction constant g. Depending on the model A or B, they can be absorbed completely or to a large extent in an effective thickness Leff=L+δL. Excellent data collapses and consistent high-precision results for both models are obtained. The approach to the low-temperature Goldstone values of the scaling functions is shown to involve logarithmic anomalies. The scaling functions exhibit all qualitative features seen in experiments on the thinning of wetting layers of 4He and Monte Carlo simulations of XY models, including a pronounced minimum of the Casimir force below Tc. The results are in conformity with various analytically known exact properties of the scaling functions.

  13. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing L-Probe experiment and standard air data sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.

  14. Thermal and Nonthermal Signatures of the Unruh Effect in Casimir-Polder Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Noto, Antonio; Passante, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    We show that Casimir-Polder forces between two relativistic uniformly accelerated atoms exhibit a transition from the short distance thermal-like behavior predicted by the Unruh effect to a long distance nonthermal behavior, associated with the breakdown of a local inertial description of the system. This phenomenology extends the Unruh thermal response detected by a single accelerated observer to an accelerated spatially extended system of two particles, and we identify the characteristic length scale for this crossover with the inverse of the proper acceleration of the two atoms. Our results are derived separating at fourth order in perturbation theory the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction field to the Casimir-Polder interaction between two atoms moving in two generic stationary trajectories separated by a constant distance and linearly coupled to a scalar field. The field can be assumed in its vacuum state or at finite temperature, resulting in a general method for the computation of Casimir-Polder forces in stationary regimes.

  15. Casimir scaling and string breaking in G{sub 2} gluodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wellegehausen, Bjoern H.; Wipf, Andreas; Wozar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential energy between static charges in G{sub 2} gluodynamics in three and four dimensions. Our work is based on an efficient local hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm and a multilevel Luescher-Weisz algorithm with exponential error reduction to accurately measure expectation values of Wilson and Polyakov loops. Both in three and four dimensions we show that at intermediate scales the string tensions for charges in various G{sub 2} representations scale with the second order Casimir. In three dimensions Casimir scaling is confirmed within 4% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, 64, 77, 77{sup '}, 182, and 189 and in four dimensions within 5% for charges in representations of dimensions 7, 14, 27, and 64. In three dimensions we detect string breaking for charges in the two fundamental representations. The scale for string breaking agrees very well with the mass of the created pair of glue lumps. Close to the string breaking distance Casimir scaling between adjoint and defining representation is violated by 2.5%. The analytical prediction for the continuum string tension is confirmed for the defining representation in three dimensions.

  16. Casimir energies of cylinders: Universal function

    SciTech Connect

    Abalo, E. K.; Milton, K. A.; Kaplan, L.

    2010-12-15

    New exact results are given for the interior Casimir energies of infinitely long waveguides of triangular cross section (equilateral, hemiequilateral, and isosceles right triangles). Results for cylinders of rectangular cross section are rederived. In particular, results are obtained for interior modes belonging to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions (TM and TE modes). These results are expressed in rapidly convergent series using the Chowla-Selberg formula, and in fact may be given in closed form, except for general rectangles. The energies are finite because only the first three heat-kernel coefficients can be nonzero for the case of polygonal boundaries. What appears to be a universal behavior of the Casimir energy as a function of the shape of the regular or quasiregular cross-sectional figure is presented. Furthermore, numerical calculations for arbitrary right triangular cross sections suggest that the universal behavior may be extended to waveguides of general polygonal cross sections. The new exact and numerical results are compared with the proximity force approximation (PFA).

  17. Casimir Effect in Hemisphere Capped Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the vacuum densities for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling in background of a (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetime corresponding to a cylindrical tube with a hemispherical cap. A complete set of mode functions is constructed and the positive-frequency Wightman function is evaluated for both the cylindrical and hemispherical subspaces. On the base of this, the vacuum expectation values of the field squared and energy-momentum tensor are investigated. The mean field squared and the normal stress are finite on the boundary separating two subspaces, whereas the energy density and the parallel stress diverge as the inverse power of the distance from the boundary. For a conformally coupled field, the vacuum energy density is negative on the cylindrical part of the space. On the hemisphere, it is negative near the top and positive close to the boundary. In the case of minimal coupling the energy density on the cup is negative. On the tube it is positive near the boundary and negative at large distances. Though the geometries of the subspaces are different, the Casimir pressures on the separate sides of the boundary are equal and the net Casimir force vanishes. The results obtained may be applied to capped carbon nanotubes described by an effective field theory in the long-wavelength approximation.

  18. Three-body critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, T. G.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-04-01

    Within mean-field theory we calculate universal scaling functions associated with critical Casimir forces for a system consisting of three parallel cylindrical colloids immersed in a near-critical binary liquid mixture. For several geometrical arrangements and boundary conditions at the surfaces of the colloids we study the force between two colloidal particles in the direction normal to their axes, analyzing the influence of the presence of a third particle on that force. Upon changing temperature or the relative positions of the particles we observe interesting features such as a change of sign of this force caused by the presence of the third particle. We determine the three-body component of the forces acting on one of the colloids by subtracting the pairwise forces from the total force. The three-body contribution to the total critical Casimir force turns out to be more pronounced for small surface-to-surface distances between the colloids as well as for temperatures close to criticality. Moreover, we compare our results with similar ones for other physical systems such as three atoms interacting via van der Waals forces.

  19. Critical Casimir interactions between Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Labbé-Laurent, M; Dietrich, S

    2016-08-21

    Recently there has been strong experimental and theoretical interest in studying the self-assembly and the phase behavior of patchy and Janus particles, which form colloidal suspensions. Although in this quest a variety of effective interactions have been proposed and used in order to achieve a directed assembly, the critical Casimir effect stands out as being particularly suitable in this respect because it provides both attractive and repulsive interactions as well as the potential of a sensitive temperature control of their strength. Specifically, we have calculated the critical Casimir force between a single Janus particle and a laterally homogeneous substrate as well as a substrate with a chemical step. We have used the Derjaguin approximation and compared it with results from full mean field theory. A modification of the Derjaguin approximation turns out to be generally reliable. Based on this approach we have derived the effective force and the effective potential between two Janus cylinders as well as between two Janus spheres. PMID:27444691

  20. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  1. Observing the Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The thermal Casimir-Lifshitz force between two bodies held at different temperatures displays striking features that are absent in systems in thermal equilibrium. The manifestation of this force has been observed so far only in Bose-Einstein condensates close to a heated substrate, but never between two macroscopic bodies. Observation of the thermal Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium with conventional Casimir setups is very difficult because for experimentally accessible separations the thermal force is small compared to the zero-temperature quantum Casimir force unless prohibitively large temperature differences among the plates are considered. We describe an apparatus that allows for direct observation of the thermal force out of equilibrium for submicron separations and for moderate temperature differences between the plates.

  2. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A Alec; Davids, Paul S; Decca, Ricardo S; Aksyuk, Vladimir A; Dalvit, Diego A R; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  3. Critical Casimir forces between planar and crenellated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröndle, M.; Harnau, L.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study critical Casimir forces between planar walls and geometrically structured substrates within mean-field theory. As substrate structures, crenellated surfaces consisting of periodic arrays of rectangular crenels and merlons are considered. Within the widely used proximity force approximation, both the top surfaces of the merlons and the bottom surfaces of the crenels contribute to the critical Casimir force. However, for such systems the full, numerically determined critical Casimir forces deviate significantly from the pairwise addition formalism underlying the proximity force approximation. A first-order correction to the proximity force approximation is presented in terms of a step contribution arising from the critical Casimir interaction between a planar substrate and the right-angled steps of the merlons consisting of their upper and lower edges as well as their sidewalls.

  4. Weak Gravitational Wave and Casimir Energy of a Scalar Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, F.; Pirmoradian, R.; Parsabod, I.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effect of a weak gravitational field on the Casimir force between two ideal plates subjected to a massless minimally coupled field. It is the aim of this work to study the Casimir energy under a weak perturbation of gravity. Moreover, the fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor for a scalar field in de Sitter space-time are computed as well.

  5. Casimir force at both nonzero temperature and finite conductivity.

    PubMed

    Bordag, M; Geyer, B; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2000-07-17

    We find the combined effect of nonzero temperature and finite conductivity onto the Casimir force between real metals. Configurations of two parallel plates and a sphere (lens) above a plate are considered. Perturbation theory in two parameters (the relative temperature and the relative penetration depth of zero-point oscillations into the metal) is developed. Perturbative results are compared with computations. Recent improper computations based on the Lifshitz formula for the temperature Casimir force are discussed. PMID:10991326

  6. Opposites attract: a theorem about the Casimir Force.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Oded; Klich, Israel

    2006-10-20

    We consider the Casimir interaction between (nonmagnetic) dielectric bodies or conductors. Our main result is a proof that the Casimir force between two bodies related by reflection is always attractive, independent of the exact form of the bodies or dielectric properties. Apart from being a fundamental property of fields, the theorem and its corollaries also rule out a class of suggestions to obtain repulsive forces, such as the two hemisphere repulsion suggestion and its relatives. PMID:17155375

  7. Nanomechanical sensing of gravitational wave-induced Casimir force perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    It is shown by means of the optical medium analogy that the static Casimir force between two conducting plates is modulated by gravitational waves. The magnitude of the resulting force changes within the range of already existing small force metrology. It is suggested to enhance the effects on a Casimir force oscillator by mechanical parametric amplification driven by periodic illumination of interacting semiconducting boundaries. This represents a novel opportunity for the ground-based laboratory detection of gravitational waves on the nanoscale.

  8. Internally labeled Cy3/Cy5 DNA constructs show greatly enhanced photo-stability in single-molecule FRET experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA constructs labeled with cyanine fluorescent dyes are important substrates for single-molecule (sm) studies of the functional activity of protein–DNA complexes. We previously studied the local DNA backbone fluctuations of replication fork and primer–template DNA constructs labeled with Cy3/Cy5 donor–acceptor Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) chromophore pairs and showed that, contrary to dyes linked ‘externally’ to the bases with flexible tethers, direct ‘internal’ (and rigid) insertion of the chromophores into the sugar-phosphate backbones resulted in DNA constructs that could be used to study intrinsic and protein-induced DNA backbone fluctuations by both smFRET and sm Fluorescent Linear Dichroism (smFLD). Here we show that these rigidly inserted Cy3/Cy5 chromophores also exhibit two additional useful properties, showing both high photo-stability and minimal effects on the local thermodynamic stability of the DNA constructs. The increased photo-stability of the internal labels significantly reduces the proportion of false positive smFRET conversion ‘background’ signals, thereby simplifying interpretations of both smFRET and smFLD experiments, while the decreased effects of the internal probes on local thermodynamic stability also make fluctuations sensed by these probes more representative of the unperturbed DNA structure. We suggest that internal probe labeling may be useful in studies of many DNA–protein interaction systems. PMID:24627223

  9. Casimir Effect for the Piecewise Uniform String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Iver

    The Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string is calculated. In its simplest version the string consists of two parts I and II having in general different tension and mass density, but is always obeying the condition that the velocity of sound is equal to the velocity of light. The model, first introduced by Brevik and Nielsen in 1990, possesses attractive formal properties implying that it becomes easily regularizable by several methods, the most powerful one being the contour integration method.We also consider the case where the string is divided into 2N pieces, of alternating type-I and type-II material. The free energy at finite temperature, as well as the Hagedorn temperature, are found. Finally, we make some remarks on the relationship between this kind of theory and the theory of quantum star graphs, recently considered by Fulling et al..

  10. Casimir-Polder Force Reversal with Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh; Genov, Dentcho

    2010-10-01

    A promising system design aiming to demonstrate Casimir-Polder force (CPF) reversal is proposed. The constraints when using naturally available materials in designing the system with air as an intermediate medium is resolved by using artificial electromagnetic materials. The parametric space in terms of the plate's magnetic and dielectric plasma frequencies, gap thickness and temperature is investigated. The parametric domain for achieving CPF reversal is obtained. Furthermore, a simple analytical expression for the CPF is derived. The analytical expression accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. This study could possibly lead us to design of quantum levitation system, frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, etc.