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Sample records for cast duplex stainless

  1. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  2. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  3. Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

  4. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  5. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  6. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to providemore » an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.« less

  7. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  8. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  9. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 is comprised of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope®, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  10. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 comprises of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope{reg_sign}, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  11. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provides recommendations to insure accurate, repeatable and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  12. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provide recommendations to ensure accurate, repeatable, and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  13. Effect of thermal aging on the fatigue crack growth behavior of cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Xu-ming; Li, Shi-lei; Zhang, Hai-long; Wang, Yan-li; Wang, Xi-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal aging on the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of Z3CN20?09M cast duplex stainless steel with low ferrite content was investigated in this study. The crack surfaces and crack growth paths were analyzed to clarify the FCG mechanisms. The microstructure and micromechanical properties before and after thermal aging were also studied. Spinodal decomposition in the aged ferrite phase led to an increase in the hardness and a decrease in the plastic deformation capacity, whereas the hardness and plastic deformation capacity of the austenite phase were almost unchanged after thermal aging. The aged material exhibited a better FCG resistance than the unaged material in the near-threshold regime because of the increased roughness-induced crack closure associated with the tortuous crack path and rougher fracture surface; however, the tendency was reversed in the Paris regime because of the cleavage fracture in the aged ferrite phases.

  14. Clean cast steel technology. Determination of transformation diagrams for duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chumbley, S. L.

    2005-09-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma ( can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ( formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local

  15. Microstructural characteristics and corrosion behavior of a super duplex stainless steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2009-02-15

    The machining of super duplex stainless steel castings is usually complicated by the difficulty involved in maintaining the dimensional tolerances required for given applications. Internal stresses originating from the solidification process and from subsequent heat treatments reach levels that exceed the material's yield strength, promoting plastic strain. Stress relief heat treatments at 520 deg. C for 2 h are an interesting option to solve this problem, but because these materials present a thermodynamically metastable condition, a few precautions should be taken. The main objective of this work was to demonstrate that, after solution annealing at 1130 deg. C and water quenching, stress relief at 520 deg. C for 2 h did not alter the duplex microstructure or impair the pitting corrosion resistance of ASTM A890/A890M Grade 6A steel. This finding was confirmed by microstructural characterization techniques, including light optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion potential measurements in synthetic sea water containing 20,000 ppm of chloride ions were also conducted at three temperatures: 5 deg. C, 25 deg. C and 60 deg. C.

  16. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the

  17. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought

  18. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  19. Mechanical property and microstructural change by thermal aging of SCS14A cast duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Okano, Satoshi; Kuwano, Hisashi

    2006-03-01

    The aging behavior, especially saturation, of JIS SCS14A cast duplex stainless steels was investigated on the basis of the mechanical properties and microstructural changes during accelerated aging at 350 °C and 400 °C. The aging behavior of the materials mainly proceeds via two stages. During the first stage, the generation and concentration of the iron-rich and chromium-enriched phase in ferrite occurs by phase decomposition. The first stage corresponds to aging times of up to 3000 h at 400 °C. During the first stage, the ferrite hardness achieved is approximately 600 VHN, and the Charpy impact energy is almost saturated. During the second stage, the precipitated chromium-enriched phase aggregates and coarsens, and the G phase precipitation also occurs. The second stage corresponds to the aging times range of 3000-30 000 h at 400 °C. During the second stage, the ferrite hardness achieved is about 800 VHN; however, further hardening exceeding 600 VHN does not influence the Charpy impact energy.

  20. Sigma phase morphologies in cast and aged super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2009-08-15

    Solution annealed and water quenched duplex and super duplex stainless steels are thermodynamically metastable systems at room temperature. These systems do not migrate spontaneously to a thermodynamically stable condition because an energy barrier separates the metastable and stable states. However, any heat input they receive, for example through isothermal treatment or through prolonged exposure to a voltaic arc in the welding process, cause them to reach a condition of stable equilibrium which, for super duplex stainless steels, means precipitation of intermetallic and carbide phases. These phases include the sigma phase, which is easily identified from its morphology, and its influence on the material's impact strength. The purpose of this work was to ascertain how 2-hour isothermal heat treatments at 920 deg. C and 980 deg. C affect the microstructure of ASTM A890/A890M GR 6A super duplex stainless steel. The sigma phase morphologies were found to be influenced by these two aging temperatures, with the material showing a predominantly lacy microstructure when heat treated at 920 deg. C and block-shaped when heat treated at 980 deg. C.

  1. Effect of N addition on tensile and corrosion behaviors of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jinil; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Choi, Byunghak

    2003-08-01

    The effect of N addition on the microstructure, tensile, and corrosion behaviors of CD4MCU (Fe-25Cr-5Ni-2.8Cu-2Mo) cast duplex stainless steel was examined in the present study. The slow strain rate tests were also conducted at a nominal strain rate of 1 × 10-6/s in air and 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 solution for studying the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. It was observed that the volume fraction of austenitic phase in CD4MCU alloy varied from 38 to 59 pct with increasing nitrogen content from 0 to 0.27 wt. pct. The tensile behavior of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels, which tended to vary significantly with different N contents, appeared to be strongly related to the volume changes in ferritic and austenitic phases, rather than the intrinsic N effect. The improvement in the resistance to general corrosion in 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 aqueous solution was notable with 0.13 pct N addition. The further improvement was not significant with further N addition. The resistance to SCC of CD4MCU cast duplex stainless steels in 3.5 pct NaCl+5 pct H2SO4 aqueous solution, however, increased continuously with increasing N content. The enhancement in the SCC resistance was believed to be related to the volume fraction of globular austenitic colonies, which tended to act as barriers for the development of initial pitting cracks in the ferritic phase into the sharp ones.

  2. Conditions for the Efficient Crushing of the As-Cast Microstructure of 30Cr10Ni Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terčelj, Milan; Fazarinc, Matevz; Bombač, David; Kugler, Goran

    2010-12-01

    The hot-deformation behavior of as-cast 30Cr10Ni duplex stainless steel was investigated with the aim to understand the conditions better that lead to the occurrence of cracking. Because of the increased content of Cr, Ni, and C, the 30Cr10Ni ferrous alloy exhibits a complex microstructure, especially in the as-cast state in which, in addition to the ferrite, austenite, and sigma phases, carbides also are present; this leads to a very complex hot-deformation behavior. Hot-compression tests on specimens with an as-cast initial microstructure in the temperature range 1223 K (950 °C) to1573 K (1300 °C) and strain rates of 0.1 to 5.0 s-1 were carried out. To find the most appropriate sequence of initial hot-deformation steps for the effective crushing of the as-cast microstructure, a special experimental procedure was developed. The results indicate that in the temperature range 1423 K (1150 °C) to 1523 K (1250 °C), the as-cast microstructure exhibits increased workability, whereas below this temperature, the microstructure is prone to cracking. As such, the as-cast microstructure should be crushed in the high-temperature range to avoid the occurrence of cracking.

  3. Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Semiannual report, April--September 1992: Volume 7, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1993-07-01

    This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on longterm thermal embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from April--September 1992. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, tearing modulus, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  4. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was

  5. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation

  6. Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Semiannual report, October 1991--March 1992: Volume 7, No.1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term thermal embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from October 1991 to March 1992. Charpy-impact, tensile, and fracture toughness J-R curve data are presented for several heats of cast stainless steel that were aged 10,000-58,000 h at 290, 320, and 350{degree}C. The results indicate that thermal aging decreases the fracture toughness of cast stainless steels. In general, CF-3 steels are the least sensitive to thermal aging and CF-8M steels are the most sensitive. The values of fracture toughness J{sub IC} and tearing modulus for CF-8M steels can be as low as {approx}90 kJ/m{sup 2} and {approx}60, respectively. The fracture toughness data are consistent with the Charpy-impact results, i.e. unaged and aged steels that show low impact energy also exhibit lower fracture toughness. All steels reach a minimum saturation fracture toughness after thermal aging; the time to reach saturation depends on the aging temperature. The results also indicate that low-strength cast stainless steels are generally insensitive to thermal aging.

  7. Switch to duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

    1994-11-01

    Duplex stainless steels contain approximately equal proportions of ferrite and austenite. These stainless steels have become an established material of construction in the chemical process industries (CPI). Duplexes offer benefits over austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels because of their higher strength, and good toughness and ductility, in combination with equivalent resistance to general corrosion, as well as better resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Additionally, duplex materials have thermal-conductivity and thermal-expansion coefficients similar to those of ferritic materials, are tough at low (sub-zero) temperatures, and have a high resistance to erosion and abrasion. In some of the highly corrosive environments encountered in the CPI, the super duplex stainless steels offer cost-effective options not possible with the standard austenitic stainless steels. The initial applications were almost exclusively as heat exchanger tubing in water-cooled service. In recent times, duplex stainless steels have been used in the oil, gas, and chemical industries. Examples include service in sweet and mildly sour corrosive environments, on offshore platforms where weight savings can be realized, and as a replacement for standard austenitic stainless steel in chemical-processing plants.

  8. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  9. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5A Super Duplex Stainless Steel ( Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  10. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  11. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  12. Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

  13. Duplex stainless steels for osteosynthesis devices.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B; Giacomazzi, M; Roos, A

    1989-09-01

    The austenitic stainless steels used today for the manufacture of osteosynthesis devices are sensitive to crevice corrosion. In this study the corrosion properties of some duplex stainless steels were evaluated and compared to traditional austenitic stainless steels. According to our results the following ranking was established: 23Cr-4Ni less than AISI 316L less than ASTM F138 less than 22Cr-5Ni-3Mo less than 27Cr-31Ni-3.5Mo less than 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N. In particular the results showed that the high-performance 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel, with high molybdenum and nitrogen contents, can be considered not susceptible to crevice corrosion in the human body. The duplex stainless steels have also better mechanical properties at the same degree of cold working compared with austenitic stainless steels. Hence the 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel can be considered a convenient substitute of ASTM F138 for orthopedic and osteosynthesis devices. PMID:2777835

  14. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires. PMID:9228844

  15. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  16. A Duplex Stainless Steel for Chloride Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, N.; Kolts, J.; Flasche, L. H.

    1985-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of microstructural changes on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue resistance of a duplex stainless steel to chloride environments. The microstructural changes can be precipitation of phases such as sigma and carbides, or changes in the distribution of austenite and ferrite. The former can be important in hot forming operations while the latter is important in welding. The methods of minimizing these deleterious effects can sometimes be different from those used for austenitic stainless steel.

  17. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures. PMID:9713683

  18. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  19. New Economical 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Zixing; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhao, Junliang; Jiang, Laizhu

    2012-02-01

    New economical duplex stainless steels (DSSs) containing 19Cr-6Mn- xNi-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N ( x = 0.5 to 2.0) were developed, and the microstructure, impact property, and corrosion resistance of the alloys were studied. The ferrite content increases with the solution treatment temperature, but decreases with an increase in nickel. The sigma phase is not found precipitating in the alloys treated with solution from 1023 K to 1523 K (750 °C to 1250 °C). The low-temperature impact energy of the experimental alloys increases first and then decreases rapidly with an increase in nickel, which is mainly due to the martensite transformation with an increase in austenite. The alloys have a better mechanical property and pitting corrosion resistance than AISI 304. Among the designed DSS alloys, 19Cr-6Mn-1.3Ni-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.5Cu-0.2N is found to be an optimum alloy with proper phase proportion, a better combination of mechanical strength and elongation, and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with those of the other alloys.

  20. In vivo behavior of a high performance duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; De Santis, G; Gatti, A M; Roos, A; Zaffe, D

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo investigation of a new high molybdenum and nitrogen duplex stainless steel (25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N) has been performed. Cylindrical pins and specially developed devices, to test in static conditions the in vivo localized corrosion resistance, made of this new duplex steel and of a common austenitic stainless steel were implanted in rabbit's femurs for 6 and 12 months. After sacrifice, SEM observations and EDS microanalyses to detect metallic ion release were carried out on the femur sections surrounding the pins. Morphologic observations with stereoscope and SEM were performed on the metallic surfaces of the special devices in order to detect the presence of localized corrosion. Both ion release and localized corrosion were observed for the specimens made of austenitic stainless steel, but not for those made of 25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N duplex stainless steel. PMID:10148344

  1. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  2. Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S.

    1993-12-31

    The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

  3. Corrosion induced by cathodic hydrogen in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this work new results about the influence of cathodic hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel are described. The results were discussed by taking into account hydrogen charged samples and without hydrogen. The corrosion resistance to pitting was qualified with the polarization curves. The conclusion is that, hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 duplex stainless steel. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen action was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  4. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  5. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  6. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  7. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  8. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  9. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-04-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  10. Duplex stainless steel—Microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debold, Terry A.

    1989-03-01

    Literature describing the microstructure of austenitic-ferritic stainless steels is reviewed, including phases which can be deleterious, such as σ and ά. The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Carpenter Technology's 7-Mo PLUSsr stainless (UNS S32950) demonstrate the resistance of this material to the formation of these phases and their deleterious effects. This material was evaluated in the annealed and welded conditions and after extended thermal treatments to simulate boiler and pressure vessel service.

  11. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. PMID:26952459

  12. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex stainless steel and maraging steel in sea water: Effect of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanne, P.; Festy, D.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrogen embrittlement behavior of cast super duplex stainless steel and cast maraging steel was examined as a function of electrode potential and hydrostatic pressure, i.e, the water depth, in synthetic sea water using fracture mechanics bolt-loaded wedge-opening (WOL) specimens. The experimental variables investigated included: (1) Electrode potential: free corrosion potential and cathodic protection; (2) Hydrostatic pressure: ambient and 10 MPa corresponding depth of 1,000 meters. The duplex stainless-,steel was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement with initial stress intensity values of 30 MPa{radical}m < K{sub i} < 45 MPa{radical}m at ambient pressure. However, at pressure of 10 MPa slight crack growth was observed at open circuit potential and the crack growth was enhanced by the cathodic protection. The maraging steel was susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement in all tests, with all examined initial stress intensity values, K{sub i} < 36 MPa{radical}m. At the open circuit potential the crack growth rate was almost independent of the pressure. Cathodic protection enhanced crack growth and lowered the threshold stress intensity value at ambient as well as at 10 MPa pressure and the crack growth rate increased clearly as pressure increased from 0.1 MPa to 10 MPa. According to these experimental results the combined effect of cathodic protection and hydrostatic pressure must be taken into consideration when designing new offshore structures and equipment especially for deep sea application.

  14. Magnetic characterisation of duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, I.

    2006-02-01

    Heat treatment-induced microstructural processes were studied by different non-destructive magnetic and mechanical material testing methods in the present work. A commercial SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel was investigated. This alloy contains about 40% metastable ferrite which can decompose to a sigma phase and secondary austenite due to heat treatment. All the mechanical, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties are strongly influenced by this microstructural changes. This study had two aims: to understand better the kinetics of the ferrite decomposition process and to study the application possibilities of the applied magnetic measurements. This paper presents an application possibility of the nonlinear harmonics analysis measurement and demonstrates the possibility to find a quantitative correlation between measured harmonics and mechanical properties obtained from destructive tests.

  15. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  16. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not ..cap alpha..'. An FCC phase, similar to the M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  18. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  20. Laboratory testing on welded duplex stainless steel line pipe internal corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Condanni, D.; Barteri, M.

    1996-12-01

    Duplex 22% Cr stainless steel (ss) was recommended, at the basic design stage, as the most cost-performing material for intrafield flowlines conveying multiphase sour production from subsea well-heads to production platform. Due to aggressiveness of the production environment [H{sub 2}S partial pressure (pH{sub 2}S) = 14 mbar, CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) = 40 bar, NaCl = 100 g/l, T = 135 C], and partially to the lack of definitive information on the corrosion resistance of welded duplex, some laboratory testing was deemed necessary and performed. The paper presents testing results dealing with localized corrosion and sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of base material and girth-welded seamless tubes 22% Cr duplex, both wrought and centrifugally cast. The last one was considered because of possible procurement difficulties of the first one when required in small quantities and large diameters as in the case of production manifolds. It is concluded that the material can be used in the test environment as girth weld line pipe provided suitable welding technique is adopted.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of material degradation of thermally aged duplex stainless steels using chemical immersion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y. S.; Shoji, T.

    1996-12-01

    In order to develop a non-destructive evaluation technique for detection of thermal aging embrittlement of duplex stainless steels, corrosion tests on unaged and aged specimens of cast duplex stainless steels were performed in 5 wt% HCl solution. After the immersion test, the dissolution rate of specimens was obtained by a dissolved depth measurement with an AFM. In the measurements of dissolved depths, a replica technique was used for easier handling and also for a possible field application of the AFM analysis method. Changes in corrosion properties by aging measured in terms of the dissolved depth after the immersion were compared with the changes in mechanical properties by aging embrittlement. The changes in corrosion properties of unaged and aged specimen were analyzed in relation to the microstructural change by thermal aging. Based upon insights on the immersion test results and the comparison of the changes in corrosion properties and mechanical properties, a possible non-destructive detection and evaluation technique for thermal aging embrittlement by spinodal decomposition is proposed.

  2. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  3. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah-Rousset, N. Ben; Chaouachi, M. A.; Chellouf, A.

    1996-04-01

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an “unsensitizing” effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  4. Influence of thermal aging on the reactivity of duplex stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, T.; Rhouma, A. Ben; Sidhom, H.; Braham, C.; Ledion, J.

    2000-08-01

    The annealing of large cast pieces in duplex stainless steel (SS) and the different heat cycles resulting from repairs involve significant structural changes characterized by carbide and intermetallic phase precipitation. This yields to lower local corrosion resistance in sea water due to changes in the local content of alloying elements. The precipitation of chromium carbide affects the resistance to the intergranular corrosion and the repassivation behavior. The eutectoidal decomposition of ferritic phase into regenerated austenite and in sigma phase ( α → γ r + σ) results in weakening the resistance to pit nucleation in synthetic sea water. In contrast, such precipitation will not have any significant effect when the treatment temperature is high enough to involve a rapid rehomogenization of depleted zones and ensure a self-healing.

  5. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  6. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  7. Plastic anisotropy in a superplastic duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.L.; Bate, P.S.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the plastic anisotropy in uniaxial tension of the duplex stainless steel, SAF2304, have been made at room temperature and under conditions where the material was superplastic. There was significant plastic anisotropy in both types of deformation and there were some similarities between the low and high temperature variations with tensile axis orientation. Although it was possible to model the high temperature anisotropy using a grain boundary sliding model, the assumed distribution of sliding boundaries was considered to be unrealistic. This, together with aspects of microstructural and textural development, indicated that deformation was principally occurring by intragranular slip with a significant contribution caused by mechanical inhomogeneity in the two-phase material.

  8. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  9. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-22

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 deg. C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  10. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  11. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  12. Effect of Nanosize Yittria and Tungsten Addition to Duplex Stainless Steel During High Energy Planetary Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.; Shashanka, R.; Chaira, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this present investigation, elemental powders of duplex stainless steel composition (Fe-18Cr-13Ni) with 1 wt. % nano yittria and tungsten were milled separately in dual drive planetary mill (DDPM) for 10 h to fabricate yittria dispersed and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel powders. The milled powder samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the size, morphology and phase evolution during milling. The gradual transformation from ferrite to austenite is evident from XRD spectra during milling. The crystallite size and lattice strain of yittria dispersed duplex stainless steel after 10 h milling were found to be 7 nm and 1.1% respectively. The crystallite size of tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel was 5 nm. It has been observed from SEM analysis that particles size has been reduced from 40 to 5 μm in both cases. Annealing of 10 h milled powder was performed at 750°C for 1 h under argon atmosphere to study phase transformation in both yittria and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel. The XRD analysis of annealed stainless steel depicts the phase transformation from α-Fe to γ-Fe with the formation of oxides of Y,Fe and Cr. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis was conducted by heating the milled powder from room temperature to 1200°C under argon atmosphere to investigate the thermal analysis of both the stainless steel powders.

  13. Phase Separation in Lean-Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, David A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, George A.; Tucker, Julie D.

    2015-08-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C to 538°C. New lean-grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 h). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α' separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205, were used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard-grade DSS alloy 2205 but inferior to the lean-grade alloy 2003 in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrate that the degree of α-α' separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205 and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, although precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.

  14. Cracking of duplex stainless steel due to dissolved hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.H.; Altstetter, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Ferallium 255 duplex stainless steel was cathodically precharged with hydrogen at 265 C in a molten salt electrolyte. Sustained load tests were carried out in air at 0 C, 25 C and 50 C with average hydrogen contents from 3 to 15 wt ppm. The DC potential drop method was calibrated with optical measurements to continuously monitor the crack position and allow calculation of crack velocity and stress intensity. The crack velocity vs stress intensity (K) curves generally rose gradually over a large range in K and had definite thresholds for subcritical crack growth. Second and third stages were not always clearly delineated. Threshold stress intensities decreased as hydrogen content increased. An identifiable stage 2 occurred most often for alloys containing about 10 wt ppm dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth velocities generally increased with increasing temperature or hydrogen content. As the dissolved hydrogen increased, the fracture mode changed from microvoid coalescence (MVC) to microcrack coalescence (MCC) with some tearing ridges. At high hydrogen content, both ferrite and austenite phases showed brittle morphology, which was identical to the fracture surface of the uncharged specimens tested in hydrogen gas at 108 kPa pressure. Comparing the embrittling effect of internal hydrogen with that of external hydrogen it is found that the threshold stress intensity in hydrogen gas at 1 atm is lower than that at the highest internal hydrogen concentration (15 wt ppm).

  15. Phase Separation in Lean Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkel, D.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, Jr., George A.; Tucker, Julie

    2015-08-19

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C - 538°C. New lean grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 hours). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α’ separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205 were used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard grade DSS alloy, 2205, but inferior to the lean grade alloy, 2003, in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrates that the degree of α-α’ separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205, and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, though precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.

  16. Phase Separation in Lean Grade Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garfinkel, D.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Young, Jr., George A.; Tucker, Julie

    2015-08-19

    The use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in nuclear power generation systems is limited by thermal instability that leads to embrittlement in the temperature range of 204°C - 538°C. New lean grade alloys, such as 2101, offer the potential to mitigate these effects. Thermal embrittlement was quantified through impact toughness and hardness testing on samples of alloy 2101 after aging at 427°C for various durations (1-10,000 hours). Additionally, atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized in order to observe the kinetics of α-α’ separation and G-phase formation. Mechanical testing and APT data for two other DSS alloys, 2003 and 2205 weremore » used as a reference to 2101. The results show that alloy 2101 exhibits superior performance compared to the standard grade DSS alloy, 2205, but inferior to the lean grade alloy, 2003, in mechanical testing. APT data demonstrates that the degree of α-α’ separation found in alloy 2101 closely resembles that of 2205, and greatly exceeds 2003. Additionally, contrary to what was observed in 2003, 2101 demonstrated G-phase like precipitates after long aging times, though precipitates were not as abundant as was observed in 2205.« less

  17. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  18. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  19. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  20. Development of nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling followed by pressureless sintering

    SciTech Connect

    R, Shashanka Chaira, D.

    2015-01-15

    Nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are prepared by planetary milling of elemental Fe, Cr and Ni powder for 40 h and then consolidated by conventional pressureless sintering. The progress of milling and the continuous refinement of stainless steel powders have been confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels is calculated by Kissinger method using differential scanning calorimetry and is found to be 159.24 and 90.17 KJ/mol respectively. Both duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are consolidated at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C in argon atmosphere to study microstructure, density and hardness. Maximum sintered density of 90% and Vickers microhardness of 550 HV are achieved for duplex stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C for 1 h. Similarly, 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness are achieved for ferritic stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesized duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling • Calculated activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels • Studied the effect of sintering temperature on density, hardness and microstructure • Duplex stainless steel exhibits 90% sintered density and microhardness of 550 HV. • Ferritic stainless steel shows 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness.

  1. Advanced Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Components

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shingledecker, J.P.; Evans, N.D.; Pollard, M.J.

    2008-10-09

    In July of 2002, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to develop and commercialize new cast stainless steels invented and initially tested on a prior CRADA. This CRADA is a direct follow-on project to CRADA ORNL-99-0533 for diesel engine exhaust component and gas turbine engine structural component applications. The goal of this new CRADA was to develop and commercialize the newly discovered cast stainless steels (primarily CF8C-Plus) with improved performance and reliability, as lower-cost upgrade alternatives to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys.

  2. Ferrite and austenite phase identification in duplex stainless steel using SPM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Lin, M. C.; Qiao, L. J.; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2013-12-01

    It can be challenging to properly identify the phases in electro-polished duplex stainless steel using optical microscopy or other characterization techniques. This letter describes magnetic force microscopy to properly identify the phases in electropolished duplex stainless steel. The results are also confirmed with the current sensing atomic force and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy. The difference in topography heights between the ferrite and austenite phases is attributed to the different etching rates during electropolishing, although these phases have different mechanical properties. The current in the austenite is much higher compared with the ferrite, thus current sensing atomic force microscopy can also be used to properly identify the phases.

  3. Transformation and Precipitation Kinetics in 30Cr10Ni Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazarinc, Matevz; Terčelj, Milan; Bombač, David; Kugler, Goran

    2010-09-01

    To improve the microstructure during casting, hot forming, and heat treatment of 30Cr10Ni duplex stainless steel, accurate data on the precipitation and transformation processes at high temperatures are needed. In this article, the precipitation and transformation processes at various aging times in the temperature range 873 K to 1573 K (600 °C to 1300 °C) were studied. The 30Cr10Ni ferrous alloy contains a relatively large amount of Cr, Ni, and C, which results in a complex microstructure. In addition to the ferrite, austenite, and sigma phase, the M23C6 and MC carbides were also observed in the microstructure. The precipitation of the sigma phase was observed after just 3 minutes of aging, and after 30 minutes of aging at approximately 1053 K (780 °C), its fraction exceeded 40 pct. An intensive austenite-to-ferrite transformation was observed above 1423 K (1150 °C). Optical microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), as well as micro-indentation hardness, hardness, impact toughness, and tensile tests, were carried out to evaluate the obtained microstructures of aged samples.

  4. Effect of aging on impact properties of ASTM A890 Grade 1C super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo Forti, Leonardo Rodrigues Nogueira

    2008-02-15

    Super duplex stainless steels in the solution annealed condition are thermodynamically metastable systems which, when exposed to heat, present a strong tendency to 'seek' the most favorable thermodynamic condition. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the microstructure of a super duplex stainless steel in the as cast and solution annealed conditions, and to determine the influence of aging heat treatments on its impact strength, based on Charpy impact tests applied to V-notched test specimens. The sigma phase was found to begin precipitating at heat treatment temperatures above 760 deg. C and to dissolve completely only above 1040 deg. C, with the highest peak concentration of this phase appearing at close to 850 deg. C. Heat treatments conducted at temperatures of 580 deg. C to 740 deg. C led to a reduction of the energy absorbed in the Charpy impact test in response to the precipitation of a particulate phase with particle sizes ranging from 0.5 {mu}m to 1.0 {mu}m, with a chromium and iron-rich chemical composition.

  5. Beneficial Effect of Microalloyed Rare Earth on S Segregation in High-Purity Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Ma, Xiaocong; Jin, Miao; Wang, Jianfeng; Long, Hongjun; Mao, Tianqiao

    2016-01-01

    S segregation at the α/ γ interface remains in duplex stainless steel with only 10 ppm S. The interfacial brittle tearing appears during hot deformation due to S segregation. Minor rare earth additions can effectively eliminate the S contamination. In particular, RE enrichment at the α/ γ interface indicating its microalloying effect is an important cause.

  6. Electrochemical Behavior of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel in NaCl Solution with Different Chromate Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Dong, C. F.; Cheng, X. Q.; Xiao, K.; Li, X. G.

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in NaCl solution with different chromate contents were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Mott-Schottky analysis, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of chromate on passivity and pitting behavior of stainless steel was also studied. The results showed that pitting susceptibility as well as semiconducting properties of passive film is heavily dependent on the chromate concentration. There exists a critical chromate value (about 0.03 M in 1 M NaCl solutions) below which the pitting corrosion on the stainless steel would be inhibited and above which it would be accelerated.

  7. Influence of sigma-phase formation on the localized corrosion behavior of a duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhe, K. M.; Kain, V.; Madangopal, K.; Gadiyar, H. S.

    1996-08-01

    Because of their austenitic-ferritic microstructures, duplex stainless steels offer a good combination of mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. However, heat treatments can lower the mechanical strength of these stainless steels as well as render them susceptible to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and pitting corrosion. In this study, a low-carbon (0.02%) duplex stainless steel is subjected to various heat treatments at 450 to 950 °C for 30 min to 10 h. The heat-treated samples then undergo ASTM IGC and pitting corrosion tests, and the results are correlated with the microstructures obtained after each heat treatment. In the absence of Cr23C6 precipitation, σ-phase precipitates render this duplex stainless steel susceptible to IGC and pitting corrosion. Even submicroscopic σ-phase precipitates are deleterious for IGC resistance. Longer-duration heat treatments (at 750 to 850 °C) induce chromium diffusion to replenish the chromium-depleted regions around the σ-phase precipitates and improve IGC resistance; pitting resistance, however, is not fully restored. Various mechanisms of σ-phase formation are discussed to show that regions adjacent to σ-phase are depleted of chromium and molybdenum. The effect of chemical composition (pitting resistance equivalent) on the pitting resistance of various stainless steels is also noted.

  8. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  9. Laser Shock Processing with Different Conditions of Treatment on Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, E.; Rubio-Gonzalez, C.; Chavez-Chavez, A.; Gomez-Rosas, G.

    2015-06-01

    The laser shock processing (LSP) has been developed as an effective alternative to traditional methods for improvement of metallic materials properties and as surface treatment to metals. Duplex stainless steel is a material that has a microstructure formed by two phases, with approximately equal amounts of each one. This stainless steel has wide applications in different fields like shipping, petrochemical, and chemical industries. We present results of the LSP performance using two pulse density configurations of 2500 and 5000 pulses/cm2, both of them at laser irradiation of 532 and 1064 nm (keeping approximately constant power density), in order to treat in under water-jet the surface of 2205 duplex stainless steel samples without coating. A flat mirror and a converging lens is used to deliver 400 mJ/pulse, (5 ns FWHM, 1.1 mm spot diameter with 532 nm wavelength) and 850 mJ/pulse, (6 ns FWHM, 1.5 mm spot diameter with 1064 nm wavelength) laser pulse produced by 10 Hz Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A motor-controlled x-y precision stage is used, for sweep the treated zone on sample. The use of two wavelengths with approximately the same power density is an effective way for obtaining high compressive residual stresses (~90% of the yield stress). An improvement of hardness (12-25%) at the surface of 2205 duplex stainless steel due to LSP is presented.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal aging embrittlement of duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1987-06-01

    Microstructural characteristics of long-term-aged cast duplex stainless steel specimens from eight laboratory heats and an actual component from a commercial boiling water reactor have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) techniques. Three precipitate phases, i.e., Cr-rich ..cap alpha..' and the Ni- and Si-rich G phase, and ..gamma../sub 2/ austenite, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged specimens. For CF-8 grade materials, M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbides were identified on the austenite-ferrite boundaries as well as in the ferrite matrix for aging at greater than or equal to 450/sup 0/C. It has been shown that Si, C, and Mo contents are important factors that influence the kinetics of the G-phase precipitation. However, TEM and APFIM analyses indicate that the embrittlement for less than or equal to400/sup 0/C aging is primarily associated with Fe and Cr segregation in ferrite by spinodal decomposition. For extended aging, e.g., 6 to 8 years at 350 to 400/sup 0/C, large platelike ..cap alpha..' formed by nucleation and growth from the structure produced by the spinodal decomposition. The Cr content appears to play an important role either to promote the platelike ..cap alpha..' (high Cr content) or to suppress the ..cap alpha..' in favor of ..gamma../sub 2/ precipitation (low Cr). Approximate TTT diagrams for the spinodal, ..cap alpha..', G, ..gamma../sub 2/, and the in-ferrite M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ have been constructed for 250 to 450/sup 0/C aging. Microstructural modifications associated with a 550/sup 0/C reannealing and a subsequent toughness restoration are also discussed. It is shown that the toughness restoration is associated primarily with the dissolution of the Cr-rich region in ferrite.

  11. Corrosion failure of duplex stainless steel equipment in a PVC plant

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, M.; Potgieter, G.

    2000-05-01

    After <9 months of operation in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) manufacturing plant, alloy 2205 duplex stainless steel (UNS 31803) columns and spiral heat exchangers (HXs) were corroding and cracking. The columns were repaired and remained in service but the HXs needed to be replaced. Candidate materials for the HXs were assessed, and it was found that the super-austenitic alloys containing 6% molybdenum would be more appropriate for this application.

  12. Application of electron backscattered diffraction to cleavage fracture in duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Marrow, T.J.

    1999-05-21

    The mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) are generally superior to conventional austenite or ferrite grades. DSSs can have yield strengths twice the austenite grades, while retaining good ductility and toughness properties. Commercial wrought duplex stainless steels, either plates or rod, are processed by hot rolling followed by a solution annealing treatment to optimize the austenite-ferrite ratio and dissolve any pre-existing secondary phases. Processing may lead to a significant anisotropy in mechanical properties. For example, the tensile properties in cold-rolled sheet of duplex stainless steel (22Cr5Ni) reveals anisotropy of strength, i.e., the transverse direction tensile strength is 7.3% higher than tensile strength in the rolling direction (RD). It was also shown in a study of the effect of crack orientation on the impact properties of the same steel, that when the crack was oriented parallel to the direction of elongation of the austenite phase, the crack could grow along the more brittle ferrite phase for a longer distance before encountering the more ductile austenite. This decreased impact toughness. These are examples of microstructure texture. Crystallographic texture may also have an effect on properties that are related to specific crystallographic planes; such as brittle cleavage and stress corrosion cracking. This paper describes the application of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study cleavage fracture and crystal texture in age-hardened DSS.

  13. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  14. Hardening of aged duplex stainless steels by spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Auger, P; Blavette, D

    2004-06-01

    Mechanical properties, such as hardness and impact toughness, of ferrite-containing stainless steels are greatly affected by long-term aging at intermediate temperatures. It is known that the alpha-alpha' spinodal decomposition occurring in the iron-chromium-based ferrite is responsible for this aging susceptibility. This decomposition can be characterized unambiguously by atom probe analysis, allowing comparison both with the existing theories of spinodal decomposition and the evolution of some mechanical properties. It is then possible to predict the evolution of hardness of industrial components during service, based on the detailed knowledge of the involved aging process. PMID:15233853

  15. Evaluation of manual ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.

    1984-05-01

    Two studies have attempted to determine the degree of inspectability of centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe. In one study, Westinghouse examined the reliability of ultrasonic test methods in the detection of mechanical fatigue cracks. The second study was an NRC-sponsored Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) test conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The Westinghouse study reported that 80% detection was achieved for mechanical fatigue cracks having 20% throughwall depth. The PNL study reported that less than 30% detection was achieved for thermal fatigue cracks ranging from 5% to 50% through-wall. A cooperative program between PNL and Westinghouse was conducted to resolve the differences between the two studies. The program was designed as a limited round robin. Detection experiments were performed on samples from both the PNL and Westinghouse studies. The data reported here indicate that flaw type (thermal fatigue versus mechanical fatigue) was a significant factor in detection. Mechanical fatigue cracks were more easily detected than thermal fatigue cracks. The data conclusively show that manual ultrasonic inspection cannot size flaws in cast stainless steel material. The study recommends that ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel pipe be continued because cracks caused by some failure mechanisms (i.e., mechanical fatigue cracks) have proven to be detectable.

  16. Study of Aging Effects in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Using Thermoelectric Power Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, N.; Ruiz, A.; Carreón, H.; Medina, A.; Sánchez, A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements have been used as an effective method for evaluating the metallurgical state of various alloys. In the steel industry, some fabrication processes promote phase transformation and second phase precipitations which affect the material properties. Assessment of mechanical properties is critical in order to ensure quality of components. This work was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of the aging state of 2205 duplex stainless steel on TEP values. Commercial 2205 duplex steel was isothermally aged at 650 °C 700 °C and 900 °C at different aging times. TEP measurement technique was applied as a non destructive assessment technique to characterize the aging kinetics of the aged 2205 duplex stainless steel, hardness Rockwell (RC) and Charpy impact test were preformed to observe the effect of aging time on the specimens. Metallographic analysis was used to monitor phase transformation and sigma phase precipitation caused by the spinodal decomposition process of ferrite into secondary austenite and sigma phase. Results indicate that that the TEP is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by the aging treatments.

  17. STUDY OF AGING EFFECTS IN 2205 DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL USING THERMOELECTRIC POWER MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, N.; Ruiz, A.; Carreon, H.; Medina, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-02-22

    Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements have been used as an effective method for evaluating the metallurgical state of various alloys. In the steel industry, some fabrication processes promote phase transformation and second phase precipitations which affect the material properties. Assessment of mechanical properties is critical in order to ensure quality of components. This work was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of the aging state of 2205 duplex stainless steel on TEP values. Commercial 2205 duplex steel was isothermally aged at 650 deg. C 700 deg. C and 900 deg. C at different aging times. TEP measurement technique was applied as a non destructive assessment technique to characterize the aging kinetics of the aged 2205 duplex stainless steel, hardness Rockwell (RC) and Charpy impact test were preformed to observe the effect of aging time on the specimens. Metallographic analysis was used to monitor phase transformation and sigma phase precipitation caused by the spinodal decomposition process of ferrite into secondary austenite and sigma phase. Results indicate that that the TEP is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by the aging treatments.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel subjected to hydrostatic extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, P.; Adamczyk-Cieślak, B.; Mizera, J.; Pachla, W.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2014-07-01

    The nanostructure and mechanical properties of ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steel subjected to hydrostatic extrusion were examined. The refinement of the structure in the initial state and in the two deformation states (ε = 1.4 and ε = 3.8) was observed in an optical microscope (OM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicate that the structure evolved from microcrystalline with a grain size of about 4 μm to nanocrystalline with a grain size of about 150 nm in ferrite and 70 nm in austenite. The material was characterized mechanically by tensile tests performed in the two deformation states. The ultimate strength appeared to increase significantly compared to that in the initial deformation stages, which can be attributed to the grain refinement and plastic deformation. The heterogeneity observed in microregions results from the dual-phase structure of the steel. The results indicate that hydrostatic extrusion is a highly potential technology suitable for improving the properties of duplex steels. - Highlights: • Duplex stainless steel was hydro extruded to a total strain of 3.8 • After the last stage of deformation heterogeneous structure was obtained in the material • As a result of stresses non-diffusive transformation γ→α’ occurred in the material • Nanometric (sub)grains were obtained in the austenite regions.

  19. Influence of Sintering under Nitrogen Atmosphere on Microstructures of Powder Metallurgy Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, C.; Martin, F.; Blanco, Y.; de Tiedra, M. P.; Aparicio, M. L.

    2009-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (SS) obtained through powder metallurgy (PM) from austenitic AISI 316L and ferritic AISI 430L powders were mixed in different amounts to obtain a biphasic structure with an austenite/ferrite ratio of 50/50, 65/35, and 85/15. Prepared powders were compacted at 750 MPa and sintered in N2-H2 (95 pct-5 pct) at 1250 °C for 1 hour. Some samples sintered in vacuum were taken as references. Optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis of X-rays were used for microstructural characterization. Powder metallurgy base materials, AISI 430L and 316L, showed a single lamellar constituent after sintering in nitrogen. A mixed constituent was identified in PM duplex SS sintered in nitrogen and in vacuum. However, coarse and fine lamellar constituents were only present in PM duplex SS sintered in nitrogen. The effects of annealing solution heat treatment (1150 °C) on microstructures were evaluated. Homogeneous structures were obtained for the PM base materials, while for PM duplex SS, annealing dissolved lamellar constituents but mixed constituent were still present.

  20. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  1. The Mechanical Behavior of a 25Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasebikan, B. A.; Akisanya, A. R.; Deans, W. F.

    2013-02-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a candidate material for production tubing in oil and gas wells and subsea pipelines used to transport corrosive hydrocarbon fluids. The suitability of this material for high temperature applications is examined in this article. The uniaxial tensile properties are determined for a 25Cr SDSS over a range of temperature relevant to high pressure-high temperature oil and gas wells. It is shown that there is a significant effect of temperature on the uniaxial tensile properties. Elevated temperature was shown to reduce the Young's modulus and increase the strain hardening index; temperature effects on these two parameters are usually neglected in the design of subsea pipelines and oil well tubulars, and this could lead to wrong predictions of the collapse pressure. The manufacturing process of the super duplex tubular did not lead to significant anisotropy in the hardness and the ultimate tensile and uniaxial yield strengths.

  2. Internal friction study of decomposition kinetics of SAF 2507 type duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smuk, O.; Smuk, S.; Hanninen, H.; Jagodzinski, Yu.; Tarasenko, O.

    1999-01-08

    During the last decade, super duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with increased nitrogen content have been an object of intensive studies. Present work is devoted to the study of the peculiarities of {delta}-ferrite decomposition in SAF 2507 type duplex steel, and redistribution of nitrogen between ferrite and austenite phases in a wide temperature range by means of internal fraction (IF). Unlike local methods of electron microscopy or engineering methods of hardness or impact toughness testing, which give basically information on the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the internal friction technique allows to study the state of solid solution and kinetics of changes in the relative amounts of ferrite and austenite phases during thermal treatment.

  3. Distinguishing between chi and sigma phases in duplex stainless steels using potentiostatic etching

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.M.L.E.M.; Visser, P.E. de . Physical Metallurgy Div.); Cornish, L.A. )

    1993-12-01

    A color interference film etching technique based on the principle of potentiostatic etching has been developed to distinguish, by optical metallography, between Cr-rich sigma and Mo-rich chi phases as well as with simultaneous identification of the ferrite and austenite phases in duplex stainless steels. The optical metallography results are confirmed by semiquantitative energy dispersive spectrometry analysis and back-scattered electron imaging. The technique is relatively simple and rapid, and makes use of low voltages and a hot etchant. Results have shown distinctively the sigma, chi, ferrite, and austenite phases, and enable observation of the microstructural development, morphology, and kinetics of formation of the phases in duplex alloys. The method, by giving excellent color contrast between sigma and chi, also facilitates quantitative image analysis of the sigma and chi volume fractions.

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of centrifugally cast stainless steel: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, P.

    1987-06-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) was investigated. The difficulties of inspecting CCSS material stem from elastic anisotropy that hampers defect location and severe attenuation caused by coarse grains within the structure that makes defect detection difficult. During this investigation, grain effects on ultrasonic wave propagation were investigated, techniques for identifying different grain structures were developed, and compensation methods for grain effects were addressed. Each step is explained analytically based on relevant theory and proven experimentally. Experiments were conducted on specially designed test specimens: angled blocks, polygonal blocks, wedge blocks, and calibration blocks. Wave parameters such as phase velocity, skew angle, energy velocity, attenuation, beam width, amplitude variation patterns, and frequency dependence on grain structures were all measured with these specimens. CCSS grain structures investigated were equiaxed-fine grains, columnar-dendritic grains, and coarse grains. For comparison purposes, additional types of material such as static-cast stainless steel, forged stainless steel, and carbon steel materials were also investigated. Longitudinal wave, horizontally and vertically polarized shear wave modes were all considered in experiments. The use of an automated ultrasonic system was also demonstrated for grain structure identification.

  5. Investigation of the stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel weldments in sour conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, M.J.; Bradshaw, R.; Cottis, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Duplex stainless steels are increasingly widely used in the oil and gas production industry for a variety of applications. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of wrought material is reasonably well understood, and limits of use are placed upon these alloys in NACE MR0175, for sour service. However, the SCC behavior of weldments is less well understood, and this has limited the use of welded material in H{sub 2}S-containing conditions. The SCC resistance of duplex stainless steels is influenced by their microstructure as well as their chemical composition and the objective of the research reported in this paper is to investigate the SCC behavior of welded 22%Cr and 25%Cr alloys in a simulated oilfield environment. Mechanized orbital TIG was used to butt weld 168mm outside diameter tubes. The shielding gas contained nitrogen additions of up to 10% (in the case of UNS S32760) and 7% (in the case of UNS S31803). Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was conducted on cross-weld specimens in sodium chloride solutions overpressured with varying partial pressures of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The SSRT results, in terms of ductility parameters and secondary cracking, are correlated with fractography and metallurgical examination of crack morphology in order to establish the effects of the welding process and the nitrogen content of the shielding gas. It was found that the nitrogen uptake from the shielding gas has a detrimental effect on SCC resistance of duplex stainless steel weldments. While this effect is only modes, it is in direct contrast to the beneficial effect it has on pitting corrosion resistance.

  6. Role of Austenite in Brittle Fracture of Bond Region of Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshihiko; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Kuroda, Toshio

    Weld simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was performed to investigate the mechanism by which austenite affects the toughness of super duplex stainless steel. Thermal cycles of various peak temperatures in the range from 1373 K to 1673 K corresponding to the HAZ were applied to SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel specimens. Charpy impact test was carried out using the specimens after the weld simulation, and the fracture surfaces were observed by SEM using three-dimensionally reconstruction technique. Austenite content decreased with increasing the peak temperature when the peak temperature exceeded 1473 K and the impact value decreased with increasing the peak temperature and decreasing the austenite content. The thermal cycle of the peak temperature of 1673 K corresponding to weld bond region caused decreasing of austenite content which was 22% lower than that of the base metal. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was measured. As a result the temperature increased rapidly in the weld bond region, the peak temperature of which exceeded 1623 K by the grain growth of ferrite matrix occurring subsequently to the completely dissolution of austenite. The morphology of the fracture surfaces after impact testing at 77 K showed cleavage fracture of ferrite. The {100} orientations of cleavage fracture facets were measured using three-dimensional images of the fracture surfaces and the results were visualized as the orientation color maps. The results showed that there were cleavage fractures consisting of a few facets parallel to each other. It was considered that a few facets existed in one ferrite grain. It was concluded that Widmanstätten austenite divided the large fracture into smaller cleavage facets in a ferrite grain and then suppressed the degradation of bond toughness of duplex stainless steel.

  7. Effect of 475 C embrittlement on fractal behavior and tensile properties of a duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hilders, O.A.; Ramos, M.; Pena, N.D.; Saenz, L.

    1999-02-01

    The fractal dimension variations of several tension surfaces of a duplex stainless steel broken at room temperature has been studied after several aging treatments performed at 475 C for 1, 2, 6.5, 12, 24, 40, and 120 h. A dimple type of fracture mode was observed for small aging times and transgranular as well as dimple rupture for 24, 40, and 120 h of aging. The higher the time of aging is, the smaller the fractal dimension and the true fracture strain. An expected reduction of the strength with the time of aging was observed.

  8. Effect of copper on active dissolution and pitting corrosion of 25% Cr duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garfias-Mesias, L.F.; Sykes, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were made of the influence of Cu on pitting behavior and active dissolution of 25% Cr duplex stainless steels (DSS) in chloride-containing neutral and acid solutions. Alloys with increased Cu content showed higher pitting potentials (E{sub p}) in 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. In HCl, the current density in the active state also was lower for the Cu-containing alloys. However, the critical pitting temperature (CPT) in ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) was not improved significantly by addition of Cu. Pitting in all environments took place preferentially in the ferrite phase.

  9. σ- Phase precipitation in a duplex stainless steel: an APFIM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swens, J. J.; Kolster, B. H.

    1991-04-01

    Structural transformations at elevated temperatures severely damage the mechanical and corrosion resistant properties of duplex stainless steels. One of the most deleterious transformations is the precipitation of σ-phase. In order to gain a better understanding of this precipitation an AP-FIM analysis has been performed on a γ-σ phase boundary. Compositions for the austenite, the σ-phase and the γ-σ phase boundary, have been obtained as well as a γ-σ phase boundary composition profile. A first attempt has been made to use the N 2+ distribution in order to verify the troublesome N-Si deconvolution.

  10. Effect of Preaging Deformation on Aging Characteristics of 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rao, A. G.; Sarkar, R.; Kashyap, B. P.; Prabhu, N.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, precipitation of sigma (σ) phase was investigated over the temperature range of 700-850 °C in undeformed and deformed (60% cold rolling) samples of 2507 super duplex stainless steel. The fraction of sigma phase formed as a result of the transformation α → σ + γ2 increases with increasing time and temperature. The increase in sigma phase leads to increase in yield strength and decrease in ductility. Preaging deformation leads to accelerated precipitation of sigma phase. The activation energy for sigma phase precipitation in deformed sample is found to be lower than that in undeformed sample.

  11. EBSD investigation of the microstructure and texture characteristics of hot deformed duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cizek, P; Wynne, B P; Rainforth, W M

    2006-05-01

    The microstructure and crystallographic texture characteristics were studied in a 22Cr-6Ni-3Mo duplex stainless steel subjected to plastic deformation in torsion at a temperature of 1000 degrees C using a strain rate of 1 s(-1). High-resolution EBSD was successfully used for precise phase and substructural characterization of this steel. The austenite/ferrite ratio and phase morphology as well as the crystallographic texture, subgrain size, misorientation angles and misorientation gradients corresponding to each phase were determined over large sample areas. The deformation mechanisms in each phase and the interrelationship between the two are discussed. PMID:16774517

  12. Microstructural Evolution in 2101 Lean Duplex Stainless Steel During Low- and Intermediate-Temperature Aging.

    PubMed

    Maetz, Jean-Yves; Cazottes, Sophie; Verdu, Catherine; Danoix, Frédéric; Kléber, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The microstructural evolution of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) during isothermal aging from room temperature to 470 °C was investigated using thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements to follow the kinetics, atom probe tomography, and transmission electron microscopy. Despite the low Ni, Cr, and Mo contents, the lean DSS was sensitive to α-α' phase separation and Ni-Mn-Si-Al-Cu clustering at intermediate temperatures. The time-temperature pairs characteristic of the early stages of ferrite decomposition were determined from the TEP kinetics. Considering their composition and locations, the clusters are most likely G phase precursors. PMID:26940550

  13. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  14. Application of martensitic, modified martensitic and duplex stainless steel bar stock for completion equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Montani, R.

    1998-12-31

    Martensitic and duplex stainless steel tubing are commonly used for oil and gas applications containing CO{sub 2}. Completion equipment manufacturing requires use of solid round bar or heavy wall hollows. Material properties for this stock are not identical in all cases. Material properties as well as corrosion characteristics are discussed for 13Cr, 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo and 25Cr alloys. Corrosion testing of modified or Enhanced 13Cr solid bar stock, UNS S41425 and other compositions in H{sub 2}S-Cl{sup {minus}} and pH is reported in coupled and uncoupled condition. Corrosion testing of various super duplex bar stock at various H{sub 2}S-chlorides and temperature in CO{sub 2} environment is reported. Impact value requirements, welding issues and special consideration required for these alloys for completion equipment is discussed. Modified 13Cr and Super Duplex Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) are readily available, however, availability of completion equipment raw material compatible with these OCTG is limited.

  15. Role of structural orientation on the susceptibility of 2205 duplex stainless steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharrfeddin, A.; Musa, S. M.; Elshawesh, F. M.

    2012-09-01

    Relationship between the microstructure directionality of delta ferrite and austenite islands and the crack morphology, crack velocity and time to failure of the mechanically notched duplex stainless samples tested in hydrogen bearing environment was assessed in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. A number of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel samples were mechanically notched in perpendicular and transverse directions with respect to the austenite and ferrite rolling direction were subjected to slow tensile strain at 21.2 nm/s while undergoing cathodic charging in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. In order to assess the role of hydrogen content on embrittlement the hydrogen charging was conducted at various cathodic potentials of -800 mV/SCE to -1300 mV/SCE at two different pH (6.7 and 3.5). Generally, the longitudinal samples showed lower susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement compared with the transverse samples. The results also confirm that long austenite island can act as an obstacle for propagated crack owing to its low diffusivity and high solubility to the hydrogen.

  16. Effect of ageing on precipitation and impact energy of 2101 economical duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei; Jiang Laizhu Hu Jincheng; Song Hongmei

    2009-01-15

    The impact energy and microstructure of a thermally aged 2101 duplex stainless steel with composition of Fe-21.4Cr-1.2Ni-5.7Mn-0.23 N-0.31Mo were studied. The results showed that the room temperature impact energy of specimens decreased gradually with ageing temperature up to 700 deg. C and then increased with aging over 700 deg. C. The minimum value of impact energy was 37 J after 700 deg. C aging, which was only 34% of that for as-annealed specimens. For specimens aged at 700 deg. C, the room temperature impact energy decreased significantly after 3 min and was halved after 10 min. Fractographs showed that, with increasing aging time, the fracture morphology changed from fibrous fracture to transgranular and intragranular fracture. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that many precipitates were distributed along {alpha}/{gamma} and {alpha}/{alpha} interfaces. The precipitates were extracted and confirmed by X-ray diffraction to be Cr{sub 2}N. Therefore, it can be concluded that precipitation of Cr{sub 2}N is the main reason for the decrease of impact energy in aged 2101 duplex stainless steel.

  17. Precipitation of Chromium Nitrides in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Pettersson, Rachel F. A.; Wessman, Sten

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of chromium nitrides during cooling from temperatures in the range 1373 K to 1523 K (1100 °C to 1250 °C) has been studied for the super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750). Characterization with optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy was combined to quantify the precipitation process. Primarily Cr2N nitrides were found to precipitate with a high density in the interior of ferrite grains. An increased cooling rate and/or an increased austenite spacing clearly promoted nitride formation, resulting in precipitation within a higher fraction of the ferrite grains, and lager nitride particles. Furthermore, formation of the meta-stable CrN was induced by higher cooling rates. The toughness seemed unaffected by nitrides. A slight decrease in pitting resistance was, however, noticed for quenched samples with large amounts of precipitates. The limited adverse effect on pitting resistance is attributed to the small size (~200 nm) of most nitrides. Slower cooling of duplex stainless steels to allow nitrogen partitioning is suggested in order to avoid large nitrides, and thereby produce a size distribution with a smaller detrimental effect on pitting resistance.

  18. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations in the HAZ of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J

    2001-08-15

    Ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of a gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld in 2205 duplex stainless steel are observed in real-time using spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) with high intensity synchrotron radiation. A map showing the locations of the {delta} and {gamma} phases with respect to the calculated weld pool dimensions has been constructed from a series of SRXRD scans. Regions of liquid, completely transformed {gamma}, a combination of partially transformed {gamma} with untransformed {delta}, and untransformed {delta}+{gamma} are identified. Analysis of each SRXRD pattern provides a semi-quantitative definition of both the {delta}/{gamma} phase balance and the extent of annealing which are mapped for the first time with respect to the calculated weld pool size and shape. A combination of these analyses provides a unique real-time description of the progression of phase transformations in the HAZ. Using these real-time observations, important kinetic information about the transformations occurring in duplex stainless steels during heating and cooling cycles typical of welding can be determined.

  19. Effects of aging temperature on G-phase precipitation and ferrite-phase decomposition in duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoka, T.; Nomoto, A.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Soneda, N.

    2012-12-01

    G-phase precipitation and ferrite-phase decomposition in a cast duplex stainless steel (DSS) aged at 623-723 K for up to 8000 h were investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). Large sample volume was observed in every APT experiment, which yielded significantly statistical results. The number density of G-phase precipitates tended to be high and their sizes were small at lower aging temperatures. G-phase precipitates grew during prolonged isothermal aging. The concentrations of nickel, silicon, manganese and molybdenum in G-phase precipitates tended to increase as the precipitates grew. Heterogeneous distributions of alloying elements within G-phase precipitates were observed. An interesting positional relationship of G-phase precipitates with dislocations was revealed. Regarding the ferrite-phase decomposition, local chromium concentrations in the ferrite phase varied fast at higher aging temperatures. Good correlation between the variation of local chromium concentrations and aging conditions was revealed, which indicates that the variation can be estimated for arbitrary aging conditions. Representative distances between chromium-enriched and chromium-diluted regions were long at higher aging temperatures. Time exponent of the representative distances of ferrite-phase decomposition as well as the size of G-phase precipitates increased with aging temperatures.

  20. Quality control and assurance program for duplex stainless steels, field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhjian, M.; Richard, D.; Nemzer, A.

    1994-12-31

    Duplex stainless steels have proven to be cost effective alternatives to more highly alloyed materials in chloride environments in which conventional 300 series austenitic stainless steels suffer from stress corrosion cracking. However, improper welding of these alloys can cause significant reduction in their corrosion resistance. Close monitoring of welding during fabrication and tight quality control is necessary to ensure that sound weld metal microstructure is obtained with optimum corrosion resistance. One of FMC`s primary applications for duplex stainless steels has been in large scrubbers units in chemical processing plants. In the fabrication of these scrubbers, training of the fabricators and welders was necessary as a part of the total quality control and assurance program. Corrosion testing was performed on coupons removed from each welding procedure qualification test plate and from run-off tabs removed from production welds. The corrosion tests were performed in ferric chloride. Although ferric chloride is not a realistic service environment for these alloys, it has been widely used for screening purposes and successfully indicates the presence of undesirable microstructures. Two deposited weld microstructures were identified as being most susceptible to pitting in the samples examined. These were areas with high ferrite containing precipitates and reheated areas of multiple pass welds with a high secondary austenite content. Field experience showed that relying only on monitoring and controlling the welding heat input, preheat and interpass temperatures, may not be sufficient for ensuring the corrosion resistance of the finished weldment and additional corrosion testing should be done. The materials tested were weldments of alloy 2205 (UNS S31803) and alloy 255 (LTNS S32550).

  1. Challenges and Capabilities for Inspection of Cast Stainless Steel Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-12-31

    Studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the utility, effec¬tiveness and limitations of NDE techniques as related to the inservice inspec¬tion of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes results from recent assessments built upon early work with low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) coupled with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) signal processing, and has subsequently evolved into an approach using low frequency phased array technology as applied from the outer diameter surface of the piping. In addition, eddy current examination as performed from the inner diameter surface of these piping welds is also reported. Cast stainless steel (CSS) pipe specimens were examined that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and have inside/outside surface geometrical conditions that simulate several PWR primary piping weldments and configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were also examined to understand inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of UT responses from different locations. The advanced UT methods were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at low frequencies and composite volumetric images of the samples were generated with 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz arrays. Eddy current studies were conducted on the inner diameter surface of these piping welds using a commercially available instrument and a

  2. Stainless Steel Round Robin Test: Centrifugally cast stainless steel screening phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Burck, E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (CCSSRRT). The CCSSRRT is the first phase of an effort to investigate and improve the capability and reliability of NDE inspections of light water reactor piping systems. This phase was a screening test to identify the most promising procedures presently available for CCSS. The next phase will be an in-depth program to evaluate the capability and reliability of inservice inspections (ISI) for piping. In the CCSSRRT, 15 centrifugally cast stainless steel pipe sections containing welds and laboratory-grown thermal fatigue cracks in both columnar and equiaxed base material were used. These pipe specimens were inspected by a total of 18 teams from Europe and the United States using a variety of NDE techniques, mostly ultrasonic (UT). The inspections were carried out at the team's facilities and included inspections from both sides of the weld and inspections restricted to one side of the weld. The results of the CCSSRRT make it apparent that a more detailed study on the capability and reliability of procedures to inspect stainless steel materials is needed to better understand the specific material and flaw properties and how they affect the outcome of an inspection.

  3. Effect of temperature and pH on cavitation erosion of super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Leung, L.K.

    1996-10-01

    Cavitation erosion characteristics of super duplex stainless steel (S32760) and austenitic stainless steel (S30400) in 3.5% NaCl solution with controlled temperature and pH value in the range of 10 to 70 C and pH 3 to 11 have been studied by means of a 20kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak to peak amplitude of 50 {micro}m. The erosion resistance of other stainless steels including S31803 and S31603 was also investigated for comparison purpose. Plots of cumulative erosion mass loss per unit area versus temperature for S32760 and S30400 indicate that the degree of erosion initially increases as the temperature increases from 10 C to 50 C and passes through a maximum at about 50 C and then decreases with further increase in temperature to 70 C. Results of cumulative erosion versus pH indicate that the degree of erosion of S32760 is more sensitive to pH value than that of S30400 at 23 C.

  4. NDE Assessments of Cast Stainless Steel Reactor Piping Components

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Mathews, Royce

    2006-02-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on developing and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) inspection techniques as related to the in-service inspection of primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes recent developments and results from assessments of three different NDE approaches including an ultrasonic phased array inspection methodology, an eddy current testing technique and a low-frequency ultrasonic inspection methodology coupled with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots, were used for assessing the inspection methods. ET studies were conducted on the inner diameter (ID) surface of piping specimens while the ultrasonic inspection methods were performed from the outer diameter (OD) surface of the specimens. The ET technique employed a ZETEC MIZ-27SI Eddy Current instrument and a ZETEC Z0000857-1 cross point spot probe with an operating frequency of 250 kHz. On some samples where noise levels were high, degaussing of the sample resulted in significant improvements. The phased array approach was implemented using an RD Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1 MHz and composite volumetric images of the samples were generated. The low-frequency ultrasonic method employs a zone-focused, multi-incident angle; inspection protocol (operating at 250-450 kHz) coupled with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for improved signal-to-noise and advanced imaging

  5. Microtexture of constituent phases in a heavily warm- rolled and annealed duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, M.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.

    2015-04-01

    Evolution of microtexture during isothermal annealing of a heavily warm-rolled Fe- 0.08%C-24.18%Cr-10.5%Ni duplex stainless steel (DSS) having approximately equal volume fraction of ferrite and austenite was investigated in the present work. The DSS was warm-rolled to ∼90% reduction in thickness at three different temperatures, namely, 225°C, 425°C and 625°C followed by isothermal annealing at 1175°C for different length of time. Austenite showed pure metal or copper type texture at different warm-rolling temperatures. In contrast, the texture of ferrite in different warm-rolled DSS revealed the presence of RD (RD//<110>) and ND (ND//<111>) fibers. The annealing texture of austenite showed retention of the deformation texture components while ferrite revealed strong RD-fiber.

  6. Decomposition and Precipitation Process During Thermo-mechanical Fatigue of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Anja; Kolmorgen, Roman; Kubena, Ivo; Kulawinski, Dirk; Kruml, Tomas; Biermann, Horst

    2016-05-01

    The so-called 748 K (475 °C) embrittlement is one of the main drawbacks for the application of ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steels (DSS) at higher temperatures caused by a spinodal decomposition of the ferritic phase. Thermo-mechanical fatigue tests performed on a DSS in the temperature range between 623 K and 873 K (350 °C and 600 °C) revealed no negative influence on the fatigue lifetime. However, an intensive subgrain formation occurred in the ferritic phase, which was accompanied by formation of fine precipitates. In order to study the decomposition process of the ferritic grains due to TMF testing, detailed investigations using scanning and transmission electron microscopy are presented. The nature of the precipitates was determined as the cubic face centered G-phase, which is characterized by an enrichment of Si, Mo, and Ni. Furthermore, the formation of secondary austenite within ferritic grains was observed.

  7. Microhardness and Surface Integrity in Turning Process of Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) for Different Cutting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolczyk, G.; Nieslony, P.; Legutko, S.

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to identify microhardness of surface integrity (SI) after turning with wedges of coated sintered carbide. SI is important in determining corrosion resistance, and also in fatigue crack initiation. The investigation included microhardness analyses in dry and wet machining of duplex stainless steel. The microhardness of SI for various cutting speeds was compared. It has been shown that wet cutting leads to the decrease of SI hardening depth, while increasing the rounded cutting edge radius of the wedge increases the maximum microhardness values and the hardening depth. An infinite focus measurement machine has been used for the rounded cutting edge radius analysis. The study has been performed within a production facility during the production of electric motor parts and deep-well pumps as well as explosively cladded sheets.

  8. Effect of Continuous Cooling on Secondary Phase Precipitation in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel ZERON-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, Irene; Bassani, Paola; Brunelli, Katya; Breda, Marco; Ramous, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    The precipitation of secondary phases in super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) is a subject of great relevance owing to their dangerous effects on both mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. This paper examines the effect of continuous cooling after solution annealing treatment on secondary phase precipitation in the ZERON-100 SDSS. It considers the influence of cooling rate on volume fraction, morphology and chemical composition. It has been found that the formation of sigma and chi phases can be avoided only at cooling rates higher than 0.7 °C/s. In addition, at the lowest cooling rate the sigma phase amount approaches the equilibrium value, but the chi phase amount remains significantly low.

  9. Corrosion of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment in Chloride Medium Containing Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, P. J.; Singh Raman, R. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Raman, R.

    2008-11-01

    Influence of changes in microstructure caused due to welding on microbiologically influenced corrosion of a duplex stainless steel was studied by exposing the weldment and parent metal to chloride medium containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Identically prepared coupons (same area and surface finish) exposed to sterile medium were used as the control. Etching-type attack was observed in the presence of SRB, which was predominant in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weldment. The anodic polarization studies indicated an increase in current density for coupon exposed to SRB-containing medium as compared to that obtained for coupon exposed to sterile medium. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations after anodic polarization revealed that the attack was preferentially in the ferrite phase of HAZ of the weldment, whereas it was restricted to the austenite phase of the parent metal.

  10. Effects of Solution Annealing Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of the Super Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Seob; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the active dissolution of super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) at various solution annealing temperatures. The active dissolutions of the α-phase and γ-phase were compared, and the effects of the surface area ratio on the active dissolutions of both phases were investigated. There were two peaks in the active-passive transition region in the potentiodynamic test in the modified green-death solution. The two peaks changed as the solution annealing temperature was increased from 1050 to 1150 °C. The solution annealing temperature difference affected the critical anodic current densities. This provides useful information for determining the appropriate solution annealing temperature in the modified green-death solution for SDSS.

  11. Embrittlement of a Duplex Stainless Steel in Acidic Environment Under Applied Cathodic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen-induced degradation of mechanical properties of a duplex stainless steel in 0.1N H2SO4 solution has been studied under in situ cathodic charging conditions. Significant reductions in percentage of elongation, toughness, and time to failure were noticed due to the ingress of hydrogen into the material at various applied cathodic potentials in the range of -200 to -800 mV (SCE). Cleavage fractures were identified mainly in the ferritic phases. Crack growth was observed to be inhibited by the austenite phase. However, depending on the severity of the environment, both the ferrite and austenite phases could be embrittled. At less negative potentials, presence of surface film and low hydrogen fugacity seemed to control hydrogen ingress in the metal. Addition of thiosulfate to the acidic solution further degraded the mechanical properties of the steel at the applied cathodic potential.

  12. Direct observations of sigma phase growth and dissolution in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Babu, S.S.; Specht, E.D.

    2007-10-10

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  13. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Growth and Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S; Specht, E

    2005-06-14

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  14. Critical stress for stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in sour environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, A.; Kanamaru, T.; Ogawa, H.

    1996-08-01

    The critical stress for initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a duplex stainless steel (DSS) in a sour environment was investigated using three stress application techniques: constant-strain, constant-load, and slow strain rate testing (SSRT). The critical stresses for SCC initiation as determined by detailed observation of the alloy surface after the three tests were in good agreement when a newly proposed index was adopted to express the SSRT results combined with crack observations for each test. The effect of cold work (CW) on SCC and pitting resistance of the DSS also was studied. CW did not accelerate SCC when initiation was controlled by pitting. The critical stress for SCC initiation increased with increasing CW and the resultant increase in yield stress.

  15. Application of Taguchi method in Nd-YAG laser welding of super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, W.M.; Man, H.C.; Ip, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    This investigation is aimed at achieving a near 50-50 % ferrite-austenite ratio of laser welded super duplex stainless steel, UNS S 32760 (Zeron 100). Bead-on-plate welding has been carried out using a 2 kW Nd-YAG laser with 3 different kinds of wave form, Continuous, Sine and Square wave. The weld metals were examined with respect to the phase volume contents by X-ray diffraction. Laser welding involved a large number of variables, interaction and levels of variables. Taguchi Method was selected and used to reduce the number of experimental conditions and to identify the dominant factors. The optimum combinations of controllable factors were found from each set of wave form. The optimum 40-60% ferrite-austenite ratio were realized on some of the combination parameter groups after using the Parameter Design method.

  16. Mechanism of hot-rolling crack formation in lean duplex stainless steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-hui; Li, Jing-yuan; Wang, Yi-de

    2016-04-01

    The thermoplasticity of duplex stainless steel 2205 (DSS2205) is better than that of lean duplex steel 2101 (LDX2101), which undergoes severe cracking during hot rolling. The microstructure, microhardness, phase ratio, and recrystallization dependence of the deformation compatibility of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), Thermo-Calc software, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the phase-ratio transformations of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were almost equal under the condition of increasing solution temperature. Thus, the phase transformation was not the main cause for the hot plasticity difference of these two steels. The grain size of LDX2101 was substantially greater than that of DSS2205, and the microhardness difference of LDX2101 was larger than that of DSS2205. This difference hinders the transfer of strain from ferrite to austenite. In the rolling process, the ferrite grains of LDX2101 underwent continuous softening and were substantially refined. However, although little recrystallization occurred at the boundaries of austenite, serious deformation accumulated in the interior of austenite, leading to a substantial increase in hardness. The main cause of crack formation is the microhardness difference between ferrite and austenite.

  17. Effect of Plastic Deformation on the Corrosion Behavior of a Super-Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renton, Neill C.; Elhoud, Abdu M.; Deans, William F.

    2011-04-01

    The role of plastic deformation on the corrosion behavior of a 25Cr-7Ni super-duplex stainless steel (SDSS) in a 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride solution at 90 °C was investigated. Different levels of plastic strain between 4 and 16% were applied to solution annealed tensile specimens and the effect on the pitting potential measured using potentiodynamic electrochemical techniques. A nonlinear relationship between the pitting potential and the plastic strain was recorded, with 8 and 16% causing a significant reduction in average E p, but 4 and 12% causing no significant change when compared with the solution-annealed specimens. The corrosion morphology revealed galvanic interaction between the anodic ferrite and the cathodic austenite causing preferential dissolution of the ferrite. Mixed potential theory and the changing surface areas of the two phases caused by the plastic deformation structures explain the reductions in pitting potential at certain critical plastic strain levels. End-users and manufacturers should evaluate the corrosion behavior of specific cold-worked duplex and SDSSs using their as-produced surface finishes assessing in-service corrosion performance.

  18. Electrochemical evaluation of a corrosion fatigue failure mechanism in a duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoudt, M. R.; Ricker, R. E.

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion fatigue studies on smooth and precracked samples indicated that two duplex stainless steels would have similar service lives in a paper-processing environment; but, in service, one of these alloys has exhibited premature failures. Since corrosion fatigue experiments had proven unable to detect this failure mechanism, electrochemical measurements and slow strain rate tensile tests were used to evaluate four alloy composition-dependent failure mechanism hypotheses. No significant differences were found in the dissolution rates or hydrogen fugacities produced when mechanical processes expose bare surface, and slow strain rate tensile tests found no indication of a difference in cracking susceptibility for the same hydrogen fugacity. Electrochemical experiments found that pits nucleate in one phase of the duplex microstructure at lower potentials in the failure prone alloy, but do not propagate beyond the microscopic dimensions of this phase. These microstructurally limited “micropits” were found to nucleate fracture in slow strain rate tensile tests, and examination of a service failure confirmed the presence of microscopic pits at crack initiation sites. The premature failures are attributed to the lower pitting resistance of the failure prone alloy, and the failure of laboratory experiments to predict this behavior is attributed to the slow kinetics of pit nucleation in these experiments. A laboratory testing methodology is suggested that will ensure detection of similar susceptibilities in future corrosion fatigue testing programs.

  19. Influence of microstructure on the flow behavior of duplex stainless steels at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Balancin, O.; Hoffmann, W.A.M.; Jonas, J.J.

    2000-05-01

    Three kinds of duplex stainless steel, with different ferrite-to-austenite ratios, were deformed in torsion over the temperature range 900 C to 1,200 C; the corresponding microstructural evolution was observed and correlated with the deformation conditions. The shapes of the high-temperature flow curves depend strongly on the volume fractions of the phases, the characteristics of the ferrite-austenite interface, and the active softening mechanism. At low volume fractions of austenite, the mechanical behavior is determined by the ferrite matrix and the flow curves are typical of materials that soften by continuous dynamic recrystallization. When the volume fraction of austenite is increased, coherent {gamma} particles distributed within the grains and at the grain boundaries hinder the deformation of the softer {alpha} matrix, increasing both the yield and the peak stress. These peaked flow curves are characterized by rapid work hardening followed by extensive flow softening; under these conditions, the hard austenite particles become aligned with the deformation direction after large strains. AT high volume fractions of austenite ({approximately}50%), the material tends to form a duplex structure, with the flow curves displaying extended work-hardening and work-softening regions; however, a drastic decrease is observed in ductility because of the dissimilar plastic behaviors of the two phases.

  20. Evaluation of Oxidation and Hydrogen Permeation of Al Containing Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Thad M.; Korinko, Paul; Duncan, Andrew

    2005-06-17

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings are typically applied to these steel to retard hydrogen ingress. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate the potential for intentional alloying of commercial 300-series stainless steels to promote hydrogen permeation resistant oxide scales. Previous research on the Cr- and Fe-oxide scales inherent to 300-series stainless steels has proven to be inconsistent in effecting permeation resistance. The approach undertaken in this research was to add aluminum to the 300-series stainless steels in an attempt to promote a pure Al-oxide or and Al-rich oxide scale. Aloxide had been previously demonstrated to be an effective hydrogen permeation barrier. Results for 304L and 347H alloys doped with Al in concentration from 0.5-3.0 wt% with respect to oxidation kinetic studies, cyclic oxidation and characterization of the oxide scale chemistry are reported herein. Gaseous hydrogen permeation testing of the Al-doped alloys in both the unoxidized and oxidized (600 C, 30 mins) conditions are reported. A critical finding from this work is that at concentration as low as 0.5 wt% Al, the Al stabilizes the ferrite phase in these steels thus producing duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructures. As the Al-content increases the amount of measured ferrite increases thus resulting in hydrogen permeabilities more closely resembling ferritic steels.

  1. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  2. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  3. CO{sub 2} laser welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels (the effect of argon-nitrogen assist-gas mixtures)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Reed, R.C.; Camyab, A.

    1996-12-31

    Continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser welds have been fabricated on duplex and super duplex stainless steel substrates at a power of 3.5 kW. The work has examined the influence of Ar-N{sub 2} assist-gas mixtures on weld metal composition and microstructure. Welding in pure argon leads to reduction in the Cr, Ni, Mo and N content of the weld metal and a significant decrease in austenite volume fraction relative to the baseplate. Relative to welding in Ar, the use of a N{sub 2} bearing assist-gas restores the Cr, Ni and Mo levels to those found in the baseplate at the welding speeds employed. Moreover, the N{sub 2} bearing assist-gases result in an increase in the weld metal N content and austenite volume fraction relative to welding in pure Ar.

  4. Passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coating on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenja, S.; Pan, J.; Wallinder, I.O.; Leygraf, C.; Kulu, P.

    1999-11-01

    The passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coatings deposited by arc ion plating onto prenitrided AISI 304 stainless steel have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky measurements in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05 M HCl. The chemical composition of the oxidized surface film atop TiN was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Up to 1.2 V/SHE the TiN coating exhibits passive behavior, which is attributed to the formation of a TiO{sub 2}-like film of nanometer thickness which grows linearly with anodic potential at a rate of 2.4 nm/V. Above 1.2 V/SHE enhanced anodic oxidation of TiN is observed at a rate of 17.7 nm/V, and the overall corrosion performance is governed both by the oxidized TiN coating and by a metallic Ti interlayer atop the nitrided stainless steel substrate. At all potentials the TiO{sub 2} film is characterized by relatively high donor densities and is, furthermore, terminated by a hydroxylated surface.

  5. Sigma phase detection in duplex stainless steel by induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, E. M.; Fialho, W. M. L.; Silva, H. F. B. M.; Leite, J. P.; Leite, J. P.; Oliveira, A. V. G.

    2016-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels when subjected to temperatures above 600 ° C have its tenacity decreased by the formation of sigma phase. This phase has high hardness and is rich in chromium and reduces the matrix of this element. In this study, field line density measurements, obtained in the reversibility region of magnetic domains, and application of artificial neural networks are used to monitor the formation of this undesirable phase. Samples of a stainless steel SAF 2205 were subjected to aging at temperatures of 800 ° C and 900 ° C, in order to obtain different amounts of sigma phase. The amount of this phase was obtained by image processing and the density of field lines through a Hall Effect sensor. Charpy impact tests were performed. The field lines densities were used for training of an artificial neural network and correlated with the presence of sigma phase and embrittlement of the material. The results showed that the method was able to correlate the parameters studied with the presence of the sigma phase and toughness of the material studied in both temperatures.

  6. Magnetic detection of sigma phase in duplex stainless steel UNS S31803

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, S. S. M.; Pardal, J. M.; Guerreiro, J. L.; Gomes, A. M.; da Silva, M. R.

    2010-09-01

    Duplex stainless steels are high strength and corrosion resistant steels extensively used in the chemical and petrochemical industry. The best mechanical properties and corrosion resistance are obtained with a microstructure composed by equal parts of ferrite and austenite and free from tertiary phases. Sigma phase is one of these deleterious tertiary phases. In the present work different amounts of sigma phase were precipitated by heat treatments in a UNS S31803 stainless steel. Some specimens were cold rolled before sigma phase precipitation in order to evaluate the effect of deformation on the magnetic measurements. The amount of sigma phase was precisely determined by microscopy and image analysis for each heat treatment condition. The effects of sigma phase on the steel properties were investigated, confirming the detrimental effects of very small percentages on corrosion resistance and toughness. Two magnetic methods were used to detect sigma phase: magnetization saturation measurements in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer and ferritoscope testing. Both methods were found to be sensitive to small percentages of sigma phase in the microstructure.

  7. In situ neutron diffraction study of the low cycle fatigue of the α-γ duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenčuš, Peter; Polák, Jaroslav; Lukáš, Petr; Muránsky, Ondrej

    2006-11-01

    In duplex stainless steels, significant thermal stresses are generated during the cooling from the homogenization temperature due to different thermal expansion coefficients of the austenitic and ferritic phases. The results of the in situ neutron diffraction examination of the evolution of the internal stresses during the low cycle fatigue in the SAF 2507 duplex stainless steel are reported. Stress response of both constituent components resulting from the load sharing between austenitic and ferritic grains was measured. It was found that the initial thermal residual stresses were relaxed rapidly at the beginning of the cyclic loading. Whereas initial hardening was identified in both phases, the subsequent fatigue softening was fully attributed to the austenitic phase.

  8. Assessment of thermal embrittlement in duplex stainless steels 2003 and 2205 for nuclear power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J. D.; Miller, M. K.; Young, G. A.

    2015-04-01

    Duplex stainless steels are desirable for use in power generation systems due to their attractive combination of strength, corrosion resistance, and cost. However, thermal embrittlement at intermediate homologous temperatures of ~887°F (475°C) and below, via spinodal decomposition, limits upper service temperatures for many applications. New lean grade duplex alloys have improved thermal stability over standard grades and potentially increase the upper service temperature or the lifetime at a given temperature for this class of material. The present work compares the thermal stability of lean grade, alloy 2003 to standard grade, alloy 2205, through a series of isothermal agings between 500°F (260°C) and 900°F (482°C) for times between 1 and 10,000 hours. Aged samples were characterized by changes in microhardness and impact toughness. Additionally, atom probe tomography was performed to illustrate the evolution of the α-α' phase separation in both alloys at select conditions. Atom probe tomography confirmed that phase separation occurs via spinodal decomposition for both alloys and identified the formation of Ni-Cu-Si-Mn-P clusters in alloy 2205 that may contribute to embrittlement of this alloy. The impact toughness model predictions for upper service temperature show that alloy 2003 can be considered for use in 550°F applications for 80 year service lifetimes based on a Charpy V-notch criteria of 35 ft-lbs at 70°F. Alloy 2205 should be limited to 500°F applications.

  9. Assessment of thermal embrittlement in duplex stainless steels 2003 and 2205 for nuclear power applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tucker, J. D.; Miller, M. K.; Young, G. A.

    2015-04-01

    Duplex stainless steels are desirable for use in power generation systems due to their attractive combination of strength, corrosion resistance, and cost. However, thermal embrittlement at intermediate homologous temperatures of ~887°F (475°C) and below, via spinodal decomposition, limits upper service temperatures for many applications. New lean grade duplex alloys have improved thermal stability over standard grades and potentially increase the upper service temperature or the lifetime at a given temperature for this class of material. The present work compares the thermal stability of lean grade, alloy 2003 to standard grade, alloy 2205, through a series of isothermal agings between 500°Fmore » (260°C) and 900°F (482°C) for times between 1 and 10,000 hours. Aged samples were characterized by changes in microhardness and impact toughness. Additionally, atom probe tomography was performed to illustrate the evolution of the α-α' phase separation in both alloys at select conditions. Atom probe tomography confirmed that phase separation occurs via spinodal decomposition for both alloys and identified the formation of Ni-Cu-Si-Mn-P clusters in alloy 2205 that may contribute to embrittlement of this alloy. The impact toughness model predictions for upper service temperature show that alloy 2003 can be considered for use in 550°F applications for 80 year service lifetimes based on a Charpy V-notch criteria of 35 ft-lbs at 70°F. Alloy 2205 should be limited to 500°F applications.« less

  10. Effect of gadolinium addition on the corrosion, wear, and neutron absorbing behaviors of duplex stainless steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Youl; Choi, Yong; Moon, Byung M.; Sohn, Dong S.; Bogdanov, S. G.; Pirogov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop the neutron absorbing and shield materials, a hot-rolled 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel was prepared with 55 vol. % of ferrite and 45 vol. % of austenite. The σ phase with an average grain size of 9-11 μm in austenitic (γ) grains tended to be elongated parallel to the rolling direction, with (100) poles concentrated towards the normal direction, and (110) poles located between the normal and radial directions (ND and RD, respectively). Most of the gadolinium existed as sub-micro-meter-sized Gd2O3 and GdCrO3 precipitates. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and microhardness of the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel were 522.8 MPa, 700.2 MPa, 38.1%, and 258.5-314.7 HV, respectively. The friction coefficient and wear resistance were 3.11 and 0.004 mg/kg/cycle, respectively. The corrosion potential and corrosion rate of the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel were-0.448 V SHE and 1.263 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-HCl,-0.544 V SHE and 2.619 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-NaCl,-0.299 V SHE and 1.469 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-H2SO4, and-0.607 V SHE and 2.295 × 10-3 A/cm2 for synthetic water, respectively. The coefficient of neutron transmission for the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel sheet of 2 mm thickness at neutron beam wavelength of 0.48 nm was 0.6.

  11. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  12. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. The model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, O.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  13. Studies of aged cast stainless steel from the Shippingport reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    The mechanical properties of cast stainless steels from the Shippingport reactor have been characterized. Baseline properties for unaged materials were obtained from tests on either recovery-annealed material or material from a cooler region of the component. The materials exhibited modest decrease in impact energy and fracture toughness and a small increase in tensile strength. The fracture toughness J-R curve, J{sub IC} value, tensile flow stress, and Charpy-impact energy of the materials showed very good agreement with estimations based on accelerated laboratory aging studies. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory at temperatures between 320 and 400{degree}C. The results showed very good agreement with estimates; the activation energies ranged from 125 to 250 kJ/mole and the minimum room-temperature impact energy was >75 J/cm{sup 2}. The estimated impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve for materials from the Ringhals reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows are also presented.

  14. In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Watson, Bruce E.; Mathews, Royce; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) was commonly used in selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems for corrosion resistance and enhanced durability in service. CASS materials are generally coarse-grained and elastically anisotropic in nature, and are consequently difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of ultrasonic wave interactions with the coarse-grain microstructures. To address the inspection needs for these materials, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being developed. However, to enhance the probability of detecting flaws, knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material may be required. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic backscatter measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date from laboratory experiments demonstrate the potential of these measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two homogeneous microstructures—equiaxed-grain material or columnar-grain material. Measurements on mixed or banded microstructures also show correlation with the estimated volume-fraction of columnar grains in the material. However, several operational issues will need to be addressed prior to applying this method for in-situ characterization of CASS microstructure.

  15. Evaluation of aging of cast stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Cast stainless steel is used extensively in nuclear reactors for primary-pressure-boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, elbows, valves, pumps, and safe ends. These components are, however, susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement in light water reactors because of the segregation of Cr atoms from Fe and Ni by spinodal decomposition in ferrite and the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides on ferrite/austenite boundaries. A recent advance in understanding the aging kinetics is presented. Aging kinetics are strongly influenced by the synergistic effects of other metallurgical reactions that occur in parallel with spinodal decomposition, i.e., clustering of Ni, Mo, and Si solute atoms and the nucleation and growth of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite phase. A number of methods are outlined for estimating aging embrittlement under end-of-life of life-extension conditions, depending on several factors such as degree of permissible conservatism, availability of component archive material, and methods of estimating and verifying the activation energy of aging. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Mathews, Royce; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roberts, Kamandi C.

    2010-12-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The engineering properties of CASS made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that are difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of wave interactions with the microstructure. To address the inspection needs, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious effects of the coarse-grained microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam will require knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detecting flaws. The goal of improving the reliability and effectiveness of ultrasonic inspection of CASS specimens can therefore potentially be achieved by first characterizing the microstructure of the component. The characterization of CASS microstructure must be done in-situ, to enable dynamic selection and optimization of the ultrasonic inspection technique. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two consistent microstructures-equiaxed-grain material and columnar-grain material.

  17. Effect of solution annealing temperature on precipitation in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwar, A.; Vennela, N. Phani; Kamath, S.L.; Khatirkar, R.K.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, effect of solution annealing temperature (1050 Degree-Sign C and 1100 Degree-Sign C) and isothermal ageing (700 Degree-Sign C: 15 min to 6 h) on the microstructural changes in 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated systematically. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to follow the microstructural evolution, while an energy dispersive spectrometer attached to scanning electron microscope was used to obtain localised chemical information of various phases. The ferritic matrix of the two phase 2205 duplex stainless steel ({approx} 45% ferrite and {approx} 55% austenite) undergoes a series of metallurgical transformations during ageing-formation of secondary austenite ({gamma}{sub 2}) and precipitation of Cr and Mo rich intermetallic (chi-{chi} and sigma-{sigma}) phases. For solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, significant amount of carbides were observed in the ferrite grains after 1 h of ageing at 700 Degree-Sign C. {chi} Phase precipitated after the precipitation of carbides-preferentially at the ferrite-ferrite and also at the ferrite-austenite boundaries. {sigma} Phase was not observed in significant quantity even after 6 h of ageing. The sequence of precipitation in samples solution annealed at 1050 Degree-Sign C was found to be carbides {yields} {chi} {yields} {sigma}. On the contrary, for samples solution annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C, the precipitation of {chi} phase was negligible. {chi} Phase precipitated before {sigma} phase, preferentially along the ferrite-ferrite grain boundaries and was later consumed in the {sigma} phase precipitation. The {sigma} phase precipitated via the eutectoid transformation of ferrite to yield secondary austenite {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase in the ferrite and along the ferrite-austenite grain boundaries. An increase in the volume fraction of {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase with simultaneous decrease in the ferrite was evidenced with ageing. - Highlights

  18. SnO2:F Coated Duplex Stainless Steel for PEM Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Duplex 2205 stainless steel was deposited with 0.6 {micro}m thick SnO2:F coating; coated steel was characterized for PEMFC bipolar plate application. Compared with bare alloy, interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values of the coated 2205 steel are higher. SnO2:F coating adds its own resistance to the air-formed film on the steel. In a PEMFC anode environment, a current peak of ca. 25 {micro}A/cm2 registered at ca. 30 min for coated 2205 steel. It stabilized at ca. 2.0 {approx} -1.0 {micro}A/cm2. This peak is related to the complicated process of coating dissolution and oxide-layer formation. Anodic-cathodic current transfer occurred at ca. 200 min polarization. In a PEMFC cathode environment, current was stable immediately after polarization. The stable current was ca. 0.5 {approx} 2.0 {micro}A/cm2 during the entire polarization period. AES depth profiles with tested samples and ICP analysis with the tested solutions confirmed the excellent corrosion resistance of the SnO2:F coated 2205 alloy in simulated PEMFC environments.

  19. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior in annealed 2205 duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Badji, Riad Bouabdallah, Mabrouk; Bacroix, Brigitte; Kahloun, Charlie; Belkessa, Brahim; Maza, Halim

    2008-04-15

    The phase transformations and mechanical behaviour during welding and subsequent annealing treatment of 2205 duplex stainless steel have been investigated. Detailed microstructural examination showed the presence of higher ferrite amounts in the heat affected zone (HAZ), while higher amounts of austenite were recorded in the centre region of the weld metal. Annealing treatments in the temperature range of 800-1000 deg. C resulted in a precipitation of {sigma} phase and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} chromium carbides at the {gamma}/{delta} interfaces that were found to be preferential precipitation sites. Above 1050 deg. C, the volume fraction of {delta} ferrite increases with annealing temperature. The increase of {delta} ferrite occurs at a faster rate in the HAZ than in the base metal and fusion zone. Optimal mechanical properties and an acceptable ferrite/austenite ratio throughout the weld regions corresponds to annealing at 1050 deg. C. Fractographic examinations showed that the mode of failure changed from quasi-cleavage fracture to dimple rupture with an increase in the annealing temperature from 850 to 1050 deg. C.

  20. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  1. Precipitation and Phase Transformations in 2101 Lean Duplex Stainless Steel During Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maetz, Jean-Yves; Cazottes, Sophie; Verdu, Catherine; Kleber, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The effect of isothermal aging at 963 K (690 °C) on the microstructure of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, with the composition Fe-21.5Cr-5Mn-1.6Ni-0.22N-0.3Mo, was investigated using a multi-technique and multi-scale approach. The kinetics of phase transformation and precipitation was followed from a few minutes to thousands of hours using thermoelectric power measurements; based on these results, certain aging states were selected for electron microscopy characterization. Scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to quantitatively describe the microstructural evolution through crystallographic analysis, chemical analysis, and volume fraction measurements from the macroscopic scale down to the nanometric scale. During aging, the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, Cr2N nitrides, and σ phase as well as the transformation of ferrite into austenite and austenite into martensite was observed. These complex microstructural changes are controlled by Cr volume diffusion. The precipitation and phase transformation mechanisms are described.

  2. Automatic assessment of a two-phase structure in the duplex stainless-steel SAF 2205

    SciTech Connect

    Komenda, J. ); Sandstroem, R. )

    1993-10-01

    Automatic image analysis was used to study the effect of deformation on the size and distribution of the austenite and ferrite phases in the duplex stainless steel SAF 2205 (22Cr-5Ni-3Mo-15N). The main parameters used were the chord size to characterize the ferrite phase and Feret's diameter for the austenite phase. As the deformation increased, ferrite bands became more elongated and thinner, contributing to a pronounced banding. The amount of banding can be quantified by using a ratio between the slopes of the chord size distributions in the longitudinal and short transverse directions. According to a proposed model of the influence of deformation on the two-phase structure, the process of austenite elongation and subdivision of austenite islands (crushing) is described. The effect of deformation on the yield and tensile strength was expressed using a Hall-Petch type relationship where the grain size was represented by the average width of the ferrite bands. The observed anisotropy in strength properties is believed to be due to texture hardening. Because elongation at a given strength level is the same in both the longitudinal and transverse directions, the banding itself does not influence the ductility. Nor can the strength anisotropy be due to banding, because the strength is greater in the longitudinal than in the transverse direction.

  3. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. B.; Kamat, H. S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 °C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance to pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constitutent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  4. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Li, Huabing; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift in the corrosion potential and an increase in the corrosion current density in the presence of the P. aeruginosa biofilm in the 2216E medium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results showed a decrease in Cr content on the coupon surface beneath the biofilm. The pit imaging analysis showed that the P. aeruginosa biofilm caused a largest pit depth of 0.69 μm in 14 days of incubation. Although this was quite small, it indicated that 2707 HDSS was not completely immune to MIC by the P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26846970

  5. Effect of thermal treatments on the wear behaviour of duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargas, G.; Mestra, A.; Anglada, M.; Mateo, A.

    2009-09-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a family of steels characterized by two-phase microstructure with similar percentages of ferrite (α) and austenite (γ).Their attractive combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance has increased its use in last decades in the marine and petrochemical industries. Nevertheless, an inappropriate heat treatment can induce the precipitation of secondary phases which affect directly their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. There are few works dealing with the influence of heat treatments on wear behaviour of these steels in the literature. For instances, this paper aims to determine wear kinetic and sliding wear volume developed as a function of heat treatment conditions. Therefore, the samples were heat treated from 850 °C to 975 °C before sliding wear tests. These wear tests were carried out using ball on disk technique at constant sliding velocity and different sliding distances. Two methodologies were used to calculate the wear volume: weight loss and area measurement using a simplified contact model. Microstructural observations showed the presence of sigma phase for all studied conditions. The formation kinetics of this phase is faster at 875 °C and decrease at higher temperatures. Results related to wear showed that the hardness introduced due to the presence of sigma phase plays an important role on wear behaviour for this steel. It was observed also that wear rates decreased when increasing the percentage of sigma phase on the microstructure.

  6. Effect of nitrogen content on the environmentally-assisted cracking susceptibility of duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chuan-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Ta; Liou, Horng-Yih

    2003-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen content on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 22 pct Cr duplex stainless steel (DSS) in chloride solutions was investigated in this study. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was employed to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength and ductility of 22 pct Cr DSS increased with increasing amount of nitrogen (in the range of 0.103 to 0.195 wt pct). Slow strain rate testing results indicated that 22 pct Cr DSSs were resistant to SCC in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution at 80 °C. However, environmentally assisted cracking occurred in 40 wt pct CaCl2 solution at 100 °C and in boiling 45 wt pct MgCl2 solution at 155 °C, respectively. The effects of environment and nitrogen content in DSS on the cracking susceptibility are discussed in this article. Selective dissolution of ferrite phase was found to participate in the SCC process for tests in CaCl2 solution. At temperatures above 80 °C, dynamic strain aging was found to occur in various environments at a strain beyond plastic deformation.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507 after Gas Phase Thermal Precharging with Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Marchi, C.; Somerday, B. P.; Zelinski, J.; Tang, X.; Schiroky, G. H.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal precharging of super duplex stainless steel 2507 with 125 wppm hydrogen significantly reduced tensile ductility and fracture toughness. Strain-hardened 2507 exhibited more severe ductility loss compared to the annealed microstructure. The reduction of area (RA) was between 80 and 85 pct for both microstructures in the noncharged condition, while reductions of area were 25 and 46 pct for the strain-hardened and annealed microstructures, respectively, after hydrogen precharging. Similar to the effect of internal hydrogen on tensile ductility, fracture toughness of strain-hardened 2507 was lowered from nearly 300 MPa m1/2 in the noncharged condition to less than 60 MPa m1/2 in the hydrogen-precharged condition. While precharging 2507 with hydrogen results in a considerable reduction in ductility and toughness, the absolute values are similar to high-strength austenitic steels that have been tested under the same conditions, and which are generally considered acceptable for high-pressure hydrogen gas systems. The fracture mode in hydrogen-precharged 2507 involved cleavage cracking of the ferrite phase and ductile fracture along oblique planes in the austenite phase, compared to 100 pct microvoid coalescence in the absence of hydrogen. Predictions from a strain-based micromechanical fracture toughness model were in good agreement with the measured fracture toughness of hydrogen-precharged 2507, implying a governing role of austenite for resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture.

  8. Characterization of a cold-rolled 2101 lean duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Paola; Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Mészáros, Istvan; Passaretti, Francesca; Zanellato, Michela; Calliari, Irene

    2013-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) may be defined as a category of steels with a two-phase ferritic-austenitic microstructure, which combines good mechanical and corrosion properties. However, these steels can undergo significant microstructural modification as a consequence of either thermo-mechanical treatments (ferrite decomposition, which causes σ- and χ-phase formation and nitride precipitation) or plastic deformation at room temperature [austenite transformation into strain-induced martensite (SIM)]. These secondary phases noticeably affect the properties of DSS, and therefore are of huge industrial interest. In the present work, SIM formation was investigated in a 2101 lean DSS. The material was subjected to cold rolling at various degrees of deformation (from 10 to 80% thickness reduction) and the microstructure developed after plastic deformation was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction measurements, and hardness and magnetic tests. It was observed that SIM formed as a consequence of deformations higher than ~20% and residual austenite was still observed at 80% of thickness reduction. Furthermore, a direct relationship was found between microstructure and magnetic properties. PMID:23721654

  9. Effect of Aging on the Fracture Behavior of Lean Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straffelini, G.; Baldo, S.; Calliari, I.; Ramous, E.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of aging in the range of 550 °C to 850 °C for 5 to 120 minutes on the impact fracture behavior of 2101 and 2304 lean duplex stainless steels (DSS) was investigated in the present study. The 2304 steel displayed ductile behavior irrespective of aging conditions. In contrast, the 2101 steel displayed a ductile behavior only in the case of aging for 5 minutes at 550 °C and 650 °C, whereas in all other cases, it fractured in a brittle manner. The brittle fracture behavior of the 2101 steel has been attributed to the precipitation of small black particles at the α/ α and α/ γ grain boundaries (nitrides), which form paths for easy crack propagation. In the 2304 steel, such particles precipitated at 750 °C and 850 °C, but they were located inside the austenitic grains because of the formation of secondary austenite. They therefore did not embrittle the steel. The larger Ni content of the 2304 steel favored the formation of the secondary austenite that is absent in the 2101 steel.

  10. The Influence of Hydrogen on the Microstructure and Dynamic Strength of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Ravit; Glam, Benny; Eliezer, Dan; Moreno, Daniel; Eliezer, Shalom

    2015-06-01

    In this research the dynamic strength of lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) with and without hydrogen was investigated. The LDS was chosen since it has a mixed structure of ferrite (BCC) and austenite (FCC) which allows an attractive combination of high strength and plasticity. Data collection was performed by VISAR and metallurgical analysis by post mortem observation. In addition, a thermal desorption process (TDS) was carried out in order to observe the influence of hydrogen charging on LDS crystal structure and to determine the hydrogen trapping mechanism before and after the plate impact experiments. Several assessments can be made based on the results of this study. TDS analysis revealed that even after hydrogen desorption, some hydrogen remained trapped in the austenitic phase causing a small lattice expansion. After impact, a brittle spall mechanism was seen, which occurred through crack progression along both phases grain boundaries. It was found that even small hydrogen content affects the dynamic strength of LDS. The relation between the microstructure and the dynamic strength of the LDS in the presence of hydrogen will be discussed. This work was supported by the Pazi foundation.

  11. Effect of silver on microstructure and antibacterial property of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Min; Chen, Yi-Chun; Pan, Yeong-Tsuen; Lin, Dong-Yih

    2016-06-01

    In this study, 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was employed to enhance the antibacterial properties of material through silver doping. The results demonstrated that silver-doped 2205 DSS produces an excellent bacteria-inhibiting effect against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial rates were 100% and 99.5%, respectively. Because the mutual solubility of silver and iron is very low in both the solid and liquid states, a silver-rich compound solidified and dispersed at the ferrite/austenite interface and the ferrite, austenite, and secondary austenite phases in silver-doped 2205 DSS. Doping 2205 DSS with silver caused the Creq/Nieq ratio of ferrite to decrease; however, the lower Creq/Nieq ratio promoted the rapid nucleation of γ2-austenite from primary α-ferrite. After 12h of homogenisation treatment at 1200 °C, the solubility of silver in the γ-austenite and α-ferrite phases can be increased by 0.10% and 0.09%, respectively. Moreover, silver doping was found to accelerate the dissolution of secondary austenite in a ferrite matrix during homogenisation. PMID:27040232

  12. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huabing; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift in the corrosion potential and an increase in the corrosion current density in the presence of the P. aeruginosa biofilm in the 2216E medium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results showed a decrease in Cr content on the coupon surface beneath the biofilm. The pit imaging analysis showed that the P. aeruginosa biofilm caused a largest pit depth of 0.69 μm in 14 days of incubation. Although this was quite small, it indicated that 2707 HDSS was not completely immune to MIC by the P. aeruginosa biofilm.

  13. Evolutions of Microstructure and Properties During Cold Rolling of 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qingxuan; Xu, Wanjian; Wu, Zhaoyu; Li, Jun; Xu, Yulai; Xiao, Xueshan; Hu, Jincheng; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-07-01

    Evolutions of microstructure, mechanical, and corrosion properties of 19Cr (Fe-18.9Cr-10.1Mn-0.3Ni-0.261N-0.030C-0.5Si) duplex stainless steel have been investigated during cold rolling at room temperature. Dislocation slip dominated deformation mode of ferrite phase. However, deformation mechanism of austenite phase was different with the increasing cold-rolling reductions. Dislocation slip and strengthening effect of twin boundaries caused pile-up phenomenon at the initial deformation stage. When the amount of cold-rolling reduction attained greater than 50 pct, induced α'-martensite appeared in deformed austenite phase. Hardness of austenite phase was higher than that of the deformed ferrite because of its higher strengthening effect during cold-rolling process. Cold-rolling deformation caused deterioration of the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt pct NaCl aqueous solution. Pitting corrosion always initiated in the ferrite phase and the phase boundary in the solution-treated alloy. Additional pitting holes appeared in deformed austenite phase because of the decrease in corrosion resistance caused by dislocation accumulation and induced α'-martensite.

  14. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  15. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of 2707 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel by Marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huabing; Zhou, Enze; Zhang, Dawei; Xu, Dake; Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Feng, Hao; Jiang, Zhouhua; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a serious problem in many industries because it causes huge economic losses. Due to its excellent resistance to chemical corrosion, 2707 hyper duplex stainless steel (2707 HDSS) has been used in the marine environment. However, its resistance to MIC was not experimentally proven. In this study, the MIC behavior of 2707 HDSS caused by the marine aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Electrochemical analyses demonstrated a positive shift in the corrosion potential and an increase in the corrosion current density in the presence of the P. aeruginosa biofilm in the 2216E medium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis results showed a decrease in Cr content on the coupon surface beneath the biofilm. The pit imaging analysis showed that the P. aeruginosa biofilm caused a largest pit depth of 0.69 μm in 14 days of incubation. Although this was quite small, it indicated that 2707 HDSS was not completely immune to MIC by the P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26846970

  16. Effect of Aging Treatment on Impact Toughness and Corrosion Resistance of Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Oh, Eun-Ji; Lee, Byung-Chan; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aging time on impact toughness and corrosion resistance of 25%Cr-7%Ni-2%Mo-4%W-0.2%N super duplex stainless steel from the viewpoint of intermetallic secondary phase variation was investigated with scanning electron microscopic observation with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopic analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The results clarified that R-phase is precipitated not only at the interface of ferrite and austenite but inside the ferrite at an initial stage of aging and then transformed into σ-phase from an aging time of 1 h, while the ferrite phase decomposed into γ2 and σ-phase with increase of aging time. This variation of the phases led to decrease of its impact toughness, and specifically, the R-phase was proved to be predominant in the degradation of the impact toughness at the initial stage of the aging. Additionally, these secondary phases led to deterioration of corrosion resistance because of Cr depletion.

  17. Direct observation and quantification of nanoscale spinodal decomposition in super duplex stainless steel weld metals.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Ahmed; Hättestrand, Mats; Nilsson, Jan-Olof; Gregori, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Three variants of super duplex stainless steel weld metals with the basic composition 29Cr-8Ni-2Mo (wt%) were investigated. The nitrogen content of the three materials was 0.22%, 0.33% and 0.37%, respectively. Isothermal heat treatments were performed at 450 degrees C for times up to 243 h. The hardness evolution of the three materials was found to vary with the overall concentration of the nitrogen. Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) was used to directly detect and quantify the degree of spinodal decomposition in different material conditions. 3-DAP atomic reconstruction clearly illustrate nanoscale variation of iron rich (alpha) and chromium rich (alpha') phases. A longer ageing time produces a coarser microstructure with larger alpha and alpha' domains. Statistical evaluation of APFIM data showed that phase separation was significant already after 1 h of ageing that gradually became more pronounced. Although nanoscale concentration variation was evident, no significant influence of overall nitrogen content on the degree of spinodal decomposition was found. PMID:19504899

  18. Austenitic and duplex stainless steels in simulated physiological solution characterized by electrochemical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Kocijan, Aleksandra; Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    A study of oxide layers grown on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel in simulated physiological solution is presented here in order to establish the possibility of replacement of AISI 316 L with 2205 DSS in biomedical applications. The results of the potentiodynamic measurements show that the extent of the passive range significantly increased for DSS 2205 compared to AISI 316L stainless steel. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate electrochemical processes taking place on the steel surfaces. Oxide layers formed by electrochemical oxidation at different oxidation potentials were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their compositions were analyzed as a function of depth. The main constituents on both the investigated materials were Cr- and Fe-oxides. Atomic force microscopy topography studies revealed the higher corrosion resistance of the DSS 2205 compared to the AISI 316L under the chosen experimental conditions. PMID:22331841

  19. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K. )

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. TEM microscopical examination of the magnetic domain boundaries in a super duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourlaris, G.; Gladman, T.; Maylin, M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated in an earlier publication that significant improvements in the coercivity, maximum induction and remanence values can be achieved, by using a 2205 type Duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (DSS) instead of the low alloy medium carbon steels currently being used. These improvements are achieved in the as received 2205 material, and after small amounts of cold rolling have been applied, to increase the strength. In addition, the modification of the duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructure, via a heat treatment route, results in a finer austenite `island` dispersion in a ferritic matrix and provides an attractive option for further modification of the magnetic characteristics of the material. However, the 2205 type DSS exhibits {open_quotes}marginal{close_quotes} corrosion protection in a marine environment, so that a study has been undertaken to examine whether the beneficial effects exhibited by the 2205 DSS, are also present in a 2507 type super-DSS.

  1. Effects of alloying elements on the mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of 2205 duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Horng-Yih; Tsai, Wen-Ta; Pan, Yeong-Tsuen; Hsieh, Rong-Iuan

    2001-04-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behaviors of duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have been investigated in this study. Experimental alloys were prepared by varying the concentrations of the constituent elements in DSSs. Hot ductility test, tensile test, charpy impact test, and corrosion test were performed to evaluate the properties of the experimental alloys. The results showed that the extent of edge cracking of DSSs increased with the increasing value of the crack sensitivity index (CSI). The higher the hot ductility index (HDI) was, the better the hot ductility of DSSs achieved. Austenite ( γ) stabilizer generally caused a decrease in the strength and an increase in the charpy impact absorbed energy of the stainless steel. On the contrary, ferrite ( α) former exerted its beneficial effect on the strength but became detrimental to the toughness of DSSs. The presences of sulfur and boron also caused a decrease in the impact energy, but nitrogen and carbon hardly affected the toughness within the concentration range tested in this study. The value of pitting nucleation potential ( E np ) of different nitrogen contents in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature was almost the same, but the value of pitting protection potential ( E pp ) among these alloys was increased with increasing the content of nitrogen. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs was high when tested in boiling 45 wt.% MgCl2 solution. On the other hand, the time to failure of the experimental steels in 40 wt.% CaCl2 solution at 100 °C was longer than that in MgCl2 solution. Nitrogen could affect the SCC behavior of DSSs in CaCl2 solution through the combinative effects by varying the pitting resistance and the slip step dissolution. An optimum nitrogen (N) content of 0.15 wt.% was found where the highest SCC resistance could be obtained. Although γ phase exhibited better resistance to SCC, cracks were found to

  2. Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

    2010-06-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

  3. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  4. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  5. In-Situ Observations of Sigma Phase Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Specht, E

    2006-08-08

    Synchrotron radiation was used to directly observe the transformation of ferrite, austenite and sigma phases during heating and cooling of 2205 duplex stainless steel. Sigma formed during the initial stages of heating, dissolved as the temperature was increased, and reformed on cooling. The dissolution temperature of sigma was measured to be 985 C {+-} 2.8 C at a heating rate of 0.25 C/s, and the kinetics of sigma formation at 850 C was determined to be slower after dissolving at 1000 C than before.

  6. The Effects of Casting Porosity on the Tensile Behavior of Investment Cast 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, D. F.; Crenshaw, T. B.; Gearhart, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of casting porosity on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel was studied as well as the effect of heat treatment on the alloy's sensitivity to casting defects. Interdendritic porosity, formed during solidification and shrinkage of the alloy, reduces the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength roughly in proportion to the reduction in load bearing cross-section. The effects of casting porosity on ductility (% strain, % reduction in area) are more severe, in agreement with research on other alloy systems. In this study, 10% porosity reduced the ductility of 17-4PH stainless steel by almost 80% for the high-strength H925 condition. Tensile testing at -10°C (263 K) further reduces the alloy ductility with and without pores present. In the lower strength H1100 condition, the ductility is higher than the H925 condition, as expected, and somewhat less sensitive to porosity. By measuring the area % porosity on the fracture surface of tensile specimens, the trend in failure strain versus area % porosity was obtained and analyzed using two methods: an empirical approach to determine an index of defect susceptibility with a logarithmic fit and an analytical approach based on the constitutive stress-strain behavior and critical strain concentration in the vicinity of the casting voids. The applicability of the second method depends on the amount of non-uniform strain (necking) and, as such, the softer H1100 material did not correlate well to the model. The behavior of 17-4PH was compared to previous work on cast Al alloys, Mg alloys, and other cast materials.

  7. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  8. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  9. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  10. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy- impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  11. Prediction of aging degradation of cast stainless steel components in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1992-03-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``predicted lower-bound` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  12. Prediction of aging degradation of cast stainless steel components in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1992-03-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common predicted lower-bound' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  13. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems - Revison 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-10-05

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330 C (535-625 F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350 C (554-633 F). The correlations for estimating the change in tensile stress, including the Ramberg/Osgood parameters for strain hardening, are also described. The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The extent or degree of thermal embrittlement at 'saturation,' i.e., the minimum impact energy that can be achieved for a material after long-term aging, is determined from the chemical composition of the steel. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of JIC are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common 'predicted lower-bound' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of

  14. Effect of annealing temperature on the pitting corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Hua; Jiang Yiming; Deng Bo; Sun Tao; Xu Juliang; Li Jin

    2009-09-15

    The pitting corrosion resistance of commercial super duplex stainless steels SAF2507 (UNS S32750) annealed at seven different temperatures ranging from 1030 deg. C to 1200 deg. C for 2 h has been investigated by means of potentiostatic critical pitting temperature. The microstructural evolution and pit morphologies of the specimens were studied through optical/scanning electron microscope. Increasing annealing temperature from 1030 deg. C to 1080 deg. C elevates the critical pitting temperature, whereas continuing to increase the annealing temperature to 1200 deg. C decreases the critical pitting temperature. The specimens annealed at 1080 deg. C for 2 h exhibit the best pitting corrosion resistance with the highest critical pitting temperature. The pit morphologies show that the pit initiation sites transfer from austenite phase to ferrite phase as the annealing temperature increases. The aforementioned results can be explained by the variation of pitting resistance equivalent number of ferrite and austenite phase as the annealing temperature changes.

  15. Annealing effects on the microstructure and magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel studied by in situ technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Li, M.; Zhang, W. J.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of annealing temperature on the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel 2507 were investigated by the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The MFM and XRD results indicated that the volume fraction of ferrite phase increased with increasing annealing temperature, but the lattice constants kept constant. Moreover, with the rise of annealing temperature, the magnetic domain structure in the ferrite phase varied gradually, where the magnetic domain became thinner and the distribution turned more homogeneous. These results gave a direct evidence for the changes of microstructure and magnetic domain structure induced by the annealing treatment. EBSD analysis showed that the orientation of ferrite grains changed after annealing treatments, which coincided with the changes of the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures.

  16. The effect of tungsten and molybdenum additions on the cavitation corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Abdullah, A.; Shalaby, H.M.

    1998-12-31

    Cavitation corrosion studies were conducted on two duplex stainless steel (DSS) specimens of which one was containing tungsten and more molybdenum than the other. Experiments were conducted in seawater using an ultrasonically-induced cavitation facilities. The rate of mass-loss, free corrosion potential, and microscopic examinations were compared for the two alloys in the presence and absence of cavitation. There was negligible mass loss for the two alloys under stagnant conditions. However, some differences were observed between the two alloys with respect to mass-loss, corrosion potential and morphology of attacked areas. The alloy containing tungsten and mover molybdenum experienced more loss in weight regardless of their more noble corrosion potential during cavitation. This difference in behavior was explained in terms of the effect of the alloying elements on the microstructure of the alloys and their susceptibility to absorb the impact energy of cavitation.

  17. Load partitioning between single bulk grains in a two-phase duplex stainless steel during tensile loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, P.; Han, T. S.; Lienert, U.; Almer, J. D.; Oden, M.; X-Ray Science Division; Lulea Univ.; Royal Inst. of Tech.; Yonsei Univ.; Linkoping Univ.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice strain tensor evolution for single bulk grains of austenite and ferrite in a duplex stainless steel during tensile loading to 0.02 applied strain has been investigated using in situ high-energy X-ray measurements and finite-element modeling. Single-grain X-ray diffraction lattice strain data for the eight austenite and seven ferrite grains measured show a large variation of residual lattice strains, which evolves upon deformation to the point where some grains with comparable crystallographic orientations have lattice strains different by 1.5 x 10{sup -3}, corresponding to a stress of -300MPa. The finite-element simulations of the 15 measured grains in three different spatial arrangements confirmed the complex deformation constraint and importance of local grain environment.

  18. Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings for Extended Design Life of 22%Cr Duplex Stainless Steel in Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Shrestha, S.; Lee, C. M.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    In this article, evaluation of sealed and unsealed thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) for the protection of 22%Cr duplex stainless steel (DSS) from corrosion in aerated, elevated temperature synthetic seawater is presented. The assessments involved general and pitting corrosion tests, external chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and hydrogen-induced stress cracking (HISC). These tests indicated that DSS samples, which would otherwise fail on their own in a few days, did not show pitting or fail under chloride SCC and HISC conditions when coated with TSA (with or without a sealant). TSA-coated specimens failed only at very high stresses (>120% proof stress). In general, TSA offered protection to the underlying or exposed steel by cathodically polarizing it and forming a calcareous deposit in synthetic seawater. The morphology of the calcareous deposit was found to be temperature dependent and in general was of duplex nature. The free corrosion rate of TSA in synthetic seawater was measured to be ~5-8 μm/year at ~18 °C and ~6-7 μm/year at 80 °C.

  19. European developments in the application of structural austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Stainless steel is increasingly being specified for structural applications. Principally, this is due to the aesthetic appeal of the material, no need for surface protection, durability, and the growing awareness, and use, of Life Cycle Cost analysis for assessing costs over the longer term, However, use of stainless steel in the U.K. offshore oil and gas platforms for fire and blast walls, has highlighted valuable properties of stainless steel that may be unfamiliar to structural designers. It is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate these properties. Additionally, new design guidance has become available in Europe as a result of a 4 year research program into the structural use of stainless steel. The ``Design Manual for Structural Stainless Steel`` was issued by Euro Inox and the Nickel Development Institute in 1994. This new manual will be outlined in this paper together with its influence on new European Building Standards and new European material standards for structural stainless steel. Currently in preparation, these include high strength grades with significantly higher strength than structural carbon steels. Finally, this paper will address the use of stainless steel for the reinforcement of concrete structures.

  20. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  1. High-Temperature Performance of Cast CF8C-Plus Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Covers and casings of small to medium size gas turbines can be made from cast austenitic stainless steels, including grades such as CF8C, CF3M, or CF10M. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Caterpillar have developed a new cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, which is a fully austenitic stainless steel, based on additions of Mn and N to the standard Nb-stabilized CF8C steel grade. The Mn addition improves castability, as well as increases the alloy solubility for N, and both Mn and N synergistically act to boost mechanical properties. CF8C-Plus steel has outstanding creep-resistance at 600-900 C, which compares well with Ni-based superalloys such as alloys X, 625, 617, and 230. CF8C-Plus also has very good fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance. It is used in the as-cast condition, with no additional heat-treatments. While commercial success for CF8C-Plus has been mainly for diesel exhaust components, this steel can also be considered for gas turbine and microturbine casings. The purposes of this paper are to demonstrate some of the mechanical properties, to update the long-term creep-rupture data, and to present new data on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of these materials, particularly in the presence of water vapor.

  2. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from Shippingport reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approximately}13 y at {approximately}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approximately}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approximately} 15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approximately} 8 y of service.

  3. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from shippingport reactor components.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    1995-06-07

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approx}13 y at {approx}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approx}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and JIC of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approx}8 y of service.

  4. NDE evaluation of the intergranular corrosion susceptibility of a 2205 duplex stainless steel using thermoelectric power and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, N.; Carreón, H.; Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a nondestructive technique to assess rapidly and with confidence the degree of sensitization (DOS) in duplex stainless steel (DSS). In this investigation, we present the use of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements as nondestructive method for the determination of DOS in isothermally aged 2205 DSS at 700°C for different aging times. The DOS of the aged samples was first established by performing the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The microstructural evolution was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results indicate that TEP coefficient is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by thermal aging and can be used to monitor IGC sensitization of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

  5. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  6. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  7. The effect of chloride ions on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tong; Xiao, Ning; Shen, Hanjie; Yong, Xingyue

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl(-) on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation in chloride solutions were investigated using nanoindentation in conjunction with XRD and XPS. The results demonstrate that Cl(-) had a strong effect on the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer under cavitation, and there was a threshold Cl(-) concentration. Furthermore, a close relationship between the nano-mechanical properties and the cavitation corrosion resistance of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel was observed. The degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer was accelerated by the synergistic effect between cavitation erosion and corrosion. A key factor was the adsorption of Cl(-), which caused a preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer on the corroded surface layer. Cavitation further promoted the preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer. Simultaneously, cavitation accelerated the erosion of the ferrite in the corroded surface layer, resulting in the degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer on 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation. PMID:27245950

  8. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  9. Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.

  10. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  11. Physical Simulation of a Duplex Stainless Steel Friction Stir Welding by the Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Hot Torsion Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Eduardo Bertoni; Santos, Tiago Felipe Abreu; Button, Sergio Tonini; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2016-07-01

    Physical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW) by means of hot torsion tests was performed on UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel. A thermomechanical simulator Gleeble 3800® with a custom-built liquid nitrogen cooling system was employed to reproduce the thermal cycle measured during FSW and carry out the torsion tests. Microstructures were compared by means of light optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. True strain and strain rate were calculated by numerical simulation of the torsion tests. Thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was reproduced at peak temperature of 1303 K (1030 °C), rotational speeds of 52.4 rad s-1 (500 rpm) and 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 0.5 to 0.75 revolutions, which represent strain rate between 10 and 16 s-1 and true strain between 0.5 and 0.8. Strong grain refinement, similar to the one observed in the stir zone (SZ), was attained at peak temperature of 1403 K (1130 °C), rotational speed of 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 1.2 revolution, which represent strain rate of 19 s-1 and true strain of 1.3. Continuous dynamic recrystallization in ferrite and dynamic recrystallization in austenite were observed in the TMAZ simulation. At higher temperature, dynamic recovery of austenite was also observed.

  12. How to control hydrogen level in (super) duplex stainless steel weldments using the GTAW or GMAW process

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, V.V.D.; Meelker, H.; Schelde, R.V.D.

    1999-01-01

    In this investigation, an attempt is made to further the understanding of factors influencing the hydrogen content in duplex stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds as well as to what extent it affects hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility. The results indicated that susceptibility to hydrogen cracking using the GTA or GMA process appears to be limited. In practice, maintaining a moisture level below 10 ppm in the shielding gas is of less importance than the choice of welding parameters. Even a moisture level of 1000 ppm in the shielding gas, in combination with the correct welding parameters, will result in a sufficient low hydrogen content in the weld. Similarly, a moisture level in the shielding gas below 10 ppm does not necessarily result in low hydrogen content in the weld metal. Although very high ferrite levels were combined with high restrain and high hydrogen content, none of the GMA and GTA welds cracked. Susceptibility to hydrogen cracking is concluded to be limited.

  13. Physical Simulation of a Duplex Stainless Steel Friction Stir Welding by the Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Hot Torsion Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Eduardo Bertoni; Santos, Tiago Felipe Abreu; Button, Sergio Tonini; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2016-09-01

    Physical simulation of friction stir welding (FSW) by means of hot torsion tests was performed on UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel. A thermomechanical simulator Gleeble 3800® with a custom-built liquid nitrogen cooling system was employed to reproduce the thermal cycle measured during FSW and carry out the torsion tests. Microstructures were compared by means of light optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. True strain and strain rate were calculated by numerical simulation of the torsion tests. Thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was reproduced at peak temperature of 1303 K (1030 °C), rotational speeds of 52.4 rad s-1 (500 rpm) and 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 0.5 to 0.75 revolutions, which represent strain rate between 10 and 16 s-1 and true strain between 0.5 and 0.8. Strong grain refinement, similar to the one observed in the stir zone (SZ), was attained at peak temperature of 1403 K (1130 °C), rotational speed of 74.5 rad s-1 (750 rpm), and 1.2 revolution, which represent strain rate of 19 s-1 and true strain of 1.3. Continuous dynamic recrystallization in ferrite and dynamic recrystallization in austenite were observed in the TMAZ simulation. At higher temperature, dynamic recovery of austenite was also observed.

  14. Real Time Imaging of Deuterium in a Duplex Stainless Steel Microstructure by Time-of-Flight SIMS

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, O.; Straub, F.; Wirth, Th.; Holzlechner, G.; Boellinghaus, Th.; Unger, W. E. S.

    2016-01-01

    For more than one century, hydrogen assisted degradation of metallic microstructures has been identified as origin for severe technical component failures but the mechanisms behind have not yet been completely understood so far. Any in-situ observation of hydrogen transport phenomena in microstructures will provide more details for further elucidation of these degradation mechanisms. A novel experiment is presented which is designed to elucidate the permeation behaviour of deuterium in a microstructure of duplex stainless steel (DSS). A hydrogen permeation cell within a TOF-SIMS instrument enables electrochemical charging with deuterium through the inner surface of the cell made from DSS. The outer surface of the DSS permeation cell exposed to the vacuum has been imaged by TOF-SIMS vs. increasing time of charging with subsequent chemometric treatment of image data. This in-situ experiment showed evidently that deuterium is permeating much faster through the ferrite phase than through the austenite phase. Moreover, a direct proof for deuterium enrichment at the austenite-ferrite interface has been found. PMID:26832311

  15. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  16. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel in Caustic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya; Singh, Preet M.

    2009-06-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have generally performed very well in caustic environments. However, some corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs have been reported in different pulp mill environments employing caustic solutions. Studies have shown that the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of DSSs depend on the alloy composition and microstructure of the steel. In this study, the effect of a sulfide-containing caustic environment (pulping liquor) and material properties (DSS alloy composition and microstructure) on the corrosion and SCC of DSSs was evaluated. During metal fabrication processes, localized areas of DSSs may be exposed to different temperatures and cooling rates, which may lead to changes in the microstructure in these regions. This change in microstructure, in turn, may affect the general and localized corrosion or SCC susceptibility of the affected area as compared to the rest of the metal. Hence, the effect of different annealing and aging temperatures as well as cooling rates on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of S32205 DSSs in caustic environment was evaluated. The results showed that changes in the microstructure of S32205 DSSs due to selected heat treatments did not have a significant effect on the general corrosion susceptibility of the steel in caustic environment, but its SCC susceptibility varied with changes in microstructures.

  18. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  19. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  20. Real Time Imaging of Deuterium in a Duplex Stainless Steel Microstructure by Time-of-Flight SIMS.

    PubMed

    Sobol, O; Straub, F; Wirth, Th; Holzlechner, G; Boellinghaus, Th; Unger, W E S

    2016-01-01

    For more than one century, hydrogen assisted degradation of metallic microstructures has been identified as origin for severe technical component failures but the mechanisms behind have not yet been completely understood so far. Any in-situ observation of hydrogen transport phenomena in microstructures will provide more details for further elucidation of these degradation mechanisms. A novel experiment is presented which is designed to elucidate the permeation behaviour of deuterium in a microstructure of duplex stainless steel (DSS). A hydrogen permeation cell within a TOF-SIMS instrument enables electrochemical charging with deuterium through the inner surface of the cell made from DSS. The outer surface of the DSS permeation cell exposed to the vacuum has been imaged by TOF-SIMS vs. increasing time of charging with subsequent chemometric treatment of image data. This in-situ experiment showed evidently that deuterium is permeating much faster through the ferrite phase than through the austenite phase. Moreover, a direct proof for deuterium enrichment at the austenite-ferrite interface has been found. PMID:26832311

  1. Structure characteristics in industrially centrifugally cast 25Cr20Ni stainless steel tubes solidified under different electromagnetic field intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.Q.; Yang, Y.S.; Zhang, J.S.; Jia, G.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    1999-10-01

    The influences of different electromagnetic field intensities on the solidification structures of industrially centrifugally cast 25Cr20Ni stainless steel tubes have been investigated in detail. The results reveal that the electromagnetic field exerted during the centrifugal solidification causes a marked variation in the structures of the cast tubes. With an increase of the electromagnetic field intensity, the area fraction of the equiaxed structures in transverse sections of the cast tubes increases, and the macrostructures are gradually refined. The distribution of the eutectic carbides changes from the dendrite boundaries to the grain boundaries. However, an excessive electromagnetic field intensity gives rise to many intergranular cast defects formed along the inner walls of the centrifugally cast tubes. The effects of fluid flow induced by the electromagnetic field on the solidification process of the centrifugally cast tubes are the primary reason for the previously mentioned structure variations.

  2. Long-term aging of cast stainless steels: Mechanisms and resulting properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical property data are presented from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 450, 400, 350, 320, and 290/sup 0/C. The results indicate that thermal aging increases the tensile strength and decreases the impactenergy, J/sub IC/ and tearing modulus of the steels. Also, the ductile-to-brittle transition curve shifts to higher temperatures. The low-carbon CF-3 steels were the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M steels were the most susceptible to low-temperature embrittlement. The influence of nitrogen content and distribution of ferrite on loss of toughness are discussed. Data also indicate that existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 280 to 450/sup 0/C, i.e., extrapolation of high-temperature data to reactor temperatures may not be valid for some compositions of cast stainless steels. 13 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Elastic-plastic characterization of a cast stainless steep pipe elbow material

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Hackett, E.M.; Roe, C.

    1992-01-01

    Tests conducted in Japan as part of the High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program for reactor piping systems revealed fatigue crack growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow. The material tested was equivalent to ASME SA-351CF8M. The David Taylor Research Center (DTRC) was tasked to developed the appropriate material property data to characterize cyclic deformation, cyclic elastic-plastic crack growth and ductile tearing resistance in the pipe elbow material. It was found that the cast stainless steel was very resistant to ductile crack extension. J-R curves essentially followed a blunting behavior to very high J levels. Low cycle fatigue crack growth rate data obtained on this material using a cyclic J integral approach was consistent with the high cycle fatigue crack growth rate and with a standard textbook correlation equation typical for this type of material. Evaluation of crack closure effects was essential to accurately determine the crack driving force for cyclic elastic- plastic crack growth in this material. SEM examination of several of the cyclic J test fracture surfaces indicated that fatigue was the primary mode of fracture with ductile crack extension intervening only during the last few cycles of loading.

  4. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, J.-O.; Huhtala, T.; Jonsson, P.; Karlsson, L.; Wilson, A.

    1996-08-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 °C to 1110 °C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ2) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ2 in these.

  5. Standard specification for castings of iron-chromium-nickel-molybdenum corrosion-resistant, duplex (austenitic/ferritic) for general application. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Nov. 10, 1997 and published August 1998. Originally published as A 890-88. Last previous edition was A 890/A 890M-94a.

  6. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  7. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  8. Thermal embrittlement of simulated heat-affected zone in cast austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Horii, Y.; Kume, R.; Uesugi, N.

    1998-08-01

    Metallurgical factors controlling thermal embrittlement in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of cast austenitic stainless steels were investigated by using the simulated HAZ. It was shown that the simulated HAZ was more susceptible to the thermal embrittlement by aging at 673 K in correspondence with its higher tendency to age hardening and a higher content of ferrite than the parent casting. Electron microprobe analyzer measurement showed that application of the simulated thermal cycle gave a change in the chemical composition of the ferrite, which might be a cause of the higher age hardening of the ferrite in the simulated HAZ. This higher ferrite hardness had a good correlation with fine precipitates of presumably G-phase in the ferrite grain, which existed more in the simulated HAZ than in the parent casting, though it is not clear whether this correlation was only apparent. Ductility of the austenite portion was found to reduce remarkably when surrounded by the hard ferrite of a high fraction. Annealing after aging restored CTOD to some degree. Aging after fatigue cracking gave more embrittlement than a usual procedure for preparation of test specimens, i.e., fatigue cracking after aging.

  9. Influence of volumic heat treatments upon cavitation erosion resistance of duplex X2CrNiMoN 22-5-3 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Popescu, M.; Bordeaşu, D.; Salcianu, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    The stainless steels Duplex 2205 with austenite and ferrite structure have mechanical characteristics close to those of martensite stainless steels but a better corrosion resistance; these steels are very sensitive on the heat treatments. Present work studies the cavitation erosion for those steels for three different heat treatments: simply quenched, annealed at 475°C post quenching and annealed at 875°C. The researches were undertaken at Timisoara “Politehnica” University in the Laboratory of Material Science and the Laboratory of Cavitation, using the T2 facility which integrally respects the recommendation of ASTM G32- 10 Standard. The best results were obtained with the specimens annealed at 875°C. In comparison with the stainless steel 41Cr4, with very good cavitation erosion qualities, all tested steels presented also good erosion resistance. So, Duplex 2205 steels can be used for details subjected to cavitation. The best results are obtained by increasing both the hardness and the quantity of the structure constituent with better cavitation erosion resistance, in our case the alloyed austenite.

  10. Decomposition Kinetics of Ferrite in Isothermally Aged SAF 2507-Type Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Fazakas, Éva; Mészáros, István; Sajó, István

    2015-12-01

    Decomposition of the ferritic phase is studied in isothermally aged SAF 2507 superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) by means of different examination methods. The ferritic phase ( δ) undergoes an eutectoid transformation into secondary austenite ( γ 2) and σ-phase between 650 and 1000 °C. Samples were treated at 900 °C because the incubation time of this transformation is the shortest at this temperature. In order to follow the microstructural changes, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), applied magnetic investigation [vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM)], micro-hardness tests, and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used. The results of XRD and EBSD methods for phase quantification showed nearly the same amounts for all three phases. The results of applied magnetic investigation for the fraction of ferritic phase were also in good agreement with the corresponding results of XRD and EBSD methods. Decomposition of ferrite is similarly well-traceable on EBSD phase maps where the coherent ferritic areas gradually broke into pieces with increasing time of heat treatment. According to the EBSD measurements the σ-phase grains appeared and started to grow after 2 min aging time in the ferritic-austenitic matrix, usually on the boundaries of ferritic and austenitic grains. After 15 min treating time, the microstructure consisted of mainly σ- and austenitic (primary and secondary) phases with negligible amount of ferrite. Chemical composition of the σ-phase was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) at different aging times. Activation energies of σ-phase precipitation and α'-phase formation were determined by the Kissinger plot, through DTA measurements; they are 243 and 261 kJ/mol, respectively. Using the results of phase quantifications, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was fitted.

  11. Evaluation of test methods for dynamic toughness characterization of duplex stainless steel forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Natishan, M.E.; Tregoning, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Ferralium is a dual-phase stainless steel which consists of roughly equal amounts of ferrite and austenite. Conventional Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed on specimens taken from several locations in three orientations from a forged Ferralium plate to quantify the materials dynamic fracture performance. The Charpy tests were compared with 2.54 cm thick (1T) single edge bend (SE(B)) specimens that were tested in a drop tower to measure dynamic fracture initiation toughness (K{sub Id}). SE(B) specimens were removed from three plate locations and tested in a single orientation. Charpy and K{sub Id} tests were performed over the entire fracture mode transition temperature range, but the bulk of testing was concentrated at a single temperature {minus}2 C to provide a statistically significant number of tests at a representative point in the ferritic fracture mode transition region. Charpy impact energy varied consistently with both orientation and location within the forged plate even though large scatter was present in the results. This large scatter precluded an accurate assessment of the materials fracture performance within the transition region. The scatter in the drop tower (SE(B)) results was much less and indicated that plate location had a minimal affect on performance. The reduced scatter in the SE(B) specimens is attributed to two factors. First, the microstructure of Ferralium, while macroscopically homogeneous, contains ferritic and austenitic phase sizes that approach the dimensions of the standard Charpy specimen. Second, the Charpy testing technique causes more variation than the standard SE(B) K{sub Id} tests within the transition region.

  12. Standard specification for steel castings, carbon, low alloy, and stainless steel, heavy-walled for steam turbines. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved May 10, 1998. Published August 1998. Originally published as A 356-52T. Last previous edition was A 356-96.

  13. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-01-01

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions. PMID:26868719

  14. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-01-01

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions. PMID:26868719

  15. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  16. Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  17. Properties of cast CF-8 stainless-steel weldments at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Klamut, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    ISABELLE is a 400 x 400 GeV proton-proton colliding beam accelerator now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams will be guided and focused by superconducting magnets. A total of 722 dipole beam bending magnets and 280 quadrupole beam focusing magnets are required. Centrifugally cast CF-8 stainless steel tubes were selected to provide a rigid support and to house the superconducting magnet assembly. The selection of this material for the support tubes is discussed by Dew-Hughes and Lee. Their study indicates that the presence of delta ferrite strengthens the material but causes a decrease in ductility if the ferrite content is greater than 10%. Brown and Tobler found that the fracture toughness is also decreased as the delta ferrite content is increased.

  18. 3D Numerical Simulation on Thermal Flow Coupling Field of Stainless Steel During Twin-Roll Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianlian; Liao, Bo; Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Hu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    The surface crack and lateral crack of the AISI 304 stainless steel thin strip produced by twin-roll casting were observed. The temperature at the center of outlet during twin-roll-casting process was determined by infrared thermometer. In order to avoid the surface cracks of the casting strip, the thermal flow coupling field of AISI 304 stainless steel during twin-roll-casting process was simulated by a 3D fluid-structure coupling model. According to the simulation result, the effect of the casting speed on thermal flow field was analyzed and the process parameters were optimized. Moreover, by studying heat flux curves, the heat transfer mechanism between molten pool and roll was analyzed. The results show that, with the increase of the casting speed, the temperature of the molten pool increases and the solidification point moves toward the outlet. Meanwhile, the whirlpool above gets larger. Based on the solidification front position, the optimized process parameters are 1500 °C and 0.37 m/s. The heat transfer mechanism between molten pool and roll contains direct contacting heat transfer and air gap heat transfer.

  19. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  20. Investigation of hydrogen induced cracking in 2205 duplex stainless steel in wet H{sub 2}S environments after isothermal treatment at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Sozanska, Maria . E-mail: maria.sozanska@polsl.pl; Klyk-Spyra, Katarzyna

    2006-06-15

    The effect of isothermal treatment (at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C) on HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) in sour environments containing hydrogen sulphide of a 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. The performance and microstructure of failed material were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and also X-ray diffraction. Two kinds of Cr-, Mo-enriched intermetallic phases, {sigma} and {chi}, were found to precipitate preferentially at {alpha}/{gamma} interfaces and within {alpha} grains after different times of aging in the temperature range of 650-900 deg. C. After performing tests according to the NACE Standard TM 0284 (1987) the specimens were investigated by using quantitative metallography methods. The volume fraction of {sigma} phase was changed with the time of aging and {sigma} phase developed into coarse particles due to the high diffusibility of solute atoms at high temperatures. The variation of size and shape of {sigma} phase particles was obtained by applying different heat treatment conditions to 2205 steel specimens. The results showed that 2205 duplex stainless steel containing nearly 12 vol.% of {sigma} phase in dispersed conditions was resistant to step cracking in wet environments containing hydrogen sulphide. It was highly possible that a crack would propagate faster along the embrittled {sigma} phase. However, very small cracks were found at austenite-ferrite boundaries where o phase particles were also present.

  1. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific and Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2006-06-30

    The goal of this project was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and the upper use temperature by 86 to 140 degrees fahrenheit (30 to 60 degrees celsius). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 35 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of approximately $230 million/year. The higher-strength H-Series cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat treating industry, including radiant burner tubes. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc., with research participation by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies.

  2. Progress in the Reliable Inspection of Cast Stainless Steel Reactor Piping Components

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2005-12-31

    Studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the utility, effec¬tiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspec¬tion of primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes progress, recent developments and results from assessments of three different NDE approaches including ultrasonic phased array inspection techniques, eddy current testing for surface-breaking flaws, and a low-frequency ultrasonic inspection methodology coupled with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank spool pieces were used for assessing the inspection methods. Eddy current studies were conducted on the inner diameter (ID) surface of piping specimens while the ultrasonic inspection methods were applied from the outer diameter (OD) surface of the specimens. The eddy current technique employed a Zetec MIZ-27SI Eddy Current instrument and a Zetec Z0000857-1 cross point spot probe with an operating frequency of 250 kHz. In order to reduce noise effects, degaussing of a subset of the samples resulted in noticeable improvements. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1 MHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. The low-frequency ultrasonic method employs a zone-focused, multi-incident angle inspection protocol (operating at 250-500 kHz) coupled with SAFT for improved signal

  3. Strengthening of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Q.; Han, J.; Yang, B.; Wang, X.T.

    2013-10-15

    The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants has been investigated. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of aged specimens increased comparing with those of the unaged ones. It was found that the increase of strengths is due to the hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure which decomposed from α phase in the steel. Fracture surfaces of specimens after in situ tensile test showed that the inhibition of (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure on the dislocation movements was more significant than ferrite although cracks started predominately at σ/γ{sub 2} interfaces. The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure behaves like a fiber reinforced composite material. - Highlights: • The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni CASS is investigated. • The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increase with increasing of σ phase. • The increase of strengths is due to hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure. • The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure in CASS behaves like a fibre reinforced composite material. • The σ/γ{sub 2} and α/σ/γ{sub 2} boundaries hinder the movement of dislocation.

  4. Cracking behavior of thermally aged and irradiated CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, W.-Y.; Natesan, K.; Li, Z.; Yang, Y.; Rao, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    To assess the combined effect of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the cracking behavior of CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel, crack growth rate (CGR) and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were carried out on compact-tension specimens in high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen. Both unaged and thermally aged specimens were irradiated at ∼320 °C to 0.08 dpa. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h apparently had no effect on the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking behavior in the test environment. The cracking susceptibility of CF-8 was not elevated significantly by neutron irradiation at 0.08 dpa. Transgranular cleavage-like cracking was the main fracture mode during the CGR tests, and a brittle morphology of delta ferrite was often seen on the fracture surfaces at the end of CGR tests. The fracture toughness J-R curve tests showed that both thermal aging and neutron irradiation can induce significant embrittlement. The loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation was more pronounced in the unaged than aged specimens. After neutron irradiation, the fracture toughness values of the unaged and aged specimens were reduced to a similar level. G-phase precipitates were observed in the aged and irradiated specimens with or without prior aging. The similar microstructural changes resulting from thermal aging and irradiation suggest a common microstructural mechanism of inducing embrittlement in CF-8.

  5. Fabrication of low-cost, cementless femoral stem 316L stainless steel using investment casting technique.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Suhasril, Andril Arafat; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Omar, Mohd Afian; Abd Kader, Ab Saman; Mohd Noor, Alias; A Harris, Arief Ruhullah; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-07-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a flourishing orthopedic surgery, generating billions of dollars of revenue. The cost associated with the fabrication of implants has been increasing year by year, and this phenomenon has burdened the patient with extra charges. Consequently, this study will focus on designing an accurate implant via implementing the reverse engineering of three-dimensional morphological study based on a particular population. By using finite element analysis, this study will assist to predict the outcome and could become a useful tool for preclinical testing of newly designed implants. A prototype is then fabricated using 316L stainless steel by applying investment casting techniques that reduce manufacturing cost without jeopardizing implant quality. The finite element analysis showed that the maximum von Mises stress was 66.88 MPa proximally with a safety factor of 2.39 against endosteal fracture, and micromotion was 4.73 μm, which promotes osseointegration. This method offers a fabrication process of cementless femoral stems with lower cost, subsequently helping patients, particularly those from nondeveloped countries. PMID:24404766

  6. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  7. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on microstructural evolution in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Ying; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M.; Lian, Tiangan

    2016-04-01

    The microstructural evolution in ferrite and austenitic in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) CF8, as received or thermally aged at 400 °C for 10,000 h, was followed under TEM with in situ irradiation of 1 MeV Kr ions at 300 and 350 °C to a fluence of 1.9 × 1015 ions/cm2 (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility. For the unaged CF8, the irradiation-induced dislocation loops appeared at a much lower dose in the austenite than in the ferrite. At the end dose, the austenite formed a well-developed dislocation network microstructure, while the ferrite exhibited an extended dislocation structure as line segments. Compared to the unaged CF8, the aged specimen appeared to have lower rate of damage accumulation. The rate of microstructural evolution under irradiation in the ferrite was significantly lower in the aged specimen than in the unaged. This difference is attributed to the different initial microstructures in the unaged and aged specimens, which implies that thermal aging and irradiation are not independent but interconnected damage processes.

  8. Application of ultrasonic waves to assess grain structure in cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.; Abrego-Lopez, J.

    1985-04-01

    Although the ASME code requires the inspection of cast stainless steel (CSS) piping in nuclear reactors, it has not been possible to demonstrate unambiguously that current inspection techniques are adequate. Ultrasonic inspection is difficult because the microstructure of CSS can vary considerably, from elastically isotropic with equiaxed, relatively small grains to elastically anisotropic with a columnar grain structure to a combination of the two. For the near term, improvements that may increase the reliability of ultrasonic inspection include (a) the development of methods to establish the microstructure of the material (to help optimize the inspection technique), (b) the identification of calibration standards that are more representative of the material to be inspected and (c) the use of cracked CSS samples for training purposes. In this paper, the results of experiments to characterize the microstructure of CSS by use of ultrasonic waves will be discussed. Shear waves may be more effective for isotropic material, whereas longitudinal waves may be better for the anisotropic case because of beam-focusing effects. Sound velocity and beam skewing can be measured accurately enough to characterize CSS even in thick-walled reactor components. 5 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Methods for the In-Situ Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ruud, Clayton O.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-06-29

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. Its engineering properties made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that make current ultrasonic in-service inspection of components quite challenging. To address inspection needs, new ultrasonic inspection approaches are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious and variable effects of the microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam may require knowledge of the microstructure, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detection (POD). The ability to classify microstructure type (e.g. polycrystalline or columnar) has the potential to guide selection of optimal NDE approaches. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic and electromagnetic methods for classifying CASS microstructures, when making measurements from the outside surface of the component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of these measurements to discriminate between two consistent microstructures - equiaxed-grain material versus columnar-grain material. The potential for fusion of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements for in-situ microstructure characterization in CASS materials will be explored.

  10. Lamb wave inspection for large cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The objective of the present research project is to develop an inspection technique to detect and size large-scale cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipes. This technique is based on the use of Lamb waves, or generally the resonant modes of propagation in the considered geometry, to circumvent the difficulties encountered when the conventional ultrasonic bulk waves are used to inspect the anisotropic, highly absorptive CCSS material. The research activities in 1987 were focused on probe design, Lamb-wave mode selection and excitation, detection mechanism, and anisotropy and curvature effects. The optimal design of a laboratory search unit was determined to be a tandem dual-element system built on the liquid-wedge principle. A reliable mechanism, which features a strong amplitude reduction when the search unit is scanned over a crack, was identified for crack detection and location. The preliminary experimental and analytical findings indicate that the best resonant modes were identified to be the four lowest modes in light of their excitability and minimization of the anisotropy effect. Finally, for typical geometrical dimensions under consideration, the curvature effect was found to be minimal.

  11. Microstructures, Mechanical and Chemical Properties of TLP-Bonded Joints in a Duplex Stainless Steel with Amorphous Ni-Based Insert Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xinjian; Kim, Myung Bok; Cho, Young Ho; Kang, Chung Yun

    2012-06-01

    The changes in tensile strength and pitting corrosion resistance of transient liquid-phase (TLP)-bonded joints for a duplex stainless steel with MBF-80, MBF-30, and MBF-35 as functions of holding time and filler were interpreted with respect to the bond microstructure. Using MBF-80 after 300 seconds, the fracture strength of the joint reached the maximum value. The failure was dependent on the interplay between the reduction in residual liquid and the increase in interface precipitates. After 3600 seconds, the joint strength had the minimum value. At the same conditions, the tensile strength for MBF-80 was low compared with MBF-35 and MBF-30. In contrast with the tensile strength, the joint produced with MBF-80 for 3600 seconds exhibited the best corrosion resistance. Among the fillers used, the corrosion resistance of the joint using MBF-80 close to that of the substrate could be related intimately to the existence of Cr in this filler.

  12. In situ colonization of marine biofilms on UNS S32760 duplex stainless steel coupons in areas with different water qualities: Implications for corrosion potential behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messano, Luciana V. R. de; Ignacio, Barbara L.; Neves, Maria H. C. B.; Coutinho, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    In the presence of biofilms, stainless steels (SS) exhibits an increase in corrosion potential, called ennoblement. In the present study, the corrosion potential ( E corr) behavior of the duplex SS UNS S32760 was recorded simultaneously with the in situ marine biofilm formation in two areas at Arraial do Cabo, Southeastern Brazil. The biofilm at Forno Harbor (an anthropogenically disturbed area) was characterized by higher relative abundances of Bacteria at day 2, followed by diatoms (especially Navicula sp.) on day 10 and dinoflagellates on day 18, whereas no clear trend was recorded at Cabo Frio Island (an undisturbed area). The ennoblement of E corr values was site-dependent. In a complementary laboratory assay, biofilms were removed and the E corr values registered in sterile conditions for the subsequent 10 days and corroborated in situ results. Understanding biofilms and SS interactions has important implications for materials science and engineering decisions as well as helping to fill in important gaps in this knowledge.

  13. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; García-Ochoa, E. M.; González-Sánchez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O2 (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N2 (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  14. M23C6 carbides and Cr2N nitrides in aged duplex stainless steel: A SEM, TEM and FIB tomography investigation.

    PubMed

    Maetz, J-Y; Douillard, T; Cazottes, S; Verdu, C; Kléber, X

    2016-05-01

    The precipitation evolution during ageing of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel was investigated, revealing that the precipitate type and morphology depends on the nature of the grain boundary. Triangular M23C6 carbides precipitate only at γ/δ interfaces and rod-like Cr2N nitrides precipitate at both γ/δ and δ/δ interfaces. After 15min of ageing, the M23C6 size no longer evolves, whereas that of the Cr2N continues to evolve. For Cr2N, the morphology is maintained at γ/δ interfaces, whereas percolation occurs to form a continuous layer at δ/δ interfaces. By combining 2D and 3D characterisation at the nanoscale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, a complete description of the precipitation evolution was obtained, including the composition, crystallographic structure, orientation relationship with the matrix phases, location, morphology, size and volume fraction. PMID:26925831

  15. Analysis of cracking phenomena in continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel billets with final electromagnetic stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu; Xu, Rong-jun; Fan, Zheng-jie; Li, Cheng-bin; Deng, An-yuan; Wang, En-gang

    2016-05-01

    Solidification cracking that occurs during continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel was investigated with and without final electromagnetic stirring (F-EMS). The results show that cracks initiates and propagates along the grain boundaries where the elements of carbon and sulfur are enriched. The final stirrer should be appropriately placed at a location that is 7.5 m away from the meniscus, and the appropriate thickness of the liquid core in the stirring zone is 50 mm. As a stirring current of 250 A is imposed, it can promote columnar-equiaxed transition, decrease the secondary dendrite arm spacing, and reduce the segregation of both carbon and sulfur. F-EMS can effectively decrease the amount of cracks in 1Cr13 stainless steel.

  16. Internal Crack Propagation in a Continuously Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Analyzed by Actual Residual Stress Tensor Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Youichi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Initiation, propagation, and termination of internal cracks in a continuously cast austenitic stainless steel has been investigated with emphasis on stress loading of the solidified shell during casting. Cracks were formed at the center of the slab, parallel to the width of the cast, and were observed near the narrow faces. Optimized two-dimensional X-ray diffraction method was employed to measure residual stress tensor distributions around the cracks in the as-cast slab with coarse and strongly preferentially oriented grains. The tensor distributions had a sharp peak, as high as 430 MPa, at the crack end neighboring the columnar grains. On the other hand, lower values were measured at the crack end neighboring the equiaxed grains, where the local temperatures were higher during solidification. The true residual stress distributions were determined by evaluating the longitudinal elastic constant for each measured position, resulting in more accurate stress values than before. Electron probe micro-analysis at the terminal crack position showed that Ni, Ti, and Si were concentrated at the boundaries of the equiaxed grains, where the tensile strength was estimated to be lower than at the primary grains. A model of the crack formation and engineering recommendations to reduce crack formation are proposed.

  17. Effects of cooling time and alloying elements on the microstructure of the gleeble-simulated heat-affected zone of 22% Cr duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Rong-Iuan; Liou, Horng-Yih; Pan, Yeong-Tsuen

    2001-10-01

    The effects of austenite stabilizers, such as nitrogen, nickel, and manganese, and cooling time on the microstructure of the Gleeble simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) of 22% Cr duplex stainless steels were investigated. The submerged are welding was performed for comparison purposes. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for microscopic studies. The amount of Cr2N precipitates in the simulated HAZ was determined using the potentiostatic electrolysis method. The experimental results indicate that an increase in the nitrogen and nickel contents raised the δ to transformation temperature and also markedly increased the amount of austenite in the HAZ. The lengthened cooling time promotes the reformation of austenite. An increase in the austenite content reduces the supersaturation of nitrogen in ferrite matrix as well as the precipitation tendency of Cr2N. The optimum cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (Δ t 8/5) obtained from the Gleeble simulation is between 30 and 60 s, which ensures the austenite content in HAZ not falling below 25% and superior pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance for the steels. The effect of manganese on the formation of austenite can be negligible.

  18. Investigation of the Kinetics of the Ferrite/Austenite Phase Transformation in the HAZ of a 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2002-03-14

    A semi-quantitative map based on a series of spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) scans shows the progression of the ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) phase balance throughout the HAZ during GTA welding of a 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS). This map shows an unexpected decrease in the ferrite fraction on heating, followed by a recovery to the original ferrite fraction on cooling at locations within the HAZ. Even though such behavior is supported by thermodynamic calculations, it has not been confirmed by either experimental methods or have the kinetics been evaluated. Both Gleeble thermal simulations and time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements on spot welds in the 2205 DSS provide further evidence for this rather low-temperature transformation. On the other hand, calculations of the diffusion of alloying elements across the 6/y interface under a variety of conditions shed no further light on the driving force for this transformation. Further work on the mechanisms and driving forces for this transformation is on-going.

  19. Microstructural Evolution and Bonding Behavior during Transient Liquid-Phase Bonding of a Duplex Stainless Steel using two Different Ni-B-Based Filler Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xinjian; Kim, Myung Bok; Kang, Chung Yun

    2011-05-01

    Microstructural evolution and bonding behavior of transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonded joint for a duplex stainless steel using MBF-30 (Ni -4.5Si -3.2B [wt pct]) and MBF-50 (Ni -7.5Si -1.4B -18.5Cr [wt pct]) were investigated. Using MBF-30, the microstructure of the athermally solidified zone was dependent on B diffusion at 1333.15 K (1060 °C). Ni3B and a supersaturated γ-Ni phase were observed in this zone. BN appeared in the bonding-affected zone. However, using MBF-50, the influences of base metal alloying elements, particularly N and Cr as well as Si in the filler material, on the bond microstructure development were more pronounced at 1448.15 K (1175 °C). BN and (Cr, Ni)3Si phase were present in the bond centerline. The formation of BN precipitates in the bonding-affected zone was suppressed. A significant deviation in the isothermal solidification rate from the conventional TLP bonding diffusion models was observed in the joints prepared at 1448.15 K (1175 °C) using MBF-50.

  20. Surface modification of 2205 duplex stainless steel by low temperature salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Runbo; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Si; Li, Mingxing; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-04-01

    2205 stainless steel was modified by salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C in this study. The microstructure, surface hardness and erosion-corrosion resistance were systematically evaluated. Salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C can form a nitrocarburized layer, and with the treated time prolong, the thickness of the layer increased. By nitrocarburizing within 8 h, only expanded austenite (S phase) formed. With treated time increased, CrN gradually diffused from the places where there were ferrite grains in the layer before nitrocarburizing. Besides, the depth increased with the nitrocarburized time and the layer grew approximately conforms to the parabolic rate law. Salt bath nitrocarburizing can effectively improve the surface hardness of 2205 DSS. The erosion-corrosion resistance was improved by salt bath nitrocarburizing and the 16 h treated sample had the best erosion-corrosion behavior.

  1. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Optimization of Heat Treatments on Stainless Steel Castings for Improved Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    John N. DuPont; Jeffrey D. Farren; Andrew W. Stockdale; Brett M. Leister

    2012-06-30

    It is commonly believed that high alloy steel castings have inferior corrosion resistance to their wrought counterparts as a result of the increased amount of microsegregation remaining in the as-cast structure. Homogenization and dissolution heat treatments are often utilized to reduce or eliminate the residual microsegregation and dissolve the secondary phases. Detailed electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and light optical microscopy (LOM) were utilized to correlate the amount of homogenization and dissolution present after various thermal treatments with calculated values and with the resultant corrosion resistance of the alloys.The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the homogenization and dissolution kinetics were investigated using stainless steel alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the impact toughness and corrosion reistance of cast stainless steel alloys CF-3, CF-3M, CF-8, and CF-8M was also investigated.

  2. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this program was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The higher strength H-Series of cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat-treating industry. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc. with research participation by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies. Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) was also a partner in this project. Each team partner had well-defined roles. Duraloy Technologies led the team by identifying the base alloys that were to be improved from this research. Duraloy Technologies also provided an extensive creep data base on current alloys, provided creep-tested specimens of certain commercial alloys, and carried out centrifugal casting and component fabrication of newly designed alloys. Nucor Steel was the first partner company that installed the radiant burner tube assembly in their heat-treating furnace. Other steel companies participated in project review meetings and are currently working with Duraloy Technologies to obtain components of the new alloys. EIO is promoting the enhanced performance of the newly designed alloys to Ohio-based companies. The Timken Company is one of the Ohio companies being promoted by EIO. The project management and coordination plan is shown in Fig. 1.1. A related project at University of Texas-Arlington (UT-A) is described in Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired

  3. Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-11-01

    This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

  4. Sensitization phenomena on aged SAF 2205 duplex stainless steel and their control using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, E.; Benedetti, B. de; Maizza, G.; Rosalbino, F. . Dept. of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Microstructural changes and resulting properties were studied for SAF 2205 (UNS S31803) austeno-ferritic stainless steel (SS) aged between 700 C and 900 C for up to 2 weeks and then water-quenched. Quantitative metallography coupled with x-ray diffraction techniques were adopted to follow ferrite ([alpha]) transformation with subsequent formation of secondary austenite ([gamma][sub 2]) and sigma ([sigma]) phase. The kinetic model of a transformation was interpreted in the form of an Avrami-type expression. The electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test was used to evaluate the degree of sensitization of the aged specimens. Results were compared with results from the corrosion test in boiling nitric acid (HNO[sub 3]). Influences of the transformation of ferrite into austenite, sigma phase, and of other microstructural variations such as chromium nitride (Cr[sub 2]N) precipitation on stability of the passive film were shown. The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion phenomena was caused by chromium depletion caused by sigma phase precipitation, while chromium nitrides appeared less harmful. Results were expressed as an isocharge line diagram that allowed concise identification of sensitization and desensitization ranges.

  5. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  6. Microstructural Evolution of an Al-Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel During Tensile Deformation Between 77 K and 473 K (-196 °C and 200 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Reza; Ullrich, Christiane; Rafaja, David; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Tensile deformation behavior of an Al-alloyed Fe-17Cr-6Mn-4Al-3Ni-0.45C (mass pct) duplex stainless steel containing approximately 20 vol pct ferrite was studied in the temperature range from 77 K to 473 K (-196 °C to 200 °C). While the elongation exhibited a maximum near room temperature, the yield strength continuously increased at lower tensile test temperatures. According to the microstructural examinations, the twinning-induced plasticity and the dislocation cell formation were the dominant deformation mechanisms in the austenite and ferrite, respectively. Reduction of the tensile ductility at T < 273 K (0 °C) was attributed to the ready material decohesion at the ferrite/austenite boundaries. Tensile testing at 473 K (200 °C) was associated with the serrated flow which was ascribed to the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Due to a rise in the stacking fault energy of austenite, the occurrence of mechanical twinning was impeded at higher tensile test temperatures. Furthermore, the evolution of microstructural constituents at room temperature was studied by interrupted tensile tests. The deformation in the austenite phase started with the formation of Taylor lattices followed by mechanical twinning at higher strains/stresses. In the ferrite phase, on the other hand, the formation of dislocation cells, cell refinement, and microbands formation occurred in sequence during deformation. Microhardness evolution of ferrite and austenite in the interrupted tensile test specimens implied a higher strain-hardening rate for the austenite as it clearly became the harder phase at higher tensile strain levels.

  7. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ying Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  8. Long-Term Oxidation of Candidate Cast Iron and Advanced Austenitic Stainless Steel Exhaust System Alloys from 650-800 C in Air with Water Vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N; Haynes, James A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherentmore » from 700-800 C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 C compared to 650-700 C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  9. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.

  10. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remainedmore » adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  11. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    DOEpatents

    Mazias, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard,Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2007-08-14

    A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

  12. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-23

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

  13. 3D stress simulation and parameter design during twin-roll casting of 304 stainless steel based on the Anand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Li-gang; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qing-xiang

    2014-07-01

    This study first investigated cracks on the surface of an actual steel strip. Formulating the Anand model in ANSYS software, we then simulated the stress field in the molten pool of type 304 stainless steel during the twin-roll casting process. Parameters affecting the stress distribution in the molten pool were analyzed in detail and optimized. After twin-roll casting, a large number of transgranular and intergranular cracks resided on the surface of the thin steel strip, and followed a tortuous path. In the molten pool, stress was enhanced at the exit and at the roller contact positions. The stress at the exit decreased with increasing casting speed and pouring temperature. To ensure high quality of the fabricated strips, the casting speed and pouring temperature should be controlled above 0.7 m/s and 1520°C, respectively.

  14. Comparative study: sensitization development in hot-isostatic-pressed cast and wrought structures type 316L(N)-IG stainless steel under isothermal heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutko, K. I.; Belous, V. N.

    2002-12-01

    This work focuses on the relative sensitization resistance of type 316L(N)-IG stainless steel (SS). Cast and wrought structures SS after solid hot-isostatic pressing (solid-HIP) operation are investigated under isothermal heat treatment. Wrought SS/SS solid-HIP joint sensitization is taken also into consideration. These experiments employed the quantitative double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) and oxalic acid etch screening tests. A copper-copper sulfate-16% sulfuric acid test applied for strongly sensitized cast SS to reinforce the results were received by the methods mentioned above. Results from all employed methods correlate well. Sensitization was detected neither in cast nor in wrought SS in as-HIPed condition excluding wrought SS/SS solid-HIP joints. Significant difference between sensitization development rates was determined in cast and wrought SS structures when annealing at 675 °C for a duration up to 50 h.

  15. Automated flaw detection scheme for cast austenitic stainless steel weld specimens using Hilbert-Huang transform of ultrasonic phased array data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Tariq; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, Lalita; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan; Diaz, Aaron; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-05-17

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize flaws using ultrasonic phased-array data. Data was collected on cast austenitic stainless stell (CASS) weld specimens onloan from the U.S. nuclear power industry' Pressurized Walter Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) traveling specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless stell (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cst(SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection singals from the weld and heat affected zone of the based materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The Accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  16. Automated flaw detection scheme for cast austenitic stainless stell weld specimens using Hilbert-Huang transform of ultrasonic phased array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Tariq; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, Lalita; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan; Diaz, Aaron; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize flaws using ultrasonic phased-array data. Data was collected on cast austenitic stainless stell (CASS) weld specimens onloan from the U.S. nuclear power industry' Pressurized Walter Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) traveling specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless stell (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cst(SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection singals from the weld and heat affected zone of the based materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The Accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  17. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel: Part II. Isothermal aging kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robino, C. V.; Cieslak, M. J.; Hochanadel, P. W.; Edwards, G. R.

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 °C to 593 °C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 °C, 538 °C, 566 °C, and 593 °C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that Β-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the Β-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels. Although the Avrami analysis was found not to provide a tenable description of the precipitation kinetics, it does provide a reasonable methodology for portrayal of the hardening response

  18. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar

  19. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel; Part 2: Isothermal aging kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J. . Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.); Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 C to 593 C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 C, 538 C, 566 C, and 593 C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that [beta]-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the [beta]-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels.

  20. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  1. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  2. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  3. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel: Part I. Mechanical properties and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochanadel, P. W.; Edwards, G. R.; Robino, C. V.; Cieslak, M. J.

    1994-04-01

    The microstructure of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel heat-treated to various conditions was studied using light and electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were investigated by using uniaxial tensile testing, hardness testing, and Charpy impact testing. The Β-NiAl strengthening precipitates, though detectable by electron diffraction, were difficult to resolve by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in specimens aged at low temperatures (566 °C and below). A high dislocation density was observed in the lath martensitic structure. The higher strength and lower ductility observed at low aging temperatures was attributed to both the high dislocation density and the precipitation of Β-NiAl. When samples were aged at high temperatures (> 566 °C), a lower dislocation density and a reverted austenite fraction on the order of 15 pct were observed. Spherical Β-NiAl precipitates were observed in the overaged condition. The decrease in strength and corresponding increase in ductility observed in samples aged at temperatures above 566 °C were attributed to the reverted austenite and recovery. Mechanical properties were improved when the homogenizing temperature and time were increased. Electron probe microanalysis quantified the increased homogeneity realized by increasing homogenizing temperature and time. Elimination of the refrigeration step, which normally follows the solution treatment, did not degrade the mechanical properties. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed only minor decreases in the fraction of retained austenite when refrigeration followed the solution treatment.

  4. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping through Large-Bore Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Components

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Coble, Jamie B.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to assist in understanding the effects of coarse-grained microstructures found in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials on acoustic longitudinal wave propagation. Ultrasonic laboratory measurements were made on three specimens representing four different grain structures. Phased array (PA) probes were fixed on each specimen surface and excited in the longitudinal mode at specific angles while a point receiver was scanned in a raster pattern over the end of the specimen, generating a transmitted sound field image. Three probes operating at nominal frequencies of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 MHz were used. A 6.4 mm (0.25-in.) thick slice was removed from the specimen end and beam mapping was repeated three times, yielding four full sets of beam images. Data were collected both with a constant part path for each configuration (probe, specimen and slice, angle, etc.) and with a variable part path (fixed position on the surface). The base specimens and slices were then polished and etched to reveal measureable grain microstructures that were compared to the sound field interactions and scattering effects seen in the collected data.

  5. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CF8C stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard, Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2010-08-17

    A CF8C type stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 18.0 weight percent to about 22.0 weight percent chromium and 11.0 weight percent to about 14.0 weight percent nickel; from about 0.05 weight percent to about 0.15 weight percent carbon; from about 2.0 weight percent to about 10.0 weight percent manganese; and from about 0.3 weight percent to about 1.5 weight percent niobium. The present alloys further include less than 0.15 weight percent sulfur which provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. The disclosed alloys also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon.

  6. Heat and corrosion resistant cast CF8C stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard, Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2006-12-26

    A CF8C type stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 18.0 weight percent to about 22.0 weight percent chromium and 11.0 weight percent to about 14.0 weight percent nickel; from about 0.05 weight percent to about 0.15 weight percent carbon; from about 2.0 weight percent to about 10.0 weight percent manganese; and from about 0.3 weight percent to about 1.5 weight percent niobium. The present alloys further include less than 0.15 weight percent sulfur which provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. The disclosed alloys also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon.

  7. Modeling of ultrasonic propagation in heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel based on EBSD analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Luo, Zhongbing; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Longjiang; Lin, Li

    2015-05-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel (CCASS) is challenging due to the complex metallurgical structure. Numerical modeling could provide quantitative information on ultrasonic propagation and plays an important role in developing advanced and reliable ultrasonic inspection techniques. But the fundamental obstacle is the accurate description of the complex metallurgical structure. To overcome this difficulty, a crystal orientation map of a CCASS specimen in the 96 mm × 12 mm radial-axial cross section was acquired based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and it was used to describe the coarse-grained structure and grain orientation. A model of ultrasonic propagation for CCASS was built according to the EBSD map. The ultrasonic responses of the CCASS sample were also tested. Some experimental phenomena such as structural noise and signal distortion were reproduced. The simulated results showed a good consistence with the experiments. The modeling method is expected to be effective for the precise interpretation of ultrasonic propagation in the polycrystalline structures of CCASS. PMID:25670411

  8. Improvements in Low-Frequency, Ultrasonic Phased-Array Evaluation for Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

    2010-12-01

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This particular study focused on the evaluation of custom-designed, low-frequency (500 kHz) phased-array (PA) probes for examining welds in thick-section cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping. In addition, research was conducted to observe ultrasonic sound field propagation effects from known coarse-grained microstructures found in parent CASS material. The study was conducted on a variety of thick-wall, coarse-grained CASS specimens that were previously inspected by an older generation 500-kHz PA-UT probe and acquisition instrument configuration. This comparative study describes the impact of the new PA probe design on flaw detection and sizing in a low signal-to-noise environment. The set of Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) CASS specimens examined in this study are greater than 50.8-mm (2.0-in.) thick with documented flaws and microstructures. These specimens are on loan to PNNL from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The flaws contained within these specimens are thermal fatigue cracks (TFC) or mechanical fatigue cracks (MFC) and range from 13% to 42% in through-wall extent. In addition, ultrasonic signal continuity was evaluated on two CASS parent material ring sections by examining the edge-of-pipe response (corner geometry) for regions of signal loss.

  9. Task 1 Final Report, Theoretical/Mathematical Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Anisotropic Polycrystalline Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-04-20

    One of the tasks of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored project titled "Reliability of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Inservice Examination (ISI)" is to provide collaborative assistance to Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) in France through theoretical predictions of ultrasonic scattering by grains of cast stainless steels (CASS) components. More specifically, a mathematical treatment of ultrasonic scattering in media having duplex micro¬structure is sought because cast stainless steel components often contains larger-scale macrograins that are composed of sub-grains/colonies. In this report, we present formal mathematical theories for ultrasonic wave propagation in polycrystalline aggregates having both simple (composed of grains only) and complex microstructures (having macrograins and sub-grains/colonies). Computations based on these theories are then carried out for ultrasonic backscatter power, attenuation due to scattering, and phase velocity dispersions. Specifically, numerical results are presented for backscatter coefficient for plane longitudinal wave propagating in duplex steel containing macrograins and colonies. Furthermore, the expected propagation characteristics (attenuation coefficient and phase velocity) are computed and described in this report for plane longitudinal waves propagating in (1) steels composed of randomly oriented grains, (2) [001] aligned grains encountered in austenitic stainless steel welds and casts, and (3) duplex steels.

  10. Molecular characterization of natural biofilms from household taps with different materials: PVC, stainless steel, and cast iron in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Yu, Zhisheng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun

    2013-09-01

    Microorganism in drinking water distribution system may colonize in biofilms. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversities were analyzed in both water and biofilms grown on taps with three different materials (polyvinyl chloride (PVC), stainless steel, and cast iron) from a local drinking water distribution system. In total, five clone libraries (440 sequences) were obtained. The taxonomic composition of the microbial communities was found to be dominated by members of Proteobacteria (65.9-98.9 %), broadly distributed among the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Other bacterial groups included Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Moreover, a small proportion of unclassified bacteria (3.5-10.6 %) were also found. This investigation revealed that the bacterial communities in biofilms appeared much more diversified than expected and more care should be taken to the taps with high bacterial diversity. Also, regular monitor of outflow water would be useful as potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected. In addition, microbial richness and diversity in taps ranked in the order as: PVC < stainless steel < cast iron. All the results interpreted that PVC would be a potentially suitable material for use as tap component in drinking water distribution system. PMID:23143469

  11. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Pankiw, Roman; Voke, Don

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  12. Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2008-07-21

    Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

  13. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Hui; Xin, Changsheng; Wang, Xitao

    2016-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels of unaged and thermally aged at 400 °C for as long as 20,000 h were studied by using a slow strain rate testing (SSRT) system. Spinodal decomposition in ferrite during thermal aging leads to hardening in ferrite and embrittlement of the SSRT specimen. Plastic deformation and thermal aging degree have a great influence on the oxidation rate of the studied material in simulated PWR primary water environments. In the SCC regions of the aged SSRT specimen, the surface cracks, formed by the brittle fracture of ferrite phases, are the possible locations for SCC. In the non-SCC regions, brittle fracture of ferrite phases also occurs because of the effect of thermal aging embrittlement.

  14. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-07-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  15. Laboratory investigation of the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel in the presence of an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jin; Yang, Chunguang; Xu, Dake; Sun, Da; Nan, Li; Sun, Ziqing; Li, Qi; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) resistance of a novel Cu-bearing 2205 duplex stainless steel (2205 Cu-DSS) against an aerobic marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was investigated. The electrochemical test results showed that Rp increased and icorr decreased sharply after long-term immersion in the inoculation medium, suggesting that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed excellent MIC resistance to the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Fluorescence microscope images showed that 2205 Cu-DSS possessed a strong antibacterial ability, and its antibacterial efficiency after one and seven days was 7.75% and 96.92%, respectively. The pit morphology comparison after 14 days between 2205 DSS and 2205 Cu-DSS demonstrated that the latter showed a considerably reduced maximum MIC pit depth compared with the former (1.44 μm vs 9.50 μm). The experimental results suggest that inhibition of the biofilm was caused by the copper ions released from the 2205 Cu-DSS, leading to its effective mitigation of MIC by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26194639

  16. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  17. Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, James A; Armstrong, Beth L; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Kumar, Deepak; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

  18. Low-Temperature Aging Characteristics of Type 316L Stainless Steel Welds: Dependence on Solidification Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Thermal aging embrittlement of light water reactor (LWR) components made of stainless steel cast has been recognized as a potential degradation issue, and careful attention has been paid to it. Although welds of austenitic stainless steels have γ-δ duplex microstructure, which is similar to that of the stainless steel cast, examination of the thermal aging characteristics of the stainless steel welds is very limited. In this investigation, two types of type 316L stainless steel weld metal with different solidification modes were prepared using two kinds of filler metals having tailored Ni equivalent and Cr equivalent. Differences between the two weld metals in the morphology of microstructure, in the composition of δ-ferrite, and in hardening behaviors with isothermal aging at 335 °C have been investigated. The hardness of the ferrite phase has increased with aging time, while the hardness of austenite phase has stayed the same. The mottled aspect has been observed in δ-ferrite of aged samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. These characteristics suggest that spinodal decomposition has occurred in δ-ferrite by aging at 335 °C. The age-hardening rate of δ-ferrite was faster for the primary austenite solidification mode (AF mode) sample than the primary ferrite solidification mode (FA mode) sample in the initial stage of the aging up to 2000 hours. It has been suggested that the solidification mode can affect the kinetics of spinodal decomposition.

  19. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluations Of Implanted And In-Situ Grown Flaws In Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-07-31

    A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimen welds (pipe-to-elbow configuration) that were salvaged from a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant that had not been operated. Thus, these welds were fabricated using vintage CASS materials that were formed in the 1970s. Additionally, in-situ grown TFCs were placed in the adjacent CASS base material of one of these specimens. Ultrasonic phased-array responses from both types of flaws (implanted and in-situ grown) were analyzed for detection and characterization based on sizing and signal-to-noise determination. Multiple probes were employed covering the 0.8 to 2.0 MHz frequency range. To further validate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) findings, an independent in-service inspection (ISI) supplier evaluated the flaws with their American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII-qualified procedure. The results obtained by PNNL personnel compared favorably to the ISI supplier results. All examined flaws were detected and sized within the ASME Code-allowable limits.

  1. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  2. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Phase Transformation of Diffusion-Bonded Joints of Duplex Stainless Steel and Ti-6Al-4V Using Nickel and Copper as Composite Intermediate Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sukumar; Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Chatterjee, Subrata; Mishra, Brajendra

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, the effect of bonding temperature on phase transformation of diffusion-bonded joints of duplex stainless steel (DSS) and Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) using simultaneously both nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) interlayers was investigated in the temperature range of 1148 K to 1223 K (875 °C to 950 °C) insteps of 25 K (25 °C) for 60 minutes under 4 MPa uniaxial pressure in vacuum. Interfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and interdiffusion of the chemical species across the diffusion interfaces were witnessed by electron probe microanalysis. At 1148 K (875 °C), layer-wise Cu4Ti, Cu2Ti, Cu4Ti3, CuTi, and CuTi2 phases were observed at the Cu-Ti64 interface; however, DSS-Ni and Ni-Cu interfaces were free from any intermetallic. At 1173 K and 1198 K (900 °C and 925 °C), Cu interlayer could not restrict the diffusion of atoms from Ti64 to Ni, and vice versa; and Ni-Ti-based intermetallics were formed at the Ni-Cu interface and throughout the Cu zone as well; however, at 1223 K (950 °C), both Ni and Cu interlayers could not inhibit the diffusion of atoms from Ti64 to DSS, and vice versa. The maximum shear strength of ~377 MPa was obtained for the diffusion couple processed at 1148 K (875 °C) and strength of the bonded joints gradually decreased with the increasing bonding temperature due to the widening of brittle intermetallics at the diffusion zone. Fracture path indicated that failure took place through the Cu4Ti intermetallic at the Cu-Ti64 interface when bonding was processed at 1148 K (875 °C). When bonding was processed at 1173 K and 1198 K (900 °C and 925 °C), fracture took place through the Ni3Ti intermetallic at the Ni-(Ni + Cu + Ti64 diffusion reaction) interface; however, at 1223 K (950 °C), fracture morphology indicated the brittle nature and the fracture took place apparently through the σ phase at the DSS-(DSS + Ni + Cu + Ti64 diffusion reaction) interface.

  3. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems. PMID:22367933

  4. Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Method for Welds in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping JCN N6398, Task 1B

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Mathews, Royce; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-07-28

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS); dissimilar metal welds; piping with corrosion-resistant cladding; weld overlays, inlays and onlays; and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. In this effort, PNNL supports cooperation with Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) to assess reliable inspection of CASS materials. The NRC Project Manager has established a cooperative effort with the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). CEA, under funding from IRSN, are supporting collaborative efforts with the NRC and PNNL. Regarding its work on the NDE of materials, CEA is providing its modeling software (CIVA) in exchange for PNNL offering expertise and data related to phased-array detection and sizing, acoustic attenuation, and back scattering on CASS materials. This collaboration benefits the NRC because CEA performs research and development on CASS for Électricité de France (EdF). This technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of welds in CASS pressurizer (PZR) surge line nuclear reactor piping. A set of thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) was implanted into three CASS PZR surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing

  5. Tensile behavior of CF8-CPF8-304H and CF8M-CPF8M-316H stainless steel static and centrifugal castings

    SciTech Connect

    McEnerney, J.W.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1981-10-01

    We have analyzed the tensile behavior of 11 heats of grades CF8-CPF8-304H and 13 heats of grades CF8M-CPF8M-316H static and centrifugal castings from room temperature to 650/sup 0/C. Except for anomalous conditions, the centrifugal castings exhibited uniform composition. All CPF8-304H centrifugal castings contained only radial columnar grains, but some CPF8M-316H castings had columnar, banded, or equiaxed structures. Ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were the properties in which castings showed the most inferiority to wrought material. With increasing ferrite content, 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength increased while uniform elongation, total elongation, and reduction of area decreased. Although centrifugal castings did not exhibit significant end-to-end variation in tensile behavior, the 0.2% yield strength displayed anisotropy, with axial and circumferential values being greater than radial.

  6. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... The absence of cellular casts or presence of a few hyaline casts is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of ...

  7. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with advanced kidney disease and chronic kidney failure . White blood cell (WBC) casts are more common ... Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  8. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  10. Properties of electroslag castings: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1984-11-01

    This part of several reports to be published on the properties of electroslag castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and type 316 stainless steel describes the properties of three electroslag-cast valve bodies of type 316 stainless steel. These castings were electroslag cast at the University of British Columbia in Canada from ORNL-supplied electrodes. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical analysis, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Tensile data on these castings were compared with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code minimum values for sand castings. The creep data were compared with the data on sand castings and the ASME code minimum curve for wrought material. 29 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Considerations in Duplex Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Arthur; Goen, Tom

    Problems of duplex investment are noted in the introduction to this booklet designed to provide a technique by which the investment decision can be approached, develop estimates of typical costs and returns under differing conditions, and encourage investors to analyze objectives and conditions before the decision to buy or build is made. A…

  12. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  13. The Duplex Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Alvin L.

    1984-01-01

    The duplex society, in which the poor live in close proximity to others but in a separate compartment, is already with us. Unless something deeply changes about family income, more than one-third of future generations will come to adulthood having spent a portion of their childhood in official poverty. (RM)

  14. Post-weld Tempered Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welded Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Manufacturing of hydroelectric turbine components involves the assembly of thick-walled stainless steels using conventional multi-pass arc welding processes. By contrast, hybrid laser-arc welding may be an attractive process for assembly of such materials to realize deeper penetration depths, higher production rates, narrower fusion, and heat-affected zones, and lower distortion. In the present work, single-pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick CA6NM, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was carried out in the butt joint configuration using a continuous wave fiber laser at its maximum power of 5.2 kW over welding speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.2 m/minute. The microstructures across the weldment were characterized after post-weld tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 hour. From microscopic examinations, the fusion zone was observed to mainly consist of tempered lath martensite and some residual delta-ferrite. The mechanical properties were evaluated in the post-weld tempered condition and correlated to the microstructures and defects. The ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact energy values of the fully penetrated welds in the tempered condition were acceptable according to ASTM, ASME, and industrial specifications, which bodes well for the introduction of hybrid laser-arc welding technology for the manufacturing of next generation hydroelectric turbine components.

  15. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  16. On the stress corrosion cracking of lean duplex steel in chloride environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayyaba, Qanita; Farooq, Hina; Shahid, Muhammad; Jadoon, Ammer Khan; Shahzad, M.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2014-06-01

    Duplex stainless steel having attractive combination of austenitic and ferritic properties is being used in industry such as petrochemical, pulp and paper mills. In this study, the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in 3.5% sodium chloride environment was investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical DC testing and slow strain rate test (SSRT). Weight loss data showed no significant corrosion after 1700 hours. Electrochemical polarization test in 3.5% NaCl solution exhibited a uniform corrosion rate of 0.008 mpy (calculated using Tafel analysis) showing passivity in the range of 735-950 mV. A comparison of the slow strain rate test in 3.5% NaCl solution with air shows almost a similar stress strain curve for duplex stainless steel. In comparison, the stress strain curves for 0.15% carbon steel show a loss of about 25% tensile elongation for the same comparison. The excellent corrosion and especially resistance to localized corrosion (pitting) is responsible for no loss of ductility in duplex stainless steel.

  17. Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-02-01

    PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

  18. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  19. Phase transformations in aged CF 8 and CF 8M stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Miller, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical properties of CF 8 and CF 8M cast stainless steels used for the primary coolant pipes in pressurized light-water nuclear reactors (service temperature about 300C) may be degraded by extended aging at 300 to 400C. Of particular concern is the dramatic loss in impact properties to approximately 15% of the initial value. The cast steels have a duplex microstructure consisting of austenite (el) with 15 to 20% delta-ferrite. The ferrite increases the yield strength and reduces the susceptibility to hot cracking. During aging, the ferrite decomposes spinodally into a fine scaled interconnected network of iron-rich phase and chromium-enriched ' phase. In addition, fine particles of G-phase, a complex silicide, are formed in the ferrite. In some cases, extensive carbide formation at el-delta interfaces occurs. These fine scale phase transformations are believed to be responsible for the degradation of mechanical properties. This paper describes the results of microstructural analysis by atom-probe field-ion microscopy and analytical electron microscopy which provide a powerful combination for a complete characterization of these steels for reliable structure-property correlations.

  20. Researches upon cavitation erosion behavior of some duplex steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, C.; Ghera, C.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels having a duplex structure formed by austenite and ferrite. The conclusions were obtained by using both the cavitation erosion characteristic curves and the pictures of the eroded surfaces obtained with performing optic microscopes. The researches were focused upon the optimal correlation between the cavitation erosion resistance and the rate of the two structural constituents. The tests were done with T2 facility, with ceramic crystals, which integrally respects the ASTM G32-2010 Standard. The obtained results present the cumulative effect upon cavitation erosion of the chemical composition, mechanical properties and the structural constituents. The results of the researches are of importance for the specialists which establishes the composition of the stainless steels used for manufacturing hydraulic machineries or other devices subjected to cavitation erosion.

  1. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1994-10-28

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft{sup 3}) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program.

  2. Properties of electroslag castings. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1985-08-01

    The quality, response to heat treatment, and mechanical properties of electroslag-cast step blocks from Cameron Iron Works and from Selectrotech, Inc., are described. The mechanical properties include Charpy impact, tensile, and creep. Properties of the electroslag castings were compared to determine the differences between casters, between wrought and electroslag cast properties, and between sand and electroslag castings. Results are presented to show that the electroslag casting process has a potential for producing properties similar to those of wrought material for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and similar to those of sand-cast material for type 316 stainless steel. 5 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  4. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  5. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  6. Localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel weldments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, W. F.; Duquette, D. J.

    1980-02-01

    Pitting corrosion experiments were conducted on 308L stainless steel as a function of alloy microstructure (% delta ferrite) in acidified water-methanol solutions. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on single-phase and duplex 304 stainless steels as functions of solution chemistry, temperature, and sensitization. (DLC)

  7. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  8. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  9. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  10. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  11. Is stainless steel really "stainless"?

    PubMed

    Porteous, Joan

    2011-06-01

    Initial purchase and replacement costs for surgical instrumentation are significant components in today's operating room budgets. OR staff and medical device reprocessing personnel work together as a team to ensure effective management of this valuable commodity. The purpose of this article is to discuss the composition of stainless steel surgical instruments, to identify processes to minimize damage to instruments caused by staining, corrosion, and pitting, and to utilize that information to describe effective measures to manage instrumentation in both the OR and reprocessing areas. PMID:21823503

  12. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  13. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  14. Duplex Direct Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, Israel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing and demonstrating communications and network technologies that are helping to enable the near-Earth space Internet. GRC envisions several service categories. The first of these categories is direct data distribution or D3 (pronounced "D-cubed"). Commercially provided D3 will make it possible to download a data set from a spacecraft, like the International Space Station. as easily as one can extract a file from a remote server today, using a file transfer protocol. In a second category, NASA spacecraft will make use of commercial satellite communication (SATCOM) systems. Some of those services will come from purchasing time on unused transponders that cover landmasses. While it is likely there will be gaps in service coverage, Internet services should be available using these systems. This report addresses alternative methods of implementing a full duplex enhancement of the GRC developed experimental Ka-Band Direct Data Distribution (D3) space-to-ground communication link. The resulting duplex version is called the Duplex Direct Data Distribution (D4) system. The D4 system is intended to provide high-data-rate commercial direct or internet-based communications service between the NASA spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) and the respective principal investigators associated with these spacecraft. Candidate commercial services were assessed regarding their near-term potential to meet NASA requirements. Candidates included Ka-band and V-band geostationary orbit and non-geostationary orbit satellite relay services and direct downlink ("LEO teleport") services. End-to-end systems concepts were examined and characterized in terms of alternative link layer architectures. Alternatives included a Direct Link, a Relay Link, a Hybrid Link, and a Dual Mode Link. The direct link assessment examined sample ground terminal placements and antenna angle issues. The SATCOM-based alternatives examined existing or proposed commercial

  15. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  16. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  17. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  18. High strain rate deformation of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb in the duplex morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S.A.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-03-01

    The compressive deformation behavior of Ti-48Al-2Nb-2Cr in the duplex microstructural morphology has been studied at strain rates of 0.001/s and 2000/s over the temperature range from -196 to 1100{degrees}C. The material was cast, homogenized, extruded and heat treated to obtain the duplex microstructure. The yield stress is strain rate sensitive at 25{degrees}C and increases with temperature at a strain rate of 2000/s from 500 to 1100{degrees}C. TEM investigations reveal that deformation occurs in {gamma}-TiAl by means of [111]<112> twinning, 1/2<110> slip, and <101> superdislocations under all conditions depending on the orientation of the grain with respect to the deformation axis. Optical metallography reveals that twinning increases with increasing strain rate. TEM results revealing the dislocation substructure are used to explain the yield stress anomaly.

  19. Effect of ageing on phase evolution and precipitation behaviour of duplex steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podany, P.; Kover, M.; Dlouhy, J.

    2015-12-01

    The isothermal formation of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel was studied. Samples were isothermally heat treated (aged) at temperatures of 700, 800 and 850°C in a quenching dilatometer. Microstructured evolution of secondary phases was analysed by means of optical and scanning electron microscopes. Both common phases, Chi and Sigma, were observed. The resulting shrinkage curves from dilatometric measurements show the potential for research into the formation of minor phases and the estimation of transformation kinetics in this kind of steel.

  20. Moldless casting by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  1. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  2. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  3. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  4. Standard specification for castings, nickel and nickel alloy. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Sep. 10, 1998. Published November 1998. Originally published as B 332-58T. Redesignated as A 494 in 1963. Last previous edition A 494/A 494M-94.

  5. Subcritical Measurements Multiple HEU Metal Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Wright, Michael C

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with the standard annular highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal castings at Y-12 were performed in which up to 5 castings ({approx}90kg) were assembled in a tightly packed array with minimal spacing between castings. The fission chain multiplication process was initiated by a time tagged {sup 253}Cf spontaneously fissioning neutron source or time and directionally tagged neutrons from a small portable DT neutron generator and the prompt neutron time behavior measured with plastic scintillation detectors sensitive the fast neutron (>1 MeV) and gamma ray without distinction. These experiments were performed to provide data to benchmark methods for the calculation of the prompt neutron time behavior. Previous measurements with a single casting have been reported. This paper presents the experimental results for multiple castings. The prompt time decay was obtained by time coincidence correlation measurements between the detectors and the time tagged neutron source emission (equivalent to randomly pulsed neutron measurements) and between pairs of plastic scintillation detectors (equivalent to a 2-detector Rossi-alpha measurement). These standard HEU storage castings at the Y-12 plant had 5.000-in-OD, 3.500-in-ID, masses between 17,636 and 17,996 g, impurity content of 992 ppm, density of 18.75 g/cm{sup 3} and average enrichment of 93.16 wt % {sup 235}U. The castings were in tight fitting 025-in.-thick, 8.0-in-high stainless steel (SS-304) cylindrical cans for contamination control which were 8.0 in high. One can had an inside diameter of 3.0 in so that the Cf source could be located on the axes of this casting. Four 1 x 1 x 6 in plastic scintillators with the long dimension perpendicular to axes of the castings and adjacent to the outer surface of the casting cans were used. The detectors were enclosed in 1/4.-in.-thick lead shields on four 1 x 6 surfaces and on the 1 x 1 surface. The small surface of the lead shield was adjacent to the steel table. The

  6. Mechanical-property characterization of an electroslag-cast valve body of CF8M composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hotsur, Y.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1983-11-01

    This initial investigation into electroslag casting involves the mechanical property study of a type 316 stainless steel (CF8M) valve body section (obtained from the University of British Columbia). The casting was subjected to tensile, creep, Charpy V-notch, and microhardness testing as well as an optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electrom microscopy. Tensile tests were conducted in the as-cast and solution-annealed conditions at room and elevated temperatures. Charpy impact testing was performed at room temperature on as-cast and solution-annealed specimens. Creep-deformation properties of the casting were obtianed at 649/sup 0/C (1200/sup 0/F) within a stress range from 90 to 170 MPa (13 to 25 ksi) in the as-cast state. Investigations into the creep behavior of this stainless steel electroslag casting are ongoing. Mechanical testing was conducted on specimens from three levels of the casting in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Comparisons made between the as-cast and solution-annealed specimens indicate that annealed specimens (in most cases) have better mechanical properties. This can be attributed to the dissolution of precipitated Fe-Cr-Mo microconstituents (sigma, chi, metal carbides, etc.) during the solution treatment. In general, though, preliminary results show that the electroslag castings have properties competitive with those of conventional sand castings.

  7. FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Duplex Housing Type with Corner Entries, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1990-05-01

    An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.

  9. Irradiation performance of long-rod duplex fuel-pellet bundle test - LDR test (AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, L.A.; Sphar, C.D.; Alff, T.H.

    1982-04-01

    The Long Duplex Rod (LDR) test is a five-rod bundle irradiation test of 0.30-inch diameter, 8-foot long, Zircaloy-clad rods containing duplex fuel pellets. These pellets include fissile material in an outer annulus surrounding fertile material in an inner cylindrical core. The rods are axially supported by top or bottom base plates and are laterally supported by an AM-350 stainless steel grid system. Design of the test, which includes duplex pellet annuli of three different compositions (UO/sub 2/, ZrO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/-CaO, and ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/), is described; and results of nondestructive examination after operation at peak linear power output of 9 to 18 Kw/ft to a peak depletion of 15 x 10/sup 20/ fissions/cm/sup 3/ of compartment (6.0 x 10/sup 4/ MWD/Tonne U + Th), or 30 x 10/sup 20/ fissions/cm/sup 3/ of fuel annulus volume (1.2 x 10/sup 5/ MWD/Tonne U + Th), are presented. It is concluded that performance capability of the duplex pellets is satisfactory for use in prebreeder reactor cores.

  10. Case of herpes zoster duplex bilateralis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bong Seok; Seo, Hyun Deok; Na, Chan Ho; Choi, Kyu Chul

    2009-02-01

    Non-contiguously simultaneous development of herpes zoster is very rare. It is named either herpes zoster duplex unilateralis or bilaterarlis, depending on whether one or both sides of the body are involved. Herein, we report a 21-year-old man, who had been treated for ulcerative colitis with prednisolone, and presented with painful grouped vesicles of the lower abdomen and back in a relatively symmetrical distribution. A Tzanck smear and punch biopsy were performed on the vesicles of the back. We report a rare case of symmetrical herpes zoster duplex bilateralis. PMID:19284453

  11. Full-duplex optical communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor); Horan, Stephen (Inventor); Payne, Jason A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of full-duplex electromagnetic communication wherein a pair of data modulation formats are selected for the forward and return data links respectively such that the forward data electro-magnetic beam serves as a carrier for the return data. A method of encoding optical information is used wherein right-hand and left-hand circular polarizations are assigned to optical information to represent binary states. An application for an earth to low earth orbit optical communications system is presented which implements the full-duplex communication and circular polarization keying modulation format.

  12. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D.J.; Smith, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigate for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649/sup 0/C showed that the tensile, yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and is comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  13. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. J.; Smith, H. H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigated for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649 °C showed that the tensile yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and was comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  14. Martensitic stainless steel seamless linepipe with superior weldability and CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Koseki, T.; Toyooka, T.; Murase, F.

    1997-08-01

    Two types of new martensitic stainless steel with good weldability and superior corrosion resistance have been developed for line pipe application. Both steels are suitable for welding without preheating owing to lowering C and N contents, and they show good low temperature toughness in welds without PWHT. One is applied to sweet environments. It gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. Lowering C and addition of Ni contribute to reduction of general corrosion rate in the CO{sub 2} environment. The addition of Cu improves the pitting resistance. The other is applied to light sour environments. It gives good SSC resistance in welds owing to the improvement of the pitting resistance due to Mo addition. The seamless pipes of these martensitic stainless steels are applicable as substitutes for a part of duplex stainless steel flow lines.

  15. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  16. Ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Huaxiang; Huang, Yawen; Wang, Xingjun; Zhou, Zhiping

    2012-11-01

    The fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) systems are growing fast these days, where two different wavelengths are used for upstream and downstream traffic, typically 1310nm and 1490nm. The duplexers are the key elements to separate these wavelengths into different path in central offices (CO) and optical network unit (ONU) in passive optical network (PON). Multimode interference (MMI) has some benefits to be a duplexer including large fabrication tolerance, low-temperature dependence, and low-polarization dependence, but its size is too large to integrate in conventional case. Based on the silicon photonics platform, ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer was demonstrated to separate the 1310nm and 1490nm lights. By studying the theory of self-image phenomena in MMI, the first order images are adopted in order to keep the device short. A cascaded MMI structure was investigated to implement the wavelength splitting, where both the light of 1310nm and 1490nm was input from the same port, and the 1490nm light was coupling cross the first MMI and output at the cross-port in the device while the 1310nm light was coupling through the first and second MMI and output at the bar-port in the device. The experiment was carried on with the SOI wafer of 340nm top silicon. The cascaded MMI was investigated to fold the length of the duplexer as short as 117μm with the extinct ratio over 10dB.

  17. Duplex Design Project: Science Pilot Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, Los Angeles, CA.

    Work is reported towards the completion of a prototype duplex-design assessment instrument for grade-12 science. The student course-background questionnaire and the pretest section of the two-stage instrument that was developed were administered to all 134 12th-grade students at St. Clairsville High School (Ohio). Based on the information obtained…

  18. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  19. LLNL casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  20. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  1. Corrosion of Stainless-Steel Tubing in a Spacecraft Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; MacDowell, Louis G.; Curran, Joe; Calle, Luz Maria; Hodge, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    This is a report of exposure of various metal tubing to oceanfront launch environments. The objective is to examine various types of corrosion-resistant tubing for Space Shuttle launch sites. The metals were stainless steels (austenitic, low-carbon, Mo-alloy, superaustenitic, duplex, and superferritic), Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, Ni-Mo-Cr-Fe-W alloy, and austenitic Ni-base superalloy.

  2. Evaluation of electroslag castings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of evaluations of electroslag castings of ferritic (2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo) and austenitic (CF8M or type 316) steels are presented. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical composition, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Pertinent data are compared with equivalent data for sand castings and wrought products of the same materials. Based on the results of these studies, the properties of electroslag castings compare favorably with those of sand castings and wrought materials.

  3. A XPS study of the Mo effect on passivation behaviors for highly controlled stainless steels in neutral and alkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Thiago J.; Chauveau, Eric; Mantel, Marc; Nogueira, Ricardo P.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of Mo additions on film passive properties of three different stainless steels (SS) types (austenitic, ferritic and duplex alloys). A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo) and free Mo (0 wt% Mo) grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their passive film formed in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The presence of oxidized Mo on the passive layer was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of Mo within the passive film improved the passivity breakdown potential for the duplex and ferritic SS, but seemed to have no effect for austenitic SS.

  4. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  5. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  6. Energy Saving Melting andRevert Reduction Technology (E0SMARRT): Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimension for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Dr. Mark Samonds; Adi Sholapurwalla; Sam Scott

    2008-11-21

    The investment casting process is an expendable mold process where wax patterns of the part and rigging are molded, assembled, shelled and melted to produce a ceramic mold matching the shape of the component to be cast. Investment casting is an important manufacturing method for critical parts because of the ability to maintain dimensional shape and tolerances. However, these tolerances can be easily exceeded if the molding components do not maintain their individual shapes well. In the investment casting process there are several opportunities for the final casting shape to not maintain the intended size and shape, such as shrinkage of the wax in the injection tool, the modification of the shape during shell heating, and with the thermal shrink and distortion in the casting process. Studies have been completed to look at the casting and shell distortions through the process in earlier phases of this project. Dr. Adrian Sabau at Oak Ridge National Labs performed characterizations and validations of 17-4 PH stainless steel in primarily fused silica shell systems with good agreement between analysis results and experimental data. Further tasks provided material property measurements of wax and methodology for employing a viscoelastic definition of wax materials into software. The final set of tasks involved the implementation of the findings into the commercial casting analysis software ProCAST, owned and maintained by ESI Group. This included: o the transfer of the wax material property data from its raw form into separate temperature-dependent thermophysical and mechanical property datasets o adding this wax material property data into an easily viewable and modifiable user interface within the pre-processing application of the ProCAST suite, namely PreCAST o and validating the data and viscoelastic wax model with respect to experimental results

  7. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  8. Symptomatic “H” Type Duplex Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Radha Govind; Srinivasa Reddy, Thallu Venkata; Swamy Balachandar, Tirupporur Govinda; Palaniswamy, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication with an incidence at autopsy of about 1 in 4000 is important in clinical practice, because it may cause some clinical, surgical, and diagnostic problems. Preoperative identification of this rare anomaly avoids biliary injuries and the other consequences of missed diagnosis. In this report, we present a case of ductular type duplex gallbladder diagnosed preoperatively by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and ultrasound and managed successfully by laparoscopy. PMID:21605535

  9. Electron Beam Welding of Duplex Steels with using Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ladislav; Vrtochová, Tatiana; Ulrich, Koloman

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents characteristics, metallurgy and weldability of duplex steels with using concentrated energy source. The first part of the article describes metallurgy of duplex steels and the influence of nitrogen on their solidification. The second part focuses on weldability of duplex steels with using electron beam aimed on acceptable structure and corrosion resistance performed by multiple runs of defocused beam over the penetration weld.

  10. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  11. A method for determining adequate resistance form of complete cast crown preparations.

    PubMed

    Weed, R M; Baez, R J

    1984-09-01

    A diagram with various degrees of occlusal convergence, which takes into consideration the length and diameter of complete crown preparations, was designed as a guide to assist the dentist to obtain adequate resistance form. To test the validity of the diagram, five groups of complete cast crown stainless steel dies were prepared (3.5 mm long, occlusal convergence 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees). Gold copings were cast for each of the 50 preparations. Displacement force was applied to the casting perpendicularly to a simulated 30-degree cuspal incline until the casting was displaced. Castings were deformed at margins except for the 22-degree group. Castings from this group were displaced without deformation, and it was concluded that there was a lack of adequate resistance form as predicted by the diagram. The hypothesis that the diagram could be used to predict adequate or inadequate resistance form was confirmed by this study. PMID:6384470

  12. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  13. The resistance to cavitation erosion of CrMnN stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.T.; Jing, T.F.; Zheng, Y.Z.; Yang, Y.B.; Yao, M.

    1998-12-01

    The resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) was measured using a magnetostrictive device and a rotating disk device for some CrMnN stainless steels (Chinese patent ZL 90 1 02197.0). The microstructural changes in the surface layer before and after CE were analyzed by use of Mossbauer spectra. Results show that the resistance to CE of duplex austenitic-martensitic CrMnN stainless steels is much better than that of ZG0Cr13Ni4-6Mo and ZG0Cr16Ni5Mo steel, which are in common use for hydraulic turbine runners. The metastable austenite and its changes in the process of CE are the key factors why the CrMnN stainless steels have excellent resistance to cavitation erosion.

  14. Textures of strip cast Fe16%Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, D.; Reher, F.; Luecke, K. ); Hoelscher, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Ferritic stainless steels with a Cr content of 16% are mainly manufactured by continuous casting, hot rolling, cold rolling and final recrystallization. The recent development of the strip casting method, which provides sheets with an equivalent geometry, i.e. thickness and width as the hot rolled band, yields significant improvements in comparison to the conventional processing. The weak initial strip texture and the homogeneous microstructure through the sample thickness have shown evidence of avoiding the well known ridging phenomenon of the finally rolled and annealed product. The occurrence of ridging in conventionally processed FeCr steel has been attributed to the collective shear of grains with (hkl)<110>, i.e. [alpha]-fibre orientations, which become oriented and topologically arranged during hot rolling. In the present paper the textures of a stainless ferritic steel with 16% Cr and 0.02% C, strip casted (SC) as well as hot rolled (HR), were thus investigated. The textures were examined by measuring the four incomplete pole figures (110), (200), (112) and (103) in the back reflection mode. The orientation distribution function (ODF) was calculated by the series expansion method (1[sup max]=22). In the case of cubic crystal symmetry and orthorhombic sample symmetry an orientation can then be presented by the three Euler angles [var phi][sub 1], [var phi], [var phi][sub 2] in the reducted Euler space. Since bcc steels tend to develop characteristic fibre textures, it is favorable to present the ODFs as isointensity diagrams in [var phi][sub 1]-sections through the Eulerspace. In this work the [alpha]-fibre and the [gamma]-fibre are of major interest.

  15. Electroslag-casting process and properties. [2. 25Cr-1 Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-09-01

    The electroslag-casting process is an extension of the electroslag-remelting process. The castings produced by this technique have the advantages of smooth defect-free finish, freedom from conventional casting defects, more reproducible mechanical properties, and properties comparable to those of forged products. This report describes the current status of electroslag-casting facilities in Canada and the United States. It also describes the variety of electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and type 316 stainless steel made during the last four years and the detailed chemical analysis, microstructural characterization, and mechanical property characterization. The mechanical properties are compared with those of the forged and wrought material. This report provides sufficient information about the electroslag-casting process and the properties of the castings to permit consideration of the process for approval by ASTM and ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code committees. 27 refs., 53 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. Full Duplex, Spread Spectrum Radio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to support the development of a full duplex, spread spectrum voice communications system. The assembly and testing of a prototype system consisting of a Harris PRISM spread spectrum radio, a TMS320C54x signal processing development board and a Zilog Z80180 microprocessor was underway at the start of this project. The efforts under this project were the development of multiple access schemes, analysis of full duplex voice feedback delays, and the development and analysis of forward error correction (FEC) algorithms. The multiple access analysis involved the selection between code division multiple access (CDMA), frequency division multiple access (FDMA) and time division multiple access (TDMA). Full duplex voice feedback analysis involved the analysis of packet size and delays associated with full loop voice feedback for confirmation of radio system performance. FEC analysis included studies of the performance under the expected burst error scenario with the relatively short packet lengths, and analysis of implementation in the TMS320C54x digital signal processor. When the capabilities and the limitations of the components used were considered, the multiple access scheme chosen was a combination TDMA/FDMA scheme that will provide up to eight users on each of three separate frequencies. Packets to and from each user will consist of 16 samples at a rate of 8,000 samples per second for a total of 2 ms of voice information. The resulting voice feedback delay will therefore be 4 - 6 ms. The most practical FEC algorithm for implementation was a convolutional code with a Viterbi decoder. Interleaving of the bits of each packet will be required to offset the effects of burst errors.

  17. 53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by A.G.D., 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Electrical - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  18. 51. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by B.S. Elliott, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Plumbing - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  19. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF SIDE FROM FACILITY 210 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW OF SIDE FROM FACILITY 210 SIDE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. FACILITY 224, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF UPSTAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 224, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF UPSTAIRS HALL FROM BATH, VIEW FACING NW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, REAR OBLIQUE FROM CENTER DRIVE, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, REAR OBLIQUE FROM CENTER DRIVE, VIEW FACING EAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, VIEW FROM CENTER DRIVE BY FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW FROM CENTER DRIVE BY FACILITY 201 FACING SE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. FACILITY 226, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR FROM HALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 226, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR FROM HALL LOOKING INTO BEDROOMS WITH DIFFERENT WINDOW ARRANGEMENTS. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. FACILITY 224, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF LIVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 224, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 319 (UNOCCUPIED), INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING AREA. KITCHEN TO LEFT, VIEW FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. FACILITY 226, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED ). INTERIOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 226, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, UNIT 327 (UNOCCUPIED ). INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM LOOKING TOWARD FRONT DOOR FROM DINING AREA - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. FACILITY 210, TWO STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE. FACILITY 209 TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE. FACILITY 209 TO LEFT, 201 TO RIGHT, VIEW FACING NW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Copeland, 7 April 1932 (Original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Heating - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  10. 50. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University. Detail of front entrance and of gable dormer - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  11. 48. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Attic and roof, basement, first floor, and second floor plans - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  12. 49. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Turner, 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Front, rear, and side elevations, and cross-section - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  13. Structural properties of g,t-parallel duplexes.

    PubMed

    Aviñó, Anna; Cubero, Elena; Gargallo, Raimundo; González, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto; Eritja, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    The structure of G,T-parallel-stranded duplexes of DNA carrying similar amounts of adenine and guanine residues is studied by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and UV- and CD spectroscopies. In addition the impact of the substitution of adenine by 8-aminoadenine and guanine by 8-aminoguanine is analyzed. The presence of 8-aminoadenine and 8-aminoguanine stabilizes the parallel duplex structure. Binding of these oligonucleotides to their target polypyrimidine sequences to form the corresponding G,T-parallel triplex was not observed. Instead, when unmodified parallel-stranded duplexes were mixed with their polypyrimidine target, an interstrand Watson-Crick duplex was formed. As predicted by theoretical calculations parallel-stranded duplexes carrying 8-aminopurines did not bind to their target. The preference for the parallel-duplex over the Watson-Crick antiparallel duplex is attributed to the strong stabilization of the parallel duplex produced by the 8-aminopurines. Theoretical studies show that the isomorphism of the triads is crucial for the stability of the parallel triplex. PMID:20798879

  14. Acoustical and perceptual influence of duplex stringing in grand pianos.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Fredrik; Askenfelt, Anders

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the acoustical and perceptual influence of the string parts outside the speaking length in grand pianos (front and rear duplex strings). Acoustical measurements on a grand piano in concert condition were conducted, measuring the fundamental frequencies of all main and duplex strings in the four octaves D4-C8. Considerable deviations from the nominal harmonic relations between the rear duplex and main string frequencies, as described by the manufacturer in a patent, were observed. Generally the rear duplex strings were tuned higher than the nominal harmonic relations with average and median deviations approaching +50 cent. Single keys reached +190 and -100 cent. The spread in deviation from harmonic relations within trichords was also substantial with average and median values around 25 cent, occasionally reaching 60 cent. Contributions from both front and rear duplex strings were observed in the bridge motion and sound. The audibility of the duplex strings was studied in an ABX listening test. Complete dampening of the front duplex was clearly perceptible both for an experiment group consisting of musicians and a control group with naive subjects. The contribution from the rear duplex could also be perceived, but less pronounced. PMID:22280708

  15. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  16. Zoster duplex: a clinical report and etiologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Herpes zoster (HZ) duplex is a rare disease presentation. The mechanisms of varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation in multiple dermal regions are unknown. To present a HZ duplex case occurring in an immunocompetent woman and to analyze the possible underlying causes of HZ duplex. Methods: We present a HZ duplex case in an immunocompetent woman and analyzed the possible contributing factors in 36 HZ duplex cases. Continuously distributed variables were categorized by numbers and percentages. Results: In our study, 24 cases (66.7%) were from Asia, 16 cases (44.4%) were in individuals ≥ 50 years of age, and 17 cases (47.2%) occurred in immunocompromised patients. Of the 36 cases, 23 involved women (63.9%) and 13 involved men. Eighteen patients suffering from HZ duplex, 13 of which were women (72.2%), did not suffer from any chronic systemic disease or have a long history of taking drugs. Conclusion: HZ duplex is a rare event that can occur in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. HZ duplex might be associated with the Asia region, advanced age, immunosuppression, and being female. PMID:26379899

  17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  19. Casting in Sport

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the “least hard” of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257

  20. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  1. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  2. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  3. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  4. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  5. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  6. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  7. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  8. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  9. (Continuous casting 1985)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, R.A.

    1985-06-12

    The report covers the Continuous Casting '85 Conference including informal discussions with conference attendees. In general, the papers presented at the conference concerned an overview of continuous steel casting worldwide, state-of-the-art aspects of steel continuous casting technology including caster startup problems, modifications, control system strategies, energy use profiles, quality control aspects, steel chemistry control, refractories, operational aspects of continuous casters, etc. No papers were presented in the development of thin section or thin strip casting of steel. Informal discussions were held with several conference attendees including (1) Bernard Trentini, Executive Director of the Association Technique De La Siderurgie Francaise in Paris, France (similar to the American Iron and Steel Institute); (2) Dr. Wolfgang Reichelt and Dr. Peter Voss-Spilker both of Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik -a continuous casting and other steel making machine builder in-lieu of meeting at their plant in Duisburg, FRG on May 31; (3) Ewan C. Hewitt of Devote McKee Corp., Sheffield, England; (4) Wilfried Heinemann, head of R D Dept. at Concast Standard AG in Zurich, Switzerland; and (5) Hideo Ueno, engineer of melting section, Mitsubishi Steel Mfg. Co. Ltd, Tokyo Japan. A visit was made to the Teesside Laboratories of British Steel Corp. for discussions of their thin section casting research program in particular and R D program in general.

  10. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  11. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-07-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ``noble`` nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation.

  12. Streamlined analysis of duplex sequencing data with Du Novo.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Nicholas; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Guiblet, Wilfried; Makova, Kateryna D; Nekrutenko, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Duplex sequencing was originally developed to detect rare nucleotide polymorphisms normally obscured by the noise of high-throughput sequencing. Here we describe a new, streamlined, reference-free approach for the analysis of duplex sequencing data. We show the approach performs well on simulated data and precisely reproduces previously published results and apply it to a newly produced dataset, enabling us to type low-frequency variants in human mitochondrial DNA. Finally, we provide all necessary tools as stand-alone components as well as integrate them into the Galaxy platform. All analyses performed in this manuscript can be repeated exactly as described at http://usegalaxy.org/duplex . PMID:27566673

  13. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  14. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  15. The chloride stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels under different test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L. Z.

    1994-12-01

    Chloride-induced stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the failure modes of stainless steels. Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels S32654, S31254, and N08028, and duplex grades S32750 and S31803 possess much improved resistance to SCC compared with S30400 and S31600 steels. With the development of a database, SSData, experimental data collected from calcium chloride tests, autoclave tests, and drop evaporation tests were evaluated. Stress-corrosion cracking data generated by autoclave tests agreed well with the practical service conditions and can be used to discriminate alloys for SCC resistance in sodium chloride solution. Drop evaporation test data can be used in situations where evaporation may occur and cyclic loading may be involved. The SCC resistance of alloys under each method increased with increasing molybdenum equivalent Mo + 0.25Cr + 0.1Ni. For a given alloy, the testing result depends on the stress state and environment; different test methods can give different ranking orders concerning SCC resistance. The performance of duplex stainless steels in a chloride-containing environment at higher temperatures was not as good as expected when dynamic loading was involved.

  16. Properties of super stainless steels for orthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Young-Sik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-05-15

    Orthodontic stainless-steel appliances are considered to be corrosion resistant, but localized corrosion can occur in the oral cavity. This study was undertaken to evaluate the properties of super stainless steels in orthodontic applications. Accordingly, the metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, amount of the released nickel, cytotoxicity, and characteristics of the passive film were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the specimens were high and in the following order: super austenitic stainless steel (SR-50A) > super ferritic stainless steel (SFSS) = super duplex stainless steel (SR-6DX) > 316L SS > super martensitic stainless steel (SR-3Mo) in artificial saliva, 37 degrees C. At 500 mV (SCE), current densities of SR-50A, SFSS, SR-6DX, 316L SS, and SR-3Mo were 5.96 microA/cm(2), 20.3 microA/cm(2), 31.9 microA/cm(2), 805 microA/cm(2), and 5.36 mA/cm(2), respectively. Open circuit potentials of SR-50A, 316L SS, SR-6DX, SR-3Mo, and SFSS were - 0.2, - 0.22, - 0.24, - 0.43, and - 0.46 V (SCE), respectively. SR-50A, SFSS, and SR-6DX released below 3 ng/ml nickel for 8 weeks, and increased a little with immersion time, and 316L SS released about 3.5 ng/ml nickel, but SR-3Mo released a large amount of nickel, which increased with immersion time. The study demonstrated that SR-50A, SR-6DX, and SFSS have high corrosion resistance and mild or no cytotoxicity, due to the passive film enhanced by synergistic effect of Mo + N or by high addition effect of Cr + W. All super stainless steels showed very low cytotoxicity regardless of their nickel contents, although SR-3Mo was found to be relatively cytotoxic. From these studies, these steels are considered suitable for orthodontic applications. PMID:15116408

  17. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  18. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α‧) phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α‧ interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36). ).

  19. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; Young, George A.; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101more » alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).« less

  20. Phase analysis in duplex stainless steel: comparison of EBSD and quantitative metallography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Chmiela, B.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the research was to work out the qualitative and quantitative analysis of phases in DSS in as-received state and after thermal aging. For quantitative purposes, SEM observations, EDS analyses and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) methods were employed. Qualitative analysis of phases was performed by two methods: EBSD and classical quantitative metallography. A juxtaposition of different etchants for the revealing of microstructure and brief review of sample preparation methods for EBSD studies were presented. Different ways of sample preparation were tested and based on these results a detailed methodology of DSS phase analysis was developed including: surface finishing, selective etching methods and image acquisition. The advantages and disadvantages of applied methods were pointed out and compared the accuracy of the analysis phase performed by both methods.

  1. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A; Tucker, Julie D; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2016-06-24

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe-Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe-Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100-10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni-Mn-Si-Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni-Mn-Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core-shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby-Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30-36). PMID:27181108

  2. Kinetic Study to Predict Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Daniella Caluscio; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved kinetic study of sigma phase formation during isothermal aging between 973 K and 1223 K (700 °C and 950 °C), based on Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (K-J-M-A) model, established from volume fraction of sigma phase determined in backscattered electron images over polished surfaces of aged samples. The kinetic study shows a change in the main mechanism of sigma formation between 973 K and 1173 K (700 °C and 900 °C), from a nucleation-governed stage to a diffusion-controlled growth-coarsening stage, confirmed by a double inclination in K-J-M-A plots and microstructural observations. A single inclination in K-J-M-A plots was observed for the 1223 K (950 °C) aging temperature, showing that kinetic behavior in this temperature is only related to diffusion-controlled growth of sigma phase. The estimated activation energies for the nucleation of sigma phase are close to the molybdenum diffusion in ferrite, probably the controlling mechanism of sigma phase nucleation. The proposed time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram shows a "double c curve" configuration, probably associated to the presence of chi-phase formed between 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C), which acts as heterogeneous nuclei for sigma phase formation in low aging temperatures.

  3. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique. [CF8M

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-01-01

    ELectroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and sand castings.

  4. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.; Hackman, L.E.; Hsiao, Yu-Hsian; Daehn, G.

    1990-03-30

    The three goals of this research project were to demonstrate the feasibility of casting steel strip up to 2 mm (0.079 in) thick on a textured chill roll, to develop the thermal-mechanical processing to optimize the properties of the steel strip and to measure the properties of the steel strip as a function of casting and metalworking variables. Each of these goals have been realized. Type 304 stainless strip measuring up to 329 mm (12.9 in) wide and up to 1.98 mm (0.078 in) thick was cast on a 600 mm (24 in) copper chill roll with a 14 pitch, 60 degree diamond knurl pattern machined on it`s circumference. The casting speed was 0.15 m/s and the depth of liquid steel in contact with the chill roll was approximately 127 m (5 in). The most important process variables are the texture on the chill roll, the chemistry and temperature of the liquid steel, the depth of liquid in contact with the chill roll and the casting speed. It has been shown that thermal mechanical treatment can significantly improve both the surface finish and mechanical properties of Type 304 stainless steel. Cold rolling in excess of 30% reduction serves to completely eliminate the textured pattern from direct cast Type 304 stainless steel strips. Furthermore, cold rolling followed by annealing can produce commercial ingot metallurgy steels. Specifically, for Type 304 stainless steel, 30% cold rolling followed by a 40 minute anneal at 1100 {degree}C (2012 {degree}F) produced equiaxed austenite grains with an average diameter of approximately 20 {mu}m (0.0008 in), and this material gives approximately 45% elongation to failure with and ultimate tensile strength of 660 MPa (96 ksi). 27 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. 43. View of station from southwest side with duplex keepers' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. View of station from southwest side with duplex keepers' dwelling to the left. USLHB photo by Herbert Bamber, June 9, 1893. - Bodie Island Light Station, Off Highway 12, Nags Head, Dare County, NC

  6. Thermoacoustic Duplex Technology for Cooling and Powering a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R.; Haberbusch, M. S.; Sasson, J.

    2015-04-01

    A Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) is directly coupled to a Pulse Tube Refrigerator (PTR) in a duplex configuration, providing simultaneous cooling and electrical power, thereby suiting the needs of a long-lived Venus lander.

  7. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  8. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  9. Perspective view of Building No. 61 from northwest. These duplex ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of Building No. 61 from northwest. These duplex quarters were built during the 1920s on the south edge of the Northwestern Branch campus. This building is sited on a rise and shares paths and lawn with two similar structures - Buildings 56 and 79. Now located directly adjacent to the current hospital complex (background), all three duplexes are slated for demolition. - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Quarters, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  10. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  11. The structural significance of HAZ sigma phase formation in welded 25%Cr super duplex pipework

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, C.S.; Garwood, S.J.; Bowden, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    The welding of 25%Cr duplex stainless steel can lead to the formation of sigma phase in both weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) regions. It has generally been accepted that this can be avoided by the adoption of appropriate welding procedure controls, generally aimed at reducing heat input and promoting rapid cooling rates. However, experience during pipe spool fabrication for the Marathon East Brae Project has shown that it is extremely difficult to satisfy a welding specification requiring sigma free HAZs. This has proved a particular problem with thin wall pipe welds made in the 2G/5G or 6G fixed positions, where the joint geometry reduces heat flow away from the weld and welding conditions tend to result in the use of higher heat inputs. This paper examines the effect of sigma phase on the fracture toughness of 25%Cr super duplex steel (UNS S32760). It is shown that the CTOD toughness at {minus}20 C decreases as soon as any sigma phase is present and continues to decrease with increasing sigma levels. The toughness of the sigmatized specimens produced by heat treatment was shown to be conservative compared to the toughness measured in the HAZ of 14.2mm and 7.1mm thick pipe weldments, made with welding parameters chosen to enhance HAZ sigma phase formation. Based on the CTOD versus percent sigma level relationship derived from the laboratory specimens, fracture assessment calculations of tolerable flaw sizes were performed. These demonstrated that under the severest design conditions, assuming the maximum flaw sizes which could remain undetected in the pipework, sigma levels up to 2.5% can be tolerated safely. The conservatism of the fracture assessments for predicting the performance of weldments was demonstrated by full scale tensile testing of 2 inch nominal bore x 2.77 mm wall thickness pipe butt welds containing through-thickness circumferential fatigue cracks located in the sigmatized HAZ.

  12. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  13. Topologically non-linked circular duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Biegeleisen, Ken

    2002-05-01

    The discovery of circular DNA, over 30 years ago, introduced an element of uneasiness in what had been, up to that point, the almost picture-perfect story of the elucidation of the molecular biology of heredity. If DNA indeed has the Watson-Crick right-handed helical secondary structure, then in circular DNA, thousands, or perhaps even millions of twists must be removed in each generation, and re-wound in the next generation. Although enzyme systems adequate for this task have long since been found and characterized, there have nevertheless arisen a number of proposals for alternative DNA structures in which the strands are topologically non-linked, so that they might separate during replication without having to be unwound. These structures have generally been put forth as theory only, and have been largely unaccompanied by experimental evidence to support their applicability to native DNA from living systems. Recently, however, a report has emerged suggesting that it might be possible to separate, intact, the individual single-stranded circular half-chromosomes which constitute the double-stranded circular chromosomes of certain plasmids. This would not be possible unless the chromosomes had one of the alternative, topologically non-linked structures. It is widely believed that after a half-century of worldwide DNA research, any significant change to the Watson-Crick structure is unlikely to stand up to scrutiny. Nevertheless, the present author has found that in many instances in which the behavior of circular duplex DNA is considered to be explicable only in terms of the topologically linked helical model, it is also possible to explain that same behavior in terms of a topologically non-linked model. It is necessary, in these instances, to make certain logical assumptions which cannot be conclusively proven at the present time. The author herein offers an example of one such instance, namely an examination of the behavior of circular duplex DNA in an alkaline

  14. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  15. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  16. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  17. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  18. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  19. Hair Casts or Pseudonits

    PubMed Central

    França, Katlein; Villa, Ricardo Tadeu; Silva, Isabella Rezende; de Carvalho, Cristine Almeida; Bedin, Valcinir

    2011-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are thin, elongated, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair shaft and can be easily dislodged. A case of pseudonits in a 9-year-old girl is reported. Though not unusual, false diagnoses are common. PMID:22223977

  20. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  1. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines. PMID:3889295

  2. Fracture during cooling of cast borosilicate glass containing nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.K.; Baxter, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    Procedures and techniques were evaluated to mitigate thermal stress fracture in waste glass as the glass cools after casting. The two principal causes of fracture identified in small-scale testing are internal thermal stresses arising from excessive thermal gradients when cooled too fast, and shear fracturing in the surface of the glass because the stainless steel canister shrinks faster than the glass on cooling. Acoustic emission and ceramographic techniques were used to outline an annealing schedule that requires at least three weeks of controlled cooling below 550/sup 0/C to avoid excessive thermal gradients and corresponding stresses. Fracture arising from canister interactions cannot be relieved by slow cooling, but can be eliminated for stainless steel canisters by using ceramic paper, ceramic or graphite paste linings, or by choosing a canister material with a thermal expansion coefficient comparable to, or less than, that of the glass.

  3. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  4. Solidification behavior and microstructural analysis of austenitic stainless steel laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel laser welds has been investigated with a high-power laser system. The welds were made at speeds ranging from 13 to 60 mm/s. The welds sowed a wide variety of microstructural features. The ferrite content in the 13-mm/s weld varied from less than 1% at the root of the weld to about 10% at the crown. The duplex structure at the crown of the weld was much finer than the one observed in conventional weld metal. However, the welds made at 25 and 60 mm/s contained an austenitic structure with less than 1% ferrite throughout the weld. Microstructural analysis of these welds used optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and analytical electron microscopy. The austenitic stainless steel welds were free of any cracking, and the results are explained in terms of the rapid solidification conditions during laser welding.

  5. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  6. Dissolution of alpha-prime precipitates in thermally embrittled S2205-duplex steels during reversion-heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanth, V.; Ravishankar, K. S.

    Duplex stainless steels offer an attractive combination of strength, corrosion resistance and cost. In annealed condition duplex steels will be in thermodynamically metastable condition but when they are subjected to intermediate homologous temperature of ∼475 °C and below significant embrittlement occurs, which is one of the key material degradation properties that limits its upper service temperature in many applications. Hence the present study is aimed to study the effect of reversion heat treatment and its time on mechanical properties of the thermally embrittled steel. The results showed that 60 min reversion heat treated samples were able to recover the mechanical properties which were very close to annealed properties because when the embrittled samples were reversion heat treated at an elevated temperature of 550 °C which is above the (α + α‧) miscibility gap, the ferritic phase was homogenized again. In other words, Fe-rich α and Cr-rich α‧ prime precipitates which were formed during ageing become thermodynamically unstable and dissolve inside the ferritic phase.

  7. Molds for electroslag casting systems. [2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.K.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the basic types of molds used for the manufacture of electroslag castings. The report also provides guidelines for the design of such molds based on heat generation and heat transfer considerations pertaining to the electroslag casting process. The designs of the two-step and three-step molds used for the manufacture of electroslag castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, 316 stainless steel and 9 Cr-1 Mo steel are provided as examples of cost effective mold construction using cooled copper liners for metal-slag containment. 5 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Surface modification of investment cast-316L implants: microstructure effects.

    PubMed

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Khalifa, Waleed; Nofal, Adel

    2015-03-01

    Artificial femur stem of 316L stainless steel was fabricated by investment casting using vacuum induction melting. Different surface treatments: mechanical polishing, thermal oxidation and immersion in alkaline solution were applied. Thicker hydroxyapatite (HAP) layer was formed in the furnace-oxidized samples as compared to the mechanically polished ones. The alkaline treatment enhanced the precipitation of HAP on the samples. It was also observed that the HAP precipitation responded differently to the different phases of the microstructure. The austenite phase was observed to have more homogeneous and smoother layer of HAP. In addition, the growth of HAP was sometimes favored on the austenite phase rather than on ferrite phase. PMID:25579929

  9. Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F.; Frary, M.E.; Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W.; McGreevy, T.E.

    2004-06-01

    In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused

  10. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  11. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  12. Duplex Ultrasonography in Assessing Restenosis of Renal Artery Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Jeannette; Beutler, Jaap J.; Elgersma, Otto E.H.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Kort, Gerard A.P. de; Beek, Frederik J. A.

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and optimal threshold values of duplex ultrasonography (US) in assessing restenosis of renal artery stents. Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with 33 renal arteries that had previously been treated with placement of a Palmaz stent underwent duplex US prior to intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA), which was the reference standard. Diagnostic accuracy of in-stent peak systolic velocity (PSV) and reno-aortic ratio (RAR = PSV renal stent/PSV aorta) in detecting > 50% in-stent restenosis were evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve. Sensitivity and specificity were determined using the optimal threshold values, and using published threshold values: RAR > 3.5 and in-stent PSV > 180 cm/sec. Results: Six examinations were technically inadequate. Nine stents had residual or restenosis > 50% at DSA. The two duplex parameters were equally accurate since areas under the curves were similar (0.943). With optimal threshold values of 226 cm/sec for PSV and 2.7 for RAR, sensitivities and specificities were 100% and 90%, and 100% and 84%, respectively. Using the published duplex criteria resulted in sensitivities and specificities of 100% and 74% for PSV, and 50% and 89% for RAR. Conclusion: Duplex US is a sensitive modality for detecting in-stent restenosis if laboratory-specific threshold values are used.

  13. Photodesorption from stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mesarwi, A.; Ignatiev, A.

    1988-01-01

    The photodesorption by low-energy photons from three types of stainless steels is examined. For all these systems both CO and CO2 were observed to photodesorb with high yields: about 0.001 molecules/photon for CO2 and about 0.0001 molecules/photon for CO at 250 nm. The observed threshold energies were found to be the same for all systems at E0 = 2.92 eV for CO2 and E0 = 2.92-3.10 eV for CO.

  14. FACILITY 210, TWOSTORY DUPLEX, VIEW FACING SW. U.S. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 210, TWO-STORY DUPLEX, VIEW FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Two-Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  16. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  17. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  18. Transition characteristics and thermodynamic analysis of DNA duplex formation: a quantitative consideration for the extent of duplex association

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    Transition characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the single-stranded self-transition and the double-stranded association were investigated and analyzed for 9-, 15- and 21-bp non-self-complementary DNA sequences. The multiple transition processes for the single-stranded self-transition and the double-stranded association were further put forth. The experimental results confirmed that the double-stranded association transition was generally imperfect and the thermodynamic properties of the single-stranded self-transition would exert an influence on a duplex formation. Combining ultraviolet melting experiments in various molar ratios, the extent of duplex association was estimated for three double-stranded DNAs. In our experimental range, the extent of duplex association decreases with increasing the number of base pairs in DNA sequences, which suggest that the short oligonucleotides may proceed in a two-state transition while the long oligonucleotides may not. When the extent of duplex association was considered, the true transition enthalpies of a duplex formation derived from UV and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were in good agreement. PMID:11095688

  19. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  20. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  1. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the advance in computer technology has increased the computing power of small work stations as well as PC (personal computers) to permit a much shorter turn-around time for complex computations. The DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARC station 10-41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  2. USGS ShakeCast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David; Lin, Kuo-Wan

    2007-01-01

    Automating, Simplifying, and Improving the Use of ShakeMap for Post-Earthquake Decisionmaking and Response. ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  3. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy. PMID:352670

  4. Experimental Determination of Heat Transfer Within the Metal/Mold Gap in a DC Casting Mold: Part II. Effect of Casting Metal, Mold Material, and Other Casting Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arvind; Bainbridge, Ian F.

    2013-07-01

    Extensive experimental studies were conducted to quantify the effect of different parameters that can affect the heat transfer from the metal to the mold during the steady-state phase of DC casting. In the first part previously published, the experimental technique was established and results were reported for the effect of gas type (atmosphere within the mold) and the gap between the metal and the mold. The results showed the significant effect of gas thermal conductivity and the metal-mold gap on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient. In this second publication on heat transfer in the mold wall region of a DC casting mold, the results from the effect of casting temperature, gas flow rate, casting alloy, mold material, and the mold insert material on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient are described. The experiments reported in the current paper show that these additional factors tested do not affect the heat flux through the mold wall to the same extent as the gap size or the gas type. The heat transfer coefficient changes by less than 5 pct when casting temperature is changed by ±25 K, less than 15 pct when the gas flow rate within the metal-mold gap flows at up to 3 LPM, and approximately 30 pct when the mold material is changed from stainless steel to AA601 to copper. Similar results were obtained when different insert materials were used. These results are explained with the help of an electrical analogy of heat transfer and are consistent with the heat transfer theory.

  5. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  6. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Hanzelka, S.E.; Haltom, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidification and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds contaning a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very litte. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  7. Ferrite morphology and variations in ferrite content in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four distinct ferrite morphologies have been identified in Type 308 stainless steel multipass welds: vermicular, lacy, acicular, and globular. The first three ferrite types are related to transformations following solidfication and the fourth is related to the shape instability of the residual ferrite. An earlier study showed that most of the ferrite observed in austenitic stainless steel welds containing a duplex structure may be identified as residual primary ferrite resulting from incomplete delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation during solidification and/or residual ferrite after Widmanstatten austenite precipitation in primary ferrite. These modes of ferrite formation can be used to explain observed ferrite morphologies in austenitic stainless steel welds. Variations in ferrite content within the weld were also related to weld metal composition, ferrite morphology, and dissolution of ferrite resulting from thermal cycles during subsequent weld passes. An investigation of the Type 308 stainless steel filler metal solidified over cooling rates ranging from 7 to 1600/sup 0/C/s (44.6 to 2912/sup 0/F/s) showed that the cooling rate of the weld metal within the freezing range of the alloy affects the amount of ferrite in the microstructure very little. However, the scale of the solidification substructure associated with various solidification rates may influence the ferrite dissolution kinetics.

  8. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1989-07-14

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issues on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  9. Textured substrate method for the direct continuous casting of steel sheet: Technical progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.

    1988-10-21

    The overall objective of this research project will be to demonstrate the feasibility of casting rapidly solidified steel strip 2 mm (0.080 in.) thick or greater using a textured chill block as described in US Patent No. 4,705,095, issued on November 10, 1987, to Ribbon Technology Corporation. The effect of melt overflow process variables on strip dimensions and uniformity will be investigated. Process variables include, but are not limited to, the following: super heat of the melt; wetting of substrate material; tundish design; and casting speed. Type 304 stainless steel and AISI 1020 standard carbon steel will be investigated.

  10. A new view of the ultrasonic behavior of cast austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensionally anisotropic model of the cast austenitics is proposed and tested experimentally. The model predicts unique propagation modes and directions, which are observed experimentally in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) specimens, but which are not predicted by the single- preferred-axis model. It accounts for a large share of the difficulties noted in ultrasonic inspection of these materials by conventional techniques. The model also suggests a technique for significant improvement in signal/noise ratio (SNR) and in apparent attenuation; this technique is demonstrated experimentally to give striking improvements in SNR. In addition, a number of previously anomalous behaviors are explained by this model. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma arising in ipsilateral duplex system.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Kundu, Reetu; Dalal, Usha

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract are common and include a wide anatomic spectrum. Duplex systems are one of the more common renal anomalies, with the majority being asymptomatic. Little is known about the molecular pathogenesis of these anomalies; however, certain causative genes have been implicated. The finding of renal cell carcinoma arising in a kidney with the duplication of pelvicalyceal system and ureters, as in the present case, is uncommon. The association between a duplex system and renal cell carcinoma may be more than a coincidence, requiring a deeper insight and further elucidation. PMID:26328175

  12. Hydrogen-induced defects in austenite and ferrite of a duplex steel.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, A; Swiatnicki, W A; Jezierska, E

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the microstructure of two types of austeno-ferritic duplex stainless steel (Cr26-Ni6 model steel and Cr22-Ni5-Mo3 commercial steel), each of them after two thermo-mechanical treatments, was investigated. The aim of this study was to reveal microstructural changes appearing during the hydrogen charging and particularly to clarify the occurrence of phase transformations induced by hydrogen. The specific microstructural changes in the ferrite (alpha) and austenite (gamma) of both types of steel were observed. A strong increase of dislocation density was noticed in the alpha phase. In the case of model steel, longer hydrogen charging times led to significant ferrite grain refinement. In the commercial steel, the strips and twin plates appeared in the ferrite after hydrogenation. The appearance of stacking faults was revealed in the gamma phase. The martensite laths appeared in austenite after longer hydrogenation times. It seems that the microstructural changes gave rise to the formation of microcracks in the alpha and gamma phases as well as on the alpha/gamma interphase boundaries. PMID:17059551

  13. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  14. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  15. Stainless steel display evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  16. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  17. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  18. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  19. Aspects of testing and selecting stainless steels for sea water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steinsmo, U.; Rogne, T.; Drugli, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    In the period from 1980, highly alloyed stainless steels (i.e. Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE{sub N}) > 40) have been widely selected for chlorinated sea water systems in the Norwegian offshore industry. Recently failures have been reported -- severe crevice corrosion on flanges in a cooling water system and crevice corrosion at the threaded cast and forged joints in a fire water system. The failures highlights the question of corrosion testing and safe use limits for high alloyed stainless steels in sea water systems. This paper discusses three aspects regarding testing and selection of highly alloyed stainless steels for sea water application -- the relevancy of the electrochemical test methods used, the quality control system and the importance of repassivation.

  20. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Stagnitti, A.; Marini, A.; Impara, L.; Drudi, F.M.; Lo mele, L.; Lillo Odoardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anatomy and physiology of the temporomandibular joint can be studied clinically and by diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography (X-ray) and computed tomography (CT) have thus for many years contributed to the study of the kinetics in the mandibular condyle. However, also duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination is widely used in the study of structures during movement, particularly vascular structures. Materials and methods A total of 30 patients were referred by the Department of Orthodontics to the Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “La Sapienza”. All patients underwent duplex Doppler ultrasound (US) examination of the temporomandibular joint using Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A equipment and duplex Doppler multi-display technique, which allows simultaneous display of US images and color Doppler signals. A linear phased array probe with crystal elements was used operating at a basic frequency of 6 MHz during pulsed Doppler spectral analysis and 7.5 MHz during US imaging. Results In normal patients a regular alternation in the spectral Doppler waveforms was obtained, while in patients with temporomandibular joint meniscus dysfunction there was no regularity in the sum of the Fourier series with an unsteady waveform pattern related to irregular movements of the temporomandibular joint. Conclusions In all cases duplex Doppler US examination proved able to differentiate between normal and pathological patients and among the latter this technique permitted identification of the most significant aspects of the dysfunctional diseases. PMID:23397016

  1. Perspective view from northeast of former Surgeon's Quarters. This duplex ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view from northeast of former Surgeon's Quarters. This duplex structure also housed the Secretary and was built in 1887. It is attributed to architect Henry C. Koch, due to the similarity between this Shingle Style house and his contemporary design for the Soldiers' Home Chapel. - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, Surgeon's Quarters, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  2. FRONT VIEW OF FACILITY 561, WHICH WAS ORIGINALLY A DUPLEX. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT VIEW OF FACILITY 561, WHICH WAS ORIGINALLY A DUPLEX. PHOTO SHOWS THE ONLY UNIT REMAINING, UNIT B (UNIT A WAS DEMOLISHED AFTER A FIRE). VIEW FACING NORTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170174 computers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), showing duplexed cyber 170-174 computers - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Standard specification for centrifugally cast austenitic steel pipe for high-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM. This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Oct. 25, 1993. Published December 1993. Originally published as A 451-61T. Last previous edition was A 451-92. Reapproved 1997.

  5. Renal pelvis urothelial carcinoma of the upper moiety in complete right renal duplex: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiran; Yu, Quanfeng; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ranlu; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) originated from renal pelvis is the common tumor of the urinary system, however, neoplasia of the renal pelvis in duplex kidneys is extremely rare, especially in the complete renal and ureteral duplex cases. We present the first case of renal pelvis UC of the upper moiety in a complete right renal duplex. This male patient has bilateral complete renal and ureteral duplex. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal pelvis UC in a complete renal duplex system. After this experience we feel that the diagnosis of renal pelvis UC in duplex kidneys is not so easy, and once the diagnosis is determined, the whole renal duplex units and bladder cuff or ectopic orifice should be excised radically. PMID:26823906

  6. Casting Equipment. Casting and Angling Skills Series. Instructor Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Robert D., Jr.

    Part of a series of self-contained instructional units designed by the Missouri Department of Conservation to teach Missourians how to use outdoor resources wisely and skillfully, the instructor manual, the first in the casting and angling series, is intended both as a reference book on casting equipment and as an introduction to the sport.…

  7. Highly porous, low elastic modulus 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Machová, Markéta; Fousová, Michaela; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Fojt, Jaroslav; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Recently, porous metallic materials have been extensively studied as candidates for use in the fabrication of scaffolds and augmentations to repair trabecular bone defects, e.g. in surroundings of joint replacements. Fabricating these complex structures by using common approaches (e.g., casting and machining) is very challenging. Therefore, rapid prototyping techniques, such as selective laser melting (SLM), have been investigated for these applications. In this study, we characterized a highly porous (87 vol.%) 316L stainless steel scaffold prepared by SLM. 316L steel was chosen because it presents a biomaterial still widely used for fabrication of joint replacements and, from the practical point of view, use of the same material for fabrication of an augmentation and a joint replacement is beneficial for corrosion prevention. The results are compared to the reported properties of two representative nonporous 316L stainless steels prepared either by SLM or casting and subsequent hot forging. The microstructural and mechanical properties and the surface chemical composition and interaction with the cells were investigated. The studied material exhibited mechanical properties that were similar to those of trabecular bone (compressive modulus of elasticity ~0.15GPa, compressive yield strength ~3MPa) and cytocompatibility after one day that was similar to that of wrought 316L stainless steel, which is a commonly used biomaterial. Based on the obtained results, SLM is a suitable method for the fabrication of porous 316L stainless steel scaffolds with highly porous structures. PMID:27612756

  8. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometry Reveals Duplex DNA Dissociation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Gabelica, Valérie; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) soft desolvation is widely used to investigate fragile species such as nucleic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) gives access to the gas phase energetics of the intermolecular interactions in the absence of solvent, by following the dissociation of mass-selected ions. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) provides indications on the tridimensional oligonucleotide structure by attributing a collision cross section (CCS) to the studied ion. Electrosprayed duplexes longer than eight bases pairs retain their helical structure in a solvent-free environment. However, the question of conformational changes under activation in MS/MS studies remains open. The objective of this study is to probe binding energetics and characterize the unfolding steps occurring prior to oligonucleotide duplex dissociation. Comparing the evolution of CCS with collision energy and breakdown curves, we characterize dissociation pathways involved in CID-activated DNA duplex separation into single strands, and we demonstrate here the existence of stable dissociation intermediates. At fixed duplex length, dissociation pathways were found to depend on the percentage of GC base pairs and on their position in the duplex. Our results show that pure GC sequences undergo a gradual compaction until reaching the dissociation intermediate: A-helix. Mixed AT-GC sequences were found to present at least two conformers: a classic B-helix and an extended structure where the GC tract is a B-helix and the AT tract(s) fray. The dissociation in single strands takes place from both conformers when the AT base pairs are enclosed between two GC tracts or only from the extended conformer when the AT tract is situated at the end(s) of the sequence.

  10. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  11. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard bandage that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while ... water. Plaster of Paris casts are heavier than fiberglass casts and don't hold up as well ...

  12. Low Frequency Phased Array Techniques for Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping Welds: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive testing (NDT) approaches for coarse-grained stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effectiveness and limitation of NDT techniques as related to inservice testing of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors. We examined cast stainless steel pipe specimens containing thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and having inner and outer diameter surface geometrical conditions that simulate several water reactor primary piping configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were examined to characterize the inherent acoustic noise and scattering caused by grain structures and to determine the consistency of ultrasonic responses when propagating through differing microstructures. Advanced ultrasonic phased array techniques were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at low frequencies, and composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Results from laboratory studies for assessing crack detection effectiveness in cast stainless steel as a function of frequency are discussed in this paper.

  13. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangdong; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen.

  14. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  15. A study of chromium carbide precipitation at interphase boundaries in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, C.F.

    1990-04-01

    Sensitization is a deleterious process which can occur in stainless steels. It is caused by grain boundary or phase boundary precipitation of chromium carbides and the resulting formation of a chromium depleted zone adjacent to these boundaries. The carbides in question actually have the composition (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} (usually written M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), and precipitate in the temperature range 450--900{degree}C. Since a minimum chromium content is required to maintain the passive film necessary for resistance to electrochemical attack, the result of chromium depletion is that the steel becomes sensitized'' to possible intergranular corrosion. Sensitization often occurs as a result of welding operations. The material close to the fusion line reaches temperatures within the sensitization range. This region is called the heat affected zone (HAZ). Since many welds are multi-pass welds, the actual weld bead of one pass may lie in the heat affected zone of the next pass. The weld bead of the first pass might therefore be sensitized. Furthermore there are applications where welds will be exposed to sensitizing temperatures for very long periods of time, such as welded labels on retrievable nuclear waste containers. For these reasons the sensitization behavior of the actual weld-bead microstructures must be understood. It has been known for many years that duplex stainless steels (steels with both ferrite and austenite phases present at room temperature) have superior resistance to intergranular corrosion. A model has been proposed to explain the sensitization behavior of these alloys. This work will be concerned with testing the validity of aspects of this model using transmission electron microscopy and further understanding of the sensitization process in duplex stainless steel welds. 52 refs., 23 figs.

  16. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Why stainless steel corrodes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mary P; Williams, David E; Chater, Richard J; Hutton, Bernie M; McPhail, David S

    2002-02-14

    Stainless steels are used in countless diverse applications for their corrosion resistance. Although they have extremely good general resistance, they are nevertheless susceptible to pitting corrosion. This localized dissolution of an oxide-covered metal in specific aggressive environments is one of the most common and catastrophic causes of failure of metallic structures. The pitting process has been described as random, sporadic and stochastic and the prediction of the time and location of events remains extremely difficult. Many contested models of pitting corrosion exist, but one undisputed aspect is that manganese sulphide inclusions play a critical role. Indeed, the vast majority of pitting events are found to occur at, or adjacent to, such second-phase particles. Chemical changes in and around sulphide inclusions have been postulated as a mechanism for pit initiation but such variations have never been measured. Here we use nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectroscopy to demonstrate a significant reduction in the Cr:Fe ratio of the steel matrix around MnS particles. These chromium-depleted zones are susceptible to high-rate dissolution that 'triggers' pitting. The implications of these results are that materials processing conditions control the likelihood of corrosion failures, and these data provide a basis for optimizing such conditions. PMID:11845203

  18. Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.

  19. In vivo evaluation of a high-strength, high-ductility stainless steel for use in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Syrett, B C; Davis, E E

    1979-07-01

    A high-strength, high-ductility, austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated for use in surgical implants by performing in vivo tests in rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. This stainless steel, a TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steel containing about 4% Mo, was compared with two alloys in current clinical use: Type 316L stainless steel and cast Vitallium. Compared with the other two alloys, cast Vitallium generally had higher resistance to corrosion and superior biocompatibility in all animals. The tests in rats and dogs indicated that the corrosion resistances of the TRIP steel and the Type 316L stainless steel were similar and that the tissue reactions caused by these alloys were also similar. However, in rhesus monkeys, the TRIP steel was shown to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking and much more susceptible to crevice corrosion than Type 316L stainless steel. Limited tests in rabbits supported the observation that the TRIP steel is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking. These inconsistencies in the in vivo tests underline the need for a reevaluation of the popular test techniques and of the animals commonly chosen for assessing the suitability of candidate implant materials. The "worst case" results from the rhesus monkey tests were entirely consistent with previous results obtained from in vitro studies. However, further work must be performed before the behavior of metals in humans, rhesus monkeys, or any other animal, can be predicted with confidence from an in vitro test program. PMID:110810

  20. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed. PMID:23378148