Science.gov

Sample records for cast iron cylinder

  1. Cast iron-base alloy for cylinder/regenerator housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witter, Stewart L.; Simmons, Harold E.; Woulds, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    NASACC-1 is a castable iron-base alloy designed to replace the costly and strategic cobalt-base X-40 alloy used in the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/generator housing. Over 40 alloy compositions were evaluated using investment cast test bars for stress-rupture testing. Also, hydrogen compatibility and oxygen corrosion resistance tests were used to determine the optimal alloy. NASACC-1 alloy was characterized using elevated and room temperature tensile, creep-rupture, low cycle fatigue, heat capacity, specific heat, and thermal expansion testing. Furthermore, phase analysis was performed on samples with several heat treated conditions. The properties are very encouraging. NASACC-1 alloy shows stress-rupture and low cycle fatigue properties equivalent to X-40. The oxidation resistance surpassed the program goal while maintaining acceptable resistance to hydrogen exposure. The welding, brazing, and casting characteristics are excellent. Finally, the cost of NASACC-1 is significantly lower than that of X-40.

  2. Determining the Mechanism of In-Service Cylinder Distortion in Aluminum Engine Blocks with Cast-In Gray Iron Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Anthony; Ravindran, Comondore; Sediako, Dimitry; MacKay, Robert

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, stringent government legislation on vehicle fuel efficiency has pushed the automotive industry to replace steel and cast iron power train components with light weight Al alloys. However, unlike their ferrous-based equivalents, Al-Si alloy engine blocks are prone to permanent dimensional distortion in critical locations such as the cylinder bore regions. Understanding the mechanisms that cause distortion will promote the use of Al alloys over ferrous alloys for power train applications and enable automotive manufacturers to meet emission standards and reduce fuel consumption. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to evaluate residual stress along the Al cylinder bridge and the gray cast iron liners of distorted and undistorted engine blocks. Microstructural analysis was carried out using OM, SEM, and TEM, while mechanical testing was accomplished via ambient and elevated temperature [~453 K (180 °C)] tensile testing. The results suggest that the distorted engine block had high tensile residual stress in the Al cylinder bridge, reaching a maximum of 170 MPa in the hoop direction, which triggered permanent dimensional distortion in the cylinders when exposed to service conditions. In addition, the middle of the cylinder had the highest magnitude of distortion since this region had a combination of high tensile residual stress (hoop stress of 150 MPa) and reduced strength compared with the bottom of the cylinder.

  3. Determining the Mechanism of In-Service Cylinder Distortion in Aluminum Engine Blocks with Cast-In Gray Iron Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Anthony; Ravindran, Comondore; Sediako, Dimitry; MacKay, Robert

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, stringent government legislation on vehicle fuel efficiency has pushed the automotive industry to replace steel and cast iron power train components with light weight Al alloys. However, unlike their ferrous-based equivalents, Al-Si alloy engine blocks are prone to permanent dimensional distortion in critical locations such as the cylinder bore regions. Understanding the mechanisms that cause distortion will promote the use of Al alloys over ferrous alloys for power train applications and enable automotive manufacturers to meet emission standards and reduce fuel consumption. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to evaluate residual stress along the Al cylinder bridge and the gray cast iron liners of distorted and undistorted engine blocks. Microstructural analysis was carried out using OM, SEM, and TEM, while mechanical testing was accomplished via ambient and elevated temperature [~453 K (180 °C)] tensile testing. The results suggest that the distorted engine block had high tensile residual stress in the Al cylinder bridge, reaching a maximum of 170 MPa in the hoop direction, which triggered permanent dimensional distortion in the cylinders when exposed to service conditions. In addition, the middle of the cylinder had the highest magnitude of distortion since this region had a combination of high tensile residual stress (hoop stress of 150 MPa) and reduced strength compared with the bottom of the cylinder.

  4. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  5. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  6. Ceramic port shields cast in an iron engine head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, Nabil S.; Groeneweg, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Silicon nitride exhaust and intake port shields have been successfully cast into a gray iron cylinder head of a heavy duty diesel single cylinder research engine. Careful design considerations, finite element, and probability of survival analyses indicated viability of the design. Foundry experience, NDE, and failure investigations are reported.

  7. Cast Fe-base cylinder/regenerator housing alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, F.; Kindlimann, L.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an iron-base alloy that can meet the requirements of automotive Stirling engine cylinders and regenerator housings is described. Alloy requirements are as follows: a cast alloy, stress for 5000-hr rupture life of 200 MPa (29 ksi) at 775 C (1427 F), oxidation/corrosion resistance comparable to that of N-155, compatibility with hydrogen, and an alloy cost less than or equal to that of 19-9DL. The preliminary screening and evaluation of ten alloys are described.

  8. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF IRON CASTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling of ductile iron casting in green sand molds with phenolic isocyanate cores and in phenol-formaldehyde bound shell molds did not provide definitive proof that environmentally hazardous organic emission occur. Both molding systems produced the same type of major emissions,...

  10. Cementite Solidification in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, J. J.; Sinatora, A.; Albertin, E.

    2014-06-01

    Two hypereutectic cast irons (5.01 pct Cr and 5.19 pct V) were cast and the polished surfaces of test pieces were deep-etched and analyzed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that graphite lamellae intersect the cementite and a thin austenite film nucleates and grows on the cementite plates. For both compositions, graphite and cementite can coexist as equilibrium phases, with the former always nucleating and growing first. The eutectic carbides grow from the austenite dendrites in a direction perpendicular to the primary plates.

  11. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  12. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED FROM CASTING MACHINE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING WEIGHED ON SCALES AT CASTING MACHINE. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE COOLING A 20' IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE COOLING A 20' IRON PIPE PRIOR TO EXTRACTION FROM CASTING MACHINE. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  18. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  19. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  20. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  2. Replication of engine block cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties with lab scale 319 Al alloy billet castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, A.; D'Elia, F.; Ravindran, C.; MacKay, R.

    2014-01-15

    In recent years, aluminum alloy gasoline engine blocks have in large part successfully replaced nodular cast iron engine blocks, resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency. However, because of the inadequate wear resistance properties of hypoeutectic Al–Si alloys, gray iron cylinder liners are required. These liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores and necessitate the maximization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. The aim of this study was to replicate the engine cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties following TSR treatment (which removes the sand binder to enable easy casting retrieval) using lab scale billet castings of the same alloy composition with varying cooling rates. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were assessed using tensile testing. The results suggest that the microstructure at the top and middle of the engine block cylinder bridge was successfully replicated by the billet castings. However, the microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder was not completely replicated due to variations in secondary phase morphology and distribution. The successful replication of engine block microstructure will enable the future optimization of heat treatment parameters. - Highlights: • A method to replicate engine block microstructure was developed. • Billet castings will allow cost effective optimization of heat treatment process. • The replication of microstructure in the cylinder region was mostly successful. • Porosity was more clustered in the billet castings compared to the engine block. • Mechanical properties were lower in billet castings due to porosity and inclusions.

  3. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  4. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  5. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  6. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED USING PIPE PULLERS. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, R.L.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin

    1996-10-01

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  8. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  9. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  10. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  11. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  12. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  13. Solidifying Cast Iron in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes study of solidification of cast iron in low and normal gravity. Because flotation, sedimentation, and convection suppressed, alloys that solidify at nearly zero gravity have unusual and potentially useful characteristics. Study conducted in airplane that repeatedly flew along parabolic trajectories. Appears iron/carbon alloys made at low gravity have greater carbon content (as high as 5 to 10 percent) than those made of Earth gravity because carbon particles do not float to top of melt.

  14. Compacted graphite iron: Cast iron makes a comeback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, S.

    1994-08-01

    Although compacted graphite iron has been known for more than four decades, the absence of a reliable mass-production technique has resulted in relatively little effort to exploit its operational benefits. However, a proven on-line process control technology developed by SinterCast allows for series production of complex components in high-quality CGI. The improved mechanical properties of compacted graphite iron relative to conventional gray iron allow for substantial weight reduction in gasoline and diesel engines or substantial increases in horsepower, or an optimal combination of both. Concurrent with these primary benefits, CGI also provides significant emissions and fuel efficiency benefits allowing automakers to meet legislated performance standards. The operational and environmental benefits of compacted graphite iron together with its low cost and recyclability reinforce cast iron as a prime engineering material for the future.

  15. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  16. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  17. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  18. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  19. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  20. Graphite formation in cast iron, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Fiske, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several types of cast irons are directionally solidified aboard the KC-135 aircraft. Also, control samples are run on Earth for comparison. Some of these samples are unusable because of various mechanical problems; the analysis and the interpretation of results on the samples that are run successfully is discussed.

  1. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2001-10-01

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  2. Orientation relationships in graphitic cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooho; Phillips, D. S.

    1987-11-01

    Ferrite/graphite and martensite/graphite interfaces in three commercial cast irons have been analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. Two recurring orientation relationships have been found to account for over 60 pct of the ferrite/graphite interfaces analyzed. A similar pair of relationships discovered in martensitic material strongly suggests that the prior austenite/graphite interface was also ordered. The same relationships were prominent in gray and ductile irons. One of the relationships observed can be transformed through the Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship to a previously-reported austenite/graphite relationship.

  3. Inoculated Slightly Hypereutectic Gray Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisamera, Mihai; Riposan, Iulian; Stan, Stelian; Militaru, Cristina; Anton, Irina; Barstow, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The current experimental investigation in this article was designed to characterize the structure of mold (M) and ladle (L) inoculated, low-S (0.025 wt.% S), low-Al (0.003 wt.% Al), slightly hypereutectic (CE = 4.4-4.5 wt.%) electric melted gray irons, typical for high performance thin-wall castings. It describes the effect of a Ca, Al, Zr-FeSi inoculant addition of 0-0.25 wt.% on structure characteristics, and compares to similar treatments with hypoeutectic irons (3.5-3.6 wt.% CE, 0.025 wt.% S, and 0.003 wt.% Al). A complex structure including primary graphite, austenite dendrites, and eutectic cells is obtained in hypereutectic irons, as the result of nonequilibrium solidification following the concept of a coexisting region. Dendrites appear to be distributed between eutectic cells at higher eutectic undercooling, while in inoculated irons and for lower undercooling, the eutectic cells are "reinforced" by eutectic austenite dendrites. A Zr, Ca, Al-FeSi alloy appears to be an effective inoculant in low S, low Al, gray cast irons, especially for a late inoculation technique, with beneficial effects on both graphite and austenite phases. First, inoculation influenced the nucleation of graphite/eutectic cell, and then their characteristics. A further role of these active elements directly contributed to form nucleation sites for austenite, as complex (Mn,X)S particles.

  4. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  5. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOEpatents

    Filippi, Arthur M.; Sprecace, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  6. 19. Inside the cast house at Furnace A. Molten iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Inside the cast house at Furnace A. Molten iron flowed into eight ladles. The furnace was cast (or tapped) six times each day. - Central Furnaces, 2650 Broadway, east bank of Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  8. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  9. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  10. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  12. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  13. DETAIL VIEW OF BASE OF CAST IRON TOWER SHOWING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BASE OF CAST IRON TOWER SHOWING THE FABRICATING MARK OF STARBUCK IRON WORKS, TROY, NY - Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge & Stone Toll House, Near Lake Oroville (moved from fork of Feather River), Oroville, Butte County, CA

  14. 10. DETAIL OF CAST IRON COLUMN BASE ON FIRST FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF CAST IRON COLUMN BASE ON FIRST FLOOR STOREFRONT, SHOWING MANUFACTURER'S STAMP: IOWA IRON WOKS CO. DUBUQUE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque Seed Company Warehouse, 169-171 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  15. AERIAL VIEW OF MC WANE CAST IRON PIPE, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF MC WANE CAST IRON PIPE, LOOKING WEST TO BIRMINGHAM CITY CENTER. I-20-59 RUNNING DIAGONALLY FROM RIGHT MIDDLE GROUND. L&N RAILROAD TRACKS IN FOREGROUND. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-01

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94-1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  17. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  18. Heat transfer characteristics of a high temperature sensible heat storage water heater using cast iron as a storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Jotshi, C.K.; Goswami, D.Y.; Klausner, J.F.; Hsieh, C.K.; Leung, M.; Li, H.; Malakar, S.; Colacino, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the heat transfer characteristics of high temperature sensible heat storage in cast iron for water heating applications. An experimental setup consisting of a cast iron cylinder and a tube running through its center was fabricated and tested. The experimental data were compared with the theoretical model. It was observed that the contact resistance between the cast iron and the tube plays a dominant role in extracting the heat. An approximate contact resistance prediction was obtained by assuming the resistance due to the air gap modulated by a correction factor, which accounts for the contacting surface area. Based on the results from the experimental setup and theoretical modeling a prototype storage water heater using cast iron blocks as the storage material was designed, fabricated and tested.

  19. Acoustic energy transmission in cast iron pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziroglou, Michail E.; Boyle, David E.; Wright, Steven W.; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose acoustic power transfer as a method for the remote powering of pipeline sensor nodes. A theoretical framework of acoustic power propagation in the ceramic transducers and the metal structures is drawn, based on the Mason equivalent circuit. The effect of mounting on the electrical response of piezoelectric transducers is studied experimentally. Using two identical transducer structures, power transmission of 0.33 mW through a 1 m long, 118 mm diameter cast iron pipe, with 8 mm wall thickness is demonstrated, at 1 V received voltage amplitude. A near-linear relationship between input and output voltage is observed. These results show that it is possible to deliver significant power to sensor nodes through acoustic waves in solid structures. The proposed method may enable the implementation of acoustic - powered wireless sensor nodes for structural and operation monitoring of pipeline infrastructure.

  20. The Structure and Properties of Cast Iron Alloyed with Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumakov, A. A.; Stepanova, N. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Riapolova, Iu Iu; Emurlaev, K. I.

    2016-04-01

    Cast iron with 3 wt. % Cu was prepared by induction melting and casting in sand molds. The structure of the samples was studied using light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Cu promoted formation of pearlite and slightiy decreased the volume fraction of graphite. No Cu inclusions were found by LM and SEM. The nanoprecipitations of ε-Cu in lamellar pearlite were observed by TEM. The properties of the Cu-alloyed cast iron were compared with the properties of cast iron not alloyed with Cu. The hardness of cast iron after alloying with Cu increased and the friction coefficient decreased in comparison with the reference sample.

  1. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  2. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  3. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  4. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  5. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  6. Materials processing threshold report: 2. Use of low gravity for cast iron process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankhouser, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Potential applications of a low gravity environment of interest to the commercial producers of cast iron were assessed to determine whether low gravity conditions offer potential opportunities to producers for improving cast iron properties and expanding the use of cast irons. The assessment is limited to the gray and nodular types of iron, however, the findings are applicable to all cast irons. The potential advantages accrued through low gravity experiments with cast irons are described.

  7. 25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted wooded post at top, located at north end of bridge. VIEW NORTHEAST - Chelsea Street Bridge & Draw Tender's House, Spanning Chelsea River, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. 3. FOURTH FLOOR OF OIL HOUSE (NOTICE CAST IRON SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FOURTH FLOOR OF OIL HOUSE (NOTICE CAST IRON SUPPORT POSTS AND OIL PRESS IN THE CENTER) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Oil House, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  9. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H. ); Lee, J.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated.

  10. 11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Becker-Hazelton Company Warehouse, 280 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  11. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a resilient material as the sealing medium. Each gasket must be suitably confined and retained under compression by...

  12. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a resilient material as the sealing medium. Each gasket must be suitably confined and retained under compression by...

  13. 4. Pier detail, cast iron bollard, north side of pier, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Pier detail, cast iron bollard, north side of pier, view to northwest. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 11, Charlestown Waterfront at confluence of Little Mystic Channel & Mystic River at northernmost ent of Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. Structure and Property Studies on Austempered and As-Cast Ausferritic Gray Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiraj, Aravind; Balachandran, G.; Kamaraj, M.

    2010-10-01

    A high-strength and wear-resistant alloyed gray iron with ausferritic microstructure on solidification directly from molten condition could be made in a Ni and Mo alloyed gray cast iron. The as-cast ausferritic cast iron was compared with two conventionally austempered gray iron with and without Ni and Mo additions. The various phase constitution and volume fractions were analyzed using optical, SEM and XRD analyses. The various aspects of the alloy chemistry and processing conditions have been correlated with the microstructure and mechanical properties obtained. The analysis showed that the Ni-Mo alloyed austempered gray iron and the directly as-cast austempered gray iron had similar phase constitutions. The strength of the direct as-cast alloy with ausferritic microstructure was higher than the others due to its higher austenite content and carbide distribution. The wear rate of the conventionally austempered Ni and Mo containing alloy and direct as-cast ausferritic alloys is 20% of the austempered gray iron without Ni and Mo with friction coefficient less than 0.4.

  15. Residual stresses in a cast iron automotive brake disc rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Maurice I.; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Runout, and consequent juddering and pulsation through the brake pedal, is a multi-million dollar per year warranty problem for car manufacturers. There is some suspicion that the runout can be caused by relaxation of residual casting stresses when the disc is overheated during severe-braking episodes. We report here neutron-diffraction measurements of the levels and distribution of residual strains in a used cast iron brake disc rotor. The difficulties of measuring stresses in grey cast iron are outlined and three-dimensional residual-strain distributions are presented and their possible effects discussed.

  16. Columnar to equiaxed transition in high Cr white iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.

    1996-07-15

    White cast irons are frequently used in applications requiring high wear resistance. High Cr white cast irons have a composite microstructure composed of hard (Fe,Cr){sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides in a steel matrix. In thick section castings, long rod-shaped carbides may grow perpendicular to the mold wall to form the columnar zone of the casting, or their long axes may grow in random directions to form equiaxed grains. Previous research has indicated that the equiaxed region of these high Cr white iron castings is much more wear resistant under high stress abrasive conditions than the columnar region, when the carbides are oriented perpendicular to the wear surface. Therefore, in order to maximize their abrasion resistance, it is essential that wear resistant cast parts with thick sections be produced with completely equiaxed macrostructures to maximize their abrasion resistance. In the present study, the effect of both the chemical composition, particularly carbon content, and the pouring superheat of the melt on the macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings is investigated.

  17. Adhesive Wear Behavior of Heat Treated Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, M.; Shama, S.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Behera, R. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron is one of the most favorable materials in cast iron family due to its wide range of mechanical and tribological properties. In the current research priority is given towards the investigation of wear system response of spheroidal graphite cast iron subjected to various heat treatment conditions. Pearlitic/ferritic and upper bainitic matrix was obtained through normalizing and austempering treatment for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Dry sliding wear test was performed at 10N, 20N, 30N for a sliding distance of 7.54m. With increase in load weight loss was observed for as-cast specimen whereas normalized specimen showed very less weight loss with increasing load. On the other hand the austempered specimen observed to lose weight when operated at 10N, whereas at 20N and 30N drastic gain in weight was observed.

  18. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF CAST IRON FENCE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, OF CAST IRON FENCE AND MARBLE MONUMENTS IN THIS GRAVE PLOT IN THE COLUMBIANA CEMETERY WHICH DATE TO 1864. IRON WORK MANUFACTURED AT SHELBY IRONWORKS FOR IRONMASTER'S FIRST WIFE AND DAUGHTER'S GRAVES. - Ware Cemetery Plot, Shelby County Road 25, Columbiana, Shelby County, AL

  19. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  20. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  1. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  2. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  3. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  4. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and malleable iron fittings conforming to the specifications of 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(a) may...; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and if their service does not exceed the rating as marked on the valve. (b) Cast... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section...

  5. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and malleable iron fittings conforming to the specifications of 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(a) may...; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and if their service does not exceed the rating as marked on the valve. (b) Cast... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section...

  6. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and malleable iron fittings conforming to the specifications of 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(a) may...; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and if their service does not exceed the rating as marked on the valve. (b) Cast... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section...

  7. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and malleable iron fittings conforming to the specifications of 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(a) may...; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and if their service does not exceed the rating as marked on the valve. (b) Cast... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section...

  8. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and malleable iron fittings conforming to the specifications of 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(a) may...; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and if their service does not exceed the rating as marked on the valve. (b) Cast... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section...

  9. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokusová, Marcela; Berta, Igor; Šooš, Ľubomír

    2014-12-01

    High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.%) 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  10. Iron/Phosphorus Alloys for Continuous Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous casting becomes practicable because of reduced eutectic temperature. Experimental ferrous alloy has melting point about 350 degrees C lower than conventional steels, making possible to cast structural members and eliminating need for hot rolling. Product has normal metal structure and good physical properties. Process used to make rails, beams, slabs, channels, and pipes.

  11. Formation of microstructures in the spheroidal graphite cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Daloz, D.; Bruneseaux, F.; Lesoult, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pipeline systems for hydraulic networks are obtained via centrifugal casting of spheroidal graphite cast iron. The very high cooling rate that is achieved in the skin of the product can sometimes lead to carbide instead of graphite in cast iron. An experimental device has been built in the laboratory that allows reproducing the extreme thermal conditions encountered during formation of skin of centrifugally cast pipes. Liquid metal droplets fall on a cold substrate. Rapid directional solidification occurs. The temperature evolution of the lower surface of the droplet is recorded during the very first moment of the solidification (t < 200 ms) thanks to a photodiode, which is located below the substrate. The microstructures that are obtained in laboratory are characterised in both the as-cast state and the heat-treated state. They are compared to the centrifugally cast ones. A model of directional solidification of cast iron under a very large temperature gradient has been built. It allows explaining the transition from stable to metastable micro structure that was observed in the products and reproduced in the laboratory samples.

  12. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... iron basis material subcategory. 466.20 Section 466.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Cast Iron Basis Material Subcategory § 466.20 Applicability; description of the cast iron basis... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  13. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... iron basis material subcategory. 466.20 Section 466.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Cast Iron Basis Material Subcategory § 466.20 Applicability; description of the cast iron basis... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  14. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... iron basis material subcategory. 466.20 Section 466.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Cast Iron Basis Material Subcategory § 466.20 Applicability; description of the cast iron basis... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  15. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... iron basis material subcategory. 466.20 Section 466.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Cast Iron Basis Material Subcategory § 466.20 Applicability; description of the cast iron basis... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  16. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... iron basis material subcategory. 466.20 Section 466.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Cast Iron Basis Material Subcategory § 466.20 Applicability; description of the cast iron basis... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  17. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

  18. Numerical Optimization of the Method of Cooling of a Massive Casting of Ductile Cast-Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovska, Jana; Kavicka, Frantisek; Stransky, Karel; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stetina, Josef

    2010-06-01

    The numerical models of the temperature field of solidifying castings, according to various authors, have been observing two main goals—directed solidification as the basic assumption for the healthiness of a casting and the optimization of the technology while maintaining the optimal product properties. The achievement of these goals is conditioned by the ability to analyze and, successively, to control the effect of the deciding factors, which either characterize the process or accompany it. An original application of ANSYS simulated the forming of the temperature field of a massive casting from ductile cast-iron during the application various methods of its cooling using steel chills. The numerical model managed to optimize more than one method of cooling but, in addition to that, provided serious results for the successive model of structural and chemical heterogeneity, and so it also contributes to influencing the pouring structure. The file containing the acquired results from both models, as well as from their organic unification, brings new and, simultaneously, remarkable findings of causal relationships between the structural and chemical heterogeneity (i.e. between the sizes of the spheroids of graphite, the cells, density of the spheroids of graphite, etc.) and the local solidification time in any point of the casting. The determined relations therefore enable the prediction of the face density of the spheroids of graphite in dependence on the local solidification time. The calculated temperature field of a two-ton 500×500×1000 mm casting of ductile cast-iron with various methods of cooling has successfully been compared with temperatures obtained experimentally. The casting was cast in sand mould. The calculated model of the kinetics of the temperature field of the casting was verified during casting with temperature measurements in selected points. This has created a tool for the optimization of the structure with an even distribution of the

  19. 146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP STANDARD. THIS AND OTHER LAMP STANDARDS WERE REMOVED FROM THE LAMP COLUMNS ON THE PARAPET WALLS DURING WORLD WAR II AND STORED INSIDE THE DAM (January 1991) - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  20. High-chromium and high-silicon cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Reynaud, A.

    1996-02-01

    High-chromium and high-silicon alloyed cast irons are not well known, although they are very corrosion-resistant materials and provide technical solutions to some difficult corrosion problems. This article reviews these alloys` chemical compositions and properties. It also highlights some industrial applications in which they are useful.

  1. 16. DETAIL OF WICKET AND CAST IRON BALL JOINT (off ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF WICKET AND CAST IRON BALL JOINT (off site) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  2. 9. GENERAL VIEW OF THE CAST IRON TRUSS SYSTEM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL VIEW OF THE CAST IRON TRUSS SYSTEM IN THE ATTIC OF UNIT 2, SHOWING THE JUNCTION OF THE TRUSSES ABOVE THE MAIN ENTRY GABLE WITH THE TYPICAL TRUSS SYSTEM FOR THE WING; LOOKING SSW. (Ryan and Ceronie) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 40, Broadway between Dalliba & Watervliet Avenues, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  3. Nondestructive characterization of ductile cast iron by magnetic adaptive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, I.; Takagi, T.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports correlation of magnetic descriptors with Brinell hardness and conductivity of ductile cast iron, aiming to develop a novel nondestructive method by magnetic adaptive testing. Four series of cast iron staircase-shaped samples were investigated by this method, where different cooling rates of samples during casting resulted in different structures of each sample. The flat samples were magnetized by an attached yoke, and sensitive descriptors were obtained from a proper evaluation, based on the measurements of series of magnetic minor hysteresis loops, without magnetic saturation of the samples. Results of the nondestructive magnetic tests were compared with destructive mechanical measurements of Brinell hardness and conductivity and good correlation was found between them.

  4. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  5. Detonation velocity of melt-cast ADN and ADN/nano-diamond cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R. M.; Forbes, J. W.; Lawrence, G. W.; Deiter, J. S.; Baker, R. N.; Ashwell, K. D.; Sutherland, G. T.

    2000-04-01

    Detonation velocities of confined cylinders of melt-cast ADN/ZnO (99.5/0.5 by weight), ADN/nano-diamond/ZnO (92.4/7.2/0.4), ADN/AN/ZnO (95.5/4.0/0.5) and ADN/AN/ZnO/nano-diamond (88.0/4.5/0.5/7.0) have been measured using a streak camera. Velocities ranging between 3.9 and 4.5 mm/μs were obtained for 1.3 cm diameter samples confined by steel and a 2.5 cm diameter ADN/AN/ZnO cylinder. In one of the samples the detonation was failing as it proceeded through the charge. For the other shots reported, the shock velocities appeared to be steady through the last half of the charge, though the lengths were too short for any definitive statement about the failure diameter to be made.

  6. Multi-scale simulation of ductile iron casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, J.

    2015-06-01

    It has been well known that addition of rare earth elements was indispensable for production of ductile cast iron. The addition reduces solidification shrinkage. However there are still ambiguities in understanding the mechanism and predicting the casting defects. A possible explanation for the reduction of shrinkage is that the addition of rare earth promotes expansion of castings due to the graphite formation, which is related to cooling rate. In this study, the effect of rare earth addition was considered as a function of cooling rate and solidification shrinkage rate was determined by the macro-scale simulation. In the meso-scale and the micro-scale simulations, distribution of graphite nodules was compared with the experimental results. The multi-scale simulation result well reproduced the experimental results.

  7. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumeni, E.; Tutum, C. C.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation and thermal analysis of the specimens have been carried out. A numerical model has been implemented and the results (i.e. cooling curve, cooling rate, nodule count and solid fraction) have shown a good agreement with experimental studies; following this, inoculation parameters in the model have been studied and discussed.

  8. Age Strengthening of Gray Cast Iron Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Von L. Richards; Wayne Nicola

    2003-06-26

    The primary objective of this research is to identify the age strengthening mechanism in gray and ductile cast iron, and to quantify the parameters that control it. It is also to contribute to a new predictive model for gray and ductile iron strength and hardness. This work shows that age strengthening occurs on a sigmoidal-logarithmic scale in gray and ductile cast irons, to a statistically significant extent. This is similar to Avrami-Johnson-Mehl kinetics for phase transformations in metals. It occurs in both cupola-melted iron and induction melted iron. However, it does not happen in all compositions. We have developed some understanding of the process. Data suggests that nitrogen and nitride-forming trace elements have a significant role in the process, but that is yet not fully characterized. Also, the time dependence of the bulk hardness and strength increase, the nano-scale precipitation evidence from neutron scattering, differential scanning calorimetry results and matrix micro-hardness increase in ferrite all indicate that age strengthening occurs by a precipitation or pre-precipitate cluster formation mechanism.

  9. Growth of Ferrite Needles in Compacted Graphite Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.A.; Mercader, R.C.; Desimoni, J.; Perez, T.; Gregorutti, R.W.

    2005-04-26

    The austempering kinetics transformation of compacted graphite cast irons austempered at 623K is studied. The length (l) and the number per unit volume (N) of ferrite needles were followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the austenite relative areas. The SEM results are compared with theoretical calculations available in the literature and indicate that the diffusion of C atoms in austenite controls the transformation, confirming the indirect MS determinations.

  10. Method of fabricating a prestressed cast iron vessel

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    A method of fabricating a prestressed cast iron vessel wherein double wall cast iron body segments each have an arcuate inner wall and a spaced apart substantially parallel outer wall with a plurality of radially extending webs interconnecting the inner wall and the outer wall, the bottom surface and the two exposed radial side surfaces of each body segment are machined and eight body segments are formed into a ring. The top surfaces and outer surfaces of the outer walls are machined and keyways are provided across the juncture of adjacent end walls of the body segments. A liner segment complementary in shape to a selected inner wall of one of the body segments is mounted to each of the body segments and again formed into a ring. The liner segments of each ring are welded to form unitary liner rings and thereafter the cast iron body segments are prestressed to complete the ring assembly. Ring assemblies are stacked to form the vessel and adjacent unitary liner rings are welded. A top head covers the top ring assembly to close the vessel and axially extending tendons retain the top and bottom heads in place under pressure.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10667 - Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron... iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste (PMN P-12-560; CAS No. 1391739-82-4;...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10667 - Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Slimes and sludges, aluminum and iron... iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... and iron casting, wastewater treatment, solid waste (PMN P-12-560; CAS No. 1391739-82-4;...

  13. Erosion-corrosion behavior of austenitic cast iron in an acidic slurry medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ke; Sun, Lan; Liu, Yu-zhen; Fan, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A series of austenitic cast iron samples with different compositions were cast and a part of nickel in the samples was replaced by manganese for economic reason. Erosion-corrosion tests were conducted under 2wt% sulfuric acid and 15wt% quartz sand. The results show that the matrix of cast irons remains austenite after a portion of nickel is replaced with manganese. (Fe,Cr)3C is a common phase in the cast irons, and nickel is the main alloying element in high-nickel cast iron; whereas, (Fe,Mn)3C is observed with the increased manganese content in low-nickel cast iron. Under erosion-corrosion tests, the weight-loss rates of the cast irons increase with increasing time. Wear plays a more important role than corrosion in determining the weight loss. It is indicated that the processes of weight loss for the cast irons with high and low nickel contents are different. The erosion resistance of the cast iron containing 7.29wt% nickel and 6.94wt% manganese is equivalent to that of the cast iron containing 13.29wt% nickel.

  14. A nonlinear kinematic hardening model for elastoplastic deformations in grey cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Josefson, B.L.; Hjelm, H.E.; Stigh, U.

    1995-04-01

    A kinematic hardening model including an associated flow rule is proposed for elastoplastic deformations in graphitic grey cast iron. Quantitatively good results are obtained when comparing with previously performed biaxial experiments. Use of a nonassociated flow rule is found to result in an undesirable weakening behavior that can be explained as a deficiency with the combination of kinetic hardening and the present choice of yield potential. The model proposed is also extended to include multilinear kinematic hardening. With this model qualitatively good agreement with experimental cyclic results from the literature is obtained. A three-dimensional FE-analysis of a cylinder head for a heavy duty Diesel engine is performed as an application. To predict initiation of thermal fatigue cracks, it is essential to use an elastoplastic material model.

  15. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%–0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: • The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. • TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. • The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. • The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  16. Statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of thin walled ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ductile iron castings have long been used in the automotive market. Ductile iron is inexpensive to produce and has desirable fracture resistance and mechanical properties. However, the weight of ductile iron is driving an effort to reduce wall thickness in order to increase fuel economy. Traditionally, cast iron has been cast into thick, bulky shapes. Reducing the section size of cast iron can be done, but pushes foundry practice into new areas. A consortium of foundries, foundry suppliers, and automotive manufacturers has been pursuing the use of thin walled ductile cast iron. This paper investigates the mechanical behavior of three experimental heats of thin-wall castings in order to evaluate property trends and limits. Castings as thin as 1.7 mm (0.07 in) have been successfully cast. The study was designed to investigate the effects of thickness and different casting heats on the dependent variables of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation-to-failure, reduction in area, and hardness. The ultimate tensile strength of the castings is found to increase as the casting thickness decreases. Conversely, the elongation-to-failure is found to decrease as the casting thickness decreases. Heat-to-heat differences were found, but they were usually within the scatter of the data.

  17. Effect of chemical composition and superheat on macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-08-01

    White cast irons are frequently used in applications requiring high wear resistance. High Cr white cast irons have a composite microstructure composed of hard (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides in a steel matrix. Previous research has indicated that the equiaxed region of these high Cr white iron castings is much more wear resistant under high stress abrasive conditions than the columnar region, when the carbides are oriented perpendicular to the wear surface. In the present study, the effect of both the chemical composition, particularly carbon content, and the pouring superheat of the melt on the macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings is investigated.

  18. Creep-rupture behavior of a developmental cast-iron-base alloy for use up to 800 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Scheuermann, Coulson M.

    1987-01-01

    A promising iron-base cast alloy is being developed as part of the DOE/NASA Stirling Engine Systems Project under contract DEN 3-282 with the United Technologies Research Center. This report presents the results of a study at the Lewis Research Center of the alloy's creep-rupture properties. The alloy was tested under a variety of conditions and was found to exhibit the normal 3-stage creep response. The alloy compared favorably with others being used or under consideration for the automotive Stirling engine cylinder/regenerator housing.

  19. Improving friction performance of cast iron by laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Zhou, Jianzhong; Huang, Shu; Sheng, Jie; Mei, Yufen; Zhou, Hongda

    2015-05-01

    According to different purpose, some high or low friction coefficient of the material surface is required. In this study, micro-dent texture was fabricated on cast iron specimens by a set of laser shock peening (LSP) experiments under different laser energy, with different patterns of micro dimples in terms of the depth over diameter. The mechanism of LSP was discussed and surface morphology of the micro dimples were investigated by utilizing a Keyence KS-1100 3D optical surface profilometer. The tests under the conditions of dry and lubricating sliding friction were accomplished on the UMT-2 apparatus. The performance of treated samples during friction and wear tests were characterized and analyzed. Based on theoretical analysis and experimental study, friction performance of textured and untextured samples were studied and compared. Morphological characteristics were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared after friction tests under dry condition. The results showed that friction coefficient of textured samples were obvious changed than smooth samples. It can be seen that LSP is an effective way to improve the friction performance of cast iron by fabricating high quality micro dimples on its surface, no matter what kind of engineering application mentioned in this paper.

  20. Thermo-Metallurgical Modeling of Nodular Cast Iron Cooling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2012-12-01

    A new numerical model to describe the microstructural evolution of a eutectic nodular cast iron during its cooling is presented. In particular, equiaxial solidification assuming an independent nucleation of austenite and graphite nodules is considered. In this context, the austenite has dendritic growth whereas the graphite grows with a spherical shape. After solidification occurs, the model assumes that the graphite nodules present in the cast iron continue growing since the carbon content in austenite decreases. Once the stable eutectoid temperature is reached, the alloy undergoes the austenite-ferrite transformation. The nucleation of the ferrite takes place at the contour of the spherical graphite nodules where austenite has low carbon concentration. A ferrite shell surrounding the graphite nodules is formed afterward by means of a process governed by carbon diffusion. Then, a ferrite-pearlite competitive transformation occurs when the temperature is below the metastable temperature. This thermo-metallurgical model is discretized and solved by means of the finite element method. The model allows the computation of cooling curves, fraction evolution for each component, and size and distribution of graphite nodules. The present numerical results are compared with experiments using standardized Quick-cup-type cups, and satisfactory numerical predictions of the final microstructure and cooling curves are achieved.

  1. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  2. Displaying structural property and inheritance of cast iron surfacing on steel base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shveev, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite inclusions heredity in deposited layer from remelted special cast iron billets was established. The possibility of controlling the structural state and the quality of the deposited layer due to technological parameters of welding and heat treatment of parts is shown. Ways of improving cast iron wear resistance durability are proposed.

  3. 75 FR 54596 - Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review: Heavy Iron Construction Castings from Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    .... See Initiation of Five-year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 75 FR 23240 (May 3, 2010). The Department received a... International Trade Administration Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review: Heavy Iron Construction Castings... of the countervailing duty order (``CVD'') on heavy iron construction castings from Brazil...

  4. 75 FR 23295 - Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... ``heavy'' and ``light'' iron construction castings from Canada on March 5, 1986 (51 FR 7600) and from... order on imports of ``heavy'' iron construction castings from Brazil (51 FR 17786). On September 23...), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR...

  5. Study on the solidification condition of exudation penetration occurrence in grey cast iron castings based on solidification simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianmin; Hansen, S. F.

    2000-11-01

    The solidification condition of eutectic exudation penetration occurrence, a kind of casting defect in grey cast-iron castings, is studied with computer solidification simulation and experiments on specially designed castings. A hot hole refers to the solidification condition when the temperature gradient or solidifying time gradient from the centre to the surface at some location in a casting is positive during the solidification process. It is a term proposed in this paper to better describe the condition of exudation penetration occurrence and for predicting its location at hot spots in a casting. The term is useful for improving the foundry technology used for solving the penetration problem with the help of computer simulation.

  6. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni-based coating obtained presents a significantly superior hardness than cast iron.

  7. Failure analysis of blistered organic coatings on gray iron castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianen, Matthew N.

    This study investigates the blistering failure of a two part coating consisting of talc-filled polyester resin and polyurethane primer on large gray iron castings. Surface metallography was performed and failed coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products were found inside of coating blisters. The proposed blistering mechanism is osmosis as a result of soluble species produced by the corrosion. It was believed that excessively thin primer layers resulted in a poor barrier to permeation of water, leading to blisters, and that a basecoat containing a corrosion inhibitor like zinc phosphate would reduce blistering. These hypotheses were tested with designed experiments using environmental testing in humidity and submersion environments. Thicker primer layers resulted in significant reductions in blistering and prolonged the time required before blister formation. A basecoat containing zinc phosphate was not found to be effective at reducing blistering in this coating system.

  8. Corrosion Mechanisms of Steel and Cast Iron by Molten Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balloy, David; Tissier, Jean-Charles; Giorgi, Marie-Laurence; Briant, Marc

    2010-09-01

    The corrosion mechanisms by liquid aluminum of three industrial materials have been studied: unalloyed steel (UAS), and ferritic and modified pearlitic cast irons (FCI and PCI, respectively). The behavior of these materials when in contact with liquid aluminum is different. Aluminum diffuses deep into the UAS and forms intermetallic compounds with iron at the surface and in the steel matrix. At the surface, only Fe2Al5 and FeAl3 are found. In the matrix, FeAl2 also is formed in agreement with the equilibrium Fe-Al diagram. From the matrix to FeAl2, the Al content in the ferrite increases progressively until Al saturation is reached. At this step, black elongated precipitates (Al4C3 and/or graphite) appear. Graphite lamellas present in both FCI and PCI constitute an efficient barrier to the Al diffusion. The high silicon content of the FCI leads to the formation of a phase free from Al and saturated in Si. For the PCI, a thin layer rich in Al and Si, which is formed between the matrix and Fe2Al5, limits the diffusion of atoms. The effects of Cr and P added in the PCI also are discussed.

  9. Low-gravity solidification of cast iron and space technology applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of analyses relating to cast iron solidification were conducted. A theoretical analysis using a computer to predict the cooling versus time relationship throughout the test specimen was performed. Tests were also conducted in a ground-based laboratory to generate a cooling time curve for cast iron. In addition, cast iron was cooled through the solidification period on a KC-135 and an F-104 aircraft while these aircraft were going through a period of low gravity. Future subjects for low gravity tests are enumerated.

  10. Characterization of tribological behaviour of graphitic aluminum matrix composites, grey cast iron, and aluminum silicon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Ahmad Reza

    In recent years a number of aluminum-silicon alloys and some graphitic aluminum matrix composites have been fabricated for potential tribological applications in the automotive industry, in particular for lightweight high efficiency internal combustion engines to replace conventional uses of cast iron. This study provides a systematic investigation for wear mechanisms in dry sliding of the graphitic aluminum-matrix composites (A356 Al-10%SiC-4%Gr and A356 Al-5%Al2O3-3%Gr) developed for cylinder liner applications. Two eutectic Al-Si alloys (modified with rare earth elements) developed for wear resistant engine blocks were also studied. The tribological behavior of grey cast iron (ASTM A30), which is a traditional material for engine components, was also investigated as reference. For graphitic aluminum matrix composites, a wear mapping approach has been adopted. Three main regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear regions were determined in the maps; additionally, a scuffing region was observed. In the ultra mild wear regime the wear resistance was primarily due to the hard particles supporting the load. It was shown that the onset of severe wear in graphitic composites occurred at considerably higher loads compared to A356 aluminum alloy and A356 Al-20% SiC composite. At the onset of severe wear, the surface temperatures and coefficient of friction of the graphitic composites was lower than that of A356 Al-20% SiC. At all testing conditions in the mild wear regime, a protective tribo-layer was formed, which by increasing the speed and load became more continuous, more compact, smoother, and harder. The tribo-layers were removed at the onset of severe wear. An experimental wear map of grey cast iron was constructed; it consisted of three wear regimes: ultra mild, mild and severe wear. In the ultra mild regime a compacted fine iron oxide powder formed on the contact. The onset of severe wear was started with local material transfer to the steel counterface, and

  11. Identification of a cast iron alloy containing nonstrategic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. V.; Anton, D. L.; Lemkey, F. D.; Nowotny, H.; Bailey, R. S.; Favrow, L. H.; Smeggil, J. G.; Snow, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    A program was performed to address the mechanical and environmental needs of Stirling engine heater head and regenerator housing components, while reducing the dependence on strategic materials. An alloy was developed which contained no strategic elemental additions per se. The base is iron with additions of manganese, molybdenum, carbon, silicon, niobium, and ferro-chromium. Such an alloy should be producible on a large scale at very low cost. The resulting alloy, designated as NASAUT 4G-Al, contained 15 Mn, 15 Cr, 2 Mo, 1.5 C, 1.0 Si, 1.0 Nb (in weight percent) with a balance of Fe. This alloy was optimized for chemistry, based upon tensile strength, creep-rupture strength, fracture behavior, and fatigue resistance up to 800 C. Alloys were also tested for environmental compatibility. The microstructure and mechanic properties (including hardness) were assessed in the as-cast condition and following several heat treatments, including one designed to simulate a required braze cycle. The alloy was fabricated and characterized in the form of both equiaxed and columnar-grained castings. The columnar grains were produced by directional solidification, and the properties were characterized in both the longitudinal and transverse orientations. The NASAUT 4G-Al alloy was found to be good in cyclic-oxidation resistance and excellent in both hydrogen and hot-corrosion resistance, especially in comparison to the baseline XF-818 alloy. The mechanical properties of yield strength, stress-rupture life, high-cycle-fatigue resistance, and low-cycle-fatigue resistance were good to excellent in comparison to the current alloy for this application, HS-31 (X-40), with precise results depending in a complex manner on grain orientation and temperature. If required, the ductility could be improved by lowering the carbon content.

  12. The morphology of solidification of thin-section ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.F.; Zhao, H.; Lee, W.B.

    1998-04-01

    The morphology of solidified structures of thin-section ductile iron castings has been investigated by color metallographic techniques. Primary austenitic dendrites were observed to be formed over the whole section of castings when the wall thickness was less than 14mm. The dendrites were thin and long, and the length and the number of dendrites depended on the solidification rate or the wall thickness of the casting. Growth of the dendritic arms was directional, being perpendicular to the surface of castings and along the wall thickness. Interdendrite segregation of Si and Mn is found to occur in thin-section ductile iron castings, as revealed by both color metallography and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The segregation is more pronounced toward the center of castings.

  13. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  14. Metallographic characterization of hypoeutectic martensitic white cast irons: Fe-C-Cr system

    SciTech Connect

    Pero-Sanz, J.A.; Plaza, D.; Verdeja, J.I.; Asensio, J.

    1999-07-01

    High wear resistance and low cost are among the most appreciated properties for the non-alloyed white cast irons. Their toughness levels, however, are poor. An attempt to optimize the compromise between abrasive wear resistance and impact toughness could be reached through the use of low-alloy Ni-Hard cast irons satisfying the majority of mining applications in mineral crushing, classification, and transportation. The present work, based on microstructural considerations, points out some of the limitations in the use of Ni-Hard martensitic cast irons, in contrast to the advantages brought about by the use of white cast irons of non-ledeburitic matrix with high chromium content with respect to the wear resistance and toughness level.

  15. Damage by indentation and single impact of hard particles on a high chromium white cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, T.A.; Dogan, O.N.

    1997-03-01

    High chromium white cast irons are used extensively in environments where small particle impact causes considerable damage. In this study, a white cast iron containing 26 wt% Cr, and with a carbide volume fraction of 0.28, is impacted with projectiles at normal incidence using a gas gun. Both crater diameter and the size of the damage zone are measured as a function of projectile velocity, and an analytical model is developed which relates the size of the impact crater to the energy absorbed by plastic and elastic deformation of the white cast iron. Peak impact loads and strain hardening rates during impact are calculated by comparing the impact craters with craters made by quasi-static indentation. It is found that considerable strain hardening occurs in austenitic white cast irons during impact and indentation. Strain localization and dynamic softening are also observed in these materials at higher impact velocities.

  16. A new type of antifriction and wear resistant malleable cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidov, S. V.; Gorlenko, A. O.

    2016-04-01

    There is developed a technology of malleable cast iron modification on the basis of complex chemical compound of surface-active elements and their solid solutions with other elements. Silicon high content in malleable cast iron helped to develop a power efficient technology of graphitizing annealing which has considerably lower annealing temperature and complete renunciation of the second graphitizing annealing stage at the expense of its change by controlled cooling up to ferrite structure or by air cooling for perlite structure.

  17. Dependency of machinability in gray cast iron on nitride-induced age strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Jared Ashley

    Work of previous researchers has suggested that room temperature age strengthening in gray cast irons improves machinability. Verification and quantification of the machinability improvement is important to industry. Improved machinability will reduce overall manufacturing costs and reduce raw material consumption by decreasing the rate at which tools are replaced. Experimental work was performed to determine a connection between improved machinability in gray cast iron and changes in machining mechanics. An industrial tool wear study verified that age strengthening improved machinability by reducing tool wear to less than one-quarter of the unaged value. Laboratory tests on iron castings from the same foundry determined that tool forces decreased with age strengthening. Additional tool force experiments were performed on castings produced in the Missouri S&T laboratory of varying carbon equivalent and microstructure. Results showed that casting microstructure played a key role in determining how age strengthening affects machinability and that the equilibrium precipitate content did not solely dictate magnitudes of hardness increases or tool force decreases after age strengthening. Machining work with industrial castings resulted in cases in which gray iron decreased in machinability after age strengthening, a situation that was previously only anecdotally reported. The determination was made that irons containing greater than one percent free ferrite increase in machinability after age strengthening. Research concluded that gray iron age strengthening improved machinability by lowering fracture toughness which decreases tool-chip contact time thereby reducing tool temperature and tool wear.

  18. Wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ting; Song, Ren-bo; Yang, Fu-qiang; Wu, Chun-jing

    2014-09-01

    The dry impact wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron was evaluated under three different impact loads for 30000 cycles. The strain-hardening effects beneath the contact surfaces were analyzed according to the surfaces' micro-hardness profiles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to observe the worn surfaces. The results indicated that the material with the highest hardness was the one continuously cooled at 20°C, which exhibited the lowest wear rate under each set of test conditions. The hardness of the worn surface and the thickness of the hardened layer increased with the increases in impact load and in the number of test cycles. The better wear performance of the sample cooled at 20°C is attributed to its finer microstructure and superior mechanical properties. All the samples underwent the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon after impact wear, as revealed by the fact that small amounts of retained austenite were detected by XRD.

  19. Thermomechanical Fatigue of Ductile Cast Iron and Its Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sloss, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behaviors of ductile cast iron (DCI) were investigated under out-of-phase (OP), in-phase (IP), and constrained strain-control conditions with temperature hold in various temperature ranges: 573 K to 1073 K, 723 K to 1073 K, and 433 K to 873 K (300 °C to 800 °C, 450 °C to 800 °C, and 160 °C to 600 °C). The integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) model was incorporated into the finite element method to simulate the hysteresis behavior and predict the TMF life of DCI under those test conditions. With the consideration of four deformation/damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement, (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation, as revealed from the previous study on low cycle fatigue of the material, the model delineates the contributions of these physical mechanisms in the asymmetrical hysteresis behavior and the damage accumulation process leading to final TMF failure. This study shows that the ICFT model can simulate the stress-strain response and life of DCI under complex TMF loading profiles (OP and IP, and constrained with temperature hold).

  20. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Von L.

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  1. Investigation of Bond Strength in Centrifugal Lining of Babbitt on Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Papa; Jones, Alan

    2010-03-01

    The quality of the bond between Babbitt metal and a cast iron substrate was evaluated for centrifugal casting and static casting using the Chalmers bond strength method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of three different centrifugal casting parameters, the speed of revolution, the pouring rate, and the cooling rate, was investigated. The bond strength and the microstructure at the bond interface were predominantly affected by the cooling rate, with a fast cooling rate resulting in better properties. The speed of revolution and the pouring rate only had a small effect on the bond strength, with faster revolution and faster pouring rate resulting in slightly better bonds.

  2. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P.

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  3. Stages of vermicular cast iron properties modeling in the intelligent design system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, K. V.; Petrovich, S. V.; Simonova, L. A.; Yusupov, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    This article presents the structure of intelligent system of the cast iron with vermicular graphite iron (CGI) design under the conditions of current production, the technique of the optimal process TP parameters of the production of CGI parts in the preparatory phase of production based on mental models is designed.

  4. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001); Iron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the nine sampling points from the point of view of the sampling sites, climate conditions and wind directions. We found no correlation with car traffic, in terms of the number of vehicles, and metals. The values of iron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds. PMID:17637476

  5. Tensile properties of as-cast iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al-based FA-129 alloy were investigated. Tensile properties were obtained in the as-cast condition in air, oxygen, and water-vapor environments, and after homogenization at 700, 900, and 1200{degrees}C. Transmission electron microscopy (MM) was used to characterize ordered phases and dislocation structure, and optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the grain microstructure and fracture morphology. Tensile properties in the as-cast condition exhibited an environmental effect; tensile ductilities in oxygen atmosphere were greater than those obtained in laboratory air. Homogenized samples of FA-129 alloy exhibited almost twice the ductility found in the as-cast condition. Microstructural characterization of the homogenized samples and comparison of the as-cast and homogenized microstructures provided clues that helped to explain the poor ductility in the as-cast state.

  6. Tensile properties of as-cast iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe{sub 3}Al with chromium, and Fe{sub 3}Al-based FA-129 alloy are investigated. Tensile properties were obtained in the as-cast condition and after homogenization at 700, 900, and 1,200{degrees}C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize ordered phases, and optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the microstructure and fracture morphology. The results indicate that the low ductility of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys may be related to the relatively large grain size in the cast condition, the low dislocation density in as-cast samples, and the presence of the DO{sub 3} ordered phase. Homogenized samples of FA-129 alloy exhibited almost twice the ductility of the as-cast the as-cast and homogenized microstructures may provide a clue to the poor ductility in the as-cast state.

  7. Tensile properties of as-cast iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.: McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe{sub 3}Al with chromium, and Fe{sub 3}Al-based FA-129 alloy are investigated. Tensile properties were obtained in the as-cast condition and after homogenization at 700, 900, and 1200{degrees}C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize ordered phases, and optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the microstructure and fracture morphology. The results indicate that the low ductility of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys may be related to the relatively large grain size in the cast condition, the low dislocation density in as-cast samples, and the presence of the D0{sub 3} ordered phase. Homogenized samples of FA-129 alloy exhibited almost twice the ductility of the as-cast condition. Microstructural characterization of the homogenized samples and comparison of the as-cast and homogenized microstructures may provide a clue to the poor ductility in the as-cast state.

  8. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thin-Walled Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Tyrała, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the effect of cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties as determined by changing molding media and section size. The research was conducted for thin-walled iron castings with 2-5-mm wall thickness and for the reference casting with 13-mm wall thickness, using different molding materials (silica sand and insulating sand "LDASC") to achieve various cooling rates. Thermal analysis was performed to determine the real cooling rate at the beginning of the graphite eutectic solidification. In general, it was found that the predictions based on theoretical analysis of the solidification process of ductile iron are in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Finally, the present study provides insights into the effect of cooling rate on the graphite nodule count, the ferrite fraction and mechanical properties of thin-walled ductile iron castings. The study shows that the cooling rate of thin-walled castings varies in a wide range (80-15 °C/s) when changing the wall thickness from 2 to 5 mm, accompanied by significantly changing the mechanical properties of ductile iron. The cooling rate can be effectively reduced by applying an insulating sand to obtain the desired properties of thin-walled castings practically in the whole range of ductile iron grades in accordance with the ASTM Standard.

  9. Industrial Environmental Testing of Coupons and Prototype Cylinders Coated With Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Aprigliano, L F; Day, S D; Lian, T; Farmer, J C

    2007-03-06

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are desirable for many industrial applications due to their dual capacity to resist corrosion and wear. These alloys may also contain a significant amount of boron which makes them candidates for criticality control, for example, in high-level nuclear waste disposition applications. The Fe-based amorphous alloys can be produced in powder form and then deposited using a HVOF thermal spray process on any surface that needs to be protected. For the current testing coupons of 316L stainless steels were coated with the amorphous alloy SAM2X5 and then tested for corrosion resistance in the salt-fog chamber and in other industrial environments. Prototype cylinders were also prepared and environmentally tested. One cylinder was 30-inch diameter, 88-inch long, and 3/8-inch thick. The coating thickness was 0.015 to 0.019-inch thick. The cylinder was in good condition after the test. Along the body of the cylinder only two pinpoint spot sized signs of rust were seen. Test results will be compared with the behavior of witness materials under the same tested conditions.

  10. Influence of Heat Treatment on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruthiventi, S.; Basavakumar, K. G.; Nambala, S.; Subramanyacharyulu, G.

    2014-04-01

    Spheroidal Graphite Iron (SG Iron) is popularly known as ductile iron or nodular cast iron which is a special case of cast iron having carbon content of more than 3 wt% in volume and graphite is in the form of spherical tiny sized particles. Since the last three decades, the demand for SG Iron has been increasing due to its superior mechanical properties such as high strength and toughness, this nature leads to the usage of SG Iron in numerous industrial applications. From the earlier studies, it has been proved that addition of alloying elements to SG Iron leads to change in properties such as increased tensile strength and hardness. Heat-treatment of alloys is one of the valuable methods to achieve better properties. In the present study, the microstructures and mechanical properties of SG Iron were studied after various heat treatments beyond the limits, and tests were done to measure its mechanical properties like tensile strength, hardness, impact strength. Digital microphotographs, scanning electron microphotographs were analysed before and after the heat treatment. Results indicated great change in mechanical properties after the heat-treatment. From the results it can be concluded that the heat treatment of SG Iron results in changed composition of alloys, which also leads to economical growth of SG Iron.

  11. Transitions between type A flake, type D flake, and coral graphite eutectic structures in cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Verhoeven, J.D. |

    1996-09-01

    Directional solidification experiments were used to measure the transition velocities between the type A and coral eutectic structures in high-purity cast irons and between the type A and type D eutectic structures in S and Te doped cast irons. Introduction of O into the gas atmosphere was found to have little effect on the A {R_arrow} D transition velocities in S doped alloys, but it produced a strong reduction in the A {R_arrow} coral transition velocities in high-purity irons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed interesting variations in the defect structures of the graphite in the flake irons vs the type of flake (A or D) and the type of doping element. Scanning Auger microscopy demonstrated that both S and Te segregate to the iron/graphite interface. In the S doped alloys, type A flakes are generally covered with a monolayer of S with patches of O in the form of iron oxide having a thickness on the order of 2 nm. A series of experiments, including examination of fracture surfaces at the quenched solid/liquid growth front, have shown that S segregates to the iron/graphite interfaces from the liquid at the growth front, but O forms at these interfaces during the cooldown. These results are discussed in relation to current models of eutectic growth in cast irons.

  12. The mutual co-regulation of extracellular polymeric substances and iron ions in biocorrosion of cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-10-01

    New insights into the biocorrosion process may be gained through understanding of the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and iron. Herein, the effect of iron ions on the formation of biofilms and production of EPS was investigated. Additionally, the impact of EPS on the corrosion of cast iron coupons was explored. The results showed that a moderate concentration of iron ions (0.06 mg/L) promoted both biofilm formation and EPS production. The presence of EPS accelerated corrosion during the initial stage, while inhibited corrosion at the later stage. The functional groups of EPS acted as electron shuttles to enable the binding of iron ions. Binding of iron ions with EPS led to anodic dissolution and promoted corrosion, while corrosion was later inhibited through oxygen reduction and availability of phosphorus from EPS. The presence of EPS also led to changes in crystalline phases of corrosion products. PMID:25069092

  13. Mathematical model of the component mixture distribution in the molten cast iron during centrifugation (sedimentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikulov, R. A.; Kotlyar, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    For the development and management of the manufacturing processes of axisymmetric articles with compositional structure by centrifugal casting method [1,2,3,4] is necessary to create a generalized mathematical model of the dynamics of component mixture in the molten cast iron during centrifugation. In article. based on the analysis of the dynamics of two-component mixture at sedimentation, a method of successive approximations to determine the distribution of a multicomponent mixture by centrifugation in a parabolic crucible is developed.

  14. Sorption and reaction kinetics of arsenate and arsenite from aqueous solution by waste cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Cho, k. H.; Wi, D. W.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Sorption and reaction kinetics of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution was investigated using waste cast iron, which is a byproduct of the iron casting process in foundries. Two types of waste cast iron were used in the experiment: grind precipitate dust (GPD) and cast iron shot (CIS). The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of Fe0 on GPD and CIS. Non-equilibrium batch experiments were performed under different concentrations of As(III) and As(V) and in the absence/presence of PO4-3 for prevention of sorption effect. Results showed that waste cast iron was effective in the removal of As(III) and As(V). The removal parameter pattern indicated that the two-stage reduction pattern type (consists of fast reduction type (sorption and reaction) and limited slow (reaction) type) was better than the first order reduction pattern at describing the experimental result. In the reduction of both As(III) and As(V), the reduction capacity of GPD was greater than CIS, mainly due to the fact that GPD had higher surface area and weight percent of Fe than CIS. The results of reduction parameter estimation revealed that In the removal of As(III) and As(V) by GPD and CIS case, both GPD and CIS were more effective at the removal of sorption and reaction than reaction under given experimental conditions. This study demonstrates that waste cast iron has potential as a reactive material to treat wastewater and groundwater containing arsenic.

  15. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  16. Wear, corrosion, and cavitation erosion characteristics of laser-surface-alloyed gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bransden, Antony S.; Tomlinson, W. J.

    1990-10-01

    There is significant industrial interest in methods to improve the surface properties of cast iron. This paper describes investigations of laser treatments to enhance cast iron surfaces by alloying with the elements chromium, nickel or cobalt, or a cobalt/chromium mixture. The coatings achieved are of high integrity, low porosity and uniform in composition, microstructure and hardness. Alloyed surfaces have been subjected to corrosion testing in a range of acids and to wear and cavitation erosion in distilled and salt waters. The data show substantial improvements over those obtained from unalloyed material. Results are presented and discussed including the response of the microstructure to the testing environments.

  17. Directional solidification of flake and spheroidal graphite cast iron in low and normal gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    A NASA KC-135 research aircraft, flying repeated low-g trajectories that yield 20-30 sec of 0.1-0.001 g microgravity, has been used to study microgravity solidification's elimination of sedimentation and convection (with formation of unique and advantageous microstructures) for the case of eutectic-composition cast irons. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons has been slowly advanced through a 4 mm-diameter rod sample. Sample solidification rates have been correlated with accelerometer data, while independently controlling thermal gradients and solidification rates.

  18. Standard specification for ferritic ductile iron pressure-retaining castings for use at elevated temperatures. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-4 on Iron Castings and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A04.02 on Malleable and Ductile Iron Castings. Current edition approved Jul. 10, 1998. Published October 1998. Originally published as A 395-55T. Last previous edition was A 395-88(1993).

  19. 76 FR 5333 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China, 68 FR 16765 (April 7, 2003). \\2\\ See Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews, 75 FR... cast iron pipe fittings with an inside diameter ranging from \\1/4\\ inch to 6 inches, whether...

  20. 75 FR 54595 - Certain Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and the People's Republic of China: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... From Canada, 51 FR 7600 (March 5, 1986), Antidumping Duty Order; Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, 51 FR 17220 (May 9, 1986), and Antidumping Duty Order; Iron Construction Castings From the People's... of Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 23240 (May 3, 2010) (Notice of Initiation). The...

  1. 77 FR 31577 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China, 68 FR 16765... Part, 77 FR 22562 (April 16, 2012) (``Initiation and Preliminary Results''). \\2\\ Petitioners account... International Trade Administration Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of...

  2. 77 FR 22562 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Initiation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China, 68 FR 16765 (April 7, 2003). Scope of the Order The... International Trade Administration Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty (AD) order on non-malleable cast iron pipe fittings from the...

  3. 75 FR 75964 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., 75 FR 29976, 29983 (May 28, 2010). The period of review is April 1, 2009, through March 31, 2010. The... International Trade Administration Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on non-malleable cast iron pipe fittings from the...

  4. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. PMID:25150521

  5. Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Casting Skin -- Evaluation, Effect on Fatigue Strength and Elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonmee, Sarum

    Compacted graphite (CG) iron features a good combination of tensile strength, impact resistance, thermal conductivity and damping capacity. This combination makes CG iron a material of choice for various applications, especially for the automobile industry. The mechanical properties of CG iron listed in the standards (i.e. ASTM) are for machined specimens. However, since most iron castings retain the original casting surface (a.k.a. casting skin), the actual performance of the part could be significantly different from that of the machined specimens. Recent studies have shown the negative effect of the casting skin, but little quantification of its effect on mechanical properties is available. Further, the understanding of its mechanism of formation is at best incomplete. In this research, the effect of the casting skin on mechanical properties in CG and ductile irons (DI) is explored. The differences in tensile and fatigue properties between as-cast and machined samples were quantified and correlated to the casting skin features. It was found that the presence of the casting skin was accountable for 9% reduction of tensile strength and up to 32% reduction of fatigue strength (for CG iron with 40% nodularity). Several mechanisms of the casting skin formation are proposed in this research. The formation of ferritic and pearlitic rims is explained by decarburizing/carburizing reactions at the mold/metal interface. Mg depletion and solidification kinetics effect were identified as the formation mechanisms of the graphite degradation. A 2-D thermal diffusion model was formulated based on Mg depletion theory. The model can be used to predict the casting skin thickness when Mg depletion is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using the asymmetric Fe-Gr phase diagram, some instances of casting skin formation were explained based on solidification kinetics theory. The experimental microstructural evidence and the theoretical progress were conducive to the development of

  6. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  7. Evaluation of static and dynamic fracture toughness in ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yamada, Shinya . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Ductile cast irons have been explored as a cask (container for spent nuclear fuel) material because of their low cost and good formability. The cask, which is a huge casting with 400-mm thickness and 100-Mg weight, envelops the nuclear material. Therefore, the fracture toughness of cask must be evaluated not only under the static loading condition but also under the dynamic loading condition to ensure its safety against an accident during the transport. In this article, crack extension behavior and fracture toughness of ductile cast iron were examined by three-point bend tests, where various detection methods of crack initiation under static and dynamic loading conditions were adopted. Loading on the specimens was interrupted at various displacement points, and the final fracture surfaces of the specimen were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) obtained under the dynamic loading conditions was smaller than that under the static loading condition in ferritic ductile cast iron, and CTOD additionally decreased with increasing pearlite content in the matrix. The relationship between J([Delta]C) obtained by the compliance changing rate method and J(R) established by the intersection of the crack extension resistance curve and the theoretical blunting line varied with pearlite content. The average value of J([Delta]C) and J(R), that is J(mid), was proposed to define the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron; J(mid) was considered to be a reasonable measure for the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron, irrespective of loading condition and the pearlite content in the matrix.

  8. Saturated Fractional Design of Experiments: Toughness and Graphite Phase Optimizing in Nihard Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Lozano, J.; Álvarez-Antolín, J. F.

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present research is to identify the manufacturing factors that exert an active influence on the graphite phase formation in mottled Nihard cast irons constituting the roll shells of duplex work rolls processed by the double pour method during centrifugal casting. The studied rolls, referred to as alloy indefinite chill, were processed at industrial scale and had a core consisting of spheroidal graphite cast iron with a matrix of ferrite and pearlite. An additional aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and extent of these factors on the dynamic toughness response of the roll shell material. The research methodology employed consisted of the application of a saturated design of experiments with seven factors, eight experiments, and resolution III. The measured responses for graphite were: the volume fraction, count number per unit area, and morphology, determined by quantitative metallography. Impact testing was characterized by Charpy tests on U-notched specimens at 350 °C. The manufacturing factors studied were: the final weight percent of silicon, sulfur, and manganese; the liquidus and the casting temperatures; and, finally, inoculation with SiCaMn and A-type FeSi (with Zr). The statistical experimental method conducted allowed us to confirm the significance of factors such as the %Si, the liquidus temperature and inoculation with SiCaMn on the precipitation of graphite in a white cast iron such as the Nihard irons used in the roll shell, in agreement with the precipitation of graphite in gray cast irons widely reported in the literature. It was also shown that the development of lamellar graphite shapes were favored by an increase in the total equivalent carbon and also by the increase in the amount of A-type FeSi added. Furthermore, the impact toughness was shown to improve with the increase in both the %Si and the liquidus temperature.

  9. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, R.A.; Helmke, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron ore containing elevated concentrations of trace metals was smelted at Hopewell Furnace during its 113 years of operation (1771-1883). For this study, we sampled iron ore, cast iron furnace products, slag, soil, groundwater, streamflow, and streambed sediment to determine the fate of trace metals released into the environment during the iron-smelting process. Standard techniques were used to sample and analyze all media except cast iron. We analyzed the trace-metal content of the cast iron using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, which provided rapid, on-site, nondestructive analyses for 23 elements. The artifacts analyzed included eight cast iron stoves, a footed pot, and a kettle in the Hopewell Furnace museum. We measured elevated concentrations of arsenic, copper, lead, and zinc in the cast iron. Lead concentrations as great as 3,150 parts per million were measured in the stoves. Cobalt was detectable but not quantifiable because of interference with iron. Our study found that arsenic, cobalt, and lead were not released to soil or slag, which could pose a significant health risk to visitors and employees. Instead, our study demonstrates these heavy metals remained with the cast iron and were removed from the site.

  10. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EMERGING PIPE WALL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE CAST IRON WATER MAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,500-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Septembe...

  11. Field Demonstration of Emerging Pipe Wall Integrity Assessment Technologies for Large Cast Iron Water Mains - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,000-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast-iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Se...

  12. Changes Found on Run-In and Scuffed Surfaces of Steel Chrome Plate, and Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, J. N.; Godfrey, Douglas

    1947-01-01

    A study was made of run-in and scuffed steel, chrome-plate, and cast-iron surfaces. X-ray and electron diffraction techniques, micro-hardness determinations, and microscopy were used. Surface changes varied and were found to include three classes: chemical reaction, hardening, and crystallite-size alteration. The principal chemical reactions were oxidation and carburization.

  13. Hot Cutting of Real-Time Cast-Forged GS Ductile Iron for Automotive Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilland, Laurence; Mansori, Mohamed El

    2011-01-01

    In the global economy context, automotive industry suppliers have to keep a constant advance on products design and manufacturing process. Concerning automotive rods, the substitution of forged steel by spherical graphite iron (SG iron) with high mechanical properties constitutes a valid economic alternative. Such rods are produced using a complex coupled process: casting and forging followed by an austempered heat treatment. The forging operation is capable to shape the cast rod which introduces hot deformation to increase mechanical properties of net-shape SG iron rod. However, the intermediate re-heating between casting and forging must be avoided to keep competitive manufacturing costs. A major concern of this new process development is the cracks produced in rod's surface which are consecutive to hot spruing involved after casting operations. This issue is addressed in this paper which discusses the physical mechanisms involved in the hot ductile damage of SG iron. Hot cutting tests were performed to simulate the spruing operation which shows the close interactions between microstructure, machining parameters and resulting damages. The damage mechanisms in terms of crack initiation and its growth have been studied with respect to the constituent phases (austenite+graphite nodules), the cut surface morphology and the hot cutting performance.

  14. Examination of the solidification macrostructure of spheroidal and flake graphite cast irons using DAAS and ESBD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, G.; Calvillo, P.R.; Boeri, R. Houbaert, Y.; Sikora, J.

    2008-09-15

    This investigation focuses on the study of the solidification macrostructure of sand cast flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons. The macrostructure is revealed by using a special technique developed earlier by the authors, called Direct Austempering After Solidification. The observations make use of conventional metallography and Electron Back Scattering Diffraction. The latter technique allows a more detailed observation of the morphology of the austenite grains and the microstructure of the matrix. The results of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction validate the observations made using the macrographic technique. It is verified that the solidification of both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons is dominated by the growth of large austenite dendrites that form a grain pattern similar to that usually found in most metallic alloys.

  15. Tensile Properties of Al-Cu 206 Cast Alloys with Various Iron Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Cao, X.; Chen, X.-G.

    2014-05-01

    The Al-Cu 206 cast alloys with varying alloy compositions ( i.e., different levels of Fe, Mn, and Si) were investigated to evaluate the effect of the iron-rich intermetallics on the tensile properties. It is found that the tensile strength decreases with increasing iron content, but its overall loss is less than 10 pct over the range of 0.15 to 0.5 pct Fe at 0.3 pct Mn and 0.3 pct Si. At similar iron contents, the tensile properties of the alloys with dominant Chinese script iron-rich intermetallics are generally higher than those with the dominant platelet phase. In the solution and artificial overaging condition (T7), the tensile strength of the 206 cast alloys with more than 0.15 pct Fe is satisfactory, but the elongation does not sufficiently meet the minimum requirement of ductility (>7 pct) for critical automotive applications. However, it was found that both the required ductility and tensile strength can be reached at high Fe levels of 0.3 to 0.5 pct for the alloys with well-controlled alloy chemistry and microstructure in the solution and natural aging condition (T4), reinforcing the motivation for developing recyclable high-iron Al-Cu 206 cast alloys.

  16. Machinability of clean thin-wall gray and ductile iron castings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Eleftheriou, E.; Griffin, R.D.; Dwyer, Z.B.; DelSorbo, C.; Sprague, J.

    1997-02-01

    First phase was to develop a laboratory technique for evaluating the machinability of gray and ductile iron; longer term goal is to learn how to modify the foundry process to produce castings meeting all specified mechanical properties while providing improved machining behavior. Microcarbides present in the irons were found to dominate the machinability of iron. Pearlitic irons with acceptable machinability contain 8.9 to 10.5 wt% microcarbides. The weight fraction microcarbides in the iron is influenced by carbide forming element concentrations, presence of elements that retard carbon diffusion, and cooling rate from the eutectic through the eutectoid temperature range. Tool wear rate increased at higher surface machining speeds and fraction microcarbides; all irons containing above 11.5% microcarbides had poor machinability. Graphite size, shape, distribution, etc. had a lesser effect on machinability. Reducing the addition of a foundry grade Ca and Al bearing 75% FeSi inoculant from 0.5 to 0.2% increased the tool life 100%. Inoculation test castings were also poured in a class 40 gray iron; laboratory analysis is currently underway. Exploratory studies were conducted to determine if tool force could be used to predict tool life: torque and feed forces were found to correlate with machinability.

  17. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction. PMID:23618271

  18. Thermal Microstructural Multiscale Simulation of Solidification and Eutectoid Transformation of Hypereutectic Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Alejandro; Celentano, Diego J.; Gunasegaram, Dayalan R.; Deeva, Natalia

    2014-08-01

    Although the gray cast iron solidification process has been the subject of several modeling studies, almost all available models appear to deal with only the more widely used hypoeutectic compositions. Models related to hypereutectic gray iron compositions with lamellar (or flake) graphite, and in particular for the proeutectic and eutectoid zones, are hard to find in the open literature. Hence, in the present work, a thermal microstructural multiscale model is proposed to describe the solidification and eutectoid transformation of a slightly hypereutectic composition leading to lamellar graphite gray iron morphology. The main predictions were: (a) temperature evolutions; (b) fractions of graphite, ferrite, and pearlite; (c) density; and (d) size of ferrite, pearlite, and gray eutectic grains; (e) average interlamellar graphite spacing; and (f) its thickness. The predicted cooling curves and fractions for castings with two different compositions and two different pouring temperatures were validated using experimental data. The differences between this model and existing models for hypoeutectic compositions are discussed.

  19. Solidification and solid-state transformation mechanisms in Si alloyed high-chromium white cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, G. II ); Powell, G.L.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Chromium white cast irons are widely used in environments where severe abrasion resistance is a dominant requirement. To improve the wear resistance of these commercially important irons, the US Bureau of Mines and CSIRO Australia are studying their solidification and solid-state transformation kinetics. A ternary Fe-Cr-C iron with 17.8 wt pct (pct) Cr and 3.0 pct C was compared with commercially available irons of similar Cr and C contents with Si contents between 1.6 and 2.2 pct. The irons were solidified and cooled at rates of 0.03 and 0.17 K/s to 873 K. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) showed that Si depresses the eutectic reaction temperature and suggests that it has no effect upon the volume of eutectic carbides formed during solidification. Microprobe analysis revealed that austenite dendrites within the Si alloyed irons cooled at 0.03 and 0.17 K/s had C and Cr contents that were lower than those of dendrites within the ternary alloy cooled at the same cooling rate and a Si alloyed iron that was water quenched from the eutectic temperature. These lower values were shown by image analysis to be the result of both solid-state growth (coarsening) of the eutectic carbides and some secondary carbide formation. Hardness measurements in the as-cast condition and after soaking in liquid nitrogen suggest an increase in the martensite start temperature as the Si content was increased. It is concluded that Si's effect on increasing the size and volume fraction of eutectic carbides and increasing the matrix hardness should lead to improved wear resistance over regular high-chromium white cast irons.

  20. Development of a Cast Iron Fatigue Properties Database for use with Modern Design Methods

    SciTech Connect

    DeLa'O, James, D.; Gundlach, Richard, B.; Tartaglia, John, M.

    2003-09-18

    A reliable and comprehensive database of design properties for cast iron is key to full and efficient utilization of this versatile family of high production-volume engineering materials. A database of strain-life fatigue properties and supporting data for a wide range of structural cast irons representing industry standard quality was developed in this program. The database primarily covers ASTM/SAE standard structural grades of ADI, CGI, ductile iron and gray iron as well as an austempered gray iron. Twenty-two carefully chosen materials provided by commercial foundries were tested and fifteen additional datasets were contributed by private industry. The test materials are principally distinguished on the basis of grade designation; most grades were tested in a 25 mm section size and in a single material condition common for the particular grade. Selected grades were tested in multiple sections-sizes and/or material conditions to delineate the properties associated with a range of materials for the given grade. The cyclic properties are presented in terms of the conventional strain-life formalism (e.g., SAE J1099). Additionally, cyclic properties for gray iron and CGI are presented in terms of the Downing Model, which was specifically developed to treat the unique stress-strain response associated with gray iron (and to a lesser extent with CGI). The test materials were fully characterized in terms of alloy composition, microstructure and monotonic properties. The CDROM database presents the data in various levels of detail including property summaries for each material, detailed data analyses for each specimen and raw monotonic and cyclic stress-strain data. The CDROM database has been published by the American Foundry Society (AFS) as an AFS Research Publication entitled ''Development of a Cast Iron Fatigue Properties Database for Use in Modern Design Methods'' (ISDN 0-87433-267-2).

  1. Analysis of dry cylinder liner behavior during engine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Kazunori; Murata, Katsuhiro; Suzawa, Takashi; Niitsu, Yasuhiko

    1996-09-01

    Engine manufacturers are continuing to develop new engine designs that provide higher power output, lower fuel consumption and lower engine weight. In order to achieve significant engine weight reduction, the light weight cylinder block structure employs dry cylinder liners rather than wet cylinder liners. The cast iron dry liner structure is utilized because of the superior wear and scuff resistance of the cast iron. Thin wall dry cast iron liners are being employed in both gasoline and diesel engines. Dry cylinder liners with wall thickness of 1.5 mm are in production for Japanese automotive diesel engines. In the case of the dry thin wall cast iron liners, 2 design configurations are employed: loose-fit type having a specified clearance between the outer liner surface and the cylinder bore surface; press-in type having an interference fit between the outer surface of liner and the cylinder bore surface. The physical properties of cast iron must be considered during the design phase if successful production designs are to be provided. In addition the operating stress caused by piston slap, combustion pressure variation and resultant effect on operating stress in the liner must be considered during the design. This paper summarizes the results of a series of studies undertaken to determine the effect of piston slap, combustion pressure and initial stress on resultant behavior of thin wall cylinder liners under engine operating conditions. The resultant data may be utilized to improve the overall design of thin wall dry cylinder liners, especially for loose-fit liners.

  2. Effects of alloying elements on the microstructure and fatigue properties of cast iron for internal combustion engine exhaust manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, David J.

    In the design of exhaust manifolds for internal combustion engines the materials used must exhibit resistance to corrosion at high temperatures while maintaining a stable microstructure. Cast iron has been used for manifolds for many years by auto manufacturers due to a combination of suitable mechanical properties, low cost, and ease of casting. Over time cast iron is susceptible to microstructural changes, corrosion, and oxidation which can result in failure due to fatigue. This thesis seeks to answer the question: "Can observed microstructural changes and measured high temperature fatigue life in cast iron alloys be used to develop a predictive model for fatigue life?" the importance of this question lies in the fact that there is little data for the behavior of cast iron alloys at high temperature. For this study two different types of cast iron, 50HS and HSM will be examined. Of particular concern for the high Si+C cast irons (and Mo in the case of the HSM cast iron) are subsurface microstructural changes that result due to heat treatment including (1) decarburization, (2) ferrite formation, (3) graphitization, (4) internal oxidation of the Si, (5) high temperature fatigue resistance, and (6) creep potential. Initial results obtained include microstructure examination after being exposed to high temperatures, grain size, nodule size, and hardness measurements. The initial examinations concluded that both cast irons performed fairly similarly, although the microstructure of the HSM samples did show slightly better resistance to high temperature as compared to that of the 50HS. Follow on work involved high temperature fatigue testing of these two materials in order to better determine if the newer alloy, HSM is a better choice for exhaust manifolds. Correlations between fatigue performance and microstructure were made and discussed, with the results examined in light of current and proposed models for predicting fatigue performance based on computational methods

  3. As-cast microstructure investigation of two iron aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo Schön, Cláudio; Geoffroy Scuracchio, Bruno

    2006-08-01

    The as-cast microstructure of Fe-30Al-6Cr and Fe-30Al-10Ti high purity alloys was investigated using Electron Backscatter Diffraction. The first alloy is characterized by a highly textured columnar grain microstructure with large grains, while the second is characterized by an equiaxed grain microstructure with small grains and a random texture. These differences are discussed with regard to the higher reactivity of Ti compared with Cr, leading to nanometric nitride or oxide, which may act as sites for heterogeneous nucleation, and the ordered state of the BCC phase in equilibrium with the liquid during solidification and its effect upon dendrite growth kinetics.

  4. Melioidosis and idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: a cast-iron case.

    PubMed

    Gerhardy, Benjamin; Simpson, Graham

    2013-12-01

    Melioidosis is an infection with clinical importance in northern Australia due to the high associated mortality despite appropriate therapy. This report presents a case of acute pulmonary melioidosis on a background remarkable for the absence of typical risk factors for infection, but the presence of a high iron pulmonary microenvironment consequent to idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis. In light of recent genetic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei, we postulate that the patient inadvertently provided a high-substrate environment for the iron-scavenging ability of B. pseudomallei's siderophore associated virulence factors, giving her a unique major risk factor for infection. This highlights the importance of considering individual patient factors in addition to population-wide risk factors in the differential diagnosis of a serious illness, and the value of genetic analysis of clinically significant pathogens. PMID:25473541

  5. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Martin f. Helmke

    2014-01-01

    Sampling cast iron produced by the furnace posed two problems. First, verification that the iron was actually cast at Hopewell Furnace was necessary, as some iron objects found at Hopewell may not have originated there. This was accomplished by using artifacts on display at the Hopewell visitor center (fig. 2). All artifacts on display have been positively attributed to the furnace, and stoves produced by the furnace are easily recognized by the name “Hopewell” cast into them. The second problem was the analysis of the trace metal content of the cast iron, because it was not possible to break off part of a historically important artifact and send it to a laboratory for analysis. This problem was solved when the USGS collaborated with West Chester University, which owns a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer.

  6. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of nodular cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, Ion; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Pelle, Marius; Crăciunescu, Corneliu

    2015-03-01

    The cavitation erosion of ductile cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure was analyzed based on ultrasonic experiments performed according to ASTM G32-2010 and the resistance was compared to the C45 steel with similar hardness. The microstructural observation of the surface for different exposure times to the ultrasonic cavitation reveals the fact that the process initiates at the nodular graphite-ferrite interface and is controlled by micro-galvanic activities and mechanical factors. The cavitation erosion resistance was evaluated based on the evolution of the mean depth erosion and the mean depth erosion rate as a function of the cavitation time. The cavitation erosion rate of the cast iron is up to 1.32 times higher than the one of the C 45 steel with similar hardness. This is explained by the occurrence of stress concentrators due to the expulsion of the graphite from the metallic matrix. PMID:25465881

  7. Microstructure Formation and Fracturing Characteristics of Grey Cast Iron Repaired Using Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The repairing technology based on laser rapid fusion is becoming an important tool for fixing grey cast iron equipment efficiently. A laser repairing protocol was developed using Fe-based alloy powders as material. The microstructure and fracturing feature of the repaired zone (RZ) were analyzed. The results showed that regionally organized RZ with good density and reliable metallurgical bond can be achieved by laser repairing. At the bottom of RZ, dendrites existed in similar direction and extended to the secondary RZ, making the grains grow extensively with inheritance with isometric grains closer to the surface substrate. The strength of the grey cast iron base material was maintained by laser repairing. The base material and RZ were combined with robust strength and fracture resistance. The prevention and deflection of cracking process were analyzed using a cracking process model and showed that the overall crack toughness of the materials increased. PMID:25032230

  8. Effect of extracellular polymeric substances on corrosion of cast iron in the reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Wu, Guangxue; Zhang, Zhenhua; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms were cultured in the R2A medium with inoculum from biofilm in a reclaimed wastewater distribution system and then extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were extracted from the culture. Characterization of EPS and their effects on the corrosion of cast iron were examined. EPS extracted from different culturing stages contained different proportions of protein and polysaccharide but with similar functional groups. All types of EPS could inhibit cast iron corrosion and the EPS from the stationary stage had the highest inhibition efficiency. The inhibition efficiency was increased with addition of a small amount of EPS while decreased with excessive amount of EPS. EPS formed a protective film on the metal surface, which retarded the cathodic reduction of oxygen. Excessive amount of EPS promoted anodic dissolution through EPS-Fe binding. The CO and C(O, N) in EPS could be the anodic electrochemical sites with possible products of C(C, H). PMID:24618284

  9. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  10. Microstructural and crystallographic features of ausferrite in as-cast gray iron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, M. . E-mail: m.ferry@unsw.edu.au; Xu, W.

    2004-09-15

    Ausferrite has been shown to form during casting of gray iron by carefully controlling the alloying additions Mo, Mn, Si and Cu and consists of an acicular ferrite constituent, termed bainitic ferrite ({alpha}{sub B}), which develops during continuous cooling as a coarse, feathery-type structure within the prior austenite ({gamma}) grains. Regardless of alloy composition, the ausferrite that forms in the microstructure during casting in volume fractions greater than {approx}0.1 was found to have a constant bainitic ferrite/retained austenite ratio ({alpha}{sub B}/{gamma}{approx}3). Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope has demonstrated that {alpha}{sub B} and {gamma} in ausferrite is related by the Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship: {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub {gamma}}//{l_brace}011{r_brace}{sub {alpha}} and <011>{sub {gamma}}//<111>{sub {alpha}} with a number of {alpha}{sub B} variants possible within a given austenite grain. This study confirms that the ausferrite generated in gray iron by direct casting has comparable microstructural and crystallographic characteristics to that produced in austempered gray and ductile irons.

  11. Resistivity-Based Evaluation of the Fatigue Behavior of Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Holger; Starke, Peter; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-08-01

    Cast irons are used in particular for highly stressed components in the automotive and commercial vehicle industry, e.g., for crankcases and in the wind power industry, e.g., for rotor hubs. The mechanical properties of cast irons are strongly influenced by parameters like phase composition of the matrix, graphite shape, micro-pinholes, and micro-cracks. The measurement of the electrical resistance in the unloaded state and its change during cyclic loading offers the possibility to get detailed information about the actual defect density and the cyclic deformation behavior. In the scope of the present work, stress-controlled load increase tests and constant amplitude tests were carried out at ambient temperature with specimens of the perlitic cast irons EN-GJL-250 (ASTM A48 35B), EN-GJV-400, and EN-GJS-600 (ASTM 80-55-06). Beside electrical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the microstructure and to correlate the change of microstructural details with cyclic properties.

  12. Health Implications of PAH Release from Coated Cast Iron Drinking Water Distribution Systems in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Bianca M.; de Jongh, Cindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coal tar and bitumen have been historically used to coat the insides of cast iron drinking water mains. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may leach from these coatings into the drinking water and form a potential health risk for humans. Objective: We estimated the potential human cancer risk from PAHs in coated cast iron water mains. Method: In a Dutch nationwide study, we collected drinking water samples at 120 locations over a period of 17 days under various operational conditions, such as undisturbed operation, during flushing of pipes, and after a mains repair, and analyzed these samples for PAHs. We then estimated the health risk associated with an exposure scenario over a lifetime. Results: During flushing, PAH levels frequently exceeded drinking water quality standards; after flushing, these levels dropped rapidly. After the repair of cast iron water mains, PAH levels exceeded the drinking water standards for up to 40 days in some locations. Conclusions: The estimated margin of exposure for PAH exposure through drinking water was > 10,000 for all 120 measurement locations, which suggests that PAH exposure through drinking water is of low concern for consumer health. However, factors that differ among water systems, such as the use of chlorination for disinfection, may influence PAH levels in other locations. PMID:23425894

  13. Effect of Titanium on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Gray Cast Iron for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfi, M.; Gorini, D.; Pola, A.; La Vecchia, G. M.

    2016-07-01

    Lamellar gray cast iron, with a mainly pearlitic microstructure, is widely used in the automotive industry, mostly in the manufacturing of brake disks. This work analyzes in depth the effects of small variations of titanium content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron brake disks. For this purpose, eight different heats of EN-GJL-250 cast iron were selected, with a similar chemical composition but with different titanium contents, varying from 0.013 to 0.031%. The drops in mechanical strength and hardness values measured on the high-Ti samples were correlated to microstructural variations quantitatively observed by means of optical and scanning electron microscope. It was found that titanium combines to form titanium nitrides, suppressing the beneficial microstructural effects of nitrogen at solidification. Residual nitrogen, if present in sufficient quantity, promotes the nucleation of primary austenite from the liquid and the formation of a fine microstructure, with small eutectic cells and lower graphite content. Such a microstructure provides brake disks with better mechanical properties. The interpretation of results was further supported by thermal analysis and thermodynamic calculations.

  14. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  15. Property enhancement of cast iron used for nuclear casks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, R. K.; Mahto, B. P.; Dubey, J. S.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile iron (DI) is a preferred material for use in various structural, automotive, and engineering fields because of its excellent combination of strength, toughness, and ductility. In the current investigation, we elucidate the relationship between the morphological and mechanical properties of DI intended for use in safety applications in the nuclear industry. DI specimens with various alloying elements were subjected to annealing and austempering heat treatment processes. A faster cooling rate appeared to increase the nodule count in austempered specimens, compensating for their nodularity value and subsequently decreasing their ductility and impact strength. The ductility and impact energy values of annealed specimens increased with increasing ferrite area fraction and nodularity, whereas an increase in the amounts of Ni and Cr resulted in an increase of hardness via solid solution strengthening. Austempered specimens were observed to be stronger than annealed specimens and failed in a somewhat brittle manner characterized by a river pattern, whereas the ductile failure mode was characterized by the presence of dimples.

  16. Nano-scale orientation mapping of graphite in cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Theuwissen, Koenraad; Lacaze, Jacques; Véron, Muriel; Laffont, Lydia

    2014-09-15

    A diametrical section of a graphite spheroid from a ductile iron sample was prepared using the focused ion beam-lift out technique. Characterization of this section was carried out through automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. This new technique automatically collects electron diffraction patterns and matches them with precalculated templates. The results of this investigation are crystal orientation and phase maps of the specimen, which bring new light to the understanding of growth mechanisms of this peculiar graphite morphology. This article shows that mapping the orientation of carbon-based materials such as graphite, which is difficult to achieve with conventional techniques, can be performed automatically and at high spatial resolution using automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. - Highlights: • ACOM/TEM can be used to study the crystal orientation of carbon-based materials. • A spheroid is formed by conical sectors radiating from a central nuclei. • Misorientations exist within the conical sectors, defining various orientation domains.

  17. The Role of Silicon in the Solidification of High-Cr Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Rainforth, M. W.; Mejía, I.

    2013-02-01

    This work analyzes the effect of different additions of silicon (0 to 5.0 pct) on the structure of a high-Chromium white cast iron, with chromium content of 16.8 pct and carbon 2.56 pct. The alloys were analyzed in both as-cast and heat-treated conditions. Casting was undertaken in metallic molds that yielded solidification rates faster than in commercial processes. Nevertheless, there was some degree of segregation of silicon; this segregation resulted in a refinement in the microstructure of the alloy. Silicon also generated a greater influence on the structure by destabilizing the austenitic matrix, and promoted greater precipitation of eutectic carbides. Above 3 pct silicon, pearlite formation occurred in preference to martensite. After the destabilization heat treatment, the matrix structure of the irons up to 3 pct Si consisted of secondary carbides in a martensitic matrix with some retained austenite; higher Si additions produced a ferritic matrix. The different as-cast and heat-treated microstructures were correlated with selected mechanical properties such as hardness, matrix microhardness, and fracture toughness. Silicon additions increased matrix microhardness in the as-cast conditions, but the opposite phenomenon occurred in the heat-treated conditions. Microhardness decreased as silicon content was increased. Bulk hardness showed the same behavior. Fracture toughness was observed to increase up to 2 pct Si, and then decreased for higher silicon contents. These results are discussed in terms of the effect of eutectic carbides' size and the resulting matrix due to the silicon additions.

  18. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  19. A process model for the microstructure evolution in ductile cast iron. Part 1: The model

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Gundersen, O.; Grong, O.; Skaland, T.

    1999-04-01

    In the present investigation, the multiple phase changes occurring during solidification and subsequent cooling of near-eutectic ductile cast iron have been modeled using the internal state variable approach. According to this formalism, the microstructure evolution is captured mathematically in terms of differential variation of the primary state variables with time for each of the relevant mechanisms. Separate response equations have then been developed to convert the current values of the state variables into equivalent volume fractions of constituent phases utilizing the constraints provided by the phase diagram. The results may conveniently be represented in the form of C curves and process diagrams to illuminate how changes in alloy composition, graphite nucleation potential, and thermal program affect the microstructure evolution at various stages of the process. The model can readily be implemented in a dedicated numerical code for the thermal field in real castings and used as a guiding tool in design of new treatment alloys for ductile cast irons. An illustration of this is given in an accompanying article (Part 2).

  20. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  1. Effect of Chromium on Microstructure and Properties of High Boron White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongli; Chen, Xiang; Li, Yanxiang; Hu, Kaihua

    2008-03-01

    In this article, the effect of chromium on microstructure and properties of high boron white cast iron was studied. The results indicate that the microstructure of high boron white cast iron with different chromium content comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectics, and the eutectic compound has a M2B-type chemical formula that does not change with the difference of chromium content. The increase of chromium not only increases the microhardness of boride, but also improves the morphology of boride, which is changed from continuous network to less continuous distribution. Moreover, with the chromium increase, martensite appears in the matrix under the as-cast condition, the appearance of which depends on the increase of chromium in the matrix and the uneven distribution of carbon in the matrix caused by chromium addition. After quenching in air, the matrixes of alloys all change to martensite. However, some secondary particles are found in the central area of the dendrite grains of alloys with higher chromium, and their existence is due to the difference of boron solubility in the matrix with different chromium content. In addition, the hardenability, hardness, and impact toughness are all improved with the increase in chromium.

  2. Study of microstructure and silicon segregation in cast iron using color etching and electron microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vazehrad, S.; Diószegi, A.

    2015-06-15

    An investigation on silicon segregation of lamellar, compacted and nodular graphite iron was carried out by applying a selective, immersion color etching and a modified electron microprobe to study the microstructure. The color etched micrographs of the investigated cast irons by revealing the austenite phase have provided data about the chronology and mechanism of microstructure formation. Moreover, electron microprobe has provided two dimensional segregation maps of silicon. A good agreement was found between the segregation profile of silicon in the color etched microstructure and the silicon maps achieved by electron microprobe analysis. However, quantitative silicon investigation was found to be more accurate than color etching results to study the size of the eutectic colonies. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of a color etchant to silicon segregation is quantitatively demonstrated. • Si segregation measurement by EMPA approved the results achieved by color etching. • Color etched micrographs provided data about solidification mechanism in cast irons. • Austenite grain boundaries were identified by measuring the local Si concentration.

  3. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Observations During Subcritical Heat Treatments of a High-Chromium Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karantzalis, A. E.; Lekatou, A.; Kapoglou, A.; Mavros, H.; Dracopoulos, V.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, Cr white iron of 18.23 wt.% was subjected to a series of subcritical heat treatments. At both temperatures of 350 and 450 °C, no precipitation of secondary carbides was observed, and the overall microstructure resembles to that of the as-cast condition. At 550 °C, hardness values increased slightly compared to the as-cast values. No evidence of secondary carbide formation was observed. At 650 and 750 °C, extensive-to-complete transformation to pearlite-ferrite structures has occurred. Some evidence of secondary carbide precipitation especially for prolonged treatment periods was not adequate to obstruct the hardness decrease due to the dominating effect of pearlitic-ferritic formation. At 850 °C, secondary carbide precipitation and martensite formation lead to high hardness values.

  4. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed

  5. High Wear Resistance of White Cast Iron Treated by Novel Process: Principle and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaoshuai; Zuo, Xunwei; Liu, Yu; Chen, Nailu; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    Based on microstructure desired, a novel process is proposed to treat Fe-2.4C-12.0Cr (mass pct) white cast iron balls, that is, destabilizing heat treatment following multicycle quenching and sub-critical treatment (De-MQ-Sct) process, and such a complex process is simply performed by alternate water quenching and air cooling. For comparison, the white cast iron balls also were treated by conventional normalization (NOR) process and Oil-quenching process, respectively. The partitioning of carbon from martensite to retained austenite during De-MQ-Sct process promotes the interaction between carbide precipitation and martensitic transformation, while this interaction is a unique effect only produced by multicycle quenching linking destabilizing and sub-critical treatments, which leads to more and finer secondary carbides and more carbon-enriched austenite in De-MQ-Sct sample than those in NOR or Oil-quenching sample. The average hardness of 60 HRC and impact toughness of 12.6 J/cm2 are obtained in De-MQ-Sct white cast iron balls, which are much higher than those in NOR and Oil-quenching ones. The wear behaviours measured by pin-on-disk wear tests indicate that the weight loss of De-MQ-Sct sample is only about one third of the NOR sample and one half of the Oil-quenching sample. Microstructural characterization reveals that high wear resistance related to hardness and toughness of the De-MQ-Sct balls are mainly attributed to the considerable fine secondary carbides and stable carbon-enriched retained austenite.

  6. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  7. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera

  8. High-Cycle Fatigue Resistance of Si-Mo Ductile Cast Iron as Affected by Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Castello, Alessandro; Firrao, Donato

    2015-09-01

    Silicon-molybdenum ductile cast irons are used to fabricate exhaust manifolds of internal combustion engines of large series cars, where the maximum pointwise temperature at full engine load may be higher than 973 K (700 °C). In this application, high-temperature oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue (the latter being caused by the engine start and stop and by the variation of its power output) have been the subject of several studies and are well known, whereas little attention has been devoted to the high-cycle fatigue, arising from the engine vibration. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of Si-Mo cast iron is studied here by means of stress-life fatigue tests up to 10 million cycles, at temperatures gradually increasing up to 973 K (700 °C). The mechanical characterization is completed by tensile and compressive tests and ensuing fractographic examinations; the mechanical test results are correlated with the cast iron microstructure and heat treatment.

  9. Interplay Between Residual Stresses, Microstructure, Process Variables and Engine Block Casting Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Anthony; D'Elia, Francesco; Ravindran, Comondore; Sediako, Dimitry; Murty, B. S.; MacKay, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The replacement of nodular cast iron with 319 type aluminum (Al) alloys in gasoline engine blocks is an example of the shift towards the use of lighter alloys in the automotive industry. However, excessive residual stress along the cylinder bore may lead to bore distortion, significantly reducing engine operating efficiency. In the current study, microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stress were characterized along the cylinder bridge of engine blocks following thermal sand reclamation (TSR), T7 heat treatment, and service testing of the casting. Neutron diffraction was effectively used to quantify the residual stress along both the Al cylinder bridge and the adjacent gray cast iron cylinder liners in the hoop, radial, and axial orientations with respect to the cylinder axis. The results suggest that an increase in cooling rate along the cylinder caused a significant refinement in microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder. In turn, this suggested an increase in alloy strength at the bottom of the cylinder relative to the top. This increased strength at the bottom of the cylinder likely reduced the susceptibility of the cylinder to rapid relief of residual stress at elevated temperature. In contrast, the coarse microstructure at the top of the cylinder likely triggered stress relief at an elevated temperature.

  10. Comparison of residual stresses in sand- and chill casting of ductile cast iron wind turbine main shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonne, M. R.; Frandsen, J. O.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, simulations of pouring, solidification and cooling, and residual stress evolution of sand and chill cast wind turbine main shafts is performed. The models are made in the commercial software MAGMAsoft. As expected, the cooling rate of the sand casting is shown to be much lower than for the chill casting, resulting in a very course microstructure. From the simulations the nodule count is found to be 17 nodules per mm2 and 159 nodules per mm2 for the sand and chill casting, respectively, in the critical region of the main bearing seat. This is verified from nodule counts performed on the real cast main shafts. Residual stress evaluations show an overall increase of the maximum principal stress field for the chill casting, which is expected. However, the stresses are found to be in compression on the surface of the chill cast main shaft, which is unforeseen.

  11. Tempering rapidly solidified ductile cast iron by pulsed laser beam reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Bergmann, H.W. . Materials Science Dept.)

    1994-08-15

    During laser surface rapid remelting of cast irons, the melt pool solidifies rapidly and metastably (i.e. according to the metastable Fe-Fe[sub 3]C system) producing an ultra-fine ledeburite hard surface which is much more abrasion resistant than the original substrate. Previous literature mainly focused on remelting various grey and ductile irons with high power CO[sub 2] lasers for improved wear resistance and other surface properties, and on studying the physical metallurgy of laser remelted surfaces. Unfortunately, the unstable nature and rapid tempering behavior of the rapidly solidified ledeburite were generally neglected, although some publications mentioned the tempering phenomenon during successive overlap remelting. In this paper, a laser remelted ductile case iron surface was tempered by rapid pulsed laser beam reprocessing. The rapidly solidified ductile iron was found to be rapidly graphitized, as a result, a layer of Fe-base alloy containing ultra-fine graphite particles was produced. The unusual rapid graphitization phenomenon was preliminarily discussed.

  12. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  13. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High Chromium Cast Irons Using SEM and Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Zhou, Jinming; Turba, Krystof; Ståhl, Jan-Eric

    2015-01-01

    The effects of composition changes and heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of high-chromium white cast irons were studied in order to characterize possible improvements in product performance and machinability. Materials characterization was performed using nanoindentation, SEM, and EDS techniques. Present results show that changes in carbon and silicon contents as well as heat treatment strongly affect the mechanical properties and their variation in the material. In the as-cast condition, the sample with relatively lower carbon and silicon contents has an austenite-martensite matrix and is much harder than the sample with relatively higher carbon and silicon contents having more eutectic carbides in a bainite matrix. Annealing leads to softening of the materials relative to the as-cast condition, with the relatively higher carbon-silicon material being marginally harder due to the presence of more eutectic carbides. A similar trend is seen after the hardening treatment, and the presence of primary carbide can restrict the extent of hardening due to the loss of alloying elements from the matrix.

  14. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  15. Production of iron aluminides by strip casting followed by cold rolling at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Blackford, J.R.; Buckley, R.A.; Jones, H.; Sellars, C.M.

    1996-05-15

    The high resistance of iron aluminides to sulfidizing and oxidizing environments at high temperatures offers potential for structural application as lower cost alternatives to 300 and 400 series stainless steels and some nickel-base alloys. They are, however, subject to ductility limitations at room temperature which compel careful processing in order to achieve optimum properties in the final product. The standard melt-processing route of casting to ingot followed by hot and warm working to bar, plate or sheet is critically dependent on, for example, control of grain size in the initial cast structure, and the low ductility of the ingot structure at room temperature rules out cold working as a possibility at that stage. The purpose of this contribution is to report results of initial trials involving strip casting from the melt followed directly by cold-rolling and heat treatment. A previous communication reported results of an alternative novel route, that of co-rolling of elemental foils followed by heat treatment.

  16. Effective and Economic Offloading of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in India with the Bohler Iron Plaster Cast.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Priyanka; Hariharan, Rajalakshmi; Shankar, Nachiket; Gaur, Anil Kumar; Jose, Naveen Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Economic constraints are a major obstacle to the implementation of offloading casts in India. The aim of this study is to monitor the healing and activity limitations related to Bohler iron plaster cast (BIPC) when used for offloading diabetic neuropathic plantar foot ulcers. Thirty patients were cast for 1 month and evaluated for healing using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH), and for activity limitation using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). The change in the scores after intervention was the outcome measure. There was good healing as evidenced by a statistical difference in mean PUSH scores. The baseline PUSH score of 9.76-0.41 (T1-SEM) was greater than follow-up PUSH score of 6.32 + 0.41 (T2 + SEM) and the p value <0.0001. Improvement was seen in ulcer area, exudate, and tissue type. There was no mobility effect as there was no significant difference in LEFS. Significant negative correlation was there between PUSH and LEFS. The r value was less than -0.7 both at baseline and after intervention. The combined benefits of good healing, lack of affect on lower extremity function, the ease of application and dressing, and relative affordability make BIPC a commendable offloading modality for the management of diabetic plantar ulcers. PMID:27303118

  17. Observation of Nanometric Silicon Oxide Bifilms in a Water-Atomized Hypereutectic Cast Iron Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Mathieu; Christopherson, Denis; L'Espérance, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the reasons for the irregular structure of primary graphite nodules that were formed in a hypereutectic cast iron powder during water atomization. The graphite nodules contain a significant amount of micron-sized pores and multiple nanometric voids that formed from silicon oxide bifilms. The bifilms theory is often used to explain the mechanisms responsible for the presence of pores in castings. However, even if many results presented in the literature tend to corroborate the existence of bifilms, to this date, only indirect evidences of their existence were presented. The observations presented in this paper are the first to show the double-sided nature of these defects. These observations support the bifilms theory and give an explanation for the presence of porosities in castings. The bifilms were used as substrate for graphite growth during solidification. The irregular structure of the graphite nodules is a consequence of the rather random structure of the bifilms that were introduced in the melt as a result of turbulences on the surface of the melt during pouring. The confirmation of the existence of bifilms can contribute to the understanding of the mechanical properties of various metallic parts.

  18. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  19. Modeling of damage in ductile cast iron - The effect of including plasticity in the graphite nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriollo, T.; Thorborg, J.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper a micro-mechanical model for investigating the stress-strain relation of ductile cast iron subjected to simple loading conditions is presented. The model is based on a unit cell containing a single spherical graphite nodule embedded in a uniform ferritic matrix, under the assumption of infinitesimal strains and plane-stress conditions. Despite the latter being a limitation with respect to full 3D models, it allows a direct comparison with experimental investigations of damage evolution on the surface of ductile cast iron components, where the stress state is biaxial in nature. In contrast to previous works on the subject, the material behaviour in both matrix and nodule is assumed to be elasto-plastic, described by the classical J2-flow theory of plasticity, and damage evolution in the matrix is taken into account via Lemaitre's isotropic model. The effects of residual stresses due to the cooling process during manufacturing are also considered. Numerical solutions are obtained using an in-house developed finite element code; proper comparison with literature in the field is given.

  20. Nucleation and Growth of Graphite in Eutectic Spheroidal Cast Iron: Modeling and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazo, Fernando D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2016-03-01

    A new model of graphite growth during the continuous cooling of eutectic spheroidal cast iron is presented in this paper. The model considers the nucleation and growth of graphite from pouring to room temperature. The microstructural model of solidification accounts for the eutectic as divorced and graphite growth rate as a function of carbon gradient at the liquid in contact with the graphite. In the solid state, the microstructural model takes into account three stages for graphite growth, namely (1) from the end of solidification to the upper bound of intercritical stable eutectoid, (2) during the intercritical stable eutectoid, and (3) from the lower bound of intercritical stable eutectoid to room temperature. The micro- and macrostructural models are coupled using a sequential multiscale approach. Numerical results for graphite fraction and size distribution are compared with experimental results obtained from a cylindrical cup, in which the graphite volumetric fraction and size distribution were obtained using the Schwartz-Saltykov approach. The agreements between the experimental and numerical results for the fraction of graphite and the size distribution of spheroids reveal the importance of numerical models in the prediction of the main aspects of graphite in spheroidal cast iron.

  1. Wear of Spheroidal Graphite Cast Irons for Tractor Drive Train Components

    SciTech Connect

    Beltowski, Mark F; Blau, Peter Julian; Qu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The study was prompted by a desire to improve the wear resistance of power transmission components in rear axle drives on commercial farm tractors. Reciprocating wear tests were conducted under lubricated and non-lubricated conditions on three spheroidal cast irons which varied in strength and hardness (designated GGG450, GGG600, and GGG700). Hemispherically-tipped steel pins (designed 42CrMoS4/ 41CrS4) were used as the sliders. Except for the test duration, test procedures were similar to those described in ASTM Standard Test Method G133 for linearly-reciprocating sliding. Among the three cast irons tested, the harder and stronger the alloy, the lower was its wear rate. Wear factors were approximately four orders of magnitude lower for experiments lubricated in fresh, fully-formulated lubricating oil. There was a linear relationship between Brinell hardness of the alloys and the negative logarithm of the wear factors that were expressed in (mm3/N-m). Wear of lubricated test pins was not measurable due to the presence of deposits; however under non-lubricated sliding, the ratio of the wear of the flat specimen to that of the pin decreased as the hardness of the flat specimens approached that of the pin specimen.

  2. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  3. Nanosized substructure of heat-treated high-strength cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhik, S. A.; Kuznetsova, T. A.; Khudolei, A. L.; Komarov, A. I.; Komarova, V. I.; Vasilenko, M. S.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the results of investigating the microstructure of high-strength VChTG cast iron by the methods of scanning electron and atomic-force microscopy and x-ray phase analysis. A nanosized substructure of ferrite, perlite, and graphite phases of the cast iron has been revealed. An ordered sandwich multilevel structure of ferrite in the initial VChTG in the form of steps of width 400-600 nm and height about 100 nm consisting of bands of width 30 nm and interband height 3-10 nm has been established. It has been shown that the width of cementite lamellae in perlite varies from 200 to 400 nm, and the lamellae themselves consist, in turn, of sublamellae of width 30 nm. Graphite inclusions consist of layered crystallites of diameter 5-200 nm with a thickness of individual layers of 0.7-1.4 nm. Upon heat treatment the size of bainite subgrains is 100-300 nm. It has been shown that there is s relation between the size of the shift of subgrains for heat-treated VChTG revealed by atomic-force microscopy and microdistortions of the α-phase lattice determined by x-ray analysis.

  4. Design and implementation of automatic opto-electrical detection system for spheroidal graphite cast iron metallographic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-xin; Xiao, Ze-xin; Deng, Shi-chao

    2010-11-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron,with excellent mechanical properties,is widely used in manufacturing many advanced castings,such as crankshaft,gears,pistons,and a variety of machine parts.Its microstructure morphology reflects the quality performance of the products,which leads to an urgent need for a simple,accurate and automatic microstructure morphology detection technique for detecting the quality of spheroidal graphite cast iron.In this paper,opto-electrical detection technique is employed for designing a spheroidal graphite cast iron microstructure automatic detection system,in which the microstructure is imaged by optical microscopy system,and the digital images are obtained by industrial cameras and sent to the computer.A series of digital image processing algorithms,including gray transformation, binarization,edge detection,image morphology and seed filling etc,are adopted to calculate and analyze the microstructure images.The morphology and microstructure analysis methods are combined to obtain the characteristic parameters such as the size of the graphite,the ball classification,the number of graphite nodules and so on.The experiment results show that this method is simple,fast,and accurate and can be employed for assessment of the spheroidal graphite cast iron metallographic phase instead of manual detection.

  5. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  6. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  7. Study on quantitative relation between characteristics of striature bionic coupling unit and wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, striature bionic coupling units of different characteristics were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with striature bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that there is a relationship between weight loss and the area of striature bionic coupling units and α: Δm = Δm0 - 0.0212S × cos α - 0.0241S × sin α.

  8. UNDERSTANDING CHLORINE AND CHLORAMINE DECAY KINETICS IN OLD CAST IRON PIPES, 2. CONVERSION FROM CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT TO MICROFILTRATION IN A SMALL WATER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This insitu pipe loop study was designed to determine the disinfectant kinetics associated with very old unlined cast iron pipelines with both chlorine and chloramination residuals. An abandoned 90-year-old unlined cast iron pipeline about 2000 ft long was acclimated to conduct a...

  9. 104. Photocopied August 1978. CYLINDER USED IN THE ERECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. Photocopied August 1978. CYLINDER USED IN THE ERECTION OF THE INCLINED BUTTRESSES FOR POWER HOUSE REINFORCEMENT IN 1916. AN AIR LOCK WAS PLACED ON TOP OF THE CYLINDER: THE LOWER PORTION OF THE VERTICAL ELEMENT RESTED ON THE POWER HOUSE FOUNDATION APRON: THE INCLINED ELEMENT WAS CUT LEVEL WITH THE RIVER BED. THE INCLINED PORTION OF THE CYLINDER CONTAINED THE SHIELD USED TO BEGIN THE ERECTION OF THE SEGMENTED INCLINED CAST IRON BUTTRESSES. (764) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  10. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair

  11. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large

  12. Reductive dehalogenation of endosulfan by cast iron: Kinetics, pathways and modeling.

    PubMed

    Lama, Yangdup; Sinha, Alok; Singh, Gurdeep; Masto, Reginald E

    2016-05-01

    Cast iron has been a material of choice for in-situ remediation of groundwater. In this study interaction of endosulfan with High Carbon Iron Filings (HCIF) was studied in batch reactors. Decline in total concentration (Ct) could be related to aqueous concentration (Ca) by equation dCt/dt = k1.M.Ca(n), where reaction rate constant (k1) and order (n) were found to be 1.246 × 10(-4) L g(-1) iron h(-1) and 1.47, respectively. Partitioning of endosulfan to HCIF could be explained by Freundlich isotherm. The process of simultaneous reductive dehalogenation and adsorption/desorption was successfully modelled. The reductive dehalogenation of endosulfan resulted in by-products identified as [(3a, alpha,7beta,7a alpha,8s)-4,5,6,7,8 Pentachloro 3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro] (C9H3Cl5O3) and Benzofuran,4,5,7-trichloro-2,3-dihydro-2-methyl (C9H7Cl3O). PMID:26653031

  13. Machinability of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) Produced by Integrated Green Technology of Continuous Casting-Heat Treatment Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.

    2011-01-17

    This study presents the novel processing technique known as continuous casting-heat treatment processes to produce Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) which is a new class of ductile iron. ADI is characterized by improved mechanical properties but has low machinability as compared to other cast irons and steel of similar strength. The novel technique is developed by the integration of casting (in die casting) and heat treatment processes in foundry to save cost energy and time. Specimens just after casting were austenitized at 930 deg. C for 90 min and then austempered in fluidized bed at 380 deg. C for 90 and 120 min. Hence, the effect of austempering time on the morphology of retained austenite and mechanical properties of the material were examined and compared with conventionally produced ADI. Drilling tests were then carried out to evaluate the machinability of ADI in terms of cutting forces, chip micro-hardness, chip morphology and surface roughness. The mechanical properties of ADI austempered for 120 min have found to be better as compare to the ADI austempered for 90 min.

  14. Machinability of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) Produced by Integrated Green Technology of Continuous Casting-Heat Treatment Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the novel processing technique known as continuous casting-heat treatment processes to produce Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) which is a new class of ductile iron. ADI is characterized by improved mechanical properties but has low machinability as compared to other cast irons and steel of similar strength. The novel technique is developed by the integration of casting (in die casting) and heat treatment processes in foundry to save cost energy and time. Specimens just after casting were austenitized at 930° C for 90 min and then austempered in fluidized bed at 380° C for 90 and 120 min. Hence, the effect of austempering time on the morphology of retained austenite and mechanical properties of the material were examined and compared with conventionally produced ADI. Drilling tests were then carried out to evaluate the machinability of ADI in terms of cutting forces, chip micro-hardness, chip morphology and surface roughness. The mechanical properties of ADI austempered for 120 min have found to be better as compare to the ADI austempered for 90 min.

  15. Recommendations for ductile and brittle failure design criteria for ductile cast iron spent-fuel shipping containers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents recommendations for establishing design and acceptance criteria for the ductile cast iron to be used for fabricating spent-fuel shipping casks. These recommendations address design criteria for preventing ductile failure, and acceptance criteria for preventing brittle fracture, based upon drop testing a flawed prototype cask.

  16. 75 FR 10216 - Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ..., Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity to Request Administrative Review, 74 FR 62743 (December 1..., 75 FR 4770 (January 29, 2010). Rescission of Review Pursuant to 19 CFR 351.213(d)(1), the Department... International Trade Administration Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings from the People's Republic of China:...

  17. 78 FR 68474 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... interested party group response to its notice of institution (78 FR 39321, July 1, 2013) of the subject five... electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (October... COMMISSION Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year...

  18. 78 FR 39321 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China Institution of a Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... fittings from China (68 FR 16765). Following the five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission...- malleable cast iron pipe fittings from China (73 FR 47887). The Commission is now conducting a second review... Federal employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b) (19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008)....

  19. Effects of Antimony and Wall Thickness on Graphite Morphology in Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Zoran; Strkalj, Anita; Maldini, Kresimir

    2016-05-01

    Effects of Sb additions on the graphite morphology of ductile iron castings in different wall thicknesses (3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm) were analyzed in this paper. In the wall thicknesses of 3, 12, and 25 mm, low contents of rare earth (RE) elements showed a beneficial effect on nodule count and nodularity. Nodularity >80 pct and a high nodule count were achieved without the addition of Sb. In the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm, nodularity >80 pct was not achieved without the use of the chill or proper content of Sb. Excess of RE elements was neutralized with the addition of proper amount of Sb to the wall thickness. Addition of 0.01 wt pct Sb (ratio of RE/Sb = 0.34, ratio of RE/SE = 0.105) was sufficient to achieve nodularity >80 pct in the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Austempering Heat Treatment of a Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardo, Adrián D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.; Górny, Marcin; Tyrała, Edward

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a coupled thermo-mechanical-metallurgical formulation to predict the dimensional changes and microstructure of a ductile cast iron part as a consequence of an austempering heat process. To take into account the different complex phenomena which are present in the process, the stress-strain law and plastic evolution equations are defined within the context of the associate rate-independent thermo-plasticity theory. The metallurgical model considers the reverse eutectoid, ausferritic, and martensitic transformations using macro- and micro-models. The resulting model is solved using the finite element method. The performance of this model is evaluated by comparison with experimental results of a dilatometric test. The results indicate that both the experimental evolution of deformation and temperature are well represented by the numerical model.

  1. Influences of single laser tracks' space on the rolling fatigue contact of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Hai-feng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Lu-quan

    2015-09-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron, the surface is modified by Nd:YAG laser to imitate the unique surface of soil creatures (alternative soft and hard phases). After laser treatment, the remelting region is the named unit which is mainly characterized of compact and refinement grains. In the present work, the influence of the unit space on the fatigue wear resistance is experimentally studied. The optimum space is proven to be 2 mm according to the tested results and two kinds of delamination are observed on samples' worn surface. Subsequently, the mechanisms of fatigue wear resistance improvement are suggested: (i) for microscopic behavior, the bionic unit not only delays the initiation of microcracks, but also significantly obstructs the propagation of cracks; (ii) for macroscopic behavior, the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation.

  2. Effects of Antimony and Wall Thickness on Graphite Morphology in Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Zoran; Strkalj, Anita; Maldini, Kresimir

    2016-08-01

    Effects of Sb additions on the graphite morphology of ductile iron castings in different wall thicknesses (3, 12, 25, 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm) were analyzed in this paper. In the wall thicknesses of 3, 12, and 25 mm, low contents of rare earth (RE) elements showed a beneficial effect on nodule count and nodularity. Nodularity >80 pct and a high nodule count were achieved without the addition of Sb. In the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm, nodularity >80 pct was not achieved without the use of the chill or proper content of Sb. Excess of RE elements was neutralized with the addition of proper amount of Sb to the wall thickness. Addition of 0.01 wt pct Sb (ratio of RE/Sb = 0.34, ratio of RE/SE = 0.105) was sufficient to achieve nodularity >80 pct in the wall thicknesses of 38, 50, 75, and 100 mm.

  3. Analysis of emissions collected from four types of iron casting molds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, W.G.; James, R.H.; Moorman, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    The levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and related compounds, phenols and particulates were determined in emissions collected from iron casting molds composed of four different types of chemical binders: furan, urethane, green sand with sea coal and phenol-formaldehyde resins in shell molds. The shell sample, with 50% particulates, contained the most water-soluble material; green sand, 25% particulates; furan, 10% particulates; and urethane, less than 2% particulate material. The portion of the particulate fraction soluble in cyclohexane varies from 16 to 36% between mold types; emissions from urethane and furan molds contained the lowest quantities of cyclohexane-soluble components and of PAH and related compounds. Phenol, which was found in all four foundry samples, was present in the highest concentration in emissions from urethane molds. Shell mold emissions contained the highest levels of 2- and 4-nitrophenol.

  4. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  5. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions. PMID:16719117

  6. The effect of heat treatment on the gouging abrasion resistance of alloy white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Are, I. R. S.; Arnold, B. K.

    1995-02-01

    A series of heat treatments was employed to vary the microstructure of four commercially important alloy white cast irons, the wear resistance of which was then assessed by the ASTM jaw-crusher gouging abrasion test. Compared with the as-cast condition, standard austenitizing treatments produced a substantial increase in hardness, a marked decrease in the retained aus-tenite content in the matrix, and, in general, a significant improvement in gouging abrasion resistance. The gouging abrasion resistance tended to decline with increasing austenitizing tem-perature, although the changes in hardness and retained austenite content varied, depending on alloy composition. Subcritical heat treatment at 500 ° following hardening reduced the retained austenite content to values less than 10 pct, and in three of the alloys it caused a significant fall in both hardness and gouging abrasion resistance. The net result of the heat treatments was the development of optimal gouging abrasion resistance at intermediate levels of retained aus-tenite. The differing responses of the alloys to both high-temperature austenitizing treatments and to subcritical heat treatments at 500 ° were related to the effects of the differing carbon and alloying-element concentrations on changes in the M s temperature and secondary carbide precipitation.

  7. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, J.; Theuwissen, K.; Laffont, L.; Véron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar; Ganguli, Ashis Chandra

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effect of manganese and copper addition, singly as well as in combination, on the microstructure, micro-segregation, and mechanical properties of ductile irons. Alloy A (3.18C, 2.64Si, 0.45Mn), alloy B (3.35C, 2.51Si, 0.82Mn), alloy C (3.16C, 2.80Si, 1.08Mn, 0.56Cu), and alloy D (3.18C, 3.00Si, 1.04Mn, 1.13Cu) were melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pieces. The cast microstructures varied from ferrito-pearlitic in alloys A, B, and C to pearlitic in alloy D. However, on XRD analysis and SEM examination, the presence of martensite patches was also detected. There was a marginal decrease in nodule count in alloy B. In alloys C and D, nodule counts were higher, but the proportion of ferrite decreased drastically. Alloy D was found to be the strongest (UTS ≈ 800 MPa, El = 5%) with alloys A and C coming next in strength; while alloy B was weakest of the four. The presence of martensite patches in association with pearlite appears to be responsible for low toughness of these alloys. Microprobe analysis shows some silicon segregation near the graphite nodules and practically little segregation of manganese. Elemental mapping by FE-SEM does not indicate any manganese segregation.

  9. Improving tribological performance of gray cast iron by laser peening in dynamic strain aging temperature regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Zhou, Jianzhong; Mei, Yufen; Huang, Shu; Sheng, Jie; Zhu, Weili

    2015-09-01

    A high and stable brake disc friction coefficient is needed for automobile safety, while the coefficient degrades due to elevated temperature during the braking process. There is no better solution except changes in material composition and shape design optimization. In the dynamic strain aging(DSA) temperature regime of gray cast iron, micro-dimples with different dimple depth over diameter and surface area density are fabricated on the material surface by laser peening(LP) which is an LST method. Friction behavior and wear mechanism are investigated to evaluate the effects of surface texturing on the tribological performance of specimens under dry conditions. Through LP impacts assisted by DSA, the friction coefficients of the LPed specimens increase noticeably both at room temperature and elevated temperature in comparison to untreated specimens. Moreover, the coefficient of specimen with dimple depth over diameter of 0.03 and surface area density of 30% is up to 0.351 at room temperature, which dramatically rises up to 1.33 times that of untextured specimen and the value is still up to 0.3305 at 400°C with an increasing ratio of 35% compared to that of untreated specimen. The surface of textured specimen shows better wear resistance compared to untreated specimen. Wear mechanism includes adhesive wear, abrasive wear and oxidation wear. It is demonstrated that LP assisted by DSA can substantially improve wear resistance, raise the friction coefficient as well as its stability of gray cast iron under elevated temperatures. Heat fade and premature wear can be effectively relieved by this surface modification method.

  10. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  11. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  12. A micro-model for eutectoid phase transformations in as-cast ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraghavan, R.; Bradley, F.J.

    1999-11-05

    As ductile iron is cooled below the eutectoid temperature range, there are two branches available for decomposition of the eutectoid austenite: the stable eutectoid reaction (ferrite reaction) in which ferrite and graphite are the product phases and the metastable eutectoid reaction (pearlite reaction) leading to pearlite formation. The following sections describe mathematical formulation and calibration of a semi-empirical micro-model to simulate solid-state transformations in as-cast ductile iron. A comprehensive set of data and experimental results obtained from laboratory experiments in conjunction with an optimization methodology has been used to calibrate the micro-model. The experimental results consisted of cooling curve and microstructure characterization data obtained from a series of heats conducted as a part of industry sponsored research aimed at developing thermal analysis based methodologies for process control in foundries. Four different types of thermal analysis cups were poured. As the principal objective in this work is to develop a model to predict microstructure evolution, heat transfer in the thermal analysis cups is simulated using a simple lumped system volume element model in which the temperature is a function of time only.

  13. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  14. Comparison of High-Temperature Properties and Thermal Shock Resistance of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) with Those of Pearlitic Ductile Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajabshiri, Mehrdad; Sharafi, Shahriar; Moeini, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature strength and thermal shock resistance of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in high temperatures because of instability of ausferrite phase has been less interest. The aim of this study is to investigate the tensile properties of ADI and pearlitic ductile cast iron by using the short-time tensile test in high temperatures. Tensile test was conducted in temperatures of 298 K, 673 K, 873 K, and 1073 K (25 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, and 800 °C). Thermal shock test also was conducted by using the molten lead bath at 1273 K (1000 °C). In this experiment, samples of pearlitic ductile cast iron and ADI were divided in two groups; that after immersing in the molten lead bath for 25 seconds, one group was cooled in the air and other one was quenched in the water. Results showed that strength and thermal shock resistance of ADI samples are higher than those of the pearlitic ductile cast iron.

  15. The effect of selected parameters of the honing process on cylinder liner surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlus, P.; Dzierwa, A.; Michalski, J.; Reizer, R.; Wieczorowski, M.; Majchrowski, R.

    2014-04-01

    Many truck cylinder liners made from gray cast iron were machined. Ceramic and diamond honing stones were used in the last stages of operation: coarse honing and plateau honing. The effect of honing parameters on the cylinder liner surface topography was studied. Selected surface topography parameters were response variables. It was found that parameters from the Sq group were sensitive to honing parameter change. When plateau honing time varied, the Smq parameter increased, while the other parameters, Spq and Svq, were stable.

  16. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small

  17. Heat treatment effect on microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of Cr26 white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaoping; Shen, Yehui; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Dequan

    2015-01-01

    High chromium cast iron(HCCI) is taken as material of coal water slurry pump impeller, but it is susceptible to produce serious abrasive wear and erosion wear because of souring of hard coal particles. The research on optimization of heat treatments to improve abrasive wear properties of HCCI is insufficient, so effect of heat treatments on the microstructure, hardness, toughness, and wear resistance of Cr26 HCCI is investigated to determine the optimal heat treatment process for HCCI. A series of heat treatments are employed. The microstructures of HCCI specimens are examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and impact fracture toughness of as-cast and heat treated specimens are measured. The wear tests are assessed by a Type M200 ring-on block wear tester. The results show the following: With increase of the quenching temperature from 950 °C to 1050 °C, the hardness of Cr26 HCCI increased to a certain value, kept for a time and then decreased. The optimal heat treatment process is 2 h quenching treatment at 1000 °C, followed by a subsequent 2 h tempering at 400 °C. The hardness of HCCI is related to the precipitation and redissolution of secondary carbides in the process of heat treatment. The subsequent tempering treatment would result in a slight decrease of hardness but increase of toughness. The wear resistance is much related to the "supporting" effect of the matrix and the "protective" effect of the hard carbide embedded in the matrix, and the wear resistance is further dependent on the hardness and the toughness of the matrix. This research can provide an important insight on developing an optimized heat treatment method to improve the wear resistance of HCCI.

  18. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a

  19. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-06-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide

  20. The development of internal repair and rehabilitation techniques for cast iron joints and small diameter steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, M.; Yasui, K.; Tsuji, T.

    1988-01-01

    Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. and Toho Gas Co., Ltd. have accomplished trenchless repair-rehabilitation techniques for cast iron mains, branches, services and house pipes as complete systems in order to maintain its buried pipelines efficiently. An outline of these systems is presented in this paper. Osaka Gas is the second largest and Toho Gas is the third largest gas company in Japan, both gas companies have 5,800,000 customers and pipelines extending approximately to 52,000 km. To maintain such gas pipelines whose length is much more longer than the circumference of the earth, a large amount of investment is required, because excavation of existing pipelines has become more and more difficult. In such a situation, it has become urgent to develop trenchless techniques to repair gas pipelines and to prevent leakage. From these viewpoints Osaka Gas and Toho Gas have developed several complete, internal repair-rehabilitation techniques for cast iron mains, branches, services, and house pipes.

  1. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-07-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  2. The sorption property of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution using waste cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wooram; Lee, Yunsub; Kim, Yangsu; Choi, Jinyoung; Han*, Ohhyung

    2015-04-01

    The sorption property of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution was investigated using waste cast iron(WCI), which is a byproduct of the iron casting process in foundries. Two types of WCI were used in the experiment: grind precipitate dust (GPD) and cast iron shot (CIS). Non-equilibrium batch experiments were performed under different concentrations of As(III) and As(V). Results showed that waste cast iron was effective in the removal of As(III) and As(V). The phase changes of sorbed As species on the GPD using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) were investigated. The results showed the binding energy of 45.19eV for As(V) were obtained, whereas two of 45.3eV and 43.91eV for As(III) were shown in GPD. It can be strongly suggested that GPD mediated As(V) had no evidence for the reduction of ionized As(V) species into As(III), whereas GPD mediated As(III) showed a partial oxidation of As(III) into As(V). The qualitative and quantitative analysis of As distribution and metal containing phase in WCI surface through the XRF, XRD, EPMA, EDS patterns, BSE and SEM image were investigated. The GPD and CIS are a spherical shape with Fe0 composition in correspondence with XRF and XRD analysis results. Quantitative analysis for molar ratio of Fe and As indicated a 1.1% and 1.5% of As(V) and As(III) molar fractions were observed in GPD, while 5.1% and 0.9% fractions in CIS.

  3. Effects of MC-Type Carbide Forming and Graphitizing Elements on Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Indefinite Chilled Cast Iron Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Choi, Won-Doo; Suh, Yongchan; Lee, Young-Kook; Oh, Yong-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of indefinite chilled cast iron rolls with various V+Nb contents and Si/Cr ratios was evaluated. Increasing the ratio of Si/Cr prolonged the life of the rolls by reducing brittle cementites. Higher V+Nb addition also increased the life through the formation of carbides that refined and toughened the martensite matrix and reduced the thermal expansion mismatch in the microstructure.

  4. Effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness of duo-cast materials composed of high-chromium white cast iron and low-chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sunghak; Jung, Jae-Young

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate effects of heat treatment on wear resistance and fracture toughness in duo-cast materials composed of a high-chromium white cast iron and a low-chromium steel as a wear-resistant part and a ductile part, respectively. Different size, volume fraction, and distribution of M7C3 carbides were employed in the wear-resistant part by changing the amount of chromium, and the volume fraction of martensite in the austenitic matrix was varied by the heat treatment. In the alloys containing a small amount of chromium, an interdendritic structure of eutectic M7C3 carbides was formed, and led to the improvement of wear resistance and fracture toughness. After the heat treatment, the selective wear of the matrix and the cracking or spalled-off carbides were considerably reduced since the hardness difference between carbides and matrix decreased by the increase in the matrix hardness, thereby leading to the improvement of the wear resistance. However, the fracture toughness of the heat-treated alloys was lower than that of the as-cast alloys because the matrix containing a considerable amount of martensite did not effectively prevent the crack propagation.

  5. Wear properties of compact graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by deep laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Na; Wang, Cheng-tao; Lin, Peng-yu; Ren, Lu-quan

    2010-08-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) processed by laser remelting gets a conspicuous improvement. In order to get a further anti-wear enhancement of CGI, a new method of deep laser cladding was used to process bionic units. By preplacing grooves then filling with WC powders and laser cladding, the bionic units had a larger dimension in depth and higher microhardness. Fe powder with different proportions from 30% (wt.) to 60% (wt.) was added into WC before laser processing for a good incorporation with CGI substrate. The improved laser cladding units turned out to induce higher wear resistance in comparison with laser remelting ones. The depth of the layer reached up to 1 mm. The results of dry sliding wear tests indicated that the specimen processed by laser cladding has a remarkable improvement than the ones processed by laser remelting. It should be noted that the wear mass loss was essentially dependent on the increase in WC proportion.

  6. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, M.; Harris, J.J.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts. Foundry operations include mixing and mold formation, core making, metal pouring, shakeout, finishing, and painting. Cutting, shaping, and welding are the principal metal fabrication operations. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that paint-related wastes are generated in large quantities, and that significant waste reduction and cost savings could be realized by installing a dry powder coating system or by replacing conventional air spray paint guns with high-volume low-pressure spray guns. This research brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  7. Effect of Silicon on Mechanical and Wear Properties of Aluminium-Alloyed Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiraj, Aravind; Tiwari, Shashank

    2014-08-01

    Influence of Si on mechanical and wear properties of Al-alloyed gray cast iron has been investigated in this work. The Si content is varied from 1.27 to 2.1% in five different alloys with nearly 2% Al additions. Alloy with 2.1% Si and 1.9% Al shows maximum ferrite matrix with highest flake volume (17.3%). It also has the lowest hardness and strength. Rest of the alloys with Si content equal to or less than 1.7% and 2% Al content shows maximum pearlite matrix with higher hardness and strength. They have also shown a tendency for oxide formation and reduced wear during sliding probably due to higher friction heat and lower heat dissipation tendency due to lower flake volume and Al addition which reduces thermal conductivity of the matrix. The same oxide layer was not evident in alloy with 2.1% Si and 1.9% Al alloy having the highest flake volume (17.3%).

  8. Effect of Tempering Temperature and Time on Strength and Hardness of Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Behera, R. K.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tempering temperature and time on the mechanical properties of ductile cast iron is investigated in the current work. The specimens were austenitized at 900°C for 120 minutes and then quenched in mineral oil at room temperature. Immediately after quenching the specimens were tempered at 400°C and 200°C for 60min, 90min, and 120min. In the tempering temperature range of 200°C-400°C, there is sudden increase in impact strength, ductility and toughness of the materials, as the temperature and time increase. The UTS drops initially, and hardness of materials will depends on amount of phase of martensitic and retained austenitic and graphite nodules. In this work alloying elements also effected the microstructure of the specimen. And due to increase tempering time the amount of martensitic phase will decrease and retained austenitic phase will increase, retained austenitic phase is softer then martensitic so hardness will decrease.

  9. Influence of Mg on Solidification of Hypereutectic Cast Iron: X-ray Radiography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, K.; Yasuda, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, A.; Nagira, T.; Yoshiya, M.; Morishita, K.; Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Radiography using a synchrotron radiation X-ray source was performed to examine solidification and melting behaviors in hypereutectic cast iron specimens containing 0.002 and 0.05mass pctMg. The solidification sequence in the alloy containing 0.002mass pctMg was (1) nucleation and growth of graphite particles of which transformed to a flake-like shape, (2) growth of γ-Fe dendrites, (3) nucleation of graphite particles ahead of the interface just prior to the eutectic solidification, and (4) the eutectic solidification. In contrast, (1) and (2) occurred nearly at the same time in the specimen containing 0.05 mass pct Mg. The addition of 0.05mass pctMg significantly reduced the temperature range in which the graphite particles grew as the primary phase. Image-based analysis of melting behavior showed that even 0.05 mass pct addition was sufficient to modify the phase equilibrium of the liquid, γ-Fe, and graphite phases. Thus, the observed influence of Mg on the solidification sequence was attributed to the modification of the phase equilibrium. The influence was consistently explained by considering the shift of the eutectic composition to the carbon side in the pseudo-ternary system. It was also suggested that supersaturation of carbon in the melt increased as the temperature decreased even though the primary graphite particles existed. The supersaturation may cause the nucleation of the graphite particles just before the eutectic solidification.

  10. Nitride precipitation during high temperature corrosion of ductile cast irons in synthetic exhaust gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholence, F.; Norell, M.

    2005-02-01

    Internal nitrides form in two ductile cast irons (SiMo and Ni-Resist) intended for exhaust systems in vehicles. Samples oxidised at 650 1050 °C for 50 h in modified synthetic exhaust gases were analysed by using AES and FEG-SEM. No nitrides formed in absence of NOx. In dry petrol gas coarse nitrides (<20 μm) precipitated heterogeneously deep (600 μm at 950 °C) into SiMo. It is argued that the accommodation of volume change, preferential diffusion paths and increased N solubility as Si was depleted contribute to a self-accelerating process. The Si depletion around the coarse nitrides lowered the microhardness and the corrosion resistance of the alloy. In diesel and in normal petrol gases μ-sized MgSiN2 form in SiMo in cell boundaries where Mg segregates. This also occurs in Ni-Resist in both dry and normal petrol whereas no nitrides were observed in Ni-Resist exposed to diesel gases.

  11. Spraying virtual iron on real engines

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, H.

    1996-02-01

    Nearly all aluminum block engines have a cast-iron sleeve inserted within each cylinder bore because aluminum does not provide adequate wear resistance unless changes are made to the piston rings and skirt. Now William L. Oberkampf and his colleagues at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., working with General Motors Corp., Detroit, are developing a method for depositing cast iron onto aluminum automotive engine blocks using thermal-spray technology. The method could eliminate the need for manufacturing and assembling cast-iron cylinder liners as well as provide a substantial cost savings. To overcome the formidable obstacles raised by the automobile industry`s quality and cost requirements, Sandia and GM are making use of what is believed to be the first commercial application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) involving two-phase flow at supersonic speeds.

  12. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:24859195

  13. Long-Term Oxidation of Candidate Cast Iron and Advanced Austenitic Stainless Steel Exhaust System Alloys from 650-800 C in Air with Water Vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N; Haynes, James A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherentmore » from 700-800 C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 C compared to 650-700 C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  14. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.

  15. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remainedmore » adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  16. Effect of Destabilizing Heat Treatment on Solid-State Phase Transformation in High-Chromium Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Vasily; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Chabak, Yuliia

    2013-12-01

    This work describes the influence of secondary carbide precipitation at destabilizing heat treatment on kinetics of austenite phase transformation at a subcritical range of temperatures in high-Cr cast irons, alloyed with 4 to 6 wt pct of Mn or by complex Mn-Ni-Mo (Mn-Cu-Mo). The samples were soaked at 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) (destabilization) or at 573 K to 973 K (300 °C to 700 °C) (subcritical treatment); the combination of destabilization and subcritical treatment was also used. The investigation was carried out with application of optical and electron microscopy and bulk hardness measurement. Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves of secondary carbide precipitation and pearlite transformation for as-cast austenite and destabilized austenite were built in this work. It was determined that the secondary carbide precipitation significantly inhibited the pearlite transformation rate at 823 K to 973 K (550 °C to 700 °C). The inhibition effect is more evident in cast irons alloyed with complex Mn-Ni-Mo or Mn-Cu-Mo. The possible reasons for transformation decelerating could be austenite chemical composition change (enriching by Ni, Si, and Cu, and depleting by Cr) and stresses induced by secondary carbide precipitation.

  17. Microstructures and tensile properties of as-cast iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1994-09-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al, Fe{sub 3}Al with chromium, and Fe{sub 3}Al-based FA-129 alloy have been investigated. Tensile properties have been obtained in air in the as-cast condition for all three alloys. Samples of FA-129 alloy have also been tested in oxygen and water vapor environments, and after homogenization at 700, 900, and 1200C. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize ordered phases and optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the microstructure and fracture morphology. Tensile properties in the as-cast condition exhibited an environmental effect; tensile ductilities in an oxygen atmosphere were greater than those obtained in laboratory air. Homogenized samples of FA-129 alloy exhibited almost twice the ductility of the as-cast condition. Results indicate that the low ductility of as-cast Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys may be related to the relatively large grain size in the as-cast condition and the presence of the DO{sub 3} ordered phase. Microstructural characterization of the homogenized samples and comparison of the as-cast and homogenized microstructures may provide a clue to the poor ductility in the as-cast condition.

  18. Corrosion resistance of cast irons and titanium alloys as reference engineered metal barriers for use in basalt geologic storage: a literature assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Charlot, L.A.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A survey and assessment of the literature on the corrosion resistance of cast irons and low-alloy titanium are presented. Selected engineering properties of cast iron and titanium are briefly described; however, the corrosion resistance of cast iron and titanium in aqueous solutions or in soils and their use in a basalt repository are emphasized. In evaluating the potential use of cast iron and titanium as structural barrier materials for long-lived nuclear waste packages, it is assumed that titanium has the general corrosion resistance to be used in relatively thin cross sections whereas the cost and availability of cast iron allows its use even in very thick cross sections. Based on this assumption, the survey showed that: The uniform corrosion of low-alloy titanium in a basalt environment is expected to be extremely low. A linear extrapolation of general corrosion rates with an added corrosion allowance suggests that a 3.2- to 6.4-mm-thick wall may have a life of 1000 yr. Pitting and crevice corrosion are not likely corrosion modes in basalt ground waters. It is also unlikely that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in the commercially pure (CP) titanium alloy or in palladiumor molybdenum-alloyed titanium materials. Low-alloy cast irons may be used as barrier metals if the environment surrounding the metal keeps the alloy in the passive range. The solubility of the corrosion product and the semipermeable nature of the oxide film allow significant uniform corrosion over long time periods. A linear extrapolation of high-temperature corrosion rates on carbon steels and corrosion rates of cast irons in soils gives an estimated metal penetration of 51 to 64 mm after 1000 yr. A corrosion allowance of 3 to 5 times that suggests that an acceptable cast iron wall may be from 178 to 305 mm thick. Although they cannot be fully assessed, pitting and crevice corrosion should not affect cast iron due to the ground-water chemistry of basalt.

  19. The Effect of Homogenization Heat Treatment on Thermal Expansion Coefficient and Dimensional Stability of Low Thermal Expansion Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Hao; Liu, Zong-Pei; Pan, Yung-Ning

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of homogenization heat treatment on α value [coefficient of thermal expansion (10-6 K-1)] of low thermal expansion cast irons was studied. In addition, constrained thermal cyclic tests were conducted to evaluate the dimensional stability of the low thermal expansion cast irons with various heat treatment conditions. The results indicate that when the alloys were homogenized at a relatively low temperature, e.g., 1023 K (750 °C), the elimination of Ni segregation was not very effective, but the C concentration in the matrix was moderately reduced. On the other hand, if the alloys were homogenized at a relatively high temperature, e.g., 1473 K (1200 °C), opposite results were obtained. Consequently, not much improvement (reduction) in α value was achieved in both cases. Therefore, a compound homogenization heat treatment procedure was designed, namely 1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ, in which a relatively high homogenization temperature of 1473 K (1200 °C) can effectively eliminate the Ni segregation, and a subsequent holding stage at 1023.15 K (750 °C) can reduce the C content in the matrix. As a result, very low α values of around (1 to 2) × 10-6 K-1 were obtained. Regarding the constrained thermal cyclic testing in 303 K to 473 K (30 °C to 200 °C), the results indicate that regardless of heat treatment condition, low thermal expansion cast irons exhibit exceedingly higher dimensional stability than either the regular ductile cast iron or the 304 stainless steel. Furthermore, positive correlation exists between the α 303.15 K to 473.15 K value and the amount of shape change after the thermal cyclic testing. Among the alloys investigated, Heat I-T3B (1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ) exhibits the lowest α 303 K to 473 K value (1.72 × 10-6 K-1), and hence has the least shape change (7.41 μm) or the best dimensional stability.

  20. Application of EDS microanalysis in the identification of inhomogeneities in surface protective layers on ductile cast iron parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroń, Ł.; Tchórz, A.

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the results of the application of both scanning electron microscopy and EDS microanalysis in investigations of the process of the protective layer formation on the surface of ductile cast iron (the substrate material) turbine blades are presented. The turbine blades, designated for operation in an aggressive environment, were coated with protective chromium carbide layers using plasma spraying methods. The first turbine blade was coated using a standard plasma spraying technique, followed by superficial remelting treatment, while the second one was coated using a modified plasma technology, i.e., HVOF (High Velocity Oxy Fuel) spraying technique.

  1. The Effect of Homogenization Heat Treatment on Thermal Expansion Coefficient and Dimensional Stability of Low Thermal Expansion Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Hao; Liu, Zong-Pei; Pan, Yung-Ning

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of homogenization heat treatment on α value [coefficient of thermal expansion (10-6 K-1)] of low thermal expansion cast irons was studied. In addition, constrained thermal cyclic tests were conducted to evaluate the dimensional stability of the low thermal expansion cast irons with various heat treatment conditions. The results indicate that when the alloys were homogenized at a relatively low temperature, e.g., 1023 K (750 °C), the elimination of Ni segregation was not very effective, but the C concentration in the matrix was moderately reduced. On the other hand, if the alloys were homogenized at a relatively high temperature, e.g., 1473 K (1200 °C), opposite results were obtained. Consequently, not much improvement (reduction) in α value was achieved in both cases. Therefore, a compound homogenization heat treatment procedure was designed, namely 1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ, in which a relatively high homogenization temperature of 1473 K (1200 °C) can effectively eliminate the Ni segregation, and a subsequent holding stage at 1023.15 K (750 °C) can reduce the C content in the matrix. As a result, very low α values of around (1 to 2) × 10-6 K-1 were obtained. Regarding the constrained thermal cyclic testing in 303 K to 473 K (30 °C to 200 °C), the results indicate that regardless of heat treatment condition, low thermal expansion cast irons exhibit exceedingly higher dimensional stability than either the regular ductile cast iron or the 304 stainless steel. Furthermore, positive correlation exists between the α 303.15 K to 473.15 K value and the amount of shape change after the thermal cyclic testing. Among the alloys investigated, Heat I-T3B (1473 K (1200 °C)/4 hours/FC/1023 K (750 °C)/2 hours/WQ) exhibits the lowest α 303 K to 473 K value (1.72 × 10-6 K-1), and hence has the least shape change (7.41 μm) or the best dimensional stability.

  2. Preliminary science report on the directional solidification of hypereutectic cast iron during KC-135 low-G maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An ADSS-P directional solidification furnace was reconfigured for operation on the KC-135 low-g aircraft. The system offers many advantages over quench ingot methods for study of the effects of sedimentation and convection on alloy formation. The directional sodification furnace system was first flown during the September 1982 series of flights. The microstructure of the hypereutectic cast iron sample solidified on one of these flights suggests a low-g effect on graphite morphology. Further experiments are needed to ascertain that this effect is due to low-gravity and to deduce which of the possible mechanisms is responsible for it.

  3. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such as...

  4. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such a...

  5. Using a Cast Iron Hand-Pump to Teach Students About Water Resources and Resource Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailloux, B. J.; Radloff, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Simply turning on the tap brings safe, clean, fresh-tasting water to most Americans. Students never need to consider basic concepts about water supply, including their daily water consumption and the quality of the water required for drinking. In stark contrast, the issues of water quality and quantity play a central role in people’s daily lives in the developing world. It is difficult to convey this reality to our students through lectures alone and hands-on activities are required. In order to develop an active learning based approach, we transported a traditional cast iron hand-pump and aluminum urns from Bangladesh to the United States. The hand-pump is mounted on a cooler, which acts as a water reservoir, and is now functional and easily transportable. Using this powerful demonstration tool, we have developed an active learning module we call “How far will you walk for water?”. The goal of the module is to teach students about water quantity, water quality, and resource allocation with a focus on Arsenic and Bangladesh, but the system could be applied to other areas of concern. First the students are given a quick lecture on Arsenic, its health impacts, and the extent of contamination in Bangladesh. They are then assigned a specific well, complete with a map of their village and picture of their well and a water sample (pre-spiked with arsenic to be above or below the 10 ug/L WHO limit). Next they pump the wellhead, fill an urn, walk down the hall and back, and measure the distance walked. This is compared to the distance from their village home to their private well, to safe wells belonging to neighbors and to a community well. The students then use the Hach Arsenic test kit to test the arsenic levels in their water samples and learn if their well is safe to drink. Finally, given all this information students must determine if they should continue drinking from their well or switch to a new well, even if that means making multiple, long trips each day

  6. Active Mg Estimation Using Thermal Analysis: A Rapid Method to Control Nodularity in Ductile Cast Iron Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Ramon; Sertucha, Jon; Larrañaga, Pello; Lacaze, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Appropriate nodularity in ductile iron castings is strongly associated with the presence of high enough not combined Mg dissolved in the melt to cast. However, the residual Mg which is commonly measured for production control accounts for both dissolved Mg and Mg combined as oxides and sulfides. To account for the uncertainties associated with such a control, it is quite usual to over treat the melt with the risk of porosity appearance. A new methodology based on thermal analysis has been developed in the present work so as to estimate the amount of free Mg dissolved in the melt ready for pouring. A combination of Te mixture and a new "reactive mixture" composed of sulfur plus a commercial inoculant has been prepared for this purpose. This reactive mixture is able to transform the magnesium remaining dissolved in the melt to combined forms of this element. Experiments performed both during start of production (when Mg overtreatment is usual) and during normal mass production indicate that important variations of free Mg occur without relevant changes in residual Mg content as determined by spectrometry. The method developed in the present work has shown to be highly effective to detect those melt batches where active Mg content is not high enough for guaranteeing a correct nodularity of castings. Selection of proper active Mg thresholds and a correct inoculation process are critical to avoid "false"-negative results when using this new method.

  7. Material Characterization of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) Produced by a Sustainable Continuous Casting-Heat Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Anil; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    Selecting a suitable manufacturing process is one way of achieving sustainability of a product by diminishing energy consumption during its production cycle and improving material efficiency. The article attempts to explore the new processing technology for direct manufacturing of lightweight austempered ductile iron (ADI) casting in a permanent mold. The new processing technology is based on the innovative integrated approach toward casting and heat-treatment process. In this technology, the ductile iron samples obtained using the permanent mold are first austenized immediately after solidification process followed by austempering heat treatment in the fluidized bed and then air cooled at room temperature to obtain ADI material. The influence of austempering time on the microstructural characteristics, mechanical properties, and strain-hardening behavior of ADI was studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed to correlate the mechanical properties with microstructural characteristics. It was observed that the mechanical properties of resulting ADI samples were influenced by the microstructural transformations and varied retained austenite volume fractions obtained due to different austempering time. The results indicate that the strain-hardening behavior of the ADI material is influenced by the carbon content of retained austenite.

  8. High-Temperature Oxidation and Decarburization of 14.55 wt pct Cr-Cast Iron in Dry Air Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Lekatou, A.; Karantzalis, A. E.; Efremenko, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation and decarburization behavior of 14.55 wt pct Cr-cast iron at 1273 K to 1423 K (1000 °C to 1150 °C) in a dry air atmosphere was studied. A gravimetric investigation showed that intensive oxidation of cast iron takes place at temperatures above 1273 K (1000 °C). It is found that oxidizing heating is accompanied by decarburization, which manifests itself in secondary and eutectic carbide dissolution. The volume fraction of carbides decreases with temperature and holding duration increasing. Decarburization results in the formation of a decarburized layer up to 4 mm in depth. A carbide-free layer in depth up to 100 μm appears in the free surface after 6 to 8 hours holding at 1373 K to 1423 K (1100 °C to 1150 °C). Preliminary activation energy calculations suggested that the eutectic carbide dissolution at the depths of 50 to 400 μm is controlled by carbon diffusion in austenite. The dissolution of eutectic carbides involves a capillarity-induced mechanism, which consists of formation and growth of capillary cavities inside carbides.

  9. Abrasive resistance of metastable V-Cr-Mn-Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons using the factorial design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Shimizu, K.; Cheiliakh, A. P.; Pastukhova, T. V.; Chabak, Yu. G.; Kusumoto, K.

    2016-06-01

    Full factorial design was used to evaluate the two-body abrasive resistance of 3wt%C-4wt%Mn-1.5wt%Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons with varying vanadium (5.0wt%-10.0wt%) and chromium (up to 9.0wt%) contents. The alloys were quenched at 920°C. The regression equation of wear rate as a function of V and Cr contents was proposed. This regression equation shows that the wear rate decreases with increasing V content because of the growth of spheroidal VC carbide amount. Cr influences the overall response in a complex manner both by reducing the wear rate owing to eutectic carbides (M7C3) and by increasing the wear rate though stabilizing austenite to deformation-induced martensite transformation. This transformation is recognized as an important factor in increasing the abrasive response of the alloys. By analyzing the regression equation, the optimal content ranges are found to be 7.5wt%-10.0wt% for V and 2.5wt%-4.5wt% for Cr, which corresponds to the alloys containing 9vol%-15vol% spheroidal VC carbides, 8vol%-16vol% M7C3, and a metastable austenite/martensite matrix. The wear resistance is 1.9-2.3 times that of the traditional 12wt% V-13wt% Mn spheroidal carbide cast iron.

  10. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  11. 75 FR 70900 - Certain Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ..., 75 FR 54595 (September 8, 2010), and Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review: Heavy Iron..., 75 FR 67395 (November 2, 2010), and USITC Publication 4191 (October 2010) entitled Iron Construction... Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 23240 (May 3, 2010). As a result of its reviews, the...

  12. Application of cast iron-platinum keeper to a collapsible denture for a patient with constricted oral opening: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Toshio

    2003-07-01

    Insertion of a denture is especially difficult for patents with a constricted oral opening. This report describes the fabrication of a collapsible removable partial denture with a cast iron-platinum attachment for a partially edentulous woman with a constricted oral opening resulting from rheumatoid arthritis and a craniotomy for a subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:12869968

  13. Machinable, Thin-Walled, Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Production, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bates; Hanjun Li; Robin Griffin

    2003-12-08

    This report presents the results of research conducted to determine the effects of normal and abnormal processing and compositional variations on machinability (tool wear rate) of gray and ductile iron. The procedures developed allow precise tool wear measurements to be made and interpreted in terms of microstructures and compositions. Accurate data allows the most efficient ways for improving machinability to be determined without sacrificing properties of the irons.

  14. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  15. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: from macroscopic multiscale models to a 1D rheological description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-07-01

    One of the critical points of the thermomechanical fatigue design process is the correct description of the cyclic behavior of the material. This work focuses on the material of automotive brake discs, namely flake graphite cast iron. The specificity of this material is its asymmetric behavior under tensile and compressive loadings, which is due to the shape of graphite that acts as small cracks. Multiscale models inspired from the literature are first presented. They lead to a good description of the material behavior under cyclic loadings. An elastoviscoplastic constitutive model is then proposed in a one-dimensional setting in order to accurately describe cyclic tests from room temperature up to {600^{circ}{C}}.

  16. A New Direct-Pour In-Mold (DPI) Technology for Producing Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Castings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Hitchings; Jay R. Hitchings

    2007-07-20

    A new "Direct Pour In-Mold" (DPI) Magnesium treatment technology has been developed that can produce both Nodular and Compacted Graphite iron. The DPI technology converts the standard horizontal runner system into a vertical one, by placing a Magnesium Ferrosilicon treatment alloy and molten metal filter into a specially designed container. The DPI container is easily placed into either vertically or horizontally parted molds, and then a base metal can be poured directly into it. The metal is treated and filtered as it passes through, and then proceeds directly into a runner or casting cavity. Various sizes of containers provide all of the necessary components required to deliver a range of weights of treated and filtered metal at accurate and consistent flow rates. The DPI containers provide energy savings over competing techniques, increased mold yields, very high Magnesium recovery, zero Magnesium fume, and no post inoculation is required. By treating the metal just prior to it entering a casting cavity many other benefits and advantages are also realized.

  17. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  18. Advances in aluminum casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tiryakioglu, M.; Campbell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the improvements of aluminum casting quality and reliability through a better understanding of processes and process variables, and explores the latest innovations in casting-process design that allow increasing use of the castings to replace complex assemblies and heavy steel and cast-iron components in aerospace and automotive applications. Presented are 35 papers by international experts in the various aspects of the subject. The contents include: Semisolid casting; Computer-aided designing of molds and castings; Casting-process modeling; Aluminum-matrix composite castings; HIPing of castings; Progress in the US car project; Die casting and die design; and Solidification and properties.

  19. 75 FR 67395 - Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and China; Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... The Commission instituted these reviews on May 3, 2010 (75 FR 23295) and determined on August 6, 2010 to conduct expedited reviews of the countervailing duty and antidumping duty orders (75 FR 49945... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-249 and 731-TA-262, 263, and 265 (Third Review)] Iron...

  20. Residual Stress, Structure and Other Properties Formation by Combined Thermo-Hardening Processing of Surface Layer of Gray Cast Iron Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimyanov, Kh M.; Nikitin, Yu V.; Semenova, Yu S.; Eremina, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The proposed combined thermo-hardening processing of gray cast iron enables to control the surface layer structure and mechanical properties formation. The processing includes high-speed heating by low-temperature plasma source and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation. The algorithm of calculation the stress-strain state of a surface layer at combined processing of gray cast iron is developed. This algorithm is based on method of sections. The ultrasonic surface deformation contribution is determined during formation of residual stresses. It is established that the combination of the thermal and deformation effects on the material provides an additional increment of microhardness and increase of surface layer thickness. Experimental results shows that the features of structural and phase transformations in a surface layer are revealed without a surface melting by energy of low-temperature plasma. The top of a layer does not contain inclusions of graphite that testifies to change of structural transformations in conditions of combined processing.

  1. Mechanochemical reactions and strengthening in epoxy-cast aluminum iron-oxide mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, Louis, Jr.

    2007-12-01

    Epoxy-cast Al+Fe2O3 thermite composites are an example of a structural energetic material that can simultaneously release chemical energy while providing structural strength. The structural/mechanical response and chemical reaction behavior are closely interlinked through characteristics of deformation and intermixing of reactants. In this work, the structural and energetic response of composites made from stoichiometric mixtures of nano- and micro-scale aluminum and hematite (Fe2O3) powders dispersed in 47 to 78 vol.% epoxy was investigated by characterizing the mechanical behavior under high-strain rate and shock loading conditions. The main focus of the work was to understand the influence of microstructure on mechanical behavior in epoxy-cast Al+Fe2O3 materials when exposed to high stress, large strain, and high rate loading conditions. The material's Hugoniot at pressures up to approximately 20 GPa for an Al+Fe2O3+78 vol.% epoxy composite and up to approximately 8 GPa for Al+Fe2O3+60 vol.% epoxy composite has been determined. The results reveal an inert pressure-relative volume (P-V) and shock-particle velocity (US-UP) response in the range of the shock-conditions explored, with the Al+Fe2O3+60 vol.% epoxy composite showing a greater shock stiffness. The addition of solid particle inclusions alters the Hugoniot response as compared to pure epoxy behavior. This is attributed to possible induced bulk damage that changes the composite's response as impact stress increases. While the 78 vol.% epoxy composition shows a transition from "undamaged" to "damaged" behavior that approaches pure epoxy response, the 60 vol.% epoxy composition exhibits a gradual toughening behavior. Impact experiments have also been conducted for characterizing the high-strain rate deformation and fracture response obtained from instrumented reverse Taylor tests using high-speed camera and velocity interferometry. The results show that these composite materials exhibit viscoelastic

  2. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  3. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  4. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  5. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  6. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Power Consumption in Machining FCD 450 Cast Iron using Coated and Uncoated Irregular Milling Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad; Arsyad, Fitriyanti

    2016-02-01

    In this project, the effects of different cutting parameters on surface roughness and power consumption when machining FCD450 cast iron were studied using coated and uncoated irregular milling tool geometry of variable helix and pitch. Their responses on roughness and power consumption were evaluated based on the spindle speed, feed rate, and depth of cut, machining length and machining time. Results showed that except spindle speed and machining length, other parameters such as feed rate, axial and radial depth of cut and also machining time proportionate with surface roughness. The power consumption proportionately increase for all cutting parameters except feedrate. It is showed that the average decrement 27.92 percent for surface roughness and average decrement 9.32 percent for power consumption by using coated compared to uncoated tool. Optimum cutting parameters for both minimum surface roughness and power consumption can be determined. The coated tools performed better than uncoated milling tools for responses of surface roughness and power consumption to increase machining productivity and profit.

  7. Effect of tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron rolls laser alloyed with C-B-W-Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Sun, G. F.; Chen, K. K.; Tong, Y. Q.

    2014-08-01

    Laser alloyed layer with C-B-W-Cr powders on high-Ni-Cr infinite chilled cast iron roll was tempered at 500 °C for 60 mins and cooled to room temperature in the furnace. Optical scanning microscopy and X-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the microstructure and phases of the layer. A microhardness tester and wear tester were used to test the microhardness distribution, friction and wear behavior. Ferrite was formed in the tempered layer. Metastable carbides changed to stoichiometric carbides after tempering. FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the first primary peak was decreased by tempering. Microhardness decreased by 44%. Friction coefficient of the tempered layer exhibited gentle increase and a stable value of 0.6 was achieved for both the tempered layer and substrate. Relative wear resistance of the tempered layer was 1.11 times that of the tempered roll substrate. Mechanism of the effect of tempering on microstructure, FWHM, microhardness and wear properties were discussed.

  8. Effect of thermal fatigue on the wear resistance of graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chuanwei; Meng, Chao; Cong, Dalong

    2013-04-01

    Thermal fatigue and wear exist simultaneously during the service life of brake discs. Previous researchers only studied thermal fatigue resistance or abrasion resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI), rather than combining them together. In this paper, wear resistance after thermal fatigue of CGI was investigated basing on the principle of bionics, which was close to actual service condition of the brake discs. In the meanwhile, the effect of thermal fatigue on wear resistance was also discussed. Non-smooth bionic units were fabricated by laser cladding WC powder with different proportions (50 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 70 wt.%). Microstructure and microhardness of the units were investigated, and wear mass losses of the samples were also compared. The results indicate that thermal fatigue has a negative effect on the wear resistance. After the same thermal fatigue cycles times, the wear resistance of laser cladding WC samples is superior to that of laser remelting ones and their wear resistance enhances with the increase of WC content.

  9. Influence of Orientations of Bionic Unit Fabricated by Laser Remelting on Fatigue Wear Resistance of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Kai; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Hai-feng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue wear resistance improvements were researched by studying experimental samples with gray cast iron fabricated with bionic units in different orientations. Experimental samples were modified by laser surface remelting, including parallel, vertical, and gradient units to the wear direction. The remelting pool was then studied to determine the micro-hardness, microstructure, alteration of phase, and etc. Lab-control fatigue wear test method was applied with the treated and untreated samples tested under the laboratorial conditions. Wear resistance result was considered as the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) resistance and mechanisms of the modified samples were experimentally investigated and discussed. Results suggested that all treated samples demonstrated the beneficial effect on the RCF improvement due to lack of graphite and reinforcement of treated region. Results also indicated the sample with fastigiated units was more effective than that with vertical units or parallel units to the wear direction. Influence of the sample unit's angle which intensely depended on the conditions of actual application, however, was not identified.

  10. Effects of bionic units on the fatigue wear of gray cast iron surface with different shapes and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Lu, Shu-chao; Song, Xi-bin; Zhang, Haifeng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron (GCI), GCI samples were modified by a laser to imitate the unique structure of some soil animals alternating between soft and hard phases; the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation. Using the self-controlled fatigue wear test method, the fatigue wear behaviors of treated and untreated samples were investigated and compared experimentally. The results show that the bionic non-smooth surface obtains a beneficial effect on improving the fatigue wear resistance of a sample, and the fatigue wear resistance of the bionic sample assembled with reticulate units (60°+0°), whose mass loss was reduced by 62%, was superior to the others. Meanwhile, a finite element (FE) was used to simulate the compression and the distributions of strain and stress on the non-smooth surface was inferred. From these results, we understood that the functions of the bionic unit such as reducing strain and stress, and also obstructing the closure and propagation of cracks were the main reasons for improving the fatigue wear property of GCI.

  11. Effect of vanadium and chromium on the microstructural features of V-Cr-Mn-Ni spheroidal carbide cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, V. G.; Shimizu, K.; Cheiliakh, A. P.; Kozarevskaya, T. V.; Kusumoto, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the influence of vanadium (5.0wt%-10.0wt%) and chromium (0-9.0wt%) on the microstructure and hardness of Cr-V-Mn-Ni white cast irons with spheroidal vanadium carbides. The alloys' microstructural features are presented and discussed with regard to the distribution of phase elements. The structural constituents of the alloys are spheroidal VC, proeutectoid cementite, ledeburite eutectic, rosette-shaped carbide eutectic (based on M7C3), pearlite, martensite, and austenite. Their combinations and area fraction (AF) ratios are reported to be influenced by the alloys' chemical composition. Spheroidized VC particles are found to be sites for the nucleation of carbide eutectics. Cr and V are shown to substitute each other in the VC and M7C3 carbides, respectively. Chromium alloying leads to the formation of a eutectic (γ-Fe + M7C3), preventing the appearance of proeutectoid cementite in the structure. Vanadium and chromium are revealed to increase the total carbide fraction and the amount of austenite in the matrix. Cr is observed to play a key role in controlling the metallic matrix microstructure.

  12. Investigation of fracture mechanical behavior of nodular cast iron and welded joints with parent-material-like weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, W.; Pusch, G.

    1995-12-31

    The focus of the investigations was the determination of fracture mechanical characteristics and crack resistance curves of the J-Integral and CTOD concept by application of the partial unloading compliance technique and D.C. potential drop technique (four point bend) under static load. The results show a close correlation between crack initiation values as well as crack resistance curves and graphite morphology parameters determined by means of quantitative microstructural analysis where the influence of the matrix (distance of graphite particles) dominates the crack resistance and fracture performance of ferritic nodular cast iron under consideration of the notch effect of graphite particles. SEM in-situ tensile tests showed that due to a beneficial shielding effect of the strength overmatching parent-material-like weld metal (mis-match ratio M = 1.21), cracks positioned directly in the plane of the fusion line did not deviate into the weld metal in spite of its lower toughness compared to that of the parent material. They also showed an unsymmetrical formation of damage in front of the crack tip.

  13. Adenovirus, MS2 and PhiX174 interactions with drinking water biofilms developed on PVC, cement and cast iron.

    PubMed

    Helmi, K; Menard-Szczebara, F; Lénès, D; Jacob, P; Jossent, J; Barbot, C; Delabre, K; Arnal, C

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms colonizing pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems could provide habitat and shelter for pathogenic viruses present in the water phase. This study aims (i) to develop a method to detect viral particles present in a drinking water biofilm and (ii) to study viral interactions with drinking water biofilms. A pilot scale system was used to develop drinking water biofilms on 3 materials (7 cm(2) discs): PVC, cast iron and cement. Biofilms were inoculated with viral model including MS2, PhiX174 or adenovirus. Five techniques were tested to recover virus from biofilms. The most efficient uses beef extract and glycine at pH = 9. After sonication and centrifugation, the pH of the supernatant is neutralized prior to viral analysis. The calculated recovery rates varied from 29.3 to 74.6% depending on the virus (MS2 or PhiX174) and the material. Applying this protocol, the interactions of virus models (MS2 and adenovirus) with drinking water biofilms were compared. Our results show that adsorption of viruses to biofilms depends on their isoelectric points, the disc material and the hydrodynamic conditions. Applying hydrodynamic conditions similar to those existing in drinking water networks resulted in a viral adsorption corresponding to less than 1% of the initial viral load. PMID:20555217

  14. Thermal shock removal of defective glass-enamel coating from cast-iron products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleutdinov, A. D.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Mylnikova, T. S.; Luchnikov, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    A setup for light beam exposure has been developed. The setup was used to consider the technology of thermal shock destruction of the coating by pulsed-periodic exposure to powerful focused light from the xenon arc lamp DKsShRB-10000. It is shown that this type of exposure can effectively remove the glass-enamel coating from iron products. The optimal mode of setup operation to efficiently remove the defective glass-enamel coating is found: the diameter of the focused light beams is 2.5-3.5 cm; the lamp arc pulse current is 350-450 A; pulse duration is (0.5-1) s and pulse repetition frequency is (0.15-0.5) s-1.

  15. Effect of Mn, Si, and Cooling Rate on the Formation of Iron-Rich Intermetallics in 206 Al-Cu Cast Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Cao, X.; Chen, X.-G.

    2012-10-01

    The solidification structures of commercial 206 Al-Cu cast alloys with 0.15 pct Fe have been studied using thermal analysis (TA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The EBSD results have shown that there are two iron-rich intermetallics: Chinese script α-Fe and platelet-like β-Fe. The addition of either Mn or Si has helped to promote the formation of α-Fe and hinder the precipitate of β-Fe. The combined addition of both Mn and Si is even more effective than the individual addition of either Mn or Si. The full solidification sequence of the 206 cast alloy has been established. The volume percent and formation temperature increase for α-Fe but decrease for β-Fe with increasing cooling rate. The platelet β-Fe can be effectively suppressed in 206 cast alloys by controlling the alloy chemistry and cooling rate. A casting process map is proposed to correlate the Mn and Si contents with cooling rates for the 206 cast alloys.

  16. Effect of iron-intermetallics and porosity on tensile and impact properties of aluminum-silicon-copper and aluminum-silicon-magnesium cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheyuan

    Aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are an important class of materials that constitute the majority of aluminum cast parts produced, due to their superior properties and excellent casting characteristics. Within this family of alloys, Al-Si-Cu and Al-Si-Mg cast alloys are frequently employed in automotive applications. The commercially popular 319 and 356 alloys, representing these two alloy systems, were selected for study in the present work, with the aim of investigating the effect of iron intermetallics and porosity on the alloy performance. This was carried out through a study of the tensile and impact properties, these being two of the important mechanical properties used in design calculations. Iron, through the precipitation of second phase intermetallic constituents, in particular the platelike beta-Al5FeSi phase, is harmful to the alloy properties. Likewise, gas- or shrinkage porosity in castings is also detrimental to the mechanical properties. By determining the optimum alloying, melt processing and solidification parameters (viz., Fe content, Sr modification and cooling rate) required to minimize the harmful effects of porosity and iron intermetallics, and studying their role on the fracture behavior, the fracture mechanism in the alloys could be determined. Castings were prepared from both industrial and experimental 319.2, B319.2 and A356.2 alloy melts, containing Fe levels of 0.2--1.0 wt%. Sr-modified (˜200 ppm) melts were also prepared for each alloy Fe level. The end-chilled refractory mold used provided directional solidification and a range of cooling rates (or dendrite arm spacings, DAS) within the same casting. Tensile and impact test samples machined from specimen blanks sectioned from the castings at various heights above the chill end provided DASs of 23--85mum. All samples were T6-heat-treated before testing. Tests were carried out employing Instron Universal and Instrumented Charpy testing machines. Optical microscopy, image analysis, SEM

  17. Effect of bacterial communities on the formation of cast iron corrosion tubercles in reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-03-15

    To understand the role bacterial communities play in corrosion scale development, the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of corrosion scales in raw and disinfected reclaimed water were systematically investigated. Corrosion tubercles were found in raw reclaimed water while thin corrosion layers formed in disinfected reclaimed water. The corrosion tubercles, composed mainly of α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and CaCO3, consisted of an top surface; a shell containing more magnetite than other layers; a core in association with stalks produced by bacteria; and a corroded layer. The thin corrosion layers also had layered structures. These had a smooth top, a dense middle, and a corroded layer. They mostly consisted of the same main components as the tubercles in raw reclaimed water, but with different proportions. The profiles of the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, redox potential, and pH in the tubercles were different to those in the corrosion layers, which demonstrated that these parameters changed with a shift in the microbial processes in the tubercles. The bacterial communities in the tubercles were found to be dominated by Proteobacteria (56.7%), Bacteroidetes (10.0%), and Nitrospira (6.9%). The abundance of sequences affiliated to iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, mainly Geothrix) and iron-oxidizing bacteria (mainly Aquabacterium) was relatively high. The layered characteristics of the corrosion layers was due to the blocking of DO transfer by the development of the scales themselves. Bacterial communities could at least promote the layering process and formation of corrosion tubercles. Possible mechanisms might include: (1) bacterial communities mediated the pH and redox potential in the tubercles (which helped to form shell-like and core layers), (2) the metabolism of IRB and magnetic bacteria (Magnetospirillum) might contribute to the presence of Fe3O4 in the shell-like layer, while IRB contributed to green rust in the core layer, and (3) the diversity of

  18. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and wear performance of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast iron grinding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthi, M. K.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2013-12-01

    The phase transformation and grinding wear behavior of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast irons subjected to destabilization treatment followed by air cooling or deep cryogenic treatment were studied as a part of the development program of substitute alloys for existing costly wear resistant alloys. The microstructural evolution during heat treatment and the consequent improvement in grinding wear performance were evaluated with optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, bulk hardness, impact toughness and corrosion rate measurements, laboratory ball mill grinding wear test etc. The deep cryogenic treatment has a significant effect in minimizing the retained austenite content and converts it to martensite embedded with fine M7C3 alloy carbides. The cumulative wear losses in cryotreated alloys are lesser than those with conventionally destabilized alloys followed by air cooling both in wet and dry grinding conditions. The cryotreated Cr-Mn-Cu irons exhibit comparable wear performance to high chromium irons.

  19. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Casts in the urine; Fatty casts; Red blood cell casts; White blood cell casts ... The absence of cellular casts or presence of a few hyaline casts is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of ...

  20. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with advanced kidney disease and chronic kidney failure . White blood cell (WBC) casts are more common ... Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  1. Investigation of Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Characteristics for Cast Aluminum (AL319-T7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Luke W.

    In today's transient economy, the demand for new alternative technologies is increasing. Vehicle fuel economy has become the most important phrase in the automotive industry. The ability to achieve optimal fuel economy has many trade-offs. In terms of engine components, this trade-off comes in the form of component reliability. In the past, most engine components were constructed of cast iron. Currently many cast iron components have been replaced by aluminum components to reduce part weight. In parallel with the use of light weight components, higher thermal loadings have been applied to engine components due to the increasing use of fuel saving technologies. Current aluminum reliability concerns have led to a thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) investigation of the aluminum casting alloy, AL319-T7. This thesis attempts to model TMF behaviour for an AL319-T7 cylinder head using a combined hardening material model, in which the effects of creep and oxidation have been neglected.

  2. Effects of W on microstructure of as-cast 28 wt.%Cr–2.6 wt.%C–(0–10)wt.%W irons

    SciTech Connect

    Imurai, S.; Thanachayanont, C.; Pearce, J.T.H.; Tsuda, K.; Chairuangsri, T.

    2015-01-15

    Microstructures of as-cast 28 wt.%Cr–2.6 wt.%C irons containing (0–10)wt.%W with the Cr/C ratio about 10 were studied and related to their hardness. The experimental irons were cast into dry sand molds. Microstructural investigation was performed by light microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. It was found that the irons with 1 to 10 wt.%W addition was hypereutectic containing large primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, whereas the reference iron without W addition was hypoeutectic. The matrix in all irons was austenite, partly transformed to martensite during cooling. The volume fractions of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and the total carbides increased, but that of eutectic carbides decreased with increasing the W content of the irons. W addition promoted the formation of W-rich M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. At about 4 wt.%W, two eutectic carbides including M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 6}C were observed together with primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. At 10 wt.%W, multiple carbides including primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, fish-bone M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, and M{sub 6}C were observed. M{sub x}C where x = 3 or less has not been found due possibly to the high M/C ratio in the studied irons. W distribution to all carbides has been determined increasing from ca. 0.3 to 0.8 in mass fraction as the W content in the irons was increased. W addition led to an increase in Vickers macro-hardness of the irons up to 671 kgf/(mm){sup 2} (HV30/15) obtained from the iron with 10 wt.%W. The formation of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and aggregates of M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were the main reasons for hardness increase, indicating potentially improved wear performance of the as-cast irons with W addition. - Highlights: • W addition at 1 up to 10 wt.%W to Fe–28Cr–2.6C produced “hypereutectic” structure. • W addition promoted the formation of W-rich M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 6}C and M

  3. [Determination of Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, P, Si, Mo and Ti in high chromium cast iron by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Guo-Xin; Xu, Yu-Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Peng-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The high-chromium cast iron sample was microwave-assisted digested with aqueous regia in a closed vessel. Series standards were prepared with matching Fe matrix and adding Y as internal standard. Line intensities of the prepared standards and the digested sample solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified by the analysis of three national standard Materials GSBH 41018, GBW 01120 and GBW 01121, and the results were well agreed with the certification data. PMID:22097871

  4. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  5. The effects of novel surface treatments on the wear and fatigue properties of steel and chilled cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jason William

    Contact fatigue driven wear is a principal design concern for gear and camshaft engineering of power systems. To better understand how to engineer contact fatigue resistant surfaces, the effects of electroless nickel and hydrogenated diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings on the fatigue life at 108 cycles of SAE 52100 steel were studied using ultrasonic fatigue methods. The addition of DLC and electroless nickel coatings to SAE 52100 bearing steel had no effect on the fatigue life. Different inclusion types were found to affect the stress intensity value beyond just the inclusion size, as theorized by Murakami. The difference in stress intensity values necessary to propagate a crack for Ti (C,N) and alumina inclusions was due to the higher driving force for crack extension at the Ti (C,N) inclusions and was attributed to differences in the shape of the inclusion: rhombohedral for the Ti (C,N) versus spherical for the oxides. A correction factor was added to the Murakami equation to account for inclusion type. The wear properties of DLC coated SAE 52100 and chilled cast iron were studied using pin-on-disk tribometry and very high cycle ultrasonic tribometry. A wear model that includes sliding thermal effects as well as thermodynamics consistent with the wear mechanism for DLCs was developed based on empirical results from ultrasonic wear testing to 108 cycles. The model fit both ultrasonic and classic tribometer data for wear of DLCs. Finally, the wear properties of laser hardened steels - SAE 8620, 4140, and 52100 - were studied at high contact pressures and low numbers of cycles. A design of experiments was conducted to understand how the laser processing parameters of power, speed, and beam size, as well as carbon content of the steel, affected surface hardness. A hardness maximum was found at approximately 0.7 wt% carbon most likely resulting from increased amounts of retained austenite. The ratcheting contact fatigue model of Kapoor was found to be useful in

  6. Determination of vanadium in refractory metals, steel, cast iron, alloys and silicates by extraction of an NBPHA complex from a sulphuric-hydrofluoric acid medium.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M

    1970-07-01

    A method for determining up to 0.15% of vanadium in high-purity niobium and tantalum metals, cast iron, steel, non-ferrous alloys and silicates is described. The proposed method is based on the extraction of a red vanadium(V)-N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine complex into chloroform from a sulphuric-hydrofluoric acid medium containing excess of ammonium persulphate as oxidant. The molar absorptivity of the complex is 428 l.mole(-1).mm(-5) at 475 nm, the wavelength of maximum absorption. Interference from chromium(VI) and cerium(IV) is eliminated by reduction with iron(II). Common ions, including large amounts of titanium, zirconium, molybdenum and tungsten, do not interfere. PMID:18960775

  7. Cast iron promises.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    During the Victorian era, a fiercely competitive industry emerged to build and operate Britain's railways. Many of the design and construction skills required were still fairly rudimentary, and were typically developed through practical experience. The resulting mix of entrepreneurship and new technology reshaped the landscape, but often in ways which proved hazardous for passengers. Minor accidents were commonplace, and a number of major failures occurred, one such being the collapse of the Tay Bridge, in 1879. Events in the ten years prior to this disaster still have some resonance today. Ambitions to exploit new technology are not always matched by foresight in the planning, financing or management of projects. Contracts may be based on wrong assumptions, and prove difficult to enforce. Once a project has gathered momentum, those working on it may fear that any attempt to draw attention to risks or defects will be seen as disloyal. When work is completed, it cannot be assumed that formal inspections will reveal potential flaws, or that those using the technology will appreciate the need to follow the procedures laid down for them. Some possible parallels with recent experiences in NHS computing are noted. PMID:18005560

  8. Cast iron freezing mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillybeck, N. P.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This task focused on liquid phase sintering and infiltration studies of refractory metals and metal composites. Particular emphases was placed on those powered metal compacts which produce liquid alloys in sintering. For this class of materials, heating to a two phase region causes the constituent components to react, forming an alloy liquid which must wet the solid phase. Densification is initially driven by the free energy effects which cause rapid rearrangement. Further densification occurs by evaporation and condensation, surface diffusion, bulk flow, and volume diffusion.

  9. Attenuation of ambient dose equivalent from neutrons by thick concrete, cast iron and composite shields for high energy proton, 3He, 48Ca and 238U ions on Cu targets for shielding design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Ronningen, R. M.

    2011-02-01

    Data on neutron dose attenuation by thick concrete, cast iron, and cast iron plus concrete composite shields for heavy ions and protons having high energies (200-1000 MeV/u) are necessary for shielding designs of high-powered heavy ion accelerator facilities. Neutron production source terms, shield material attenuation lengths, and neutron dose rate reduction effectiveness of the bulk shielding in the angular range from 0° to 125° were determined by the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code (PHITS) for beams of 300 and 550 MeV/u 48Ca ions, 200 and 400 MeV/u 238U ions, 800 MeV/u 3He and 1 GeV protons. Calculated results of interaction lengths of concrete and cast iron were also compared with similar work performed by Agosteo et al., and to experimental and other calculated data on interaction lengths. The agreement can be regarded as acceptable.

  10. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  11. Effects of a Destabilization Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Behavior of High-Chromium White Cast Iron Investigated Using Different Characterization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasan, Hakan; Erturk, Fatih

    2013-11-01

    The hypoeutectic white cast iron was subjected to various destabilization heat treatment temperatures of 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K (900 °C, 1000 °C, and 1100 °C) for 2 hours. The as-cast and destabilized specimens were characterized by optical metallography, classical direct comparison, and the Rietveld method. The volume fractions of carbides were measured by optical metallography. Moreover, the volume fractions of retained austenite and martensite were measured by the classical direct comparison method. Despite the limitations of optical metallography and the classical direct comparison method, the Rietveld method was successively and accurately applied to determine the volume fractions of all phases. In addition, the Rietveld analysis yielded certain results, such as the crystallographic properties of the phases that can be used to explain the relationship between the microstructural parameters and the wear behavior. Abrasive wear tests with different sliding speeds were carried out on the as-cast and destabilized alloys to identify the effect of microstructural parameters on the wear behavior. The results indicated that the morphologies of secondary carbides, the crystallographic properties of the phases, and the proper combination of the amount of martensite, retained austenite, and carbides were the principle parameters that affect the hardness and wear behavior of the alloy.

  12. Cast iron (CI) based soft magnetic BMG Ci88.3Al2Ga1P4.35B4.35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. N.; Lee, H. J.; Jeong, Y. H.; Varga, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal stability, structure, and magnetic properties of bulk type Ci88.3Al2Ga1P4.35B4.35 alloy in ribbon form have been studied using differential thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Results reveal that crystallization peak temperature (Tx) and Curie temperature (Tc) of the as-cast alloy are respectively 513 and 370 °C. Crystallization of the specimen starts after annealing at 460 °C and α-Fe is precipitated out. Annealing at temperatures higher than 515 °C, produces apart from α-Fe, hard magnetic precipitants (Fe2B, Fe3B), which deteriorate the soft magnetic properties. Lowest coercive field - 9.8 A/m, highest saturation of induction - 1.55 Tesla and best losses - 0.42 W/kg (at 50 Hz and 0.4 kA/m) were obtained for as-cast specimen. Observed good soft magnetic properties of these low cost cast-iron based alloys suggest perspective applications of these soft magnetic alloys as an alternative to the conventional Fe-Si electrical steel and Mn-Zn ferrites.

  13. New aspects about reduced LCF-life time of spherical ductile cast iron due to dynamic strain aging at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri, Hayato; Wunderlich, Wilfried; Hayashi, Morihito

    2009-06-01

    Spherical ductile cast iron (FCD400) is widely used as container material in nuclear energy processing line due to its superior mechanical properties and low price. Fatigue properties in low cycle fatigue (LCF) can be described well by the Manson-Coffin-Basquin's rule. However, at intermediate temperature range between 453 and 723 K the elongation-temperature-diagram shows a significantly 20-10% reduced elongation and an increase in yield stress in tensile test experiments. These non-linear deviations and the phenomenon of less ductility at intermediate temperatures are known for a long time [1] [K. Chijiiwa, M. Hayashi, Mechanical properties of ductile cast iron at temperature in the region of room temperature to liquid, Imono 51 (7) (2004) 395-400]. But the following explanation is presented for the first time. In the same temperature range as the reduced fatigue life time dynamic strain ageing (DSA) also known as Portevin-le-Chartelier effect with the formation of visible serrations occurs. Both phenomena are explained by interaction effects between carbon diffusion and dislocation velocity which have at this temperature the same order of magnitude. However, this phenomenon shows interesting behavior at intermediate temperature range. During the low cycle fatigue test, DSA phenomenon disappeared, but mechanical properties show clear evidence of DSA phenomenon. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to study the correlation of DSA occurrence, LCF and mechanical properties.

  14. Laser treatment of dual matrix cast iron with presence of WC particles at the surface: Influence of self-annealing on stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.; Karatas, C.; Boran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Laser control melting of dual matrix cast iron surface is carried out. A carbon film containing 15% WC particles is formed at the surface prior to the laser treatment and the spiral tracks are adopted for laser scanning at the workpiece surface. Morphological, metallurgical, microhardness, and scratch resistance of the laser treated surface are examined using analytical tools. Temperature and stress fields in the laser irradiated region are predicted incorporating ABAQUS finite element code. Predictions of temperature and residual stress at the laser treated surface are validated with the thermocouple and the X-ray diffraction data. It is found that surface temperature and residual stress predictions agree well with their counterparts corresponding to thermocouple data and findings of X-ray diffraction technique. Laser treated surface is free from asperities including voids and micro-cracks despite the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients of WC and dual matrix cast iron. This behavior is attributed to the self-annealing effects of recently formed spiral tracks on the previously formed tracks during the laser treatment process; in which case, the self-annealing effect modifies the cooling rates and lowers thermal stress levels in the laser treated layer. Laser treated layer consists of a dense region composing of fine grains and WC particles, dendritic and featherlike structures below the dense layer, and the heat affected zone.

  15. The Structure and Bond Strength of Composite Carbide Coatings (WC-Co + Ni) Deposited on Ductile Cast Iron by Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the role of Ni particles in the WC-Co coating produced with the supersonic method on microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties in a system of type: WC-Co coating/ductile cast iron. The microstructure of the thermal-sprayed WC-Co + Ni coating was characterized by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas (EDS, XRD). The microstructure of the WC-Co + Ni coating consisted of large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine grains of WC embedded in cobalt matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. Moreover, the results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of (WC-Co + Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. It was found that the addition of Ni particles was significantly increase resistance to cracking and wear behavior in the studied system.

  16. Physico-chemical properties of quartz from industrial manufacturing and its cytotoxic effects on alveolar macrophages: The case of green sand mould casting for iron production.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzano, Elena; Tomatis, Maura; Turci, Francesco; Pardi, Luca A; Bronco, Simona; Fornaciai, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Muniz Miranda, Maurizio; Zoleo, Alfonso; Capacci, Fabio; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario; Romanelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-15

    Industrial processing of materials containing quartz induces physico-chemical modifications that contribute to the variability of quartz hazard in different plants. Here, modifications affecting a quartz-rich sand during cast iron production, have been investigated. Composition, morphology, presence of radicals associated to quartz and reactivity in free radical generation were studied on a raw sand and on a dust recovered after mould dismantling. Additionally, cytotoxicity of the processed dust and ROS and NO generation were evaluated on MH-S macrophages. Particle morphology and size were marginally affected by casting processing, which caused only a slight increase of the amount of respirable fraction. The raw sand was able to catalyze OH and CO2(-) generation in cell-free test, even if in a lesser extent than the reference quartz (Min-U-Sil), and shows hAl radicals, conventionally found in any quartz-bearing raw materials. Enrichment in iron and extensive coverage with amorphous carbon were observed during processing. They likely contributed, respectively, to increasing the ability of processed dust to release CO2- and to suppressing OH generation respect to the raw sand. Carbon coverage and repeated thermal treatments during industrial processing also caused annealing of radiogenic hAl defects. Finally, no cellular responses were observed with the respirable fraction of the processed powder. PMID:27015375

  17. Molecular characterization of natural biofilms from household taps with different materials: PVC, stainless steel, and cast iron in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Yu, Zhisheng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun

    2013-09-01

    Microorganism in drinking water distribution system may colonize in biofilms. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversities were analyzed in both water and biofilms grown on taps with three different materials (polyvinyl chloride (PVC), stainless steel, and cast iron) from a local drinking water distribution system. In total, five clone libraries (440 sequences) were obtained. The taxonomic composition of the microbial communities was found to be dominated by members of Proteobacteria (65.9-98.9 %), broadly distributed among the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Other bacterial groups included Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Moreover, a small proportion of unclassified bacteria (3.5-10.6 %) were also found. This investigation revealed that the bacterial communities in biofilms appeared much more diversified than expected and more care should be taken to the taps with high bacterial diversity. Also, regular monitor of outflow water would be useful as potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected. In addition, microbial richness and diversity in taps ranked in the order as: PVC < stainless steel < cast iron. All the results interpreted that PVC would be a potentially suitable material for use as tap component in drinking water distribution system. PMID:23143469

  18. An investigation into the suitability of some etching reagents to restoring obliterated stamped numbers on cast iron engine blocks of cars.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, Mohd Farizon; Mohamad Ghani, Nurul Izwani; Kuppuswamy, R

    2012-11-30

    Most of the automotive companies use cast iron for their engine blocks. Restoration of obliterated number on these iron surfaces by chemical etching is known to be quite difficult. Heating of the obliterated surface using oxyacetylene flame is an alternative recovery treatment suggested in literature and used in practice. However chemical etching has been established to be the most sensitive technique for detection of metal deformation present under stamped serial numbers. Hence, the current work investigated the suitability of some common etchants on cast iron surfaces with a view to determining the most suitable one for revealing the obliterated marks. The reagents tested were mostly copper containing Fry's reagent and its modifications. Two cast iron engine blocks (3.29%C and 3.1%C) of two cars--a Proton Saga and a Toyota--were utilized for the experiments. The engine blocks were cut into several small plates and each plate was stamped with some numerical characters at 8 kN load using Instron Table Mounted Universal Testing Machine. The depth of stamping impression varied between 0.2 mm and 0.3 mm. The stamped number was completely ground off manually using a metal file. The grounded surface was then polished smooth using emery papers and etched with a few selected reagents mostly by swabbing. Experimental results showed that a modified Fry's composition consisting of 4 5g CuCl(2), 100 mL HCl, and 180 mL H(2)O restored the number with better contrast at a reasonably shorter time. The above reagent is a slightly modified form of one of the Fry's original compositions--45 g CuCl(2), 180 mL HCl, and 100 mL H(2)O. Quite importantly the proposed reagent restored the original stamped numbers of both Proton and Toyota cars and also a Mitsubishi car that had been obliterated. The most widely used Fry's composition (90 g CuCl(2), 120 mL HCl and 100 mL H(2)O), although recovered the obliterated number, did not cause the desired contrast. PMID:22955030

  19. Effects of Mo on microstructure of as-cast 28 wt.% Cr–2.6 wt.% C–(0–10) wt.% Mo irons

    SciTech Connect

    Imurai, S.; Thanachayanont, C.; Pearce, J.T.H.; Tsuda, K.; Chairuangsri, T.

    2014-04-01

    Microstructures of as-cast 28 wt.% Cr–2.6 wt.% C irons containing (0–10) wt.% Mo with the Cr/C ratio of about 10 were studied and related to hardness. The experimental irons were cast into dry sand molds. Microstructural investigation was performed by light microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. It was found that the iron with about 10 wt.% Mo was eutectic/peritectic, whereas the others with less Mo content were hypoeutectic. The matrix in all irons was austenite, partly transformed to martensite during cooling. Mo addition promoted the formation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C. At 1 wt.% Mo, multiple eutectic carbides including M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C were observed. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} existed as a transition zone between eutectic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 6}C, indicating a carbide transition as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}(M{sub 2.3}C) → M{sub 23}C{sub 6}(M{sub 3.8}C) → M{sub 6}C. At 6 wt.% Mo, multiple eutectic carbides including M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were observed together with fine cellular/lamellar M{sub 6}C aggregates. In the iron with 10 wt.% Mo, only eutectic/peritectic M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C were found without M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. Mo distribution to all carbides has been determined to be increased from ca. 0.4 to 0.7 in mass fraction as the Mo content in the irons was increased. On the other hand, Cr distribution to all carbides is quite constant as ca. 0.6 in mass fraction. Mo addition increased Vickers macro-hardness of the irons from 495 up to 674 HV{sub 30}. High Mo content as solid-solution in the matrix and the formation of M{sub 6}C or M{sub 23}C{sub 6} aggregates were the main reasons for hardness increase, indicating potentially improved wear performance of the irons with Mo addition. - Highlights: • Mo promoted the formation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 6}C in the irons with Cr/C ratio of about 10

  20. Damage mechanisms in a cast ductile iron and a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/Al composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K.; Corum, J.M.; Hansen, J.G.R.; Cornie, J.A.

    1998-11-01

    Recently, pressure infiltration was used to fabricate alumina particulate (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p})-reinforced Al matrix composites, and a program is in progress to demonstrate the suitability of this material for use in automobile parts with the goal of reducing the weight and increasing the vehicle performance. Mechanical behavior and damage mechanisms of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate-reinforced Al matrix composite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/Al) prepared by pressure infiltration are investigated and compared with those of a cast ductile iron. In addition to low cost and reduced weight, the composite has a Young`s modulus comparable to the ductile iron, However, its fracture toughness is lower than that of the ductile iron. Interface debonding between the graphite and ferrite is responsible for the crack initiation behavior of the ductile iron. The crack in the ductile iron is arrested by the ductile ferrite phase surrounding the graphite, leading to high fracture toughness. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/Al composite, the dominating crack initiation mode is particulate cracking. Interface debonding and zigzag cracking of particulates are additional fracture modes. The high content of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and the high thermal and elastic incompatibilities between the Al matrix and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates result in brittle fracture and low fracture toughness for the composite. Possible ways to increase the fracture toughness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/Al composite material are also outlined.

  1. Arsenic Accumulation and Release Studies Using a Cast Iron Pipe Section from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tendency of iron solid surfaces to adsorb arsenic and other ions is well known and has become the basis for several drinking water treatment approaches that remove these contaminants. It is reasonable to assume that iron-based solids, such as corrosion deposits present in dri...

  2. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  3. J/sub Ic/ fracture toughness of ferritic DCI (ductile cast iron) alloys: A comparison of two versions of ASTM E 813

    SciTech Connect

    Salzbrenner, R.

    1989-05-01

    The fracture toughness of several ductile cast iron (DCI) alloys has been calculated according to two versions of the ASTM Standard covering the determination of J/sub Ic/. The original version (ASTM E 813-81) had previously been used to establish the relationship between ferritic DCI alloys and the graphite nodule spacing. The J/sub Ic/ values were recalculated by the methods of the revised version of the ASTM Standard (ASME 813-87), and were found to be 5 to 8% higher than those determined by the original standard. A linear regression analysis was used to reaffirm that the fracture toughness is directly related to the graphite nodule size or spacing. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Die Soldering in Aluminium Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Kenik, E.A.; Viswanathan, S.

    2000-03-15

    Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs. conditions, an aluminum-rich soldering layer may also form over the intermetallic layer. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted on the nature of these intermetallics, little is known about the conditions under which soldering occurs.

  5. A process model for the microstructure evolution in ductile cast iron. Part 2: Applications of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Gundersen, O.; Grong, O.; Skaland, T.

    1999-04-01

    In the present investigation, the process model developed in Part 1 has been implemented in a dedicated numerical code to reveal the evolution of the coupled thermal and microstructural fields during directional solidification of ductile iron. In a calibrated form, the model predicts adequately both the variation in the graphite nodule count and the resulting microstructural profiles (i.e., graphite, iron carbide, ferrite, and pearlite) in the length direction of the bar. At the same time, the model has the required flexibility to serve as a research tool and predict behavior under conditions that have not yet been explored experimentally. In this article, the aptness of the model to alloy design and optimization of melt treatment practice for ductile iron is illustrated in different case studies and numerical examples.

  6. Influence of Annealing Heat Treatment and Cr, Mg, and Ti Alloying on the Mechanical Properties of High-Silicon Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, D. B. V.; Rossino, L. S.; Malafaia, A. M. S.; Angeloni, M.; Maluf, O.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of annealing on the mechanical properties of high-silicon cast iron for three alloys with distinct chromium levels was investigated. Each alloy was melted either with or without the addition of Ti and Mg. These changes in the chemical composition and heat treatment aimed to improve the material's mechanical properties by inhibiting the formation of large columnar crystals, netlike laminae, precipitation of coarse packs of graphite, changing the length and morphology of graphite, and rounding the extremities of the flakes to minimize the stress concentration. For alloys with 0.07 wt.% Cr, the annealing reduced the impact resistance and tensile strength due to an enhanced precipitation of refined carbides and the formation of interdendritic complex nets. Annealing the alloys containing Ti and Mg led to a decrease in the mechanical strength and an increase in the toughness. Alloys containing approximately 2 wt.% Cr achieved better mechanical properties as compared to the original alloy. However, with the addition of Ti and Mg to alloys containing 2% Cr, the chromium carbide formation was inhibited, impairing the mechanical properties. In the third alloy, with 3.5 wt.% of Cr additions, the mechanical strength improved. The annealing promoted a decrease in both hardness and amount of iron and silicon complex carbides. However, it led to a chromium carbide formation, which influenced the mechanical characteristics of the matrix of the studied material.

  7. 78 FR 72639 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China, 68 FR 16765 (April 7, 2003). \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 78 FR 39256 (July 1, 2013). As explained in the memorandum from the...: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY:...

  8. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability of iron corrosion products and the bacterial composition of biofilm in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could have great impact on the water safety at the consumer ends. In this work, pipe loops were setup to investigate the transformation characteristics ...

  9. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ failure, coma, convulsions, and death. Child-proof packaging and warning labels on iron supplements have greatly ... levodopa that the body absorbs, making it less effective. Levodopa, found in Sinemet® and Stalevo®, is used ...

  11. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  12. Mechanical evaluation of a soft cast material.

    PubMed

    Zmurko, M G; Belkoff, S M; Herzenberg, J E

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the structural and material properties of a new semi-rigid material, Scotchcast SoftCast (SCS), were compared to the properties of two rigid materials, plaster of paris (POP) and Scotchcast Plus (SCP). Cylinders and flat beams made from 4, 6, 8, and 10 layers of each casting material were tested in three-point bending and diametrical compression. Initial stiffness and yield force values of SCS casts were significantly lower than for casts of SCP and POP made of the same number of layers. Casts made from SCS may be indicated for non-rigid applications, but not where rigid immobilization is required. PMID:9263288

  13. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  14. Solid-State Transformation of Iron-Rich Intermetallic Phases in Al-Cu 206 Cast Alloys During Solution Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Cao, X.; Chen, X.-G.

    2013-08-01

    The solid-state transformation of the iron-rich intermetallic phases in Al-Cu 206 cast alloys during the solution heat treatment was studied by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). At a normal solution treatment temperature of 793 K (520 °C), no visible variation is observed for the β-Fe phase solidified from the Al alloy melt. With increasing soaking time, however, the Chinese script α-Fe becomes unstable and progressively transforms into platelet β-Fe, termed as solid-state-transformed (STed) β-Fe to distinguish it from the β-Fe directly solidified from the Al alloy melt. The STed β-Fe preferentially nucleates on the α-Fe and then grows from the α-Fe/Al interface into α-Fe and/or Al matrix with a much higher growth rate in the α-Fe. The incomplete solid-state transformation from α-Fe into STed β-Fe leads to the fragmentation of the α-Fe. The formation of the STed β-Fe with increasing size and volume fraction after longer soaking time can deteriorate the tensile properties.

  15. Effect of powder reactivity on fabrication and properties of NiAl/Al2O3 composite coated on cast iron using spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyhaghi, Maryam; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Kashefi, Mehrdad; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Jonsson, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Powder mixtures of Ni, NiO and Al are ball milled for 1 and 10 h. X-ray diffractometry and differential thermal analysis show that while ball milling for 1 h produced mechanically activated powder; 10 h ball milling produced NiAl and Al2O3 phases. Dense NiAl/Al2O3 composite coatings are formed on gray cast iron substrate by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The effect of powder reactivity on microstructure, hardness and scratch hardness of NiAl/Al2O3 coatings after SPS is discussed. Results show that in the coating sample made of mechanically activated powder in situ synthesis of NiAl/Al2O3 composite coating is fulfilled and a thicker well-formed diffusion bond layer at the interface between coating and substrate is observed. The diffusion of elements across the bond layers and phase evolution in the bond layers were investigated. No pores or cracks were observed at the interface between coating layer and substrate in any of samples. Higher Vickers hardness and scratch hardness values in coating made of 10 h ball milled powder than in coating fabricated from 1 h ball milled powder are attributed to better dispersion of Al2O3 reinforcement particles in NiAl matrix and nano-crystalline structure of NiAl matrix. Scratched surface of coatings did not reveal any cracking or spallation at coating-substrate interface indicating their good adherence at test conditions.

  16. A New Method For Advanced Virtual Design Of Stamping Tools For Automotive Industry: Application To Nodular Cast Iron EN-GJS-600-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Slima, Khalil; Penazzi, Luc; Mabru, Catherine; Ronde-Oustau, François; Rezaï-Aria, Farhad

    2011-05-01

    This contribution presents an approach combining the stamping numerical processing simulations and structure analysis in order to improve the design for optimizing the tool fatigue life. The method consists in simulating the stamping process via AutoForm® (or any FEM Code) by considering the tool as a perfect rigid body. The estimated contact pressure is then used as boundary condition for FEM structure loading analysis. The result of this analysis is used for life prediction of the tool using S-N fatigue curve. If the prescribed tool life requirements are not satisfied, then the critical region of the tool is redesigned and the whole simulation procedures are reactivated. This optimization method is applied for a cast iron EN-GJS-600-3 as candidate stamping tool materiel. The room temperature fatigue S-N curves of this alloy are established in laboratory under uniaxial push/pull cyclic experiments on cylindrical specimens under a load ratio of R (σmin/σmax) = -2.

  17. Effect of Destabilization Heat Treatments on the Microstructure of High-Chromium Cast Iron: A Microscopy Examination Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karantzalis, A. E.; Lekatou, A.; Diavati, E.

    2009-11-01

    A 18.22 wt.% Cr white iron has been subjected to various destabilization heat treatments. Destabilization at 800 °C caused gradual precipitation of M23C6 secondary carbide particles with time leading to a gradual increase in the bulk hardness. At 900, 1000, and 1100 °C, an initial sharp increase in bulk hardness with time occurred, reaching a plateau that was followed by a slightly decreasing trend. The combination of martensite formed, stoichiometry, and morphology of the secondary carbides present (mostly M7C3) are responsible for the obtained values of hardness. At 1100 °C, severe dissolution of the secondary carbides and consequent stabilization of the austenitic phase took place. Maximum hardness values were obtained for destabilization at 1000 °C. The correlation between bulk hardness and microstructural features was elaborated.

  18. Effects of operational parameters and common ions on the reduction of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by scrap copper-modified cast iron.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jin-Hong; Wang, Hong-Wu

    2015-07-01

    Scrap Cu-modified cast iron (CMCI) is a potent material for the reduction of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by a surface-mediated reaction. However, the effects of operational parameters and common ions on its reduction and final rate are unknown. Results show that the 2,4-DNT reduction was significantly affected by Cu:Fe mass ratio and the optimum m(Cu:Fe) was 0.25%. The slight pH-dependent trend of 2,4-DNT reduction by CMCI was observed at pH 3 to 11, and the maximum end product, 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), was generated at pH 7. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water reduced the 2,4-DNT degradation and the formation of 2,4-DAT. CMCI effectively treated high concentrations of 2,4-DNT (60 to 150 mg L(-1)). In addition, varying the concentration of (NH4)2SO4 from 0.001 to 0.1 mol L(-1) improved the efficiency of the reduction process. The green rust-like corrosion products (GR-SO4 (2-)) were also effective for 2,4-DNT reduction, in which Na2CO3 (0.01 to 0.2 mol L(-1)) significantly inhibited this reduction. The repeated-use efficiency of CMCI was also inhibited. Moreover, 2,4-DNT and its products, such as 4A2NT, 2A4NT, and 2,4-DAT, produced mass imbalance (<35%). Hydrolysis of Fe(3+) and CO3 (2-) leading to the generation of Fe(OH)3 and conversion to FeOOH that precipitated on the surface and strongly adsorbed the products of reduction caused the inhibition of CO3 (2-). The 2,4-DNT reduction by CMCI could be described by pseudo-first-order kinetics. The operational conditions and common ions affected the 2,4-DNT reduction and its products by enhancing the corrosion of iron or accumulating a passive oxide film on the reactivity sites. PMID:25663339

  19. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems. PMID:22367933

  20. (Continuous casting 1985)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, R.A.

    1985-06-12

    The report covers the Continuous Casting '85 Conference including informal discussions with conference attendees. In general, the papers presented at the conference concerned an overview of continuous steel casting worldwide, state-of-the-art aspects of steel continuous casting technology including caster startup problems, modifications, control system strategies, energy use profiles, quality control aspects, steel chemistry control, refractories, operational aspects of continuous casters, etc. No papers were presented in the development of thin section or thin strip casting of steel. Informal discussions were held with several conference attendees including (1) Bernard Trentini, Executive Director of the Association Technique De La Siderurgie Francaise in Paris, France (similar to the American Iron and Steel Institute); (2) Dr. Wolfgang Reichelt and Dr. Peter Voss-Spilker both of Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik -a continuous casting and other steel making machine builder in-lieu of meeting at their plant in Duisburg, FRG on May 31; (3) Ewan C. Hewitt of Devote McKee Corp., Sheffield, England; (4) Wilfried Heinemann, head of R D Dept. at Concast Standard AG in Zurich, Switzerland; and (5) Hideo Ueno, engineer of melting section, Mitsubishi Steel Mfg. Co. Ltd, Tokyo Japan. A visit was made to the Teesside Laboratories of British Steel Corp. for discussions of their thin section casting research program in particular and R D program in general.

  1. Multi-surface topography targeted plateau honing for the processing of cylinder liner surfaces of automotive engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, K. Deepak; Ramamoorthy, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cylinder bores of automotive engines are 'engineered' surfaces that are processed using multi-stage honing process to generate multiple layers of micro geometry for meeting the different functional requirements of the piston assembly system. The final processed surfaces should comply with several surface topographic specifications that are relevant for the good tribological performance of the engine. Selection of the process parameters in three stages of honing to obtain multiple surface topographic characteristics simultaneously within the specification tolerance is an important module of the process planning and is often posed as a challenging task for the process engineers. This paper presents a strategy by combining the robust process design and gray-relational analysis to evolve the operating levels of honing process parameters in rough, finish and plateau honing stages targeting to meet multiple surface topographic specifications on the final running surface of the cylinder bores. Honing experiments were conducted in three stages namely rough, finish and plateau honing on cast iron cylinder liners by varying four honing process parameters such as rotational speed, oscillatory speed, pressure and honing time. Abbott-Firestone curve based functional parameters (Rk, Rpk, Rvk, Mr1 and Mr2) coupled with mean roughness depth (Rz, DIN/ISO) and honing angle were measured and identified as the surface quality performance targets to be achieved. The experimental results have shown that the proposed approach is effective to generate cylinder liner surface that would simultaneously meet the explicit surface topographic specifications currently practiced by the industry.

  2. Tribological evaluation of piston skirt/cylinder liner contact interfaces under boundary lubrication conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Demas, N. G.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-01

    The friction and wear between the piston and cylinder liner significantly affects the performance of internal combustion engines. In this paper, segments from a commercial piston/cylinder system were tribologically tested using reciprocating motion. The tribological contact consisted of aluminium alloy piston segments, either uncoated, coated with a graphite/resin coating, or an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : H) coating, in contact with gray cast iron liner segments. Tests were conducted in commercial synthetic motor oils and base stocks at temperatures up to 120 C with a 2 cm stroke length at reciprocating speeds up to 0.15 m s{sup -1}. The friction dependence of these piston skirt and cylinder liner materials was studied as a function of load, sliding speed and temperature. Specifically, an increase in the sliding speed led to a decrease in the friction coefficient below approximately 70 C, while above this temperature, an increase in sliding speed led to an increase in the friction coefficient. The presence of a coating played an important role. It was found that the graphite/resin coating wore quickly, preventing the formation of a beneficial tribochemical film, while the a-C : H coating exhibited a low friction coefficient and provided significant improvement over the uncoated samples. The effect of additives in the oils was also studied. The tribological behaviour of the interface was explained based on viscosity effects and subsequent changes in the lubrication regime, formation of chemical and tribochemical films.

  3. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  4. 9. DETAIL OF UNITEDTOD TWINTANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING HIGHPRESSURE CYLINDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF UNITED-TOD TWIN-TANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING HIGH-PRESSURE CYLINDER AND EXTENSION OF HOUSING. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  5. POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM ELECTRIC FURNACE INTO BULL LADLE AFTER MAGNESIUM HAD BEEN ADDED TO GENERATE DUCTILE IRON WHEN IT COOLS IN THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  7. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  8. Application of the Billet Casting Method to Determine the Onset of Incipient Melting of 319 Al Alloy Engine Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, A.; Ravindran, C.; MacKay, R.

    2015-06-01

    The increased use of Al for automotive applications has resulted from the need to improve vehicle fuel efficiency. Aluminum alloy engine blocks fulfil the need of lightweighting. However, there are many challenges associated with thermo-mechanical mismatch between Al and the gray cast iron cylinder liners, which result in large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores. This requires improced mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. In this study, replicating billet castings were used to simulate the engine block solution heat treatment process and determine the onset of incipient melting. Microstructural changes during heat treatment were assessed with SEM and EDX, while thermal analysis was carried out using differential scanning calorimetry. The results suggest that solution heat treatment at 500 °C was effective in dissolving secondary phase particles, while solutionizing at 515 or 530 °C caused incipient melting of Al2Cu and Al5Mg8Cu2Si6. Incipient melting caused the formation ultra-fine eutectic clusters consisting of Al, Al2Cu, and Al5Mg8Cu2Si6 on quenching. In addition, DSC analysis found that incipient melting initiated at 507 °C for all billets, although the quantity of local melting reduced with microstructural refinement as evidenced by smaller endothermic peaks and energy absorption. The results from this study will assist in improving engine block casting integrity and process efficiency.

  9. Cylinder Test Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

  10. Standard specification for castings of iron-chromium-nickel-molybdenum corrosion-resistant, duplex (austenitic/ferritic) for general application. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.18 on Castings. Current edition approved Nov. 10, 1997 and published August 1998. Originally published as A 890-88. Last previous edition was A 890/A 890M-94a.

  11. AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS THEY MOVE IN BINS ALONG TRACKS IN THE OVEN BOTTOM IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS TRANSFORMS BRITTLE WHITE IRON CASTINGS INTO SOFTER, STRONGER MALLEABLE IRON. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Acoustic resonances in cylinder bundles oscillating in a compressibile fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-12-01

    This paper deals with an analytical study on acoustic resonances of elastic oscillations of a group of parallel, circular, thin cylinders in an unbounded volume of barotropic, compressible, inviscid fluid. The perturbed motion of the fluid is assumed due entirely to the flexural oscillations of the cylinders. The motion of the fluid disturbances is first formulated in a three-dimensional wave form and then casted into a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation for the harmonic motion in time and in axial space. The acoustic motion in the fluid and the elastic motion in the cylinders are solved simultaneously. Acoustic resonances were approximately determined from the secular (eigenvalue) equation by the method of successive iteration with the use of digital computers for a given set of the fluid properties and the cylinders' geometry and properties. Effects of the flexural wavenumber and the configuration of and the spacing between the cylinders on the acoustic resonances were thoroughly investigated.

  13. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  14. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  15. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  16. Delamination of Composite Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Peter; Carlsson, Leif A.

    The delamination resistance of filament wound glass/epoxy cylinders has been characterized for a range of winding angles and fracture mode ratios using beam fracture specimens. The results reveal that the delamination fracture resistance increases with increasing winding angle and mode II (shear) fraction (GΠ/G). It was also found that interlaced fiber bundles in the filament wound cylinder wall acted as effective crack arresters in mode I loading. To examine the sensitivity of delamina-tion damage on the strength of the cylinders, external pressure tests were performed on filament-wound glass/epoxy composite cylinders with artificial defects and impact damage. The results revealed that the cylinder strength was insensitive to the presence of single delaminations but impact damage caused reductions in failure pressure. The insensitivity of the failure pressure to a single delamination is attributed to the absence of buckling of the delaminated sublaminates before the cylinder wall collapsed. The impacted cylinders contained multiple delaminations, which caused local reduction in the compressive load capability and reduction in failure pressure. The response of glass/epoxy cylinders was compared to impacted carbon reinforced cylinders. Carbon/epoxy is more sensitive to damage but retains higher implosion resistance while carbon/PEEK shows the opposite trend.

  17. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Piwonka, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    This report details results of a 30-month program to develop methods of making clean ferrous castings, i.e., castings free of inclusions and surface defects. The program was divided into 3 tasks: techniques for producing clean steel castings, electromagnetic removal of inclusions from ferrous melts, and study of causes of metal penetration in sand molds in cast iron.

  18. Properties of electroslag castings. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1985-08-01

    The quality, response to heat treatment, and mechanical properties of electroslag-cast step blocks from Cameron Iron Works and from Selectrotech, Inc., are described. The mechanical properties include Charpy impact, tensile, and creep. Properties of the electroslag castings were compared to determine the differences between casters, between wrought and electroslag cast properties, and between sand and electroslag castings. Results are presented to show that the electroslag casting process has a potential for producing properties similar to those of wrought material for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and similar to those of sand-cast material for type 316 stainless steel. 5 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS FROM CUPOLA TO IRON TREATMENT AREAS BEFORE BEING TRANSFERRED TO PIPE CASTING MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Tests of Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1924-01-01

    Tests were made in the no. 1 wind tunnel at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the air forces acting on rotating cylinders with axes perpendicular to the direction of motion. One cylinder had a circular cross-section, the other that of a greek cross.

  1. A Sequence of Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erica

    2006-01-01

    Hoping to develop in her students an understanding of mathematics as a way of thinking more than a way of doing, the author of this article describes how her students worked on a spatial reasoning problem stemming from an iteratively constructed sequence of cylinders. She presents an activity of making cylinders out of paper models, and for every…

  2. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  3. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  4. Effect of trace elements vanadium and nickel on iron intermetallic phases formation and distribution in DC cast 5xxx series aluminum ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaofeng

    AA5657 alloy is one of the important members of 5xxx-series alloys. It has application in many fields as packing, electricity, architectural, and printing. These applications require high quality surface finishing, and the alloy ingots require homogeneous microstructure. In the industry of DC (direct-chill) casting of 1xxx and 5xxx-series aluminium ingots, there exist different cooling rates from the casting surface to the ingot center. Thus, different Fe intermetallic phases such as AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and Al3Fe can form preferentially in different positions of the ingot. The Fe intermetallic phase transition in DC casting ingot may cause microstructure inhomogeneities, which in turn cause the so called fir-tree zones (FTZs) in the ingots as well as streaks and bands on the Al sheets. Nowadays, with the increase of impurity in aluminium smelting raw materials (coke, alumina, etc.), the levels of trace elements present in the primary metal is gradually increasing. The impact of this increase on the aluminium transformation process and the final products is uncertain. Thus, there is a clear need to better understand these impacts, which will allow identifying ways to mitigate the negative impacts. The study presented in this thesis was performed on AA5657 alloys to study the effect of trace elements V and Ni on Fe intermetallic phases formation and distribution. A slice of AA1050 alloy ingot with visible FTZs was also studied to characterize the Fe intermetallic phases transition across the FTZs. A DC simulator was built in the lab, which can reproduce the solidification conditions in the sub-surface regions of industry ingots. The methods for the characterization of Fe intermetallic particles were developed in this research. AlmFe, Al6Fe, alpha-AlFeSi and alpha-Al3Fe intermetallic phases were successfully identified by using Deep-etching method, EDS and EBSD technique in combination. Quantitative analysis of the Fe intermetallic particles was carried out by

  5. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to better understand landing-gear noise sources, we have been examining a simplified configuration that still maintains some of the salient features of landing-gear flow fields. In particular, tandem cylinders have been studied because they model a variety of component level interactions. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders spatially separated in the streamwise direction by 3.7 diameters. Experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have provided steady surface pressures, detailed off-surface measurements of the flow field using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), hot-wire measurements in the wake of the rear cylinder, unsteady surface pressure data, and the radiated noise. The experiments were conducted at a Reynolds number of 166 105 based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent shedding process and simulate the effects of a high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The current calculations further explore the influence of the grid resolution and spanwise extent on the flow and associated radiated noise. Extensive comparisons with the experimental data are used to assess the ability of the computations to simulate the details of the flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuations on the upstream cylinder, caused by vortex shedding, are smaller than those generated on the downstream cylinder by wake interaction. Consequently, the downstream cylinder dominates the noise radiation, producing an overall directivity pattern that is similar to that of an isolated cylinder. Only calculations based on the full length of the model span were able to

  6. Fiber Tracking Cylinder Nesting

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1999-03-30

    The fiber tracker consists of 8 concentric carbon fiber cylinders of varying diameters, from 399mm to 1032.2mm and two different lengths. 1.66 and 2.52 meters. Each completed cylinder is covered over the entire o.d. with scintillating fiber ribbons with a connector on each ribbon. These ribbons are axial (parallel to the beam line) at one end and stereo (at 3 deg. to the beam line) at the other. The ribbon connectors have dowel pins which are used to match with the connectors on the wave guide ribbons. These dowel pins are also used during the nesting operation, locating and positioning measurements. The nesting operation is the insertion of one cylinder into another, aligning them with one another and fastening them together into a homogeneous assembly. For ease of assembly. the nesting operation is accomplished working from largest diameter to smallest. Although the completed assembly of all 8 cylinders glued and bolted together is very stiff. individual cylinders are relatively flexible. Therefore. during this operation, No.8 must be supported in a manner which maintains its integrity and yet allows the insertion of No.7. This is accomplished by essentially building a set of dummy end plates which replicate a No.9 cylinder. These end plates are mounted on a wheeled cart that becomes the nesting cart. Provisions for a protective cover fastened to these rings has been made and will be incorporated in finished product. These covers can be easily removed for access to No.8 and/or the connection of No.8 to No.9. Another wheeled cart, transfer cart, is used to push a completed cylinder into the cylinder(s) already mounted in the nesting cart.

  7. Casting methods

    DOEpatents

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  8. Relativistic Bessel cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    A set of cylindrical solutions to Einstein's field equations for power law densities is described. The solutions have a Bessel function contribution to the metric. For matter cylinders regular on axis, the first two solutions are the constant density Gott-Hiscock string and a cylinder with a metric Airy function. All members of this family have the Vilenkin limit to their mass per length. Some examples of Bessel shells and Bessel motion are given.

  9. Effect of Rotational Speeds on the Cast Tube During Vertical Centrifugal Casting Process on Appearance, Microstructure, and Hardness Behavior for Al-2Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Tattimani, Mahantesh S.; Rao, Shrikantha S.

    2015-04-01

    The flow of molten metal plays a crucial role in determining casting quality. During rotation of the mold, melt flow around its inner circumference determines the final configurations and properties of the cast tube. In this paper, Al-2Si alloy is cast in the vertical mold at the various rotational speeds of the mold. The uniform cylinder tube is formed at a rotational speed of 1000 rpm, while before and beyond this speed, irregular-shaped cast tube is formed. Finally, fine structured grain size with high hardness value is found in uniform cast tube compared with others.

  10. POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POURING IRON FROM BULL LADLE INTO MOBILE LADLES USED TO FILL MOLDS ON CONVEYOR LINES AFTER FERRO-SILICON IS ADDED TO ENHANCE DUCTILITY AND FLUIDITY. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Cast aluminum denture base.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Dembert, M L

    1987-08-01

    The laboratory procedures for a cast aluminum base denture have been presented. If an induction casting machine is not available, the "two-oven technique" works well, provided the casting arm is kept spinning manually for 4 minutes after casting. If laboratory procedures are executed precisely and with care, the aluminum base denture can be cast with good results. PMID:3305884

  12. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  13. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  14. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikka, V. K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several value body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni (Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and where applicable, with data on sand castings.

  15. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-10-01

    Electroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and, where applicable, with data on sand castings. 22 figures.

  16. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  17. 42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Casting floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; operator takes temperature of iron in trough during pout. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  18. 126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, FURNACE NO. 2, STOVES, POWER HOUSE, STACKS, FURNACE NO. 1 CAST SHED. FURNACE NO. 2 IS IN PROCESS OF RESTORATION. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 7. DETAIL OF UNITEDTOD TWINTANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING CYLINDER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF UNITED-TOD TWIN-TANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING CYLINDER AND CROSS HEAD OF PISTON AT THE LOW PRESSURE SIDE OF ENGINE. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  20. 8. DETAIL OF UNITEDTOD TWINTANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING CYLINDER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF UNITED-TOD TWIN-TANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING CYLINDER AND CROSS HEAD OF PISTON AT THE HIGH-PRESSURE SIDE OF ENGINE. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  1. 11. DETAIL OF UNITEDTOD TWINTANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING HIGHPRESSURE CYLINDER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF UNITED-TOD TWIN-TANDEM STEAM ENGINE, SHOWING HIGH-PRESSURE CYLINDER AND VALVE, AND LUBRICATING EQUIPMENT FOR ENGINE. - Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngstown Works, Blooming Mill & Blooming Mill Engines, North of Poland Avenue, Youngstown, Mahoning County, OH

  2. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  3. Engine cylinder intake port

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, C.G.

    1986-08-19

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine, means defining a cylinder closed at one end and having an axis, means defining an inlet passage through the cylinder defining means and communicating with the cylinder through the closed end, and a poppet inlet valve including a stem and head having a valve axis and disposed in the passage for reciprocation on the valve axis to control communication of the inlet passage with the cylinder. The inlet passage is characterized by: a throat of generally circular cross-section opening into the cylinder and adapted to be closed by the inlet valve, an entrance portion spaced from the throat and offset from the valve axis, and means defining a fluid flow path extending from the entrance portion toward and around opposite sides of the valve axis and below the valve head when open to the throat. The fluid flow path defines means having a top wall including first and second ramp portions and a shelf portion spaced from and opposite the throat, the ramp portions sloping downwardly and merging with the shelf portion on generally opposite sides of the valve axis. The ramp portions lie at steep angles to the shelf portion and one of the ramp portions having a substantially steeper angle than the other to slow and direct downwardly fluid flow passing the one of the sides of the valve axis below the one steeper ramp relative to the higher speed and less downward direction of flow passing the other of the sides of the valve axis, whereby preferential entry of swirl developing flow into the shelf area from below the ramp of lower slope is encouraged.

  4. Torsion of Noncircular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Hyer, Michael W.; Haynie, Waddy T.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a brief overview of the predicted deformation and failure characteristics of noncircular composite cylinders subjected to torsion. Using a numerical analysis, elliptical cylinders with a minor-to-major diameter ratio of 0.7 are considered. Counterpart circular cylinders with the same circumference as the elliptical cylinders are included for comparison. The cylinders are constructed of a medium-modulus graphite-epoxy material in a quasi-isotropic lay-up. Imperfections generated from the buckling mode shapes are included in the initial cross-sectional geometry of the cylinders. Deformations until first fiber failure, as predicted using the maximum stress failure criterion and a material degradation scheme, are presented. For increasing levels of torsion, the deformations of the elliptical cylinders, in the form of wrinkling of the cylinder wall, occur primarily in the flatter regions of the cross section. By comparison the wrinkling deformations of the circular cylinders are more uniformly distributed around the circumference. Differences in the initial failure and damage progression and the overall torque vs. twist relationship between the elliptical and circular cylinders are presented. Despite differences in the response as the cylinders are being loaded, at first fiber failure the torque and twist for the elliptical and circular cylinders nearly coincide.

  5. 38. Base of No. 2 Furnace showing iron runner to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Base of No. 2 Furnace showing iron runner to ladle car on floor of casting shed. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. 40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED TO TUMBLE CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO BREAK OFF RUNNERS AND SPRUES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Development of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  8. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S.

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  9. Anaesthesia gas supply: gas cylinders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-09-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment. PMID:24249883

  10. Anaesthesia Gas Supply: Gas Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Invention of oxygen cylinder was one of the most important developments in the field of medical practice. Oxygen and other gases were compressed and stored at high pressure in seamless containers constructed from hand-forged steel in1880. Materials technology has continued to evolve and now medical gas cylinders are generally made of steel alloys or aluminum. The filling pressure as well as capacity has increased considerably while at the same time the weight of cylinders has reduced. Today oxygen cylinder of equivalent size holds a third more oxygen but weighs about 20 kg less. The cylinders are of varying sizes and are color coded. They are tested at regular intervals by the manufacturer using hydraulic, impact, and tensile tests. The top end of the cylinder is fitted with a valve with a variety of number and markings stamped on it. Common valve types include: Pin index valve, bull nose, hand wheel and integral valve. The type of valve varies with cylinder size. Small cylinders have a pin index valve while large have a bull nose type. Safety features in the cylinder are: Color coding, pin index, pressure relief device, Bodok seal, and label attached etc., Safety rules and guidelines must be followed during storage, installation and use of cylinders to ensure safety of patients, hospital personnel and the environment. PMID:24249883

  11. 42. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. 8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACES AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS, CUPOLA TENDER RICHARD SLAUGHTER SUPERVISING THE POUR. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  16. 49 CFR 178.46 - Specification 3AL seamless aluminum cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... suitable method that will identify the alloy, the aluminum producer's cast number, the solution heat treat batch number and the lot number. (4) The material must be of uniform quality. Only the following heat... to any test, all cylinders must be subjected to a solution heat treatment and aging...

  17. Expandable pattern casting research. Phase 2, Final report, October 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001--0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  18. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  19. LLNL casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  20. Evaluation of electroslag castings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Results of evaluations of electroslag castings of ferritic (2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo and 9 Cr-1 Mo) and austenitic (CF8M or type 316) steels are presented. The castings have been characterized for surface finish, cracking, solidification structure, chemical composition, hardness, ferrite distribution, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties, and creep properties. Pertinent data are compared with equivalent data for sand castings and wrought products of the same materials. Based on the results of these studies, the properties of electroslag castings compare favorably with those of sand castings and wrought materials.

  1. Effect of Thermal and Chemical Treatment on the Microstructural, Mechanical and Machining Performance of W319 Al-Si-Cu Cast Alloy Engine Blocks and Directionally Solidified Machinability Test Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szablewski, Daniel

    The research presented in this work is focused on making a link between casting microstructural, mechanical and machining properties for 319 Al-Si sand cast components. In order to achieve this, a unique Machinability Test Block (MTB) is designed to simulate the Nemak V6 Al-Si engine block solidification behavior. This MTB is then utilized to cast structures with in-situ nano-alumina particle master alloy additions that are Mg based, as well as independent in-situ Mg additions, and Sr additions to the MTB. The Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer (UMSA) Technology Platform is utilized for characterization of each cast structure at different Secondary Dendrite Arm Spacing (SDAS) levels. The rapid quench method and Jominy testing is used to assess the capability of the nano-alumina master alloy to modify the microstructure at different SDAS levels. Mechanical property assessment of the MTB is done at different SDAS levels on cast structures with master alloy additions described above. Weibull and Quality Index statistical analysis tools are then utilized to assess the mechanical properties. The MTB is also used to study single pass high speed face milling and bi-metallic cutting operations where the Al-Si hypoeutectic structure is combined with hypereutectoid Al-Si liners and cast iron cylinder liners. These studies are utilized to aid the implementation of Al-Si liners into the Nemak V6 engine block and bi-metallic cutting of the head decks. Machining behavior is also quantified for the investigated microstructures, and the Silicon Modification Level (SiML) is utilized for microstructural analysis as it relates to the machining behavior.

  2. Heat-Flux Sensor For Hot Engine Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.; Smith, Floyd A.; Koch, John

    1989-01-01

    Heat-flux sensor includes buried wire thermocouple and thin-film surface thermocouple, made of platinum and platinum with 13 percent rhodium. Sensor intended for use in ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine at temperatures of about 1,000 K. Thermocouple junction resists environment in cylinder of advanced high-temperature diesel engine created by depositing overlapping films of Pt and 0.87 Pt/0.13 Rh on iron plug. Plug also contains internal thermocouple.

  3. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  4. Melting of uranium-contaminated metal cylinders by electroslag refining

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, T.; Ozawa, Y.; Iba, H.

    1987-12-01

    Melt refining as a means of uranium decontamination of metallic wastes by electroslag refining was examined. Electroslag refining was selected because it is easy to scale up to the necessary industrial levels. Various thicknesses of iron and aluminum cylinders with uranium concentrations close to actual metallic wastes were melted by adding effective fluxes for decontamination. Thin-walled iron and aluminum cylinders with a fill ratio (electrode/mold cross-section ratio) of 0.05 could be melted, and the energy efficiency obtained was 16 to 25%. The ingot uranium concentration of the iron obtained was 0.01 to 0.015 ppm, which was close to the contamination level of the as-received specimen, while for aluminum it was 3 to 5 ppm, which was a few times higher than the as-received specimen contamination level of --0.9 ppm. To melt a thin aluminum cylinder in a steady state, with this fill ratio of 0.05, instantaneous electrode driving response control was desired. Electroslag refining gave better decontamination and energy economization results than by a resistance furnace.

  5. Development of Lead-Free Copper Alloy-Graphite Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    In this project, graphite is used as a substitute for lead in order to maintain the machinability of plumbing components at the level of leaded brass. Graphite dispersed in Cu alloy was observed to impart good machinability and reduce the sizes of chips during machining of plumbing components in a manner similar to lead. Copper alloys containing dispersed graphite particles could be successfully cast in several plumbing fixtures which exhibited acceptable corrosion rate, solderability, platability, and pressure tightness. The power consumption for machining of composites was also lower than that of the matrix alloy. In addition, centrifugally cast copper alloy cylinders containing graphite particles were successfully made. These cylinders can therefore be used for bearing applications, as substitutes for lead-containing copper alloys. The results indicate that copper graphite alloys developed under this DOE project have a great potential to substitute for lead copper alloys in both plumbing and bearing applications.

  6. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  7. CONTROLLING ODOROUS EMISSIONS FROM IRON FOUNDRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the control of odorous emissions from iron foundries. he main process sources of odors in iron foundries are mold and core making, casting, and sand shakeout. he odors are usually caused by chemicals, which may be present as binders and other additives to the...

  8. Effect of sand dilation on core expansion during steel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galles, D.; Beckermann, C.

    2015-06-01

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of the bonded sand used for molds and cores has a strong effect on dimensions of steel castings. Experiments are conducted in which a thick- walled hollow carbon steel cylinder is cast using a silica sand core. The temporal evolution of the inner diameter of the cylinder is measured in-situ during solidification and cooling by utilizing quartz rods connected to LVDTs (Linear Variable Differential Transformers). It is found that the inner diameter increases significantly during the initial stages of solidification when the steel offers little restraint to core expansion. Without accurately modeling this initial core expansion, the final cylinder dimensions at room temperature cannot be predicted. Preliminary simulations using the measured linear thermal expansion coefficient of the core considerably under-predict the measurements, which suggests that shear induced sand dilation also contributes to core expansion. The Drucker-Prager Cap model, which can predict dilative behavior, is used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the core. Utilizing this model in conjunction with an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law for the steel, the stress simulations successfully predict the observed dimensional changes in the casting during solidification.

  9. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  10. Turbine endwall single cylinder program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in front of a large-scale single cylinder, mounted in a wind tunnel is discussed. A better understanding of the three dimensional separation occuring in front of the cylinder on the endwall, and of the vortex system that is formed is sought. A data base with which to check analytical and numerical computer models of three dimensional flows is also anticipated.

  11. (Natural fragmentation of exploding cylinders)

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Hightower, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The natural fragmentation of a 4140 steel cylinder fully loaded with RX-35-AN insensitive high explosive is investigated through experiment and analysis. Methods of Taylor and Gurney are used to determine the fracture strain and kinematic state of the expanding cylinder. Energy methods based on mechanisms of both tension fracture and adiabatic shear fracture are used to calculate the circumferential fragmentation intensity. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Scalar cylinder-plate and cylinder-cylinder Casimir interaction in higher dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Lee-Peng

    2015-07-01

    We study the cylinder-plate and the cylinder-cylinder Casimir interaction in the (D +1 )-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of massless scalar fields. Different combinations of Dirichlet (D) and Neumann (N) boundary conditions are imposed on the two interacting objects. For the cylinder-cylinder interaction, we consider the case where one cylinder is inside the other and the case where the two cylinders are outside each other. By computing the transition matrices of the objects and the translation matrices that relate different coordinate systems, the explicit formulas for the Casimir interaction energies are derived. From these formulas, we compute the large separation and small separation asymptotic behaviors of the Casimir interaction. For the cylinder-plate interaction with R ≪L , where R is the radius of the cylinder and L is the distance from the center of the cylinder to the plate, the order of decay of the Casimir interaction only depends on the boundary conditions imposed on the cylinder. The orders are L-D +1/ln (L ) and L-D -1/ln L , respectively, for the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions on the cylinder. For two cylinders with radii R1 and R2 lying parallelly outside each other, the orders of decay of the Casimir interaction energies when R1+R2≪L are L-D +1/(ln L )2, L-D -1/ln L , and L-D -3, respectively, for DD, DN/ND, and NN boundary conditions, where L is the distance between the centers of the cylinders. The more interesting and important characteristic of Casimir interaction appears at small separation. Using the perturbation technique, we compute the small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energies up to the next-to-leading-order terms. The leading terms coincide with the respective results obtained using the proximity force approximation, which is of order d-D +1 /2 , where d is the distance between the two objects. The results on the next-to-leading-order terms are more

  13. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  14. SALT FOG TEST OF SAM2X5 COATED STAINLESS STEEL CYLINDER

    SciTech Connect

    Aprigliano, L F; Rebak, R B; Choi, J; Lian, T; Day, S D

    2007-04-23

    A salt fog test of an iron-based amorphous metal, SAM2X5, coated Type 316L stainless steel (SS316L) cylinder was made. The cylinder was 30-inch diameter by 88-inch long, and 3/8-inch thick. One end was welded shut with a SS316L end cap before coating. The body of the cylinder and the end cap were both coated. The cylinder was coated with SAM2X5 by the HVOF thermal spray process. The coating thickness was 0.015-inch to 0.019-inch thick. The cylinder was tested in a horizontal position. Also included in the test for reference purposes were five coupons (2-inch x 2-inch x 1/8-inch) of uncoated Type 1018 carbon steel (1018CS). The test used an abbreviated form of GM 9540P. Each cycle was 6 hours in duration and the cylinder and reference samples were exposed to a total of eight cycles. The cylinder was in relatively good condition after the test. Along the body of the cylinder only two pinpoint spot sized signs of rust were seen. The 1018CS reference specimens were extensively rusted.

  15. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  16. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  19. Casting in Sport

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing cast usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing cast construction. Materials used in playing cast construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing casts for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the “least hard” of the underlying casting materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing cast materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing cast construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257

  20. View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of foundrymen casting ingot molds; The flames from the mold in the center-right of the photo are present immediately after the pour has been completed - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Iron Foundry, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  1. 13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast iron bases for oil butts (oil butts removed when lighthouse lamp was converted to electric power.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  2. 15. TAKING A CAST AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. TAKING A CAST AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, BY-PRODUCT IN SMELTING OF PIG IRON, CAN BE SEEN FLOWING INTO THE SLAG YARD. VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 20. TAKING A CAST AT BLAST FURNACE NO. 1. WORKERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. TAKING A CAST AT BLAST FURNACE NO. 1. WORKERS, LIKE THE ONE STANDING ON THE BRIDGE ABOVE THE 'BOTTLE' INTO WHICH THE HOT IRON FLOWS, ARE PROTECTED BY HEAVY FIREPROOF GARMENTS. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  5. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  6. A Study on the Wear Behavior of Cast Boron Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han-Guang; Xing, Jian-Dong; Lei, Yong-Ping; Huang, Li-Ming

    2011-12-01

    In this study, a wear-resistant Cast Boron Steel (CBS) of nominal composition 0.25% C, 1.18% B, 1.27% Cr, 0.85% Mn, and 0.69% Si was oil-quenched at different temperatures. The effect of quenching temperature on the microstructure and wear resistance of CBS was investigated. Moreover, the wear resistance between CBS and high chromium cast iron was compared. The results show that a martensite matrix can be obtained by quenching from 900 to 1050 °C, and the wear resistance of quenched CBS is excellent, which reaches the level of high chromium cast iron. The reason behind the fact that CBS has excellent wear resistance is discussed.

  7. Modal Vibration Analysis of Large Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Margasahayam, Ravi N.

    2009-01-01

    The art of experimental modal vibration analysis (MVA) has been extended to apply to large castings. This extension was made to enable the use of experimental MVA as a relatively inexpensive, simple means of assessing the internal structural integrity of tread shoes of crawler transporters used to move spacecraft to the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center. Each tread shoe is made from cast iron and weighs about a ton (has a mass .907 kg). The present extended version of experimental MVA could also be applied to other large castings. It could be especially useful to manufacturers as a means of rapidly discriminating against large castings that contain unacceptably large concentrations of internal defects. The use of experimental MVA to assess structural integrity is not new. What are new here are those aspects of the extension of experimental MVA that pertain to the application of MVA to objects so massive that it may not be practical or cost effective to mount them in special test fixtures that impose special test boundary conditions to test them in place under normal conditions of use.

  8. Solidification modeling of continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, V. S.; Lerner, Y. S.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to utilize a new systematic mathematical-informational approach based on informational macrodynamics (IMD) to model and optimize the casting process, taking as an example horizontal continuous casting (HCC). The IMD model takes into account the interrelated thermal, diffusion, kinetic, hydrodynamic, and mechanical effects that are essential for the given casting process. The optimum technological process parameters are determined by the simultaneous solution of problems of identification and optimal control. The control functions of the synthesized optimal model are found from the extremum of the entropy functional having a particular sense of an integrated assessment of the continuous cast bar physicochemical properties. For the physical system considered, the IMD structures of the optimal model are connected with controllable equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. This approach was applied to the HCC of ductile iron, and the results were compared with experimental data and numerical simulation. Good agreement was confirmed between the predicted and practical data, as well as between new and traditional methods.

  9. Blower Cooling of Finned Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Several electrically heated finned steel cylinders enclosed in jackets were cooled by air from a blower. The effect of the air conditions and fin dimensions on the average surface heat-transfer coefficient q and the power required to force the air around the cylinders were determined. Tests were conducted at air velocities between the fins from 10 to 130 miles per hour and at specific weights of the air varying from 0.046 to 0.074 pound per cubic foot. The fin dimensions of the cylinders covered a range in pitches from 0.057 to 0.25 inch average fin thicknesses from 0.035 to 0.04 inch, and fin widths from 0.67 to 1.22 inches.

  10. Transient scattering by resistive cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaskos, N. J.; Brown, R. T.; Jameson, J. R.; Uslenghi, P. L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The two-dimensional scattering of an electromagnetic pulse normally incident on a collection of infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary shape is considered. For E-polarization an electric field integral equation is derived that is applicable to solid cylinders and/or thin sheets, resistive and/or perfectly conducting. The contribution of the self-cell at later times is carefully analyzed. The expression obtained represents a generalization of previously known results. For an incident Gaussian pulse, numerical results are presented for surface currents and far-fields, for perfectly conducting and resistive circular cylinders and strips. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is implemented to obtain the backscattering radar cross section, which is in good agreement with results obtained from either exact continuous wave (CW) solutions or the method of moments.

  11. Feasibility of producing cast-refractory metal-fiber superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of direct casting as a practical method for producing cast superalloy tungsten or columbium alloy fiber composites while retaining a high percentage of fiber strength. Fourteen nickel base, four cobalt, and three iron based matrices were surveyed for their degree of reaction with the metal fibers. Some stress-rupture results were obtained at temperatures of 760, 816, 871, and 1093 C for a few composite systems. The feasibility of producing acceptable composites of some cast nickel, cobalt, and iron matrix alloys with tungsten or columbium alloy fibers was demonstrated.

  12. Enhancement of polarizabilities of cylinders with cylinder-slab resonances

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Liu, H.; Chan, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much “brighter” is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as “cloaking by anomalous resonance” which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder. PMID:25641391

  13. Enhancement of polarizabilities of cylinders with cylinder-slab resonances.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Liu, H; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    If an object is very small in size compared with the wavelength of light, it does not scatter light efficiently. It is hence difficult to detect a very small object with light. We show using analytic theory as well as full wave numerical calculation that the effective polarizability of a small cylinder can be greatly enhanced by coupling it with a superlens type metamaterial slab. This kind of enhancement is not due to the individual resonance effect of the metamaterial slab, nor due to that of the object, but is caused by a collective resonant mode between the cylinder and the slab. We show that this type of particle-slab resonance which makes a small two-dimensional object much "brighter" is actually closely related to the reverse effect known in the literature as "cloaking by anomalous resonance" which can make a small cylinder undetectable. We also show that the enhancement of polarizability can lead to strongly enhanced electromagnetic forces that can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the material properties of the cylinder. PMID:25641391

  14. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  15. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  17. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  18. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  19. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Robert Alan; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Lee, Ching-Pang; Abuaf, Nesim; Hasz, Wayne Charles

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  20. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOEpatents

    Trudel, David R.; Meyer, Thomas N.; Kinosz, Michael J.; Arnaud, Guy; Bigler, Nicolas

    2003-06-17

    The filtering molten metal injector system includes a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and at least one molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the casting mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The molten metal injector projects into the holder furnace. The molten metal injector includes a cylinder defining a piston cavity housing a reciprocating piston for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace to the mold cavity. The cylinder and piston are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder or the piston includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity when the holder furnace contains molten metal. A conduit connects the piston cavity to the mold cavity. A molten metal filter is located in the conduit for filtering the molten metal passing through the conduit during the reciprocating movement of the piston. The molten metal intake may be a valve connected to the cylinder, a gap formed between the piston and an open end of the cylinder, an aperture defined in the sidewall of the cylinder, or a ball check valve incorporated into the piston. A second molten metal filter preferably covers the molten metal intake to the injector.

  1. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  2. SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY METAL SOURCES, ARE STORED IN THESE BINS AND LIFTED TO SCALES BY AN ELECTRIC MAGNET. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M.

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  4. Video Analysis of Rolling Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phommarach, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.; Johnston, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we studied the rolling motion of solid and hollow cylinders down an inclined plane at different angles. The motions were captured on video at 300 frames s[superscript -1], and the videos were analyzed frame by frame using video analysis software. Data from the real motion were compared with the theory of rolling down an inclined…

  5. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  6. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  7. Rotating Cylinder Treatment System Demonstration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 2008, a rotating cylinder treatment system (RCTSTM) demonstration was conducted near Gladstone, CO. The RCTSTM is a novel technology developed to replace the aeration/oxidation and mixing components of a conventional lime precipitation treatment s...

  8. Analysis on autofrettage of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Zhu, Guolin; Tang, Feng

    2012-05-01

    Autofrettage is an effective technique to improve load-bearing capacity and safety for pressure vessels. For autofrettaged cylinder, the depth of plastic zone, or overstrain is a key factor which affects load-bearing capacity and safety. The previous research on overstrain was not done in terms of the point of view of raising load-bearing capacity as far as possible and simultaneously avoiding compressive yield for cylinders experiencing autofrettage handling, and there were no analytic solutions of autofrettage in the above view point presented, the 3rd and 4th strength theories were not applied synthetically in the research to compare the results from these two theories. In this paper, with the aid of the analytic method, based on summing up the authors' previous research, results from autofrettage of a cylinder based on the 3rd and 4th strength theories are studied and compared, and the laws contained in the results are looked into. Then, the essential cause and reason for the obtained laws are analyzed and the inherent and meaning relations between various parameters in autofrettage theory are revealed. It is shown that the maximum radius ratio for equivalent residual stress at inside surface never exceeds the yield strength even for a cylinder experiencing wholly yielded autofrettage, or the critical radius ratio is k c=2.218 457 489 916 7…, irrespective of the 3rd or 4th strength theories. The equation relating the depth of plastic zone with the thickness of a cylinder is identical for the 3rd and 4th strength theories. In form, the optimum load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder irrespective of the 3rd or 4th strength theory. The revealed inherent relations between various parameters and varying laws of the parameters as well as the forms of the relations under the 3rd and 4th strength theories not only have theoretical meanings but also have prospects in engineering

  9. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  10. Three-dimensional accuracy of different correction methods for cast implant bars

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji-Yung; Kim, Chang-Whe; Lim, Young-Jun; Kwon, Ho-Beom

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of three techniques for correction of cast implant bars. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty cast implant bars were fabricated on a metal master model. All cast implant bars were sectioned at 5 mm from the left gold cylinder using a disk of 0.3 mm thickness, and then each group of ten specimens was corrected by gas-air torch soldering, laser welding, and additional casting technique. Three dimensional evaluation including horizontal, vertical, and twisting measurements was based on measurement and comparison of (1) gap distances of the right abutment replica-gold cylinder interface at buccal, distal, lingual side, (2) changes of bar length, and (3) axis angle changes of the right gold cylinders at the step of the post-correction measurements on the three groups with a contact and non-contact coordinate measuring machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-test were performed at the significance level of 5%. RESULTS Gap distances of the cast implant bars after correction procedure showed no statistically significant difference among groups. Changes in bar length between pre-casting and post-correction measurement were statistically significance among groups. Axis angle changes of the right gold cylinders were not statistically significance among groups. CONCLUSION There was no statistical significance among three techniques in horizontal, vertical and axial errors. But, gas-air torch soldering technique showed the most consistent and accurate trend in the correction of implant bar error. However, Laser welding technique, showed a large mean and standard deviation in vertical and twisting measurement and might be technique-sensitive method. PMID:24605205

  11. Steel castings by the electroslag casting technique. [CF8M

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Mitchell, A.

    1984-01-01

    ELectroslag casting facilities in Canada and the United States were reviewed. Several valve body castings of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and 18% Cr-8% Ni(Mo) steels were made at the University of British Columbia facility. These castings were examined for surface finish, chemical segregation, and macrostructure in the as-cast condition and after various heat treatments. Castings were subjected to tensile, Charpy impact, and creep testing. Results of these tests were compared with similar data on wrought material and sand castings.

  12. Effect of cerium addition on casting/chill interfacial heat flux and casting surface profile during solidification of Al-14%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, Al-14 wt. % Si alloy was solidified against copper, brass and cast iron chills, to study the effect of Ce melt treatment on casting/chill interfacial heat flux transients and casting surface profile. The heat flux across the casting/chill interface was estimated using inverse modelling technique. On addition of 1.5% Ce, the peak heat flux increased by about 38%, 42% and 43% for copper, brass and cast iron chills respectively. The effect of Ce addition on casting surface texture was analyzed using a surface profilometer. The surface profile of the casting and the chill surfaces clearly indicated the formation of an air gap at the periphery of the casting. The arithmetic average value of the profile departure from the mean line (Ra) and arithmetical mean of the absolute departures of the waviness profile from the centre line (Wa) were found to decrease on Ce addition. The interfacial gap width formed for the unmodified and Ce treated casting surfaces at the periphery were found to be about 35µm and 13µm respectively. The enhancement in heat transfer on addition of Ce addition was attributed to the lowering of the surface tension of the liquid melt. The gap width at the interface was used to determine the variation of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) across the chill surface after the formation of stable solid shell. It was found that the HTC decreased along the radial direction for copper and brass chills and increased along radial direction for cast iron chills.

  13. 49 CFR 230.83 - Cylinder cocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Cabs, Warning Signals, Sanders and Lights § 230.83 Cylinder cocks. Each steam locomotive shall be equipped with cylinder cocks which can be operated from the cab of the steam locomotive. All cylinder...

  14. Turbine endwall two-cylinder program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L. S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments to study the three dimensional separation of fluid flow around two isolated cylinders mounted on an endwall are described. Topics covered include: (1) water tunnel testing for both the single and double cylinder cases; (2) wind tunnel flow characteristics; (3) static pressure distribution measured on the cylinders; and (4) design and construction of a pressure reference system.

  15. Iron overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is an ingredient in many mineral and vitamin supplements. Iron supplements are also sold by themselves. Types include: Ferrous sulfate (Feosol, Slow Fe) Ferrous gluconate (Fergon) Ferrous fumarate (Femiron, Feostat) Other products may also contain iron.

  16. Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical simulation model for the horizontal centrifugal pipe casting process was developed with the commercial simulation package Flow3D. It considers - additionally to mass, energy and momentum conservation equations and free surface tracking - the fast radial and slower horizontal movement of the mold. The iron inflow is not steady state but time dependent. Of special importance is the friction between the liquid and the mold in connection with the viscosity and turbulence of the iron. Experiments with the mold at controlled revolution speeds were carried out using a high-speed camera. From these experiments friction coefficients for the description of the interaction between mold and melt were obtained. With the simulation model, the influence of typical process parameters (e.g. melts inflow, mold movement, melt temperature, cooling media) on the wall thickness of the pipes can be studied. The comparison to results of pipes from production shows a good agreement between simulation and reality.

  17. Massless rotating fermions inside a cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2015-12-07

    We study rotating thermal states of a massless quantum fermion field inside a cylinder in Minkowski space-time. Two possible boundary conditions for the fermion field on the cylinder are considered: the spectral and MIT bag boundary conditions. If the radius of the cylinder is sufficiently small, rotating thermal expectation values are finite everywhere inside the cylinder. We also study the Casimir divergences on the boundary. The rotating thermal expectation values and the Casimir divergences have different properties depending on the boundary conditions applied at the cylinder. This is due to the local nature of the MIT bag boundary condition, while the spectral boundary condition is nonlocal.

  18. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios (KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }} ); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }} . It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  19. Metallographic study of articles of the Kamensk iron foundry and iron works produced in the 18th-20th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Gizhevski, B. A.; Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Naumov, S. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Results have been presented for studies of the microstructure and chemical composition of a number of articles made of iron and cast iron at the Kamensk plant, which cover the period from the start of the production of iron on the territory of the city of Kamensk-Ural'skii at the turn of the 17th-18th centuries to the beginning of the 20th century. Differences in the composition of the Kamensk cast iron and modern grades of foundry cast iron have been established. Possible sources of technological difficulties and production waste at the Kamensk plant have been revealed. The potential of metallographic studies for the attribution of historical articles made of ferrous metals are shown.

  20. Generalized Bistability in Origami Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Austin; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Lechenault, Frederic

    Origami folded cylinders (origami bellows) have found increasingly sophisticated applications in space flight, medicine, and even experimental nuclear physics. In spite of this interest, a general understanding of the dynamics of an origami folded cylinder has been elusive. By solving the fully constrained behavior of a periodic fundamental origami cell defined by unit vectors, we have found an analytic solution for all possible rigid-face states accessible from a cylindrical Miura-ori pattern. Although an idealized bellows has two rigid-face configurations over a well-defined region, a physical device, limited by nonzero material thickness and forced to balance hinge with plate-bending energy, often cannot stably maintain a stowed configuration. We have identified and measured the parameters which control this emergent bistability, and have demonstrated the ability to fabricate bellows with tunable deployability.

  1. CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAST FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH CAST FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE CAST HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Note: Vignetting calibration and temperature correction for casting billets.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Zhang, Yuzhong; Hu, Zhenwei; Bai, Haicheng

    2013-09-01

    A method for calibration of vignetting coefficient is proposed in this paper to solve the distortion of temperature measurement using a CCD-based pyrometer. On this basis, a hybrid temperature measurement system, which comprises of an array CCD camera with high resolution and a single spot colorimetric thermometer, is introduced to eliminate the influences of surface striped iron oxide scale, dust, and emissivity on temperature measurement for casting billets. Currently, the system has been successfully applied and verified in some continuous casting production lines. The vignetting estimation error of 0.052 and the maximum temperature measurement fluctuation of 5 °C were achieved in these measurements. PMID:24089881

  3. Quantitative chemical analysis of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Kuroiwa, A; Ando, Y; Hashimoto, H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-nine brands of dental casting nickel-chromium alloys made in Japan for small castings were analyzed by electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. Nickel-chromium alloys for metal-ceramic application were composed primarily of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum with the exception of one brand. Of the nickel-chromium alloys for inlay, crown, and bridgework applications, 11 of the 22 alloys were up to the standard of the Ministry of Welfare specifications. And additive metal elements of these alloys were molybdenum, iron, copper, manganese, aluminum, silicon, tin, indium, silver, titanium, and gallium. PMID:2134288

  4. Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B. W.; Li, L. X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L. Q.; Xu, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a rotating cylinder viscometer (RCV) was adopted to measure the viscosity of AlSi10MnMg aluminum alloy. The results show that the measured viscosity is much higher than previously reported viscosity of aluminum alloys measured by oscillation vessel viscometer. The viscosity measured by RCV was introduced into the simulation of the filling progress of high pressure die casting (HPDC) for thin-walled castings of aluminum alloy (TWCA). The simulated results match well with the experimental results indicating that the RCV is the most appropriate to use for simulations of HPDC for TWCA.

  5. Transposed compression piston and cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.A.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes an improved V-type two piston Stirling engine wherein the improvement is a transposed compression piston slidably engaged in a mating cylinder. It comprises: a cylindrical body which is pivotally connected to a connecting rod at a pivot axis which is relatively nearer the outer end of the cylindrical body and has a seal relatively nearer the inner end of the cylindrical body.

  6. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  7. Improvement in functional characteristics of aluminum-silicon cast components through the utilization of a novel electromagnetic treatment of liquid melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles Hernandez, Francisco Carlos

    In the present dissertation the study of Electromagnetic Stirring (ES) and Electromagnetic Stirring and Vibration (ESV) techniques in several Al-Si hypo and hypereutectic alloys were conducted. Five ES and ESV workstations were designed and tested in order to develop a technology capable of conducting melt treatments on Al-Si hypereutectic alloys at temperatures above liquidus. The 390 series alloys were selected because they have shown comparable wear characteristics to cast iron (currently used for cylinder liner applications) three times higher thermal conductivity, the difference in thermal expansion coefficient thermal between the Al-Si alloys was <6%, stability and metallurgical compatibility with the 319 alloy. The ES technique was effectively used in a semi-solid state to refine the microstructure of the 319 alloy used to cast engine blocks. For instance the ES treatment was capable of reducing the grain of the 319 alloy size by 600%, and partially eliminates the dendrites. However, the ES treatment had negligible effect on Al-Si eutectic, Mg and Cu enriched phases and was limited to the semi-solid state and for hypoeutectic alloys. The ESV technique was successfully implemented to modify the primary Si particles in Al-Si hypereutectic (390.1(I), 390.1(II), 393.2(I) and 393.2(II)) alloys at temperatures as high as ˜100°C above liquidus. The effectiveness of the ESV melt treatment is higher as the temperature gets closer to liquidus. For the first time the application of ESV treatments were able to modify the microstructure of Al-Si hypereutectic alloys from the liquid state. A novel algorithm known as the "Image Analysis Based Si Modification Level " to determine the effect of the ESV melt treatment on the microstructure. Thermal analysis shows that the liquidus temperature increases up to 15°C as a function of the ESV melt treatment conditions and alloy composition. Therefore, thermal analysis can be used as on-line technique to predict this Si

  8. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  9. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  10. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  11. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  12. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  13. Hair Casts or Pseudonits

    PubMed Central

    França, Katlein; Villa, Ricardo Tadeu; Silva, Isabella Rezende; de Carvalho, Cristine Almeida; Bedin, Valcinir

    2011-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are thin, elongated, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair shaft and can be easily dislodged. A case of pseudonits in a 9-year-old girl is reported. Though not unusual, false diagnoses are common. PMID:22223977

  14. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  15. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines. PMID:3889295

  16. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  17. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  18. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  19. FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM INTEGRATED IRON AND STEEL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering investigation of fugitive (non-ducted) emissions in the iron and steel industry. Operations excluded from the study are coke ovens, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) charging, and blast furnace cast houses. Fugitive emission factors for iron an...

  20. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL