Science.gov

Sample records for cast-to implant components

  1. Sterility of packaged implant components.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Several implant components in their original glass vial and peel-back packages were subjected to sterility testing to determine whether the contents remained sterile after the expiration date marked on the package had passed. The results from a university microbiology laboratory showed that the contents remained sterile for 6 to 11 years after the expiration dates. PMID:15973959

  2. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  3. Biocompatibility tests of components of an implantable cardiac assist device.

    PubMed

    von Recum, A F; Imamura, H; Freed, P S; Kantrowitz, A; Chen, S T; Ekstrom, M E; Baechler, C A; Barnhart, M I

    1978-09-01

    A permanently implantable in-series left ventricular assist device, the dynamic aortic patch (DAP), has been tested in chronic animal experiments. The DAP replaces a section of the intrathoracic aortic wall. Hemothorax and hematocele at the implantation site have been complications in recent experiments. Primary postoperative hemorrhage was ruled out, and the biocompatibility of all components was therefore examined. Dacron velour, Teflon felt, conductive polyurethane, segmented polyether polyurethane, and Teflon-coated polyester fiber sutures were implanted in the pleural cavities of dogs and tested in vitro by culturing canine saphenous vein explants on them. In vivo experiments demonstrated that all components elicited mild to moderate inflammatory reactions, but hematocele occurred only when the components were implanted in the aorta with direct blood contact and exposed to arterial blood pressures. In vitro, cells were cultured on all components with no signs of toxic reactions. These results indicated that the host tolerated all implant components without major inflammatory responses. However, histological data indicated that chronic slow bleeding into or through the Dacron velour in contact with the arterial blood serum could account for hemothorax or hematocele formation. Therefore, a configuration of the assist device using materials impermeable to blood may obviate these difficulties. PMID:151687

  4. Comparison between conventional and plasma source ion-implanted femoral knee components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Scheuer, J. T.; Ritter, C.; Alexander, R. B.; Conrad, J. R.

    1991-12-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation of Ti-6Al-4V knee joint femoral components was carried out by both plasma source ion implantation (PSII), a non-line of sight technique, and conventional beamline implantation. Implantation using the PSII process was performed on a flat sample as well as a 2×2 square array of components to demonstrate batch processing capability. The retained dose of the flat sample and at different locations on the implanted components was measured by a scanning auger microprobe (SAM). The variation in dose of the PSII treated component was found to be within the SAM error, while the dose at one location on the beamline implanted component was found to be significantly low. For the beamline case, the SAM results show good agreement with the PC profile computer simulation, which includes the angular dependence of sputtering.

  5. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  6. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOEpatents

    Muller, Rolf H.; Zhang, Shengtao

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  7. Use of Authentic, Integrated Dental Implant Components Vital to Predictability and Successful Long-Term Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hurson, Steve

    2016-07-01

    The accepted requirements for achieving long-term maintenance and performance of implant treatments include properly matched implant system components, a precise fit and connection between the abutment and implant, and appropriate preload. Satisfying these requisites can be predictably achieved when authentic and suitably compatible components that are engineered and marketed as an integrated implant system are placed. To the contrary, intermixing third-party or aftermarket implant components could result in unpredictable sequelae that negatively affect implant treatment outcomes. Because implant manufacturers strive to balance and integrate all aspects of implant system design (eg, abutment, implant, connections), dentists should understand how and why individual implant component characteristics (eg, fatigue strength, fracture resistance) affect the strength and integrity of the overall implant complex. PMID:27548397

  8. Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Pauyo, T; Lim, L; Legoux, J G; Bureau, M N

    2010-09-01

    Bone loss around femoral implants used for THA is a persistent clinical concern. It may be caused by stress shielding, generally attributed to a mismatch in stiffness between the implants and host bone. In this regard, a fatigue resistant, carbon fiber (CF) composite femoral implant with bone-matching stiffness has been developed. This study evaluated the tissue response to the three material components of this implant in normal and textured (blasted with 24 grit alumina) surfaces: the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, the CF composite and the intermediate crystalline HA particulate composite layer to bond to the HA coating (blended). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral femoral implantation each receiving two rod-like implants. Bone apposition to the HA (37%) and textured Ti (41%) implants was not significantly different. Bone apposition to the untextured CF (14%) and blended (19%) implants and polished Ti (8%) implants was significantly lower. Bone apposition to the textured CF (9%) and blended (11%) implants was lower (but not statistically from the as received or untextured counterparts). Nearly all sections from femurs containing CF implants presented CF debris. There was no evidence of localized bone loss or any strong immune response associated with any of the implant materials. All materials were well tolerated with minimal inflammation despite the presence of particulate debris. The high degree of bone apposition to the HA-coated composite implants and the lack of short-term inflammation and adverse tissue response to the three material implant component support continued evaluation of this composite technology for use in THA. PMID:20730932

  9. Power loss measurement of implantable wireless power transfer components using a Peltier device balance calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ho Yan; Budgett, David M.; Taberner, Andrew; Hu, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Determining heat losses in power transfer components operating at high frequencies for implantable inductive power transfer systems is important for assessing whether the heat dissipated by the component is acceptable for implantation and medical use. However, this is a challenge at high frequencies and voltages due to limitations in electronic instrumentation. Calorimetric methods of power measurement are immune to the effects of high frequencies and voltages; hence, the measurement is independent of the electrical characteristics of the system. Calorimeters have been widely used to measure the losses of high power electrical components (>50 W), however it is more difficult to perform on low power components. This paper presents a novel power measurement method for components dissipating anywhere between 0.2 W and 1 W of power based on a heat balance calorimeter that uses a Peltier device as a balance sensor. The proposed balance calorimeter has a single test accuracy of ±0.042 W. The experimental results revealed that there was up to 35% difference between the power measurements obtained with electrical methods and the proposed calorimeter.

  10. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  11. Increased audiovisual integration in cochlear-implanted deaf patients: independent components analysis of longitudinal positron emission tomography data.

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, K; Rouger, J; Lagleyre, S; Fraysse, B; Démonet, J-F; Déguine, O; Barone, P

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated in earlier studies that patients with a cochlear implant have increased abilities for audio-visual integration because the crude information transmitted by the cochlear implant requires the persistent use of the complementary speech information from the visual channel. The brain network for these abilities needs to be clarified. We used an independent components analysis (ICA) of the activation (H2(15)O) positron emission tomography data to explore occipito-temporal brain activity in post-lingually deaf patients with unilaterally implanted cochlear implants at several months post-implantation (T1), shortly after implantation (T0) and in normal hearing controls. In between-group analysis, patients at T1 had greater blood flow in the left middle temporal cortex as compared with T0 and normal hearing controls. In within-group analysis, patients at T0 had a task-related ICA component in the visual cortex, and patients at T1 had one task-related ICA component in the left middle temporal cortex and the other in the visual cortex. The time courses of temporal and visual activities during the positron emission tomography examination at T1 were highly correlated, meaning that synchronized integrative activity occurred. The greater involvement of the visual cortex and its close coupling with the temporal cortex at T1 confirm the importance of audio-visual integration in more experienced cochlear implant subjects at the cortical level. PMID:25728184

  12. "Solar-Wind-Rich" Howardite: True Regolith vs. CM-Implanted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, Julia A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herrin, J. S.; Hermann, S.; Ott, U.

    2011-01-01

    Howardite, eucrite and diogenite meteorites (collectively HED) likely originate from asteroid 4-Vesta [1], one of two asteroids targeted by NASA s Dawn mission. Many howardites (polymict breccias of E and D material) contain "regolithic" features, including impact-melt clasts, fragmental breccia clasts, and carbonaceous chondrite fragments. True regolithic nature can be determined through noble gas analysis, as Solar Wind (SW) is implanted into the upper-most surfaces of solar system bodies. Whilst previous work [2] suggested that high siderophile element contents (e.g. Ni of 300-1200 g/g) were regolith indicators, we found no obvious correlation between SW and these indicators in our initial howardite noble gas analyses [3]. We observed CM-like fragments in a number of our howardites, whose textures suggest late addition to the breccia assemblage [4]. As typical CMs contain mixtures of SW (in matrix) and planetary (in clasts) components [5], we investigate the dominance of such components in SW-rich howardites. This will help deter-mine the extent of implanted SW in HED grains vs. SW and planetary gases from CM fragments, and allow better understanding of regolith processes

  13. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Routine checking of hearing aids and external components... Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.113 Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids...

  14. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Routine checking of hearing aids and external components... Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.113 Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids...

  15. Uncemented acetabular components. Histologic analysis of retrieved hydroxyapatite-coated and porous implants.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T W; Stulberg, B N; Ming, J; Geesink, R G

    1993-04-01

    Histologic sections of five hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular components retrieved at autopsy (2 dual geometry and 3 threaded cup designs) were analyzed, and the extent and pattern of bone apposition were compared with that of an uncoated, porous (beaded) dual geometry acetabular cup that had been removed for repeated dislocations. The results show hydroxyapatite and bone apposition most prominent in areas of likely load transmission, primarily around the peripheral rim of the dual-geometry cups and at the peaks of the threads of the screw cups. Hydroxyapatite and bone may have been removed by remodeling from the grooves between the threads. Although no significant wear debris was identified, the screw holes were incompletely covered by bone. The dual-geometry designs generally showed somewhat more bone apposition than the threaded cups, but all implants demonstrated less bone than might have been predicted from radiographs. PMID:8386747

  16. Chromium isotopic composition of the implanted solar wind-bearing component in Apollo 16 lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitts, Bunnie Kathleen

    2002-09-01

    Chromium isotopes are scientifically interesting for many reasons. For example, 53Mn decays to 53Cr which has allowed for the development of a fine-scale chronometer, 54Cr is a neutron-rich isotope believed to be generated in Type Ia supernovae which sheds light on local nucleosynthetic processes, and variations in 53Cr may be due to incorporation of differing amounts of live 53Mn. This 53Mn may be linearly, radially heterogeneous (Lugmair and Shukolyukov, 1998). Therefore, to investigate these issues, the isotopic composition of the implanted solar wind-bearing component was measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of acid etches of plagioclase grains from two Apollo 16 lunar soils. Small aliquots of the etches were spiked with Cr and Ca for isotope dilution. Spiking for Ca allows for the determination of etch depth and the Cr/Ca ratio which acts as a proxy for solar wind content. From these isotope dilution data, three important observations were made. First, the etch depth is in line with the solar wind implantation depths of noble gases (e.g. Eberhardt et al., 1970). Second, the Cr/Ca ratio falls off quickly with depth, peaks in the Etch 1 fraction of 62281 at 0.0006 and 0.0009 for 60601 and returns to the lunar Cr/Ca ratio of 0.00007 by weight by Etch 5. The coronal ratio is 0.224 (Anders and Grevesse, 1989). Third, the absolute abundance of Cr peaks in Etch 1 and falls off with progressive etches. Therefore, it is inferred that the solar wind-bearing component has been successfully isolated from the background lunar signature. The isotopic composition of this component is 3.9 ± 0.4 ɛ53Cr and 8.5 ± 0.6 ɛ54Cr for 62281 and 4.5 ± 0.1 and 15.0 ± 0.3, respectively, for 60601. These data are surprising. It will be shown that contributions from contamination, spallation and isobaric interferences are unlikely to be significant. The Cr data presented here are not linearly mass-dependent. Therefore, the linear, mass-dependent processes of volatilization

  17. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Routine checking of hearing aids and external... Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.113 Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids...

  18. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Routine checking of hearing aids and external... Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.113 Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids...

  19. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Routine checking of hearing aids and external... Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.113 Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids...

  20. Development of a multi-component fiber-reinforced composite implant for load-sharing conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D S; Moritz, N; Laurila, P; Mattila, R; Lassila, L V J; Strandberg, N; Mäntylä, T; Vallittu, P K; Aro, H T

    2009-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) have the potential for use as load-bearing orthopaedic implants if the high strength and elastic modulus of FRC implant can be matched with local requirements. This study tested the in vivo performance of novel FRC implants made of unidirectional glass fibers (E-glass fibers in Bis-GMA and TEGDMA polymeric matrix). The implant surface was covered with bioactive glass granules. Control implants were made of surface-roughened titanium. Stress-shielding effects of the implants were predicted by finite element modelling (FEM). Surgical stabilization of bone metastasis in the subtrochanteric region of the femur was simulated in 12 rabbits. An oblong subtrochanteric defect of a standardized size (reducing the torsional strength of the bones approximately by 66%) was created and an intramedullary implant made of titanium or the FRC composite was inserted. The contralateral femur served as the intact control. At 12 weeks of healing, the femurs were harvested and analyzed by radiography, torsional testing, micro-CT imaging and hard tissue histology. The functional recovery was unremarkable in both groups, although the final analysis revealed two healed undisplaced peri-implant fractures in the group of FRC implants. FEM studies demonstrated differences in stress-shielding effects of the titanium and FRC implants, but the expected biological consequences did not become evident during the follow-up time of the animal study. Biomechanical testing of the retrieved femurs showed no significant differences between the groups. The torsional strength of the fixed bones had returned the level of contralateral intact femurs. Both implants showed ongrowth of intramedullary new bone. No adverse tissue reactions were observed. Based on these favorable results, a large-scale EU-project (NewBone, www.hb.se/ih/polymer/newbone) has been launched for development of orthopaedic FRC implants. PMID:19109047

  1. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating appears to be of benefit for implant durability of tibial components in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether there is a clinical benefit to adding hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings to total knee implants, especially with the tibial component, where failure of the implant more often occurs. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify all prospective randomized trials for determining whether the overall clinical results (as a function of durability, function, and adverse events) favored HA-coated tibial components. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed for the years 1990 to September 16, 2010. We restricted our search to randomized controlled trials involving participants receiving either an HA-coated tibia or other forms of tibial fixation. The primary outcome measures evaluated were durability, function, and acute adverse events. Results Data from 926 evaluable primary total knee implants in 14 studies were analyzed. Using an RSA definition for durability, HA-coated tibial components (porous or press-fit) without screw fixation were less likely to be unstable at 2 years than porous and cemented metal-backed tibial components (RR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.34–0.98; p = 0.04, I2 = 39%, M-H random effects model). There was no significant difference in durability, as measured from revision and evaluated at 2 and 8–10 years, between groups. Also, functional status using different validated measures showed no significant difference at 2 and 5 years, no matter what measure was used. Lastly, there was no significant difference in adverse events. Limitations included small numbers of evaluable patients (≤ 50) in 7 of the 14 trials identified, and a lack of “hard” evidence of durability with need for replacement (i.e. frank failure, pain, or loss of functionality). Interpretation In patients > 65 years of age, an HA-coated tibial implant may provide better durability than other forms of tibial fixation. Larger trials should be undertaken comparing the long-term durability, function, and adverse events of HA

  2. Combined probabilistic and principal component analysis approach for multivariate sensitivity evaluation and application to implanted patellofemoral mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Baldwin, Mark A; Rullkoetter, Paul J; Laz, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Many aspects of biomechanics are variable in nature, including patient geometry, joint mechanics, implant alignment and clinical outcomes. Probabilistic methods have been applied in computational models to predict distributions of performance given uncertain or variable parameters. Sensitivity analysis is commonly used in conjunction with probabilistic methods to identify the parameters that most significantly affect the performance outcome; however, it does not consider coupled relationships for multiple output measures. Principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied to characterize common modes of variation in shape and kinematics. In this study, a novel, combined probabilistic and PCA approach was developed to characterize relationships between multiple input parameters and output measures. To demonstrate the benefits of the approach, it was applied to implanted patellofemoral (PF) mechanics to characterize relationships between femoral and patellar component alignment and loading and the resulting joint mechanics. Prior studies assessing PF sensitivity have performed individual perturbation of alignment parameters. However, the probabilistic and PCA approach enabled a more holistic evaluation of sensitivity, including identification of combinations of alignment parameters that most significantly contributed to kinematic and contact mechanics outcomes throughout the flexion cycle, and the predictive capability to estimate joint mechanics based on alignment conditions without requiring additional analysis. The approach showed comparable results for Monte Carlo sampling with 500 trials and the more efficient Latin Hypercube sampling with 50 trials. The probabilistic and PCA approach has broad applicability to biomechanical analysis and can provide insight into the interdependencies between implant design, alignment and the resulting mechanics. PMID:20825941

  3. Custom-designed orthopedic implants evaluated using finite element analysis of patient-specific computed tomography data: femoral-component case study

    PubMed Central

    Harrysson, Ola LA; Hosni, Yasser A; Nayfeh, Jamal F

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional knee and hip implant systems have been in use for many years with good success. However, the custom design of implant components based on patient-specific anatomy has been attempted to overcome existing shortcomings of current designs. The longevity of cementless implant components is highly dependent on the initial fit between the bone surface and the implant. The bone-implant interface design has historically been limited by the surgical tools and cutting guides available; and the cost of fabricating custom-designed implant components has been prohibitive. Methods This paper describes an approach where the custom design is based on a Computed Tomography scan of the patient's joint. The proposed design will customize both the articulating surface and the bone-implant interface to address the most common problems found with conventional knee-implant components. Finite Element Analysis is used to evaluate and compare the proposed design of a custom femoral component with a conventional design. Results The proposed design shows a more even stress distribution on the bone-implant interface surface, which will reduce the uneven bone remodeling that can lead to premature loosening. Conclusion The proposed custom femoral component design has the following advantages compared with a conventional femoral component. (i) Since the articulating surface closely mimics the shape of the distal femur, there is no need for resurfacing of the patella or gait change. (ii) Owing to the resulting stress distribution, bone remodeling is even and the risk of premature loosening might be reduced. (iii) Because the bone-implant interface can accommodate anatomical abnormalities at the distal femur, the need for surgical interventions and fitting of filler components is reduced. (iv) Given that the bone-implant interface is customized, about 40% less bone must be removed. The primary disadvantages are the time and cost required for the design and the possible need

  4. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2006-05-30

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  5. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2004-08-03

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  6. BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO SEPARATIONS SCREENS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Dual-Component Intramedullary Implant Versus Kirschner Wire for Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Fusion: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Jay, Richard M; Malay, D Scot; Landsman, Adam S; Jennato, Nathan; Huish, James; Younger, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a multicenter, parallel treatment arm, randomized controlled trial to compare the outcomes after surgery for the treatment of lesser digital hammertoe using either a Kirschner wire or a 2-piece intramedullary, stainless steel implant for fixation of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Our primary aim was to compare the incidence of arthrodesis and complications, and our secondary aim was to compare the subjective foot-related outcomes measured using the Bristol Foot Score and the Foot Function Index, stratified by fixation group. We hypothesized that the use of the dual-component implant would result in greater patient satisfaction, a greater incidence of radiographic arthrodesis, and fewer complications after hammertoe repair. The overall mean age of the participants was 58.72 ± 13.48 (range 18 to 84) years, their mean body mass index was 30.14 ± 6.55 (range 20.7 to 46.98) kg/m(2), and no statistically significant differences in the demographic variables were present between the treatment groups at baseline or during the follow-up period. Of the 91 participants, 46 (50.55%) were randomly allocated to the Kirschner wire group and 45 (49.45%) to the intramedullary implant group. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 fixation groups in the incidence of complications; however, the 2-piece intramedullary implant group was associated with a greater mean Bristol Foot Score and Foot Function Index score and a greater incidence of fusion. PMID:27180101

  8. Simultaneous grouping in cochlear implant listeners: can abrupt changes in level be used to segregate components from a complex tone?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Huw R; Roberts, Brian

    2010-03-01

    A sudden increase in the amplitude of a component often causes its segregation from a complex tone, and shorter rise times enhance this effect. We explored whether this also occurs in implant listeners (n = 8). Condition 1 used a 3.5-s "complex tone" comprising concurrent stimulation on five electrodes distributed across the array of the Nucleus CI24 implant. For each listener, the baseline stimulus level on each electrode was set at 50% of the dynamic range (DR). Two 1-s increments of 12.5%, 25%, or 50% DR were introduced in succession on adjacent electrodes within the "inner" three of those activated. Both increments had rise and fall times of 30 and 970 ms or vice versa. Listeners reported which increment was higher in pitch. Some listeners performed above chance for all increment sizes, but only for 50% increments did all listeners perform above chance. No significant effect of rise time was found. Condition 2 replaced amplitude increments with decrements. Only three listeners performed above chance even for 50% decrements. One exceptional listener performed well for 50% decrements with fall and rise times of 970 and 30 ms but around chance for fall and rise times of 30 and 970 ms, indicating successful discrimination based on a sudden rise back to baseline stimulation. Overall, the results suggest that implant listeners can use amplitude changes against a constant background to pick out components from a complex, but generally these must be large compared with those required in normal hearing. For increments, performance depended mainly on above-baseline stimulation of the target electrodes, not rise time. With one exception, performance for decrements was typically very poor. PMID:19826870

  9. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals functionalized with alendronate as bioactive components for bone implant coatings to decrease osteoclastic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Ruggero; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The integration of bone implants within native bone tissue depends on periprosthetic bone quality, which is severely decreased in osteoporotic patients. In this work, we have synthesized bone-like hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHA) using an acid-base neutralization reaction and analysed their physicochemical properties. Subsequently, we have functionalized the nHA with alendronate (nHAALE), a well-known bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis. An in vitro osteoclastogenesis test was carried out to evaluate the effect of nHAALE on the formation of osteoclast-like cells from monocytic precursor cells (i.e. RAW264.7 cell line) showing that nHAALE significantly promoted apoptosis of osteoclast-like cells. Subsequently, nHA and nHAALE were deposited on titanium disks using electrospray deposition (ESD), for which characterisation of the deposited coatings confirmed the presence of alendronate in nHAALE coatings with nanoscale thickness of about 700 nm. These results indicate that alendronate linked to hydroxyapatite nanocrystals has therapeutic potential and nHAALE can be considered as an appealing coating constituent material for orthopaedic and oral implants for application in osteoporotic patients.

  10. New method of plasma immersion ion implantation and also deposition of industrial components using tubular fixture and plasma generated inside the tube by high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Mario; Silva, Ataide Ribeiro da; Pillaca, Elver J. D. M.; Mariano, Samantha F. M.; Oliveira, Rogério de Moraes; Rossi, José Osvaldo; Lepienski, Carlos Mauricio; Pichon, Luc

    2016-01-01

    A new method of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) and deposition (PIII and D) for treating industrial components in the batch mode has been developed. A metal tubular fixture is used to allocate the components inside, around, and along the tube, exposing only the parts of each component that are to be ion implanted to the plasma. Hollow cathode-like plasma is generated only inside the tube filled with the desired gas, by applying high negative voltage pulses to the hollow cylindrical fixture which is insulated from the vacuum chamber walls. This is a very convenient method of batch processing of industrial parts by ion implantation, in which a large number of small to medium sized components can be treated by PIII and PIII and D, very quickly, efficiently, and also at low cost.

  11. New method of plasma immersion ion implantation and also deposition of industrial components using tubular fixture and plasma generated inside the tube by high voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mario; da Silva, Ataide Ribeiro; Pillaca, Elver J D M; Mariano, Samantha F M; Oliveira, Rogério de Moraes; Rossi, José Osvaldo; Lepienski, Carlos Mauricio; Pichon, Luc

    2016-01-01

    A new method of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) and deposition (PIII and D) for treating industrial components in the batch mode has been developed. A metal tubular fixture is used to allocate the components inside, around, and along the tube, exposing only the parts of each component that are to be ion implanted to the plasma. Hollow cathode-like plasma is generated only inside the tube filled with the desired gas, by applying high negative voltage pulses to the hollow cylindrical fixture which is insulated from the vacuum chamber walls. This is a very convenient method of batch processing of industrial parts by ion implantation, in which a large number of small to medium sized components can be treated by PIII and PIII and D, very quickly, efficiently, and also at low cost. PMID:26827328

  12. Biomechanical modeling of acetabular component polyethylene stresses, fracture risk, and wear rate following press-fit implantation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kevin L; Rundell, Steve; Liepins, Imants; Laurent, Ryan; Markel, David; Kurtz, Steven M

    2009-11-01

    Press-fit implantation may result in acetabular component deformation between the ischial-ilial columns ("pinching"). The biomechanical and clinical consequences of liner pinching due to press-fit implantation have not been well studied. We compared the effects of pinching on the polyethylene fracture risk, potential wear rate, and stresses for two different thickness liners using computational methods. Line-to-line ("no pinch") reaming and 2 mm underreaming press fit ("pinch") conditions were examined for Trident cups with X3 polyethylene liner wall thicknesses of 5.9 mm (36E) and 3.8 mm (40E). Press-fit cup deformations were measured from a foam block configuration. A hybrid material model, calibrated to experimentally determined stress-strain behavior of sequentially annealed polyethylene, was applied to the computational model. Molecular chain stretch did not exceed the fracture threshold in any cases. Nominal shell pinch of 0.28 mm was estimated to increase the volumetric wear rate by 70% for both cups and peak contact stresses by 140 and 170% for the 5.9 and 3.8 mm-thick liners, respectively. Although pinching increases liner stresses, polyethylene fracture is highly unlikely, and the volumetric wear rates are likely to be low compared to conventional polyethylene. PMID:19489047

  13. Package architecture and component design for an implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control.

    PubMed

    Bjune, Caroline K; Marinis, Thomas F; Brady, Jeanne M; Moran, James; Wheeler, Jesse; Sriram, Tirunelveli S; Parks, Philip D; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    An implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control requires electrodes for stimulation pulses and recording neuron activity. Our system features arrays of 64 electrodes. Each electrode can be addressed through a cross bar switch, to enable it to be used for stimulation or recording. This electrode switch, a bank of low noise amplifiers with an integrated analog to digital converter, power conditioning electronics, and a communications and control gate array are co-located with the electrode array in a 14 millimeter diameter satellite package that is designed to be flush mounted in a skull burr hole. Our system features five satellite packages connected to a central hub processor-controller via ten conductor cables that terminate in a custom designed, miniaturized connector. The connector incorporates features of high reliability, military grade devices and utilizes three distinct seals to isolate the contacts from fluid permeation. The hub system is comprised of a connector header, hermetic electronics package, and rechargeable battery pack, which are mounted on and electrically interconnected by a flexible circuit board. The assembly is over molded with a compliant silicone rubber. The electronics package contains two antennas, a large coil, used for recharging the battery and a high bandwidth antenna that is used to download data and update software. The package is assembled from two machined alumina pieces, a flat base with brazed in, electrical feed through pins and a rectangular cover with rounded corners. Titanium seal rings are brazed onto these two pieces so that they can be sealed by laser welding. A third system antenna is incorporated in the flexible circuit board. It is used to communicate with an externally worn control package, which monitors the health of the system and allows both the user and clinician to control or modify various system function parameters. PMID:26738106

  14. An indicator for fitting castings to a die.

    PubMed

    Troendle, G R; Troendle, K B

    1992-10-01

    This article describes a procedure for making an indicator to be used in fitting a casting to a die. It also describes how to use the indicator in the laboratory. The materials for making the indicator are inexpensive, present no health hazard, and are readily available at any arts and crafts store. PMID:1403953

  15. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  16. Inflammasome components ASC and AIM2 modulate the acute phase of biomaterial implant-induced foreign body responses

    PubMed Central

    Christo, Susan N.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Manavis, Jim; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Detailing the inflammatory mechanisms of biomaterial-implant induced foreign body responses (FBR) has implications for revealing targetable pathways that may reduce leukocyte activation and fibrotic encapsulation of the implant. We have adapted a model of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) bead injection to perform an assessment of the mechanistic role of the ASC-dependent inflammasome in this process. We first demonstrate that ASC−/− mice subjected to PMMA bead injections had reduced cell infiltration and altered collagen deposition, suggesting a role for the inflammasome in the FBR. We next investigated the NLRP3 and AIM2 sensors because of their known contributions in recognising damaged and apoptotic cells. We found that NLRP3 was dispensable for the fibrotic encapsulation; however AIM2 expression influenced leukocyte infiltration and controlled collagen deposition, suggesting a previously unexplored link between AIM2 and biomaterial-induced FBR. PMID:26860464

  17. Aqueous Extract of Brazilian Green Propolis: Primary Components, Evaluation of Inflammation and Wound Healing by Using Subcutaneous Implanted Sponges

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Negri, Giuseppina; Salatino, Antônio; Lima, Luiza Dias da Cunha; Dourado, Luana Pereira Antunes; Mendes, Juliana Barros; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Ferreira, Mônica Alves Neves Diniz; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2011-01-01

    Propolis is a chemically complex resinous bee product which has gained worldwide popularity as a means to improve health condition and prevent diseases. The main constituents of an aqueous extract of a sample of green propolis from Southeast Brazil were shown by high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy to be mono- and di-O-caffeoylquinic acids; phenylpropanoids known as important constituents of alcohol extracts of green propolis, such as artepillin C and drupanin were also detected in low amounts in the aqueous extract. The anti-inflammatory activity of this extract was evaluated by determination of wound healing parameters. Female Swiss mice were implanted subcutaneously with polyesther-polyurethane sponge discs to induce wound healing responses, and administered orally with green propolis (500 mg kg−1). At 4, 7 and 14 days post-implantation, the fibrovascular stroma and deposition of extracellular matrix were evaluated by histopathologic and morphometric analyses. In the propolis-treated group at Days 4 and 7 the inflammatory process in the sponge was reduced in comparison with control. A progressive increase in cell influx and collagen deposition was observed in control and propolis-treated groups during the whole period. However, these effects were attenuated in the propolis-treated group at Days 4 and 7, indicating that key factors of the wound healing process are modulated by propolis constituents. PMID:19690045

  18. Effects of Bu-Shen-An-Tai recipe and its two components on endometrial morphology during peri-implantation in superovulated mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan-Dan; Zheng, Cui-Hong; Gong, Ping; Wen, Lu; Ma, Wen-Wen; Zhou, Shun-Chang; Zhang, Ming-Min

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Bu-Shen-An-Tai recipe (BSATR) and its two components (Bushen recipe, and Huoxue recipe) on endometrial morphology during peri-implantation in superovulated mice. Mice were randomly divided into five groups, including the normal (N), model (M), Bushen (BS), Huoxue (HX) and Bu-Shen-An-Tai (BH) groups. The uteri were collected on day 4 of pregnancy, and the endometrium thickness, microvessel density (MVD) and number of pinopodes observed. Compared with the M group, the endometrial thickness in the BS, HX and BH groups was significantly increased and there was a significant difference in endometrial thickness between the BS and the BH groups. The mean MVD was significantly lower in the M group than in the N group, and there was a significant increase in MVD in the BS, HX and BH groups as compared with the M group. Compared with the M group, the pinopode scores in the endometrium were significantly increased in the HX and BH groups; and the BS group had significantly higher pinipode scores than the HX and BH groups. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that the recipes (Bushen, Huoxue and BSATR) could improve the endometrial environment by regulating the endometrial thickness, MVD and the number of pinopodes at the window of implantation. Moreover, the Huoxue recipe and the BSATR were more efficient than the Bushen recipe, with the BSATR tending to have the most beneficial effects. PMID:25318891

  19. Posterior Shift of Contact Point between Femoral Component and Polyethylene in the LCS Rotating Platform Implant under Weight Bearing Condition

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Won Seok; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kim, Byung Kak; Sim, Jae Ang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the contact mechanics of the femoral component and polyethylene of the Low Contact Stress rotating platform (LCS-RP) in nonweight bearing and weight bearing conditions using full flexion lateral radiographs. Materials and Methods From May 2009 to December 2013, 58 knees in 41 patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis and treated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were included in this study. TKA was performed using an LCS-RP knee prosthesis. Full flexion lateral radiographs in both weight bearing and nonweight bearing condition were taken at least one month postoperatively (average, 28.8 months). Translation of femoral component was determined by the contact point between the femoral component and polyethylene. Maximum flexion was measured as the angle between the lines drawn at the midpoint of the femur and tibia. Results Posterior shift of the contact point in LCS-RP TKA was observed under weight bearing condition, which resulted in deeper flexion compared to LCS-RP TKA under nonweight bearing condition. Conclusions In the LCS-RP TKA, the contact point between the femoral component and polyethylene moved posteriorly under weight bearing condition, and the joint was more congruent and maximum flexion increased with weight bearing. PMID:27274470

  20. Surface Protection and Improved Performance of Satellite Components as well as Mitigation of Space Environmental Pollution by Plasma Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, M.; Takahashi, W. K.; Marcondes, A. R.; Tan, I. H.; Silva, G.

    2009-01-05

    Three plasma processing systems based on PII technique have been used in the improvement of surface properties of different materials important for aerospace and space applications. Metal plasma PII of Al and Mg was used for surface protection of polymers used in space such as Kapton, Mylar and polyethylene. Al alloys were treated with nitrogen PII for improved resistance to corrosion aiming at aerospace applications. A rigid polymer UHMWPE was also treated in a nitrogen PII to produce a protective layer with DLC. Although not very light, SS304 stainless steel components are being used in a imaging camera in space, and some components made of this material showed endurance to vibration tests after nitrogen PII, therefore being qualified for on-board application.

  1. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  2. Ultra Large Castings to Produce Low Cost Aluminum Vehicle Structures

    SciTech Connect

    T. N. Meyer; M. J. Kinosz; E. M. Bradac; M. Mbaye; J. T. Burg; M. A. Klingensmith

    1999-04-26

    Through a cooperative effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT), Alcoa is developing a casting process to produce ultra large thin wall components. The casting process is a low pressure, metal mold, multiport injection vertical casting process. The specific system for demonstration of the process is located at Alcoa's Technology Center and will be capable of producing parts extending 3 M long, 1.7 M wide and 0.4 M high. For example, single castings of car floor pan frames or side wall aperture structures are candidates for this installation. This shall provide a major opportunity to reduce the cost of lightweight transportation vehicle structures by (a) reducing the components or part count and (b) reducing the cost of assembly. To develop and demonstrate the process, an inner panel of the Chrysler minivan liftgate will be first produced on this system. Through computer analyses, the cast inner panel design was developed to satisfy both structural performance and casting process requirements. Currently, this is an 11 part assembly of steel components. At the time of this abstract, the numerous system components are in various phases of fabrication and site preparation is fully underway, with system shakedown beginning in the second quarter of 1999. Successful demonstration of caster system operation is anticipated to occur during the third quarter and production of a high quality product during the fourth quarter. Although the process is targeted toward reducing the cost of lightweight trucks, buses and autos, consideration is being given to application in the aircraft industry.

  3. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements. PMID:24286654

  4. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  5. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  6. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  8. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  9. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  10. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  11. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  12. [Allergy diagnostics in implant intolerance].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    To clarify a suspected implant allergy, a patch test with implant metals and bone cement components can be used. The (immuno)histology of periimplant tissue may also indicate T-lymphocyte-dominant inflammation. Identification of histological allergy characteristics and evaluation of the lymphocyte transformation test beyond indications of sensitization will be possible only when larger studies are available. PMID:18227997

  13. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  14. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  15. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  16. International Classification of Reliability for Implanted Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Backous, Douglas D.; Balkany, Thomas J.; Briggs, Robert J. S.; Gantz, Bruce J.; van Hasselt, Andrew; Kim, Chong Sun; Kubo, Takeshi; Lenarz, Thomas; Pillsbury, Harold C.; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design an international standard to be used when reporting reliability of the implanted components of cochlear implant systems to appropriate governmental authorities, cochlear implant (CI) centers, and for journal editors in evaluating manuscripts involving cochlear implant reliability. Study Design The International Consensus Group for Cochlear Implant Reliability Reporting was assembled to unify ongoing efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia to create a consistent and comprehensive classification system for the implanted components of CI systems across manufacturers. Setting All members of the consensus group are from tertiary referral cochlear implant centers. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure A clinically relevant classification scheme adapted from principles of ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1) originally designed for reporting reliability of cardiac pacemakers, pulse generators, or leads. Results Standard definitions for device failure, survival time, clinical benefit, reduced clinical benefit, and specification were generated. Time intervals for reporting back to implant centers for devices tested to be “out of specification,” categorization of explanted devices, the method of cumulative survival reporting, and content of reliability reports to be issued by manufacturers was agreed upon by all members. The methodology for calculating Cumulative survival was adapted from ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1). Conclusion The International Consensus Group on Cochlear Implant Device Reliability Reporting recommends compliance to this new standard in reporting reliability of implanted CI components by all manufacturers of CIs and the adoption of this standard as a minimal reporting guideline for editors of journals publishing cochlear implant research results. PMID:20864879

  17. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  18. [Implantable materials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schaldach, M

    1975-11-01

    There is a steadily increasing importance of implants used as substitutions for body functions which have been impaired due to disease, natural abrasion or accident. With the present state of the art, the limitations for the application of surgical substitutions are due to insufficient properties of biomaterials with regard to specific applications as well as to deficiencies in design and function of the implants used. The basis for the improvement and new development of implants is therefore a functionally adequate design in which the specific properties of the material are taken into account with regard to the individual requirements of the implantation site. For orthopedic implants, materials have to be developed which are to a large extent corrosion and degradation resistant, and withstand high mechanical stress. For implants in the cardiovascular system, compatibility with blood is most significant. Present research in this field is concentrated on efforts to improve the thromboresistivity of conventional polymers by different kinds of surface treatments. One possibility is to influence actively the electrochemical interactions between material and blood components, e.g. by the use of redox catalysts. PMID:1107653

  19. Allergy to Surgical Implants.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Surgical implants have a wide array of therapeutic uses, most commonly in joint replacements, but also in repair of pes excavatum and spinal disorders, in cardiac devices (stents, patches, pacers, valves), in gynecological implants, and in dentistry. Many of the metals used are immunologically active, as are the methacrylates and epoxies used in conjunction with several of these devices. Allergic responses to surgical components can present atypically as failure of the device, with nonspecific symptoms of localized pain, swelling, warmth, loosening, instability, itching, or burning; localized rash is infrequent. Identification of the specific metal and cement components used in a particular implant can be difficult, but is crucial to guide testing and interpretation of results. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium remain the most common metals implicated in implant failure due to metal sensitization; methacrylate-based cements are also important contributors. This review will provide a guide on how to assess and interpret the clinical history, identify the components used in surgery, test for sensitization, and provide advice on possible solutions. Data on the pathways of metal-induced immune stimulation are included. In this setting, the allergist, the dermatologist, or both have the potential to significantly improve surgical outcomes and patient care. PMID:26362550

  20. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  1. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  2. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  4. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  5. The Effects of Musical and Linguistic Components in Recognition of Real-World Musical Excerpts by Cochlear Implant Recipients and Normal-Hearing Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Jiang, Dingfeng; Oleson, Jacob; Driscoll, Virginia; Olszewski, Carol; Knutson, John F.; Turner, Christopher; Gantz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Background Cochlear implants (CI) are effective in transmitting salient features of speech, especially in quiet, but current CI technology is not well suited in transmission of key musical structures (e.g., melody, timbre). It is possible, however, that sung lyrics, which are commonly heard in real-world music may provide acoustical cues that support better music perception. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine how accurately adults who use CIs (n=87) and those with normal hearing (NH) (n=17) are able to recognize real-world music excerpts based upon musical and linguistic (lyrics) cues. Results CI recipients were significantly less accurate than NH listeners on recognition of real-world music with or, in particular, without lyrics; however, CI recipients whose devices transmitted acoustic plus electric stimulation were more accurate than CI recipients reliant upon electric stimulation alone (particularly items without linguistic cues). Recognition by CI recipients improved as a function of linguistic cues. Methods Participants were tested on melody recognition of complex melodies (pop, country, classical styles). Results were analyzed as a function of: hearing status and history, device type (electric only or acoustic plus electric stimulation), musical style, linguistic and musical cues, speech perception scores, cognitive processing, music background, age, and in relation to self-report on listening acuity and enjoyment. Age at time of testing was negatively correlated with recognition performance. Conclusions These results have practical implications regarding successful participation of CI users in music-based activities that include recognition and accurate perception of real-world songs (e.g., reminiscence, lyric analysis, listening for enjoyment). PMID:22803258

  6. Early History and Challenges of Implantable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    KO, WEN H.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable systems for biomedical research and clinical care are now a flourishing field of activities in academia as well as industrial institutions. The broad field includes experimental explorations in electronics, mechanical, chemical, and biological components and systems, and the combination of all these. Today virtually all implants involve both electronic circuits and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS). This article offers a very brief glance back at the early history of implant electronics in the period from the 1950s to the 1970s, by employing selected examples from the author’s research. This short review also discusses the challenges of implantable electronics at present, and suggests some potentially important trends in the future research and development of implantable microsystems. It is aimed as an introduction of implantable/attached electronic systems to research engineers that are interested in implantable systems as a section of Biomedical Instrumentations. PMID:24791159

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  8. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  9. Evaluation of Evoked Potentials to Dyadic Tones after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jancke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of…

  10. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  11. Contact dermatitis after implantable cardiac defibrillator implantation for ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Pinar; Inci, Sinan; Kuyumcu, Mevlut Serdar; Kus, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pacemaker contact sensitivity is a rare condition. Less than 30 reports of pacemaker skin reactions have been described. We report a 57-year-old woman who underwent an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) implantation for ventricular tachycardia. A skin patch test was positive on almost all components of the pacemaker system. She was treated with topical corticosteroids and skin lesions resolved within 2 weeks. Because of widespread use of various devices, we will see this more often and therefore it is important to recognize this problem and its effective management. PMID:26989652

  12. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  13. Contamination Control in Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, R.; Doi, D.; Santos, I.; Wriggins, W.

    2011-01-07

    The investigation and elimination or control of metallic contamination in ion implanters has been a leading, continuous effort at implanter OEMs and in fabs/IDMs alike. Much of the efforts have been in the area of control of sputtering through material and geometry changes in apertures, beamline and target chamber components. In this paper, we will focus on an area that has not, heretofore, been fully investigated or controlled. This is the area of lubricants and internal and external support material such as selected cleaning media. Some of these materials are designated for internal use (beamline/vacuum) only while others are for internal and/or external use. Many applications for selected greases, for example, are designated for or are used for platens, implant disks/wheels and for wafer handling components. We will present data from popular lubricants (to be unnamed) used worldwide in ion implanters. This paper will review elements of concern in many lubricants that should be tracked and monitored by all fabs.Proper understanding of the characteristics, risks and the control of these potential contaminants can provide for rapid return to full process capability following major PMs or parts changes. Using VPD-ICPMS, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography (IC) data, we will review the typical cleaning results and correlation to ''on wafer'' contamination by elements of concern--and by some elements that are otherwise barred from the fab.

  14. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subodh K.

    2006-01-09

    A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the

  15. Finite element analysis of thumb carpometacarpal joint implants

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, C.

    1995-11-01

    The thumb carpometacarpal joint is frequently replaced in women who have developed severe osteoarthritis of the hand. A new, privately developed implant design consists of two components, trapezial and metacarpal, each with a saddle-shaped articulating surface. A three dimensional finite element model of this implant has been developed to analyze stresses on the device. The first simulations using the model involve loading the implant with forces normal to the trapezial component. Preliminary results show contact stress distributions at the particulating surfaces of the implant.

  16. Ion Implantation into Presolar Grains: A Theoretical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    A numerical model for ion implantation into spherical grains in free space has been developed. It can be applied to single grains or collections of grains with known grain-size distributions. Ion-scattering effects were taken into account using results of computer simulations. Possible isotope and element fractionation of the implanted species was investigated using this model. The astrophysical significance of the model lies in the possible identification of energetically different components (such as noble gases) implanted into presolar grains (such as diamond and SiC) and in establishing implantation energies of the components.

  17. Evaluation of evoked potentials to dyadic tones after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of cochlear implant users (n = 12), which allowed detailed spatio-temporal evaluation of auditory evoked potentials by means of dipole source analysis. The present study examined hemispheric asymmetries of auditory evoked potentials to musical sounds in cochlear implant users to evaluate the effect of this type of implantation on neuronal activity. In particular, implant users were presented with two dyadic tonal intervals in an active oddball design and in a passive listening condition. Principally, the results show that independent component analysis is an efficient approach that enables the study of neurophysiological mechanisms of restored auditory function in cochlear implant users. Moreover, our data indicate altered hemispheric asymmetries for dyadic tone processing in implant users compared with listeners with normal hearing (n = 12). We conclude that the evaluation of auditory evoked potentials are of major relevance to understanding auditory cortex function after cochlear implantation and could be of substantial clinical value by indicating the maturation/reorganization of the auditory system after implantation. PMID:19293240

  18. A new approach towards a minimal invasive retina implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerding, H.

    2007-03-01

    The possibility of using retina implants ('retinal prostheses') for the restoration of basic orientation in blind patients suffering from distal retinal diseases is presently under investigation by at least 18 independent project groups worldwide. It is a common feature of all implants to bypass degenerated retinal layers and to transfer visual information into the retinal network either by direct electrical stimulation or by neurotransmitter release. Contemporary implant designs are differing in the position of stimulating electrodes (epiretinal, subretinal, external) and the anatomical arrangement of implant components (intraocular, extraocular). The latter is of high relevance with regard to possible implant-tissue interactions and biological reactions. During the last few years new types of implants appeared that reduce intraocular components which are now deposited on the outer scleral surface or even in extraorbital position. The extreme of this trend are completely extraocular implants with transchoroidal or extraocular stimulation of the retina. The new type of implant presented in this paper combines the principle of direct retinal stimulation and minimal invasive implantation in a way that stimulating electrodes are the only implant component penetrating the eye via sclera, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. All other device elements are positioned in extraocular position. The new concept necessitates a paradigmatic change about surgical handling of the choroid and multiple penetrations of the eye. Successful data about this type of retinal prosthesis are already available from long-term observation in non-human primates.

  19. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  20. Clinical evaluation of mandibular implant overdentures via Locator implant attachment and Locator bar attachment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong-Ho; Bae, Eun-Bin; Kim, Jung-Woo; Lee, So-Hyoun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Young-Chan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical findings and patient satisfaction on implant overdenture designed with Locator implant attachment or Locator bar attachment in mandibular edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Implant survival rate, marginal bone loss, probing depth, peri-implant inflammation, bleeding, plaque, calculus, complications, and satisfaction were evaluated on sixteen patients who were treated with mandibular overdenture and have used it for at least 1 year (Locator implant attachment: n=8, Locator bar attachment: n=8). RESULTS Marginal bone loss, probing depth, plaque index of the Locator bar attachment group were significantly lower than the Locator implant attachment group (P<.05). There was no significant difference on bleeding, peri-implant inflammation, and patient satisfaction between the two denture types (P>.05). The replacement of the attachment components was the most common complication in both groups. Although there was no correlation between marginal bone loss and plaque index, a significant correlation was found between marginal bone loss and probing depth. CONCLUSION The Locator bar attachment group indicates lesser marginal bone loss and need for maintenance, as compared with the Locator implant attachment group. This may be due to the splinting effect among implants rather than the types of Locator attachment. PMID:27555901

  1. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  2. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  3. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  4. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient. PMID:22990986

  5. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  6. Modified Titanium Implant as a Gateway to the Human Body: The Implant Mediated Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Cho, Joo-Youn; Hwang, Chee Il

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a proposed new implant mediated drug delivery system (IMDDS) in rabbits. The drug delivery system is applied through a modified titanium implant that is configured to be implanted into bone. The implant is hollow and has multiple microholes that can continuously deliver therapeutic agents into the systematic body. To examine the efficacy and feasibility of the IMDDS, we investigated the pharmacokinetic behavior of dexamethasone in plasma after a single dose was delivered via the modified implant placed in the rabbit tibia. After measuring the plasma concentration, the areas under the curve showed that the IMDDS provided a sustained release for a relatively long period. The result suggests that the IMDDS can deliver a sustained release of certain drug components with a high bioavailability. Accordingly, the IMDDS may provide the basis for a novel approach to treating patients with chronic diseases. PMID:25136624

  7. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  8. [Possibilities for improvement of the surface properties of dental implants (2). The use of ceramic oxides in surface coating for titanium and tantalum implants].

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Kovács, L; Vargha, K

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion-resistant, 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure was produced on the surface of titanium implants. The layer contains a bioactive component, it is made from the material of the implant, adheres well and gives an aesthetically pleasant impression. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for their qualitative characterization. These tests demonstrated the good properties of the implants. The procedure is protected internationally by patents. PMID:7875341

  9. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  10. Silicone breast implant materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U

    2012-01-01

    This opinion article has been written on request because of the recent public controversy over silicone breast implants produced by a now-defunct company, Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) in France. More than 300,000 PIP devices have been implanted. The purposes of my article are to (1.) provide a general overview of silicone breast implant materials, (2.) to describe the general safety of these materials as reported to date, and (3.) to summarise current publicly available information about these aspects of the PIP prostheses. The materials covered are the silicone rubber from which the implant shells are made and the silicone gel used to fill the shell. The materials safety issues are biocompatibility (especially of the gel) and biodurability of the shell. The literature reviewed indicates that biocompatibility is not an issue with other current generation implants. However, biodurability is. A rough estimate of implant shell rupture rate is ~10+% at 10 years. Information is still emerging about the PIP implants. Initial regulatory disclosures suggest the PIP implants may have both biocompatibility and biodurability problems. They also suggest that PIP implants may have been produced using silicone materials not certified as medical grade. Governmental health and regulatory agencies are just now in the process of deciding what actions should be taken to protect patients. PMID:22826101

  11. Percutaneous Implants with Porous Titanium Dermal Barriers: An In Vivo Evaluation of Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants are a promising prosthetic alternative for a subset of amputees. However, as with all percutaneous implants, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Theoretically, host tissues could attach to the metal implant creating a barrier to infection. When compared with smooth surfaces, it is hypothesized that porous surfaces improve the attachment of the host tissues to the implant, and decrease the infection risk. In this study, 4 titanium implants, manufactured with a percutaneous post and a subcutaneous disk, were placed subcutaneously on the dorsum of eight New Zealand White rabbits. Beginning at four weeks post-op, the implants were inoculated weekly with 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus until signs of clinical infection presented. While we were unable to detect a difference in the incidence of infection of the porous metal implants, smooth surface (no porous coating) percutaneous and subcutaneous components had a 7-fold increased risk of infection compared to the implants with a porous coating on one or both components. The porous coated implants displayed excellent tissue ingrowth into the porous structures; whereas, the smooth implants were surrounded with a thick, organized fibrotic capsule that was separated from the implant surface. This study suggests that porous coated metal percutaneous implants are at a significantly lower risk of infection when compared to smooth metal implants. The smooth surface percutaneous implants were inadequate in allowing a long-term seal to develop with the soft tissue, thus increasing vulnerability to the migration of infecting microorganisms. PMID:21145778

  12. Reliability systems for implantable cardiac defibrillator batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Esther S.

    The reliability of the power sources used in implantable cardiac defibrillators is critical due to the life-saving nature of the device. Achieving a high reliability power source depends on several systems functioning together. Appropriate cell design is the first step in assuring a reliable product. Qualification of critical components and of the cells using those components is done prior to their designation as implantable grade. Product consistency is assured by control of manufacturing practices and verified by sampling plans using both accelerated and real-time testing. Results to date show that lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells used for implantable cardiac defibrillators have a calculated maximum random failure rate of 0.005% per test month.

  13. Larynx: implants and stents

    PubMed Central

    Sittel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In the human larynx, implants a primarily used for the correction of glottis insufficiency. In a broader sense laryngeal stents may be considered as implants as well. Laryngeal implants can be differentiated into injectable and solid. The most important representatives of both groups are discussed in detail along with the respective technique of application. Laryngeal stents are primarily used perioperatively. Different types and their use are presented. PMID:22073097

  14. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  15. [Adjusting gingival tissues morphology after dental implantation with fibrin use].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Sheplev, B V; Ragimova, T M; Kovyntsev, A N; Kovyntsev, D N; Shevela, A I

    2009-01-01

    In gingival tissues of 62 patients after dental implantation of traditional type and with the use of thrombocyte rich fibrin preparation (TRFP) microcirculation and leucocytal infiltration were studied. It was disclosed that in all terms after titanium screw dental implant setting lymphostasis and leucocytal infiltration were seen as signs of active inflammatory process in gingival tissues. 3 months later after implants setting with the use of TRFP the lymphatic vessels status was normalized, the degree of leucocytal infiltration was reduced; when implantation was made without use of fibrin technologies in gingival tissues more leucocytes were found and lymphatic bed components were remained dilated. Besides fibrin preparation use in the process of dental implantation promoted quicker and stronger implant fixation, but granulomatous inflammatory process could develop and amount of eosinophils in gingival tissues could also increased. PMID:19365340

  16. Programming, Care, and Troubleshooting of Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current cochlear implant technology, programming strategies, troubleshooting, and care techniques. It considers: device components, initial stimulation, speech coding strategies, use and care, troubleshooting, and the classroom environment. (Contains references.) (DB)

  17. Diclofenac Sodium Loaded Multicomponent Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2008-02-01

    Earlier we have reported on developing DS releasing bioabsorbable rods for inhibition of osteolysis [l]. Due to their unsatisfactory drug release profiles we assessed the use of sintering technique of enhancement of drug release in the current study. Melt extruded PLGA 80/20 rods were compounded 8 wt-% DS. Some rods were self reinforced (SR) and some of them were sterilized to get three different components with different drug release profiles. Different rods were sintered together with heat and pressure. Three different specimen groups with different construction were studied. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Changes of IV were performed with capillary analysis and drug release measurements with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Mechanical strength were measured two weeks, when disintegration occurred. Release rate consisted of 1) sharp jump start peak, 2) second smoother peak, and 3) third smooth peak. Released DS concentrations reached local therapeutic levels and maintained at that stage for 24-36 days. All DS was released during 50-70 days. The drug release from multicomponent implant was more stable and commenced earlier than from initial rods. Such properties were favored ones. Initial shear strength was 82 MPa and it decreased to 15 MPa. The mechanical bonding was sufficient although the components disintegrated relatively fast. By sintering different PLGA/DS components with different release rates it is possible to construct a truly controlled release implant for bone fixation with anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. The Sponge Implant Model of Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Silvia Passos; Ferreira, Mônica Alves Neves Diniz

    2016-01-01

    The host response observed after the application of an appropriate stimulus, such as mechanical injury or injection of neoplastic or normal tissue implants, has allowed the cataloging of a number of molecules and cells involved in the vascularization of normal repair or neoplastic tissue. Implantation of sponge matrices has been adopted as a model for the accurate quantification of angiogenic and fibrogenic responses, as they may occur during wound healing, in vivo. Such implants are particularly useful because they offer scope for modulating the environment within which angiogenesis occurs. Sponge implantation model has been optimized and adapted to characterize essential components and their roles in blood vessels formation in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. As a direct consequence of advances in genetic manipulation, mouse models (i.e., knockouts, SCID, nude) have provided resources to delineate the mechanisms regulating the healing associated with implants. Here we outline the usefulness of the sponge implant model of angiogenesis and detailed description of the methodology. PMID:27172965

  19. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimum design of orthopedic knee implants.

    PubMed

    Saravanos, D A; Mraz, P J; Davy, D T; Hopkins, D A

    1991-03-01

    NASA technology originally developed for designing aircraft turbine-engine blades has been adapted and applied to orthopedic knee implants. This article describes a method for tailoring an implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The implant components are designed to control stresses in the bone for minimizing bone degradation and preventing failures. Engineers expect the tailoring system to improve knee prosthesis design and allow customized implants for individual patients. PMID:10150099

  20. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  1. Microbiological Seal of Two Types of Tapered Implant Connections.

    PubMed

    Peruzetto, Wheslley M; Martinez, Elizabeth F; Peruzzo, Daiane C; Joly, Júlio Cesar; Napimoga, Marcelo H

    2016-01-01

    Tapered implant connections have gained wide popularity for being more resistant to fatigue and for promoting a better seal against bacterial infiltration than conventional connections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial seal at the implant-abutment interface using two Morse taper implant models, by in vitro microbiological analysis. Eleven non-indexed and 11 indexed abutments were selected and connected to their respective implants with a 20 N torque, according to manufacturer's recommendation. Microbiological analysis was carried out using colonies of Escherichia coli transported directly from a culture dish to the prosthetic component. For control, one non-contaminated abutment-implant set from each group (negative control) and one contaminated implant with no abutment (positive control) were used. The specimens were immersed in BHI broth and maintained in an incubator at 37 °C for 14 days to assess the development of bacterial contamination. The results revealed that 36.4% (n=4) of the indexed components and 90.9% (n=10) of the non-indexed components allowed bacterial leakage, with significant difference between groups (p=0.0237). In conclusion, both tapered components failed to provide adequate sealing to bacterial leakage, although the indexed type components showed a superior seal compared with non-indexed components. PMID:27224559

  2. Gold bead implants.

    PubMed

    Durkes, T E

    1992-03-01

    Gold bead implantation is an experimental area of study in the acupuncture field dealing with chronic diseases. Special acupuncture techniques are required to implant the gold beads successfully in the proper location. Gold beads are used to treat degenerative joint disease, osteochondritis, osteochondritis dessicans, ventral spondylosis, and seizures. PMID:1581658

  3. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  4. Synthetic facial implants.

    PubMed

    Quatela, Vito C; Chow, Jen

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a range of synthetic implant materials for use in facial plastic surgery. The authors discuss alternatives to autogenous tissue transfer in terms of biocompatibility, technique, complications, controversies, and cautions. The reader is presented information about a range of synthetic implant materials such as silicone, polyester fiber, polyamide mesh, metal, polyethylene, polyacrylamide gel, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, collagen, and others. PMID:18063244

  5. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  6. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  7. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  8. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  9. Melodic Contour Identification by Cochlear Implant Listeners

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie; Nogaki, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    , MCI performance was significantly correlated with vowel recognition performance; FMI performance was not correlated with cochlear implant subjects’ phoneme recognition performance. Preliminary results also showed that the MCI training improved all subjects’ MCI performance; the improved MCI performance also generalized to improved FMI performance. Conclusions Preliminary data indicate that the closed-set MCI task is a viable approach toward quantifying an important component of cochlear implant users’ music perception. The improvement in MCI performance and generalization to FMI performance with training suggests that MCI training may be useful for improving cochlear implant users’ music perception and appreciation; such training may be necessary to properly evaluate patient performance, as acute measures may underestimate the amount of musical information transmitted by the cochlear implant device and received by cochlear implant listeners. PMID:17485980

  10. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  11. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  12. [Implantable medical devices].

    PubMed

    Crickx, B; Arrault, X

    2008-01-01

    Medical devices have been individualized to include a category of implantable medical devices, "designed to be totally implanted in the human body or to replace an epithelial surface or a surface of the eye, through surgery, and remain in place after the intervention" (directive 93/42/CEE and decree of 20 April 206). Each implantable medical device has a common name and a commercial name for precise identification of the model (type/references). The users' service and the implanting physician should be clearly identified. There are a number of rules concerning health traceability to rapidly identify patients exposed to risks in which the implantable medical devices of a particular batch or series were used and to monitor the consequences. The traceability data should be preserved 10 years and the patient's medical file for 20 years. PMID:18442666

  13. Cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Young, N M

    1994-04-01

    Children with such profound deafness that they are not helped by hearing aids are now candidates for cochlear implantation. This technology permits us to provide these children with a significant degree of useful hearing. The degree of improvement in speech perception and spoken language in pediatric cochlear implant recipients varies. However, the younger the children and the less time they have been completely deprived of auditory stimuli, the more likely they are to make significant progress. The evaluation of the deaf child for implantation is best done by a multidisciplinary team who understands the needs of hearing-impaired children and who can work with the family, the child, and classroom teachers, as well as other school professionals. The decision to proceed with cochlear implantation in a child is one that requires long-term commitment on the part of the family and the cochlear implant team. PMID:8039409

  14. A histological study of retrieved Cambridge acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Roger A; Field, Richard E; Jones, Eric; Sood, Asheesh; Rushton, Neil

    2010-01-01

    A new uncemented acetabular component, the Cambridge cup, has been designed to mimic the anatomy and physiology of subchondral bone in order to minimise stress shielding and enhance long-term component stability. Cambridge cups were implanted in a cohort of 50 women who presented with displaced sub-capital fracture of the femoral neck. The cups were manufactured with an hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Twenty six cups were implanted after removal of the HA. Twelve Cambridge cups were retrieved post-mortem between two and 84 months after implantation. Histological and histomorphometric testing was undertaken to analyse the residual HA coating thickness, bone apposition to the implant surface and particulate wear debris in the surrounding tissues. The HA-coated implants showed significantly greater bone apposition to the implant surface with significantly less fibrous tissue formation than the uncoated implants. Where HA resorption occurred, bone and bone marrow was seen adjacent to the implant. Excessive wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene liner was not seen. The HA-coated components demonstrated good initial bone implant bonding and the flexible carbon polymer appeared to maintain stability following HA resorption. The uncoated implants showed little or no bony apposition but had a fibrous membrane apposed to the implant surface. This may be explained by a combination of micro-motion at the bone implant interface and having a component surface finish that was poorly suited to osseous attachment. Hydroxyapatite coated acetabular components can provide reliable osseous attachment. Subsequent HA resorption need not compromise medium-term osseous fixation to an appropriate implant surface. PMID:20235075

  15. Hip and knee arthroplasty implants contraindicated in obesity.

    PubMed

    Craik, J D; Bircher, M D; Rickman, M

    2016-05-01

    Introduction High patient weight is a risk factor for mechanical implant failure and some manufacturers list obesity as a contraindication for implant use. We reviewed data from the 2012-2013 UK National Joint Registry to determine whether surgical practice reflects these manufacturer recommendations. Methods The product literature for the most commonly used hip and knee implants was reviewed for recommendations against use in obese patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30kg/m(2)). The total number of obese patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty was calculated, as was the proportion receiving implants against manufacturer recommendations. Results Out of 200,054 patient records, 147,691 (74%) had a recorded BMI. The mean BMI for patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty was 29kg/m(2), compared with 31kg/m(2) for total knee arthroplasty. Of the 25 components reviewed, 5 listed obesity as a contraindication or recommended against implant use in obese patients. A total of 10,745 patients (16% of all obese patients) received implants against manufacturer recommendations. Conclusions A high proportion of patients are receiving implants against manufacturer recommendations. However, there are limitations to using BMI for stratifying risk of implant fatigue failure and manufacturers should therefore provide more detailed guidelines on size specific implant load limits to facilitate surgical decisions. PMID:27023636

  16. Cochlear Implants:System Design, Integration and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rebscher, Stephen; Harrison, William V.; Sun, Xiaoan; Feng, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    As the most successful neural prosthesis, cochlear implants have provided partial hearing to more than 120,000 persons worldwide; half of which being pediatric users who are able to develop nearly normal language. Biomedical engineers have played a central role in the design, integration and evaluation of the cochlear implant system, but the overall success is a result of collaborative work with physiologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, and entrepreneurs. This review presents broad yet in-depth academic and industrial perspectives on the underlying research and ongoing development of cochlear implants. The introduction accounts for major events and advances in cochlear implants, including dynamic interplays among engineers, scientists, physicians, and policy makers. The review takes a system approach to address critical issues from design and specifications to integration and evaluation. First, the cochlear implant system design and specifications are laid out. Second, the design goals, principles, and methods of the subsystem components are identified from the external speech processor and radio frequency transmission link to the internal receiver, stimulator and electrode arrays. Third, system integration and functional evaluation are presented with respect to safety, reliability, and challenges facing the present and future cochlear implant designers and users. Finally, issues beyond cochlear implants are discussed to address treatment options for the entire spectrum of hearing impairment as well as to use the cochlear implant as a model to design and evaluate other similar neural prostheses such as vestibular and retinal implants. PMID:19946565

  17. Posterior implants for distal extension removable prostheses: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mitrani, Ricardo; Brudvik, James S; Phillips, Keith M

    2003-08-01

    Common complaints associated with the Kennedy Class I (bilateral free end) and Class II (unilateral free end) removable partial denture situations are lack of stability, minimal retention, and unesthetic retentive clasping. Some of the same complaints have been reported for implant overdentures with only anterior implants. Starting in 1995, 10 of these patients were treated at the University of Washington with posterior osseointegrated implants to provide stability and/or retention of the removable prostheses, eliminating the need for clasps when possible. This article describes implant alternatives and prosthesis designs and presents a follow-up clinical evaluation of at least 1 year consisting of patient satisfaction, radiographic examination, and soft tissue health. Two groups were evaluated. Group 1 included patients whose implants were used as vertical stops for mandibular distal extension prostheses. Care was taken to ensure that the implants were not loaded laterally by creating a single-point contact at the center of a modified healing abutment. In these cases, sufficient retention was available from the anterior teeth and/or implant abutments. Group 2 included patients whose implants required retention because of lack of adequate tooth abutments. In those cases, a resilient type of attachment was used, which allowed for a small divergence from the path of insertion. Results indicated consistent increased satisfaction in all patients, minimal component wear, no radiographic evidence of excessive bone loss, and stable peri-implant soft tissues. PMID:12956479

  18. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  19. Immunopathologic effects of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed Central

    Teuber, S S; Yoshida, S H; Gershwin, M E

    1995-01-01

    Silicone-gel breast implants have been associated with a myriad of autoimmune and connective tissue disorders by anecdotal reports and small observational series. To date, no prospective epidemiologic studies have been done to substantiate these observations, but an increasing body of literature is being developed and older studies are being recognized that point to immunotoxic or inflammatory effects of these breast implant components. The development of disease due to implants would depend on the interaction of genetic host factors so that only a few patients would potentially be at risk. Based on the example of other chemically mediated disorders, such as scleroderma in association with silica exposure, latency periods of more than 30 years before disease develops may be possible. Herein we review studies on silicone and immunity. PMID:7785255

  20. [Implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Luers, J C; Beutner, D; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2011-10-01

    Strictly speaking, implantable hearing aids are technical systems that process audiological signals and convey these by direct mechanical stimulation of the ossicular chain or cochlea. They have certain benefits over conventional hearing aids in terms of wearing comfort and general acceptance. As current studies lack convincing audiological results, the indications for implantable hearing aids are primarily of medical or cosmetic nature. To date, three systems are available in Germany: Vibrant Soundbridge®, Carina®, and Esteem®. Because the performance of the different implantable and nonimplantable hearing systems together with various surgical procedures are currently undergoing major changes, audiological indications may also develop in the future. PMID:21956678

  1. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  3. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  4. Imaging of tritium implanted into graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Causey, R.A.

    1988-05-01

    The extensive use of graphite in plasma-facing surfaces of tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, which has planned tritium discharges, makes two-dimensional tritium detection techniques important in helping to determine torus tritium inventories. We have performed experiments in which highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were first tritium implanted with fluences of approx.10/sup 16/ T/cm/sup 2/ at energies approx. <25 eV and then the near-surface implant distributions were detected in two dimensions using tritium imaging. A portion of the sample was masked off during the implant in order to produce a well-defined implant boundary. Heating of the HOPG samples to temperatures as high as 500 /sup 0/C resulted in no discernible motion of tritium along the basal plane, but did show that significant desorption of the implanted tritium occurred. The current results indicate that tritium in quantities of 10/sup 12/ T/cm/sup 2/ in tritiated components could be readily detected by imaging at lower magnifications.

  5. A Luting Technique for Passive Fit of Implant-Supported Fixed Dentures.

    PubMed

    Menini, Maria; Dellepiane, Elena; Pera, Paolo; Bevilacqua, Marco; Pesce, Paolo; Pera, Francesco; Tealdo, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Several factors contribute to distortion of implant prostheses during fabrication and could prevent passive, accurate adaptation between implants and implant frameworks. The misfit between implants and restorative components may be significant and possibly lead to biologic or mechanical complications. The aim of this article is to describe a laboratory luting technique used to lute implant cylinders to metal frameworks in implant prostheses. This technique provides accurate, passive fits. According to this technique, titanium implant cylinders provided with corresponding external castable cylinders are used. Implant cylinders are screwed into the analogs in the master cast while the castable cylinders on top are splinted together using castable resin to realize a castable resin pattern. After casting, the framework is adjusted and cemented to the titanium cylinders on the master cast. Due to its ease and quickness of use and clinical efficiencies, this technique is deemed particularly useful in immediate loading rehabilitations. PMID:25898912

  6. Visualization of spiral ganglion neurites within the scala tympani with a cochlear implant in situ

    PubMed Central

    Chikar, Jennifer A.; Batts, Shelley A.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Current cochlear histology methods do not allow in situ processing of cochlear implants. The metal components of the implant preclude standard embedding and mid-modiolar sectioning, and whole mounts do not have the spatial resolution needed to view the implant within the scala tympani. One focus of recent auditory research is the regeneration of structures within the cochlea, particularly the ganglion cells and their processes, and there are multiple potential benefits to cochlear implant users from this work. To facilitate experimental investigations of auditory nerve regeneration performed in conjunction with cochlear implantation, it is critical to visualize the cochlear tissue and the implant together to determine if the nerve has made contact with the implant. This paper presents a novel histological technique that enables simultaneous visualization of the in situ cochlear implant and neurofilament – labeled nerve processes within the scala tympani, and the spatial relationship between them. PMID:19428528

  7. Clinically based implant selection.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    A hierarchy of implant selection is presented, based on overcoming specific clinical challenges in a variety of situations, including maximization of the esthetic, comfort, and functional potentials of therapy. PMID:10709488

  8. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... stages, or surgeries. During the first stage, a tissue expander is used. An implant is placed during the ... a pouch under your chest muscle. A small tissue expander is placed in the pouch. The expander is ...

  9. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  10. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  11. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  12. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  13. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  14. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  15. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  16. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  17. A Fully Implantable 96-channel Neural Data Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively-coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed, and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. PMID:19255459

  18. Electroslag component casting. [Nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This project is directed toward the development of electroslag-casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is also to develop a sufficient data base to permit electroslag casting to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. A total of 32 electroslag castings of 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, type 316, and nickel aluminide were procured from four facilities for evaluation (Table 1). The most complex castings procured during this program were the valve bodies shown in Figure 2. The castings were subjected to various heat treatments (Table 2), checked for chemical composition uniformity from top to bottom, and subjected to macrostructural evaluation and mechanical properties testing. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. NONSURGICAL PERIODONTAL MANAGEMENT OF IATROGENIC PERI-IMPLANTITIS: A CLINICAL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Roncati, M; Lauritano, D; Tagliabue, A; Tettamanti, L

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have emerged as a first line of treatment to replace missing teeth for both the edentulous and partially dentate patients. The anticipated high degree of success is somewhat challenged by the onset of peri-implantitis. Peri-implant diseases are a cluster of “contemporary” oral infections in humans; they are characterized by the inflammatory destruction of the implant-supporting tissues, as a result of biofilm formation on the implant surface. It is still not clear how the roles of its etiologic agents work. A history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, and smoking are considered as risk factors for peri-implant diseases. Occasionally failing implants are associated with iatrogenic factors, that, only recently, have been acknowledged as direct cause of peri-implant complications, i.e.: non-parallel adjacent implants or the presence of a gap, between fixture and prosthetic components. The use both of traditional protocols of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and the diode laser seems to be an effective alternative treatment modality for peri-implantitis. By the application of laser-assisted non-surgical peri-implant therapy the periodontal pocket depth was reduced. Intraoral periapical radiographs, taken at 6 months and 1 year post nonsurgical treatment, seemed to provide evidence of some improvement of the bone level. The present article illustrates the nonsurgical management of one case, where failure to remove residual cement, from an implant-supported dental prosthesis, seemed to cause peri-implant inflammation. PMID:26511197

  20. A tag and trace approach to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on hillslopes under permanent pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Philip; Walling, Desmond; Quine, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    This communication presents preliminary results from a tag and trace experiment to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on a gentle (i.e. 4%) hillslope under permanent pasture using artificial radionuclides, caesium-134 (134Cs) and cobalt-60 (60Co). A rapid and repeatable laboratory-based procedure was devised for tagging groups of intact, air-dried casts by immersion into solutions containing a known activity concentration of either 134Cs or 60Co, each mixed in 2 l of water. For the tracing component of the work, fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 203 g of sediment were labelled with 216 Bq of 134Cs activity and evenly distributed across the upslope half of a 0.6 m long * 0.5 m wide bounded area of pasture, at a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from a plot outlet. A further fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 190.7 g of sediment were labelled with 224 Bq of 60Co activity and evenly distributed across the downslope half of the plot, at a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from the plot outlet. Over the following 76 days, all casts were exposed to natural weather events, during which time, 186.3 mm of rainfall generated 16 separate storm runoff samples. Sediment was recovered from the runoff, assayed by gamma spectrometry and a simple mixing model was used to partition the sediment into labelled material and unlabelled surface material. Provisional results indicate that a total of 26.8 g of 60Co-labelled sediment, equivalent to 14.1% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from their original position. In contrast, 9.1 g of 134Cs-labelled sediment, equivalent to 4.5% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from their original position. This presentation discusses key findings, with a particular focus on the temporal changes in sediment-supply, as well as a number of uncertainties associated with the technique. Despite these uncertainties, however, the essentially

  1. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  2. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient. PMID:22319362

  3. The Vestibular Implant: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Stokroos, Robert J.; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant (VI) and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, and Embase. Key words used were “vestibular prosth*” and “VI.” The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation. Study selection: All studies about the VI and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the VI. Data extraction and synthesis: Data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: To use a basic VI in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation), complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt. PMID:21991260

  4. Understanding music with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  5. Understanding music with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  6. Polylactide-polyglycolide antibiotic implants.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kevin; Feschuk, Connie

    2005-08-01

    Surgeons continually struggle to reduce orthopaedic infections, but no current treatment offers minimum side effects with maximum effectiveness. Antibiotics mixed in plaster of paris have been successful in treating large bony defects in patients with chronic osteomyelitis, and have the advantage of being well tolerated and absorbed by the body. Antibiotics impregnated in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have offered local antibiotic delivery with some success. However, the effect of the antibiotic on the bone cement, the inconsistent elution of the antibiotic, and the need to remove the PMMA implant drives the need for a better system of antibiotic delivery. Polymers or copolymers of antibiotic-impregnated polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid or polyparadioxanone may provide an absorbable system for localized antibiotic delivery. Similar biodegradable systems used to treat small bone fractures have been successful with minimal side effects. In vitro studies have shown promising results of antibiotic elution from bioabsorbable microspheres and beads. Animal in vivo tests have shown that antibiotic impregnated polymers can successfully treat induced osteomyelitis in rabbits and dogs. These studies have provided consistent reproducible results, and now it is time to plan human trials to assess the efficacy of antibiotic microspheres implanted in infected bone and to plan in vivo and in vitro animal testing to investigate the feasibility of antibiotic-polymer-coated components. PMID:16056034

  7. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  8. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Andreas L.; Kotsakis, Georgios A.; McHale, Michelle G.; Lareau, Donald E.; Hinrichs, James E.; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2015-01-01

    Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon's rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth. PMID:26124837

  9. First metatarsophalangeal joint implant as a salvage procedure.

    PubMed

    Allman, L M; Keating, S E

    2000-06-01

    First metatarsophalangeal joint implants are used to correct deformity, to restore or improve motion, and to relieve pain. The authors report on a patient with pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint that was not relieved by multiple first metatarsophalangeal joint surgical procedures. A two-component first metatarsophalangeal joint titanium implant was successfully used as a salvage procedure to relieve pain and restore foot function following a failed first metatarsophalangeal joint fusion. PMID:10881462

  10. Imaging for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Annis, J A; Robinson, P J

    1990-07-01

    Insertion of a sound amplification device into the round window niche (extracochlear implant) or into the coils of the cochlea (intracochlear implant) can give significant benefits to some carefully selected, severely deaf patients. Imaging has an essential role in selective and pre-operative assessment. Severe otosclerosis and post-meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans are common causes of deafness in these patients and can be demonstrated by computed tomography (CT). The most suitable side for operation can be assessed. We describe our experiences with 165 patients, 69 of whom were found suitable for implants. Thin (1 mm) section CT in axial and coronal planes is the best imaging investigation of the petrous temporal bones but the place of magnetic resonance scanning to confirm that the inner ear is fluid-filled and polytomography to show a multichannel implant in the cochlea is discussed. No implants were used for congenital deformities, but some observations are made of this type of structural deformity of the inner ear. PMID:2390686

  11. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  12. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure.

    PubMed

    Athanasou, N A

    2016-05-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles.Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162-168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  13. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles. Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162–168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  14. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    PubMed

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  15. Lightweight Breast Implants: A Novel Solution for Breast Augmentation and Reconstruction Mammaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Govrin-Yehudain, Jacky; Dvir, Haim; Preise, Dina; Govrin-Yehudain, Orel; Govreen-Segal, Dael

    2015-01-01

    Breast augmentation and reconstruction mammaplasty have been in practice for decades and are highly prevalent surgeries performed worldwide. While overall patient satisfaction is high, common long-term effects include breast tissue atrophy, accelerated ptosis and inframammary fold breakdown. Increasing evidence attributes these events to the durative loading and compressive forces introduced by the breast implants. Mechanical challenges exceeding the elastic capacity of the breast tissue components, eventually lead to irreversible tissue stretching, directly proportional to the introduced mass. Thus, it is suggested that, contrary to long-standing dogmas, implant weight, rather than its volume, stands at the basis of future tissue compromise and deformation. A novel lightweight implant has been developed to address the drawbacks of traditional breast implants, which demonstrate equivalence between their size and weight. The B-Lite® breast implant (G&G Biotechnology Ltd., Haifa, Israel) design allows for a reduction in implant weight of up to 30%, while maintaining the size, form, and function of traditional breast implants. The CE-marked device can be effectively implanted using standard of care procedures and has been established safe for human use. Implantation of the B-Lite® breast implant is projected to significantly reduce the inherent strains imposed by standard implants, thereby conserving tissue stability and integrity over time. In summary, this novel, lightweight breast implant promises to reduce breast tissue compromise and deformation and subsequent reoperation, further improving patient safety and satisfaction. PMID:26333989

  16. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  17. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  18. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  19. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  20. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  1. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  2. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  3. Rehabilitation using single stage implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B.; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K. V.; Shivakumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Implant related prosthesis has become an integral part of rehabilitation of edentulous areas. Single stage implant placement has become popular because of its ease of use and fairly predictable results. In this paper, we present a series of cases of single stage implants being used to rehabilitate different clinical situations. All the implants placed have been successfully restored and followed up for up to one year. PMID:20376239

  4. Prosthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Kutkut, Ahmad; Kim, Hyeongil

    2015-01-01

    Although osseointegrated dental implants have become a predictable and effective modality for the treatment of single or multiple missing teeth, their use is associated with clinical complications. Such complications can be biologic, technical, mechanical, or esthetic and may compromise implant outcomes to various degrees. This article presents prosthetic complications accompanied with implant-supported single and partial fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25434566

  5. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  6. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  7. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  8. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  9. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  10. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  11. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  12. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  13. [Allergy to bone cement components].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

  14. A Fully-Implanted Intramuscular Bipolar Myoelectric Signal Recording Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Memberg, William D.; Stage, Thomas G.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a fully-implanted, intramuscular, bipolar, myoelectric signal recording electrode (IM-MES) for functional electrical stimulation (FES), prosthetic myoelectric control, and other permanently implantable systems. Materials and Methods An existing fully-implanted intramuscular stimulating electrode was modified at each end to allow bipolar recording. The design change also required a modification of the implantation method. Mechanical and in vivo testing was performed on the novel components of the electrode. The first clinical application is also described. Results The electrode design modifications did not create any areas of excess mechanical strain on the wires at the distal end where the leads were wound into electrode surfaces. In vivo testing showed that the IM-MES electrode recorded myoelectric signals that were equivalent to an existing epimysial MES electrode. The modified implantation method was simple to implement. The IM-MES electrode was used in an upper extremity FES system in an individual with a spinal cord injury, and provided signals that were suitable for a command signal. Conclusions A fully-implanted, bipolar intramuscular recording electrode (IM-MES) was developed. Implantation of the IM-MES is straightforward and almost any muscle can be targeted. Testing has been performed to demonstrate the suitability of the IM-MES electrode for clinical use. Initial clinical applications were successful. PMID:24612356

  15. Polymeric packaging for fully implantable wireless neural microsensors.

    PubMed

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2012-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O(2)). PMID:23365999

  16. Polymeric Packaging for Fully Implantable Wireless Neural Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A.; Patterson, William R.; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O2). PMID:23365999

  17. Biofilm formation on surface characterized micro-implants for skeletal anchorage in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chin, Mervyn Y H; Sandham, Andrew; de Vries, Joop; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2007-04-01

    Micro-implants are increasingly popular in clinical orthodontics to effect skeletal anchorage. However, biofilm formation on their surfaces and subsequent infection of peri-implant tissues can result in either exfoliation or surgical removal of these devices. The present study aimed to assess biofilm formation on five commercially available, surface characterized micro-implant systems in vitro. The elemental surface compositions of as-received and autoclave-sterilized micro-implants were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High carbon contamination was detected on the oxide surfaces, along with traces of inorganic elements (Ca, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn, and P) which disappeared after Ar(+) ion sputtering. The mean surface roughnesses (R(a)) were around 182nm for titanium micro-implants, and 69nm for stainless steel micro-implants, as measured by atomic force microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed different surface topographies between manufacturers, varying from typical machined grooves to structural defects like pores and pits. Overnight biofilms were grown on micro-implant surfaces by immersion in pooled human whole saliva. Biofilms on micro-implants treated with chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthrinses contained comparable numbers of viable organisms, but significantly less than did untreated micro-implants. Comparison of different implant systems using multiple linear regression analysis indicated that biofilm formation was governed by roughness of the implant surface and the prevalence of carbon- and oxygen-rich components. PMID:17194475

  18. A Technique Elucidating the Retrieval of an Adhered Cover Screw in a Dental Implant – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswarri, J.; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dental implants have become one of the most popular and rapidly growing techniques for replacing missing teeth. While their predictability, functionality, and durability make them an attractive option for patients and clinicians alike, complications can arise at any stage from patient assessment to maintenance of therapy. Failure of dental implants not only occurs due to biological factors, like unsuccessful osseointegration or peri-implantitis but may also occur due to technical complications like, failures of implant-supported restorations relating those from the implant components, and those relating to the prosthesis. Technical problems related to implant components include abutment screw fractures and cover screw fractures. In this case report we have elucidated an adhered cover screw in an implant. PMID:24392429

  19. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  20. Development of a new, completely implantable intraventricular pressure meter and preliminary report of its clinical experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, K.; Murata, T.; Okamoto, S.; Ohta, T.; Ozaki, T.; Maeda, T.; Mori, K.; Handa, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Sakaguchi, I.

    1982-01-01

    A completely implantable intracranial pressure sensor designed for long-term measurement of intraventricular pressure in hydrocephalic patients is described. The measurement principal of the device is discussed along with the electronic and component structure and sources of instrument error. Clinical tests of this implanted pressure device involving both humans and animals showed it to be comparable to other methods of intracranial pressure measurement.

  1. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  2. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  3. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  4. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  5. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  6. Radiation-induced physical changes in UHMWPE implant components.

    PubMed

    Naidu, S H; Bixler, B L; Moulton, M J

    1997-02-01

    Post-irradiation aging of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is not well understood. Retrieval studies and in vitro aged specimens have shown oxidative changes along with increases in crystallinity. Critical analysis and review of the polymer science and polymer physics literature shows that while oxidation may be important during the first year post-irradiation, subsequent aging occurs because of initial gamma radiation-induced chain scission leading to eventual isothermal crystallization of polymer chains in the amorphous regions of the UHMWPE bulk. Mechanical properties of aged UHMWPE are not as yet clear and, until such data become available, gamma irradiation sterilization must be used with caution. PMID:9048391

  7. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  8. Hip Resurfacing Implants.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Sambri, Andrea; Mazzotti, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the advantages of hip resurfacing. 2. Describe the disadvantages of hip resurfacing. 3. Identify the population in which hip resurfacing is most often indicated. 4. Demonstrate how to properly postoperatively manage patients with metal-on-metal prostheses. Hip resurfacing offers a suitable solution for young patients affected by hip disease who have high function demands and good bone quality. Bone stock preservation, restoration of the normal proximal femur anatomy, the lack of stress shielding, and the possibility of resuming sporting activity are proven advantages of hip resurfacing. However, there are some disadvantages, such as fracture of the femoral neck, onset of neck narrowing, and possible complications due to the metal-on-metal bearings, including pseudotumors, peri-implant osteolysis, and chronic elevation of metal ions in serum levels. Recent data suggest that the ideal candidate for hip resurfacing is an active male, younger than 65 years, with primary or posttraumatic osteoarthritis, and with a femoral head diameter larger than 50 to 54 mm. Based on these selection criteria, the literature reports implant survival to be similar to that of total hip arthroplasty. The current authors' experience confirms a low failure rate and excellent functional outcomes, with metal ion serum levels becoming stable over time in well-functioning implants. Proper surgical technique, correct patient selection, and the right choice of a well-established prosthetic model are essential elements for the long-term success of these implants. PMID:26270748

  9. Sensitivity to implant materials in patients undergoing total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Cenni, Elisabetta; Trisolino, Giovanni; Giunti, Armando; Baldini, Nicola

    2006-05-01

    Sensitivity to implant materials is an unpredictable event, which may contribute to the process leading to the failure of the total hip replacement (THR). The aim of the current study was to investigate the informative power of skin testing in detecting the sensitization to the implant components in patients undergoing THR. A consecutive series of 223 patients was enrolled in the study, including 66 candidates to THR, 53 with stable implant, and 104 with THR loosening. The patch testing was performed by using the most relevant components of cobalt-based alloys (CoCrMo), Ti-based alloys (TiAlV), and bone cements. The frequency of positive patch testing in preimplant patients did not differ from that observed after THR. Patients with CoCrMo-failed implant showed a significant low frequency of nickel-positive skin reaction, while patients with TiAlV-THR had a high incidence of vanadium-positive patch testing. The panel of haptens showed a good performance in the identification of patients known to have a contact dermatitis. With regard to the THR outcome, patch testing was not able to discriminate between stable and failed implant. Sensitivity to at least one hapten, namely bone cement, as well as the positive medical history of hypersensitivity, influenced negatively the THR survival. Our results show the reliability of patch testing for investigating the sensitivity to implant components. The cause-effect relationship between sensitization and negative outcome cannot be established, but the shorter lifespan of THR in patients who have a positive patch testing supports the significant role of this event in contributing to the implant failure. PMID:16265661

  10. Accuracy of a proposed implant impression technique using abutments and metal framework

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Chang-Whe; Choi, Jung-Han

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the accuracy of an abutment-framework (A-F) taken with open tray impression technique combining cementon crown abutments, a metal framework and resin cement to closed tray and resin-splinted open tray impression techniques for the 3-implant definitive casts. The effect of angulation on the accuracy of these 3 techniques was also evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three definitive casts, each with 3 linearly positioned implant analogs at relative angulations 0, 30, and 40 degrees, were fabricated with passively fitted corresponding reference frameworks. Ten impressions were made and poured, using each of the 3 techniques on each of the 3 definitive casts. To record the vertical gap between reference frameworks and analogs in duplicate casts, a light microscope with image processing was used. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test. RESULTS The open tray techniques showed significantly smaller vertical gaps compare to closed tray technique (P < .05). The closed tray and the resin-splinted open tray technique showed significantly different vertical gaps according to the angulation of implant (P < .05), but the A-F impression technique did not (P > .05). CONCLUSION The accuracy of the A-F impression technique was superior to that of conventional techniques, and was not affected by the angulation of the implants. PMID:21165184

  11. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology. PMID:25912703

  12. Short implants: are they a viable option in implant dentistry?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven Richard

    2015-04-01

    Short-length implants (<10 mm) can be used effectively in atrophic maxillae or mandibles even with crown/implant ratios that previously would have been considered excessive. Short implants can support either single or multiple units and can be used for fixed prostheses or overdentures. The use of short-length implants may avoid the need for complicated bone augmentation procedures, thus allowing patients who were either unwilling or unable for financial or medical reasons to undergo these advanced grafting techniques to be adequately treated. PMID:25835796

  13. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward. PMID:24109798

  14. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimization of orthopedic knee implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) is adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the tailoring of the implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized, such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation and prevent failures. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is elevated. The optimization system is expected to provide the means for improving knee prosthesis and individual implant tailoring for each patient.

  15. Perioperative Management of Multiple Noncardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan A; Brull, Sorin J

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients with noncardiac implantable electronic devices is increasing, and the absence of perioperative management standards, guidelines, practice parameters, or expert consensus statements presents clinical challenges. A 69-year-old woman presented for latissimus dorsi breast reconstruction. The patient had previously undergone implantation of a spinal cord stimulator, a gastric pacemaker, a sacral nerve stimulator, and an intrathecal morphine pump. After consultation with device manufacturers, the devices with patient programmability were switched off. Bipolar cautery was used intraoperatively. Postoperatively, all devices were interrogated to ensure appropriate functioning before home discharge. Perioperative goals include complete preoperative radiologic documentation of device component location, minimizing electromagnetic interference, and avoiding mechanical damage to implanted device components. PMID:26588030

  16. [Actuality with the breast implants].

    PubMed

    Duchateau, J

    2013-09-01

    The author presents the history of breast implants, and the modern evolution where breast implants are largely used in both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. Breast augmentation is one of the most performed cosmetic procedures, with a high satisfaction rate. However, one needs to remind that breast implants have a limited duration of life. The estimated rate of breast implant rupture after 10 years is of 10% in the current literature, This rate will probably become lower with the new more cohesive implants recently available on the market. It is therefore essential to propose a regular follow-up to all patients having breast implants. This follow-up is performed using a combination of physical examination, mammograms, ultrasound and MRI. The more specific therapeutic approach for patients having a PIP prosthesis will also be discussed. PMID:24195240

  17. [Pre-implant esthetic study].

    PubMed

    Missika, P; Khayat, P

    1990-09-01

    The first dental prostheses used on Branemark implants were aesthetically disappointing both for the dentists and their patients. Therefore the authors will consider the various aesthetic problems encountered when treating loss of teeth with implant systems. The problems related to resorption are numerous: large bone losses are resolved by adapting removable acrylic, carrying out bone transplants immediately fixed by the implants, using filling materials, or complete dentures fixed with attachments supported by the implants. Periodontal surgery often provides a solution to the problem of gum visibility at the level of the maxillary anterior teeth. The problems related to the site where implants emerge can often be avoided by consultation between the surgeon and the prosthodontist and by flexing a surgical guide compiled from a pre-prosthetic analysis of the clinical situation. The aesthetic problems related to the actual implant systems are dependent on three factors: When the prosthesis is directly screwed onto the implant, the axis of the implant determines the axis of the dental prosthesis and can lead to the emergence of the screw on the buccal surface; With angulated cores, orientated screws provide the required solution. The implant material, when metallic leads to an unsightly border at the gingival level. Ceramic implants, or the "ceraming" of titanium, provide a solution to this problem. In case of diastema the use of an implant system gives the best choice in comparison to the more conventional treatments. In conclusion, the authors point out the importance of pre-implant analysis which must give an evaluation of the aesthetic result. The fragility of the aesthetic evaluation should encourage dentists to obtain the "clear and written consent" of their patients, accepting the risks run by treatment of this kind. PMID:2268774

  18. Positron Implantation Profile in Kapton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2006-11-01

    The discussion presented in the paper focuses on processes accompanying positron implantation in condensed matter. They finally constitute the positron implantation profile which generally does not exhibit the exponential behavior as it is concluded from the Monte Carlo simulation made using the EGSnrc 4.0 code. The simulation was performed for the kapton and two commonly used positron sources 22Na and 68Ge\\68Ga. New formula for the implantation profile was proposed.

  19. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  20. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate.

  1. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J A

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  2. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  3. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  4. Benzoyl peroxide: is it a relevant bone cement allergen in patients with orthopaedic implants?

    PubMed

    Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C

    2007-09-01

    Contact allergies to orthopaedic implant material are discussed to be relevant for postoperative complaints. We aimed at determining the prevalence of sensitizations to implant metals and to bone cements in patients with implants. We investigated 13 consecutive patients with suspicion of contact allergy to implant material. Epicutaneous patch testing was performed with metals and bone cement components including benzoyl peroxide (BPO). The chief complaints were skin disorders (n = 3), loosening of implant (n = 2), swelling (n = 6), and pain (n = 2). 6 patients had a sensitization to at least 1 allergen. 3 patients reacted to BPO, being of possible relevance in 1 of these patients suffering from dermatitis. Other sensitizations, such as those to nickel, fragrance, and balsam of Peru, were observed, with no clinical relevance (n = 1, respectively). BPO in bone cements may lead to type 4 sensitizations of which the relevance, however, remains questionable. Nevertheless we recommend this allergen to be tested in patients with complicated cemented orthopaedic implants. PMID:17680868

  5. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current Knowledge and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Mohammed Zaheer; Shah, Altaf H; Khalil, Hesham S; Rabah, Ahmed Mahmoud; Harby, Nehad Mohammed H; Sabra, Seham Ali; Raghav, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants. PMID:25838757

  6. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mangado, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Dejea Velardo, Hector; Mistrik, Pavel; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Fagertun, Jens; Noailly, Jérôme; Piella, Gemma; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging. To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient's CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns constitutive parameters to all components of the finite element model. This model can then be used to study in silico the effects of the electrical stimulation of the cochlear implant. Results are shown on a total of 25 models of patients. In all cases, a final mesh suitable for finite element simulations was obtained, in an average time of 94 s. The framework has proven to be fast and robust, and is promising for a detailed prognosis of the cochlear implantation surgery. PMID:26715210

  7. Rationale for the Use of CAD/CAM Technology in Implant Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Abduo, Jaafar; Lyons, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Despite the predictable longevity of implant prosthesis, there is an ongoing interest to continue to improve implant prosthodontic treatment and outcomes. One of the developments is the application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to produce implant abutments and frameworks from metal or ceramic materials. The aim of this narrative review is to critically evaluate the rationale of CAD/CAM utilization for implant prosthodontics. To date, CAD/CAM allows simplified production of precise and durable implant components. The precision of fit has been proven in several laboratory experiments and has been attributed to the design of implants. Milling also facilitates component fabrication from durable and aesthetic materials. With further development, it is expected that the CAD/CAM protocol will be further simplified. Although compelling clinical evidence supporting the superiority of CAD/CAM implant restorations is still lacking, it is envisioned that CAD/CAM may become the main stream for implant component fabrication. PMID:23690778

  8. Constrained Implants in Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Drosos, Georgios I; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-05-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a successful procedure for pain relief and functional restoration in patients with advanced osteoarthritis. The number of TKRs is increasing, and this has led to an increase in revision surgeries. The key to long-term success in both primary and revision TKR is stability, as well as adequate and stable fixation between components and underlying bone. In the vast majority of primary TKRs and in some revision cases, a posterior cruciate retaining or a posterior cruciate substituting device can be used. In some primary cases with severe deformity or ligamentous instability and in most of the revision cases, a more constrained implant is required. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the use of condylar constrained knee (CCK) and rotating hinge (RH) implants in primary and revision cases focusing on the indications and results. According to this review, although excellent and very good results have been reported, there are limitations of the existing literature concerning the indications for the use of constrained implants, the absence of long-term results, and the limited comparative studies. PMID:26055025

  9. The design and production of Ti-6Al-4V ELI customized dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, Gilbert; Koike, Mari; Okabe, Toru; Smith, Pauline; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2008-11-01

    This paper addresses the production of customized Ti-6Al-4V ELI dental implants via electron beam melting (EBM). The melting of Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder produces implants with great biocompatibility, fi ne mechanical performance, and a high bone ingrowth potential. The EBM technology is used to produce one-component dental implants that mimic the exact shape of the patient’s tooth, replacing the traditional, three-component, “screw-like” standardized dental implants currently used. The new generation of implants provides the possibility of simplifying pre-insertion procedures leading to faster healing time, and the potential of better and stronger osseointegration, specifi cally through incorporating lattice structure design.

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  11. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  12. [Implantation of the zygote].

    PubMed

    Hicks Gómez, J J

    1990-01-01

    In order for implantation to occur, the endometrium must be adequately differentiated, a estate which results from the sequential interaction of progesterone and estrogens, and the local effects of prostaglandins and histamine. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism through which these hormones affect the uterus is not clearly understood. Recently it has been proposed the role of second messengers (cAMP.cGMP, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol) in this process. All these messengers are related with the intracellular mechanisms of proteic and steroid hormones action. PMID:2177440

  13. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options. PMID:23372455

  14. Hyperfrequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  15. Foreign body giant cells selectively covering haptics of intraocular lens implants: indicators of poor toleration?

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R

    1983-10-01

    A Sputnik lens implant removed after five years because of bullous keratopathy exhibits a dense covering of its Supramid anterior staves with large foreign body giant cells, while its Prolene loops and Polymethylmethacrylate optics have attracted only few of these cell units. The glass-membrane-like component of the reactive membrane also shows significant differences on the different parts of this implant. The use of observation of the components of reactive membranes on lens implants as indicators of toleration in the eye is suggested. PMID:6364004

  16. Fabrication of a maxillary implant-supported overdenture retained by two cemented bars: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Bulent; Sahin, Volkan; Celik, Gozde

    2007-05-01

    Parallel placement of 2 separate bars may be indicated in patients where bone is available in the posterior part of the maxilla. Bars and stud attachments are the primary attachment systems compatible with the majority of the implant systems currently available; however, treatment planning in certain situations may be challenging due to the component available with the implant system used. This report describes the fabrication of a cemented bar design for use in situations when the components of the implant system are inadequate for fabrication of a screw-retained bar. PMID:17547940

  17. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results. PMID:23220306

  18. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  19. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  20. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  1. Anatomic consideration for preventive implantation.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; Veldhuis, H A; van Waas, M A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of preventive implant therapy is to prevent or delay loss of alveolar ridge bone mass. For use in an anatomic study of 60 mandibles, resorption of the alveolar ridge was classified into four preventive stages: (1) after extraction of teeth; (2) after initial resorption; (3) when the ridge has atrophied to a knife-edge shape; and (4) when only basal bone remains. Implantation in stage 3 necessitates removal of the knife-edge ridge to create space for cylindrical implants. Therefore, implantation in stage 2 is advocated to prevent the development of stage 3. The aim of implantation in stage 4 is to prevent total loss of function of the atrophic mandible. PMID:8359876

  2. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  3. Ion implantation and diamond-like coatings of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Malaczynski, G.W.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Qiu, X.

    1997-04-01

    In an attempt to increase the wear resistance of some key automotive components, General Motors Research and Development Center initiated a study to determine the potential of surface modification as a means of improving the tribological properties of automotive parts, and to investigate the feasibility of mass producing such parts. This paper describes the plasma immersion ion implantation system that was designed for the study of various options for surface treatment, and it discusses bench testing procedures used for evaluating the surface-treated samples. In particular, both tribological and microstructural analyses are discussed for nitrogen implants and diamond-like hydrocarbon coatings of some aluminum alloys.

  4. Defect studies of zirconia implanted by high energy Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhova, O.; Čížek, J.; Procházka, I.; Hruška, P.; Skuratov, V. A.; Konstantinova, T. E.; Danilenko, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work positron lifetime spectroscopy was employed for characterization of radiation-induced defects in yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) implanted by 167 MeV Xe ions. Positron lifetime data were interpreted with aid of ab-initio theoretical modelling of defects in YSZ lattice. Damage caused by Xe implantation was investigated in two YSZ samples with different microstructure: (i) single crystal and (ii) sintered ceramic. The virgin YSZ single crystal exhibits single component spectrum with lifetime of ≈ 180 ps. Similar lifetime component was found also in the virgin sample of sintered YSZ ceramic. Since this lifetime is significantly higher than the YSZ bulk lifetime the virgin YSZ crystal and the sintered ceramic both contain vacancy-like defects. Xe implantation leads to appearance of additional defect component with longer lifetime ≈ 370 ps which comes obviously from vacancy clusters fonned by agglomeration of irradiation induced vacancies. A broad absorption band with peak absorption at ≈ 518 nm was found in Xe-implanted crystal by optical measurements.

  5. Laser biomodulation in bone implants: a Raman spectral study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Cibelle; Sathaiah, Sokki; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Duarte, Janaina; Martin, Airton A.; Cunha, Vicente P. P.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2002-03-01

    Healing is important for the success of the insertion of implants and for treating traumatic or pathologic injuries of the bone. Lasertherapy has been suggested as a mean of improving bone healing. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the amount of both inorganic and organic components of irradiated and non-irradiated bone around dental implants inserted in to the tibia. Fourteen rabbits received a titanium implant on the tibia, eight of them were irradiated with 830nm laser and six acted as controls. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30 and 45 days after the surgery, and specimens were prepared for Raman spectroscopy, which was collected at every four points from each three thirds of the bone around the implants. The results showed significant differences in the concentration of inorganic components in irradiated specimens between 15 and 30days, 15 and 45; between irradiated and controls 30 and 45 days after surgery. Concentration of organic components was also significantly different between irradiated and controls in periods of 30 to 45 days after surgery. It is concluded that LLLT does improve bone healing and this can be safely assessed by Raman Spectroscopy.

  6. Laser biomodulation in bone implants: a Raman spectral study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Lopes, Cibelle; Sathaiah, Sokki; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio L.; Duarte, Janaina; Martins, Maria C.

    2003-06-01

    Healing is important for the success of the insertion of implants and for treating traumatic or pathologic injuries of the bone. Lasertherapy has been suggested as a mean of improving bone healing. Near infrared Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the amount of both inorganic and organic components of irradiated and control bone around dental implants inserted in to the tibia. Fourteen rabbits received a titanium implant on the tibia; eight of them were irradiated with λ830nm laser (Thera Lase, DMC, Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, 21.5 J/cm2, 10mW, spot size 0.60mm) and six acted as controls. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30 and 45 days after the surgery, and specimens were prepared for Raman spectroscopy, which was collected at every four points from each three thirds of the bone around the implants. The results showed significant differences in the concentration of inorganic components in irradiated specimens between 15 and 30days (p < 0.05), 15 and 45 (p < 0.01); between irradiated and controls 30 and 45 days after surgery (p <0.01). Concentration of organic components was also significantly different between irradiated and controls in periods of 30 to 45 days after surgery. It is concluded that LLLT does improve bone healing and Raman Spectroscopy can safely assess this.

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  8. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  9. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  10. Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Lead Failure and Management.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Charles D; Kalahasty, Gautham; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2016-03-22

    The implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) lead is the most vulnerable component of the ICD system. Despite advanced engineering design, sophisticated manufacturing techniques, and extensive bench, pre-clinical, and clinical testing, lead failure (LF) remains the Achilles' heel of the ICD system. ICD LF has a broad range of adverse outcomes, ranging from intermittent inappropriate pacing to proarrhythmia leading to patient mortality. ICD LF is often considered in the context of design or construction defects, but is more appropriately considered in the context of the finite service life of a mechanical component placed in chemically stressful environment and subjected to continuous mechanical stresses. This clinical review summarizes LF mechanisms, assessment, and differential diagnosis of LF, including lead diagnostics, recent prominent lead recalls, and management of LF and functioning, but recalled leads. Despite recent advances in lead technology, physicians will likely continue to need to understand how to manage patients with transvenous ICD leads. PMID:26988958

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  12. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  13. Nitinol Surfaces for Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalovskaya, Svetlana; Rondelli, Gianni; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2009-08-01

    Nitinol, a group of nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloys, steadily conquers new areas of application. Because of the need to keep a low profile of miniature implant devices, and considering the lack of compatibility between Nitinol superelasticity and the mechanical properties of traditional coatings, bare surfaces are of interest. In this article, an overview of our studies of bare Nitinol surfaces is presented, and the performance of coated surfaces is outlined. Together dense and porous Nitinol offer a wide array of surface topographies, suitable for attachment and migration of biological cells and tissue ingrowth. Native Nitinol surface oxides vary from amorphous to crystalline and exhibit semiconducting properties associated with better blood compatibility. Nitinol surfaces are analyzed with regard to high and lasting nickel release in vitro. Surface oxide thickness and Nitinol intermetallic particulates are discussed in relation to corrosion resistance and mechanical performance of the material.

  14. [A totally implantable hearing aid for inner ear deafness: TICA LZ 3001].

    PubMed

    Leysieffer, H; Baumann, J W; Mayer, R; Müller, D; Müller, G; Schön, T; Volz, A; Zenner, H P

    1998-10-01

    Recently, Zenner et al. implanted the first totally implantable electronic hearing devices in patients with SNHL (HNO 46 [1998] 844-852). In the present report, technical and audiological features of the implant TICA are published. The development of the piezoelectric transducer and the microphone for implantation in the posterior wall of the auditory canal as components for the present fully implantable hearing system has already been described (HNO 45, 1997, 792-880). Here we report about our experience with the electronic main module that completes the TICA LZ 3001 system. This module is suited for implantation in the mastoid bone and contains the signal-processing electronics and an integrated battery that can be recharged transcutaneously with a portable charger. The recharging time is around 2 h for an implant operating time of 50 h. The microphone and transducer connectors allow for easy replacement of the main module when the battery lifetime is reached. This lifetime is around 3-5 years. A small wireless remote control allows volume adjustment, contains an on/off switch, and permits selection of four different individual hearing programs. The basic audiological features are provided by a flexible, digitally programmable 3-channel-AGC-system with a peak clipping function. The total bandwidth is around 10 kHz. To our knowledge this is the first fully implantable hearing system that has been in implanted in humans. PMID:9846265

  15. Surface segregation during alloy sputtering and implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Stenum, Bjarne; Sørensen, Tom; Whitlow, Harry J.

    1983-05-01

    The angular distribution of material sputtered from a two-component system carries information on concentration gradients close to the target surface. The surface layer will preferentially reduce that part of the flux from deeper layers, which exits from the target at angles far away from the surface normal. If a concentration gradient exists the element being depleted from the very surface will hence be emitted with a more forward-pointed angular distribution than that of the component in which the surface is enriched. An earlier setup for measurements of differential angular distributions has been improved to give higher sensitivity and reproducibility of measurement. The sputtered material is collected on cylindrically mounted thin carbon collectors and analysed with Rutherford backscattering. The setup has been used to investigate surface segregation in sputtered and ion-implanted alloys. Copper targets implanted to saturation with 45 keV Bi + at 77 K are found to have weak copper segregation at the surface. Alloy samples sputtered with argon at energies higher than 20 keV are found to have the weaker-bound component segregated to the surface (Ag from AgAu, Cu from CuPt, Au from Cu 3Au, Pd from Ni 5Pd, and Ni from NiPt) even at 77 K, where thermal segregation is usually prohibited. The segregated component is exactly the one in which the surfaces are usually assumed to be depleted of due to preferential sputtering. Chemical driving forces may be utilized to invert the segregation. For example oxygen will drive Ni to the surface instead of Pd from a Ni 5Pd sample.

  16. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  17. The Development of a Wireless Implantable Blood Flow Monitor.

    PubMed

    Unadkat, Jignesh V; Rothfuss, Michael; Mickle, Marlin H; Sejdic, Ervin; Gimbel, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    Microvascular anastomotic failure remains an uncommon but devastating problem. Although the implantable Doppler probe is helpful in flap monitoring, the devices are cumbersome, easily dislodged, and plagued by false-positive results. The authors have developed an implantable wireless Doppler monitor prototype from off-the-shelf components and tested it in a swine model. The wireless probe successfully distinguished between femoral vein flow, occlusion, and reflow, and wirelessly reported the different signals reliably. This is the first description of a wireless implantable blood flow sensor for flap monitoring. Future iterations will incorporate an integrated microchip-based Doppler system that will decrease the size to 1 mm, small enough to fit onto an anastomotic coupler. PMID:26111323

  18. Channeling effects in high energy implantation of N + in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparotto, A.; Carnera, A.; Acco, S.; La Ferla, A.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrogen implantation in Si single crystals in the 600 keV to 1.4 MeV energy range in random, <100> and <110> alignment conditions on <100> cut silicon wafers was performed. The 6 × 10 13-2 × 10 16 cm -2 fluence range was investigated. The beam alignment along the various axial directions was precisely checked by monitoring the backscattered nitrogen signal. RBS-channeling analysis was performed in order to measure the damage profiles. The nitrogen concentration profiles were analyzed by SIMS in all the implanted samples. The behaviour of the channeled component and the amorphization process was studied as a function of the dose for all the implantation orientations. The energy loss of the channeled ions was also estimated.

  19. Comparative Finite Element Analysis of Short Implants and Lateralization of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve With Different Prosthesis Heights.

    PubMed

    Jayme, Sérgio J; Ramalho, Paulo R; De Franco, Leonardo; Jugdar, Ricardo Elias; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Vasco, Marco A A

    2015-11-01

    The lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve (LIAN) and short implants are efficient options for rehabilitation of the posterior atrophic mandible. However, the loss of bone leads to prosthesis with greater height and lever effect that in turn can have different impact on treatments. Through the finite element method, the present study tests the hypothesis that conventional implants placed under LIAN and short implants have similar risk of bone loss regarding variable height of the crown and that crown-to-implant ratio is not a reliable resource to evaluate risk in these treatments. Computed tomography scans of mandibles were processed and implants and prosthetic components were reverse engineered for reconstruction of three-dimensional models to simulate 3 elements fixed partial dentures supported by 2 osseointegrated implants. The models of implants were based on MK III implants (Nobel Biocare, Zurich, Switzerland) with 4 mm in diameter by 7 mm in length representing short implants, and 15 mm in length representing implants used in LIAN. The implant/crown ratio for short implants was 1:1.5, 1:2, and 1:2.5 and LIAN models were modeled with exactly the same prosthesis, resulting in implant/crown ratios of 1:0.67, 1:0.89, and 1:1.12. The results partially rejected the hypothesis that LIAN and short implants have similar risk of bone loss, showing that although LIAN results were better in the models evaluated, the variations in height had proportionally similar impact on both treatments and accepted the hypothesis that crown-to-implant ratio was not a reliable resource to evaluate risk. PMID:26491923

  20. Modularity of Prosthetic Implants.

    PubMed

    Barrack

    1994-01-01

    The vast majority of total-joint-replacement components currently utilized are modular to some degree. Modularity reduces inventory and increases the surgeon's options in both primary and revision total-joint arthroplasty. Use of a modular interface, however, increases the risk of fretting, wear debris, and dissociation and mismatching of components. The use of modular heads in total hip replacement is firmly established. The occurrence of corrosion and fretting has been recognized, and most manufacturers have improved the quality of the interface to minimize these problems. Modular polyethylene liners also offer advantages, particularly in revision procedures, where the option of additional screw fixation remains important. Many uncemented acetabular components are inserted without screws, which may generate renewed interest in one-piece factory-preassembled components. The conformity, locking mechanism, and nonarticular interface of modular acetabular components have all been studied and improved. Modular tibial components offer additional flexibility in the performance of total knee replacement but introduce the risk of dissociation and increased polyethylene wear; in revision procedures, modularity provides a valuable option for dealing with bone loss and an additional method of fixation by means of press-fit stems. Modular humeral components offer a significant advantage with limited apparent risk; however, longer clinical experience is required to assess potential problems. PMID:10708990

  1. An analysis of the implant-supported overdenture in the edentulous mandible.

    PubMed

    Chen, K-W; Lin, T-M; Liu, P-R; Ramp, L C; Lin, H-J; Wu, C-T; Pan, Y-H

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the cumulative survival rate of the implant-supported overdenture using two types of attachments in patients treated at Show Chwan Memorial Hospital Implant Center from 1992 to 2006. Fifty-one patients (30 men and 21 women) were treated with mandibular implant-supported overdentures. Attachment systems used were the Hader bar with bilateral, cast ERA attachments (Group A, 31 patients with 15 men and 16 women, 134 implants) and the Hader bar with bilateral, distal extension cantilevers (Group B, 20 patients with 15 men and 5 women, 85 implants). Two hundred and four implants remained at the end of the follow-up period. Among failed implants, 10 implants were in Group A (failure rate: 10/134 = 7·5%), whereas five implants were in Group B (failure rate: 5/85 = 5·9%). Sixty-six point seven per cent (10/15) of failed implants were placed in the distal anterior mandible, and 33·3% (5/15) were placed in the middle anterior mandible. Survival was also examined with respect to condition of the opposing arch. Patients wearing a maxillary removable partial denture had the highest implant failure rate (5/51 = 9·8%), whereas the failure rate of the maxillary complete denture group was only 5·7%. The most frequent need for maintenance was wear over patrix component of ERA or Hader clip (n = 56). Eight patients experienced connector fracture between ERA and Hader bar, and one experienced distal extension cantilever fracture. The implant-supported overdenture can be an effective and reliable alternative to the conventional complete mandibular denture. Fewer prosthetic complications were seen in overdentures retained with distal extension cantilever attachments. PMID:23121231

  2. Implant platform switching: biomechanical approach using two-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Adelino Ricardo Barão, Valentim; de Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Gomes, Erica Alves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    In implant therapy, a peri-implant bone resorption has been noticed mainly in the first year after prosthesis insertion. This bone remodeling can sometimes jeopardize the outcome of the treatment, especially in areas in which short implants are used and also in aesthetic cases. To avoid this occurrence, the use of platform switching (PS) has been used. This study aimed to evaluate the biomechanical concept of PS with relation to stress distribution using two-dimensional finite element analysis. A regular matching diameter connection of abutment-implant (regular platform group [RPG]) and a PS connection (PS group [PSG]) were simulated by 2 two-dimensional finite element models that reproduced a 2-piece implant system with peri-implant bone tissue. A regular implant (prosthetic platform of 4.1 mm) and a wide implant (prosthetic platform of 5.0 mm) were used to represent the RPG and PSG, respectively, in which a regular prosthetic component of 4.1 mm was connected to represent the crown. A load of 100 N was applied on the models using ANSYS software. The RPG spreads the stress over a wider area in the peri-implant bone tissue (159 MPa) and the implant (1610 MPa), whereas the PSG seems to diminish the stress distribution on bone tissue (34 MPa) and implant (649 MPa). Within the limitation of the study, the PS presented better biomechanical behavior in relation to stress distribution on the implant but especially in the bone tissue (80% less). However, in the crown and retention screw, an increase in stress concentration was observed. PMID:20098182

  3. Pediatric cochlear implantation: an update.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Bacciu, Andrea; Guida, Maurizio; Marra, Francesca; Bertoldi, Barbara; Bacciu, Salvatore; Pasanisi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Deafness in pediatric age can adversely impact language acquisition as well as educational and social-emotional development. Once diagnosed, hearing loss should be rehabilitated early; the goal is to provide the child with maximum access to the acoustic features of speech within a listening range that is safe and comfortable. In presence of severe to profound deafness, benefit from auditory amplification cannot be enough to allow a proper language development. Cochlear implants are partially implantable electronic devices designed to provide profoundly deafened patients with hearing sensitivity within the speech range. Since their introduction more than 30 years ago, cochlear implants have improved their performance to the extent that are now considered to be standard of care in the treatment of children with severe to profound deafness. Over the years patient candidacy has been expanded and the criteria for implantation continue to evolve within the paediatric population. The minimum age for implantation has progressively reduced; it has been recognized that implantation at a very early age (12-18 months) provides children with the best outcomes, taking advantage of sensitive periods of auditory development. Bilateral implantation offers a better sound localization, as well as a superior ability to understand speech in noisy environments than unilateral cochlear implant. Deafened children with special clinical situations, including inner ear malformation, cochlear nerve deficiency, cochlear ossification, and additional disabilities can be successfully treated, even thogh they require an individualized candidacy evaluation and a complex post-implantation rehabilitation. Benefits from cochlear implantation include not only better abilities to hear and to develop speech and language skills, but also improved academic attainment, improved quality of life, and better employment status. Cochlear implants permit deaf people to hear, but they have a long way to go before

  4. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries. PMID:17676376

  5. Silicone breast implants and platinum.

    PubMed

    Wixtrom, Roger N

    2007-12-01

    Platinum, in a specific form, is used as a catalyst in the cross-linking reactions of the silicone gel and elastomer in breast implants. After manufacture, it remains in the devices at low-parts-per-million levels. Potential concerns have been raised as to whether this platinum might diffuse from silicone breast implants into the body and result in adverse health effects. The weight of evidence indicates that the platinum present is in its most biocompatible (zero valence) form, and the very minute levels (<0.1 percent) that might diffuse from the implants do not represent a significant health risk to patients. PMID:18090821

  6. Occlusion on oral implants: current clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Koyano, K; Esaki, D

    2015-02-01

    Proper implant occlusion is essential for adequate oral function and the prevention of adverse consequences, such as implant overloading. Dental implants are thought to be more prone to occlusal overloading than natural teeth because of the loss of the periodontal ligament, which provides shock absorption and periodontal mechanoreceptors, which provide tactile sensitivity and proprioceptive motion feedback. Although many guidelines and theories on implant occlusion have been proposed, few have provided strong supportive evidence. Thus, we performed a narrative literature review to ascertain the influence of implant occlusion on the occurrence of complications of implant treatment and discuss the clinical considerations focused on the overloading factors at present. The search terms were 'dental implant', 'dental implantation', 'dental occlusion' and 'dental prosthesis'. The inclusion criteria were literature published in English up to September 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies and case-control studies with at least 20 cases and 12 months follow-up interval were included. Based on the selected literature, this review explores factors related to the implant prosthesis (cantilever, crown/implant ratio, premature contact, occlusal scheme, implant-abutment connection, splinting implants and tooth-implant connection) and other considerations, such as the number, diameter, length and angulation of implants. Over 700 abstracts were reviewed, from which more than 30 manuscripts were included. We found insufficient evidence to establish firm clinical guidelines for implant occlusion. To discuss the ideal occlusion for implants, further well-designed RCTs are required in the future. PMID:25284468

  7. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...