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Sample records for catabolism preinduces tolerance

  1. Polyamine catabolism: target for antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants.

    PubMed

    Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra; Federico, Rodolfo; Tempera, Giampiero; Viceconte, Nikenza; Saccoccio, Stefania; Battaglia, Valentina; Toninello, Antonio; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2012-02-01

    Metabolism of polyamines spermidine and spermine, and their diamine precursor, putrescine, has been a target for antineoplastic therapy since these naturally occurring alkyl amines were found essential for normal mammalian cell growth. Intracellular polyamine concentrations are maintained at a cell type-specific set point through the coordinated and highly regulated interplay between biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism. A correlation between regulation of cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism is described. In particular, polyamine catabolism involves copper-containing amine oxidases and FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases. Several studies showed an important role of these enzymes in several developmental and disease-related processes in both animals and plants through a control on polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment, environmental and/or cellular stressors. The production of toxic aldehydes and reactive oxygen species, H(2)O(2) in particular, by these oxidases using extracellular and intracellular polyamines as substrates, suggests a mechanism by which the oxidases can be exploited as antineoplastic drug targets. This minireview summarizes recent advances on the physiological roles of polyamine catabolism in animals and plants in an attempt to highlight differences and similarities that may contribute to determine in detail the underlined mechanisms involved. This information could be useful in evaluating the possibility of this metabolic pathway as a target for new antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants. PMID:21874532

  2. Loss of Antibiotic Tolerance in Sod-Deficient Mutants Is Dependent on the Energy Source and Arginine Catabolism in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Ladjouzi, Rabia; Bizzini, Alain; van Schaik, Willem; Zhang, Xinglin; Rincé, Alain; Benachour, Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococci are naturally tolerant to typically bactericidal cell wall-active antibiotics, meaning that their growth is inhibited but they are not killed even when exposed to a high concentration of the drug. The molecular reasons for this extraordinary tolerance are still incompletely understood. Previous work showed that resistance to killing collapsed specifically in mutants affected in superoxide dismutase (Sod) activity, arguing that bactericidal antibiotic treatment led to induction of a superoxide burst. In the present work, we show that loss of antibiotic tolerance in ΔsodA mutants of pathogenic enterococci is dependent on the energy source present during antibiotic treatment. Hexoses induce greater killing than the pentose ribose, and no killing was observed with glycerol as the energy source. These results point to glycolytic reactions as crucial for antibiotic-mediated killing of ΔsodA mutants. A transposon mutant library was constructed in Enterococcus faecalis ΔsodA mutants and screened for restored tolerance of vancomycin. Partially restored tolerance was observed in mutants with transposon integrations into intergenic regions upstream of regulators implicated in arginine catabolism. In these mutants, the arginine deiminase operon was highly upregulated. A model for the action of cell wall-active antibiotics in tolerant and nontolerant bacteria is proposed. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic tolerance is a serious clinical concern, since tolerant bacteria have considerably increased abilities to resist killing by bactericidal drugs. Using enterococci as models for highly antibiotic-tolerant pathogens, we showed that tolerance of these bacteria is linked to their superoxide dismutase (Sod), arguing that bactericidal antibiotics induce generation of reactive oxygen species inside cells. Wild-type strains are tolerant because they detoxify these deleterious molecules by the activity of Sod, whereas Sod-deficient strains are killed. This study showed that

  3. Control of Abscisic Acid Catabolism and Abscisic Acid Homeostasis Is Important for Reproductive Stage Stress Tolerance in Cereals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xuemei; Dong, Baodi; Shiran, Behrouz; Talbot, Mark J.; Edlington, Jane E.; Hughes, Trijntje; White, Rosemary G.; Gubler, Frank; Dolferus, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress at the reproductive stage causes pollen sterility and grain loss in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Drought stress induces abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis genes in anthers and ABA accumulation in spikes of drought-sensitive wheat varieties. In contrast, drought-tolerant wheat accumulates lower ABA levels, which correlates with lower ABA biosynthesis and higher ABA catabolic gene expression (ABA 8′-hydroxylase). Wheat TaABA8′OH1 deletion lines accumulate higher spike ABA levels and are more drought sensitive. ABA treatment of the spike mimics the effect of drought, causing high levels of sterility. ABA treatment represses the anther cell wall invertase gene TaIVR1, and drought-tolerant lines appeared to be more sensitive to the effect of ABA. Drought-induced sterility shows similarity to cold-induced sterility in rice (Oryza sativa). In cold-stressed rice, the rate of ABA accumulation was similar in cold-sensitive and cold-tolerant lines during the first 8 h of cold treatment, but in the tolerant line, ABA catabolism reduced ABA levels between 8 and 16 h of cold treatment. The ABA biosynthesis gene encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase in anthers is mainly expressed in parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular bundle of the anther. Transgenic rice lines expressing the wheat TaABA8′OH1 gene under the control of the OsG6B tapetum-specific promoter resulted in reduced anther ABA levels under cold conditions. The transgenic lines showed that anther sink strength (OsINV4) was maintained under cold conditions and that this correlated with improved cold stress tolerance. Our data indicate that ABA and ABA 8′-hydroxylase play an important role in controlling anther ABA homeostasis and reproductive stage abiotic stress tolerance in cereals. PMID:21502188

  4. Pre-induced Lac Operon Effect on Non Specific Sugars: Pre-culture Effect is Dependent on Strength of Induction, Exponential Phase and Substrate Concentration.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    The source and history of the cell plays an important role in influencing the phenotypic properties of the organism in a particular environmental condition. Pre-induced lac operon provides benefit on lactose environment. During metabolism lactose is broken down into glucose and galactose. The fate of cells with pre-induced lac operon on glucose and galactose milieu is not known. The influence of nutritional status of the medium, level of pre-induction and growth phase on pre-culture effect is not investigated. Effect of pre-induced lac operon on non specific sugars along with the factors that influence this effect was enumerated in the present study. Results of this present study indicate that pre-induced lac operon provide benefit in terms of growth on galactose milieu. This study also suggests that Pre induced lac operon effect depends on the (i) strength of induction in the pre-culture, (ii) nutritional content of the environment and (iii) exponential growth phase of the organism. The above study will help in the better characterization of the pre culture effect. It will also help in the better understanding of the relation between gene expression and growth physiology. PMID:26161153

  5. Pre-induced Lac Operon Effect on Non Specific Sugars: Pre-culture Effect is Dependent on Strength of Induction, Exponential Phase and Substrate Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Malakar, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    The source and history of the cell plays an important role in influencing the phenotypic properties of the organism in a particular environmental condition. Pre-induced lac operon provides benefit on lactose environment. During metabolism lactose is broken down into glucose and galactose. The fate of cells with pre-induced lac operon on glucose and galactose milieu is not known. The influence of nutritional status of the medium, level of pre-induction and growth phase on pre-culture effect is not investigated. Effect of pre-induced lac operon on non specific sugars along with the factors that influence this effect was enumerated in the present study. Results of this present study indicate that pre-induced lac operon provide benefit in terms of growth on galactose milieu. This study also suggests that Pre induced lac operon effect depends on the (i) strength of induction in the pre-culture, (ii) nutritional content of the environment and (iii) exponential growth phase of the organism. The above study will help in the better characterization of the pre culture effect. It will also help in the better understanding of the relation between gene expression and growth physiology. PMID:26161153

  6. Characterization of burden on growth due to the nutritional state of media and pre-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pushkar; Venkatesh, K V

    2013-04-01

    Studies have shown that the production of unnecessary proteins burdens the cellular growth mainly due to allocation of cellular resources to unnecessary protein synthesis, thereby limiting the resources available for growth. In the current study, we focus on the effect of pre-induction and nutritional status of the medium on the burden imposed on growth due to the synthesis of unnecessary protein. Escherichia coli cells with different history were grown in a glycerol media with and without IPTG to characterize the burden imposed due to the synthesis of β-galactosidase. Effect of pre-induced lac operon on growth and β-galactosidase expression on lactose milieu was also investigated. The study demonstrates that pre-induction has a strong influence on the extent of burden and is sustained in several generations. Further, the burden was much lower in a rich media relative to that observed in a minimal media. PMID:23354326

  7. Ureide catabolism of soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, R.G.; Blevins, D.G.; Polacco, J.C.; Randall, D.D.

    1987-03-01

    Allantoin catabolism studies have been extended to intact leaf tissue of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) Phenyl phosphordiamidate, one of the most potent urease inhibitors known does not inhibit /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release from (2,7-/sup 14/C)allantoin (urea labeled), but inhibits urea dependent CO/sub 2/release greater than or equal to99.9% under similar conditions. Furthermore, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and /sup 14/C) allantoate are the only detectable products of (2,7-/sup 14/C)allantoin catabolism. Neither urea nor any other product were detected by analysis on HPLC organic acid or organic base columns although urea and all commercially available metabolites that have been implicated in allantoin and glyoxylate metabolism can be resolved by a combination of these two columns. In contrast, when allantoin was labeled in the two central, nonureido carbons ((4,5-/sup 14/C)allantoin), its catabolism to (/sup 14/)allantoate, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/,(/sup 14/C)glyoxylate, (/sup 14/C)glycine, and (/sup 14/C)serine in leaf discs could be detected. These data are fully consistent with the metabolism of allantoate by two amidohydrolase reactions (neither of which is urease) that occur at similar rates to release glyoxylate, which in turn is metabolized via the photorespiratory pathway. This is the first evidence that allantoate is metabolized without urease action to NH/sub 4//sup +/ and CO/sub 2/ and that carbons 4 and 5 enter the photorespiratory pathway.

  8. Methionine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Perpète, Philippe; Duthoit, Olivier; De Maeyer, Simon; Imray, Louise; Lawton, Andrew I; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos E; Gitonga, Virginia W; Hewlins, Michael J E; Dickinson, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of methionine to methionol and methanethiol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, enzyme assays and a number of mutants. Methionine is first transaminated to alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate. Methionol is formed by a decarboxylation reaction, which yields methional, followed by reduction. The decarboxylation is effected specifically by Ydr380wp. Methanethiol is formed from both methionine and alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate by a demethiolase activity. In all except one strain examined, demethiolase was induced by the presence of methionine in the growth medium. This pathway results in the production of alpha-ketobutyrate, a carbon skeleton, which can be re-utilized. Hence, methionine catabolism is more complex and economical than the other amino acid catabolic pathways in yeast, which use the Ehrlich pathway and result solely in the formation of a fusel alcohol. PMID:16423070

  9. Structural Biology of Proline Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The proline catabolic enzymes proline dehydrogenase and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase catalyze the 4-electron oxidation of proline to glutamate. These enzymes play important roles in cellular redox control, superoxide generation, apoptosis and cancer. In some bacteria, the two enzymes are fused into the bifunctional enzyme, proline utilization A. Here we review the three-dimensional structural information that is currently available for proline catabolic enzymes. Crystal structures have been determined for bacterial monofunctional proline dehydrogenase and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, as well as the proline dehydrogenase and DNA-binding domains of proline utilization A. Some of the functional insights provided by analyses of these structures are discussed, including substrate recognition, catalytic mechanism, biochemical basis of inherited proline catabolic disorders and DNA recognition by proline utilization A. PMID:18369526

  10. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  11. Arginine catabolism in Aphanocapsa 6308.

    PubMed

    Weathers, P J; Chee, H L; Allen, M M

    1978-07-01

    The catabolic products of arginine metabolism were observed in Aphanocapsa 6308, a unicellular cyanobacterium, by thin layer chromatography of growth media, by limiting growth conditions, and by enzymatic analysis. Of the organic, nitrogenous compounds examined, only arginine supported growth in CO2-free media. The excretion of ornithine at a concentration level greater than citrulline suggested the existence in Aphanocapsa 6308 of the arginine dihydrolase pathway which produced ornithine, CO2,NH4,+ adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Its existence was confirmed by enzymatic analysis. Although cells could not grow on urea as a sole carbon source a very active urease and subsequently an arginase were also demonstrated, indicating that Aphanocapsa can metabolize arginine via the arginase pathway. The level of enzymes for both pathways indicates a lack of genetic control. It is suggested that the arginase pathway provides only nitrogen for the cells wheras the arginine dihydrolase pathway provides not only nitrogen, but also CO2 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:100070

  12. Bacterial Catabolism of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Chris R.; Moran, Mary Ann; Whitman, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a metabolite produced primarily by marine phytoplankton and is the main precursor to the climatically important gas dimethylsulfide (DMS). DMS is released upon bacterial catabolism of DMSP, but it is not the only possible fate of DMSP sulfur. An alternative demethylation/demethiolation pathway results in the eventual release of methanethiol, a highly reactive volatile sulfur compound that contributes little to the atmospheric sulfur flux. The activity of these pathways control the natural flux of sulfur released to the atmosphere. Although these biochemical pathways and the factors that regulate them are of great interest, they are poorly understood. Only recently have some of the genes and pathways responsible for DMSP catabolism been elucidated. Thus far, six different enzymes have been identified that catalyze the cleavage of DMSP, resulting in the release of DMS. In addition, five of these enzymes appear to produce acrylate, while one produces 3-hydroxypropionate. In contrast, only one enzyme, designated DmdA, has been identified that catalyzes the demethylation reaction producing methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The metabolism of MMPA is performed by a series of three coenzyme-A mediated reactions catalyzed by DmdB, DmdC, and DmdD. Interestingly, Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, a member of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria that is highly abundant in marine surface waters, possessed functional DmdA, DmdB, and DmdC enzymes. Microbially mediated transformations of both DMS and methanethiol are also possible, although many of the biochemical and molecular genetic details are still unknown. This review will focus on the recent discoveries in the biochemical pathways that mineralize and assimilate DMSP carbon and sulfur, as well as the areas for which a comprehensive understanding is still lacking. PMID:21886640

  13. Tryptophan catabolism in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Bouknight, R R; Sadoff, H L

    1975-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium grows in a medium containing L-tryptophan as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Kynurenine, anthranilic acid, and catechol are metabolic intermediates, suggesting that this organism used the anthranilic acid pathway for tryptophan degradation. Cells that grow on L-tryptophan oxidize kynurenine, alanine, and anthranilic acid and the presence of tryptophan oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.12), kynureninase (EC 3.7.1.3), and catechol oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.1) in cell extracts provide additional evidence for the degradative pathway in B. megaterium. Tryptophan oxygenase is inhibited by sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and hydroxylamine, indicating that the enzyme has a functional heme group. D-Tryptophan is not a substrate for tryptophan oxygenase, and the D-isomer does not inhibit this enzyme. Formamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) and anthranilate hydroxylase are not detectable in extracts. Tryptophan catabolism is inducible in B megaterium and is subject to catabolite repression by glucose and glutamate. Arginine does not cause repression, and kynurenine induces both tryptophan oxygenase and kynureninase. PMID:803956

  14. Catabolism of Hexuronides, Hexuronates, Aldonates, and Aldarates.

    PubMed

    Mandrand-Berthelot, M-A; Condemine, G; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    2004-12-01

    Following elucidation of the regulation of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli, studies on the metabolism of many sugars were initiated in the early 1960s. The catabolic pathways of D-gluconate and of the two hexuronates, D-glucuronate and D-galacturonate, were investigated. The post genomic era has renewed interest in the study of these sugar acids and allowed the complete characterization of the D-gluconate pathway and the discovery of the catabolic pathways for L-idonate, D-glucarate, galactarate, and ketogluconates. Among the various sugar acids that are utilized as sole carbon and energy sources to support growth of E. coli, galacturonate, glucuronate, and gluconate were shown to play an important role in the colonization of the mammalian large intestine. In the case of sugar acid degradation, the regulators often mediate negative control and are inactivated by interaction with a specific inducer, which is either the substrate or an intermediate of the catabolism. These regulators coordinate the synthesis of all the proteins involved in the same pathway and, in some cases, exert crosspathway control between related catabolic pathways. This is particularly well illustrated in the case of hexuronide and hexuronate catabolism. The structural genes encoding the different steps of hexuronate catabolism were identified by analysis of numerous mutants affected for growth with galacturonate or glucuronate. E. coli is able to use the diacid sugars D-glucarate and galactarate (an achiral compound) as sole carbon source for growth. Pyruvate and 2-phosphoglycerate are the final products of the D-glucarate/galactarate catabolism. PMID:26443361

  15. Amino acid catabolism: a pivotal regulator of innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L.; Huang, Lei; Lemos, Henrique; Metz, Richard; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Enhanced amino acid catabolism is a common response to inflammation, but the immunologic significance of altered amino acid consumption remains unclear. The finding that tryptophan catabolism helped maintain fetal tolerance during pregnancy provided novel insights into the significance of amino acid metabolism in controlling immunity. Recent advances in identifying molecular pathways that enhance amino acid catabolism and downstream mechanisms that affect immune cells in response to inflammatory cues support the notion that amino acid catabolism regulates innate and adaptive immune cells in pathologic settings. Cells expressing enzymes that degrade amino acids modulate antigen-presenting cell and lymphocyte functions and reveal critical roles for amino acid- and catabolite-sensing pathways in controlling gene expression, functions, and survival of immune cells. Basal amino acid catabolism may contribute to immune homeostasis that prevents autoimmunity, whereas elevated amino acid catalytic activity may reinforce immune suppression to promote tumorigenesis and persistence of some pathogens that cause chronic infections. For these reasons, there is considerable interest in generating novel drugs that inhibit or induce amino acid consumption and target downstream molecular pathways that control immunity. In this review, we summarize recent developments and highlight novel concepts and key outstanding questions in this active research field. PMID:22889220

  16. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essential for the control of various metabolic and signaling pathways. They are also the key elements in catabolism of hyaluronan in the joint. In this overview, the role of these metals in physiological and pathophysiological catabolism of hyaluronan is described. The participation of these metals in the initiation and propagation of the radical degradation hyaluronan is critically reviewed. PMID:21217859

  17. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  18. Glycosidases: inborn errors of glycosphingolipid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Hisashi; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are information-rich glycoconjugates that occur in nature mainly as constituents of biomembranes. Each GSL contains a complex carbohydrate chain linked to a ceramide moiety that anchors the molecule to biomembranes. In higher animals, catabolism of GSLs takes place in lysosomes where sugar chains in GSLs are hydrolyzed by exo-glycosidases to cleave a sugar residue from the non-reducing end of a sugar chain. Inborn errors of GSL-catabolism, collectively called sphingolipidoses or GSL-storage diseases, are caused by the deficiency of exo-glycosidases responsible for the degradation of the specific sugar residues at the non-reducing termini in GSLs. This chapter briefly discusses glycone, anomeric, linkage, and aglycone specificities of exo-glycosidases and some of the historical landmarks on their associations with the chemical pathology of the five best known sphingolipidoses: GM1 gangliosidosis, GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease), Fabry disease, Gaucher disease, and Krabbe disease. PMID:25151392

  19. Microbial catabolism of vanillate: decarboxylation to guaiacol.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R L; Olson, P P

    1978-01-01

    A novel catabolic transformation of vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) by microorganisms is reported. Several strains of Bacillus megaterium and a strain of Streptomyces are shown to convert vanillate to guaiacol (o-methoxyphenol) and CO2 by nonoxidative decarboxylation. Use of a modified most-probable-number procedure shows that numerous soils contain countable numbers (10(1) to 10(2) organisms per g of dry soil) of aerobic sporeformers able to convert vanillate to guaiacol. Conversion of vanillate to guaiacol by the microfloras of most-probable-number replicates was used as the criterion for scoring replicates positive or negative. Guaiacol was detected by thin-layer chromatography. These results indicate that the classic separations of catabolic pathways leading to specific ring-fashion substrates such as protocatechuate and catechol are often interconnectable by single enzymatic transformations, usually a decarboxylation. PMID:101140

  20. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans. PMID:27156062

  1. Intracellular Growth Is Dependent on Tyrosine Catabolism in the Dimorphic Fungal Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kylie J.; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-01-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host’s defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells. PMID:25812137

  2. Determinants of Skeletal Muscle Catabolism After Severe Burn

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David W.; Wolf, Steven E.; Chinkes, David L.; Gore, Dennis C.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Beauford, Robert B.; Obeng, Michael K.; Lal, Sophia; Gold, Warren F.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Herndon, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine which patient factors affect the degree of catabolism after severe burn. Summary Background Data Catabolism is associated with severe burn and leads to erosion of lean mass, impaired wound healing, and delayed rehabilitation. Methods From 1996 to 1999, 151 stable-isotope protein kinetic studies were performed in 102 pediatric and 21 adult subjects burned over 20–99.5% of their total body surface area (TBSA). Patient demographics, burn characteristics, and hospital course variables were correlated with the net balance of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown across the leg. Data were analyzed sequentially and cumulatively through univariate and cross-sectional multiple regression. Results Increasing age, weight, and delay in definitive surgical treatment predict increased catabolism (P < .05). Body surface area burned increased catabolism until 40% TBSA was reached; catabolism did not consistently increase thereafter. Resting energy expenditure and sepsis were also strong predictors of net protein catabolism. Among factors that did not significantly correlate were burn type, pneumonia, wound contamination, and time after burn. From these results, the authors also infer that gross muscle mass correlates independently with protein wasting after burn. Conclusions Heavier, more muscular subjects, and subjects whose definitive surgical treatment is delayed are at the greatest risk for excess catabolism after burn. Sepsis and excessive hypermetabolism are also associated with protein catabolism. PMID:10998644

  3. Comparison of Four Comamonas Catabolic Plasmids Reveals the Evolution of pBHB To Catabolize Haloaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Xihui; Zhang, Long; Gou, Zhenjiu; Li, Shunpeng

    2015-01-01

    Comamonas plasmids play important roles in shaping the phenotypes of their hosts and the adaptation of these hosts to changing environments, and understanding the evolutionary strategy of these plasmids is thus of great concern. In this study, the sequence of the 119-kb 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile-catabolizing plasmid pBHB from Comamonas sp. strain 7D-2 was studied and compared with those of three other Comamonas haloaromatic catabolic plasmids. Incompatibility group determination based on a phylogenetic analysis of 24 backbone gene proteins, as well as TrfA, revealed that these four plasmids all belong to the IncP-1β subgroup. Comparison of the four plasmids revealed a conserved backbone region and diverse genetic-load regions. The four plasmids share a core genome consisting of 40 genes (>50% similarities) and contain 12 to 50 unique genes each, most of which are xenobiotic-catabolic genes. Two functional reductive dehalogenase gene clusters are specifically located on pBHB, showing distinctive evolution of pBHB for haloaromatics. The higher catabolic ability of the bhbA2B2 cluster than the bhbAB cluster may be due to the transcription levels and the character of the dehalogenase gene itself rather than that of its extracytoplasmic binding receptor gene. The plasmid pBHB is riddled with transposons and insertion sequence (IS) elements, and ISs play important roles in the evolution of pBHB. The analysis of the origin of the bhb genes on pBHB suggested that these accessory genes evolved independently. Our work provides insights into the evolutionary strategies of Comamonas plasmids, especially into the adaptation mechanism employed by pBHB for haloaromatics. PMID:26682859

  4. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  5. INHIBITION OF INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE DOES NOT IMPEDE ORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme, regulates immune tolerance through inhibition of T-cell proliferation. Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO, which causes fetal rejection and increased tumor resistance in mice, may prove useful in cancer...

  6. CsPAO4 of Citrus sinensis functions in polyamine terminal catabolism and inhibits plant growth under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Polyamine oxidase (PAO) is a key enzyme catalyzing polyamine catabolism leading to H2O2 production. We previously demonstrated that Citrus sinensis contains six putative PAO genes, but their functions are not well understood. In this work, we reported functional elucidation of CsPAO4 in polyamine catabolism and salt stress response. CsPAO4 was localized to the apoplast and used both spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) as substrates for terminal catabolism. Transgenic plants overexpressing CsPAO4 displayed prominent increase in PAO activity, concurrent with marked decrease of Spm and Spd and elevation of H2O2. Seeds of transgenic lines displayed better germination when compared with wild type (WT) under salt stress. However, both vegetative growth and root elongation of the transgenic lines were prominently inhibited under salt stress, accompanied by higher level of H2O2 and more conspicuous programmed cell death (PCD). Exogenous supply of catalase (CAT), a H2O2 scavenger, partially recovered the vegetative growth and root elongation. In addition, spermine inhibited root growth of transgenic plants. Taken together, these data demonstrated that CsPAO4 accounts for production of H2O2 causing oxidative damages under salt stress and that down-regulation of a PAO gene involved in polyamine terminal catabolism may be an alternative approach for improving salt stress tolerance. PMID:27535697

  7. CsPAO4 of Citrus sinensis functions in polyamine terminal catabolism and inhibits plant growth under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Polyamine oxidase (PAO) is a key enzyme catalyzing polyamine catabolism leading to H2O2 production. We previously demonstrated that Citrus sinensis contains six putative PAO genes, but their functions are not well understood. In this work, we reported functional elucidation of CsPAO4 in polyamine catabolism and salt stress response. CsPAO4 was localized to the apoplast and used both spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) as substrates for terminal catabolism. Transgenic plants overexpressing CsPAO4 displayed prominent increase in PAO activity, concurrent with marked decrease of Spm and Spd and elevation of H2O2. Seeds of transgenic lines displayed better germination when compared with wild type (WT) under salt stress. However, both vegetative growth and root elongation of the transgenic lines were prominently inhibited under salt stress, accompanied by higher level of H2O2 and more conspicuous programmed cell death (PCD). Exogenous supply of catalase (CAT), a H2O2 scavenger, partially recovered the vegetative growth and root elongation. In addition, spermine inhibited root growth of transgenic plants. Taken together, these data demonstrated that CsPAO4 accounts for production of H2O2 causing oxidative damages under salt stress and that down-regulation of a PAO gene involved in polyamine terminal catabolism may be an alternative approach for improving salt stress tolerance. PMID:27535697

  8. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  9. The mucopolysaccharidoses: inborn errors of glycosaminoglycan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Cantz, M; Gehler, J

    1976-06-29

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are genetic disorders of glycosaminoglycan metabolism. Patients with these diseases accumulate within the lysosomes of most tissues excessive amounts of dermatan and/or heparan sulfates, or of keratan sulfate. The clinical consequences of such glycosaminoglycan storage range from skeletal abnormalities to cardiovascular problems, and to motor and mental retardation. In all mucopolysaccharidoses, except Morquio disease, an excessive accumulation of sulfate-labeled glycosaminoglycans has been demonstrated in fibroblasts cultured from the patient's skin. It was subsequently shown that this was due to the deficiency of specific proteins which were named "corrective factors", because their addition to the culture medium effected a normalization of the impaired glycosaminoglycan catabolism in the respective mucopolysaccharidosis fibroblasts. The investigation of the function of the corrective factors, and other studies, led to the identification of the enzymatic defect in each of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Seven lysosomal enzyme deficiencies are now recognized among this group of disorders. A classification of the diseases, according to the mutant gene products, reveals that there is considerable phenotypic variation not only between diseases, but also within several disease types. With the availability of the appropriate enzyme assays, the previous difficulties in diagnosing these disorders have now been overcome. Methods are also available for the prenatal diagnosis, and the detection of heterozygous individuals, in most of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Although correction of the metabolic defect through enzyme replacement has been achieved in tissue culture, many problems remain to be solved before such therapy may become applicable in the patients themselves. PMID:820626

  10. Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as “the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability”. The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. PMID:23680304

  11. Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michelle M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, Reynolds Paul

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as "the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability". The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. PMID:23680304

  12. Functional role of the Ti plasmid-encoded catabolic mannopine cyclase in mannityl opine catabolism by Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S B; Farrand, S K

    1994-01-01

    Catabolic mannopine (MOP) cyclase encoded by Ti or Ri plasmids lactonizes MOP to agropine (AGR). The gene of the octopine-type Ti plasmid pTi15955 encoding the catabolic MOP cyclase enzyme previously was localized to a 1.6-kb segment within a cosmid clone, pYDH208. A subclone containing only this region complemented the AGR catabolism-negative phenotype conferred by a derivative of the octopine-type plasmid pTiB6S3 containing a Tn7 insertion in the region encoding the MOP cyclase enzyme. Uptake assays of strains harboring pRiA4 or pArA4a, along with complementation analyses, indicate that MOP cyclase is not sufficient for catabolism of AGR but that the strains must also express an AGR transport system. To determine the requirement for MOP cyclase in opine catabolism unequivocally, a site-specific, nonpolar deletion mutation abolishing only MOP cyclase activity was introduced into pYDH208, a cosmid clone that confers utilization of MOP, AGR, and mannopinic acid (MOA). Strains harboring this MOP cyclase-negative mutant clone, pYDPH208, did not utilize AGR but continued to utilize MOP. Growth on AGR was restored in this strain upon introduction of clones encoding the pTi15955-derived catabolic or anabolic MOP cyclase genes. The induction pattern of MOA catabolism shown by strain NT1 harboring the MOP cyclase-deficient pYDPH208 suggests that AGR is converted into MOP by MOP cyclase and that MOP, but not AGR, induces catabolism of MOA. Genetic and biochemical analyses of MOP and AGR metabolism suggest that only the conversion of AGR to MOP is directly involved in catabolism of AGR, even though the reaction catalyzed by MOP cyclase predominantly lies in the lactonization of MOP to AGR. Images PMID:8206835

  13. Catabolism of low density lipoproteins by perfused rabbit livers: cholestyramine promotes receptor-dependent hepatic catabolism of low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y S; Yamin, T T; Alberts, A W

    1982-07-01

    Rabbits fed a wheat starch/casein diet develop a marked hypercholesterolemia accompanied by a decrease in the number of EDTA-sensitive binding sites on plasma membrane fractions of the liver for low density lipoproteins (LDL) and beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins [Chao, Y.-S., Yamin, T.-T. & Alberts, A. W. (1982) J. Biol. Chem., in press]. Inclusion of 1% cholestyramine resin in this diet prevents the increase in plasma cholesterol, increases the removal of LDL from plasma, and increases the number of hepatic plasma membrane LDL-binding sites. To determine the functional role of hepatic LDL-binding sites in the catabolism of LDL, we studied the catabolism of (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) by in situ perfused rabbit livers in a recirculating system. The rate of catabolism was measured from the increment of nonprotein-bound radioiodine in the perfusate. The receptor-dependent catabolism of LDL by the liver was calculated from the difference of hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL and catabolism of (125)I-labeled cyclohexanedione-modified LDL, which does not bind to LDL receptors. The data show that about 74% of LDL catabolized by perfused livers from chow-fed rabbits is through the receptor-dependent pathway and 26% is through the receptor-independent pathway. In rabbits fed a cholesterol diet, the hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced, and the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is abolished. In rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet, the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced by 40% when compared with hepatic catabolism in chow-fed rabbits. Perfused livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet supplemented with 1% cholestyramine show a 5,4-fold increase of receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL when compared with that of livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet alone. Thus, these studies demonstrate that the change in the number of rabbit hepatic membrane LDL receptors induced by dietary manipulation

  14. Protein catabolism and requirements in severe illness.

    PubMed

    Genton, L; Pichard, C

    2011-03-01

    Reduced total body protein mass is a marker of protein-energy malnutrition and has been associated with numerous complications. Severe illness is characterized by a loss of total body protein mass, mainly from the skeletal muscle. Studies on protein turnover describe an increased protein breakdown and, to a lesser extent, an increased whole-body protein synthesis, as well as an increased flux of amino acids from the periphery to the liver. Appropriate nutrition could limit protein catabolism. Nutritional support limits but does not stop the loss of total body protein mass occurring in acute severe illness. Its impact on protein kinetics is so far controversial, probably due to the various methodologies and characteristics of nutritional support used in the studies. Maintaining calorie balance alone the days after an insult does not clearly lead to an improved clinical outcome. In contrast, protein intakes between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg body weight/day with neutral energy balance minimize total body protein mass loss. Glutamine and possibly leucine may improve clinical outcome, but it is unclear whether these benefits occur through an impact on total body protein mass and its turnover, or through other mechanisms. Present recommendations suggest providing 20 - 25 kcal/kg/day over the first 72 - 96 hours and increasing energy intake to target thereafter. Simultaneously, protein intake should be between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Enteral immunonutrition enriched with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids is indicated in patients with trauma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and mild sepsis. Glutamine (0.2 - 0.4 g/kg/day of L-glutamine) should be added to enteral nutrition in burn and trauma patients (ESPEN guidelines 2006) and to parenteral nutrition, in the form of dipeptides, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in general (ESPEN guidelines 2009). PMID:22139565

  15. A previously undescribed pathway for pyrimidine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kevin D.; Gyaneshwar, Prasad; Markenscoff Papadimitriou, Eirene; Fong, Rebecca; Kim, Kwang-Seo; Parales, Rebecca; Zhou, Zhongrui; Inwood, William; Kustu, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    The b1012 operon of Escherichia coli K-12, which is composed of seven unidentified ORFs, is one of the most highly expressed operons under control of nitrogen regulatory protein C. Examination of strains with lesions in this operon on Biolog Phenotype MicroArray (PM3) plates and subsequent growth tests indicated that they failed to use uridine or uracil as the sole nitrogen source and that the parental strain could use them at room temperature but not at 37°C. A strain carrying an ntrB(Con) mutation, which elevates transcription of genes under nitrogen regulatory protein C control, could also grow on thymidine as the sole nitrogen source, whereas strains with lesions in the b1012 operon could not. Growth-yield experiments indicated that both nitrogens of uridine and thymidine were available. Studies with [14C]uridine indicated that a three-carbon waste product from the pyrimidine ring was excreted. After trimethylsilylation and gas chromatography, the waste product was identified by mass spectrometry as 3-hydroxypropionic acid. In agreement with this finding, 2-methyl-3-hydroxypropionic acid was released from thymidine. Both the number of available nitrogens and the waste products distinguished the pathway encoded by the b1012 operon from pyrimidine catabolic pathways described previously. We propose that the genes of this operon be named rutA–G for pyrimidine utilization. The product of the divergently transcribed gene, b1013, is a tetracycline repressor family regulator that controls transcription of the b1012 operon negatively. PMID:16540542

  16. Ribitol Catabolic Pathway in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Charnetzky, W. T.; Mortlock, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    In Klebsiella aerogenes W70, there is an inducible pathway for the catabolism of ribitol consisting of at least two enzymes, ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) and d-ribulokinase (DRK). These two enzymes are coordinately controlled and induced in response to d-ribulose, an intermediate of the pathway. Whereas wild-type K. aerogenes W70 are unable to utilize xylitol as a carbon and energy source, mutants constitutive for the ribitol pathway are able to utilize RDH to oxidize the unusual pentitol, xylitol, to d-xylulose. These mutants are able to grow on xylitol, presumably by utilization of the d-xylulose produced. Mutants constitutive for l-fucose isomerase can utilize the isomerase to convert d-arabinose to d-ribulose. In the presence of d-ribulose, RDH and DRK are induced, and such mutants are thus able to phosphorylate the d-ribulose by using the DRK of the ribitol pathway. Derivatives of an l-fucose isomerase-constitutive mutant were plated on d-arabinose, ribitol, and xylitol to select and identify mutations in the ribitol pathway. Using the transducing phage PW52, we were able to demonstrate genetic linkage of the loci involved. Three-point crosses, using constitutive mutants as donors and RDH−, DRK− double mutants as recipients and selecting for DRK+ transductants on d-arabinose, resulted in DRK+RDH+-constitutive, DRK+RDH+-inducible, and DRK+RDH−-inducible transductants but no detectable DRK+RDH− constitutive transductants, data consistent with the order rbtC-rbtD-rbtK, where rbtC is a control site and rbtD and rbtK correspond to the sites for the sites for the enzymes RDH and DRK, respectively. PMID:4366025

  17. Catabolism of Exogenous Lactate Reveals It as a Legitimate Metabolic Substrate in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Kelly M.; Scarbrough, Peter M.; Ribeiro, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Sonveaux, Pierre; Landon, Chelsea D.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Pizzo, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in tumors has been associated with metastases and poor overall survival in cancer patients. Lactate promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, providing rationale for understanding how it is processed by cells. The concentration of lactate in tumors is a balance between the amount produced, amount carried away by vasculature and if/how it is catabolized by aerobic tumor or stromal cells. We examined lactate metabolism in human normal and breast tumor cell lines and rat breast cancer: 1. at relevant concentrations, 2. under aerobic vs. hypoxic conditions, 3. under conditions of normo vs. hypoglucosis. We also compared the avidity of tumors for lactate vs. glucose and identified key lactate catabolites to reveal how breast cancer cells process it. Lactate was non-toxic at clinically relevant concentrations. It was taken up and catabolized to alanine and glutamate by all cell lines. Kinetic uptake rates of lactate in vivo surpassed that of glucose in R3230Ac mammary carcinomas. The uptake appeared specific to aerobic tumor regions, consistent with the proposed “metabolic symbiont” model; here lactate produced by hypoxic cells is used by aerobic cells. We investigated whether treatment with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC), a MCT1 inhibitor, would kill cells in the presence of high lactate. Both 0.1 mM and 5 mM CHC prevented lactate uptake in R3230Ac cells at lactate concentrations at ≤20 mM but not at 40 mM. 0.1 mM CHC was well-tolerated by R3230Ac and MCF7 cells, but 5 mM CHC killed both cell lines ± lactate, indicating off-target effects. This study showed that breast cancer cells tolerate and use lactate at clinically relevant concentrations in vitro (± glucose) and in vivo. We provided additional support for the metabolic symbiont model and discovered that breast cells prevailingly take up and catabolize lactate, providing rationale for future studies on manipulation of lactate catabolism pathways for therapy. PMID:24069390

  18. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  19. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  20. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  1. Influence of Metformin on Glucose Intolerance and Muscle Catabolism Following Severe Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Dennis C.; Wolf, Steven E.; Sanford, Arthur; Herndon, David N.; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: Hyperglycemia and accelerated muscle catabolism have been shown to adversely affect immune response and survival. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of metformin on glucose kinetics and muscle protein metabolism in severely burned patients and assess any potential benefit of metformin in this clinical setting. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized manner, 8 adult burn patients received metformin (850 mg every 8 hours × 7 days), while 5 burn patients received placebo. Infusions of 6,6d2 glucose, d5 phenylalanine, sequential muscle biopsies, and femoral arterial, venous blood sampling allowed determination of glucose and muscle protein kinetics. Measurements were obtained immediately prior and at the conclusion of 7 days of treatment (metformin versus placebo). All patients received enteral feeds of comparable amounts during study. Results: Patients receiving metformin had a significant decrease in their plasma glucose concentration, the rate of glucose production, and an increase in glucose clearance. Metformin administration was also associated with a significant increase in the fractional synthetic rate of muscle protein and improvement in net muscle protein balance. Glucose kinetics and muscle protein metabolism were not significantly altered in the patients receiving placebo. Conclusions: Metformin attenuates hyperglycemia and increases muscle protein synthesis in severely burned patients, thereby indicating a metabolic link between hyperglycemia and muscle loss following severe injury. Therefore, therapies that improve glucose tolerance such as metformin may be of clinical value in ameliorating muscle catabolism in critically injured patients. PMID:15650645

  2. Single cell ganglioside catabolism in primary cerebellar neurons and glia

    PubMed Central

    Essaka, David C.; Prendergast, Jillian; Keithley, Richard B.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Palcic, Monica M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell heterogeneity in ganglioside catabolism was determined by profiling fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine-labeled GM1 (TMR-GM1) breakdown in individual primary neurons and glia from the rat cerebellum. Cells isolated from 5–6 day old rat cerebella were cultured for 7 days, and then incubated for 14 h with TMR-GM1. Intact cells were recovered from cultures by mild proteolysis, paraformaldehyde fixed, and subjected to single cell analysis. Individual cells were captured in a capillary, lysed, and the released single-cell contents subjected to capillary electrophoresis with quantitative laser-induced fluorescent detection of the catabolic products. Non-neuronal cells on average took up much more exogenous TMR-GM1 than neuronal cells, and catabolized it more extensively. After 14 h of incubation, non-neuronal cells retained only 14% of the TMR products as GM1 and GM2, compared to >50% for neurons. On average, non-neuronal cells contained 74% of TMR-labeled product as TMR-ceramide, compared to only 42% for neurons. Non-neuronal cells retained seven times as much TMR-GM3 (7%) compared to neuronal cells (1%). To confirm the observed single cell metabolomics, we lysed and compared TMR-GM1 catabolic profiles from mixed neuron/glial cell cultures and from cultures depleted of non-neuronal cells by treatment with the antimitotic agent cytosine arabinoside. The whole culture catabolic profiles were consistent with the average profiles of single neurons and glia. We conclude that the ultrasensitive analytic methods described accurately reflect single cell ganglioside catabolism in different cell populations from the brain. PMID:22407243

  3. Cholesterol catabolism as a therapeutic target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an intracellular pathogen that infects 10 million worldwide and kills 2 million people every year. The uptake and utilization of nutrients by Mtb within the host cell is still poorly understood, although lipids play an important role in Mtb persistence. The recent identification of a large regulon of cholesterol catabolic genes suggests that Mtb can use host sterol for infection and persistence. In this review, we report on recent progress in elucidation of the Mtb cholesterol catabolic reactions and their potential utility as targets for tuberculosis therapeutic agents. PMID:21924910

  4. Branched chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Courtney R.; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Phillips, Susan A.; Murphy, Anne N.; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Metallo, Christian M.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, though less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre–adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells that use glucose and glutamine for acetyl–coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes increased branched chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from media and/or protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd–chain fatty acid synthesis. B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism plays a functional role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26571352

  5. Variable Carbon Catabolism among Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Lay Ching; Kong, Boon Hong; Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever) and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas oftyphoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates) was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. Conclusion The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen. PMID:22662115

  6. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation. PMID:131119

  7. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas. PMID:24690587

  8. Characterization of p-Hydroxycinnamate Catabolism in a Soil Actinobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Hiroshi; Lee, Young-Eun; Casabon, Israël

    2014-01-01

    p-Hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate and p-coumarate, are components of plant cell walls and have a number of commercial applications. Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (RHA1) catabolizes ferulate via vanillate and the β-ketoadipate pathway. Here, we used transcriptomics to identify genes in RHA1 that are upregulated during growth on ferulate versus benzoate. The upregulated genes included three transcriptional units predicted to encode the uptake and β-oxidative deacetylation of p-hydroxycinnamates: couHTL, couNOM, and couR. Neither ΔcouL mutants nor ΔcouO mutants grew on p-hydroxycinnamates, but they did grow on vanillate. Among several p-hydroxycinnamates, CouL catalyzed the thioesterification of p-coumarate and caffeate most efficiently (kcat/Km = ∼400 mM−1 s−1). p-Coumarate was also RHA1's preferred growth substrate, suggesting that CouL is a determinant of the pathway's specificity. CouL did not catalyze the activation of sinapate, in similarity to two p-coumaric acid:coenzyme A (CoA) ligases from plants, and contains the same bulged loop that helps determine substrate specificity in the plant homologues. The couO mutant accumulated 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionate in the culture supernatant when incubated with ferulate, supporting β-oxidative deacetylation. This phenotype was not complemented with a D257N variant of CouO, consistent with the predicted role of Asp257 as a metal ligand in this amidohydrolase superfamily member. These data suggest that CouO functionally replaces the β-ketothiolase and acyl-CoA thioesterase that occur in canonical β-oxidative pathways. Finally, the transcriptomics data suggest the involvement of two distinct formaldehyde detoxification pathways in vanillate catabolism and identify a eugenol catabolic pathway. The results of this study augment our understanding of the bacterial catabolism of aromatics from renewable feedstocks. PMID:25266382

  9. Bacterial Cytochrome P450 System Catabolizing the Fusarium Toxin Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Michihiro; Sato, Ikuo; Ishizaka, Masumi; Yoshida, Shin-ichiro; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a natural toxin of fungi that cause Fusarium head blight disease of wheat and other small-grain cereals. DON accumulates in infected grains and promotes the spread of the infection on wheat, posing serious problems to grain production. The elucidation of DON-catabolic genes and enzymes in DON-degrading microbes will provide new approaches to decrease DON contamination. Here, we report a cytochrome P450 system capable of catabolizing DON in Sphingomonas sp. strain KSM1, a DON-utilizing bacterium newly isolated from lake water. The P450 gene ddnA was cloned through an activity-based screening of a KSM1 genomic library. The genes of its redox partner candidates (flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD]-dependent ferredoxin reductase and mitochondrial-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin) were not found adjacent to ddnA; the redox partner candidates were further cloned separately based on conserved motifs. The DON-catabolic activity was reconstituted in vitro in an electron transfer chain comprising the three enzymes and NADH, with a catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of 6.4 mM−1 s−1. The reaction product was identified as 16-hydroxy-deoxynivalenol. A bioassay using wheat seedlings revealed that the hydroxylation dramatically reduced the toxicity of DON to wheat. The enzyme system showed similar catalytic efficiencies toward nivalenol and 3-acetyl deoxynivalenol, toxins that frequently cooccur with DON. These findings identify an enzyme system that catabolizes DON, leading to reduced phytotoxicity to wheat. PMID:23275503

  10. A Novel Testosterone Catabolic Pathway in Bacteria ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Ismail, Wael; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Forty years ago, Coulter and Talalay (A. W. Coulter and P. Talalay, J. Biol. Chem. 243:3238–3247, 1968) established the oxygenase-dependent pathway for the degradation of testosterone by aerobes. The oxic testosterone catabolic pathway involves several oxygen-dependent reactions and is not available for anaerobes. Since then, a variety of anaerobic bacteria have been described for the ability to degrade testosterone in the absence of oxygen. Here, a novel, oxygenase-independent testosterone catabolic pathway in such organisms is described. Steroidobacter denitrificansDSMZ18526 was shown to be capable of degrading testosterone in the absence of oxygen and was selected as the model organism in this study. In a previous investigation, we identified the initial intermediates involved in an anoxic testosterone catabolic pathway, most of which are identical to those of the oxic pathway demonstrated in Comamonas testosteroni. In this study, five additional intermediates of the anoxic pathway were identified. We demonstrated that subsequent steps of the anoxic pathway greatly differ from those of the established oxic pathway, which suggests that a novel pathway for testosterone catabolism is present. In the proposed anoxic pathway, a reduction reaction occurs at C-4 and C-5 of androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, the last common intermediate of both the oxic and anoxic pathways. After that, a novel hydration reaction occurs and a hydroxyl group is thus introduced to the C-1α position of C19steroid substrates. To our knowledge, an enzymatic hydration reaction occurring at the A ring of steroid compounds has not been reported before. PMID:21725000

  11. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  12. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed. PMID:22527843

  13. Transport and Catabolism of Carbohydrates by Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Derkaoui, Meriem; Antunes, Ana; Nait Abdallah, Jamila; Poncet, Sandrine; Mazé, Alain; Ma Pham, Que Mai; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Joyet, Philippe; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Deutscher, Josef

    2016-01-01

    We identified the genes encoding the proteins for the transport of glucose and maltose in Neisseria meningitidis strain 2C4-3. A mutant deleted for NMV_1892(glcP) no longer grew on glucose and deletion of NMV_0424(malY) prevented the utilization of maltose. We also purified and characterized glucokinase and α-phosphoglucomutase, which catalyze early catabolic steps of the two carbohydrates. N. meningitidis catabolizes the two carbohydrates either via the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway or the pentose phosphate pathway, thereby forming glyceraldehyde-3-P and either pyruvate or fructose-6-P, respectively. We purified and characterized several key enzymes of the two pathways. The genes required for the transformation of glucose into gluconate-6-P and its further catabolism via the ED pathway are organized in two adjacent operons. N. meningitidis also contains genes encoding proteins which exhibit similarity to the gluconate transporter (NMV_2230) and gluconate kinase (NMV_2231) of Enterobacteriaceae and Firmicutes. However, gluconate might not be the real substrate of NMV_2230 because N. meningitidis was not able to grow on gluconate as the sole carbon source. Surprisingly, deletion of NMV_2230 stimulated growth in minimal medium in the presence and absence of glucose and drastically slowed the clearance of N. meningitidis cells from transgenic mice after intraperitoneal challenge. PMID:27454890

  14. Molecular Basis of a Bacterial Consortium: Interspecies Catabolism of Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mervyn L.; Newcombe, David; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E.; Hay, Anthony; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP contains the genes, atzA, -B, and -C, that encode three enzymes which metabolize atrazine to cyanuric acid. Atrazine-catabolizing pure cultures isolated from around the world contain genes homologous to atzA, -B, and -C. The present study was conducted to determine whether the same genes are present in an atrazine-catabolizing bacterial consortium and how the genes and metabolism are subdivided among member species. The consortium contained four or more bacterial species, but two members, Clavibacter michiganese ATZ1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, collectively mineralized atrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 released chloride from atrazine, produced hydroxyatrazine, and contained a homolog to the atzA gene that encoded atrazine chlorohydrolase. C. michiganese ATZ1 stoichiometrically metabolized hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide and contained genes homologous to atzB and atzC, suggesting that either a functional AtzB or -C catalyzed N-isopropylamine release from hydroxyatrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 grew on isopropylamine as its sole carbon and nitrogen source, explaining the ability of the consortium to use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. A second consortium member, Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, metabolized the N-ethylammelide produced by C. michiganese ATZ1 to transiently form cyanuric acid, a reaction catalyzed by AtzC. A gene homologous to the atzC gene of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was present, as demonstrated by Southern hybridization and PCR. Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, but not C. michiganese, metabolized cyanuric acid. The consortium metabolized atrazine faster than did C. michiganese individually. Additionally, the consortium metabolized a much broader set of triazine ring compounds than did previously described pure cultures in which the atzABC genes had been identified. These data begin to elucidate the genetic and metabolic bases of catabolism by multimember consortia. PMID:16349478

  15. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Andrey M.; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism—coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids. PMID:26075354

  16. Catabolism of aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S G; Flannery, C R; Little, C B; Hughes, C E; Caterson, B; Dent, C M

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the catabolism of the proteoglycans aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in fresh tendon samples and in explant cultures of tissue from the tensional and compressed regions of young and mature bovine tendons. A panel of well-characterized antibodies that recognize glycosaminoglycan or protein (linear or neoepitope) sequences was used to detect proteoglycans and proteoglycan degradation products that were both retained within the tissue and released into the culture medium. In addition, a reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis was used to examine the mRNA expression patterns of tendon proteoglycans and aggrecanases. The results of this study indicate a major role for aggrecanase(s) in the catabolism of aggrecan in bovine tendon. The study also provides a characterization of glycosaminoglycan epitopes associated with the proteoglycans of tendon, illustrating age-related changes in the isomers of chondroitin sulphate disaccharides that remain attached to the core protein glycosaminoglycan linkage region after digestion with chondroitinase ABC. Evidence for a rapid turnover of the small proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was also observed, indicating additional molecular pathways that might compromise the integrity of the collagen matrix and potentially contribute to tendon dysfunction after injury and during disease. PMID:10926842

  17. Lysosomes from rabbit type II cells catabolize surfactant lipids.

    PubMed

    Rider, E D; Ikegami, M; Pinkerton, K E; Peake, J L; Jobe, A H

    2000-01-01

    The role of a lysosome fraction from rabbit type II cells in surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) catabolism was investigated in vivo using radiolabeled DPPC and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (1, 2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DEPC), a phospholipase A(1)- and A(2)-resistant analog of DPPC. Freshly isolated type II cells were gently disrupted by shearing, and lysosomes were isolated with Percoll density gradients (density range 1.0591-1.1457 g/ml). The lysosome fractions were relatively free of contaminating organelles as determined by electron microscopy and organelle marker enzymes. After intratracheal injection of rabbits with [(3)H]DPPC and [(14)C]DEPC associated with a trace amount of natural rabbit surfactant, the degradation-resistant DEPC accumulated 16-fold compared with DPPC in lysosome fractions at 15 h. Lysosomes can be isolated from freshly isolated type II cells, and lysosomes from type II cells are the primary catabolic organelle for alveolar surfactant DPPC following reuptake by type II cells in vivo. PMID:10645892

  18. Pressure Sensitivity of Streptococcal Growth in Relation to Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.; Brown, William P.; Fenn, Wallace O.

    1971-01-01

    The sensitivity of Streptococcus faecalis growth to hydrostatic pressures ranging up to 550 atm was found to depend on the source of adenosine triphosphate for growth. Barotolerance of cultures growing in a complex medium with ribose as major catabolite appeared to be determined primarily by the pressure sensitivity of ribose-degrading enzymes. Apparent activation volumes for growth were nearly identical to those for lactate production from ribose, and yield coefficients per mole of ribose degraded were relatively independent of pressure. In contrast, cultures with glucose as main catabolite were less sensitive to pressure; glycolysis was less severely restricted under high pressure than was growth, and yield coefficients declined with pressure, especially above 400 atm. Thus, two distinct types of barotolerance could be defined—one dominated by catabolic reactions and one dominated by noncatabolic reactions. The results of experiments with a series of other catabolites further supported the view that catabolic reactions can determine streptococcal barotolerance. We also found that growing, glucose-degrading cultures increased in volume under pressure in the same manner that they do at 1 atm. Thus, it appeared that the bacterium has no alternative means of carrying out glycolysis under pressure without dilatation. Also, the observation that cultures grown under pressure did not contain abnormally large or morphologically deformed cells suggested that pressure did not inhibit cell division more than cell growth. PMID:4925191

  19. Hepatic sortilin regulates both apolipoprotein B secretion and LDL catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Alanna; Ding, Qiurong; Edmondson, Andrew C.; Millar, John S.; Sachs, Katherine V.; Li, Xiaoyu; Kumaravel, Arthi; Wang, Margaret Ye; Ai, Ding; Guo, Liang; Alexander, Eric T.; Nguyen, David; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Phillips, Michael C.; Morales, Carlos R.; Tall, Alan R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Fisher, Edward A.; Musunuru, Kiran; Rader, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a genetic variant at a locus on chromosome 1p13 that is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, reduced plasma levels of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and markedly increased expression of the gene sortilin-1 (SORT1) in liver. Sortilin is a lysosomal sorting protein that binds ligands both in the Golgi apparatus and at the plasma membrane and traffics them to the lysosome. We previously reported that increased hepatic sortilin expression in mice reduced plasma LDL-C levels. Here we show that increased hepatic sortilin not only reduced hepatic apolipoprotein B (APOB) secretion, but also increased LDL catabolism, and that both effects were dependent on intact lysosomal targeting. Loss-of-function studies demonstrated that sortilin serves as a bona fide receptor for LDL in vivo in mice. Our data are consistent with a model in which increased hepatic sortilin binds intracellular APOB-containing particles in the Golgi apparatus as well as extracellular LDL at the plasma membrane and traffics them to the lysosome for degradation. We thus provide functional evidence that genetically increased hepatic sortilin expression both reduces hepatic APOB secretion and increases LDL catabolism, providing dual mechanisms for the very strong association between increased hepatic sortilin expression and reduced plasma LDL-C levels in humans. PMID:22751103

  20. Tryptophan-Catabolizing Enzymes – Party of Three

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Helen J.; Jusof, Felicita F.; Bakmiwewa, Supun M.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Yuasa, Hajime J.

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  1. Phosphonate biosynthesis and catabolism: a treasure trove of unusual enzymology.

    PubMed

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2013-08-01

    Natural product biosynthesis has proven a fertile ground for the discovery of novel chemistry. Herein we review the progress made in elucidating the biosynthetic pathways of phosphonate and phosphinate natural products such as the antibacterial compounds dehydrophos and fosfomycin, the herbicidal phosphinothricin-containing peptides, and the antimalarial compound FR-900098. In each case, investigation of the pathway has yielded unusual, and often unprecedented, biochemistry. Likewise, recent investigations have uncovered novel ways to cleave the CP bond to yield phosphate under phosphorus starvation conditions. These include the discovery of novel oxidative cleavage of the CP bond catalyzed by PhnY and PhnZ as well as phosphonohydrolases that liberate phosphate from phosphonoacetate. Perhaps the crown jewel of phosphonate catabolism has been the recent resolution of the longstanding problem of the C-P lyase responsible for reductively cleaving the CP bond of a number of different phosphonates to release phosphate. Taken together, the strides made on both metabolic and catabolic fronts illustrate an array of fascinating biochemistry. PMID:23870698

  2. Early hormonal changes affect the catabolic response to trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, P Q; Lowe, K A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine how temporary insulin suppression might alter the catabolic effects of cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The metabolic responses to injury include hypermetabolism, accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. These alterations are associated with increased stress hormone concentrations. Insulin elaboration is usually suppressed immediately after an injury but is abundant later during convalescence. An infusion of hydrocortisone, glucagon, and epinephrine increases both stress hormone concentrations and insulin levels. It induces many of the metabolic alterations seen in critically ill patients, but it does not affect net muscle breakdown. METHODS: Seven healthy adults received a stress hormone infusion for 3 days in two separate studies. During one study they, also received an infusion of the somatostatin analogue, octreotide (0.005 micrograms/kg/min), to suppress insulin elaboration for the first 24 hours. During the other study (control), insulin was permitted to rise unchecked. RESULTS: Stress hormone concentrations, hypermetabolism (+/- 20% above basal), and leukocytosis were similar during both study periods. When insulin elaboration was temporarily suppressed, whole-body nitrogen loss was increased during the first 48 hours, and the efflux of amino acids from the forearm after 72 hours of infusion was 60% greater than the control level. CONCLUSIONS: Temporary insulin suppression during physiologic increases in stress hormone concentrations amplified whole-body nitrogen loss and led to the development of accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown. Early hormonal changes after an injury may affect the development of later catabolic responses. PMID:8215639

  3. Influence of high glycine diets on the activity of glycine-catabolizing enzymes and on glycine catabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Petzke, K.J.; Albrecht, V.; Przybilski, H.

    1986-05-01

    Male albino rats were adapted to isocaloric purified diets that differed mainly in their glycine and casein contents. Controls received a 30% casein diet. In experimental diets gelatin or gelatin hydrolysate was substituted for half of the 30% casein. An additional group was fed a glycine-supplemented diet, which corresponded in glycine level to the gelatin diet but in which the protein level was nearly the same as that of the casein control diet. Another group received a 15% casein diet. Rat liver glycine cleavage system, serine hydroxymethyltransferase and serine dehydratase activities were measured. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from the catabolism of /sup 14/C-labeled glycine was measured in vivo and in vitro (from isolated hepatocytes). Serine dehydratase and glycine cleavage system activities were higher in animals fed 30% casein diets than in those fed 15% casein diets. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity of the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions was highest when a high glycine diet (glycine administered as pure, protein bound in gelatin or peptide bound in gelatin hydrolysate) was fed. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ formation from (1-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)glycine both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes was higher when a high glycine diet was fed than when a casein diet was fed. These results suggest that glycine catabolism is dependent on and adaptable to the glycine content of the diet. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase appears to play a major role in the regulation of glycine degradation via serine and pyruvate.

  4. Functional genomics by NMR spectroscopy. Phenylacetate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael; El-Said Mohamed, Magdy; Wanner, Barry L; Datsenko, Kirill A; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Bacher, Adelbert; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    Aerobic metabolism of phenylalanine in most bacteria proceeds via oxidation to phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the further metabolism of phenylacetate has not been elucidated, even in well studied bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The only committed step is the conversion of phenylacetate into phenylacetyl-CoA. The paa operon of E. coli encodes 14 polypeptides involved in the catabolism of phenylacetate. We have found that E. coli K12 mutants with a deletion of the paaF, paaG, paaH, paaJ or paaZ gene are unable to grow with phenylacetate as carbon source. Incubation of a paaG mutant with [U-13C8]phenylacetate yielded ring-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrophenylacetyl lactone as shown by NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of the paaF and paaH mutants with phenylacetate yielded delta3-dehydroadipate and 3-hydroxyadipate, respectively. The origin of the carbon atoms of these C6 compounds from the aromatic ring was shown using [ring-13C6]phenylacetate. The paaG and paaZ mutants also converted phenylacetate into ortho-hydroxyphenylacetate, which was previously identified as a dead end product of phenylacetate catabolism. These data, in conjunction with protein sequence data, suggest a novel catabolic pathway via CoA thioesters. According to this, phenylacetyl-CoA is attacked by a ring-oxygenase/reductase (PaaABCDE proteins), generating a hydroxylated and reduced derivative of phenylacetyl-CoA, which is not re-oxidized to a dihydroxylated aromatic intermediate, as in other known aromatic pathways. Rather, it is proposed that this nonaromatic intermediate CoA ester is further metabolized in a complex reaction sequence comprising enoyl-CoA isomerization/hydration, nonoxygenolytic ring opening, and dehydrogenation catalyzed by the PaaG and PaaZ proteins. The subsequent beta-oxidation-type degradation of the resulting CoA dicarboxylate via beta-ketoadipyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA appears to be catalyzed by the PaaJ, PaaF and PaaH proteins. PMID:12846838

  5. Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2009-01-01

    Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA), epimerase (NanE), and kinase (NanK), necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster), are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body. The Nan region shows a

  6. Apolipoprotein AI levels are increased in part as a consequence of reduced catabolism in nephrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Kaysen, G A; Hoye, E; Jones, H

    1995-03-01

    Apolipoprotein AI (apo AI) synthesis, measured as the turnover of 125I-labeled apo AI-labeled high-density lipoprotein (HDL), was increased significantly in rats with Heymann nephritis (HN) vs. control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. However, fractional apo AI catabolic rate was also significantly less in HN vs. SD. We used 125I-apo AI tyramine cellobiose HDL, a marker retained at the catabolic site, to establish where apo AI catabolism decreased in six HN rats, seven rats with adriamycin (Adria)-induced nephrosis, and six control SD. Total renal apo AI catabolism, plus urinary losses, were the same in all three groups, despite significant urinary apo AI in HN and Adria rats. Apo AI catabolism was reduced in skin in both nephrotic groups, accounting for approximately 44% of reduced in apo AI catabolism. Thus a significant fraction of apo AI is catabolized in skin of normal male rats. Reduced apo AI catabolism in skin contributes to increased plasma levels in nephrotic rats. PMID:7900854

  7. Regulation of phenolic catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. ); Rynne, F.; Glenn, A. )

    1991-09-01

    In members of the family Rhizobiaceae, many phenolic compounds are degraded by the protocatechuate branch of the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway, In this paper the authors describe a novel pattern of induction of protocatechuate (pca) genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. Isolation of pca mutant strains revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate, quinate, and 4-coumarate are degraded via the protocatechuate pathway. At least three inducers govern catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A. The enzyme that catalyzes the initial step is induced by its substrate, whereas the catabolite {beta}-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate induces enzymes for the upper protocatechuate pathway, and {beta}-ketoadipate elicits expression of the enzyme for a subsequent step, {beta}-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase. Elucidation of the induction pattern relied in part on complementation of mutant Rhizobium strains by known subclones of Acinetobacter genes expressed off the lac promoter in a broad-host-range vector.

  8. Regulation and Evolution of Malonate and Propionate Catabolism in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, I. A.; Ravcheev, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria. PMID:22505679

  9. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebe, T.; Iribe, H.; Hirata, M.; Yanaga, F.; Koga, T. )

    1990-12-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes.

  10. Bioluminescent reporters for catabolic gene expression and pollutant bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Sayler, G.S. . Center for Environmental Biotechnology); Burlage, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The application of visualized catabolic nah-gene expression using a luxCDABE gene fusion provides a valuable method to measure quantitatively and specifically naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability. It has been demonstrated that the physiological state of the test culture together with the intrinsic regulation mechanisms of the naphthalene degradation pathway as well as the physiological aspects of the lux gene fusion have to be taken into account. The method presented provides a high potential for in situ bioprocess monitoring. In addition, the results obtained with immobilized cells provide a basis for the development of biosensors for environmental applications in specific pollutant monitoring in waste streams and soil slurry systems but, as a general method, also for more conventional biotechnological process control. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Lipid catabolism of invertebrate predator indicates widespread wetland ecosystem degradation.

    PubMed

    Anteau, Michael J; Afton, Alan D

    2011-01-01

    Animals frequently undergo periods when they accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent energetically expensive activities, such as migration or breeding. During such periods, daily lipid-reserve dynamics (DLD) of sentinel species can quantify how landscape modifications affect function, health, and resilience of ecosystems. Aythya affinis (Eyton 1838; lesser scaup; diving duck) are macroinvertebrate predators; they migrate through an agriculturally dominated landscape in spring where they select wetlands with the greatest food density to refuel and accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent reproduction. We index DLD by measuring plasma-lipid metabolites of female scaup (n = 459) that were refueling at 75 spring migration stopover areas distributed across the upper Midwest, USA. We also indexed DLD for females (n = 44) refueling on a riverine site (Pool 19) south of our upper Midwest study area. We found that mean DLD estimates were significantly (P<0.05) less than zero in all ecophysiographic regions of the upper Midwest, and the greatest negative value was in the Iowa Prairie Pothole region (-31.6). Mean DLD was 16.8 at Pool 19 and was markedly greater than in any region of the upper Midwest. Our results indicate that females catabolized rather than stored lipid reserves throughout the upper Midwest. Moreover, levels of lipid catabolism are alarming, because scaup use the best quality wetlands available within a given stopover area. Accordingly, these results provide evidence of wetland ecosystem degradation across this large agricultural landscape and document affects that are carried-up through several trophic levels. Interestingly, storing of lipids by scaup at Pool 19 likely reflects similar ecosystem perturbations as observed in the upper Midwest because wetland drainage and agricultural runoff nutrifies the riverine habitat that scaup use at Pool 19. Finally, our results underscore how using this novel technique to monitor DLD, of a carefully selected sentinel

  12. Lipid catabolism of invertebrate predator indicates widespread wetland ecosystem degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Afton, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Animals frequently undergo periods when they accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent energetically expensive activities, such as migration or breeding. During such periods, daily lipid-reserve dynamics (DLD) of sentinel species can quantify how landscape modifications affect function, health, and resilience of ecosystems. Aythya affinis (Eyton 1838; lesser scaup; diving duck) are macroinvertebrate predators; they migrate through an agriculturally dominated landscape in spring where they select wetlands with the greatest food density to refuel and accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent reproduction. We index DLD by measuring plasma-lipid metabolites of female scaup (n = 459) that were refueling at 75 spring migration stopover areas distributed across the upper Midwest, USA. We also indexed DLD for females (n = 44) refueling on a riverine site (Pool 19) south of our upper Midwest study area. We found that mean DLD estimates were significantly (P<0.05) less than zero in all ecophysiographic regions of the upper Midwest, and the greatest negative value was in the Iowa Prairie Pothole region (-31.6). Mean DLD was 16.8 at Pool 19 and was markedly greater than in any region of the upper Midwest. Our results indicate that females catabolized rather than stored lipid reserves throughout the upper Midwest. Moreover, levels of lipid catabolism are alarming, because scaup use the best quality wetlands available within a given stopover area. Accordingly, these results provide evidence of wetland ecosystem degradation across this large agricultural landscape and document affects that are carried-up through several trophic levels. Interestingly, storing of lipids by scaup at Pool 19 likely reflects similar ecosystem perturbations as observed in the upper Midwest because wetland drainage and agricultural runoff nutrifies the riverine habitat that scaup use at Pool 19. Finally, our results underscore how using this novel technique to monitor DLD, of a carefully selected sentinel

  13. Novel Pathway of Toluene Catabolism in the Trichloroethylene-Degrading Bacterium G4

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Malcolm S.; Montgomery, Stacy O.; Chapman, Peter J.; Cuskey, Stephen M.; Pritchard, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    o-Cresol and 3-methylcatechol were identified as successive transitory intermediates of toluene catabolism by the trichloroethylene-degrading bacterium G4. The absence of a toluene dihydrodiol intermediate or toluene dioxygenase and toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activities suggested that G4 catabolizes toluene by a unique pathway. Formation of a hybrid species of 18O- and 16O-labeled 3-methylcatechol from toluene in an atmosphere of 18O2 and 16O2 established that G4 catabolizes toluene by successive monooxygenations at the ortho and meta positions. Detection of trace amounts of 4-methylcatechol from toluene catabolism suggested that the initial hydroxylation of toluene was not exclusively at the ortho position. Further catabolism of 3-methylcatechol was found to proceed via catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase activities. PMID:16347956

  14. d-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  15. D-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-06-25

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  16. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-06-28

    The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2(L-/-)), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2(L-/-) mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2(L-/-) mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting. PMID:27320917

  17. Enhancing S-adenosyl-methionine catabolism extends Drosophila lifespan.

    PubMed

    Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Methionine restriction extends the lifespan of various model organisms. Limiting S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthesis, the first metabolic reaction of dietary methionine, extends longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans but accelerates pathology in mammals. Here, we show that, as an alternative to inhibiting SAM synthesis, enhancement of SAM catabolism by glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) extends the lifespan in Drosophila. Gnmt strongly buffers systemic SAM levels by producing sarcosine in either high-methionine or low-sams conditions. During ageing, systemic SAM levels in flies are increased. Gnmt is transcriptionally induced in a dFoxO-dependent manner; however, this is insufficient to suppress SAM elevation completely in old flies. Overexpression of gnmt suppresses this age-dependent SAM increase and extends longevity. Pro-longevity regimens, such as dietary restriction or reduced insulin signalling, attenuate the age-dependent SAM increase, and rely at least partially on Gnmt function to exert their lifespan-extending effect in Drosophila. Our study suggests that regulation of SAM levels by Gnmt is a key component of lifespan extension. PMID:26383889

  18. A Product of Heme Catabolism Modulates Bacterial Function and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Christopher L.; Green, Sabrina I.; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome) and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome). This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models. PMID:23935485

  19. Catabolism of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin by rat intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2013-05-22

    Catabolism of (+)-catechin (+C) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) by rat intestinal microbiota was examined in vitro. +C and EC metabolites isolated were identified by LC-MS and NMR analyses. As a result, 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)valeric acid (C-5 and EC-5), 4-oxo-5-(3,4-dihydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-7), 4-oxo-5-(3-hydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-8), and 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)propan-2-ol (EC-13) were identified as new metabolites of +C or EC. From the measurement of optical rotation, each of the +C and EC metabolites possessing the same chemical structure and chiral carbon was inferred to have an enantiomeric relationship to each other and to maintain the configurations at the 3-position of the original catechins. On the basis of these findings together with previous information, the proposed metabolic pathway of +C and EC by rat intestinal microbiota was updated. PMID:23621128

  20. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P < 0.05). The augmented negative amino acid balance was the result of an increased muscle protein breakdown (P < 0.05) without a concomitant change in muscle protein synthesis. Muscle efflux of glutamine and alanine increased significantly after bed rest due to a significant increase in de novo synthesis (P < 0.05). Thus, inactivity sensitizes skeletal muscle to the catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  1. Inhibition of growth by erythritol catabolism in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, J F; Robertson, D C

    1975-01-01

    The growth of Brucella abortus (US-19) in a complex tryptose-yeast extract medium containing D-glucose is inhibited by 10 mM erythritol. The enzymes of the erythritol pathway, except for D-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) 4-oxidoreductase) were detected in the soluble and membrane fractions of cell extracts. Glucose catabolism by cell extracts was inhibited by erythritol, whereas, phosphorylated intermediates of the hexose monophosphate pathway were converted to pyruvic acid with oxygen consumption. Erythritol kinase (EC 2.7.1.27; adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP): erythritol 1-phosphotransferase) was found to be eightfold higher in activity than the hexokinase in cell extracts. In vivo, ATP is apparently consumed with the accumulation of D-erythrulose 1-phosphate (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate) and no substrate level phosphorylation. ATP levels dropped 10-fold in 30 min after addition of erythritol to log phase cells in tryptose-yeast extract medium with D-glucose as the carbon source. These data suggest bacteriostasis in the presence of erythritol results from the ATP drain caused by erythritol kinase. PMID:170249

  2. Hyaluronan Synthesis, Catabolism, and Signaling in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Larry S.; Matsumoto, Steven; Su, Weiping; Srivastava, Taasin; Back, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been implicated in regulating neural differentiation, survival, proliferation, migration, and cell signaling in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). HA is found throughout the CNS as a constituent of proteoglycans, especially within perineuronal nets that have been implicated in regulating neuronal activity. HA is also found in the white matter where it is diffusely distributed around astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Insults to the CNS lead to long-term elevation of HA within damaged tissues, which is linked at least in part to increased transcription of HA synthases. HA accumulation is often accompanied by elevated expression of at least some transmembrane HA receptors including CD44. Hyaluronidases that digest high molecular weight HA into smaller fragments are also elevated following CNS insults and can generate HA digestion products that have unique biological activities. A number of studies, for example, suggest that both the removal of high molecular weight HA and the accumulation of hyaluronidase-generated HA digestion products can impact CNS injuries through mechanisms that include the regulation of progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation. These studies, reviewed here, suggest that targeting HA synthesis, catabolism, and signaling are all potential strategies to promote CNS repair. PMID:26448752

  3. Leptin plays a catabolic role on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jia-peng; Chen, Wei-ping; Feng, Jie; Hu, Peng-fei; Shi, Zhong-li; Wu, Li-dong

    2010-10-01

    Leptin has been shown to play a crucial role in the regulation of body weight. There is also evidence that this adipokine plays a key role in the process of osteoarthritis. However, the precise role of leptin on articular cartilage metabolism is not clear. We investigate the role of leptin on articular cartilage in vivo in this study. Recombinant rat leptin (100 μg) was injected into the knee joints of rats, 48 h later, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2, MMP-9), cathepsin D, and collagen II from articular cartilage were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. Two important aggrecanases ADAMTS-4 and -5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5) were also analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Besides, articular cartilage was also assessed for proteoglycan/GAG content by Safranin O staining. Leptin significantly increased both gene and protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, cathepsin D, and collagen II, while decreased bFGF markedly in cartilage. Moreover, the gene expression of ADAMTS-4 and -5 were markedly increased, and histologically assessed depletion of proteoglycan in articular cartilage was observed after treatment with leptin. These results strongly suggest that leptin plays a catabolic role on cartilage metabolism and may be a disadvantage factor involve in the pathological process of OA. PMID:19876764

  4. AP2-NR4A3 transgenic mice display reduced serum epinephrine because of increased catecholamine catabolism in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Zhu, Xiaolin; Tian, Ling; Heywood, Elizabeth B; Liu, Jian; Hill, Helliner S; Liu, Jiarong; Bruemmer, Dennis; Yang, Qinglin; Fu, Yuchang; Garvey, W Timothy

    2016-07-01

    The NR4A orphan nuclear receptors function as early response genes to numerous stimuli. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that overexpression of NR4A3 (NOR-1, MINOR) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To assess the in vivo effect of NR4A3 on adipocytes, we generated transgenic mice with NR4A3 overexpression driven by the adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AP2) promoter (AP2-NR4A3 mice). We hypothesized that AP2-NR4A3 mice would display enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. However, AP2-NR4A3 mice exhibit metabolic impairment, including increased fasting glucose and insulin, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, decreased serum free fatty acids, and increased low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. AP2-NR4A3 mice also display a significant reduction in serum epinephrine due to increased expression of catecholamine-catabolizing enzymes in adipose tissue, including monoamine oxidase-A. Furthermore, enhanced expression of monoamine oxidase-A is due to direct transcriptional activation by NR4A3. Finally, AP2-NR4A3 mice display cardiac and behavioral alterations consistent with chronically low circulating epinephrine levels. In conclusion, overexpression of NR4A3 in adipocytes produces a complex phenotype characterized by impaired glucose metabolism and low serum catecholamines due to enhanced degradation by adipose tissue. PMID:27166283

  5. A key ABA catabolic gene, OsABA8ox3, is involved in drought stress resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanlan; Jiang, Guobin; Ye, Nenghui; Chu, Zhizhan; Xu, Xuezhong; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhu, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Expressions of ABA biosynthesis genes and catabolism genes are generally co-regulated in plant development and responses to environmental stress. Up-regulation of OsNCED3 gene, a key gene in ABA biosynthesis, has been suggested as a way to enhance plant drought resistance but little is known for the role of ABA catabolic genes during drought stress. In this study, we found that OsABA8ox3 was the most highly expressed gene of the OsABA8ox family in rice leaves. Expression of OsABA8ox3 was promptly induced by rehydration after PEG-mimic dehydration, a tendency opposite to the changes of ABA level. We therefore constructed rice OsABA8ox3 silencing (RNA interference, RNAi) and overexpression plants. There were no obvious phenotype differences between the transgenic seedlings and wild type under normal condition. However, OsABA8ox3 RNAi lines showed significant improvement in drought stress tolerance while the overexpression seedlings were hypersensitive to drought stress when compared with wild type in terms of plant survival rates after 10 days of unwatering. Enzyme activity analysis indicated that OsABA8ox3 RNAi plants had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities and less malondialdehyde (MDA) content than those of wild type when the plants were exposed to dehydration treatment, indicating a better anti-oxidative stress capability and less membrane damage. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analysis under dehydration treatment revealed that expressions of a group of stress/drought-related genes, i.e. LEA genes, were enhanced with higher transcript levels in OsABA8ox3 RNAi transgenic seedlings. We therefore conclude that that OsABA8ox3 gene plays an important role in controlling ABA level and drought stress resistance in rice. PMID:25647508

  6. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  7. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  8. Biochemical and genetic analyses of acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, C; Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1989-01-01

    In genetic studies on the catabolism of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, we used Tn5::mob-induced mutants which were impaired in the utilization of acetoin as the sole carbon source for growth. The transposon-harboring EcoRI restriction fragments from 17 acetoin-negative and slow-growing mutants (class 2a) and from six pleiotropic mutants of A. eutorphus, which were acetoin-negative and did not grow chemolithoautotrophically (class 2b), were cloned from pHC79 gene banks. The insertions of Tn5 were mapped on four different chromosomal EcoRI restriction fragments (A, C, D, and E) in class 2a mutants. The native DNA fragments were cloned from a lambda L47 or from a cosmid gene bank. Evidence is provided that fragments A (21 kilobase pairs [kb]) and C (7.7 kb) are closely linked in the genome; the insertions of Tn5 covered a region of approximately 5 kb. Physiological experiments revealed that this region encodes for acetoin:dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductase, a fast-migrating protein, and probably for one additional protein that is as yet unknown. In mutants which were not completely impaired in growth on acetoin but which grew much slower and after a prolonged lag phase, fragments D (7.2 kb) and E (8.1 kb) were inactivated by insertion of Tn5::mob. No structural gene could be assigned to the D or E fragments. In class 2b mutants, insertions of Tn5 were mapped on fragment B (11.3 kb). This fragment complemented pleiotropic hno mutants in trans; these mutants were impaired in the formation of a rpoN-like protein. The expression of the gene cluster on fragments A and C seemed to be rpoN dependent. PMID:2556366

  9. Characterization of the mannitol catabolic operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xue; Okai, Naoko; Vertès, Alain A; Inatomi, Ken-Ichi; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes a mannitol catabolic operon, which comprises three genes: the DeoR-type repressor coding gene mtlR (sucR), an MFS transporter gene (mtlT), and a mannitol 2-dehydrogenase gene (mtlD). The mtlR gene is located upstream of the mtlTD genes in the opposite orientation. In spite of this, wild-type C. glutamicum lacks the ability to utilize mannitol. This wild-type phenotype results from the genetic regulation of the genes coding for mannitol transport and catalytic proteins mediated by the autoregulated MtlR protein since mtlR mutants grow on mannitol as the sole carbon source. MtlR binds to sites near the mtlR (two sites) and mtlTD promoters (one site downstream of the promoter), with the consensus sequence 5'-TCTAACA-3' being required for its binding. The newly discovered operon comprises the three basic functional elements required for mannitol utilization: regulation, transport, and metabolism to fructose, further processed to the common intermediate of glycolysis fructose-6-phosphate. When relieved from MtlR repression, C. glutamicum, which lacks a functional fructokinase, excretes the fructose derived from mannitol and imports it by the fructose-specific PTS. In order to use mannitol from seaweed biomass hydrolysates as a carbon source for the production of useful commodity chemicals and materials, an overexpression system using the tac promoter was developed. For congruence with the operon, we propose to rename sucR as the mtlR gene. PMID:21655984

  10. Substrate Specificity of Atrazine Chlorohydrolase and Atrazine-Catabolizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial atrazine catabolism is initiated by the enzyme atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA) in Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Other triazine herbicides are metabolized by bacteria, but the enzymological basis of this is unclear. Here we begin to address this by investigating the catalytic activity of AtzA by using substrate analogs. Purified AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP catalyzed the hydrolysis of an atrazine analog that was substituted at the chlorine substituent by fluorine. AtzA did not catalyze the hydrolysis of atrazine analogs containing the pseudohalide azido, methoxy, and cyano groups or thiomethyl and amino groups. Atrazine analogs with a chlorine substituent at carbon 2 and N-alkyl groups, ranging in size from methyl to t-butyl, all underwent dechlorination by AtzA. AtzA catalyzed hydrolytic dechlorination when one nitrogen substituent was alkylated and the other was a free amino group. However, when both amino groups were unalkylated, no reaction occurred. Cell extracts were prepared from five strains capable of atrazine dechlorination and known to contain atzA or closely homologous gene sequences: Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, Rhizobium strain PATR, Alcaligenes strain SG1, Agrobacterium radiobacter J14a, and Ralstonia picketti D. All showed identical substrate specificity to purified AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Cell extracts from Clavibacter michiganensis ATZ1, which also contains a gene homologous to atzA, were able to transform atrazine analogs containing pseudohalide and thiomethyl groups, in addition to the substrates used by AtzA from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. This suggests that either (i) another enzyme(s) is present which confers the broader substrate range or (ii) the AtzA itself has a broader substrate range. PMID:11010866

  11. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights. PMID:8051515

  12. Religious Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three issues of religious tolerance. The first article examines a case recently decided by the United States Supreme Court on student-led prayers at school events. The second article explores the persecution suffered by members of the Mormon religion during the 19th century. The final article looks at Martin Luther and…

  13. Methanesulfonate (MSA) Catabolic Genes from Marine and Estuarine Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana C; De Marco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively, methanesulfonate (MSA) is a very relevant compound in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Its utilization by bacteria as a source of carbon and energy has been described and a specific enzyme, methanesulfonate monooxygenase (MSAMO), has been found to perform the first catabolic step of its oxidation. Other proteins seemingly involved in the import of MSA into bacterial cells have been reported. In this study, we obtained novel sequences of genes msmA and msmE from marine, estuary and soil MSA-degraders (encoding the large subunit of the MSAMO enzyme and the periplasmic component of the import system, respectively). We also obtained whole-genome sequences of two novel marine Filomicrobium strains, Y and W, and annotated two full msm operons in these genomes. Furthermore, msmA and msmE sequences were amplified from North Atlantic seawater and analyzed. Good conservation of the MsmA deduced protein sequence was observed in both cultured strains and metagenomic clones. A long spacer sequence in the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding motif within MsmA was found to be conserved in all instances, supporting the hypothesis that this feature is specific to the large (α) subunit of the MSAMO enzyme. The msmE gene was more difficult to amplify, from both cultivated isolates and marine metagenomic DNA. However, 3 novel msmE sequences were obtained from isolated strains and one directly from seawater. With both genes, our results combined with previous metagenomic analyses seem to imply that moderate to high-GC strains are somehow favored during enrichment and isolation of MSA-utilizing bacteria, while the majority of msm genes obtained by cultivation-independent methods have low levels of GC%, which is a clear example of the misrepresentation of natural populations that culturing, more often than not, entails. Nevertheless, the data obtained in this work show that MSA-degrading bacteria are abundant in surface seawater, which suggests ecological

  14. Substrate Uptake and Subcellular Compartmentation of Anoxic Cholesterol Catabolism in Sterolibacterium denitrificans*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Yu-Wen; El Nayal, Ashraf; Yang, Chia-Ying; Yang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol catabolism by actinobacteria has been extensively studied. In contrast, the uptake and catabolism of cholesterol by Gram-negative species are poorly understood. Here, we investigated microbial cholesterol catabolism at the subcellular level. 13C metabolomic analysis revealed that anaerobically grown Sterolibacterium denitrificans, a β-proteobacterium, adopts an oxygenase-independent pathway to degrade cholesterol. S. denitrificans cells did not produce biosurfactants upon growth on cholesterol and exhibited high cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, S. denitrificans did not produce extracellular catabolic enzymes to transform cholesterol. Accordingly, S. denitrificans accessed cholesterol by direction adhesion. Cholesterol is imported through the outer membrane via a putative FadL-like transport system, which is induced by neutral sterols. The outer membrane steroid transporter is able to selectively import various C27 sterols into the periplasm. S. denitrificans spheroplasts exhibited a significantly higher efficiency in cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid uptake than in cholesterol uptake. We separated S. denitrificans proteins into four fractions, namely the outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm, and we observed the individual catabolic reactions within them. Our data indicated that, in the periplasm, various periplasmic and peripheral membrane enzymes transform cholesterol into cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid. The C27 acidic steroid is then transported into the cytoplasm, in which side-chain degradation and the subsequent sterane cleavage occur. This study sheds light into microbial cholesterol metabolism under anoxic conditions. PMID:25418128

  15. Evidence of a plasmid-encoded oxidative xylose-catabolic pathway in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1.

    PubMed

    Mihasan, Marius; Stefan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian; Artenie, Vlad; Brandsch, Roderich

    2013-01-01

    Due to its high abundance, the D-xylose fraction of lignocellulose provides a promising resource for production of various chemicals. Examples of efficient utilization of d-xylose are nevertheless rare, mainly due to the lack of enzymes with suitable properties for biotechnological applications. The genus Arthrobacter, which occupies an ecological niche rich in lignocellulosic materials and containing species with high resistance and tolerance to environmental factors, is a very suitable candidate for finding D-xylose-degrading enzymes with new properties. In this work, the presence of the pAO1 megaplasmid in cells of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans was directly linked to the ability of this microorganism to ferment D-xylose and to sustain longer log growth. Three pAO1 genes (orf32, orf39, orf40) putatively involved in degradation of xylose were identified and cloned, and the corresponding proteins purified and characterized. ORF40 was shown to be a homotetrameric NADP(+)/NAD(+) sugar dehydrogenase with a strong preference for d-xylose; ORF39 is a monomeric aldehyde dehydrogenase with wide substrate specificity and ORF32 is a constitutive expressed transcription factor putatively involved in control of the entire catabolic pathway. Based on analogies with other pentose degradation pathways, a putative xylose oxidative pathway similar to the Weimberg pathway is postulated. PMID:23063486

  16. Understanding Sugar Catabolism in Unicellular Cyanobacteria Toward the Application in Biofuel and Biomaterial Production.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Iijima, Hiroko; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model species of the cyanobacteria that undergo oxygenic photosynthesis, and has garnered much attention for its potential biotechnological applications. The regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in this cyanobacterium has been intensively studied and recent omics approaches have revealed the changes in transcripts, proteins, and metabolites of sugar catabolism under different light and nutrient conditions. Several transcriptional regulators that control the gene expression of enzymes related to sugar catabolism have been identified in the past 10 years, including a sigma factor, transcription factors, and histidine kinases. The modification of these genes can lead to alterations in the primary metabolism as well as the levels of high-value products such as bioplastics and hydrogen. This review summarizes recent studies on sugar catabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, emphasizing the importance of elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial metabolism for biotechnological applications. PMID:27023248

  17. Unity in organisation and regulation of catabolic operons in Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ulrika; Molenaar, Douwe; Rådström, Peter; de Vos, Willem M

    2005-04-01

    Global regulatory circuits together with more specific local regulators play a notable role when cells are adapting to environmental changes. Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium abundant in nature fermenting most mono- and disaccharides. Comparative genomics analysis of the operons encoding the proteins and enzymes crucial for catabolism of lactose, maltose and threhalose revealed an obvious unity in operon organisation . The local regulator of each operon was located in a divergent transcriptional direction to the rest of the operon including the transport protein-encoding genes. Furthermore, in all three operons a catabolite responsive element (CRE) site was detected inbetween the gene encoding the local regulator and one of the genes encoding a sugar transport protein. It is evident that regardless of type of transport system and catabolic enzymes acting upon lactose, maltose and trehalose, respectively, Lc. lactis shows unity in both operon organisation and regulation of these catabolic operons. This knowledge was further extended to other catabolic operons in Lc. lactis and the two related bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-nine catabolic operons responsible for degradation of sugars and sugar alcohols in Lc. lactis, Lb. plantarum and L. monocytogenes were investigated and the majority of those possessed the same organisation as the lactose, maltose and trehalose operons of Lc. lactis. Though, the frequency of CRE sites and their location varied among the bacteria. Both Lc. lactis and Lb. plantarum showed CRE sites in direct proximity to genes coding for proteins responsible for sugar uptake. However, in L. monocytogenes CRE sites were not frequently found and not in the vicinity of genes encoding transport proteins, suggesting a more local mode of regulation of the catabolic operons found and/or the use of inducer control in this bacterium. PMID:15900965

  18. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of rhamnose catabolic pathways and regulons in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Thiel, Vera; Stolyar, Sergey; Stanton, Krista; Fredrickson, James K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Best, Aaron A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    L-rhamnose (L-Rha) is a deoxy-hexose sugar commonly found in nature. L-Rha catabolic pathways were previously characterized in various bacteria including Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, homology searches failed to recognize all the genes for the complete L-Rha utilization pathways in diverse microbial species involved in biomass decomposition. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms of L-Rha catabolism have remained unclear in most species. A comparative genomics approach was used to reconstruct the L-Rha catabolic pathways and transcriptional regulons in the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Thermotogae. The reconstructed pathways include multiple novel enzymes and transporters involved in the utilization of L-Rha and L-Rha-containing polymers. Large-scale regulon inference using bioinformatics revealed remarkable variations in transcriptional regulators for L-Rha utilization genes among bacteria. A novel bifunctional enzyme, L-rhamnulose-phosphate aldolase (RhaE) fused to L-lactaldehyde dehydrogenase (RhaW), which is not homologous to previously characterized L-Rha catabolic enzymes, was identified in diverse bacteria including Chloroflexi, Bacilli, and Alphaproteobacteria. By using in vitro biochemical assays we validated both enzymatic activities of the purified recombinant RhaEW proteins from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Bacillus subtilis. Another novel enzyme of the L-Rha catabolism, L-lactaldehyde reductase (RhaZ), was identified in Gammaproteobacteria and experimentally validated by in vitro enzymatic assays using the recombinant protein from Salmonella typhimurium. C. aurantiacus induced transcription of the predicted L-Rha utilization genes when L-Rha was present in the growth medium and consumed L-Rha from the medium. This study provided comprehensive insights to L-Rha catabolism and its regulation in diverse Bacteria. PMID:24391637

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of erythritol catabolic loci within the Rhizobiales and Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to use erythritol as a sole carbon source is not universal among the Rhizobiaceae. Based on the relatedness to the catabolic genes in Brucella it has been suggested that the eryABCD operon may have been horizontally transferred into Rhizobium. During work characterizing a locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol, adonitol and L-arabitol in Sinorhizobium meliloti, we became interested in the differences between the erythritol loci of S. meliloti and R. leguminosarum. Utilizing the Ortholog Neighborhood Viewer from the DOE Joint Genome Institute database it appeared that loci for erythritol and polyol utilization had distinct arrangements that suggested these loci may have undergone genetic rearrangements. Results A data set was established of genetic loci containing erythritol/polyol orthologs for 19 different proteobacterial species. These loci were analyzed for genetic content and arrangement of genes associated with erythritol, adonitol and L-arabitol catabolism. Phylogenetic trees were constructed for core erythritol catabolic genes and contrasted with the species phylogeny. Additionally, phylogenetic trees were constructed for genes that showed differences in arrangement among the putative erythritol loci in these species. Conclusions Three distinct erythritol/polyol loci arrangements have been identified that reflect metabolic need or specialization. Comparison of the phylogenetic trees of core erythritol catabolic genes with species phylogeny provides evidence that is consistent with these loci having been horizontally transferred from the alpha-proteobacteria into both the beta and gamma-proteobacteria. ABC transporters within these loci adopt 2 unique genetic arrangements, and although biological data suggests they are functional erythritol transporters, phylogenetic analysis suggests they may not be orthologs and probably should be considered analogs. Finally, evidence for the presence of paralogs, and xenologs

  20. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 regulates immune tolerance and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Elizabeth C; de Vries, Victor C; Wasiuk, Anna; Ahonen, Cory; Bennett, Kathryn A; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Ha, Dae-Gon; Noelle, Randolph J

    2012-10-22

    Nutrient deprivation based on the loss of essential amino acids by catabolic enzymes in the microenvironment is a critical means to control inflammatory responses and immune tolerance. Here we report the novel finding that Tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase-1), a synthase which catalyses the conversion of tryptophan to serotonin and exhausts tryptophan, is a potent regulator of immunity. In models of skin allograft tolerance, tumor growth, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Tph-1 deficiency breaks allograft tolerance, induces tumor remission, and intensifies neuroinflammation, respectively. All of these effects of Tph-1 deficiency are independent of its downstream product serotonin. Because mast cells (MCs) appear to be the major source of Tph-1 and restoration of Tph-1 in the MC compartment in vivo compensates for the defect, these experiments introduce a fundamentally new mechanism of MC-mediated immune suppression that broadly impacts multiple arms of immunity. PMID:23008335

  1. Dissection of the bifunctional ARGRII protein involved in the regulation of arginine anabolic and catabolic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Qui, H F; Dubois, E; Messenguy, F

    1991-01-01

    ARGRII is a regulatory protein which regulates the arginine anabolic and catabolic pathways in combination with ARGRI and ARGRIII. We have investigated, by deletion analysis and fusion to LexA protein, the different domains of ARGRII protein. In contrast to other yeast regulatory proteins, 92% of ARGRII is necessary for its anabolic repression function and 80% is necessary for its catabolic activator function. We can define three domains in this protein: a putative DNA-binding domain containing a zinc finger motif, a region more involved in the repression activity located around the RNase-like sequence, and a large activation domain. Images PMID:2005903

  2. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  3. Tryptophan Catabolism in Chronic Viral Infections: Handling Uninvited Guests

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    l-Tryptophan (l-Trp) is an essential amino acid that possesses diverse metabolic, neurological, and immunological roles spanning from the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitter serotonin, and neurohormone melatonin, to its degradation into immunosuppressive catabolites by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in the kynurenine pathway (KP). Trp catabolites, by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), play an important role in antimicrobial defense and immune regulation. IDO/AhR acts as a double-edged sword by both depleting l-Trp to starve the invaders and by contributing to the state of immunosuppression with microorganisms that were not cleared during acute infection. Pathogens experiencing Trp deprivation by IDO-mediated degradation include certain bacteria, parasites, and less likely viruses. However, chronic viral infections highjack the host immune response to create a state of disease tolerance via kynurenine catabolites. This review covers the latest data involving chronic viral infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) and their cellular interplay with Trp catabolites. Strategies developed by viruses to escape immune control also represent new avenues for therapeutic interventions based on Trp metabolism. PMID:26309411

  4. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  5. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  6. Activation and inactivation of Pseudomonas stutzeri methylbenzene catabolism pathways mediated by a transposable element

    SciTech Connect

    Bolognese, F.; Di Lecce, C.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1999-05-01

    The arrangement of the genes involved in o-xylene, m-xylene, and p-xylene catabolism was investigated in three Pseudomonas stutzeri strains: the wild-type strain OX1, which is able to grow on o-xylene but not on the meta and para isomers; the mutant M1, which grows on m-xylene and p-xylene but is unable to utilize the ortho isomer; and the revertant R1, which can utilize all the three isomers of xylene. A 3-kb insertion sequence (IS) termed ISPs1, which inactivates the m-xylene and p-xylene catabolic pathway in P. stutzeri OX1 and the o-xylene catabolic genes in P. stutzeri M1, was detected. No IS was detected in the corresponding catabolic regions of the P. stutzeri R1 genome. ISPs1 is present in several copies in the genomes of the three strains. It is flanked by 24-bp imperfect inverted repeats, causes the direct duplication of 8 bp in the target DNA, and seems to be related to the ISL3 family.

  7. Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase is essential for Arginine Catabolism but not for Proline Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Funck, Dietmar; Stadelhofer, Bettina; Koch, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background Like many other plant species, Arabidopsis uses arginine (Arg) as a storage and transport form of nitrogen, and proline (Pro) as a compatible solute in the defence against abiotic stresses causing water deprivation. Arg catabolism produces ornithine (Orn) inside mitochondria, which was discussed controversially as a precursor for Pro biosynthesis, alternative to glutamate (Glu). Results We show here that ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (δOAT, At5g46180), the enzyme converting Orn to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), is localised in mitochondria and is essential for Arg catabolism. Wildtype plants could readily catabolise supplied Arg and Orn and were able to use these amino acids as the only nitrogen source. Deletion mutants of δOAT, however, accumulated urea cycle intermediates when fed with Arg or Orn and were not able to utilize nitrogen provided as Arg or Orn. Utilisation of urea and stress induced Pro accumulation were not affected in T-DNA insertion mutants with a complete loss of δOAT expression. Conclusion Our findings indicate that δOAT feeds P5C exclusively into the catabolic branch of Pro metabolism, which yields Glu as an end product. Conversion of Orn to Glu is an essential route for recovery of nitrogen stored or transported as Arg. Pro biosynthesis occurs predominantly or exclusively via the Glu pathway in Arabidopsis and does not depend on Glu produced by Arg and Orn catabolism. PMID:18419821

  8. Protein catabolism in suckling and fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga anglstirostris).

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Costa, D P

    2001-11-01

    Nursing elephant seal pups are hypothesized to be preadapted to the postweaning fast, yet no comparison of lipid or protein use for meeting metabolic costs has been made between these contrasting nutritional periods. To address this, protein catabolism was estimated in five elephant seal pups from measurements of urea turnover made twice during nursing and twice during the postweaning fast. Changes in body composition were measured in ten separate weaned pups via tritiated water dilution and matched to fasting urea turnover measurements in order to assess errors in protein catabolism derived from urea turnover rates. Estimates of lean mass loss based upon urea turnover and tritiated water dilution were in general agreement, supporting estimates of protein catabolism derived from urea turnover measurements. Protein catabolism was estimated to contribute less than 4% to the average metabolic rate of suckling and fasting pups implying strict protein conservation during both periods and supporting the shypothesis that suckling pups are pre-adapted to fasting. It is proposed that strict protein conservation across suckling and fasting compensates for relative reductions in maternal investment associated with the abbreviated lactation period of the elephant seal. PMID:11765972

  9. Changes in expression of proteolytic genes in response to anabolic and catabolic signals in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rates of protein accrual are largely affected by rates of protein degradation. Determining how proteolytic pathways are affected by catabolic and anabolic signals will contribute to the understanding of the impact and regulation these pathways have on protein turnover. Real time RT-PCR was used to...

  10. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Green, Courtney R; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Phillips, Susan A; Murphy, Anne N; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, but less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre-adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells, which use glucose and glutamine for acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes showed increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from medium and/or from protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd-chain fatty acid synthesis. Vitamin B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism has a functional role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26571352

  11. CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PHTHALATE CATABOLISM REGION OF PRE1 OF ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B

    EPA Science Inventory

    o-Phthalate (benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate) is a central intermediate in the bacterial degradation of phthalate ester plasticizers as well as of a number of fused-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in fossil fuels. In Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, the genes encoding catabolism o...

  12. Mechanical ventilation induces myokine expression and catabolism in peripheral skeletal muscle in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis increases circulating cytokines which have been associated with skeletal muscle catabolism. During critical illness, it has been postulated that muscle wasting associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) occurs due to inactivity. We hypothesize that MV and sepsis promo...

  13. A functional myo-inositol catabolism pathway is essential for rhizopine utilization by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M P; Feng, S F; Borneman, J; Triplett, E W; de Bruijn, F J; Rossbach, S

    1998-10-01

    Rhizopine (L-3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine) is a symbiosis-specific compound found in alfalfa nodules induced by specific Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It has been postulated that rhizobial strains able to synthesize and catabolize rhizopine gain a competitive advantage in the rhizosphere. The pathway of rhizopine degradation is analysed here. Since rhizopine is an inositol derivative, it was tested whether inositol catabolism is involved in rhizopine utilization. A genetic locus required for the catabolism of inositol as sole carbon source was cloned from S. meliloti. This locus was delimited by transposon Tn5 mutagenesis and its DNA sequence was determined. Based on DNA similarity studies and enzyme assays, this genetic region was shown to encode an S. meliloti myo-inositol dehydrogenase. Strains that harboured a mutation in the myo-inositol dehydrogenase gene (idhA) did not display myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity, were unable to utilize myo-inositol as sole carbon/energy source, and were unable to catabolize rhizopine. Thus, myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity is essential for rhizopine utilization in S. meliloti. PMID:9802033

  14. Identification and catabolic activity of well-derived gasoline-degrading bacteria from a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgway, H.F.; Safarik, J.; Phipps, D.; Carl, P.; Clark, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Approximately 300 gasoline-degrading bacteria were isolated from well water and core material from a shallow coastal aquifer contaminated with unleaded gasoline. Identification of 244 isolates revealed four genera: Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Nocardia, and Micrococcus, with pseudomonads making up 86.9% of bacteria identified. A total of 297 isolates was sorted into 111 catabolic groups on the basis of aerobic growth responses on 15 gasoline hydrocarbons. Each test hydrocarbon was degraded by at least one isolate. Toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were most frequently utilized as growth substrates, whereas cyclic and branched alkanes were least utilized. Most isolates were able to grow on 2 or 3 different hydrocarbons, and nearly 75% utilized toluene as a sole source of carbon and energy. Isolates were remarkably specific for hydrocarbon usage, often catabolizing only one of several closely related compounds. A subset of 220 isolates was sorted into 51 groups by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was partitioned into 16 protein-banding groups (i.e., subspecies) whose catabolic activities were largely restricted to substituted aromatics. Different members of subspecies groups defined by protein-banding pattern analysis often exhibited different growth responses on the same hydrocarbon, implying marked strain diversity. The catabolic activities of well-derived, gasoline-degrading bacteria associated with this contaminated aquifer are consonant with in situ adaptation at the site.

  15. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  16. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  17. Cloning of Azorhizobium caulinodans nicotinate catabolism genes and characterization of their importance in N2 fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Buckmiller, L M; Lapointe, J P; Ludwig, R A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty Azorhizobium caulinodans vector insertion (Vi) mutants unable to catabolize nicotinate (Nic- phenotype) were identified and directly cloned as pVi plasmids. These pVi plasmids were used as DNA hybridization probes to isolate homologous wild-type sequences. From subsequent physical mapping experiments, the nic::Vi mutants defined four distinct loci. Two, possibly three, of these loci are physically linked. A. caulinodans nic loci II and III encode the structural genes for nicotinate catabolism; nic loci I and IV encode nicotinate-driven respiratory chain components. Recombinant lambda bacteriophages corresponding to three of these loci were subcloned in pRK293; resulting plasmids were used for complementation tests with resolved nic::IS50 derivatives of the nic::Vi mutants. When wild-type A. caulinodans was cultured in defined liquid medium under 3% O2, nicotinate catabolism stimulated N2 fixation 10-fold. In these exponentially growing cultures, the entire (300 microM) nicotinate supplement was exhausted within 10 h. While nic::Vi mutants retained the ability to fix some N2, they did so at rates only 10% of that of the wild type: nitrogenase activity by nic::Vi mutants was not stimulated by 300 microM added nicotinate. Higher-level (5 mM) nicotinate supplementation inhibited N2 fixation. Because 5 mM nicotinate repressed nitrogenase induction in all nic::Vi mutants as well, this repression was independent of nicotinate catabolism. During catabolism, nicotinate is first oxidized to 6-OH-nicotinate by a membrane-bound nicotinate hydroxylase which drives a respiratory chain to O2. In A. caulinodans wild-type cultures, added 300 microM 6-OH-nicotinate stimulated N2 fixation twofold better than did added 300 microM nicotinate. Likewise, nic::Vi mutant 61302, defective in nicotinate hydroxylase, fixed N2 at wild-type levels when supplemented with 300 microM 6-OH-nicotinate. Therefore, nicotinate catabolism stimulates N2 fixation not by nicotinate hydroxylase

  18. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    SciTech Connect

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A.; Roughley, P.J.; Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C.; Iatridis, James

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  19. Genetic Examination of Initial Amino Acid Oxidation and Glutamate Catabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP+/NAD+) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis. PMID:23435976

  20. Muscle Protein Catabolism After Severe Burn: Effects of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, David N.; Ramzy, Peter I.; DebRoy, Meelie A.; Zheng, Ming; Ferrando, Arny A.; Chinkes, David L.; Barret, Juan P.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Wolf, Steven E.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) complexed with its principal binding protein, IGFBP-3, on skeletal muscle metabolism in severely burned children. Summary Background Data Severe burns are associated with a persistent hypermetabolic response characterized by hyperdynamic circulation and severe muscle catabolism and wasting. Previous studies showed that nutritional support and pharmacologic intervention with anabolic agents such as growth hormone and insulin abrogated muscle wasting and improved net protein synthesis in the severely burned. The use of these agents, however, has several adverse side effects. A new combination of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 is now available for clinical study. Methods Twenty-nine severely burned children were prospectively studied before and after treatment with 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 mg/kg/day IGF-1/IGFBP-3 to determine net balance of protein across the leg, muscle protein fractional synthetic rates, and glucose metabolism. Another group was studied in a similar fashion without IGF-1/IGFBP-3 treatment as time controls. Results Seventeen of 29 children were catabolic before starting treatment. The infusion of 1.0 mg/kg/day IGF-1/IGFBP-3 increased serum IGF-1, which did not further increase with 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg/day. IGF-1/IGFBP-3 treatment at 1 to 4 mg/kg/day improved net protein balance and increased muscle protein fractional synthetic rates. This effect was more pronounced in catabolic children. IGF-1/IGFBP-3 did not affect glucose uptake across the leg or change substrate utilization. Conclusions IGF-1/IGFBP-3 at doses of 1 to 4 mg/kg/day attenuates catabolism in catabolic burned children with negligible clinical side effects. PMID:10235530

  1. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs. PMID:23153459

  2. Evolved Osmotolerant Escherichia coli Mutants Frequently Exhibit Defective N-Acetylglucosamine Catabolism and Point Mutations in Cell Shape-Regulating Protein MreB

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, James D.; Garcia, Carlos; Olson, Michelle; Callaway, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Biocatalyst robustness toward stresses imposed during fermentation is important for efficient bio-based production. Osmotic stress, imposed by high osmolyte concentrations or dense populations, can significantly impact growth and productivity. In order to better understand the osmotic stress tolerance phenotype, we evolved sexual (capable of in situ DNA exchange) and asexual Escherichia coli strains under sodium chloride (NaCl) stress. All isolates had significantly improved growth under selection and could grow in up to 0.80 M (47 g/liter) NaCl, a concentration that completely inhibits the growth of the unevolved parental strains. Whole genome resequencing revealed frequent mutations in genes controlling N-acetylglucosamine catabolism (nagC, nagA), cell shape (mrdA, mreB), osmoprotectant uptake (proV), and motility (fimA). Possible epistatic interactions between nagC, nagA, fimA, and proV deletions were also detected when reconstructed as defined mutations. Biofilm formation under osmotic stress was found to be decreased in most mutant isolates, coupled with perturbations in indole secretion. Transcriptional analysis also revealed significant changes in ompACGL porin expression and increased transcription of sulfonate uptake systems in the evolved mutants. These findings expand our current knowledge of the osmotic stress phenotype and will be useful for the rational engineering of osmotic tolerance into industrial strains in the future. PMID:24727267

  3. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthesis of L-fucose permease, isomerase, and kinase. This constitutive mutation differs from the constitutive mutation described by Chen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 159:725-729, 1984) in that it is tightly linked to the fucose genes and appears to be located in the gene believed to code for the positive activator of the L-fucose genes. PMID:3005235

  4. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D; Thrash, J Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Nicora, Carrie D; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H; Johnston, Andrew W B; Davie-Martin, Cleo L; Halsey, Kimberly H; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton produce ∼10(9) tonnes of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year(1,2), an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide(3,4). SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemo-organotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell's unusual requirement for reduced sulfur(5,6). Here, we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol, and that a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a cupin-like DMSP lyase, DddK, simultaneously shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to dimethyl sulfide production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of dimethyl sulfide as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. PMID:27573103

  5. Carrier-mediated transport controls hydroxyproline catabolism in heart mitochondria from spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Seccia, T M; Marra, E; Minervini, G M; Vulpis, V; Pirrelli, A; Passarella, S

    1996-11-01

    In this study we have investigated hydroxyproline transport in rat heart mitochondria and, in particular, in heart left ventricle mitochondria isolated from both spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar-Kyoto rats. Hydroxyproline uptake by mitochondria, where its catabolism takes place, occurs via a carrier-mediated process as demonstrated by the occurrence of both saturation kinetics and the inhibition shown by phenylsuccinate and the thiol reagent mersalyl. In any case, hydroxyproline transport was found to limit the rate of mitochondrial hydroxyproline catabolism. A significant change in Vmax and Km values was found in mitochondria from hypertensive/hypertrophied rats in which the Km value decreases and the Vmax value increases with respect to normotensive rats, thus accounting for the increase of hydroxyproline metabolism due to its increased concentration in a hypertrophic/hypertensive state. PMID:8915003

  6. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Almo, Steven C.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catabolic pathway was repressed by osmotic stress and cold stress, and a regulatory transcription factor was identified. We also report crystal structure complexes of the P. denitrificans HpbD hydroxyproline betaine epimerase/proline betaine racemase with l-proline betaine and cis-hydroxyproline betaine. PMID:24520058

  7. RNA Interference Mediated Interleukin-1β Silencing in Inflamed Chondrocytes Decreases Target and Downstream Catabolic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ortved, Kyla F.; Austin, Bethany S.; Scimeca, Michael S.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic activation of the catabolic cascade plays a major role in degradation of cartilage. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a primary instigator in the catabolic axis, is upregulated in chondrocytes following injury. IL-1β activates key degradative enzymes, including MMPs and aggrecanases, and other proinflammatory mediators such as PGE2 which contribute to ECM breakdown. Posttranscriptional silencing of IL-1β by RNA interference (RNAi) may drive a reduction in IL-1β. We hypothesized that transduction of chondrocytes using rAAV2 expressing a short hairpin RNAi motif targeting IL-1β (shIL-1β) would significantly decrease IL-1β expression and, in turn, decrease expression of other catabolic enzymes. Chondrocyte cultures were transduced with rAAV2-tdT-shIL-1β in serum-free media. The fluorescent protein, tdTomato, was used to determine transduction efficiency via flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 48 hours following transduction. After 24-hour stimulation, supernatants were collected for cytokine analysis, and cells lysed for gene expression analysis. IL-1β knockdown led to significantly decreased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and ADAMTS5. PGE2 synthesis was also significantly downregulated. Overall, effective silencing of IL-1β using rAAV2 vector expressing a short hairpin IL-1β knockdown sequence was shown. Additionally, significant downstream effects were evident, including decreased expression of TNF-α and ADAMTS5. Targeted silencing of catabolic cytokines may provide a promising treatment avenue for osteoarthritic (OA) joints. PMID:27073697

  8. Factors Affecting the Pathways of Glucose Catabolism and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Pseudomonas natriegens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. W.; Eagon, R. G.

    1967-01-01

    Less than 50% of theoretical oxygen uptake was observed when glucose was dissimilated by resting cells of Pseudomonas natriegens. Low oxygen uptakes were also observed when a variety of other substrates were dissimilated. When uniformly labeled glucose-14C was used as substrate, 56% of the label was shown to accumulate in these resting cells. This material consisted, in part, of a polysaccharide which, although it did not give typical glycogen reactions, yielded glucose after its hydrolysis. Resting cells previously cultivated on media containing glucose completely catabolized glucose and formed a large amount of pyruvate within 30 min. Resting cells cultivated in the absence of glucose catabolized glucose more slowly and produced little pyruvate. Pyruvate disappeared after further incubation. In this latter case, experimental results suggested (i) that pyruvate was converted to other acidic products (e.g., acetate and lactate) and (ii) that pyruvate was further catabolized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Growth on glucose repressed the level of key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of lactic dehydrogenase. Growth on glycerol stimulated the level of these enzymes. A low level of isocitratase, but not malate synthetase, was noted in extracts of glucose-grown cells. Isocitric dehydrogenase was shown to require nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) as cofactor. Previous experiments have shown that reduced NADP (NADPH2) cannot be readily oxidized and that pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase could not be detected in extracts. It was concluded that acetate, lactate, and pyruvate accumulate under growing conditions when P. natriegens is cultivated on glucose (i) because of a rapid initial catabolism of glucose via an aerobic glycolytic pathway and (ii) because of a sluggishly functioning tricarboxylic acid cycle due to the accumulation of NADPH2 and to repressed levels of key enzymes. PMID:4381634

  9. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    PubMed

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  10. Diversity of Opines and Opine-Catabolizing Bacteria Isolated from Naturally Occurring Crown Gall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L. W.; Chilton, W. S.; Canfield, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    The diversity of opines from 43 naturally occurring crown gall tumors on several plant species was analyzed for the presence of agropine, chrysopine, iminodiacid, an unidentified leucinopine-like iminodiacid (IDA-B), mannopine, octopine, nopaline, DL- and LL-succinamopine, leucinopine and heliopine. Opine utilization patterns of agrobacteria and fluorescent pseudomonads resident in a tumor were then analyzed and compared for agreement with the opine isolated from that tumor. Nopaline was the most common opine found and was detected in tumors from cherry, blackberry, grape, and plum. Octopine was not found, although octopine-catabolizing bacteria were isolated from several tumors. A new, previously undescribed iminodiacid of the succinamopine-leucinopine type (provisionally designated IDA-B) was isolated from tumors of wild blackberry. Field tumors from apple, blueberry and grape yielded no detectable opines, even though opine-utilizing bacteria were present. Bacterial isolates from plum and cherry showed the best correspondence between the opine in tumors (nopaline) and the presence of bacteria that catabolized that opine. However, several unusual opine catabolic combinations were identified, including isolates that catabolized a variety of opines but were nonpathogenic. More variability was observed among isolates from field tumors on the remaining plant species. We isolated novel mannopine-nopaline type agrobacteria from field tumors of cherry, plum and blackberry that induced tumors containing either mannopine (plus agropine) or nopaline, but not both. Epidemiologically, the galled plants from an area were not of clonal origin (same Ti plasmid), indicating that the field tumors from a small area were incited by more than one type of Ti plasmid. PMID:16535484

  11. Differential effects of endocannabinoid catabolic inhibitors on morphine withdrawal in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gamage, Thomas F.; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M.; Muldoon, Pretal P.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Damaj, M. Imad; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and/or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) reduces somatic morphine withdrawal signs, but its effects on aversive aspects of withdrawal are unknown. The present study investigated whether Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the MAGL inhibitor JZL184, the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845, or the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor SA-57 would reduce acquisition of morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned place avoidance (CPA) and jumping. Methods Mice were implanted with placebo or 75 mg morphine pellets, 48 h later injected with naloxone or saline and placed in the conditioning apparatus, and assessed for CPA at 72 h. Subjects were also observed for jumping behavior following naloxone challenge. Results Naloxone (0.056 mg/kg) produced robust CPA in morphine-pelleted, but not placebo-pelleted, mice. Morphine pretreatment prevented the occurrence of withdrawal CPA and withdrawal jumping, while clonidine (an α2 adrenergic receptor agonist) only blocked withdrawal CPA. THC, JZL184, and SA-57 significantly reduced the percentage of mice that jumped during the conditioning session, but did not affect acquisition of withdrawal CPA. PF-3845 did not reduce morphine withdrawal CPA or jumping. Finally, neither THC nor the endocannabinoid catabolic enzyme inhibitors in non-dependent mice elicited a conditioned place preference or aversion. Conclusions These findings suggest that inhibiting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes reduces somatic morphine withdrawal signs, but not aversive aspects as inferred in the CPA paradigm. The observation that non-dependent mice administered inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation did not display place preferences is consistent with the idea that that endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes might be targeted therapeutically, with reduced risk of abuse. PMID:25479915

  12. RNA Interference Mediated Interleukin-1β Silencing in Inflamed Chondrocytes Decreases Target and Downstream Catabolic Responses.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla F; Austin, Bethany S; Scimeca, Michael S; Nixon, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic activation of the catabolic cascade plays a major role in degradation of cartilage. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a primary instigator in the catabolic axis, is upregulated in chondrocytes following injury. IL-1β activates key degradative enzymes, including MMPs and aggrecanases, and other proinflammatory mediators such as PGE2 which contribute to ECM breakdown. Posttranscriptional silencing of IL-1β by RNA interference (RNAi) may drive a reduction in IL-1β. We hypothesized that transduction of chondrocytes using rAAV2 expressing a short hairpin RNAi motif targeting IL-1β (shIL-1β) would significantly decrease IL-1β expression and, in turn, decrease expression of other catabolic enzymes. Chondrocyte cultures were transduced with rAAV2-tdT-shIL-1β in serum-free media. The fluorescent protein, tdTomato, was used to determine transduction efficiency via flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 48 hours following transduction. After 24-hour stimulation, supernatants were collected for cytokine analysis, and cells lysed for gene expression analysis. IL-1β knockdown led to significantly decreased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and ADAMTS5. PGE2 synthesis was also significantly downregulated. Overall, effective silencing of IL-1β using rAAV2 vector expressing a short hairpin IL-1β knockdown sequence was shown. Additionally, significant downstream effects were evident, including decreased expression of TNF-α and ADAMTS5. Targeted silencing of catabolic cytokines may provide a promising treatment avenue for osteoarthritic (OA) joints. PMID:27073697

  13. Higher serum phosphorus is associated with catabolic/anabolic imbalance in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rozentryt, Piotr; Niedziela, Jacek T; Hudzik, Bartosz; Lekston, Andrzej; Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A; Nowak, Jolanta; von Haehling, Stephan; Partyka, Robert; Rywik, Tomasz; Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Poloński, Lech

    2015-01-01

    Background A higher serum phosphate level is associated with worse outcome. Energy-demanding intracellular transport of phosphate is needed to secure anion bioavailability. In heart failure (HF), energy starvation may modify intracellular and serum levels of phosphate. We analysed determinants of serum phosphates in HF and assessed if catabolic/anabolic balance (CAB) was associated with elevation of serum phosphate. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data from 1029 stable patients with HF and have calculated negative (loss) and positive (gain) components of weight change from the onset of HF till index date. The algebraic sum of these components was taken as CAB. The univariate and multivariable predictors of serum phosphorus were calculated. In quintiles of CAB, we have estimated odds ratios for serum phosphorus above levels previously identified to increase risk of mortality. As a reference, we have selected a CAB quintile with similar loss and gain. Results Apart from sex, age, and kidney function, we identified serum sodium, N-terminal fragment of pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide, and CAB as independent predictors of serum phosphorus. The odds for serum phosphorus above thresholds found in literature to increase risk were highest in more catabolic patients. In most catabolic quintile relative to neutral balance, the odds across selected phosphorus thresholds rose, gradually peaking at 1.30 mmol/L with a value of 3.29 (95% confidence interval: 2.00–5.40, P < 0.0001) in an unadjusted analysis and 2.55 (95% confidence interval: 1.38–2.72, P = 0.002) in a fully adjusted model. Conclusions Metabolic status is an independent determinant of serum phosphorus in HF. Higher catabolism is associated with serum phosphorus above mortality risk-increasing thresholds. PMID:26672973

  14. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  15. Correlation between structural diversity and catabolic versatility of metal-affected bacteria in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenderoth, D. F.; Reber, H. H.; Timmis, K. N.

    2003-04-01

    Application of sewage sludge to an agricultural field resulted in contamination of metal. Metal affects on the the structural diversity and the catabolic versatility of bacteria capable of growing in the absence of growing factors were studied six years after sludge application. The number of strain clusters as estimated by amplified ribosomal restriction analysis (ADRDA) was reduced by 39% when comparing isolates from the control and the most contaminated soil. Concomittantly, the average number of aromatic acids utilized per isolate from among 21 substrates tested decreased from 12.28 to 5.23. This loss in catabolic versatility was greater in Gram-negative (68%) than in Gram-positive bacteria (49%). Due to bioenergetic reasons discussed, it is supposed that the catabolic versatility between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and the greater loss of this property in the former may explain why, in metal contaminated soils, Grtam-negatives are selected at the expense of Gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling.

    PubMed

    Karner, Courtney M; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Long, Fanxin

    2015-02-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2-mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases. PMID:25562323

  17. Integrated Response to Inducers by Communication between a Catabolic Pathway and Its Regulatory System▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Olga; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Efficient gene regulation of metabolic pathways implies that the profile of molecules inducing the pathway matches that of the molecules that are metabolized. Gratuitous induction, a well-known phenomenon in catabolic pathways, is the consequence of differences in the substrate and inducer profiles. This phenomenon is particularly evident in pathways for biodegradation of organic contaminants that can be induced by a variety of molecules similar to the real substrates. Analysis of the regulation of tetralin biodegradation genes in mutant strains with mutations that affect each component of the initial dioxygenase enzymatic complex indicated that the response of the regulatory system to potential inducers is altered differently depending on the mutated component. Based on the expression phenotypes of a number of single or double mutants, we propose a model that represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent efficient induction by a molecule that is not a real substrate. This communication allows a better fit of the substrate and inducer profiles, thus minimizing gratuitous induction, without a requirement for optimal coevolution to match the specificity of catabolic enzymes and their regulatory systems. Modulation of the regulatory system in this way not only provides a more appropriate response to potential inducers recognized by the regulatory system but also may properly adjust the levels of gene expression to the substrate availability. PMID:17351041

  18. The control of chlorophyll catabolism and the status of yellowing as a biomarker of leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Ougham, H; Hörtensteiner, S; Armstead, I; Donnison, I; King, I; Thomas, H; Mur, L

    2008-09-01

    The pathway of chlorophyll catabolism during leaf senescence is known in a fair amount of biochemical and cell biological detail. In the last few years, genes encoding a number of the catabolic enzymes have been characterized, including the key ring-opening activities, phaeophorbide a oxygenase (PaO) and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). Recently, a gene that modulates disassembly of chlorophyll-protein complexes and activation of pigment ring-opening has been isolated by comparative mapping in monocot species, positional cloning exploiting rice genomics resources and functional testing in Arabidopsis. The corresponding gene in pea has been identified as Mendel's I locus (green/yellow cotyledons). Mutations in this and other chlorophyll catabolic genes have significant consequences, both for the course of leaf senescence and senescence-like stress responses, notably hypersensitivity to pathogen challenge. Loss of chlorophyll can occur via routes other than the PaO/RCCR pathway, resulting in changes that superficially resemble senescence. Such 'pseudosenescence' responses tend to be pathological rather than physiological and may differ from senescence in fundamental aspects of biochemistry and regulation. PMID:18721307

  19. Increased fat catabolism sustains water balance during fasting in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Joanna; Sadowska, Edyta T; Cichoń, Mariusz; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Patterns of physiological flexibility in response to fasting are well established, but much less is known about the contribution of water deprivation to the observed effects. We investigated body composition and energy and water budget in three groups of zebra finches: birds with access to food and water, food-deprived birds having access to drinking water and food-and-water-deprived birds. Animals were not stimulated by elevated energy expenditure and they were in thermoneutral conditions; thus, based on previous studies, water balance of fasting birds was expected to be maintained by increased catabolism of proteins. In contrast to this expectation, we found that access to water did not prevent reduction of proteinaceous tissue, but it saved fat reserves of the fasting birds. Thus, water balance of birds fasting without access to water seemed to be maintained by elevated fat catabolism, which generated 6 times more metabolic water compared with that in birds that had access to water. Therefore, we revise currently established views and propose fat to serve as the primary source for metabolic water production. Previously assumed increased protein breakdown for maintenance of water budget would occur if fat stores were depleted or if fat catabolism reached its upper limits due to high energy demands. PMID:27582561

  20. Metabolic Signature of Sun Exposed Skin Suggests Catabolic Pathway Overweighs Anabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Sangar, Vineet; Tucker-Samaras, Samantha; Southall, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Skin chronically exposed to sun results in phenotypic changes referred as photoaging. This aspect of aging has been studied extensively through genomic and proteomic tools. Metabolites, the end product are generated as a result of biochemical reactions are often studied as a culmination of complex interplay of gene and protein expression. In this study, we focused exclusively on the metabolome to study effects from sun-exposed and sun-protected skin sites from 25 human subjects. We generated a highly accurate metabolomic signature for the skin that is exposed to sun. Biochemical pathway analysis from this data set showed that sun-exposed skin resides under high oxidative stress and the chains of reactions to produce these metabolites are inclined toward catabolism rather than anabolism. These catabolic activities persuade the skin cells to generate metabolites through the salvage pathway instead of de novo synthesis pathways. Metabolomic profile suggests catabolic pathways and reactive oxygen species operate in a feed forward fashion to alter the biology of sun exposed skin. PMID:24603693

  1. The bzd Gene Cluster, Coding for Anaerobic Benzoate Catabolism, in Azoarcus sp. Strain CIB

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, María J. López; Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María T.; Thiele, Bärbel; Boll, Matthias; Fuchs, Georg; García, José L.; Díaz, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the bzd genes for anaerobic benzoate degradation in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB are organized as two transcriptional units, i.e., a benzoate-inducible catabolic operon, bzdNOPQMSTUVWXYZA, and a gene, bzdR, encoding a putative transcriptional regulator. The last gene of the catabolic operon, bzdA, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and encodes the benzoate-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase that catalyzes the first step in the benzoate degradation pathway. The BzdA enzyme is able to activate a wider range of aromatic compounds than that reported for other previously characterized benzoate-CoA ligases. The reduction of benzoyl-CoA to a nonaromatic cyclic intermediate is carried out by a benzoyl-CoA reductase (bzdNOPQ gene products) detected in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB extracts. The bzdW, bzdX, and bzdY gene products show significant similarity to the hydratase, dehydrogenase, and ring-cleavage hydrolase that act sequentially on the product of the benzoyl-CoA reductase in the benzoate catabolic pathway of Thauera aromatica. Benzoate-CoA ligase assays and transcriptional analyses based on lacZ-reporter fusions revealed that benzoate degradation in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB is subject to carbon catabolite repression by some organic acids, indicating the existence of a physiological control that connects the expression of the bzd genes to the metabolic status of the cell. PMID:15317781

  2. Transcriptional analysis of prebiotic uptake and catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Hachem, Maher Abou; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Goh, Yong-Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β-linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. PTS systems were upregulated primarily by di- and tri-saccharides such as cellobiose, isomaltose, isomaltulose, panose and gentiobiose, while ABC transporters were upregulated by raffinose, Polydextrose, and stachyose. A single GPH transporter was induced by lactitol and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). The various transporters were associated with a number of glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 4, 13, 32, 36, 42, and 65, involved in the catabolism of various α- and β-linked glucosides and galactosides. Further subfamily specialization was also observed for different PTS-associated GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively influence the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:23028535

  3. Synthesis of prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin catabolism in gastritis and gastric ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J

    1986-01-01

    Because endogenous prostaglandins may protect the gastric mucosa a study was conducted to determine factors influencing the synthesis of immunoreactive prostaglandin (iPG) E2 and thromboxane (iTx) B2 as measured by radioimmunoassay and prostaglandin catabolism measured radiometrically, in human gastric mucosa. Gastric mucosa was obtained at endoscopy. Synthesis of iPE2 and iTxB2 was inhibited in vitro by indomethacin; iTxB2 synthesis was also selectively inhibited by the thromboxane synthesis inhibitor dazmegrel. Prostaglandin catabolism was inhibited by carbenoxolone. Multivariate analysis showed that synthesis of iPGE2 from endogenous precursor during homogenisation was decreased in patients on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mucosal inflammation was associated with significantly increased synthesis of iPGE2 and decreased prostaglandin catabolism. There were no differences between the mucosa of patients with or without gastric ulcers, nor between the ulcer rim and mucosa 5 cm away. Age, sex, smoking history and ingestion of antisecretory drugs appeared to exert no influence. In this study gastritis was the major influence on prostaglandin synthesis. It seems unlikely that prostaglandin deficiency is a strong predisposing factor for gastric ulceration. PMID:3468053

  4. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Karner, Courtney M.; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Long, Fanxin

    2014-01-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2–mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases. PMID:25562323

  5. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-08-15

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  6. An l-glucose Catabolic Pathway in Paracoccus Species 43P*

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsu; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    An l-glucose-utilizing bacterium, Paracoccus sp. 43P, was isolated from soil by enrichment cultivation in a minimal medium containing l-glucose as the sole carbon source. In cell-free extracts from this bacterium, NAD+-dependent l-glucose dehydrogenase was detected as having sole activity toward l-glucose. This enzyme, LgdA, was purified, and the lgdA gene was found to be located in a cluster of putative inositol catabolic genes. LgdA showed similar dehydrogenase activity toward scyllo- and myo-inositols. l-Gluconate dehydrogenase activity was also detected in cell-free extracts, which represents the reaction product of LgdA activity toward l-glucose. Enzyme purification and gene cloning revealed that the corresponding gene resides in a nine-gene cluster, the lgn cluster, which may participate in aldonate incorporation and assimilation. Kinetic and reaction product analysis of each gene product in the cluster indicated that they sequentially metabolize l-gluconate to glycolytic intermediates, d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and pyruvate through reactions of C-5 epimerization by dehydrogenase/reductase, dehydration, phosphorylation, and aldolase reaction, using a pathway similar to l-galactonate catabolism in Escherichia coli. Gene disruption studies indicated that the identified genes are responsible for l-glucose catabolism. PMID:23038265

  7. An Oxygenase-Independent Cholesterol Catabolic Pathway Operates under Oxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Lin, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Wen; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most ubiquitous compounds in nature. The 9,10-seco-pathway for the aerobic degradation of cholesterol was established thirty years ago. This pathway is characterized by the extensive use of oxygen and oxygenases for substrate activation and ring fission. The classical pathway was the only catabolic pathway adopted by all studies on cholesterol-degrading bacteria. Sterolibacterium denitrificans can degrade cholesterol regardless of the presence of oxygen. Here, we aerobically grew the model organism with 13C-labeled cholesterol, and substrate consumption and intermediate production were monitored over time. Based on the detected 13C-labeled intermediates, this study proposes an alternative cholesterol catabolic pathway. This alternative pathway differs from the classical 9,10-seco-pathway in numerous important aspects. First, substrate activation proceeds through anaerobic C-25 hydroxylation and subsequent isomerization to form 26-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one. Second, after the side chain degradation, the resulting androgen intermediate is activated by adding water to the C-1/C-2 double bond. Third, the cleavage of the core ring structure starts at the A-ring via a hydrolytic mechanism. The 18O-incorporation experiments confirmed that water is the sole oxygen donor in this catabolic pathway. PMID:23826110

  8. Regulation of the catabolic cascade in osteoarthritis by the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Jeon, Jimin; Shin, Minhee; Won, Yoonkyung; Lee, Minju; Kwak, Ji-Sun; Lee, Gyuseok; Rhee, Jinseol; Ryu, Je-Hwang; Chun, Churl-Hong; Chun, Jang-Soo

    2014-02-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA), primarily characterized by cartilage degeneration, is caused by an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic factors. Here, we investigated the role of zinc (Zn2+) homeostasis, Zn2+ transporters, and Zn(2+)-dependent transcription factors in OA pathogenesis. Among Zn2+ transporters, the Zn2+ importer ZIP8 was specifically upregulated in OA cartilage of humans and mice, resulting in increased levels of intracellular Zn2+ in chondrocytes. ZIP8-mediated Zn2+ influx upregulated the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12, MMP13, and ADAMTS5) in chondrocytes. Ectopic expression of ZIP8 in mouse cartilage tissue caused OA cartilage destruction, whereas Zip8 knockout suppressed surgically induced OA pathogenesis, with concomitant modulation of Zn2+ influx and matrix-degrading enzymes. Furthermore, MTF1 was identified as an essential transcription factor in mediating Zn2+/ZIP8-induced catabolic factor expression, and genetic modulation of Mtf1 in mice altered OA pathogenesis. We propose that the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis is an essential catabolic regulator of OA pathogenesis. PMID:24529376

  9. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani

    2015-01-01

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  10. 14C-labeled substrate catabolism by human diploid fibroblasts derived from infants and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, W.J.; Moon, A.; Roettger, V.; Henkle, K.

    1985-10-01

    Untransformed diploid skin fibroblasts from eight normal adults, aged 24 to 74 years, catabolized several 14C-labeled substrates less effectively than cells from ten normal male infants. 14C-labeled substrate metabolism was quantitated either by measuring the evolution of 14CO2 from the 14C-labeled compounds or the incorporation of 14C into cellular protein via transamination of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates derived from the 14C-labeled substrates. With these methods, adult cells catabolized (1-14C)butyrate, (1-14C)octanoate, and 1-(2-14C)leucine at rates 44 to 64% of those found in infant cells. The oxidation of (1,4-14C)succinate and (U-14C)malate was identical in both infant and adult cells, while (2,3-14C)succinate catabolism was mildly decreased in adult cells (65-80% of control). These observations parallel those made in rat tissues and confirm that the same phenomenon occurs in cultured human fibroblasts.

  11. Insulin resistance is a two-sided mechanism acting under opposite catabolic and anabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwartsburd, Polina

    2016-04-01

    The survival of multi-cellular organisms depends on the organism ability to maintain glucose homeostasis for time of low/high nutrient availability or high energy needs, and the ability to fight infections or stress. These effects are realized through the insulin controlled transport of blood glucose into the insulin-responsive cells such as muscle, fat and liver cells. Reduction in the ability of these cells to take glucose from the blood in response to normal circulating levels of insulin is known as insulin resistance (IR). Chronic IR is a key pathological feature of obesity, type 2 diabetes, sepsis and cancer cachexia, however temporal IR are widely met in fasting/ hibernation, pregnancy, anti-bacterial immunity, exercise and stress. Paradoxically, a certain part of the IR-cases is associated with catabolic metabolism, whereas the other is related to anabolic pathways. How can this paradoxical IR-response be explained? What is the metabolic basis of this IR variability and its physiological and pathological impacts? An answer to these questions might be achieved through the hypothesis in which IR is considered as a two-sided mechanism acting under opposite metabolic conditions (catabolism and anabolism) but with the common aim to sustain glucose homeostasis in a wide metabolic range. To test this hypothesis, I examined the main metabolic distinctions between the varied IR-cases and their dependence on the blood glucose concentration, level of the IR-threshold, and catabolic/anabolic activation. On the basis of the established interrelations, a simple model of IR-distribution has been developed. The model revealed the «U-type distribution» form with separation into two main IR-groups, each determined in the catabolic or anabolic conditions with one exception - type 2 diabetes and its paradoxical catabolic activation in anabolic conditions. The dual opposing (or complementary) role for the IR opens a new possibility for better understanding the cause and

  12. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michener, Joshua K.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-07-19

    Chloromethane is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important environmental niche for microbes capable of consuming it. Chloromethane catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for chloromethane catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new chloromethane-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. Here, we demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve chloromethane catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on chloromethane. In contrast to growth of Methylobacteriummore » strains with the closely-related compound dichloromethane, we find that chloride export does not limit growth on chloromethane and, in general, that the ability of a strain to grow on dichloromethane is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on chloromethane. Finally, this heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective chloromethane catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer.« less

  13. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    PubMed Central

    Michener, Joshua K.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Chloromethane (CM) is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. CM catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for CM catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new CM-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve CM catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on CM. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely related compound dichloromethane (DCM), we find that chloride export does not limit growth on CM and, in general that the ability of a strain to grow on DCM is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on CM. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective CM catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer. PMID:27486448

  14. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Michener, Joshua K; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Chloromethane (CM) is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. CM catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for CM catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new CM-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve CM catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on CM. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely related compound dichloromethane (DCM), we find that chloride export does not limit growth on CM and, in general that the ability of a strain to grow on DCM is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on CM. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective CM catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer. PMID:27486448

  15. A plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti 41 encodes catabolism of two compounds from root exudate of Calystegium sepium.

    PubMed Central

    Tepfer, D; Goldmann, A; Pamboukdjian, N; Maille, M; Lepingle, A; Chevalier, D; Dénarié, J; Rosenberg, C

    1988-01-01

    Our objectives were to identify substances produced by plant roots that might act as nutritional mediators of specific plant-bacterium relationships and to delineate the bacterial genes responsible for catabolizing these substances. We discovered new compounds, which we call calystegins, that have the characteristics of nutritional mediators. They were detected in only 3 of 105 species of higher plants examined: Calystegia sepium, Convolvulus arvensis (both of the Convolvulaceae family), and Atropa belladonna. Calystegins are abundant in organs in contact with the rhizosphere and are not found, or are observed only in small quantities, in aerial plant parts. Just as the synthesis of calystegins is infrequent in the plant kingdom, their catabolism is rare among rhizosphere bacteria that associate with plants and influence their growth. Of 42 such bacteria tested, only one (Rhizobium meliloti 41) was able to catabolize calystegins and use them as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The calystegin catabolism gene(s) (cac) in this strain is located on a self-transmissible plasmid (pRme41a), which is not essential to nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legumes. We suggest that under natural conditions calystegins provide an exclusive carbon and nitrogen source to rhizosphere bacteria which are able to catabolize these compounds. Calystegins (and the corresponding microbial catabolic genes) might be used to analyze and possibly modify rhizosphere ecology. Images PMID:2981046

  16. Normothermic central hypovolemia tolerance reflects hyperthermic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that those who are highly tolerant to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) while normothermic are also highly tolerant to this challenge while hyperthermic. Methods Sixty pairs of normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tests to pre-syncope were evaluated. LBNP tolerance was quantified via the cumulative stress index (CSI), which is calculated as the sum of the product of the LBNP level and the duration of each level until test termination (i.e., 20 mmHg × 3 min + 30 mmHg × 3 min, etc.). CSI was compared between normothermic and hyperthermic trials. Internal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and arterial pressure were measured throughout. Results Hyperthermia reduced (P<0.001) CSI from 997 ± 437 to 303 ± 213 mmHg min. There was a positive correlation between normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tolerance (R2 = 0.38; P<0.001). As a secondary analysis, the 20 trials with the highest LBNP tolerance while normothermic were identified (indicated as the HIGH group; CSI 1,467 ± 356 mmHg min), as were the 20 trials with the lowest normothermic tolerance (indicated as the LOW group; CSI 565 ± 166 mmHg min; P<0.001 between groups). While hyperthermia unanimously reduced CSI in both HIGH and LOW groups, in this hyperthermic condition CSI was ~threefold higher in the HIGH group (474 ± 226 mmHg min) relative to the LOW group (160 ± 115 mmHg min; P<0.001). Conclusions LBNP tolerance while hyperthermic is related to normothermic tolerance and, associated with this finding, those who have a high LBNP tolerance while normothermic remain relatively tolerant when hyperthermic. PMID:24700256

  17. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  18. Zero Tolerance in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henault, Cherry

    2001-01-01

    Questions the effectiveness of the widespread use of zero-tolerance policies enacted by school boards to punish students who violate weapon and drug rules. Suggests that enforcement of zero-tolerance policies has not been equitable. Reviews proposal for alternative to zero tolerance. (PKP)

  19. Cloning and Characterization of Benzoate Catabolic Genes in the Gram-Positive Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degrader Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fukuda, Masao

    2001-01-01

    Benzoate catabolism is thought to play a key role in aerobic bacterial degradation of biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Benzoate catabolic genes were cloned from a PCB degrader, Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1, by using PCR amplification and temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis separation. A nucleotide sequence determination revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the RHA1 benzoate catabolic genes, benABCDK, exhibit 33 to 65% identity with those of Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. The gene organization of the RHA1 benABCDK genes differs from that of ADP1. The RHA1 benABCDK region was localized on the chromosome, in contrast to the biphenyl catabolic genes, which are located on linear plasmids. Escherichia coli cells containing RHA1 benABCD transformed benzoate to catechol via 2-hydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzoate. They transformed neither 2- nor 4-chlorobenzoates but did transform 3-chlorobenzoate. The RHA1 benA gene was inactivated by insertion of a thiostrepton resistance gene. The resultant mutant strain, RBD169, neither grew on benzoate nor transformed benzoate, and it did not transform 3-chlorobenzoate. It did, however, exhibit diminished growth on biphenyl and growth repression in the presence of a high concentration of biphenyl (13 mM). These results indicate that the cloned benABCD genes could play an essential role not only in benzoate catabolism but also in biphenyl catabolism in RHA1. Six rhodococcal benzoate degraders were found to have homologs of RHA1 benABC. In contrast, two rhodococcal strains that cannot transform benzoate were found not to have RHA1 benABC homologs, suggesting that many Rhodococcus strains contain benzoate catabolic genes similar to RHA1 benABC. PMID:11673430

  20. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Magalhaes, Nelly; De Vos, Delphine; Bordenave, Marianne; Crilat, Emilie; Clément, Gilles; Meyer, Christian; Munnik, Teun; Savouré, Arnould

    2014-01-01

    Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signaling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 (P5CS1) biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1), a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose. PMID:25628629

  1. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Boivin, C.; Camut, S.; Malpica, C. A.; Truchet, G.; Rosenberg, C.

    1990-12-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  2. Resistance training minimizes catabolic effects induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Mônico-Neto, Marcos; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lee, Kil Sun; Phillips, Stuart M; Giampá, Sara Quaglia de Campos; Souza, Helton de Sá; Dáttilo, Murilo; Medeiros, Alessandra; de Moraes, Wilson Max; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2015-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) can induce muscle atrophy. We aimed to investigate the changes underpinning SD-induced muscle atrophy and the impact of this condition on rats that were previously submitted to resistance training (RT). Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were randomly allocated into 1 of 5 groups: control, sham, SD (for 96 h), RT, and RT+SD. The major outcomes of this study were muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and the abundance of select proteins involved in muscle protein synthesis and degradation pathways. SD resulted in muscle atrophy; however, when SD was combined with RT, the reduction in muscle fiber CSA was attenuated. The levels of IGF-1 and testosterone were reduced in SD animals, and the RT+SD group had higher levels of these hormones than the SD group. Corticosterone was increased in the SD group compared with the control group, and this increase was minimized in the RT+SD group. The increases in corticosterone concentrations paralleled changes in the abundance of ubiquitinated proteins and the autophagic proteins LC3 and p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that corticosterone may trigger these changes. SD induced weight loss, but this loss was minimized in the RT+SD group. We conclude that SD induced muscle atrophy, probably because of the increased corticosterone and catabolic signal. High-intensity RT performed before SD was beneficial in containing muscle loss induced by SD. It also minimized the catabolic signal and increased synthetic activity, thereby minimizing the body's weight loss. PMID:26513007

  3. Plasmid-Encoded Phthalate Catabolic Pathway in Arthrobacter keyseri 12B†

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri (formerly Micrococcus sp.) 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates). Because these products lack a carboxyl group at the 2 position, they were not substrates for the next enzyme of the phthalate catabolic pathway, 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate 2-decarboxylase, and accumulated. When these incubations were carried out in iron-containing minimal medium, the products formed colored chelates. This chromogenic response was subsequently used to identify recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying genes encoding the responsible enzymes, phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase, from the 130-kbp plasmid pRE1 of strain 12B. Beginning with the initially cloned 8.14-kbp PstI fragment of pRE824 as a probe to identify recombinant plasmids carrying overlapping fragments, a DNA segment of 33.5 kbp was cloned from pRE1 on several plasmids and mapped using restriction endonucleases. From these plasmids, the sequence of 26,274 contiguous bp was determined. Sequenced DNA included several genetic units: tnpR, pcm operon, ptr genes, pehA, norA fragment, and pht operon, encoding a transposon resolvase, catabolism of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, a possible phthalate ester hydrolase, a fragment of a norfloxacin resistance-like transporter, and the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate, respectively. Activities of the eight enzymes involved in the catabolism of phthalate through protocatechuate to pyruvate and oxaloacetate were demonstrated in cells or cell extracts of recombinant E. coli strains. PMID:11371533

  4. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Magalhaes, Nelly; De Vos, Delphine; Bordenave, Marianne; Crilat, Emilie; Clément, Gilles; Meyer, Christian; Munnik, Teun; Savouré, Arnould

    2015-01-01

    Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signaling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 (P5CS1) biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1), a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose. PMID:25628629

  5. Chloral hydrate, through biotransformation to dichloroacetate, inhibits maleylacetoacetate isomerase and tyrosine catabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Coats, Bonnie S.; Langaee, Taimour; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chloral hydrate (CH), a sedative and metabolite of the environmental contaminant trichloroethylene, is metabolized to trichloroacetic acid, trichloroethanol, and possibly dichloroacetate (DCA). DCA is further metabolized by glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1), which is identical to maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), the penultimate enzyme in tyrosine catabolism. DCA inhibits its own metabolism through depletion/inactivation of GSTZ1/ MAAI with repeated exposure, resulting in lower plasma clearance of the drug and the accumulation of the urinary biomarker maleylacetone (MA), a metabolite of tyrosine. It is unknown if GSTZ1/MAAI may participate in the metabolism of CH or any of its metabolites and, therefore, affect tyrosine catabolism. Stable isotopes were utilized to determine the biotransformation of CH, the kinetics of its major metabolites, and the influence, if any, of GSTZ1/MAAI. Methods Eight healthy volunteers (ages 21 – 40 years) received a dose of 1 g of CH (clinical dose) or 1.5 μg/kg (environmental) for five consecutive days. Plasma and urinary samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Plasma DCA (1.2 – 2.4 μg/mL), metabolized from CH, was measured on the fifth day of the 1 g/day CH dosage but was undetectable in plasma at environmentally relevant doses. Pharmacokinetic measurements from CH metabolites did not differ between slow and fast GSTZ1 haplotypes. Urinary MA levels increased from undetectable to 0.2 – 0.7 μg/g creatinine with repeated CH clinical dose exposure. Kinetic modeling of a clinical dose of 25 mg/kg DCA administered after 5 days of 1 g/day CH closely resembled DCA kinetics obtained in previously naïve individuals. Conclusions These data indicate that the amount of DCA produced from clinically relevant doses of CH, although insufficient to alter DCA kinetics, is sufficient to inhibit MAAI and tyrosine catabolism, as evidenced by the accumulation of urinary MA. PMID:25283137

  6. Carbohydrate Catabolism in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, a Member of the Marine Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Katharina; Hensler, Michael; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Ulbrich, Marcus; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Since genome analysis did not allow unambiguous reconstruction of transport, catabolism, and substrate-specific regulation for several important carbohydrates in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, proteomic and metabolomic analyses of N-acetylglucosamine-, mannitol-, sucrose-, glucose-, and xylose-grown cells were carried out to close this knowledge gap. These carbohydrates can pass through the outer membrane via porins identified in the outer membrane fraction. For transport across the cytoplasmic membrane, carbohydrate-specific ABC transport systems were identified. Their coding genes mostly colocalize with the respective “catabolic” and “regulatory” genes. The degradation of N-acetylglucosamine proceeds via N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate and glucosamine-6-phosphate directly to fructose-6-phosphate; two of the three enzymes involved were newly predicted and identified. Mannitol is catabolized via fructose, sucrose via fructose and glucose, glucose via glucose-6-phosphate, and xylose via xylulose-5-phosphate. Of the 30 proteins predicted to be involved in uptake, regulation, and degradation, 28 were identified by proteomics and 19 were assigned to their respective functions for the first time. The peripheral degradation pathways feed into the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, which is connected to the lower branch of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway. The enzyme constituents of these pathways displayed higher abundances in P. inhibens DSM 17395 cells grown with any of the five carbohydrates tested than in succinate-grown cells. Conversely, gluconeogenesis is turned on during succinate utilization. While tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins remained mainly unchanged, the abundance profiles of their metabolites reflected the differing growth rates achieved with the different substrates tested. Homologs of the 74 genes involved in the reconstructed catabolic pathways and central metabolism are present in various Roseobacter clade members. PMID:24858085

  7. Endocannabinoid Catabolic Enzymes Play Differential Roles in Thermal Homeostasis in Response to Environmental or Immune Challenge.

    PubMed

    Nass, Sara R; Long, Jonathan Z; Schlosburg, Joel E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H; Kinsey, Steven G

    2015-06-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ(9)-THC, the primary active constituent of Cannabis sativa, have anti-pyrogenic effects in a variety of assays. Recently, attention has turned to the endogenous cannabinoid system and how endocannabinoids, including 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, regulate multiple homeostatic processes, including thermoregulation. Inhibiting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), elevates levels of 2-AG or anandamide in vivo, respectively. The purpose of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes function to maintain thermal homeostasis in response to hypothermic challenge. In separate experiments, male C57BL/6J mice were administered a MAGL or FAAH inhibitor, and then challenged with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2 mg/kg ip) or a cold (4 °C) ambient environment. Systemic LPS administration caused a significant decrease in core body temperature after 6 h, and this hypothermia persisted for at least 12 h. Similarly, cold environment induced mild hypothermia that resolved within 30 min. JZL184 exacerbated hypothermia induced by either LPS or cold challenge, both of which effects were blocked by rimonabant, but not SR144528, indicating a CB1 cannabinoid receptor mechanism of action. In contrast, the FAAH inhibitor, PF-3845, had no effect on either LPS-induced or cold-induced hypothermia. These data indicate that unlike direct acting cannabinoid receptor agonists, which elicit profound hypothermic responses on their own, neither MAGL nor FAAH inhibitors affect normal body temperature. However, these endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes play distinct roles in thermoregulation following hypothermic challenges. PMID:25715681

  8. Amino acid repletion does not decrease muscle protein catabolism during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dominic S C; Adeniyi, Oladipo; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Boivin, Michel A; McClelland, Sandra; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Morgan, Nancy; Gonzales, Lawrence; Wolfe, Robert; Ferrando, Arny

    2007-06-01

    Intradialytic protein catabolism is attributed to loss of amino acids in the dialysate. We investigated the effect of amino acid infusion during hemodialysis (HD) on muscle protein turnover and amino acid transport kinetics by using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine in eight patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjects were studied at baseline (pre-HD), 2 h of HD without amino acid infusion (HD-O), and 2 h of HD with amino acid infusion (HD+AA). Amino acid depletion during HD-O augmented the outward transport of amino acids from muscle into the vein. Increased delivery of amino acids to the leg during HD+AA facilitated the transport of amino acids from the artery into the intracellular compartment. Increase in muscle protein breakdown was more than the increase in synthesis during HD-O (46.7 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.001). Net balance (nmol.min(-1).100 ml (-1)) was more negative during HD-O compared with pre-HD (-33.7 +/- 1.5 vs. -6.0 +/- 2.3, P < 0.001). Despite an abundant supply of amino acids, the net balance (-16.9 +/- 1.8) did not switch from net release to net uptake. HD+AA induced a proportional increase in muscle protein synthesis and catabolism. Branched chain amino acid catabolism increased significantly from baseline during HD-O and did not decrease during HD+AA. Protein synthesis efficiency, the fraction of amino acid in the intracellular pool that is utilized for muscle protein synthesis decreased from 42.1% pre-HD to 33.7 and 32.6% during HD-O and HD+AA, respectively (P < 0.01). Thus amino acid repletion during HD increased muscle protein synthesis but did not decrease muscle protein breakdown. PMID:17264222

  9. Catabolism of hirudin and thrombin-hirudin complexes in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bichler, J; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R

    1993-01-01

    The metabolic fate of the anticoagulant protein, hirudin, and its complex with thrombin are presently unknown. Therefore we have labelled hirudin and human thrombin-hirudin complex with the residualizing label dilactitol-125I-tyramine (*I-DLT) in order to identify their tissue sites of catabolism in the rat. The rapid plasma clearance of hirudin after intravenous injection was unaffected by *I-DLT labelling, and by 2 h 6% or less of the injected dose remained in the blood. The majority (80.3 +/- 4.0%, n = 2) of *I-DLT-hirudin radioactivity recovered in tissues was found in kidney, and kidney was also at least 150 times more active in taking up hirudin, on a weight basis, than any other tissue examined (liver, spleen, skin, muscle, intestine, fat, lung). *I-DLT-hirudin which bound to thrombin was isolated by chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose; hirudin itself does not bind to concanavalin A. Radioactivity from thrombin-*I-DLT-hirudin was precipitable by anti-thrombin antibody and *I-DLT-thrombin-hirudin was precipitable by anti-hirudin antibody. By 1 h after injection of labelled thrombin-hirudin complexes, the recoveries of radioactivity from hirudin and thrombin in liver were comparable (38.6 +/- 3.0 and 36.4 +/- 4.1%, n = 3), whereas more radioactivity was recovered in kidney from hirudin than from thrombin (27.6 +/- 8.7 compared with 13.6 +/- 4.5%) and less was recovered in lung (0.4 +/- 0.2 compared with 17.7 +/- 2.9%). We conclude that hirudin is catabolized predominantly in kidney, whereas the thrombin-hirudin complex is catabolized by both liver and kidney. PMID:8280076

  10. Cloning and characterization of styrene catabolism genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, A.M.; Solinas, F.; Galli, E.; Bestetti, G.

    1996-01-01

    Styrene is used in large quantities in the manufacturing of plastics, synthetic rubber, and resins. Styrene-utilizing microorganisms have been isolate in consideration of their potential applications as biocatalysts in the removal of styrene in industrial wastes. However, data conserving styrene catabolism in bacteria are not abundant. In this paper the isolated of the Pseudomonas fluorescens ST genes involved in the first steps of styrene degradation are reported as well as the identification of the intermediates accumulated by single recombinant clones. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Developmental and hormonal regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis and catabolism in pea fruit.

    PubMed

    Ozga, Jocelyn A; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ayele, Belay T; Ngo, Phuong; Nadeau, Courtney; Wickramarathna, Aruna D

    2009-05-01

    In pea (Pisum sativum), normal fruit growth requires the presence of the seeds. The coordination of growth between the seed and ovary tissues involves phytohormones; however, the specific mechanisms remain speculative. This study further explores the roles of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and catabolism genes during pollination and fruit development and in seed and auxin regulation of pericarp growth. Pollination and fertilization events not only increase pericarp PsGA3ox1 message levels (codes for GA 3-oxidase that converts GA(20) to bioactive GA(1)) but also reduce pericarp PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(20) to GA(29)), suggesting a concerted regulation to increase levels of bioactive GA(1) following these events. 4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) was found to mimic the seeds in the stimulation of PsGA3ox1 and the repression of PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels as well as the stimulation of PsGA2ox2 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(1) to GA(8)) in pericarp at 2 to 3 d after anthesis, while the other endogenous pea auxin, IAA, did not. This GA gene expression profile suggests that both seeds and 4-Cl-IAA can stimulate the production, as well as modulate the half-life, of bioactive GA(1), leading to initial fruit set and subsequent growth and development of the ovary. Consistent with these gene expression profiles, deseeded pericarps converted [(14)C]GA(12) to [(14)C]GA(1) only if treated with 4-Cl-IAA. These data further support the hypothesis that 4-Cl-IAA produced in the seeds is transported to the pericarp, where it differentially regulates the expression of pericarp GA biosynthesis and catabolism genes to modulate the level of bioactive GA(1) required for initial fruit set and growth. PMID:19297588

  12. Dibenzothiophene Catabolism Proceeds via a Flavin-N5-oxide Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Adak, Sanjoy; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-05-25

    The dibenzothiophene catabolic pathway converts dibenzothiophene to 2-hydroxybiphenyl and sulfite. The third step of the pathway, involving the conversion of dibenzothiophene sulfone to 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-benzenesulfinic acid, is catalyzed by a unique flavoenzyme DszA. Mechanistic studies on this reaction suggest that the C2 hydroperoxide of dibenzothiophene sulfone reacts with flavin to form a flavin-N5-oxide. The intermediacy of the flavin-N5-oxide was confirmed by LC-MS analysis, a co-elution experiment with chemically synthesized FMN-N5-oxide and (18)O2 labeling studies. PMID:27120486

  13. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  14. Detection of streptococcal mutants presumed to be defective in sugar catabolism.

    PubMed

    Feary, T W; Mayo, J A

    1984-06-01

    The tetrazolium method for detection of bacterial mutants defective in sugar catabolism was modified for use with streptococci. The critical factors were (i) the concentration of tetrazolium, which must be titrated to determine the optimum concentration for each species or even strain, and (ii) anaerobic incubation of tetrazolium-containing agar plates. When used with standard mutagenesis protocols, this method yielded lactose-negative mutants of nine streptococcal strains representing six species. A collection of lactose-negative mutants of streptococcus, sanguis Challis was characterized and contained phospho-beta-galactosidase, lactose phosphotransferase, and general phosphotransferase mutants. PMID:6378096

  15. "Infectious" Transplantation Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shixin; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Pope, Heather; Elliott, James; Kioussis, Dimitris; Davies, Joanna; Waldmann, Herman

    1993-02-01

    The maintenance of transplantation tolerance induced in adult mice after short-term treatment with nonlytic monoclonal antibodies to CD4 and CD8 was investigated. CD4^+ T cells from tolerant mice disabled naive lymphocytes so that they too could not reject the graft. The naive lymphocytes that had been so disabled also became tolerant and, in turn, developed the capacity to specifically disable other naive lymphocytes. This process of "infectious" tolerance explains why no further immunosuppression was needed to maintain long-term transplantation tolerance.

  16. Recent advances in polyamine metabolism and abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Parimalan; Subramani, Rajkumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is an alarming problem in agriculture and its effect on yield loss has been estimated to be five per cent for every degree centigrade rise in temperature. Plants exhibit multiple mechanisms like optimizing signaling pathway, involvement of secondary messengers, production of biomolecules specifically in response to stress, modulation of various metabolic networks in accordance with stress, and so forth, in order to overcome abiotic stress factors. Many structural genes and networks of pathway were identified and reported in plant systems for abiotic stress tolerance. One such crucial metabolic pathway that is involved in normal physiological function and also gets modulated during stress to impart tolerance is polyamine metabolic pathway. Besides the role of structural genes, it is also important to know the mechanism by which these structural genes are regulated during stress. Present review highlights polyamine biosynthesis, catabolism, and its role in abiotic stress tolerance with special reference to plant systems. Additionally, a system based approach is discussed as a potential strategy to dissect the existing variation in crop species in unraveling the interacting regulatory components/genetic determinants related to PAs mediated abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:25136565

  17. Emmental Cheese Environment Enhances Propionibacterium freudenreichii Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Valérie; Jardin, Julien; Rabah, Houem; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Jan, Gwénaël

    2015-01-01

    Dairy propionibacteria are actinomycetales found in various fermented food products. The main species, Propionibacterium freudenreichii, is generally recognized as safe and used both as probiotic and as cheese starter. Its probiotic efficacy tightly depends on its tolerance towards digestive stresses, which can be largely modulated by the ingested delivery vehicle. Indeed, tolerance of this bacterium is enhanced when it is consumed within a fermented dairy product, compared to a dried probiotic preparation. We investigated both stress tolerance and protein neosynthesis upon growth in i) chemically defined or ii) aqueous phase of Emmental cheeses. Although the same final population level was reached in both media, a slower growth and an enhanced survival of CIRM BIA 1 strain of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii was observed in Emmental juice, compared to chemically defined medium. This was accompanied by differences in substrates used and products released as well as overexpression of various early stress adaptation proteins in Emmental juice, compared to chemically defined medium, implied in protein folding, in aspartate catabolism, in biosynthesis of valine, leucine and isoleucine, in pyruvate metabolism in citrate cycle, in the propionate metabolism, as well as in oxidoreductases. All these changes led to a higher digestive stress tolerance after growth in Emmental juice. Mechanisms of stress adaptation were induced in this environment, in accordance with enhanced survival. This opens perspectives for the use of hard and semi-hard cheeses as delivery vehicle for probiotics with enhanced efficacy. PMID:26275229

  18. Emmental Cheese Environment Enhances Propionibacterium freudenreichii Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gagnaire, Valérie; Jardin, Julien; Rabah, Houem; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Jan, Gwénaël

    2015-01-01

    Dairy propionibacteria are actinomycetales found in various fermented food products. The main species, Propionibacterium freudenreichii, is generally recognized as safe and used both as probiotic and as cheese starter. Its probiotic efficacy tightly depends on its tolerance towards digestive stresses, which can be largely modulated by the ingested delivery vehicle. Indeed, tolerance of this bacterium is enhanced when it is consumed within a fermented dairy product, compared to a dried probiotic preparation. We investigated both stress tolerance and protein neosynthesis upon growth in i) chemically defined or ii) aqueous phase of Emmental cheeses. Although the same final population level was reached in both media, a slower growth and an enhanced survival of CIRM BIA 1 strain of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii was observed in Emmental juice, compared to chemically defined medium. This was accompanied by differences in substrates used and products released as well as overexpression of various early stress adaptation proteins in Emmental juice, compared to chemically defined medium, implied in protein folding, in aspartate catabolism, in biosynthesis of valine, leucine and isoleucine, in pyruvate metabolism in citrate cycle, in the propionate metabolism, as well as in oxidoreductases. All these changes led to a higher digestive stress tolerance after growth in Emmental juice. Mechanisms of stress adaptation were induced in this environment, in accordance with enhanced survival. This opens perspectives for the use of hard and semi-hard cheeses as delivery vehicle for probiotics with enhanced efficacy. PMID:26275229

  19. Recent Advances in Polyamine Metabolism and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Parimalan; Subramani, Rajkumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is an alarming problem in agriculture and its effect on yield loss has been estimated to be five per cent for every degree centigrade rise in temperature. Plants exhibit multiple mechanisms like optimizing signaling pathway, involvement of secondary messengers, production of biomolecules specifically in response to stress, modulation of various metabolic networks in accordance with stress, and so forth, in order to overcome abiotic stress factors. Many structural genes and networks of pathway were identified and reported in plant systems for abiotic stress tolerance. One such crucial metabolic pathway that is involved in normal physiological function and also gets modulated during stress to impart tolerance is polyamine metabolic pathway. Besides the role of structural genes, it is also important to know the mechanism by which these structural genes are regulated during stress. Present review highlights polyamine biosynthesis, catabolism, and its role in abiotic stress tolerance with special reference to plant systems. Additionally, a system based approach is discussed as a potential strategy to dissect the existing variation in crop species in unraveling the interacting regulatory components/genetic determinants related to PAs mediated abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:25136565

  20. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Thomas, James W

    2009-09-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is known about purine catabolism in marsupials and monotremes. Here we report the results of a comparative genomics study designed to characterize the purine catabolic pathway in a marsupial, the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). We found that both genomes encode a more complete set of genes for purine catabolism than do eutherians and conclude that a near complete purine catabolic pathway was present in the common ancestor of all mammals, and that the loss of ALLN is specific to placental mammals. Our results therefore provide a revised history for gene loss in the purine catabolic pathway and suggest that marsupials and monotremes represent a third class of mammals with respect to their end products of purine catabolism. PMID:20161190

  1. Genetic analysis of phenylacetic acid catabolism in Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Drzyzga, Oliver; Perera, Julián

    2008-07-01

    Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386 is a Gram-positive bacterium able to use either phenylacetic acid or phenylacetaldehyde as the sole carbon and energy source for aerobic growth. Genes responsible for the catabolism of these compounds have been located at two chromosomal regions and were organized in one isolated paaN gene and two putative paa operons, one consisting of the paaD, paaF, tetR and prot genes, and one consisting of the paaG, paaH, paaI, paaJ, paaK and paaB genes. The identity of the paaF and paaN genes was supported by functional complementation experiments. A comparison with the paa catabolic genes and/or gene clusters of other bacteria that degrade these aromatic compounds is presented. The results of this study broaden the knowledge regarding the range of metabolic potential of this strain and eventually make it attractive for environmental applications. PMID:18437357

  2. Catabolism and Deactivation of the Lipid-Derived Hormone Jasmonoyl-Isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J. K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxylipin hormone jasmonate controls myriad processes involved in plant growth, development, and immune function. The discovery of jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) as the major bioactive form of the hormone highlights the need to understand biochemical and cell biological processes underlying JA-Ile homeostasis. Among the major metabolic control points governing the accumulation of JA-Ile in plant tissues are the availability of jasmonic acid, the immediate precursor of JA-Ile, and oxidative enzymes involved in catabolism and deactivation of the hormone. Recent studies indicate that JA-Ile turnover is mediated by a ω-oxidation pathway involving members of the CYP94 family of cytochromes P450. This discovery opens new opportunities to genetically manipulate JA-Ile levels for enhanced resistance to environmental stress, and further highlights ω-oxidation as a conserved pathway for catabolism of lipid-derived signals in plants and animals. Functional characterization of the full complement of CYP94 P450s promises to reveal new pathways for jasmonate metabolism and provide insight into the evolution of oxylipin signaling in land plants. PMID:22639640

  3. Carnitine levels in severe infection and starvation: a possible key to the prolonged catabolic state.

    PubMed

    Border, J R; Burns, G P; Rumph, C; Schenk, W G

    1970-07-01

    Tissue carnitine levels have been measured in man and the dog. Skeletal muscle carnitine levels rise in the dog with starvation to roughly twice the normal level. An equal degree of starvation plus peritonitis is associated with unchanged skeletal muscle carnitine levels. In the presence of peritonitis, sequential skeletal muscle biopsies show a progressive fall in the tissue carnitine levels with a subsequent rise in those animals which survive and clear their peritonitis. Normal human skeletal muscle levels are essentially the same as in the dog. A combination of sepsis and starvation in man is associated with essentially unchanged skeletal muscle carnitine levels, whereas pure sepsis without starvation is associated with decreased skeletal muscle carnitine levels. It is suggested that these changes are in the direction expected for a limitation of fat catabolism and, in the presence of a limited exogenous source of glucose, that this would result secondarily in a protein catabolic state to supply glucose for the body's energy needs. PMID:10483466

  4. Multiscale investigation of USPIO nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques and their catabolism and storage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maraloiu, Valentin-Adrian; Appaix, Florence; Broisat, Alexis; Le Guellec, Dominique; Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghezzi, Catherine; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Blanchin, Marie-Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    The storage and catabolism of Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles were analyzed through a multiscale approach combining Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) at different times after intravenous injection in an atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mouse model. The atherosclerotic plaque features and the USPIO heterogeneous biodistribution were revealed down from organ's scale to subcellular level. The biotransformation of the nanoparticle iron oxide (maghemite) core into ferritin, the non-toxic form of iron storage, was demonstrated for the first time ex vivo in atherosclerotic plaques as well as in spleen, the iron storage organ. These results rely on an innovative spatial and structural investigation of USPIO's catabolism in cellular phagolysosomes. This study showed that these nanoparticles were stored as non-toxic iron compounds: maghemite oxide or ferritin, which is promising for MRI detection of atherosclerotic plaques in clinics using these USPIOs. From the Clinical Editor: Advance in nanotechnology has brought new contrast agents for clinical imaging. In this article, the authors investigated the use and biotransformation of Ultrasmall Super-paramagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles for analysis of atherosclerotic plagues in Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The biophysical data generated from this study could enable the possible use of these nanoparticles for the benefits of clinical patients. PMID:26370708

  5. Mutants of Pseudomonas cepacia G4 defective in catabolism of aromatic compounds and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Montgomery, S O; Cuskey, S M; Chapman, P J; Pritchard, P H

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 possesses a novel pathway of toluene catabolism that is shown to be responsible for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). This pathway involves conversion of toluene via o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol. In order to determine the enzyme of toluene degradation that is responsible for TCE degradation, chemically induced mutants, blocked in the toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) pathway of G4, were examined. Mutants of the phenotypic class designated TOM A- were all defective in their ability to oxidize toluene, o-cresol, m-cresol, and phenol, suggesting that a single enzyme is responsible for conversion of these compounds to their hydroxylated products (3-methylcatechol from toluene, o-cresol, and m-cresol and catechol from phenol) in the wild type. Mutants of this class did not degrade TCE. Two other mutant classes which were blocked in toluene catabolism, TOM B-, which lacked catechol-2,3-dioxygenase, and TOM C-, which lacked 2-hydroxy-6-oxoheptadienoic acid hydrolase activity, were fully capable of TCE degradation. Therefore, TCE degradation is directly associated with the monooxygenation capability responsible for toluene, cresol, and phenol hydroxylation. PMID:1892384

  6. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  7. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). A significant 20% reduction in hepatic LDL receptor protein expression was also observed with empagliflozin. Importantly, none of these parameters were changed by empagliflozin in fed conditions. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). These data suggest that empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion. PMID:27207551

  8. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route. PMID:26817843

  9. Impaired adiponectin signaling contributes to disturbed catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kun; Du, Chaosheng; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Di; Yan, Wenjun; Zhang, Haifeng; Hong, Zhibo; Liu, Peilin; Zhang, Lijian; Pei, Haifeng; Zhang, Jinglong; Gao, Chao; Xin, Chao; Cheng, Hexiang; Xiong, Lize; Tao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) accumulated in type 2 diabetes are independent contributors to insulin resistance. The activity of branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, rate-limiting enzyme in BCAA catabolism, is reduced in diabetic states, which contributes to elevated BCAA concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying decreased BCKD activity remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial phosphatase 2C (PP2Cm), a newly identified BCKD phosphatase that increases BCKD activity, was significantly downregulated in ob/ob and type 2 diabetic mice. Interestingly, in adiponectin (APN) knockout (APN(-/-)) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HD), PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were significantly decreased, whereas BCKD kinase (BDK), which inhibits BCKD activity, was markedly increased. Concurrently, plasma BCAA and branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKA) were significantly elevated. APN treatment markedly reverted PP2Cm, BDK, BCKD activity, and BCAA and BCKA levels in HD-fed APN(-/-) and diabetic animals. Additionally, increased BCKD activity caused by APN administration was partially but significantly inhibited in PP2Cm knockout mice. Finally, APN-mediated upregulation of PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were abolished when AMPK was inhibited. Collectively, we have provided the first direct evidence that APN is a novel regulator of PP2Cm and systematic BCAA levels, suggesting that targeting APN may be a pharmacological approach to ameliorating BCAA catabolism in the diabetic state. PMID:25071024

  10. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  11. Drosophila miR-277 controls branched-chain amino acid catabolism and affects lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Esslinger, Stephanie Maria; Schwalb, Björn; Helfer, Stephanie; Michalik, Katharina Maria; Witte, Heidi; Maier, Kerstin C.; Martin, Dietmar; Michalke, Bernhard; Tresch, Achim; Cramer, Patrick; Förstemann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Development, growth and adult survival are coordinated with available metabolic resources, ascertaining that the organism responds appropriately to environmental conditions. MicroRNAs are short (21–23 nt) regulatory RNAs that confer specificity on the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to inhibit a given set of mRNA targets. We profiled changes in miRNA expression during adult life in Drosophila melanogaster and determined that miR-277 is downregulated during adult life. Molecular analysis revealed that this miRNA controls branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism and as a result it can modulate the activity of the TOR kinase, a central growth regulator, in cultured cells. Metabolite analysis in cultured cells as well as flies suggests that the mechanistic basis may be an accumulation of branched-chain α-keto-acids (BCKA), rather than BCAAs, thus avoiding potentially detrimental consequences of increased branched chain amino acid levels on e.g., translational fidelity. Constitutive miR-277 expression shortens lifespan and is synthetically lethal with reduced insulin signaling, indicating that metabolic control underlies this phenotype. Transgenic inhibition with a miRNA sponge construct also shortens lifespan, in particular on protein-rich food. Thus, optimal metabolic adaptation appears to require tuning of cellular BCAA catabolism by miR-277. PMID:23669073

  12. The ygeW encoded protein from Escherichia coli is a knotted ancestral catabolic transcarbamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2012-06-28

    Purine degradation plays an essential role in nitrogen metabolism in most organisms. Uric acid is the final product of purine catabolism in humans, anthropoid apes, birds, uricotelic reptiles, and almost all insects. Elevated levels of uric acid in blood (hyperuricemia) cause human diseases such as gout, kidney stones, and renal failure. Although no enzyme has been identified that further degrades uric acid in humans, it can be oxidized to produce allantoin by free-radical attack. Indeed, elevated levels of allantoin are found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lung disease, bacterial meningitis, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In other mammals, some insects and gastropods, uric acid is enzymatically degraded to the more soluble allantoin through the sequential action of three enzymes: urate oxidase, 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) hydrolase and 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) decarboxylase. Therefore, an elective treatment for acute hyperuricemia is the administration of urate oxidase. Many organisms, including plants, some fungi and several bacteria, are able to catabolize allantoin to release nitrogen, carbon, and energy. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Eschrichia coli, S-allantoin has recently been shown to be degraded to glycolate and urea by four enzymes: allantoinase, allantoate amidohydrolase, ureidoglycine aminohydrolase, and ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase.

  13. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  14. N2-Succinylated intermediates in an arginine catabolic pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Alfred; Stalon, Victor; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Leisinger, Thomas; Haas, Dieter

    1986-01-01

    Arginine-nonutilizing (aru) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO converted L-arginine to N2-succinylarginine or N-succinylglutamate, which were identified by high-voltage electrophoresis and HPLC. Addition of aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes, to resting cells of the wild-type PAO1 in arginine medium led to the accumulation of N2-succinylornithine. Enzyme assays with crude P. aeruginosa extracts established the following pathway: L-arginine + succinyl-CoA → N2-succinylarginine → N2-succinylornithine → N_succinylglutamate 5-semialdehyde → N-succinylglutamate → succinate + glutamate. Succinyl-CoA may be regenerated from glutamate via 2-ketoglutarate. L-Arginine induced the enzymes of the pathway, and succinate caused catabolite repression. Purified N2-acetylornithine 5-aminotransferase (N2-acetyl-L-ornithine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.11), an arginine biosynthetic enzyme, efficiently transaminated N2-succinylornithine; this explains the enzyme's dual role in arginine biosynthesis and catabolism. The succinylarginine pathway enables P. aeruginosa to utilize arginine efficiently as a carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas the other three arginine catabolic pathways previously established in P. aeruginosa fulfill different functions. Images PMID:16593724

  15. Monitoring of naphthalene catabolism by bioluminescence with nah-lux transcriptional fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Burlage, R S; Sayler, G S; Larimer, F

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated the efficacy of a light-generating genetic construction in describing the induction of a nah operon for the catabolism of naphthalene. A fragment from plasmid NAH7, which contains the promoter for the upper pathway of degradation, was transcriptionally fused to the lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A Pseudomonas strain containing this construction is inducible to high levels of light production in the presence of a suitable substrate and the nahR regulatory gene product. This system was used to examine catabolic activity in a unique manner under a variety of growth conditions. Induction of bioluminescence was demonstrated to coincide with naphthalene degradation in all cases through the use of mineralization assays. A significant delay in bioluminescence and biodegradation was observed when naphthalene was added to batch cultures that were growing exponentially. These results suggest that the metabolism of naphthalene by this Pseudomonas strain is optimal when the growth rate of the culture is slow and is greatly reduced during exponential growth. Images PMID:2203729

  16. Effect of Growth Rate on Histidine Catabolism and Histidase Synthesis in Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Donald E.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1969-01-01

    A study was made of how the catabolism of a carbon and energy source is affected by the biosynthetic demands of growing bacterial cells. Cultures of Aerobacter aerogenes in l-histidine medium were grown in a chemostat at rates determined by the supply of either sulfate or a required amino acid, l-arginine. It was discovered that the rate at which these cells grow under a biosynthetic restriction determines both the rate and the pattern of histidine degradation. (i) Histidine catabolism is partially coupled to the growth rate. This coupling is achieved by catabolite repression of histidase (histidine ammonia lyase; EC 4.3.1.3.), and also by a slightly decreased in vivo function of this enzyme at low growth rates. (ii) The looseness of the coupling results in a direct relationship between growth rate and growth yield, and possibly is correlated with an altered pattern of carbon flow from histidine. (iii) Sudden decreases in growth rate cause total repression of histidase synthesis for substantial periods of time. (iv) Sudden release of biosynthetic restriction leads rapidly to an increase in the functioning of the cells' complement of histidase, an increase in the rate of synthesis of this enzyme, and an increase in the growth yield from histidine. PMID:5781570

  17. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  18. The inhibitory effects of interleukin-1 on growth hormone action during catabolic illness.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Robert N; Shumate, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) induces the expression of the anabolic genes responsible for growth, metabolism, and differentiation. Normally, GH stimulates the synthesis of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) by liver, which upregulates protein synthesis in many tissues. The development of GH resistance during catabolic illness or inflammation contributes to loss of body protein, resulting in multiple complications that prolong recovery and cause death. In septic patients, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and GH resistance are commonly observed together. Numerous studies have provided evidence that the inhibitory effects of cytokines on skeletal muscle protein synthesis during sepsis and inflammation are mediated indirectly by changes in the GH/IGF-I system. Interleukin (IL)-1, a member of the family of proinflammatory cytokines, interacts with most cell types and is an important mediator of the inflammatory response. Infusion of a specific IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) ameliorates protein catabolism and GH resistance during systemic infection. This suggests that IL-1 is an important mediator of GH resistance during systemic infection or inflammation. Consequently, a better understanding of the interaction between GH, IL-1, and the regulation of protein metabolism is of great importance for the care of the patient. PMID:17027521

  19. Glycogen catabolism, but not its biosynthesis, affects virulence of Fusarium oxysporum on the plant host.

    PubMed

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2015-04-01

    The role of glycogen metabolism was investigated in the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Targeted inactivation was performed of genes responsible for glycogen biosynthesis: gnn1 encoding glycogenin, gls1 encoding glycogen synthase, and gbe1 encoding glycogen branching enzyme. Moreover genes involved in glycogen catabolism were deleted: gph1 encoding glycogen phosphorylase and gdb1 encoding glycogen de-branching enzyme. Glycogen reserves increased steadily during growth of the wild type strain in axenic cultures, to reach up to 1500μg glucose equivalents mg(-1) protein after 14 days. Glycogen accumulation was abolished in mutants lacking biosynthesis genes, whereas it increased by 20-40% or 80%, respectively, in the single and double mutants affected in catabolic genes. Transcript levels of glycogen metabolism genes during tomato plant infection peaked at four days post inoculation, similar to the results observed during axenic culture. Significant differences were observed between gdb mutants and the wild type strain for vegetative hyphal fusion ability. The single mutants defective in glycogen metabolism showed similar levels of virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella. Interestingly, the deletion of gdb1 reduced virulence on the plant host up to 40% compared to the wild type in single and in double mutant backgrounds, whereas the other mutants showed the virulence at the wild-type level. PMID:25865793

  20. Specific and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by using a bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Thonnard, J.E.; Sayler, G.S.; Webb, O.F. )

    1992-06-01

    A bioassay was developed and standardized for the rapid, specific, and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by use of bioluminescence monitoring of catabolic gene expression. The bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, which carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism, was used. The physiological state of the reporter cultures as well as the intrinsic regulatory properties of the naphthalene degradation operon must be taken into account to obtain a high specificity at low target substrate concentrations. Experiments have shown that the use of exponentially growing reporter cultures has advantages over the use of carbon-starved, resting cultures. In aqueous solutions for both substrates, naphthalene and salicylate, linear relationships between initial substrate concentration and bioluminescence response were found over concentration ranges of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Naphthalene could be detected at a concentration of 45 ppb. Studies conducted under defined conditions with extracts and slurries of experimentally contaminated sterile soils and identical uncontaminated soil controls demonstrated that this method can be used for specific and quantitative estimations of target pollutant presence and bioavailability in soil extracts and for specific and qualitative estimations of napthalene in soil slurries.

  1. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  2. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb. PMID:26858255

  3. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  4. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Anila K.; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  5. Nodule carbohydrate catabolism is enhanced in the Medicago truncatula A17-Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419 symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Seminario, Amaia; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic association between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti is a well-established model system in the legume–Rhizobium community. Despite its wide use, the symbiotic efficiency of this model has been recently questioned and an alternative microsymbiont, S. medicae, has been proposed. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms behind the higher symbiotic efficiency of S. medicae WSM419. In the present study, we inoculated M. truncatula Jemalong A17 with either S. medicae WSM419 or S. meliloti 2011 and compared plant growth, photosynthesis, N2-fixation rates, and plant nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolic activities in the two systems. M. truncatula plants in symbiosis with S. medicae showed increased biomass and photosynthesis rates per plant. Plants grown in symbiosis with S. medicae WSM419 also showed higher N2-fixation rates, which were correlated with a larger nodule biomass, while nodule number was similar in both systems. In terms of plant nodule metabolism, M. truncatula–S. medicae WSM419 nodules showed increased sucrose-catabolic activity, mostly associated with sucrose synthase, accompanied by a reduced starch content, whereas nitrogen-assimilation activities were comparable to those measured in nodules infected with S. meliloti 2011. Taken together, these results suggest that S. medicae WSM419 is able to enhance plant carbon catabolism in M. truncatula nodules, which allows for the maintaining of high symbiotic N2-fixation rates, better growth and improved general plant performance. PMID:25221545

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor-PPARα axis in fetal mouse liver prepares neonates for milk lipid catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Gianpaolo; Tan, Chek Kun; Khaled, Nourhène; Montagner, Alexandra; Leuenberger, Nicolas; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Guillou, Hervé; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hepatic lipid catabolism is essential for the newborns to efficiently use milk fat as an energy source. However, it is unclear how this critical trait is acquired and regulated. We demonstrate that under the control of PPARα, the genes required for lipid catabolism are transcribed before birth so that the neonatal liver has a prompt capacity to extract energy from milk upon suckling. The mechanism involves a fetal glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-PPARα axis in which GR directly regulates the transcriptional activation of PPARα by binding to its promoter. Certain PPARα target genes such as Fgf21 remain repressed in the fetal liver and become PPARα responsive after birth following an epigenetic switch triggered by β-hydroxybutyrate-mediated inhibition of HDAC3. This study identifies an endocrine developmental axis in which fetal GR primes the activity of PPARα in anticipation of the sudden shifts in postnatal nutrient source and metabolic demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11853.001 PMID:27367842

  7. Ecotoxicological assessment of soil microbial community tolerance to glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, Marco; Zabaloy, María Celina; Gómez, Elena del V

    2015-11-15

    Glyphosate is the most used herbicide worldwide. While contrasting results have been observed related with its impact on soil microbial communities, more studies are necessary to elucidate the potential effects of the herbicide. Differences in tolerance detected by Pollution Induced Community Tolerance (PICT) approach could reflect these effects. The objective of the present study was to assess the tolerance to glyphosate (the active ingredient and a commercial formulation) of contrasting soils with (H) and without (NH) history of exposure. The hypothesis of a higher tolerance in H soils due to a sustained selection pressure on community structure was tested through the PICT approach. Results indicated that tolerance to glyphosate is not consistent with previous history of exposure to the herbicide either for the active ingredient or for a commercial formulation. Soils of H and NH sites were also characterized in order to determine to what extent they differ in their functional diversity and structure of microbial communities. Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and Quantitative Real Time PCR (Q-PCR) indicated high similarity of Eubacteria profiles as well as no significant differences in abundance, respectively, between H and NH sites. Community level physiological profiling (CLPP) indicated some differences in respiration of specific sources but functional diversity was very similar as reflected by catabolic evenness (E). These results support PICT assay, which ideally requires soils with differences in their exposure to the contaminant but minor differences in other characteristics. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of PICT approach with glyphosate examining tolerance at soil microbial community level. PMID:26150308

  8. Summer-to-Winter Phenotypic Flexibility of Fatty Acid Transport and Catabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Heart of Small Birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Swanson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged shivering in birds is mainly fueled by lipids. Consequently, lipid transport and catabolism are vital for thermogenic performance and could be upregulated along with thermogenic capacity as part of the winter phenotype. We investigated summer-to-winter variation in lipid transport and catabolism by measuring mRNA expression, protein levels, and enzyme activities for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolic pathways in pectoralis muscle and heart in two small temperate-zone resident birds, American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Cytosolic fatty acid binding protein (FABPc; a key component of intramyocyte lipid transport) mRNA and/or protein levels were generally higher in winter for pectoralis muscle and heart for both species. However, seasonal variation in plasma membrane lipid transporters, fatty acyl translocase, and plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein in pectoralis and heart differed between the two species, with winter increases for chickadees and seasonal stability or summer increases for goldfinches. Catabolic enzyme activities generally showed limited seasonal differences for both tissues and both species. These data suggest that FABPc is an important target of upregulation for the winter phenotype in pectoralis and heart of both species. Plasma membrane lipid transporters and lipid catabolic capacity were also elevated in winter for chickadees but not for goldfinches. Because the two species show differential regulation of distinct aspects of lipid transport and catabolism, these data are consistent with other recent studies documenting that different bird species or populations employ a variety of strategies to promote elevated winter thermogenic capacity. PMID:26658250

  9. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  10. Application of p-toluidine in chromogenic detection of catechol and protocatechuate, diphenolic intermediates in catabolism of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. )

    1992-08-01

    In the presence of p-toluidine and iron, protocatechuate and catechols yield color. Inclusion of p-toluidine in media facilities the screening of microbial strains for alterations affecting aromatic catabolism. Such strains include mutants affected in the expression of oxygenases and Escherichia coli colonies carrying cloned or subcloned aromatic catabolic genes which encode enzymes giving rise to protocatechuate or catechol. The diphenolic detection system can also be applied to the creation of vectors relying on insertion of cloned DNA into one of the latter marker genes.

  11. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  12. A Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Involved in Cholesterol Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y.-C.; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I.; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent kcat/Km = 1000 ± 100 m−1 s−1 versus 700 ± 100 m−1 s−1). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent kcat/Km = 80 ± 40 m−1 s−1). In the presence of 3-HSA the Kmapp for O2 was 100 ± 10 μm. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-Å resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val367–Val394) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25° around Arg366. This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial catabolism of steroids. PMID

  13. Albumin absorption and catabolism by isolated perfused proximal convoluted tubules of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Park, C H; Maack, T

    1984-01-01

    Overall characteristics and kinetics of tubular absorption of albumin (Alb) were studied in isolated perfused proximal convoluted tubules of the rabbit. The fate of absorbed Alb was determined in tubules perfused with low [Alb]. Alb was labeled with tritium by reductive methylation ( [3H3C]Alb). At [Alb] = 0.03 mg/ml, approximately 80% of the absorbed [3H3C]Alb was released to the peritubular bathing solution as catabolic products. Transcellular transport of intact [3H3C]Alb was negligible. Iodoacetate (IAA, 4 mM) inhibited albumin absorption (JAlb) by greater than 95% and fluid reabsorption (JV) by 55%. At [Alb] = 0.1 mg/ml the absorption rate of a derivatized cationic Alb (pI = 8.4) was fivefold greater (P less than 0.01) than that of anionic Alb. Higher cationic [Alb] had deleterious effects on tubular functions. Overall Alb absorption was of high capacity and low affinity (JmaxAlb = 3.7 ng/min per mm tubule length, apparent Michaelis constant (Km) = 1.2 mg/ml). A low capacity system that saturates at near physiological loads was also detected (JmaxAlb = 0.064 ng/min per mm, apparent Km = 0.031 mg/ml). High [Alb] did not alter the rate of endocytic vesicle formation as determined by the tubular uptake of [14C]inulin. Results show that Alb absorption is a saturable process that is inhibited by high IAA concentrations and is affected by the charge of the protein. Absorbed Alb is hydrolyzed by tubular cells and catabolic products are readily released to the peritubular side. The dual kinetics of Alb absorption may be due to a combination of adsorptive endocytosis (low capacity system) and fluid endocytosis of albumin aggregates (high capacity system). Results indicate that albuminuria occurs much before albumin absorption is saturated. The kinetic characteristics of the process of tubular absorption of albumin helps to explain the concomitance of albuminuria, increased renal catabolic rates of albumin, and renal cell deposition of protein absorption droplets in

  14. A flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis involved in cholesterol catabolism.

    PubMed

    Dresen, Carola; Lin, Leo Y-C; D'Angelo, Igor; Tocheva, Elitza I; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2010-07-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 have similar cholesterol catabolic pathways. This pathway contributes to the pathogenicity of Mtb. The hsaAB cholesterol catabolic genes have been predicted to encode the oxygenase and reductase, respectively, of a flavin-dependent mono-oxygenase that hydroxylates 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione (3-HSA) to a catechol. An hsaA deletion mutant of RHA1 did not grow on cholesterol but transformed the latter to 3-HSA and related metabolites in which each of the two keto groups was reduced: 3,9-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-17-one (3,9-DHSA) and 3,17-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9-one (3,17-DHSA). Purified 3-hydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione 4-hydroxylase (HsaAB) from Mtb had higher specificity for 3-HSA than for 3,17-DHSA (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 1000 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1) versus 700 +/- 100 M(-1) s(-1)). However, 3,9-DHSA was a poorer substrate than 3-hydroxybiphenyl (apparent k(cat)/K(m) = 80 +/- 40 M(-1) s(-1)). In the presence of 3-HSA the K(m)(app) for O(2) was 100 +/- 10 microM. The crystal structure of HsaA to 2.5-A resolution revealed that the enzyme has the same fold, flavin-binding site, and catalytic residues as p-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydroxylase. However, HsaA has a much larger phenol-binding site, consistent with the enzyme's substrate specificity. In addition, a second crystal form of HsaA revealed that a C-terminal flap (Val(367)-Val(394)) could adopt two conformations differing by a rigid body rotation of 25 degrees around Arg(366). This rotation appears to gate the likely flavin entrance to the active site. In docking studies with 3-HSA and flavin, the closed conformation provided a rationale for the enzyme's substrate specificity. Overall, the structural and functional data establish the physiological role of HsaAB and provide a basis to further investigate an important class of monooxygenases as well as the bacterial

  15. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase from Lactobacillus hilgardii

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Blanca de las; Rodríguez, Héctor; Angulo, Iván; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-07-01

    The catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTC) from L. hilgardii has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized under two different experimental conditions. The structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement method using the atomic coordinates of catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase from P. aeruginosa as the search model. The catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTC; EC 2.1.3.3) from the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus hilgardii is a key protein involved in the degradation of arginine during malolactic fermentation. cOTC containing an N-terminal His{sub 6} tag has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized under two different experimental conditions using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals obtained from a solution containing 8%(w/v) PEG 4000, 75 mM sodium acetate pH 4.6 belong to the trigonal space group P321 and have unit-cell parameters a = b = 157.04, c = 79.28 Å. Conversely, crystals grown in 20%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol, 7.5%(w/v) PEG 4000, 100 mM HEPES pH 7.8 belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have unit-cell parameters a = 80.06, b = 148.90, c = 91.67 Å, β = 100.25°. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 3.00 and 2.91 Å resolution for trigonal and monoclinic crystals, respectively. The estimated Matthews coefficient for the crystal forms were 2.36 and 2.24 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, respectively, corresponding to 48% and 45% solvent content. In both cases, the results are consistent with the presence of three protein subunits in the asymmetric unit. The structure of cOTC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method using the atomic coordinates of cOTC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PDB code) as the search model.

  16. Sialic acid catabolism drives intestinal inflammation and microbial dysbiosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Lin; Chassard, Christophe; Hausmann, Martin; von Itzstein, Mark; Hennet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Rapid shifts in microbial composition frequently occur during intestinal inflammation, but the mechanisms underlying such changes remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that an increased caecal sialidase activity is critical in conferring a growth advantage for some bacteria including Escherichia coli (E. coli) during intestinal inflammation in mice. This sialidase activity originates among others from Bacteroides vulgatus, whose intestinal levels expand after dextran sulphate sodium administration. Increased sialidase activity mediates the release of sialic acid from intestinal tissue, which promotes the outgrowth of E. coli during inflammation. The outburst of E. coli likely exacerbates the inflammatory response by stimulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by intestinal dendritic cells. Oral administration of a sialidase inhibitor and low levels of intestinal α2,3-linked sialic acid decrease E. coli outgrowth and the severity of colitis in mice. Regulation of sialic acid catabolism opens new perspectives for the treatment of intestinal inflammation as manifested by E. coli dysbiosis. PMID:26303108

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupling links lipid catabolism to Akt inhibition and resistance to tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowinski, Sara M.; Solmonson, Ashley; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Rho, Okkyung; Cho, Jiyoon; Lago, Cory U.; Riley, Christopher L.; Lee, Sunhee; Kohno, Shohei; Dao, Christine K.; Nikawa, Takeshi; Bratton, Shawn B.; Wright, Casey W.; Fischer, Susan M.; DiGiovanni, John; Mills, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    To support growth, tumour cells reprogramme their metabolism to simultaneously upregulate macromolecular biosynthesis while maintaining energy production. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) oppose this phenotype by inducing futile mitochondrial respiration that is uncoupled from ATP synthesis, resulting in nutrient wasting. Here using a UCP3 transgene targeted to the basal epidermis, we show that forced mitochondrial uncoupling inhibits skin carcinogenesis by blocking Akt activation. Similarly, Akt activation is markedly inhibited in UCP3 overexpressing primary human keratinocytes. Mechanistic studies reveal that uncoupling increases fatty acid oxidation and membrane phospholipid catabolism, and impairs recruitment of Akt to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of Akt overcomes metabolic regulation by UCP3, rescuing carcinogenesis. These findings demonstrate that mitochondrial uncoupling is an effective strategy to limit proliferation and tumorigenesis through inhibition of Akt, and illuminate a novel mechanism of crosstalk between mitochondrial metabolism and growth signalling. PMID:26310111

  18. Tissue and Subcellular Localization of Enzymes Catabolizing (R)-Amygdalin in Mature Prunus serotina Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Elisabeth; Li, Chun Ping; Poulton, Jonathan E.

    1992-01-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) homogenates, (R)-amygdalin is catabolized to HCN, benzaldehyde, and d-glucose by the sequential action of amygdalin hydrolase, prunasin hydrolase, and mandelonitrile lyase. The tissue and subcellular localizations of these enzymes were determined within intact black cherry seeds by direct enzyme analysis, immunoblotting, and colloidal gold immunocytochemical techniques. Taken together, these procedures showed that the two β-glucosidases are restricted to protein bodies of the procambium, which ramifies throughout the cotyledons. Although amygdalin hydrolase occurred within the majority of procambial cells, prunasin hydrolase was confined to the peripheral layers of this meristematic tissue. Highest levels of mandelonitrile lyase were observed in the protein bodies of the cotyledonary parenchyma cells, with lesser amounts in the procambial cell protein bodies. The residual endosperm tissue had insignificant levels of amygdalin hydrolase, prunasin hydrolase, and mandelonitrile lyase. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:16652960

  19. Persistent inflammatory, immunosuppressed, catabolic syndrome (PICS): A new phenotype of multiple organ failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Martin D.; Moore, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    A new phenotype of multiple organ failure has appeared: Persistent Inflammatory, Immunosuppressed, Catabolic Syndrome (PICS). Comorbidities and age >65 years have been established as the leading risk factors for PICS. As the percentage of elderly people continues to increase the prevalence of PICS in our ICUs will surely grow. Malnutrition (despite appropriate supplementation), recurrent nosocomial infections, frailty, ventilator dependence, and an indolent death depicts the central theme that plagues PICS patients. Aligned with the recently awarded P50 grant by NIGMS entitled, “PICS: A New Horizon for Surgical Critical Care”, and the University Of Florida’s Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center will investigate the genetic make-up of PICS patients, better understand frailty and the implication in trauma patients, and hopefully elucidate new therapies. Currently, there are no therapies to combat PICS aside from nutritional inference elaborated after reviewing the literature on Burns, Cachexia, and Sarcopenia. PMID:26086042

  20. Mitochondrial uncoupling links lipid catabolism to Akt inhibition and resistance to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Sara M; Solmonson, Ashley; Rundhaug, Joyce E; Rho, Okkyung; Cho, Jiyoon; Lago, Cory U; Riley, Christopher L; Lee, Sunhee; Kohno, Shohei; Dao, Christine K; Nikawa, Takeshi; Bratton, Shawn B; Wright, Casey W; Fischer, Susan M; DiGiovanni, John; Mills, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    To support growth, tumour cells reprogramme their metabolism to simultaneously upregulate macromolecular biosynthesis while maintaining energy production. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) oppose this phenotype by inducing futile mitochondrial respiration that is uncoupled from ATP synthesis, resulting in nutrient wasting. Here using a UCP3 transgene targeted to the basal epidermis, we show that forced mitochondrial uncoupling inhibits skin carcinogenesis by blocking Akt activation. Similarly, Akt activation is markedly inhibited in UCP3 overexpressing primary human keratinocytes. Mechanistic studies reveal that uncoupling increases fatty acid oxidation and membrane phospholipid catabolism, and impairs recruitment of Akt to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of Akt overcomes metabolic regulation by UCP3, rescuing carcinogenesis. These findings demonstrate that mitochondrial uncoupling is an effective strategy to limit proliferation and tumorigenesis through inhibition of Akt, and illuminate a novel mechanism of crosstalk between mitochondrial metabolism and growth signalling. PMID:26310111

  1. The impact of carbon nanomaterials on the development of phenanthrene catabolism in soil.

    PubMed

    Oyelami, Ayodeji O; Semple, Kirk T

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of different types of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) namely C60, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and fullerene soot on the catabolism of (14)C-phenanthrene in soil by indigenous microorganisms. Different concentrations (0%, 0.01%, 0.1% and 1%) of the different CNMs were blended with soil spiked with 50 mg kg(-1) of (12)C-phenanthrene, and aged for 1, 25, 50 and 100 days. An increase in the concentration of MWCNT- and FS-amended soils showed a significant difference (P = 0.014) in the lag phase, maximum rates and overall extent of (14)C-phenanthrene mineralisation. Microbial cell numbers did not show an obvious trend, but it was observed that control soils had the highest population of heterotrophic and phenanthrene degrading bacteria at all time points. PMID:26067741

  2. Activity of a gelsolin-like actin modulator in rat skeletal muscle under protein catabolic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haese, J; Rutschmann, M; Dahlmann, B; Hinssen, H

    1987-01-01

    A gelsolin-like actin-modulating protein was isolated from rat skeletal muscle and characterized with respect to its interaction with actin. The protein, with a molecular mass of approx. 85 kDa, forms a stoichiometric complex with two actin molecules and is activated by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. It effectively severs actin filaments and promotes nucleation of actin polymerization. The activity of this protein is detectable already in crude extracts by its capability to reduce the steady state viscosity of actin. Actin-modulating activities were determined in muscle extracts of rats kept under protein catabolic conditions, i.e. as generated by corticosterone treatment and starvation. In both cases we found a marked increase of modulator activity. The possibility is discussed that the increased activity of actin modulator indicates a fragmentation of actin filaments prior to the proteolytic degradation of actin. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3435453

  3. Iatrogenic angioedema associated with ACEi, sitagliptin, and deficiency of 3 enzymes catabolizing bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Beaudouin, E; Defendi, F; Picaud, J; Drouet, C; Ponard, D; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    2014-05-01

    New concepts of idiopathic and iatrogenic angioedema underline the role of bradykinin, and the importance of catabolizing enzymes. A case is described of Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) and sitagliptin induced angioedema, where AO attacks decreased after the withdrawal of lisinopril but resolved only after the withdrawal of sitagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptylpeptidase IV. ACE, aminopeptidase P and carboxypeptidase N were decreased down to 17%, 42%, 64% of median references values, and remained low one year after the interruption of these drugs: 56%, 28% and 50%, respectively. The combined deficiency of APP and CPN might enhance the inhibiting effect of the DPP IV inhibitor. The fact that this triple deficiency remained latent before and after the treatment indicates that searching for latent enzyme deficiencies should be carried out when there is intention to treat with a combination of drugs interfering with the bradykinin metabolism. PMID:24853572

  4. Azotobacter vinelandii Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Regulated by ς54: Role in Alcohol Catabolism and Encystment

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Núñez, Cinthia; Segura, Daniel; Moreno, Soledad; Guzmán, Josefina; Espín, Guadalupe

    2001-01-01

    Encystment in Azotobacter vinelandii is induced by n-butanol or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). We identified a gene, encoding an aldehyde dehydrogenase, that was named aldA. An aldA mutation impaired bacterial growth on n-butanol, ethanol, or hexanol as the sole carbon source. Expression of aldA increased in cells shifted from sucrose to n-butanol and was shown to be dependent on the alternative ς54 factor. A mutation in rpoN encoding the ς54 factor also impaired growth on alcohols. Encystment on n-butanol, but not on BHB, was impaired in aldA or rpoN mutants, indicating that n-butanol is not an inducer of encystment by itself but must be catabolized in order to induce encystment. PMID:11591659

  5. Bioaugmentation of DDT-contaminated soil by dissemination of the catabolic plasmid pDOD.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunming; Jin, Xiangxiang; Ren, Jingbei; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid transfer-mediated bioaugmentation method for the enhancement of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation in soil was developed using the catabolic plasmid pDOD from Sphingobacterium sp. D-6. The pDOD plasmid could be transferred to soil bacteria, such as members of Cellulomonas, to form DDT degraders and thus accelerate DDT degradation. The transfer efficiency of pDOD was affected by the donor, temperature, moisture, and soil type. Approximately 50.7% of the DDT in the contaminated field was removed 210 days after the application of Escherichia coli TG I (pDOD-gfp). The results suggested that seeding pDOD into soil is an effective bioaugmentation method for enhancing the degradation of DDT. PMID:25597661

  6. A 2-Hydroxypyridine Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain PY11

    PubMed Central

    Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 (DSM 101666) is able to use 2-hydroxypyridine as a sole source of carbon and energy. By investigating a gene cluster (hpo) from this bacterium, we were able to reconstruct the catabolic pathway of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation. Here, we report that in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11, the initial hydroxylation of 2-hydroxypyridine is catalyzed by a four-component dioxygenase (HpoBCDF). A product of the dioxygenase reaction (3,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-2-one) is further oxidized by HpoE to 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine, which spontaneously forms a blue pigment. In addition, we show that the subsequent 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine ring opening is catalyzed by the hypothetical cyclase HpoH. The final products of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 are ammonium ion and α-ketoglutarate. PMID:26655765

  7. Frequent, independent transfers of a catabolic gene from bacteria to contrasted filamentous eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bruto, Maxime; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Luis, Patricia; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Even genetically distant prokaryotes can exchange genes between them, and these horizontal gene transfer events play a central role in adaptation and evolution. While this was long thought to be restricted to prokaryotes, certain eukaryotes have acquired genes of bacterial origin. However, gene acquisitions in eukaryotes are thought to be much less important in magnitude than in prokaryotes. Here, we describe the complex evolutionary history of a bacterial catabolic gene that has been transferred repeatedly from different bacterial phyla to stramenopiles and fungi. Indeed, phylogenomic analysis pointed to multiple acquisitions of the gene in these filamentous eukaryotes—as many as 15 different events for 65 microeukaryotes. Furthermore, once transferred, this gene acquired introns and was found expressed in mRNA databases for most recipients. Our results show that effective inter-domain transfers and subsequent adaptation of a prokaryotic gene in eukaryotic cells can happen at an unprecedented magnitude. PMID:24990676

  8. Frost tolerance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When conducting studies to characterize and determine the underlying mechanisms for freezing tolerance, it is essential to take into account that the type and form of freezing injury varies with the species and its degree of freezing tolerance. There are at least seven different patterns of freezin...

  9. Moving Beyond Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirone, Bill

    2001-01-01

    Operating under the umbrella of the Santa Barbara County Education Office, the Beyond Tolerance Educational Center serves as a resource for educators. It provides county schools with information and programs that promote social awareness and tolerance while teaching kids the dangers of hatred and discrimination. (MLH)

  10. A Lesson in Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnt, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one classroom's experience integrating a three-part lesson that focused on tolerance. In the lesson, students examined works by American folk-art painter Edward Hicks, researched quotes about tolerance in society, and applied calligraphy skills to an original composition.

  11. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  12. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  13. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  14. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  15. Muscle wasting from kidney failure–a model for catabolic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaonan H.; Mitch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Muscle atrophy is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The processes causing loss of muscle mass are also present in several catabolic conditions. Understanding the pathogenesis of CKD-induced muscle loss could lead to therapeutic interventions that prevent muscle wasting in CKD and potentially, other catabolic conditions. Major findings Insulin or IGF-1 resistance caused by CKD, acidosis, inflammation, glucocorticoids or cancer causes defects in insulin-stimulated intracellular signaling that suppresses IRS-1 activity leading to decreased phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt). A low p-Akt activates caspase-3 which provides muscle proteins substrates of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). A low p-Akt also leads to decreased phosphorylation of forkhead transcription factors which enter the nucleus to stimulate the expression of atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1, E3 ubiquitin ligases that can be associated with proteolysis of muscle cells by the UPS. Caspase-3 also stimulates proteasome-dependent proteolysis in muscle. Summary in CKD, diabetes, inflammatory conditions or in response to acidosis or excess glucocorticoids, insulin resistance develops, initiating reduced IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling. In CKD, this reduces p-Akt which stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating caspase-3 and the UPS. Second, caspase-3 cleaves actomyosin yielding substrates for the UPS and increased proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Third, p-Akt down-regulation suppresses myogenesis in CKD. Fourth, exercise in CKD stimulates insulin/IGF-1 signaling to reduce muscle atrophy. Lastly, there is evidence that microRNAs influence insulin signaling providing a potential opportunity to design therapeutic interventions. PMID:23872437

  16. Lymphatic transport and catabolism of therapeutic proteins after subcutaneous administration to rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weirong; Chen, Nancy; Shen, Xiaolan; Cunningham, Paul; Fauty, Scott; Michel, Kimberly; Wang, Bo; Hong, Xuening; Adreani, Christine; Nunes, Christian N; Johnson, Chris V; Yin, Kuo-Chang; Groff, Michelle; Zou, Yan; Liu, Liming; Hamuro, Lora; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism underlying subcutaneous absorption of macromolecules and factors that can influence this process were studied in rats using PEGylated erythropoietins (EPOs) as model compounds. Using a thoracic lymph duct cannulation (LDC) model, we showed that PEGylated EPO was absorbed from the subcutaneous injection site mainly via the lymphatic system in rats, which is similar to previous reports in sheep. After subcutaneous administration, the serum exposure was reduced by ∼70% in LDC animals compared with that in the control animals, and most of the systemically available dose was recovered in the lymph. In both LDC and intact rats, the total radioactivity recoveries in excreta after subcutaneous administration were high (70-80%), indicating that catabolism, not poor absorption, was the main cause for the observed low bioavailability (30-40%). Moreover, catabolism of PEGylated EPO was found with both rat subcutaneous tissue homogenate and lymph node cell suspensions, and a significant amount of dose-related breakdown fragments was found in the lymph of LDC rats. In addition, the bioavailability of PEGylated EPOs was shown to be 2- to 4-fold lower in "fat rats," indicating that physiologic features pertinent to lymphatic transport can have a profound impact on subcutaneous absorption. Limited studies in dogs also suggested similar subcutaneous absorption mechanisms. Collectively, our results suggest that the lymphatic absorption mechanism for macromolecules is probably conserved among commonly used preclinical species, e.g., rats and dogs, and that mechanistic understanding of the subcutaneous absorption mechanism and associated determinants should be helpful in biologic drug discovery and development. PMID:22328584

  17. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects.

    PubMed

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects. PMID:27187487

  18. Involvement of MicroRNAs in the Regulation of Muscle Wasting during Catabolic Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ricardo José; Cagnin, Stefano; Chemello, Francesco; Silvestrin, Matteo; Musaro, Antonio; De Pitta, Cristiano; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Sandri, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Loss of muscle proteins and the consequent weakness has important clinical consequences in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, chronic heart failure, and in aging. In fact, excessive proteolysis causes cachexia, accelerates disease progression, and worsens life expectancy. Muscle atrophy involves a common pattern of transcriptional changes in a small subset of genes named atrophy-related genes or atrogenes. Whether microRNAs play a role in the atrophy program and muscle loss is debated. To understand the involvement of miRNAs in atrophy we performed miRNA expression profiling of mouse muscles under wasting conditions such as fasting, denervation, diabetes, and cancer cachexia. We found that the miRNA signature is peculiar of each catabolic condition. We then focused on denervation and we revealed that changes in transcripts and microRNAs expression did not occur simultaneously but were shifted. Indeed, whereas transcriptional control of the atrophy-related genes peaks at 3 days, changes of miRNA expression maximized at 7 days after denervation. Among the different miRNAs, microRNA-206 and -21 were the most induced in denervated muscles. We characterized their pattern of expression and defined their role in muscle homeostasis. Indeed, in vivo gain and loss of function experiments revealed that miRNA-206 and miRNA-21 were sufficient and required for atrophy program. In silico and in vivo approaches identified transcription factor YY1 and the translational initiator factor eIF4E3 as downstream targets of these miRNAs. Thus miRNAs are important for fine-tuning the atrophy program and their modulation can be a novel potential therapeutic approach to counteract muscle loss and weakness in catabolic conditions. PMID:24891504

  19. Dual Inhibition of Endocannabinoid Catabolic Enzymes Produces Enhanced Antiwithdrawal Effects in Morphine-Dependent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Divya; Gamage, Thomas F; Vanuytsel, Tim; Owens, Robert A; Abdullah, Rehab A; Niphakis, Micah J; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal signs in mice via activation of CB1 receptors. Complete FAAH inhibition blocks only a subset of withdrawal signs, whereas complete MAGL inhibition elicits enhanced antiwithdrawal efficacy, but is accompanied with some cannabimimetic side effects. Thus, the primary objective of the present study was to determine whether combined, full FAAH inhibition and partial MAGL represents an optimal strategy to reduce opioid withdrawal. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether combined administration of high-dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 and low-dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184, as well as the novel dual FAAH-MAGL inhibitor SA-57, which is 100-fold more potent in inhibiting FAAH than MAGL, would prevent spontaneous withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice, a model with greater face validity than precipitating withdrawal with μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Strikingly, a combination of low-dose JZL184 and high-dose PF-3845 as well as the dual inhibitor SA-57 reduced all abrupt withdrawal signs (ie, platform jumping, paw flutters, head shakes, diarrhea, and total body weight loss), but did not elicit any cannabimimetic side effects. In addition, JZL184 or PF-3845 blocked naloxone-precipitated hypersecretion in morphine-dependent small intestinal tissue. Collectively, these results are the first to show that endocannabinoid catabolic enzyme inhibitors reduce abrupt withdrawal in morpine-dependent mice and are effective in a novel in vitro model of opioid withdrawal. More generally, these findings support the idea that joint MAGL and FAAH inhibition represents a promising approach for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:23303065

  20. Characterization of an Arginine:Pyruvate Transaminase in Arginine Catabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2007-01-01

    The arginine transaminase (ATA) pathway represents one of the multiple pathways for l-arginine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The AruH protein was proposed to catalyze the first step in the ATA pathway, converting the substrates l-arginine and pyruvate into 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine. Here we report the initial biochemical characterization of this enzyme. The aruH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified to homogeneity. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed to detect the presence of the transamination products 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine, thus demonstrating the proposed biochemical reaction catalyzed by AruH. The enzymatic properties and kinetic parameters of dimeric recombinant AruH were determined by a coupled reaction with NAD+ and l-alanine dehydrogenase. The optimal activity of AruH was found at pH 9.0, and it has a novel substrate specificity with an order of preference of Arg > Lys > Met > Leu > Orn > Gln. With l-arginine and pyruvate as the substrates, Lineweaver-Burk plots of the data revealed a series of parallel lines characteristic of a ping-pong kinetic mechanism with calculated Vmax and kcat values of 54.6 ± 2.5 μmol/min/mg and 38.6 ± 1.8 s−1. The apparent Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) were 1.6 ± 0.1 mM and 24.1 mM−1 s−1 for pyruvate and 13.9 ± 0.8 mM and 2.8 mM−1 s−1 for l-arginine. When l-lysine was used as the substrate, MS analysis suggested Δ1-piperideine-2-carboxylate as its transamination product. These results implied that AruH may have a broader physiological function in amino acid catabolism. PMID:17416668

  1. Volatile sulphur compounds and pathways of L-methionine catabolism in Williopsis yeasts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Amelia W J; Lee, Pin-Rou; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2012-08-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are important to the food industry due to their high potency and presence in many foods. This study assessed for the first time VSC production and pathways of L: -methionine catabolism in yeasts from the genus Williopsis with a view to understanding VSC formation and their potential flavour impact. Five strains of Williopsis saturnus (var. saturnus, var. subsufficiens, var. suavolens, var. sargentensis and var. mrakii) were screened for VSC production in a synthetic medium supplemented with L: -methionine. A diverse range of VSCs were produced including dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanal (methional), 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol (methionol), 3-(methylthio)-1-propene, 3-(methylthio)-1-propyl acetate, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoic acid (methionic acid) and ethyl 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoate, though the production of these VSCs varied between yeast strains. W. saturnus var. saturnus NCYC22 was selected for further studies due to its relatively high VSC production. VSC production was characterised step-wise with yeast strain NCYC22 in coconut cream at different L: -methionine concentrations (0.00-0.20%) and under various inorganic sulphate (0.00-0.20%) and nitrogen (ammonia) supplementation (0.00-0.20%), respectively. Optimal VSC production was obtained with 0.1% of L: -methionine, while supplementation of sulphate had no significant effect. Nitrogen supplementation showed a dramatic inhibitory effect on VSC production. Based on the production of VSCs, the study suggests that the Ehrlich pathway of L: -methionine catabolism is operative in W. saturnus yeasts and can be manipulated by adjusting certain nutrient parameters to control VSC production. PMID:22370952

  2. A sustained rat model for studying the long-lasting catabolic state of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Breuille, D; Voisin, L; Contrepois, M; Arnal, M; Rose, F; Obled, C

    1999-03-01

    Most animal models of sepsis induced high mortality or early recovery and do not mimic the long-lasting catabolic state observed in patients. The purpose of this study is to develop a model of sepsis which reproduces these disorders, especially the long-lasting muscle wasting. This report summarizes our observations in a series of seven experiments using this model with rats to study the route of live Escherichia coli administration, dose of bacteria, reproducibility of the model, bacterial count in tissues, comparison of injection of live or dead bacteria, metabolic perturbations linked to infection, and potential role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in muscle wasting. After intravenous infection, animals were anorexic and the catabolic state was long-lasting: body weight loss for 2 to 3 days followed by a chronic wasting state for several days. Liver, spleen, lung protein content, and plasma concentration of alpha2-macroglobulin were increased 2 and 6 days after infection. At 6 days, muscle protein content was substantially (-40%) reduced. The plasma TNF-alpha level measured 1.5 h after infection correlated with body weight loss observed 9 days later. The inhibition of TNF-alpha secretion by administration of pentoxifylline 1 h before infection reduced muscle wasting and activation of proteolysis at day 2 and abolished them at day 6. This septic model mimics in rats the prolonged protein metabolism alterations and muscle atrophy characteristics of infected patients and thus is useful for studying the impact of nutritional support on outcome. PMID:10024546

  3. Imaging B. anthracis heme catabolism in mice using the IFP1.4 gene reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Robinson, Holly; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Nobles, Christopher L.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Maresso, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    B. anthracis is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium which likes all pathogenic bacteria, survive by sequestering heme from its host. To image B. anthracis heme catabolism in vivo, we stably transfect new red excitable fluorescent protein, IFP1.4, that requires the heme catabolism product biliverdin (BV). IFP1.4 reporter has favorable excitation and emission characteristics, which has an absorption peak at 685 nm and an emission peak at 708 nm. Therefore, IFP1.4 reporter can be imaged deeply into the tissue with less contamination from tissue autofluorescence. However, the excitation light "leakage" through optical filters can limit detection and sensitivity of IFP1.4 reporter due to the small Stoke's shift of IFP1.4 fluorescence. To minimize the excitation light leakage, an intensified CCD (ICCD) based infrared fluorescence imaging device was optimized using two band pass filters separated by a focus lens to increase the optical density at the excitation wavelength. In this study, a mouse model (DBA/J2) was first injected with B. anthracis bacteria expressing IFP1.4, 150 μl s.c., on the ventral side of the left thigh. Then mouse was given 250 μl of a 1mM BV solution via I.V. injection. Imaging was conducted as a function of time after infection under light euthanasia, excised tissues were imaged and IFP1.4 fluorescence correlated with standard culture measurements of colony forming units (CFU). The work demonstrates the use of IFP1.4 as a reporter of bacterial utilization of host heme and may provide an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of bacterial infection and developing new anti-bacterial therapeutics.

  4. Tolerance Induction in Liver.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M H; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tolerogenicity. The mentioned cells secret anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-β and IL-10 and express negative co-stimulatory molecules like PD-L1 to mediate immunosuppression. Other mechanisms such as microchimerism, soluble major histocompatibility complex and regulatory T cells may take part in tolerance induction. Understanding the mechanisms involved in liver transplant rejection/tolerance helps us to improve therapeutic options to induce hepatic tolerance. PMID:26082828

  5. Oxidised low density lipoprotein causes human macrophage cell death through oxidant generation and inhibition of key catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Katouah, Hanadi; Chen, Alpha; Othman, Izani; Gieseg, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is thought to be a significant contributor to the death of macrophage cells observed in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Using human-derived U937 cells we have examined the effect of cytotoxic oxLDL on oxidative stress and cellular catabolism. Within 3h of the addition of oxLDL, there was a rapid, concentration dependent rise in cellular reactive oxygen species followed by the loss of cellular GSH, and the enzyme activity of both glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and aconitase. The loss of these catabolic enzymes was accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP and lower lactate generation. Addition of the macrophage antioxidant 7,8-dihydroneopterin inhibited the ROS generation, glutathione loss and catabolic inactivation. NOX was shown to be activated by oxLDL addition while apocynin inhibited the loss of GSH and cell viability. The data suggests that oxLDL triggers an excess of ROS production through NOX activation, and catabolic failure through thiol oxidation resulting in cell death. PMID:26255116

  6. Wounding of potato tubers induces increases in ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and alters expression of ABA metabolic genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of physical wounding on ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and expression of genes encoding key ABA metabolic enzymes were determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. An increase in ABA and ABA metabolite content was observed 48 h after wounding and remained elevated through 96 h. ...

  7. CATABOLISM OF AROMATIC BIOGENIC AMINES BY 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' PA01 VIA META CLEAVAGE OF HOMOPROTOCATECHUIC ACID (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aruginosa PA01 catabolized the aromatic amines tyramine and octopamine through 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). Meta ring cleavage was mediated by 3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPADO), producing 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymeth...

  8. Recombination of a 3-chlorobenzoate catabolic plasmid from Alcaligenes eutrophus NH9 mediated by direct repeat elements.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Miyashita, K

    1995-11-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus NH9 was isolated from soil. This strain can utilize 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB) as a sole source of carbon and energy. Most of the 3-CB-negative segregants had lost one of the plasmids present in the parent strain. The genes for catabolism of 3-CB were located within a 9.2-kb SacI fragment of this plasmid (pENH91). The genes were found to hybridize with genes for components of the modified ortho cleavage pathway from Pseudomonas putida. In one of the 3-CB-negative segregants, the plasmid had undergone the deletion of a segment with a size of about 12.5 kb that covered the catabolic genes. The deletion event seemed to be the result of reciprocal recombination between two highly homologous sequences with sizes of 2.5 kb that were present as a direct repeat at the two ends of the region that included the catabolic genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of homologous fragments revealed a structure that resembled an insertion sequence and relatedness to IS21. During repeated subculturing of NH9 on liquid media with 3-CB, the culture was taken over by a derivative strain (designated NH9A) in which the degradative plasmid carried a duplicate copy of the 12.5-kb region that contained the catabolic genes. The duplication of these genes seemed again to have been mediated by recombination between the direct repeat sequences. PMID:8526487

  9. Catabolism of (2E)-4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal via ω- and ω-1-Oxidation Stimulated by Ketogenic Diet*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Li, Qingling; Henry, Fabrice; Huang, Zhong; Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Gao, Peng; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress triggers the peroxidation of ω-6-polyunsaturated fatty acids to reactive lipid fragments, including (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). We previously reported two parallel catabolic pathways of HNE. In this study, we report a novel metabolite that accumulates in rat liver perfused with HNE or 4-hydroxynonanoic acid (HNA), identified as 3-(5-oxotetrahydro-2-furanyl)propanoyl-CoA. In experiments using a combination of isotopic analysis and metabolomics studies, three catabolic pathways of HNE were delineated following HNE conversion to HNA. (i) HNA is ω-hydroxylated to 4,9-dihydroxynonanoic acid, which is subsequently oxidized to 4-hydroxynonanedioic acid. This is followed by the degradation of 4-hydroxynonanedioic acid via β-oxidation originating from C-9 of HNA breaking down to 4-hydroxynonanedioyl-CoA, 4-hydroxyheptanedioyl-CoA, or its lactone, 2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA, and 2-ketoglutaric acid entering the citric acid cycle. (ii) ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA leads to 4,8-dihydroxynonanoic acid (4,8-DHNA), which is subsequently catabolized via two parallel pathways we previously reported. In catabolic pathway A, 4,8-DHNA is catabolized to 4-phospho-8-hydroxynonanoyl-CoA, 3,8-dihydroxynonanoyl-CoA, 6-hydroxyheptanoyl-CoA, 4-hydroxypentanoyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA, and acetyl-CoA. (iii) The catabolic pathway B of 4,8-DHNA leads to 2,6-dihydroxyheptanoyl-CoA, 5-hydroxyhexanoyl-CoA, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, and acetyl-CoA. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that HNE can be catabolically disposed via ω- and ω-1-oxidation in rat liver and kidney, with little activity in brain and heart. Dietary experiments showed that ω- and ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA in rat liver were dramatically up-regulated by a ketogenic diet, which lowered HNE basal level. HET0016 inhibition and mRNA expression level suggested that the cytochrome P450 4A are main enzymes responsible for the NADPH-dependent ω- and ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA/HNE. PMID:25274632

  10. The RpiR-Like Repressor IolR Regulates Inositol Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Petra R. A.; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and d-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5′-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3′) in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-d-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA. PMID:21784930

  11. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2015-06-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  12. Tolerability and patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Roose, S P

    1999-01-01

    Currently available antidepressants interact with several types of receptors, which may explain both wanted and unwanted effects of these drugs. These effects are different and distinctive, and knowledge about them may help clinicians understand differences between compounds in terms of their tolerability profiles. Given roughly comparable efficacy, tolerability profile is the critical determinant in selecting an antidepressant medication for a particular patient. In addition, tolerability is inseparably linked to patient compliance, both in acute and long-term treatment, and ultimately to overall success of treatment. Refinement in pharmacologic profiles of all newly introduced antidepressants resulted in overall advantages in tolerability in comparison with older tricyclic compounds. However, differences in receptor interactions between antidepressants are directly reflected in tolerability (adverse event) profiles. Among new antidepressants, mirtazapine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors share favorable overall tolerability and safety, especially with respect to low premature termination rates because of adverse events, cardiac safety, and safety in overdose. However, the different pharmacologic profile of mirtazapine is reflected in its different tolerability profile. Because of interactions with the histamine (H1) receptor, mirtazapine may be related to transient initial somnolence and weight gain in some patients. Its serotonin-2 (5-HT2)-blocking properties may account for lack of sexual dysfunction, insomnia, nervousness, and agitation. Mirtazapine's 5-HT3-blocking properties are unique among all currently available antidepressants and may account for lack of gastrointestinal adverse events. PMID:10446736

  13. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  14. Contribution of polyamines metabolism and GABA shunt to chilling tolerance induced by nitric oxide in cold-stored banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-04-15

    Effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on polyamines (PAs) catabolism, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, proline accumulation and chilling injury of banana fruit under cold storage was investigated. Banana fruit treated with NO sustained lower chilling injury index than the control. Notably elevated nitric oxide synthetase activity and endogenous NO level were observed in NO-treated banana fruit. PAs contents in treated fruit were significantly higher than control fruit, due to the elevated activities of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase. NO treatment increased the activities of diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase and glutamate decarboxylase, while reduced GABA transaminase activity to lower levels compared with control fruit, which resulted the accumulation of GABA. Besides, NO treatment upregulated proline content and significantly enhanced the ornithine aminotransferase activity. These results indicated that the chilling tolerance induced by NO treatment might be ascribed to the enhanced catabolism of PAs, GABA and proline. PMID:26616957

  15. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  16. Radiation Tolerant Antifuse FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jih-Jong; Cronquist, Brian; McCollum, John; Parker, Wanida; Katz, Rich; Kleyner, Igor; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The total dose performance of the antifuse FPGA for space applications is summarized. Optimization of the radiation tolerance in the fabless model is the main theme. Mechanisms to explain the variation in different products are discussed.

  17. [INABILITY TO TOLERATE COSMETICS].

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    2016-05-01

    Inability to tolerate cosmetics can result from distinct mechanisms which appear as the so-called sensitive skin corresponding to one aspect of invisible dermatosis, or which corresponds to manifestations of a contact allergic or irritation dermatitis. PMID:27337844

  18. DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Psakhye, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Accurate chromosomal DNA replication is fundamental for optimal cellular function and genome integrity. Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance pathways, which are crucial to complete genome duplication as well as to prevent formation of deleterious double strand breaks. Cells use two general strategies to tolerate lesions: recombination to a homologous template, and trans-lesion synthesis with specialized polymerases. While key players of these processes have been outlined, much less is known on their choreography and regulation. Recent advances have uncovered principles by which DNA damage tolerance is regulated locally and temporally - in relation to replication timing and cell cycle stage -, and are beginning to elucidate the DNA dynamics that mediate lesion tolerance and influence chromosome structure during replication. PMID:27060551

  19. Psychological Stress-Induced, IDO1-Dependent Tryptophan Catabolism: Implications on Immunosuppression in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kiank, Cornelia; Zeden, Jan-Philip; Drude, Solveig; Domanska, Grazyna; Fusch, Gerhard; Otten, Winfried; Schuett, Christine

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that psychological stress influences inflammatory responses and mood. Here, we investigated whether psychological stress (combined acoustic and restraint stress) activates the tryptophan (Trp) catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1(IDO1) and thereby alters the immune homeostasis and behavior in mice. We measured IDO1 mRNA expression and plasma levels of Trp catabolites after a single 2-h stress session and in repeatedly stressed (4.5-days stress, 2-h twice a day) naïve BALB/c mice. A role of cytokines in acute stress-induced IDO1 activation was studied after IFNγ and TNFα blockade and in IDO1−/− mice. RU486 and 1-Methyl-L-tryptophan (1-MT) were used to study role of glucocorticoids and IDO1 on Trp depletion in altering the immune and behavioral response in repeatedly stressed animals. Clinical relevance was addressed by analyzing IDO1 activity in patients expecting abdominal surgery. Acute stress increased the IDO1 mRNA expression in brain, lung, spleen and Peyer's patches (max. 14.1±4.9-fold in brain 6-h after stress) and resulted in a transient depletion of Trp (−25.2±6.6%) and serotonin (−27.3±4.6%) from the plasma measured 6-h after stress while kynurenine levels increased 6-h later (11.2±9.3%). IDO1 mRNA up-regulation was blocked by anti-TNFα and anti-IFNγ treatment. Continuous IDO1 blockade by 1-MT but not RU486 treatment normalized the anti-bacterial defense and attenuated increased IL-10 inducibility in splenocytes after repeated stress as it reduced the loss of body weight and behavioral alterations. Moreover, kynurenic acid which remained increased in 1-MT treated repeatedly stressed mice was identified to reduce the TNFα inducibility of splenocytes in vitro and in vivo. Thus, psychological stress stimulates cytokine-driven IDO1 activation and Trp depletion which seems to have a central role for developing stress-induced immunosuppression and behavioral alteration. Since patients showed Trp

  20. Increased catabolism and decreased unsaturation of ganglioside in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Miklavcic, John J; Hart, Tasha DL; Lees, Gordon M; Shoemaker, Glen K; Schnabl, Kareena L; Larsen, Bodil MK; Bathe, Oliver F; Thomson, Alan BR; Mazurak, Vera C; Clandinin, M Tom

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether accelerated catabolism of ganglioside and decreased ganglioside content contribute to the etiology of pro-inflammatory intestinal disease. METHODS: Intestinal mucosa from terminal ileum or colon was obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis or inflammatory Crohn’s disease (n = 11) undergoing bowel resection and compared to control samples of normal intestine from patients with benign colon polyps (n = 6) and colorectal cancer (n = 12) in this observational case-control study. Gangliosides and phospholipids of intestinal mucosa were characterized by class and ceramide or fatty acid composition using liquid chromatography triple-quad mass spectrometry. Content and composition of ganglioside classes GM1, GM3, GD3, GD1a, GT1 and GT3 were compared among subject groups. Content and composition of phospholipid classes phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine were compared among subject groups. Unsaturation index of individual ganglioside and phospholipid classes was computed and compared among subject groups. Ganglioside catabolism enzymes beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) and sialidase-3 (NEU3) were measured in intestinal mucosa using western blot and compared among subject groups. RESULTS: Relative GM3 ganglioside content was 2-fold higher (P < 0.05) in intestine from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to control intestine. The quantity of GM3 and ratio of GM3/GD3 was also higher in IBD intestine than control tissue (P < 0.05). Control intestine exhibited 3-fold higher (P < 0.01) relative GD1a ganglioside content than IBD intestine. GD3 and GD1a species of ganglioside containing three unsaturated bonds were present in control intestine, but were not detected in IBD intestine. The relative content of PC containing more than two unsaturated bonds was 30% lower in IBD intestine than control intestine (P < 0.05). The relative content of HEXA in IBD intestine was increased 1.7-fold (P < 0.05) and NEU3 was

  1. pH-Dependent Catabolic Protein Expression during Anaerobic Growth of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Barnhart, D. Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2004-01-01

    During aerobic growth of Escherichia coli, expression of catabolic enzymes and envelope and periplasmic proteins is regulated by pH. Additional modes of pH regulation were revealed under anaerobiosis. E. coli K-12 strain W3110 was cultured anaerobically in broth medium buffered at pH 5.5 or 8.5 for protein identification on proteomic two-dimensional gels. A total of 32 proteins from anaerobic cultures show pH-dependent expression, and only four of these proteins (DsbA, TnaA, GatY, and HdeA) showed pH regulation in aerated cultures. The levels of 19 proteins were elevated at the high pH; these proteins included metabolic enzymes (DhaKLM, GapA, TnaA, HisC, and HisD), periplasmic proteins (ProX, OppA, DegQ, MalB, and MglB), and stress proteins (DsbA, Tig, and UspA). High-pH induction of the glycolytic enzymes DhaKLM and GapA suggested that there was increased fermentation to acids, which helped neutralize alkalinity. Reporter lac fusion constructs showed base induction of sdaA encoding serine deaminase under anaerobiosis; in addition, the glutamate decarboxylase genes gadA and gadB were induced at the high pH anaerobically but not with aeration. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a connection between the gad system and GabT metabolism of 4-aminobutanoate. On the other hand, 13 other proteins were induced by acid; these proteins included metabolic enzymes (GatY and AckA), periplasmic proteins (TolC, HdeA, and OmpA), and redox enzymes (GuaB, HmpA, and Lpd). The acid induction of NikA (nickel transporter) is of interest because E. coli requires nickel for anaerobic fermentation. The position of the NikA spot coincided with the position of a small unidentified spot whose induction in aerobic cultures was reported previously; thus, NikA appeared to be induced slightly by acid during aeration but showed stronger induction under anaerobic conditions. Overall, anaerobic growth revealed several more pH-regulated proteins; in particular, anaerobiosis

  2. Cyclic Tensile Strain Suppresses Catabolic Effects of Interleukin-1β in Fibrochondrocytes From the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discern the effects of continuous passive motion on inflamed temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Methods The effects of continuous passive motion on TMJ were simulated by exposing primary cultures of rabbit TMJ fibrochondrocyte monolayers to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-1β (rHuIL-1β) in vitro. The messenger RNA (mRNA) induction of rHuIL-1β response elements was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of nitric oxide was examined by Griess reaction, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was examined by radioimmunoassay. The synthesis of proteins was examined by Western blot analysis of the cell extracts, and synthesis of proteoglycans via incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate in the culture medium. Results Exposure of TMJ fibrochondrocytes to rHuIL-1β resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which were paralleled by NO and PGE2 production. Additionally, IL-1β induced significant levels of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) within 4 hours, and this was sustained over a period of 48 hours. Concomitant application of CTS abrogated the catabolic effects of IL-1β on TMJ chondrocytes by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-1 mRNA production and NO, PGE2, and MMP-1 synthesis. CTS also counteracted cartilage degradation by augmenting expression of mRNA for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 that is inhibited by rHuIL-1β. In parallel, CTS also counteracted rHuIL-1β–induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nevertheless, the presence of an inflammatory signal was a prerequisite for the observed CTS actions, because fibrochondrocytes, when exposed to CTS alone, did not exhibit any of the effects described above. Conclusion CTS acts as an effective antagonist of rHuIL-1β by potentially diminishing its catabolic actions on TMJ fibrochondrocytes. Furthermore, CTS actions appear

  3. Mechanisms dependent on tryptophan catabolism regulate immune responses in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pertovaara, M; Raitala, A; Uusitalo, H; Pukander, J; Helin, H; Oja, SS; Hurme, M

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of tryptophan metabolism in immune regulation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) the serum concentrations of tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were measured by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 103 patients with pSS, 56 patients with sicca symptoms and 309 healthy blood donors. The kynurenine per tryptophan ratio (kyn/trp), which reflects the activity of the indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism, was calculated. Both female and male patients with pSS had significantly higher serum kynurenine concentrations and kyn/trp than subjects with sicca symptoms or healthy blood donors. The median (quartile range) concentration of kynurenine in female patients with pSS was 2·41 µmol/l (1·86–3·26) compared with 1·85 µmol/l (1·58–2·38, P < 0·0001) in subjects with sicca symptoms and 1·96 µmol/l (1·65–2·27, P < 0·0001) in healthy blood donors. Their kyn/trp × 1000 was 34·0 (25·1–44·3) compared with 25·3 (21·1–31·5, P < 0·0001) in subjects with sicca symptoms and 24·3 (21·0–28·9, P < 0·0001) in healthy blood donors. Female pSS patients with high IDO activity (kyn/trp × 1000 ≥ 34·0) had significantly higher ESR, serum C-reactive protein, serum IgA and serum beta-2 microglobulin concentrations as well as higher serum creatinine levels, and they had positive antinuclear antibodies more frequently and presented with more American-European consensus group criteria than those with low IDO activity (kyn/trp × 1000 < 34·0). These data suggest that mechanisms dependent on tryptophan catabolism regulate immune responses in pSS. Tryptophan degradation is enhanced in patients with pSS, and high IDO activity is associated with severity of pSS. PMID:16178870

  4. Reassessment of Phenylalanine Tolerance in Adults with Phenylketonuria is Needed as Body Mass Changes

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Erin L.; Gleason, Sally T.; van Calcar, Sandra C.; Ney, Denise M.

    2009-01-01

    Lifelong treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) includes a phenylalanine (phe) restricted diet that provides sufficient phe for growth and maintenance plus phe-free amino acid formula to meet requirements for protein, energy and micronutrients. Phe tolerance (mg phe/kg body weight/day) is the amount of phe those with PKU can consume and maintain acceptable blood phe levels; it requires individual assessment because of varying phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. The objective was to reassess phe tolerance in 8 adults with PKU considering phe requirements, blood phe levels, genotype and phe tolerance at 5 years of age. Subjects had not received a personalized assessment of phe tolerance in several years, and 5 subjects were overweight, body mass index (BMI) 25–28. With the guidance of a metabolic dietitian, 7 subjects increased phe tolerance (by 15–173%) without significantly increasing blood phe concentration. Increased phe tolerance was associated with both improved dietary compliance and inadequate phe intake at the onset of the protocol compared with current requirements. Improved dietary compliance reflected increased consumption of protein equivalents from amino acid formula and increased frequency of formula intake, from 2.2 to 3 times per day. Predictors of higher final phe tolerance following reassessment included being male and having a lower BMI (R2=0.588). This suggests that the rising trend of overweight and obesity may affect assessment of phe tolerance in adults. Therefore, interaction with the metabolic dietitian to reassess phe tolerance in relation to body mass is essential throughout adulthood to insure adequate intake of phe to support protein synthesis and prevent catabolism. PMID:19747868

  5. Reassessment of phenylalanine tolerance in adults with phenylketonuria is needed as body mass changes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Erin L; Gleason, Sally T; van Calcar, Sandra C; Ney, Denise M

    2009-12-01

    Lifelong treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) includes a phenylalanine (phe) restricted diet that provides sufficient phe for growth and maintenance plus phe-free amino acid formula to meet requirements for protein, energy and micronutrients. Phe tolerance (mg phe/kg body weight/day) is the amount of phe those with PKU can consume and maintain acceptable blood phe levels; it requires individual assessment because of varying phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. The objective was to reassess phe tolerance in eight adults with PKU considering phe requirements, blood phe levels, genotype and phe tolerance at 5 years of age. Subjects had not received a personalized assessment of phe tolerance in several years, and five subjects were overweight, body mass index (BMI) 25-28. With the guidance of a metabolic dietitian, seven subjects increased phe tolerance (by 15-173%) without significantly increasing blood phe concentration. Increased phe tolerance was associated with both improved dietary compliance and inadequate phe intake at the onset of the protocol compared with current requirements. Improved dietary compliance reflected increased consumption of protein equivalents from amino acid formula and increased frequency of formula intake, from 2.2 to 3 times per day. Predictors of higher final phe tolerance following reassessment included being male and having a lower BMI (R(2)=0.588). This suggests that the rising trend of overweight and obesity may affect assessment of phe tolerance in adults. Therefore, interaction with the metabolic dietitian to reassess phe tolerance in relation to body mass is essential throughout adulthood to insure adequate intake of phe to support protein synthesis and prevent catabolism. PMID:19747868

  6. Catabolism of (+/-)-abscisic acid by excised leaves of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Dyan and its modification by chemical and environmental factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, A.K.; Railton, I.D.

    1987-05-01

    Excised light-grown leaves and etiolated leaves of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Dyan catabolized applied (+/-)-(2-/sup 14/C)abscisic acid ((+/-)-(2-/sup 14/C)ABA) to phaseic acid (PA), dihydrophaseic acid (DPA), and 2'-hydroxymethyl ABA (2'-HMABA). Identification of these catabolites was made by microchemical methods and by combined capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following high dose feeds of nonlabeled substrate to leaves. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that 2'-HMABA was derived from the (-) enantiomer of ABA. Refeeding studies were used to confirm the catabolic route. The methyl ester of (+/-)-(2/sup 14/C)-ABA was hydrolyzed efficiently by light-grown leaves of H. vulgare. Leaf age played a significant role in (+/-)-ABA catabolism, with younger leaves being less able than their older counterparts to catabolize this compound. The catabolism of (+/-)-ABA was inhibited markedly in water-stressed Hordeum leaves which was characterized by a decreased incorporation of label into 2'-HMABA, DPA, and conjugates. The specific, mixed function oxidase inhibitor, ancymidol, did not inhibit, dramatically (+/-)-ABA catabolism in light-grown leaves of Hordeum whereas the 80s ribosome, translational inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited this process markedly. The 70s ribosome translational inhibitors, lincomycin and chloramphenicol, were less effective than cycloheximide in inhibiting (+/-)-ABA catabolism, implying that cytoplasmic protein synthesis is necessary for the catabolism of (+/-)-ABA in Hordeum leaves whereas chloroplast protein synthesis plays only a minor role. This further suggests that the enzymes involved in (+/-)-ABA catabolism in this plant are cytoplasmically synthesized and are turned-over rapidly, although the enzyme responsible for glycosylating (+/-)-ABA itself appeared to be stable.

  7. Serum and urinary lipoproteins in the human nephrotic syndrome: evidence for renal catabolism of lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.G.; Forte, T.; Licht, H.; Lewis, S.B.

    1982-03-01

    The urinary excretion of lipoproteins and the possibility of catabolic alterations on glomerular filtration were investigated in four nephrotic subjects difering in etiology, serum lipoprotein profile, and 24 hr urinary output of protein and lipids. The apolipoproteins and lipoproteins of urine were compared with those of serum with respect to distribution profile, physical properties, and composition. As expected from molecular sieving effects during glomerular filtration, the urinary HDL were more abundant than the lower density lipoproteins even when the plasma LDL was elevated markedly. Intact apolipoproteins were not found in the concentrated urinary fraction isolated by ultrafiltration between the limits of 10/sup 4/ and 5 x 10/sup 4/ daltons. On the basis of immunoreactivity, gel electrophoresis, and amino acid composition, apolipoproteins B and AI are the major and minor proteins, respectively, of urinary LDL, and apo B is the major protein of the urinary IDL and VLDL. Apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CIII, and possibly AIV were isolated from the urinary HDL. As much as 20% of the protein moiety of the urinary HDL appeared to be large apolipoprotien fragments with molecular weights and isoelectric points similar to those of apo CII and apo CIII. The lower density classes of urinary lipoproteins also appeared to have lost apo E and apo C's and to have undergone partial proteolysis.

  8. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  9. FGF21 Lowers Plasma Triglycerides by Accelerating Lipoprotein Catabolism in White and Brown Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Schlein, Christian; Talukdar, Saswata; Heine, Markus; Fischer, Alexander W; Krott, Lucia M; Nilsson, Stefan K; Brenner, Martin B; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    FGF21 decreases plasma triglycerides (TGs) in rodents and humans; however, the underlying mechanism or mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of FGF21 in production and disposal of TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) in mice. Treatment with pharmacological doses of FGF21 acutely reduced plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), liver TG content, and VLDL-TG secretion. In addition, metabolic turnover studies revealed that FGF21 facilitated the catabolism of TRL in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). FGF21-dependent TRL processing was strongly attenuated in CD36-deficient mice and transgenic mice lacking lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissues. Insulin resistance in diet-induced obese and ob/ob mice shifted FGF21 responses from WAT toward energy-combusting BAT. In conclusion, FGF21 lowers plasma TGs through a dual mechanism: first, by reducing NEFA plasma levels and consequently hepatic VLDL lipidation and, second, by increasing CD36 and LPL-dependent TRL disposal in WAT and BAT. PMID:26853749

  10. Planktonic versus Biofilm Catabolic Communities: Importance of the Biofilm for Species Selection and Pesticide Degradation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Pieter; De Gelder, Leen; Hoefman, Sven; De Vos, Paul; Boon, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Chloropropham-degrading cultures were obtained from sludge and soil samples by using two different enrichment techniques: (i) planktonic enrichments in shaken liquid medium and (ii) biofilm enrichments on two types of solid matrixes (plastic chips and gravel). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting showed that planktonic and biofilm cultures had a different community composition depending on the presence and type of added solid matrix during enrichment. This was reflected in the unique chloropropham-degrading species that could be isolated from the different cultures. Planktonic and biofilm cultures also differed in chloropropham-degrading activity. With biofilm cultures, slower chloropropham removal was observed, but with less build-up of the toxic intermediate 3-chloroaniline. Disruption of the biofilm architecture resulted in degradation characteristics shifting toward those of the free suspensions, indicating the importance of a well-established biofilm structure for good performance. These results show that biofilm-mediated enrichment techniques can be used to select for pollutant-degrading microorganisms that like to proliferate in a biofilm and that cannot be isolated using conventional shaken-liquid procedures. Furthermore, the influence of the biofilm architecture on the pesticide degradation characteristics suggests that for bioaugmentation the use of biofilm catabolic communities might be a proficient alternative to using planktonic freely suspended cultures. PMID:21602394

  11. Haloacetate analogs of pheromones: effects on catabolism and electrophysiology in Plutella xylostella

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, G.D.; Streinz, L.

    1988-03-01

    A series of mono, di-, and trihalogenated acetate analogs of Z11-16:Ac were prepared and examined for electrophysiological activity in antennae of males of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. In addition, two potential affinity labels, a diazoacetate (Dza) and a trifluoromethyl ketone (Tfp), were evaluated for EAG activity. The Z11-16:Ac showed the highest activity in EAG assays, followed by the fluorinated acetates, but other haloacetates were essentially inactive. The effects of these analogs on the hydrolysis of (/sup 3/H)Z11-16:Ac to (/sup 3/H)Z11-16:OH by antennal esterases was also examined. The three fluorinated acetates showed the greatest activity as inhibitors in competition assays, with rank order F/sub 2/Ac > F/sub 3/Ac > FAc > AC > Cl/sub 2/Ac > ClAc > Dza > Br/sub 2/Ac > BrAc > Tfp > I > Cl/sub 3/Ac > Br/sub 3/Ac > OH. The relative polarities of the haloacetates, as determined by TLC mobility, are in the order mono- > di- > trihalo, but F, Cl, Br, and I all confer similar polarities within a substitution group. Thus, the steric size appears to be the predominant parameter affecting the interactions of the haloacetate analogs with both receptor and catabolic proteins in P. xylostella males.

  12. Catabolic pathway of gamma-caprolactone in the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Cirou, Amélie; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-caprolactone (GCL) is well-known as a food flavor and has been recently described as a biostimulant molecule promoting the growth of bacteria with biocontrol activity against soft-rot pathogens. Among these biocontrol agents, Rhodococcus erythropolis, characterized by a remarkable metabolic versatility, assimilates various γ-butyrolactone molecules with a branched-aliphatic chain, such as GCL. The assimilative pathway of GCL in R. erythropolis was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. This analysis suggests the involvement of the lactonase QsdA in ring-opening, a feature confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. According to proteome analysis, the open-chain form of GCL was degraded by β- and ω-oxidation coupled to the Krebs cycle and β-ketoadipate pathway. Ubiquity of qsdA gene among environmental R. erythropolis isolates was verified by PCR. In addition to a previous N-acyl homoserine lactone catabolic function, QsdA may therefore be involved in an intermediate degradative step of cyclic recalcitrant molecules or in synthesis of flavoring lactones. PMID:22085026

  13. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  14. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  15. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Background The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. Conclusions These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment. PMID:21633497

  16. Characterization of a plasmid-specified pathway for catabolism of isopropylbenzene in Pseudomonas putida RE204

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.W.; Timmis, K.N.

    1986-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain designated RE204, able to utilize isopropylbenzene as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated. Tn5 transposon mutagenesis by means of the suicide transposon donor plasmid pLG221 yielded mutant derivatives defective in isopropylbenzene metabolism. These were characterized by the identification of the products which they accumulated when grown in the presence of isopropylbenzene and by the assay of enzyme activities in cell extracts. Based on the results obtained, the following metabolic pathway is proposed: isopropylbenzene ..-->.. 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyisopropylbenzene ..-->.. 3-isopropylcatechol ..-->.. 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-7-methylocta-2,4-dienoate ..-->.. isobutyrate + 2-oxopent-4-enoate ..-->.. amphibolic intermediates. Plasmid DNA was isolated from strain RE204 and mutant derivatives and characterized by restriction enzyme cleavage analysis. Isopropylbenzene-negative isolates carried a Tn5 insert within a 15-kilobase region of a 105-kilobase plasmid designated pRE4. DNA fragments of pRE4 carrying genes encoding isopropylbenzene catabolic enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli with various plasmid vectors. These clones were subsequently used to generate a transposon insertion and restriction enzyme cleavage map of the isopropylbenzene metabolic region of pRE4.

  17. Metapopulation dominance and genomic-island acquisition of Bradyrhizobium with superior catabolic capabilities.

    PubMed

    Hollowell, Amanda C; Regus, John U; Turissini, David; Gano-Cohen, Kelsey A; Bantay, Roxanne; Bernardo, Andrew; Moore, Devora; Pham, Jonathan; Sachs, Joel L

    2016-04-27

    Root nodule-forming rhizobia exhibit a bipartite lifestyle, replicating in soil and also within plant cells where they fix nitrogen for legume hosts. Host control models posit that legume hosts act as a predominant selective force on rhizobia, but few studies have examined rhizobial fitness in natural populations. Here, we genotyped and phenotyped Bradyrhizobium isolates across more than 800 km of the native Acmispon strigosus host range. We sequenced chromosomal genes expressed under free-living conditions and accessory symbiosis loci expressed in planta and encoded on an integrated 'symbiosis island' (SI). We uncovered a massive clonal expansion restricted to the Bradyrhizobium chromosome, with a single chromosomal haplotype dominating populations, ranging more than 700 km, and acquiring 42 divergent SI haplotypes, none of which were spatially widespread. For focal genotypes, we quantified utilization of 190 sole-carbon sources relevant to soil fitness. Chromosomal haplotypes that were both widespread and dominant exhibited superior growth on diverse carbon sources, whereas these patterns were not mirrored among SI haplotypes. Abundance, spatial range and catabolic superiority of chromosomal, but not symbiosis genotypes suggests that fitness in the soil environment, rather than symbiosis with hosts, might be the key driver of Bradyrhizobium dominance. PMID:27122562

  18. Chitosan Enriched Three-Dimensional Matrix Reduces Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators Production by Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oprenyeszk, Frederic; Sanchez, Christelle; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Maquet, Véronique; Henrist, Catherine; Compère, Philippe; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the metabolism of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes encapsulated in a spherical matrix enriched of chitosan. Human OA chondrocytes were encapsulated and cultured for 28 days either in chitosan-alginate beads or in alginate beads. The beads were formed by slowly passing dropwise either the chitosan 0.6%–alginate 1.2% or the alginate 1.2% solution through a syringe into a 102 mM CaCl2 solution. Beads were analyzed histologically after 28 days. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, prostaglandin (PG) E2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronan and aggrecan were quantified directly in the culture supernatant by specific ELISA and nitric oxide (NO) by using a colorimetric method based on the Griess reaction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that chitosan was homogeneously distributed through the matrix and was in direct contact with chondrocytes. The production of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by chondrocytes significantly decreased in chitosan-alginate beads compared to alginate beads. PGE2 and NO decreased also significantly but only during the first three days of culture. Hyaluronan and aggrecan production tended to increase in chitosan-alginate beads after 28 days of culture. Chitosan-alginate beads reduced the production of inflammatory and catabolic mediators by OA chondrocytes and tended to stimulate the synthesis of cartilage matrix components. These particular effects indicate that chitosan-alginate beads are an interesting scaffold for chondrocytes encapsulation before transplantation to repair cartilage defects. PMID:26020773

  19. Catabolism of Naphthalenesulfonic Acids by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22

    PubMed Central

    Brilon, C.; Beckmann, W.; Knackmuss, H.-J.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene and two naphthalenesulfonic acids were degraded by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22 by the same enzymes. Gentisate is a major metabolite. Catabolic activities for naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, and 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid are induced by growth with naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, methylnaphthalene, or salicylate. Gentisate is also an inducer in strain A3. Inhibition kinetics show that naphthalene and substituted naphthalenes are hydroxylated by the same naphthalene dioxygenase. Substrates with nondissociable substituents such as CH3, OCH3, Cl, or NO2 are hydroxylated in the 7,8-position, and 4-substituted salicylates are accumulated. If CO2H, CH2CO2H, or SO3H are substituents, hydroxylation occurs with high regioselectivity in the 1,2-position. Thus, 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acids are formed quantitatively from the corresponding naphthalenecarboxylic acids. Utilization of naphthalenesulfonic acids proceeds by the same regioselective 1,2-dioxygenation which labilizes the C—SO3− bond and eliminates sulfite. PMID:16345814

  20. Elucidation of the 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Catabolic Pathway in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB▿

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Mariëlle J. H.; Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Boeren, Sjef A.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The catabolism of 4-hydroxyacetophenone in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB is known to proceed through the intermediate formation of hydroquinone. Here, we provide evidence that hydroquinone is further degraded through 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and maleylacetate to β-ketoadipate. The P. fluorescens ACB genes involved in 4-hydroxyacetophenone utilization were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of a 15-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 14 open reading frames containing a gene cluster (hapCDEFGHIBA) of which at least four encoded enzymes are involved in 4-hydroxyacetophenone degradation: 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (hapA), 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydrolase (hapB), 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (hapE), and maleylacetate reductase (hapF). In between hapF and hapB, three genes encoding a putative intradiol dioxygenase (hapG), a protein of the Yci1 family (hapH), and a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (hapI) were found. Downstream of the hap genes, five open reading frames are situated encoding three putative regulatory proteins (orf10, orf12, and orf13) and two proteins possibly involved in a membrane efflux pump (orf11 and orf14). Upstream of hapE, two genes (hapC and hapD) were present that showed weak similarity with several iron(II)-dependent extradiol dioxygenases. Based on these findings and additional biochemical evidence, it is proposed that the hapC and hapD gene products are involved in the ring cleavage of hydroquinone. PMID:18502868

  1. Plant d-2-Hydroxyglutarate Dehydrogenase Participates in the Catabolism of Lysine Especially during Senescence*

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Kuhn, Anke; Wienstroer, Judith; Weber, Katrin; Jansen, Erwin E. W.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2011-01-01

    d-2-Hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (d-2HGDH) catalyzes the specific and efficient oxidation of d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG) to 2-oxoglutarate using FAD as a cofactor. In this work, we demonstrate that d-2HGDH localizes to plant mitochondria and that its expression increases gradually during developmental and dark-induced senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating an enhanced demand of respiration of alternative substrates through this enzymatic system under these conditions. Using loss-of-function mutants in d-2HGDH (d2hgdh1) and stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS, we found that the d-isomer of 2HG accumulated in leaves of d2hgdh1 during both forms of carbon starvation. In addition to this, d2hgdh1 presented enhanced levels of most TCA cycle intermediates and free amino acids. In contrast to the deleterious effects caused by a deficiency in d-2HGDH in humans, d2hgdh1 and overexpressing lines of d-2HGDH showed normal developmental and senescence phenotypes, indicating a mild role of d-2HGDH in the tested conditions. Moreover, metabolic fingerprinting of leaves of plants grown in media supplemented with putative precursors indicated that d-2HG most probably originates during the catabolism of lysine. Finally, the l-isomer of 2HG was also detected in leaf extracts, indicating that both chiral forms of 2HG participate in plant metabolism. PMID:21296880

  2. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid Receptor β Enhances Myogenesis and Reduces Catabolic Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Terry D; Peck, Bailey; Shek, Evan; Stroup, Steven; Hinson, Jennifer; Arthur, Susan; Marino, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα), GR β (GRβ) has a truncated ligand-binding domain that prevents glucocorticoid binding, implicating GRα as the mediator of glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle loss. Because GRβ causes glucocorticoid resistance, targeting GRβ may be beneficial in impairing muscle loss as a result of GRα activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how the overexpression of GRβ affects myotube formation and dexamethasone (Dex) responsiveness. We measured GR isoform expression in C₂C12 muscle cells in response to Dex and insulin, and through four days of myotube formation. Next, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of GRβ in C₂C12 was performed, and these cells were characterized for cell fusion and myotube formation, as well as sensitivity to Dex via the expression of ubiquitin ligases. GRβ overexpression increased mRNA levels of muscle regulatory factors and enhanced proliferation in myoblasts. GRβ overexpressing myotubes had an increased fusion index. Myotubes overexpressing GRβ had lower forkhead box O3 (Foxo3a) mRNA levels and a blunted muscle atrophy F-box/Atrogen-1 (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) response to Dex. We showed that GRβ may serve as a pharmacological target for skeletal muscle growth and protection from glucocorticoid-induced catabolic signaling. Increasing GRβ levels in skeletal muscle may cause a state of glucocorticoid resistance, stabilizing muscle mass during exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids. PMID:26875982

  3. Catabolism of homologous murine monoclonal hybridoma IgG antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, P J; Buchmeier, M J

    1987-01-01

    Two neutralizing monoclonal hybridoma antibodies to the surface spike glycoprotein E2 of the JHM strain of murine hepatitis virus were injected into homologous BALB/c mice, and their biological half-lives were determined by sequential titration of plasma samples in a virus-specific enzyme immunoassay. Intravascular half-lives of monomeric immunoglobulins were estimated at 8.0 +/- 1.5 days for antibody 5B19.3, an IgG1, and 12.7 +/- 2.4 days for antibody 4B11.6, an IgG2a. These catabolic rates are statistically different from each other (P less than 0.001) and significantly higher than previously reported values, which were all obtained with radiolabelled polyclonal or myeloma immunoglobulins of unknown specificities. Failure to remove aggregated 4B11.6 antibodies by high-speed centrifugation yielded a statistically significant acceleration of biological turnover (half-life 9.9 +/- 1.6 days; P less than 0.01). PMID:3034767

  4. Catabolism of tritiated thymidine by aquatic microbial communities and incorporation of tritium into RNA and protein

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, A.M.; Karl, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The incorporation of tritiated thymidine by five microbial ecosystems and the distribution of tritium into DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. Nonspecific labeling was greatest in sediment samples, for which {>=}95% of the tritium was recovered with the RNA and protein fractions. The percentage of tritium recovered in the DNA fraction ranged from 15 to 38% of the total labeled macromolecules recovered. Nonspecific labeling was independent of both incubation time and thymidine concentration over very wide ranges. We also evaluated the specificity of (2-{sup 3}H) adenine incorporation into adenylate residues in both RNA and DNA in parallel with the ({sup 3}H) thymidine experiments and compared the degree of nonspecific labeling by ({sup 3}H) adenine with that derived from ({sup 3}H)thymidine. Rapid catabolism of tritiated thymidine was evaluated by determining the disappearance of tritiated thymidine from the incubation medium and the appearance of degradation products. Degradation product formation, including that of both volatile and nonvolatile compounds, was much greater than the rate of incorporation of tritium into stable macromolecules. The standard degradation pathway for thymidine coupled with utilization of Krebs cycle intermediates for the biosynthesis of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines readily accounts for the observed nonspecific labeling in environmental samples.

  5. Effect of salt stress on glycine betaine biosynthesis and catabolism by Medicago sativa bacteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Fougere, F.; Poggi, M.-C.; Le Rudulier, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous works have shown that glycine betaine (GB) and choline (Cho) are actively taken up by Medicago sativa bacteroids isolated from 4-week-old nodules. Here, we have investigated the effects of NaCl on the fte of Cho and GB. Bacteroids were incubated in low- or high-salt-medium (0.4 M NaCl) and supplemented with {sup 14}C 1,2-Cho or {sup 14}C 1,2-GB. After 3 hours, radioactivity was measured in CO{sub 2} released, in ethanol-soluble and insoluble fractions. In absence of salt, a low proportion of the labelling was found in soluble fraction: 47 and 19% after Cho or GB supply, respectively. On the contrary, in high-salt-medium, the soluble fraction still contained 85% of the radioactivity with GB corresponding to 92-98%. Both enzymes involved in GB biosynthesis from Cho were studied. Choline oxidase activity was enhanced by 59%, while betainal dehydrogenase activity remained unchanged after bacteroid incubation in high-salt-medium. Thus, GB accumulation in salt-stressed bacteroids would be likely a consequence of a decrease of its catabolism rather than an increase of its biosynthesis.

  6. MYC-induced reprogramming of glutamine catabolism supports optimal virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Minh; Thaker, Shivani K.; Feng, Jun; Du, Yushen; Hu, Hailiang; Ting Wu, Ting; Graeber, Thomas G.; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rewire host cell glucose and glutamine metabolism to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral propagation. However, the mechanism by which viruses reprogram glutamine metabolism and the metabolic fate of glutamine during adenovirus infection have remained elusive. Here, we show MYC activation is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glutamine utilization and increased expression of glutamine transporters and glutamine catabolism enzymes. Adenovirus-induced MYC activation promotes increased glutamine uptake, increased use of glutamine in reductive carboxylation and increased use of glutamine in generating hexosamine pathway intermediates and specific amino acids. We identify glutaminase (GLS) as a critical enzyme for optimal adenovirus replication and demonstrate that GLS inhibition decreases replication of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and influenza A in cultured primary cells. Our findings show that adenovirus-induced reprogramming of glutamine metabolism through MYC activation promotes optimal progeny virion generation, and suggest that GLS inhibitors may be useful therapeutically to reduce replication of diverse viruses. PMID:26561297

  7. Perceptual Tolerance Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasilewski, Piotr; Peters, James F.; Ramanna, Sheela

    This paper elaborates on the introduction of perceptual tolerance intersection of sets as an example of a near set operation. Such operations are motivated by the need to consider similarities between digital images viewed as disjoint sets of points. The proposed approach is in keeping with work by E.C. Zeeman on tolerance spaces and visual perception and work by J.H. Poincaré on sets of similar sensations used to define representative spaces (aka tolerance spaces) such as visual, tactile and motile spaces. Perceptual tolerance intersection of sets is a direct consequence of recent work on near sets. The theory of perceptual set intersection has many practical applications such as a solution to the problem of how one goes about measuring the closeness of digital images. The main contribution of this article is a description-based approach to formulating perceptual set intersections between disjoint sets that resemble each other. A practical application of the proposed approach is the discovery of resemblances between sets of points in digital image regions that represent tolerance rough sets.

  8. Expression of the retinoic acid catabolic enzyme CYP26B1 in the human brain to maintain signaling homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Fragoso, Yara D; Saeed, Reem Bu; Ashton, Anna; Goodman, Timothy; Simons, Claire; Gomaa, Mohamed S; Sementilli, Angelo; Sementilli, Leonardo; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent regulator of gene transcription via its activation of a set of nuclear receptors controlling transcriptional activation. Precise maintenance of where and when RA is generated is essential and achieved by local expression of synthetic and catabolic enzymes. The catabolic enzymes Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 have been studied in detail in the embryo, where they limit gradients of RA that form patterns of gene expression, crucial for morphogenesis. This paracrine role of RA has been assumed to occur in most tissues and that the RA synthetic enzymes release RA at a site distant from the catabolic enzymes. In contrast to the embryonic CNS, relatively little is known about RA metabolism in the adult brain. This study investigated the distribution of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 transcripts in the rat brain, identifying several novel regions of expression, including the cerebral cortex for both enzymes and striatum for Cyp26b1. In vivo use of a new and potent inhibitor of the Cyp26 enzymes, ser 2-7, demonstrated a function for endogenous Cyp26 in the brain and that hippocampal RA levels can be raised by ser 2-7, altering the effect of RA on differential patterning of cell proliferation in the hippocampal region of neurogenesis, the subgranular zone. The expression of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 was also investigated in the adult human brain and colocalization of CYP26A1 and the RA synthetic enzyme RALDH2 indicated a different, autocrine role for RA in human hippocampal neurons. Studies with the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line implied that the co-expression of RA synthetic and catabolic enzymes maintains retinoid homeostasis within neurons. This presents a novel view of RA in human neurons as part of an autocrine, intracellular signaling system. PMID:26374207

  9. Molecular Iodine-Mediated Chemoselective Synthesis of Multisubstituted Pyridines through Catabolism and Reconstruction Behavior of Natural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jia-Chen; Wang, Miao; Cheng, Yan; Wu, An-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A new process has been developed for the selective construction of 2,6-disubstituted, 2,4,6-trisubstituted, and 3,5-disubstituted pyridines based on the catabolism and reconstruction behaviors of amino acids. Molecular iodine was used as a tandem catalyst to trigger the decarboxylation-deamination of amino acids and to promote the subsequent formation of the pyridine products. PMID:26653580

  10. Aerobic Exercise Training Prevents Heart Failure-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Anti-Catabolic, but Not Anabolic Actions

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Rodrigo W. A.; Piedade, Warlen P.; Soares, Luana C.; Souza, Paula A. T.; Aguiar, Andreo F.; Vechetti-Júnior, Ivan J.; Campos, Dijon H. S.; Fernandes, Ana A. H.; Okoshi, Katashi; Carvalho, Robson F.; Cicogna, Antonio C.; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is associated with cachexia and consequent exercise intolerance. Given the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise training (ET) in HF, the aim of this study was to determine if the ET performed during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF would alter the expression of anabolic and catabolic factors, thus preventing skeletal muscle wasting. Methods and Results We employed ascending aortic stenosis (AS) inducing HF in Wistar male rats. Controls were sham-operated animals. At 18 weeks after surgery, rats with cardiac dysfunction were randomized to 10 weeks of aerobic ET (AS-ET) or to an untrained group (AS-UN). At 28 weeks, the AS-UN group presented HF signs in conjunction with high TNF-α serum levels; soleus and plantaris muscle atrophy; and an increase in the expression of TNF-α, NFκB (p65), MAFbx, MuRF1, FoxO1, and myostatin catabolic factors. However, in the AS-ET group, the deterioration of cardiac function was prevented, as well as muscle wasting, and the atrophy promoters were decreased. Interestingly, changes in anabolic factor expression (IGF-I, AKT, and mTOR) were not observed. Nevertheless, in the plantaris muscle, ET maintained high PGC1α levels. Conclusions Thus, the ET capability to attenuate cardiac function during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF was accompanied by a prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy that did not occur via an increase in anabolic factors, but through anti-catabolic activity, presumably caused by PGC1α action. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of aerobic ET to block HF-induced muscle atrophy by counteracting the increased catabolic state. PMID:25330387

  11. Differential Regulation of Root Arginine Catabolism and Polyamine Metabolism in Clubroot-Susceptible and Partially Resistant Arabidopsis Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jubault, Mélanie; Hamon, Céline; Gravot, Antoine; Lariagon, Christine; Delourme, Régine; Bouchereau, Alain; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J.

    2008-01-01

    The hypertrophy and hyperplasia of infected roots into clubs are the intrinsic characteristics of clubroot, one of the economically most important diseases in Brassica crops worldwide. Polyamines, arginine (Arg)-derived metabolites, have long been recognized as cell proliferation and differentiation regulators in plants and consequently are suitable candidates for potential gall development factors. Furthermore, Arg catabolism, through arginase, which is strongly connected to polyamine metabolism, would play an important role in response to wound trauma and pathogen infection. In this study, we exploited the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-Plasmodiophora brassicae pathosystem to investigate the involvement of polyamine metabolism and Arg catabolism in host responses to the pathogen infection and in partial clubroot resistance mechanisms. We demonstrated at the transcriptional, enzymatic, and metabolic levels that polyamine metabolism and Arg catabolism are induced during the later stages of disease in compatible Arabidopsis-P. brassicae interactions. However, susceptible and partially resistant plants showed strikingly different Arg metabolism signatures. Susceptible plants were characterized by a transient agmatine production, a massive induction of arginase, and a strong accumulation of proline. The potential functions of this marked activation of the arginase pathway in the P. brassicae pathogenicity strategy are discussed. Partially resistant plants showed a continuous agmatine production and a weaker arginase pathway activity than the susceptible genotype. Results suggest that the symptom severity was strongly associated to the differential regulation of root polyamine metabolism and Arg catabolism. Further work using arginase transgenic plants will provide insight into the physiological function of the arginase pathway in partial clubroot resistance. PMID:18305204

  12. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    PubMed

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research. PMID:26474926

  13. Silencing of the polyamine catabolic key enzyme SSAT prevents CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çoker, A; Arısan, E D; Palavan-Ünsal, N

    2012-04-01

    Roscovitine and purvalanol are purine derivative cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. However, their impact on the apoptotic cell death mechanism requires further elucidation. Natural polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine play essential roles in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. Increased levels of polyamines in cells are considered to be involved in cancer progression. Intracellular polyamine levels are under the control of several catabolic enzymes, such as spermidine/spermine-N-acetyl transferase (SSAT), acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) and spermine oxidase (SMO), which could be altered by several therapeutic drugs. However, the possible role of polyamines in drug-induced apoptosis has yet to be clarified. In the present study, our aim was to determine the modulation of the polyamine catabolic pathway related to CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. We found that roscovitine and purvalanol (each 20 µM) induced apoptosis by activating caspase-9 and -3, and inhibiting the mitochondrial membrane potential in Caco-2 cells. CDK inhibitors decreased the intracellular putrescine and spermine levels without affecting spermidine levels. Although both roscovitine and purvalanol induced SSAT expression, they did not exert a significant effect on the APAO expression profile. SSAT transient silencing prevented roscovitine-induced apoptosis compared to parental cells. Thus, we concluded that roscovitine and purvalanol significantly induce apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by modulating the polyamine catabolism, and that SSAT could be an important target in evaluating the potential role of polyamines in apoptotic cell death. PMID:22294330

  14. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  15. Exercise training increases anabolic and attenuates catabolic and apoptotic processes in aged skeletal muscle of male rats.

    PubMed

    Ziaaldini, Mohammad Mosaferi; Koltai, Erika; Csende, Zsolt; Goto, Sataro; Boldogh, Istvan; Taylor, Albert W; Radak, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    Aging results in significant loss of mass and function of the skeletal muscle, which negatively impacts the quality of life. In this study we investigated whether aerobic exercise training has the potential to alter anabolic and catabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle. Five and twenty eight month old rats were used in the study. Aging resulted in decreased levels of follistatin/mTOR/Akt/Erk activation and increased myostatin/Murf1/2, proteasome subunits, and protein ubiquitination levels. In addition, TNF-α, reactive oxygen species (ROS), p53, and Bax levels were increased while Bcl-2 levels were decreased in the skeletal muscle of aged rats. Six weeks of exercise training at 60% of VO2max reversed the age-associated activation of catabolic and apoptotic pathways and increased anabolic signaling. The results suggest that the age-associated loss of muscle mass and cachexia could be due to the orchestrated down-regulation of anabolic and up-regulation of catabolic and pro-apoptotic processes. These metabolic changes can be attenuated by exercise training. PMID:25910622

  16. Use of 125I- and 51Cr-Labeled Albumin for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal and Total Albumin Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert M.; Bois, John J. Du; Holt, Peter R.

    1967-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous measurement of gastrointestinal protein loss and total albumin turnover entailing the use of a combination of 125iodine- and 51chromium-labeled albumin is described. Albumin turnover was calculated by the measurement of albumin-125I plasma decay and cumulative urinary excretion, and the results obtained agreed closely with previous studies utilizing albumin-131I. Gastrointestinal catabolism was calculated from the rate of fecal excretion of 51Cr and the specific activity of plasma albumin-51Cr, and these data were related to the calculated albumin turnover results. During the period of 6-14 days after administration, the ratio of specific activties of albumin-125I and -51Cr in plasma and in extravascular spaces or gastric and biliary secretions remained almost identical. Fecal excretion of 51Cr was also quite stable at this time. In six normal subjects gastrointestinal catabolism accounted for less than 10% of total albumin catabolism. Excessive gastrointestinal protein losses did not contribute to the low serum albumin in three patients with cirrhosis or in two adults with the nephrotic syndrome. Multiple mechanisms leading to hypoalbuminemia were demonstrated in other subjects with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Images PMID:5630419

  17. Periodic Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Biokinetics Model Identifying Anabolic and Catabolic Pathways Associated With Cartilage Matrix Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asit K.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing the available nanotechnology to describe physicochemical interactions during biokinetic regulation will strongly support cellular and molecular engineering efforts. In a recent mathematical model developed to extend the applicability of a statically loaded, single-cell biomechanical analysis, a biokinetic regulatory threshold was presented (Saha and Kohles, 2010, “A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Static Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Cartilage Biokinetics Model,” J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med., 1(3), p. 031005). Results described multiscale mechanobiology in terms of catabolic to anabolic pathways. In the present study, we expand the mathematical model to continue exploring the nanoscale biomolecular response within a controlled microenvironment. Here, we introduce a dynamic mechanical stimulus for regulating cartilage molecule synthesis. Model iterations indicate the identification of a biomathematical mechanism balancing the harmony between catabolic and anabolic states. Relative load limits were defined to distinguish between “healthy” and “injurious” biomolecule accumulations. The presented mathematical framework provides a specific algorithm from which to explore biokinetic regulation. PMID:21152382

  18. Optical biosensor for environmental on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability with an immobilized bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Malachowsky, K.; Thonnard, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    An optical whole-cell biosensor based on a genetically engineered bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium was developed for continuous on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability and microbial catabolic activity potential in waste streams. The bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism. Exposure to either compound resulted in inducible bioluminescence. The reporter culture was immobilized onto the surface of an optical guide by using strontium alginate. The biosensor probe was then inserted into a measurement cell which simultaneously received the waste stream solution and a maintenance medium. Exposure under defined conditions to both naphthalene and salicylate resulted in a rapid increase in bioluminescence. The magnitude of the response and the response time were concentration dependent. Good reproducibility of the response was observed during repetitive perturbations with either napthalene or salicylate. Exposure to other compounds, such as glucose and complex nutrient medium or toluene, resulted in either minor bioluminescence increases after significantly longer response times compared with naphthalene or no response, respectively. The environmental utility of the biosensor was tested by using real pollutant mixtures. A specific bioluminescence response was obtained after exposure to either an aqueous solution saturated with JP-4 fuel or an aqueous leachate from a manufactured-gas plant soil, since napthalene was present in both pollutant mixtures. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  20. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  3. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551), ipdB (rv3552), fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 3aα-H-4α(3′-propionic acid)-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP). Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections. PMID:21901092

  4. Organic matter mineralization in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Sparrman, Tobias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and associated production and emission of atmospheric trace gases proceed during the winter months in the frozen soils of high latitude ecosystems. However, in what ways this microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is uncertain. This presentation will address how temperature, water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of microbial activity at below freezing temperatures and the implications of this activity for SOM mineralization in the surface layers of boreal forest soils experiencing seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. Using stable isotope labeling (13C) we also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity prior to substrate uptake. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

  5. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic. PMID:26860863

  6. Molecular and population analyses of a recombination event in the catabolic plasmid pJP4.

    PubMed

    Larraín-Linton, Juanita; De la Iglesia, Rodrigo; Melo, Francisco; González, Bernardo

    2006-10-01

    Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) harbors a catabolic plasmid, pJP4, which confers the ability to grow on chloroaromatic compounds. Repeated growth on 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB) results in selection of a recombinant strain, which degrades 3-CB better but no longer grows on 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D). We have previously proposed that this phenotype is due to a double homologous recombination event between inverted repeats of the multicopies of this plasmid within the cell. One recombinant form of this plasmid (pJP4-F3) explains this phenotype, since it harbors two copies of the chlorocatechol degradation tfd gene clusters, which are essential to grow on 3-CB, but has lost the tfdA gene, encoding the first step in degradation of 2,4-D. The other recombinant plasmid (pJP4-FM) should harbor two copies of the tfdA gene but no copies of the tfd gene clusters. A molecular analysis using a multiplex PCR approach to distinguish the wild-type plasmid pJP4 from its two recombinant forms, was carried out. Expected PCR products confirming this recombination model were found and sequenced. Few recombinant plasmid forms in cultures grown in several carbon sources were detected. Kinetic studies indicated that cells containing the recombinant plasmid pJP4-FM were not selectable by sole carbon source growth pressure, whereas those cells harboring recombinant plasmid pJP4-F3 were selected upon growth on 3-CB. After 12 days of repeated growth on 3-CB, the complete plasmid population in C. necator JMP134 apparently corresponds to this form. However, wild-type plasmid forms could be recovered after growing this culture on 2,4-D, indicating that different plasmid forms can be found in C. necator JMP134 at the population level. PMID:16980481

  7. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  8. Perturbation of Polyamine Catabolism Can Strongly Affect Root Development and Xylem Differentiation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Federico, Rodolfo; Moreno, Sandra; Lucretti, Sergio; Moschou, Panagiotis N.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Spermidine (Spd) treatment inhibited root cell elongation, promoted deposition of phenolics in cell walls of rhizodermis, xylem elements, and vascular parenchyma, and resulted in a higher number of cells resting in G1 and G2 phases in the maize (Zea mays) primary root apex. Furthermore, Spd treatment induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation as well as precocious differentiation and cell death in both early metaxylem and late metaxylem precursors. Treatment with either N-prenylagmatine, a selective inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) enzyme activity, or N,N1-dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, reverted Spd-induced autofluorescence intensification, DNA fragmentation, inhibition of root cell elongation, as well as reduction of percentage of nuclei in S phase. Transmission electron microscopy showed that N-prenylagmatine inhibited the differentiation of the secondary wall of early and late metaxylem elements, and xylem parenchymal cells. Moreover, although root growth and xylem differentiation in antisense PAO tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were unaltered, overexpression of maize PAO (S-ZmPAO) as well as down-regulation of the gene encoding S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase via RNAi in tobacco plants promoted vascular cell differentiation and induced programmed cell death in root cap cells. Furthermore, following Spd treatment in maize and ZmPAO overexpression in tobacco, the in vivo H2O2 production was enhanced in xylem tissues. Overall, our results suggest that, after Spd supply or PAO overexpression, H2O2 derived from polyamine catabolism behaves as a signal for secondary wall deposition and for induction of developmental programmed cell death. PMID:21746808

  9. The phn Island: A New Genomic Island Encoding Catabolism of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, William J.; Chen, Shicheng; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD) that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism. A given RHD genotype can be possessed by a variety of bacterial genera, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important process for dissemination of PAH-degrading genes. But, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrading bacterium Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present study, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI), now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and >50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G + C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G + C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general. PMID:22493593

  10. Catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase of Halobacterium halobium (salinarium): purification, characterization, sequence determination, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ruepp, A; Müller, H N; Lottspeich, F; Soppa, J

    1995-03-01

    Halobacterium halobium (salinarium) is able to grow fermentatively via the arginine deiminase pathway, which is mediated by three enzymes and one membrane-bound arginine-ornithine antiporter. One of the enzymes, catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTCase), was purified from fermentatively grown cultures by gel filtration and ammonium sulfate-mediated hydrophobic chromatography. It consists of a single type of subunit with an apparent molecular mass of 41 kDa. As is common for proteins of halophilic Archaea, the cOTCase is unstable below 1 M salt. In contrast to the cOTCase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the halophilic enzyme exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with both carbamylphosphate and ornithine as substrates with Km values of 0.4 and 8 mM, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the protein and four peptides were determined, comprising about 30% of the polypeptide. The sequence information was used to clone and sequence the corresponding gene, argB. It codes for a polypeptide of 295 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 32 kDa and an amino acid composition which is typical of halophilic proteins. The native molecular mass was determined to be 200 kDa, and therefore the cOTCase is a hexamer of identical subunits. The deduced protein sequence was compared to the cOTCase of P. aeruginosa and 14 anabolic OTCases, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The halobacterial cOTCase is more distantly related to the cOTCase than to the anabolic OTCase of P. aeruginosa. It is found in a group with the anabolic OTCases of Bacillus subtilis, P. aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium bovis. PMID:7868583

  11. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-11-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 10(9) bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  12. Changes in glutamine metabolism indicate a mild catabolic state in the transition mare.

    PubMed

    Manso Filho, H C; McKeever, K H; Gordon, M E; Costa, H E C; Lagakos, W S; Watford, M

    2008-12-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant free alpha-AA in the mammalian body, and large amounts of glutamine are extracted by both the fetus during pregnancy and the mammary gland during lactation. The work presented here addressed the hypothesis that there would be major changes in glutamine metabolism in the mare during the transition period, the time between late gestation, parturition, and early lactation. Eight foals were born to Standardbred mares provided with energy and protein at 10% above NRC recommendations, and foals remained with mares for 6 mo. During lactation, lean body mass decreased by 1.5% (P < 0.05), whereas fat mass was unchanged throughout gestation and lactation. There was a sharp increase in the concentration of most plasma metabolites and hormones after birth, which was due in part to hemoconcentration because of fluid shifts at parturition. Plasma glutamine concentration, however, was maintained at greater concentrations for up to 2 wk postpartum but then began to decrease, reaching a nadir at approximately 6 wk of lactation. Skeletal muscle glutamine content did not change, but glutamine synthetase expression was decreased at the end of lactation (P < 0.05). Free glutamine was highly abundant in milk early in lactation, but the concentration decreased by more than 50% after 3 mo of lactation and paralleled the decrease in plasma glutamine concentration. Thus, lactation represents a mild catabolic state for the mare in which decreased glutamine concentrations may compromise the availability of glutamine to other tissues such as the intestines and the immune system. PMID:19036697

  13. Metformin Improves Diabetic Bone Health by Re-Balancing Catabolism and Nitrogen Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiyan; Guo, Yuqi; Yan, Wenbo; Snyder, Michael P.; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metformin, a leading drug used to treat diabetic patients, is reported to benefit bone homeostasis under hyperglycemia in animal models. However, both the molecular targets and the biological pathways affected by metformin in bone are not well identified or characterized. The objective of this study is to investigate the bioengergeric pathways affected by metformin in bone marrow cells of mice. Materials and Methods Metabolite levels were examined in bone marrow samples extracted from metformin or PBS -treated healthy (Wild type) and hyperglycemic (diabetic) mice using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics. We applied an untargeted high performance LC-MS approach which combined multimode chromatography (ion exchange, reversed phase and hydrophilic interaction (HILIC)) and Orbitrap-based ultra-high accuracy mass spectrometry to achieve a wide coverage. A multivariate clustering was applied to reveal the global trends and major metabolite players. Results A total of 346 unique metabolites were identified, and they are grouped into distinctive clusters that reflected general and diabetes-specific responses to metformin. As evidenced by changes in the TCA and urea cycles, increased catabolism and nitrogen waste that are commonly associated with diabetes were rebalanced upon treatment with metformin. In particular, we found glutamate and succinate whose levels were drastically elevated in diabetic animals were brought back to normal levels by metformin. These two metabolites were further validated as the major targets of metformin in bone marrow stromal cells. Conclusion Overall using limited sample size, our study revealed the metabolic pathways modulated by metformin in bones which have broad implication in our understanding of bone remodeling under hyperglycemia and in finding therapeutic interventions in mammals. PMID:26716870

  14. Zebrafish 20β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Is Important for Glucocorticoid Catabolism in Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Tokarz, Janina; Norton, William; Möller, Gabriele; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Adamski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Stress, the physiological reaction to a stressor, is initiated in teleost fish by hormone cascades along the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Cortisol is the major stress hormone and contributes to the appropriate stress response by regulating gene expression after binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Cortisol is inactivated when 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 2 catalyzes its oxidation to cortisone. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, cortisone can be further reduced to 20β-hydroxycortisone. This reaction is catalyzed by 20β-HSD type 2, recently discovered by us. Here, we substantiate the hypothesis that 20β-HSD type 2 is involved in cortisol catabolism and stress response. We found that hsd11b2 and hsd20b2 transcripts were up-regulated upon cortisol treatment. Moreover, a cortisol-independent, short-term physical stressor led to the up-regulation of hsd11b2 and hsd20b2 along with several HPI axis genes. The morpholino-induced knock down of hsd20b2 in zebrafish embryos revealed no developmental phenotype under normal culture conditions, but prominent effects were observed after a cortisol challenge. Reporter gene experiments demonstrated that 20β-hydroxycortisone was not a physiological ligand for the zebrafish glucocorticoid or mineralocorticoid receptor but was excreted into the fish holding water. Our experiments show that 20β-HSD type 2, together with 11β-HSD type 2, represents a short pathway in zebrafish to rapidly inactivate and excrete cortisol. Therefore, 20β-HSD type 2 is an important enzyme in stress response. PMID:23349977

  15. Mice deficient in Neu4 sialidase exhibit abnormal ganglioside catabolism and lysosomal storage.

    PubMed

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Canuel, Maryssa; Carpentier, Stéphane; Landry, Karine; Durand, Stéphanie; Liang, Feng; Zeng, Jibin; Caqueret, Aurore; Gravel, Roy A; Marchesini, Sergio; Zwingmann, Claudia; Michaud, Jacques; Morales, Carlos R; Levade, Thierry; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2008-06-01

    Mammalian sialidase Neu4, ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, is located in the lysosomal and mitochondrial lumen and has broad substrate specificity against sialylated glycoconjugates. To investigate whether Neu4 is involved in ganglioside catabolism, we transfected beta-hexosaminidase-deficient neuroglia cells from a Tay-Sachs patient with a Neu4-expressing plasmid and demonstrated the correction of storage due to the clearance of accumulated GM2 ganglioside. To further clarify the biological role of Neu4, we have generated a stable loss-of-function phenotype in cultured HeLa cells and in mice with targeted disruption of the Neu4 gene. The silenced HeLa cells showed reduced activity against gangliosides and had large heterogeneous lysosomes containing lamellar structures. Neu4(-/-) mice were viable, fertile and lacked gross morphological abnormalities, but showed a marked vacuolization and lysosomal storage in lung and spleen cells. Lysosomal storage bodies were also present in cultured macrophages preloaded with gangliosides. Thin-layer chromatography showed increased relative level of GD1a ganglioside and a markedly decreased level of GM1 ganglioside in brain of Neu4(-/-) mice suggesting that Neu4 may be important for desialylation of brain gangliosides and consistent with the in situ hybridization data. Increased levels of cholesterol, ceramide and polyunsaturated fatty acids were also detected in the lungs and spleen of Neu4(-/-) mice by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Together, our data suggest that Neu4 is a functional component of the ganglioside-metabolizing system, contributing to the postnatal development of the brain and other vital organs. PMID:18270209

  16. Enhanced ethanol catabolism in orphan nuclear receptor SHP-null mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Eun; Lee, Mikang; Mifflin, Ryan; Lee, Yoon Kwang

    2016-05-15

    Deficiency of the orphan nuclear hormone receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0B2) protects mice from diet-induced hepatic steatosis, in part, via repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ2 (Pparg2) gene expression. Alcoholic fatty liver diseases (AFLD) share many common pathophysiological features with non-AFLD. To study the role of SHP and PPARγ2 in AFLD, we used a strategy of chronic ethanol feeding plus a single binge ethanol feeding to challenge wild-type (WT) and SHP-null (SHP(-/-)) mice with ethanol. The ethanol feeding induced liver fat accumulation and mRNA expression of hepatic Pparg2 in WT mice, which suggests that a high level of PPARγ2 is a common driving force for fat accumulation induced by ethanol or a high-fat diet. Interestingly, ethanol-fed SHP(-/-) mice displayed hepatic fat accumulation similar to that of ethanol-fed WT mice, even though their Pparg2 expression level remained lower. Mortality of SHP(-/-) mice after ethanol binge feeding was significantly reduced and their acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh2) mRNA level was higher than that of their WT counterparts. After an intoxicating dose of ethanol, SHP(-/-) mice exhibited faster blood ethanol clearance and earlier wake-up time than WT mice. Higher blood acetate, the end product of ethanol metabolism, and lower acetaldehyde levels were evident in the ethanol-challenged SHP(-/-) than WT mice. Ethanol-induced inflammatory responses and lipid peroxidation were also lower in SHP(-/-) mice. The current data show faster ethanol catabolism and extra fat storage through conversion of acetate to acetyl-CoA before its release into the circulation in this ethanol-feeding model in SHP(-/-) mice. PMID:26968209

  17. Effect of hydration state on resistance exercise-induced endocrine markers of anabolism, catabolism, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Yamamoto, Linda M; Farrell, Mark J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Spiering, Barry A; Casa, Douglas J; Anderson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    Hypohydration (decreased total body water) exacerbates the catabolic hormonal response to endurance exercise with unclear effects on anabolic hormones. Limited research exists that evaluates the effect of hypohydration on endocrine responses to resistance exercise; this work merits attention as the acute postexercise hormonal environment potently modulates resistance training adaptations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hydration state on the endocrine and metabolic responses to resistance exercise. Seven healthy resistance-trained men (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three identical resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via controlled water deprivation and exercise-heat stress. Cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, testosterone, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, lactate, glycerol, and free fatty acids were measured during euhydrated rest, immediately preceding resistance exercise, immediately postexercise, and during 60 min of recovery. Body mass decreased 0.2 +/- 0.4, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during EU, HY25, and HY50, respectively, supported by humoral and urinary changes that clearly indicated subjects achieved three distinct hydration states. Hypohydration significantly 1) increased circulating concentrations of cortisol and norepinephrine, 2) attenuated the testosterone response to exercise, and 3) altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These results suggest that hypohydration can modify the hormonal and metabolic response to resistance exercise, influencing the postexercise circulatory milieu. PMID:18617629

  18. Functional metagenomics to mine the human gut microbiome for dietary fiber catabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tasse, Lena; Bercovici, Juliette; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Robe, Patrick; Tap, Julien; Klopp, Christophe; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël; Monsan, Pierre; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem composed mainly of uncultured bacteria. It plays an essential role in the catabolism of dietary fibers, the part of plant material in our diet that is not metabolized in the upper digestive tract, because the human genome does not encode adequate carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). We describe a multi-step functionally based approach to guide the in-depth pyrosequencing of specific regions of the human gut metagenome encoding the CAZymes involved in dietary fiber breakdown. High-throughput functional screens were first applied to a library covering 5.4 × 109 bp of metagenomic DNA, allowing the isolation of 310 clones showing beta-glucanase, hemicellulase, galactanase, amylase, or pectinase activities. Based on the results of refined secondary screens, sequencing efforts were reduced to 0.84 Mb of nonredundant metagenomic DNA, corresponding to 26 clones that were particularly efficient for the degradation of raw plant polysaccharides. Seventy-three CAZymes from 35 different families were discovered. This corresponds to a fivefold target-gene enrichment compared to random sequencing of the human gut metagenome. Thirty-three of these CAZy encoding genes are highly homologous to prevalent genes found in the gut microbiome of at least 20 individuals for whose metagenomic data are available. Moreover, 18 multigenic clusters encoding complementary enzyme activities for plant cell wall degradation were also identified. Gene taxonomic assignment is consistent with horizontal gene transfer events in dominant gut species and provides new insights into the human gut functional trophic chain. PMID:20841432

  19. Tolerant (parallel) Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiNucci, David C.; Bailey, David H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In order to be truly portable, a program must be tolerant of a wide range of development and execution environments, and a parallel program is just one which must be tolerant of a very wide range. This paper first defines the term "tolerant programming", then describes many layers of tools to accomplish it. The primary focus is on F-Nets, a formal model for expressing computation as a folded partial-ordering of operations, thereby providing an architecture-independent expression of tolerant parallel algorithms. For implementing F-Nets, Cooperative Data Sharing (CDS) is a subroutine package for implementing communication efficiently in a large number of environments (e.g. shared memory and message passing). Software Cabling (SC), a very-high-level graphical programming language for building large F-Nets, possesses many of the features normally expected from today's computer languages (e.g. data abstraction, array operations). Finally, L2(sup 3) is a CASE tool which facilitates the construction, compilation, execution, and debugging of SC programs.

  20. Zero Tolerance Expulsions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1999-01-01

    Most courts have flexibly interpreted the constitutional requirement of procedural and substantive due process in favor of zero-tolerance expulsion decisions. While being sensitive to community intolerance for threats to school safety (student possession of guns or drugs), school leaders should modulate development and enforcement of expulsion…

  1. Teaching Tolerance Magazine, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, Jim, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This magazine provides teachers with classroom learning materials to help children learn to be tolerant with others. Articles in the magazine are: "A Standard to Sustain" (Mary M. Harrison); "Let's Just Play" (Janet Schmidt); "Who's Helen Keller?" (Ruth Shagoury Hubbard); "Margins of Error" (Joe Parsons); "Out of the Shadows" (Elizabeth Hunt);…

  2. Pesticide tolerance in amphibians: induced tolerance in susceptible populations, constitutive tolerance in tolerant populations

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jessica; Morehouse, Nathan I; Relyea, Rick

    2013-01-01

    The role of plasticity in shaping adaptations is important to understanding the expression of traits within individuals and the evolution of populations. With increasing human impacts on the environment, one challenge is to consider how plasticity shapes responses to anthropogenic stressors such as contaminants. To our knowledge, only one study (using mosquitoes) has considered the possibility of induced insecticide tolerance. Using populations of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) located close to and far from agricultural fields, we discovered that exposing some populations of embryos and hatchlings to sublethal concentrations of the insecticide carbaryl induced higher tolerance to a subsequent lethal concentration later in life. Interestingly, the inducible populations were located >800 m from agricultural areas and were the most susceptible to the insecticide. In contrast, the noninducible populations were located close to agricultural areas and were the least susceptible. We also found that sublethal concentrations of carbaryl induced higher tadpole AChE concentrations in several cases. This is the first study to demonstrate inducible tolerance in a vertebrate species and the pattern of inducible and constitutive tolerance among populations suggests the process of genetic assimilation. PMID:24187585

  3. Cuphea tolerates clopyralid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuphea is a new crop of temperate regions that produces seed oil with medium-chain length fatty acids, which can substitute for imported coconut and palm kernels oils. Only four herbicides are known to be tolerated by cuphea to date. More herbicides, especially POST products, are needed for continue...

  4. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry. PMID:23340387

  5. Tolerance through Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Carolyn

    In this project, eighth grade students are exposed to black history, literature, music, and art to enhance the understanding of diversity and to establish an atmosphere of tolerance for diversity. Students are asked to choose a personality or significant historical event to research and present to the class. They focus on issues such as prejudice,…

  6. Zero Tolerance versus Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2000-01-01

    In a case involving questionable canine search-and-seizure practices, a circuit court upheld a school board's decision to terminate a teacher's contract. While touting zero tolerance, the board fired an honored teacher 3 years from retirement who may not have known about the marijuana cigarette in her car. (MLH)

  7. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  8. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  9. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

  10. Zero Tolerance Policies. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Much of this brief comes from the ERIC Digest on Zero Tolerance Policies (ERIC #: ED451579). State legislatures and school boards are adopting a growing number of zero-tolerance polices toward weapons, guns, and violence. Zero-tolerance polices are rules intended to address specific school-safety issues. Despite the controversies that it has…

  11. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Xu, Tao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Graham, David E; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  12. CYP24, the enzyme that catabolizes the antiproliferative agent vitamin D, is increased in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Parise, Robert A; Egorin, Merrill J; Kanterewicz, Beatriz; Taimi, Mohammed; Petkovich, Martin; Lew, April M; Chuang, Samuel S; Nichols, Mark; El-Hefnawy, Talal; Hershberger, Pamela A

    2006-10-15

    1Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) displays potent antiproliferative activity in a variety of tumor model systems and is currently under investigation in clinical trials in cancer. Studies were initiated to explore its potential in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as effective approaches to the treatment of that disease are needed. In evaluating factors that may affect activity in NSCLC, the authors found that CYP24 (25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase), the enzyme that catabolizes 1,25D3, is frequently expressed in NSCLC cell lines but not in the nontumorigenic bronchial epithelial cell line, Beas2B. CYP24 expression by RT-PCR was also detected in 10/18 primary lung tumors but in only 1/11 normal lung tissue specimens. Tumor-specific CYP24 upregulation was confirmed at the protein level via immunoblot analysis of patient-matched normal lung tissue and lung tumor extracts. Enzymatically active CYP24 is expected to desensitize NSCLC cells to 1,25D3. The authors therefore implemented a high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) assay for 1,25D3 and its CYP24-generated metabolites to determine whether NSCLC cells express active enzyme. Analysis of NSCLC cell cultures revealed time-dependent loss of 1,25D3 coincident with the appearance of CYP24-generated metabolites. MK-24(S)-S(O)(NH)-Ph-1, a specific inhibitor of CYP24, slowed the loss of 1,25D3 and increased 1,25D3 half-life. Furthermore, combination of 1,25D3 with MK-24(S)-S(O)(NH)-Ph-1 resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of 1,25D3 required to achieve maximum growth inhibition in NSCLC cells. These data suggest that increased CYP24 expression in lung tumors restricts 1,25D3 activity and support the preclinical evaluation of CYP24 inhibitors for lung cancer treatment. PMID:16708384

  13. Targeting Bone Alleviates Osteoarthritis in Osteopenic Mice and Modulates Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Lin, Hilène; Hay, Eric; Ah Kioon, Marie-Dominique; Schiltz, Corinne; Hannouche, Didier; Nizard, Rémy; Lioté, Frédéric; Orcel, Philippe; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Cohen-Solal, Martine Esther

    2012-01-01

    Objective Subchondral bone modifications occur early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). The level of bone resorption might impact cartilage remodeling. We therefore assessed the in vivo and in vitro effects of targeting bone resorption in OA and cartilage metabolism. Methods OA was induced by meniscectomy (MNX) in ovariectomized osteopenic mice (OP) treated with estradiol (E2), pamidronate (PAM), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 6 weeks. We assessed the subchondral bone and cartilage structure and the expression of cartilage matrix proteases. To assess the involvement of bone soluble factors in cartilage metabolism, supernatant of human bone explants pre-treated with E2 or PAM were transferred to cartilage explants to assess proteoglycan release and aggrecan cleavage. OPG/RANKL mRNA expression was assessed in bone explants by real-time quantitative PCR. The role of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the bone-cartilage crosstalk was tested using an OPG neutralizing antibody. Results Bone mineral density of OP mice and osteoclast number were restored by E2 and PAM (p<0.05). In OP mice, E2 and PAM decreased ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression, while only PAM markedly reduced OA compared to PBS (2.0±0.63 vs 5.2±0.95; p<0.05). OPG/RANKL mRNA was increased in human bone explants treated with both drugs (2.2–3.7-fold). Moreover, supernatants from bone explants cultured with E2 or PAM reduced aggrecan cleavage and cartilage proteoglycan release (73±8.0% and 80±22% of control, respectively, p<0.05). This effect was reversed with osteoprotegerin blockade. Conclusion The inhibition of bone resorption by pamidronate in osteopenic mice alleviates the histological OA score with a reduction in the expression of aggrecanases. Bone soluble factors, such as osteoprotegerin, impact the cartilage response to catabolic factors. This study further highlights the importance of subchondral bone in the regulation of joint cartilage damage in OA. PMID:22432033

  14. Carotenoid biosynthetic and catabolic pathways: gene expression and carotenoid content in grains of maize landraces.

    PubMed

    da Silva Messias, Rafael; Galli, Vanessa; Dos Anjos E Silva, Sérgio Delmar; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have been implicated in preventing several age-related diseases, and they also provide vitamin A precursors; therefore, increasing the content of carotenoids in maize grains is of great interest. It is not well understood, however, how the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated. Fortunately, the maize germplasm exhibits a high degree of genetic diversity that can be exploited for this purpose. Here, the accumulation of carotenoids and the expression of genes from carotenoid metabolic and catabolic pathways were investigated in several maize landraces. The carotenoid content in grains varied from 10.03, in the white variety MC5, to 61.50 μg·g⁻¹, in the yellow-to-orange variety MC3, and the major carotenoids detected were lutein and zeaxanthin. PSY1 (phythoene synthase) expression showed a positive correlation with the total carotenoid content. Additionally, the PSY1 and HYD3 (ferredoxin-dependent di-iron monooxygenase) expression levels were positively correlated with β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, while CYP97C (cytochrome P450-type monooxygenase) expression did not correlate with any of the carotenoids. In contrast, ZmCCD1 (carotenoid dioxygenase) was more highly expressed at the beginning of grain development, as well as in the white variety, and its expression was inversely correlated with the accumulation of several carotenoids, suggesting that CCD1 is also an important enzyme to be considered when attempting to improve the carotenoid content in maize. The MC27 and MC1 varieties showed the highest HYD3/CYP97C ratios, suggesting that they are promising candidates for increasing the zeaxanthin content; in contrast, MC14 and MC7 showed low HYD3/CYP97C, suggesting that they may be useful in biofortification efforts aimed at promoting the accumulation of provitamin A. The results of this study demonstrate the use of maize germplasm to provide insight into the regulation of genes involved in the carotenoid pathway, which would thus

  15. Carotenoid Biosynthetic and Catabolic Pathways: Gene Expression and Carotenoid Content in Grains of Maize Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Rafael da Silva; Galli, Vanessa; Silva, Sérgio Delmar dos Anjos e; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have been implicated in preventing several age-related diseases, and they also provide vitamin A precursors; therefore, increasing the content of carotenoids in maize grains is of great interest. It is not well understood, however, how the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated. Fortunately, the maize germplasm exhibits a high degree of genetic diversity that can be exploited for this purpose. Here, the accumulation of carotenoids and the expression of genes from carotenoid metabolic and catabolic pathways were investigated in several maize landraces. The carotenoid content in grains varied from 10.03, in the white variety MC5, to 61.50 μg·g−1, in the yellow-to-orange variety MC3, and the major carotenoids detected were lutein and zeaxanthin. PSY1 (phythoene synthase) expression showed a positive correlation with the total carotenoid content. Additionally, the PSY1 and HYD3 (ferredoxin-dependent di-iron monooxygenase) expression levels were positively correlated with β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, while CYP97C (cytochrome P450-type monooxygenase) expression did not correlate with any of the carotenoids. In contrast, ZmCCD1 (carotenoid dioxygenase) was more highly expressed at the beginning of grain development, as well as in the white variety, and its expression was inversely correlated with the accumulation of several carotenoids, suggesting that CCD1 is also an important enzyme to be considered when attempting to improve the carotenoid content in maize. The MC27 and MC1 varieties showed the highest HYD3/CYP97C ratios, suggesting that they are promising candidates for increasing the zeaxanthin content; in contrast, MC14 and MC7 showed low HYD3/CYP97C, suggesting that they may be useful in biofortification efforts aimed at promoting the accumulation of provitamin A. The results of this study demonstrate the use of maize germplasm to provide insight into the regulation of genes involved in the carotenoid pathway, which would thus better

  16. Implications of interferon-induced tryptophan catabolism in cancer, auto-immune diseases and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Ozaki, Y; Datta, S P; Borden, E C; Sondel, P M; Malone, D G

    1991-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is an indispensable amino acid required for biosynthesis of proteins, serotonin and niacin. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is induced by infections, viruses, lipopolysaccharides, or interferons (IFNs) and this results in significant catabolism of Trp along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway. Intracellular growth of Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci in human fibroblasts in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and this inhibition is negated by extra Trp in the medium. Similarly, growth of a number of human cell lines in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and addition of extra Trp restores growth. Thus, in some in vitro systems, antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma are mediated by induced depletion of Trp. We find that cancer patients given Type I or Type II IFNs can induce IDO which results in decreased serum Trp levels (20-50% of pretreatment) and increased urinary metabolites of the Kyn pathway (5 to 500 fold of pretreatment). We speculate that in vivo antineoplastic effects of IFNs and clinical side effects are mediated, at least in part, by a general or localized depletion of Trp. In view of reported increases of IFNs in autoimmune diseases and our earlier findings of elevated urinary Trp metabolites in autoimmune diseases, it seems likely that systemic or local depletion of Trp occurs in autoimmune diseases and may relate to degeneration, wasting and other symptoms in such diseases. We find high levels of IDO in cells isolated from synovia of arthritic joints. IFNs are also elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and increasing IFN levels are associated with a worsening prognosis. We propose that IDO is induced chronically by HIV infection, is further increased by opportunistic infections, and that this chronic loss of Trp initiates mechanisms responsible for the cachexia, dementia, diarrhea and possibly immunosuppression of AIDS patients. In these symptoms, AIDS resembles classical pellagra due to dietary deficiency of Trp and

  17. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    results suggest that T cells may potentiate the catabolic effect of GCT.

  18. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle R.; Allcorn, Eric

    2015-10-01

    As lithium-ion battery technologies mature, the size and energy of these systems continues to increase (> 50 kWh for EVs); making safety and reliability of these high energy systems increasingly important. While most material advances for lithium-ion chemistries are directed toward improving cell performance (capacity, energy, cycle life, etc.), there are a variety of materials advancements that can be made to improve lithium-ion battery safety. Issues including energetic thermal runaway, electrolyte decomposition and flammability, anode SEI stability, and cell-level abuse tolerance continue to be critical safety concerns. This report highlights work with our collaborators to develop advanced materials to improve lithium-ion battery safety and abuse tolerance and to perform cell-level characterization of new materials.

  19. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  20. Impurity tolerant electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project has two central goals. The primary research effort addresses fundamental aspects of Pt electrocatalyst poisoning by CO and an understanding of practical schemes for improving the CO tolerance of electrocatalytic materials. The second mission of this work is an attempt to address, on a fundamental level, the surface chemical properties that enhance the direct electrooxidation of methanol at binary Pt alloy electrode surfaces. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Fatty acid elongase-5 (Elovl5) regulates hepatic triglyceride catabolism in obese C57BL/6J mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A.; Stevens, Robert D.; Bain, James R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Huang, Li-Shin; Jump, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a major public health concern in the obese and type 2 diabetic populations. The high-fat lard diet induces obesity and fatty liver in C57BL/6J mice and suppresses expression of the PPAR-target gene, FA elongase 5 (Elovl5). Elovl5 plays a key role in MUFA and PUFA synthesis. Increasing hepatic Elovl5 activity in obese mice lowered hepatic TGs and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (X-box binding protein 1 and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 6α) and increased TG catabolism and fatty acyl carnitines. Increased hepatic Elovl5 activity did not increase hepatic capacity for β-oxidation. Elovl5 effects on hepatic TG catabolism were linked to increased protein levels of adipocyte TG lipase (ATGL) and comparative gene identification 58 (CGI58). Elevated hepatic Elovl5 activity also induced the expression of some (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and fibroblast growth factor 21), but not other cytochrome P450 4A10 (CYP4A10), PPAR-target genes. FA products of Elovl5 activity increased ATGL, but not CGI58, mRNA through PPARβ-dependent mechanisms in human HepG2 cells. Treatment of mouse AML12 hepatocytes with the PPARβ agonist (GW0742) decreased 14C-18:2,n-6 in TGs but did not affect β-oxidation. These studies establish that Elovl5 activity regulates hepatic levels of FAs controlling PPARβ activity, ATGL expression, and TG catabolism, but not FA oxidation. PMID:24814977

  2. Secondary successional trajectories of structural and catabolic bacterial communities in oil-polluted soil planted with hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shinjini; Sipilä, Timo; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Yrjälä, Kim

    2015-02-01

    Poplars have widely been used for rhizoremediation of a broad range of organic contaminants for the past two decades. Still, there is a knowledge gap regarding the rhizosphere-associated bacterial communities of poplars and their dynamics during the remediation process. It is envisaged that a detailed understanding of rhizosphere-associated microbial populations will greatly contribute to a better design and implementation of rhizoremediation. To investigate the long-term succession of structural and catabolic bacterial communities in oil-polluted soil planted with hybrid poplar, we carried out a 2-year field study. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) seedlings were planted in polluted soil excavated from an accidental oil-spill site. Vegetated and un-vegetated soil samples were collected for microbial community analyses at seven different time points during the course of 2 years and sampling time points were chosen to cover the seasonal variation in the boreal climate zone. Bacterial community structure was accessed by means of 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, whereas catabolic diversity was monitored by pyrosequencing of alkane hydroxylase and extradiol dioxygenase genes. We observed a clear succession of bacterial communities on both structural and functional levels from early to late-phase communities. Sphingomonas type extradiol dioxygenases and alkane hydroxylase homologs of Rhodococcus clearly dominated the early-phase communities. The high-dominance/low-diversity functional gene communities underwent a transition to low-dominance/high-diversity communities in the late phase. These results pointed towards increased catabolic capacities and a change from specialist to generalist strategy of bacterial communities during the course of secondary succession. PMID:25545194

  3. Homozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Increased LDL catabolism in hypobetalipoproteinemia due to a truncated apolipoprotein B species, apo B-87Padova.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, C; Bilato, C; Martini, S; Tennyson, G E; Zech, L A; Corsini, A; Albanese, M; Brewer, H B; Crepaldi, G; Baggio, G

    1996-09-01

    Mutations on the apolipoprotein (apo) B gene that interfere with the full-length translation of the apoB molecule are associated with familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL), a disease characterized by the reduction of plasma apoB and LDL cholesterol. In this report, we describe an FHBL kindred carrying a unique truncated apoB form, apoB-87Padova. Sequence analysis of amplified genomic DNA identified a single G deletion at nucleotide 12032, which shifts the translation reading frame and causes a termination at amino acid 3978. Two homozygous subjects and seven heterozygous relatives were studied. Although homozygous individuals had only trace amounts of LDL, they were virtually free from the symptoms typical of homozygous FHBL subjects. We investigated the in vivo turnover of radiolabeled normal apoB-100 LDL and apoB-87 LDL in one homozygous patient and two normal control subjects. ApoB-87 LDL showed a similar metabolism in all three subjects, with a fractional catabolic rate more than double that of normal LDL. The rate of entry of apoB-87 in the LDL compartment was also markedly decreased compared with normal apoB-100. The increased in vivo catabolism of apoB-87 LDL was paralleled in vitro by a 2.5-fold increased ability of these particles to inhibit the uptake and degradation of normal apoB-100 LDL by normal human cultured fibroblasts. These results indicate that apoB-87 LDL has an enhanced ability to interact with the LDL receptor, the increased apoB catabolism contributes to the hypobetalipoproteinemia and may explain the mild expression of the disease in the two homozygous individuals. PMID:8792774

  4. Fatty acid elongase-5 (Elovl5) regulates hepatic triglyceride catabolism in obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A; Stevens, Robert D; Bain, James R; Newgard, Christopher B; Greenberg, Andrew S; Huang, Li-Shin; Jump, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a major public health concern in the obese and type 2 diabetic populations. The high-fat lard diet induces obesity and fatty liver in C57BL/6J mice and suppresses expression of the PPAR-target gene, FA elongase 5 (Elovl5). Elovl5 plays a key role in MUFA and PUFA synthesis. Increasing hepatic Elovl5 activity in obese mice lowered hepatic TGs and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (X-box binding protein 1 and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 6α) and increased TG catabolism and fatty acyl carnitines. Increased hepatic Elovl5 activity did not increase hepatic capacity for β-oxidation. Elovl5 effects on hepatic TG catabolism were linked to increased protein levels of adipocyte TG lipase (ATGL) and comparative gene identification 58 (CGI58). Elevated hepatic Elovl5 activity also induced the expression of some (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and fibroblast growth factor 21), but not other cytochrome P450 4A10 (CYP4A10), PPAR-target genes. FA products of Elovl5 activity increased ATGL, but not CGI58, mRNA through PPARβ-dependent mechanisms in human HepG2 cells. Treatment of mouse AML12 hepatocytes with the PPARβ agonist (GW0742) decreased (14)C-18:2,n-6 in TGs but did not affect β-oxidation. These studies establish that Elovl5 activity regulates hepatic levels of FAs controlling PPARβ activity, ATGL expression, and TG catabolism, but not FA oxidation. PMID:24814977

  5. Simultaneous Catabolism of Plant-Derived Aromatic Compounds Results in Enhanced Growth for Members of the Roseobacter Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Gulvik, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived aromatic compounds are important components of the dissolved organic carbon pool in coastal salt marshes, and their mineralization by resident bacteria contributes to carbon cycling in these systems. Members of the roseobacter lineage of marine bacteria are abundant in coastal salt marshes, and several characterized strains, including Sagittula stellata E-37, utilize aromatic compounds as primary growth substrates. The genome sequence of S. stellata contains multiple, potentially competing, aerobic ring-cleaving pathways. Preferential hierarchies in substrate utilization and complex transcriptional regulation have been demonstrated to be the norm in many soil bacteria that also contain multiple ring-cleaving pathways. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether substrate preference exists in S. stellata when the organism is provided a mixture of aromatic compounds that proceed through different ring-cleaving pathways. We focused on the protocatechuate (pca) and the aerobic benzoyl coenzyme A (box) pathways and the substrates known to proceed through them, p-hydroxybenzoate (POB) and benzoate, respectively. When these two substrates were provided at nonlimiting carbon concentrations, temporal patterns of cell density, gene transcript abundance, enzyme activity, and substrate concentrations indicated that S. stellata simultaneously catabolized both substrates. Furthermore, enhanced growth rates were observed when S. stellata was provided both compounds simultaneously compared to the rates of cells grown singly with an equimolar concentration of either substrate alone. This simultaneous-catabolism phenotype was also demonstrated in another lineage member, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. These findings challenge the paradigm of sequential aromatic catabolism reported for soil bacteria and contribute to the growing body of physiological evidence demonstrating the metabolic versatility of roseobacters. PMID:23563956

  6. Drought Tolerance in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Prodhan, Zakaria Hossain; Faruq, Golam

    2013-01-01

    Drought is one of the most important phenomena which limit crops' production and yield. Crops demonstrate various morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses to tackle drought stress. Plants' vegetative and reproductive stages are intensively influenced by drought stress. Drought tolerance is a complicated trait which is controlled by polygenes and their expressions are influenced by various environmental elements. This means that breeding for this trait is so difficult and new molecular methods such as molecular markers, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping strategies, and expression patterns of genes should be applied to produce drought tolerant genotypes. In wheat, there are several genes which are responsible for drought stress tolerance and produce different types of enzymes and proteins for instance, late embryogenesis abundant (lea), responsive to abscisic acid (Rab), rubisco, helicase, proline, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and carbohydrates during drought stress. This review paper has concentrated on the study of water limitation and its effects on morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses of wheat with the possible losses caused by drought stress. PMID:24319376

  7. Biocular image misalignment tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalich, Melvyn E.; Rash, Clarence E.; van de Pol, Corina; Rowe, Terri L.; Lont, Lisa M.; Peterson, R. David

    2003-09-01

    Biocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) design flexibility and cost are directly related to image misalignment tolerance standards. Currently recommended tolerance levels are based on highly variable data from a number of studies. This paper presents progress of an ongoing study to evaluate optometric measures sensitive to misalignment in partial-overlap biocular optical systems like that proposed for the Comanche RAH-66 helicopter helmet integrated display sighting system (HIDSS). Horizontal divergent and relative vertical misalignments (offsets) of see-through biocular symbology viewed against a simulated daytime background were chosen for this study. Misalignments within and just beyond current tolerance recommendations were evaluated using pre, pre and post, and during measures of visual performance. Data were obtained from seven experimental and four control subjects. The diplopia responses from experimental and control subjects were essentially the same. However, accommodative facility showed a rate decrement following exposure to both types of misalignment. Horizontal heterophorias showed definite post-misalignment increases. Subject responses to questionnaires universally indicated increased adaptation to (ease with) visual tasks over the testing period.

  8. Drought tolerance in wheat.

    PubMed

    Nezhadahmadi, Arash; Prodhan, Zakaria Hossain; Faruq, Golam

    2013-01-01

    Drought is one of the most important phenomena which limit crops' production and yield. Crops demonstrate various morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses to tackle drought stress. Plants' vegetative and reproductive stages are intensively influenced by drought stress. Drought tolerance is a complicated trait which is controlled by polygenes and their expressions are influenced by various environmental elements. This means that breeding for this trait is so difficult and new molecular methods such as molecular markers, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping strategies, and expression patterns of genes should be applied to produce drought tolerant genotypes. In wheat, there are several genes which are responsible for drought stress tolerance and produce different types of enzymes and proteins for instance, late embryogenesis abundant (lea), responsive to abscisic acid (Rab), rubisco, helicase, proline, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and carbohydrates during drought stress. This review paper has concentrated on the study of water limitation and its effects on morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses of wheat with the possible losses caused by drought stress. PMID:24319376

  9. Damage tolerance for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The damage tolerance experience in the United States Air Force with military aircraft and in the commercial world with large transport category aircraft indicates that a similar success could be achieved in commuter aircraft. The damage tolerance process is described for the purpose of defining the approach that could be used for these aircraft to ensure structural integrity. Results of some of the damage tolerance assessments for this class of aircraft are examined to illustrate the benefits derived from this approach. Recommendations are given for future damage tolerance assessment of existing commuter aircraft and on the incorporation of damage tolerance capability in new designs.

  10. Crocin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects on rat intervertebral discs by suppressing the activation of JNK

    PubMed Central

    LI, KANG; LI, YAN; MA, ZHENJIANG; ZHAO, JIE

    2015-01-01

    As intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration has been proven to contribute to low back pain (LBP), drug treatment aiming at attenuating IVD degeneration may prove to be benefiical. Crocin, a bioactive component of saffron, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects on cartilage. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of crocin on rat IVDs were analyzed in vitro and ex vivo. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were isolated from the lumbar IVDs of Sprague-Dawley rats. The NP cells were first treated with various concentrations of crocin, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation. Subsequently, RT-qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were carried out to measure the expression levels of catabolic enzymes, pro-inflammatory factors and the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, western blot analysis was also used to investigate the related signaling pathways. The whole spinal motion segment (vertebra-IVD-vertebra section) of the rats was isolated and cultured in the presence or absence of LPS and crocin for 7 days. The ex vivo effects of crocin on the ECM of the IVD structures were determined by histological and biochemical analysis. In vitro, crocin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced overexpression of catabolic enzymes [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease (reprolysin type) with thrombospondin type 1 motif (ADAMTS)-4 and ADAMTS-5], pro-inflammatory factors [interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)] and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, crocin partly prevented the downregulation of aggrecan and type II collagen (collagen-II). Moreover, crocin suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by inhibiting the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Ex vivo experiments demonstrated

  11. Crocin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects on rat intervertebral discs by suppressing the activation of JNK.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; Ma, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    As intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration has been proven to contribute to low back pain (LBP), drug treatment aiming at attenuating IVD degeneration may prove to be benefiical. Crocin, a bioactive component of saffron, has been found to exert anti-inflammatory effects on cartilage. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of crocin on rat IVDs were analyzed in vitro and ex vivo. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were isolated from the lumbar IVDs of Sprague-Dawley rats. The NP cells were first treated with various concentrations of crocin, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation. Subsequently, RT-qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were carried out to measure the expression levels of catabolic enzymes, pro-inflammatory factors and the components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, western blot analysis was also used to investigate the related signaling pathways. The whole spinal motion segment (vertebra-IVD-vertebra section) of the rats was isolated and cultured in the presence or absence of LPS and crocin for 7 days. The ex vivo effects of crocin on the ECM of the IVD structures were determined by histological and biochemical analysis. In vitro, crocin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced overexpression of catabolic enzymes [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease (reprolysin type) with thrombospondin type 1 motif (ADAMTS)-4 and ADAMTS‑5], pro-inflammatory factors [interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)] and Toll-like receptor (TLR)‑2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, crocin partly prevented the downregulation of aggrecan and type II collagen (collagen‑II). Moreover, crocin suppressed the LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by inhibiting the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Ex vivo experiments

  12. Genetic Analysis of Dioxin Dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. Strain RW1: Catabolic Genes Dispersed on the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Armengaud, Jean; Happe, Birgitta; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    1998-01-01

    The dioxin dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 activates dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran for further metabolism by introducing two atoms of oxygen at a pair of vicinal carbon atoms, one of which is involved in one of the bridges between the two aromatic rings, i.e., an angular dioxygenation. The dxnA1 and dxnA2 cistrons encoding this dioxygenase have been cloned and shown to be located just upstream of a hydrolase gene which specifies an enzyme involved in the subsequent step of the dibenzofuran biodegradative pathway. Genes encoding the electron supply system of the dioxygenase are not clustered with the dioxygenase gene but rather are located on two other distinct and separate genome segments. Moreover, whereas expression of dxnA1A2 is modulated according to the available carbon source, expression of the dbfB gene encoding the ring cleavage enzyme of the dibenzofuran pathway, which is located in the neighborhood of dxnA1A2 but oriented in the opposite direction, is constitutive. The scattering of genes for the component proteins of dioxin dioxygenase system around the genome of Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1, and the differential expression of dioxin pathway genes, is unusual and contrasts with the typical genetic organization of catabolic pathways where component cistrons tend to be clustered in multicistronic transcriptional units. The sequences of the α and β subunits of the dioxin dioxygenase exhibit only weak similarity to other three component dioxygenases, but some motifs such as the Fe(II) binding site and the [2Fe-2S] cluster ligands are conserved. Dioxin dioxygenase activity in Escherichia coli cells containing the cloned dxnA1A2 gene was achieved only through coexpression of the cognate electron supply system from RW1. Under these conditions, exclusively angular dioxygenation of dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin was obtained. The dioxin dioxygenase was not active in E. coli cells coexpressing a class IIB electron supply system. In the course of

  13. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-01-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR. PMID:26267598

  14. Gene expression and biochemical analysis of cheese-ripening yeasts: focus on catabolism of L-methionine, lactate, and lactose.

    PubMed

    Cholet, Orianne; Hénaut, Alain; Casaregola, Serge; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2007-04-01

    DNA microarrays of 86 genes from the yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica were developed to determine which genes were expressed in a medium mimicking a cheese-ripening environment. These genes were selected for potential involvement in lactose/lactate catabolism and the biosynthesis of sulfur-flavored compounds. Hybridization conditions to follow specifically the expression of homologous genes belonging to different species were set up. The microarray was first validated on pure cultures of each yeast; no interspecies cross-hybridization was observed. Expression patterns of targeted genes were studied in pure cultures of each yeast, as well as in coculture, and compared to biochemical data. As expected, a high expression of the LAC genes of K. marxianus was observed. This is a yeast that efficiently degrades lactose. Several lactate dehydrogenase-encoding genes were also expressed essentially in D. hansenii and K. marxianus, which are two efficient deacidifying yeasts in cheese ripening. A set of genes possibly involved in l-methionine catabolism was also used on the array. Y. lipolytica, which efficiently assimilates l-methionine, also exhibited a high expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs BAT2 and ARO8, which are involved in the l-methionine degradation pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that the use of a multispecies microarray could be a powerful tool to investigate targeted metabolism and possible metabolic interactions between species within microbial cocultures. PMID:17308183

  15. Pathway-Level Acceleration of Glycogen Catabolism by a Response Regulator in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis Species PCC 68031[W

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-01-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:24521880

  16. Monotropein exerts protective effects against IL-1β-induced apoptosis and catabolic responses on osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Longhuo; Li, Linfu; Chen, Siyi

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis, characterized by a loss of articular cartilage accompanied with inflammation, is the most common age-associated degenerative disease. Monotropein, an iridoids glycoside isolated from the roots of Morinda officinalis How, has been demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, monotropein was firstly to exhibit cartilage protective activity by down regulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the knee synovial fluid in vivo. The anti-apoptotic and anti-catabolic effects of monotropein on rat OA chondrocytes treated by IL-1β were investigated in vitro. In cultured chondrocytes, monotropein attenuated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in response to IL-1β stimulation. Moreover, treatment with monotropein, the expressions of MMP-3 and MMP-13 were significantly decreased, the expression of COL2A1 was increased. Taken together, these findings suggested that monotropein exerted anti-apoptosis and anti-catabolic activity in chondrocytes, which might support its possible therapeutic role in OA. PMID:25466264

  17. Functional characterization of diverse ring-hydroxylating oxygenases and induction of complex aromatic catabolic gene clusters in Sphingobium sp. PNB

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Pratick; Roy, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Ghosal, Debajyoti; Dutta, Tapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. PNB, like other sphingomonads, has multiple ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO) genes. Three different fosmid clones have been sequenced to identify the putative genes responsible for the degradation of various aromatics in this bacterial strain. Comparison of the map of the catabolic genes with that of different sphingomonads revealed a similar arrangement of gene clusters that harbors seven sets of RHO terminal components and a sole set of electron transport (ET) proteins. The presence of distinctly conserved amino acid residues in ferredoxin and in silico molecular docking analyses of ferredoxin with the well characterized terminal oxygenase components indicated the structural uniqueness of the ET component in sphingomonads. The predicted substrate specificities, derived from the phylogenetic relationship of each of the RHOs, were examined based on transformation of putative substrates and their structural homologs by the recombinant strains expressing each of the oxygenases and the sole set of available ET proteins. The RHO AhdA1bA2b was functionally characterized for the first time and was found to be capable of transforming ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, p-cymene and biphenyl, in addition to a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overexpression of aromatic catabolic genes in strain PNB, revealed by real-time PCR analyses, is a way forward to understand the complex regulation of degradative genes in sphingomonads. PMID:24918041

  18. Biodegradation Ability and Catabolic Genes of Petroleum-Degrading Sphingomonas koreensis Strain ASU-06 Isolated from Egyptian Oily Soil

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Yasser M.; Shoreit, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06) was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period. PMID:25177681

  19. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust

    PubMed Central

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Rao Uppalapati, Srinivasa; Gill, Upinder S.; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2015-01-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR. PMID:26267598

  20. Association of FcRn expression with lung abnormalities and IVIG catabolism in patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Freiberger, T; Grodecká, L; Ravcuková, B; Kurecová, B; Postránecká, V; Vlcek, J; Jarkovský, J; Thon, V; Litzman, J

    2010-09-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) acts as a key regulator of IgG homeostasis and is an important sensor of luminal infection. We analyzed the influence of FcRn expression on disease phenotype and the catabolism of therapeutically administered intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) in 28 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Patients with generalized bronchiectasis and fibrosis had lower levels of FCRN mRNA compared to patients without these complications (P=0.027 and P=0.041, respectively). Moreover, FCRN mRNA levels correlated negatively with the extent of bronchiectasis and the rate of IgG decline after infusion of IVIG (P=0.027 and P=0.045, respectively). No relationship of FCRN expression with age at disease onset, age at diagnosis, diagnostic delay, IgG levels or frequency of infections before or during replacement immunoglobulin treatment, the presence of lung functional abnormalities, chronic diarrhea, granulomas, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly or autoimmune phenomena was observed. Our results showed that FcRn might play a role in the development of lung structural abnormalities and in the catabolism of IVIG in patients with CVID. PMID:20627700

  1. Bovine lactoferricin, an antimicrobial peptide, is anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic in human articular cartilage and synovium

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Chen, Di; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Guozhi; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a multi-functional peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of bovine lactoferrin. LfcinB was found to antagonize the biological effects mediated by angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in endothelial cells. However, the effect of LfcinB on human articular cartilage remained unknown. Here, our findings demonstrate that LfcinB restored the proteoglycan loss promoted by catabolic factors (interleukin-1 β) IL-1β and FGF-2 in vitro and ex vivo. Mechanistically, LfcinB attenuated the effects of IL-1β and FGF-2 on the expression of cartilage-degrading enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13), destructive cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and inflammatory mediators (iNOS and TLR2). LfcinB induced protective cytokine expression (IL-4 and IL-10), and downregulated aggrecanase basal expression. LfcinB specifically activated ERK MAPK and Akt signaling pathways, which may account for its anti-inflammatory activity. We also revealed that LfcinB exerted similar protective effects on human synovial fibroblasts challenged by IL-1β, with minimal cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results suggest that LfcinB possesses potent anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory bioactivities in human articular tissues, and may be utilized for the prevention and/or treatment of OA in the future. PMID:22740381

  2. Ectoine-Induced Proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti Include an Ectoine ABC-Type Transporter Involved in Osmoprotection and Ectoine Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jebbar, Mohamed; Sohn-Bösser, Linda; Bremer, Erhard; Bernard, Théophile; Blanco, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of ectoine-induced osmoprotection in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a proteomic examination of S. meliloti cells grown in minimal medium supplemented with ectoine was undertaken. This revealed the induction of 10 proteins. The protein products of eight genes were identified by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Five of these genes, with four other genes whose products were not detected on two-dimensional gels, belong to the same gene cluster, which is localized on the pSymB megaplasmid. Four of the nine genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter that was named ehu, for ectoine/hydroxyectoine uptake. This transporter was encoded by four genes (ehuA, ehuB, ehuC, and ehuD) that formed an operon with another gene cluster that contains five genes, named eutABCDE for ectoine utilization. On the basis of sequence homologies, eutABCDE encode enzymes with putative and hypothetical functions in ectoine catabolism. Analysis of the properties of ehuA and eutA mutants suggests that S. meliloti possesses at least one additional ectoine catabolic pathway as well as a lower-affinity transport system for ectoine and hydroxyectoine. The expression of ehuB, as determined by measurements of UidA activity, was shown to be induced by ectoine and hydroxyectoine but not by glycine betaine or by high osmolality. PMID:15687193

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates IL-1β induced alteration of anabolic and catabolic activities in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Shi, Changgui; Xu, Chen; Cao, Peng; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Lianfu; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism, implicating subdued anabolism and enhanced catabolic activities in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of discs. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) are considered to be potent mediators of ECM breakdown. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to participate in cellular anti-inflammatory processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate HO-1 modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells under IL-1β stimulation. Our results revealed that expression of HO-1 decreased considerably during IDD progression. Induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX attenuated the inhibition of sulfate glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II (COL-II) synthesis and ameliorated the reduced expressions of aggrecan, COL-II, SOX-6 and SOX-9 mediated by IL-1β. Induction of HO-1 also reversed the effect of IL-1β on expression of the catabolic markers matrix metalloproteinases-1, 3, 9 and 13. This was combined with inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. These findings suggest that HO-1 might play a pivotal role in IDD, and that manipulating HO-1 expression might mitigate the impairment of ECM metabolism in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD. PMID:26877238

  4. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fugui; Yu, Hai; Lepp, Dion; Shi, Xuejiang; Yang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jielun; Leeson, Steve; Yang, Chengbo; Nie, Shaoping; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    indicated that dietary BG intervention induced 79 and 205 characterized DEGs in the jejunum and liver, respectively. In addition, 255 and 165 TSEGs were detected in the liver and jejunum of BG-fed group, while 162 and 211 TSEGs genes were observed in the liver and jejunum of BD-fed birds, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis with both IPA and DAVID-BR further revealed a significant enrichment of DEGs and TSEGs in the biological processes for reducing the synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion of lipids in the jejunum, while those in the liver were for enhancing the oxidation of ingested lipids and fatty acids. In particular, transcriptional regulators of THRSP and EGR-1 as well as several DEGs involved in the PPAR-α signaling pathway were significantly induced by dietary BG intervention for lipid catabolism. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BG reduces body fat deposition via regulation of gene expression, which is involved in the biological events relating to the reduction of synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion, and improvement of oxidation of lipids and fatty acids. PMID:27508934

  5. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1994-12-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  6. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  7. Mondo/ChREBP-Mlx-Regulated Transcriptional Network Is Essential for Dietary Sugar Tolerance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Havula, Essi; Teesalu, Mari; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Seppälä, Heini; Hasygar, Kiran; Auvinen, Petri; Orešič, Matej; Sandmann, Thomas; Hietakangas, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Sugars are important nutrients for many animals, but are also proposed to contribute to overnutrition-derived metabolic diseases in humans. Understanding the genetic factors governing dietary sugar tolerance therefore has profound biological and medical significance. Paralogous Mondo transcription factors ChREBP and MondoA, with their common binding partner Mlx, are key sensors of intracellular glucose flux in mammals. Here we report analysis of the in vivo function of Drosophila melanogaster Mlx and its binding partner Mondo (ChREBP) in respect to tolerance to dietary sugars. Larvae lacking mlx or having reduced mondo expression show strikingly reduced survival on a diet with moderate or high levels of sucrose, glucose, and fructose. mlx null mutants display widespread changes in lipid and phospholipid profiles, signs of amino acid catabolism, as well as strongly elevated circulating glucose levels. Systematic loss-of-function analysis of Mlx target genes reveals that circulating glucose levels and dietary sugar tolerance can be genetically uncoupled: Krüppel-like transcription factor Cabut and carbonyl detoxifying enzyme Aldehyde dehydrogenase type III are essential for dietary sugar tolerance, but display no influence on circulating glucose levels. On the other hand, Phosphofructokinase 2, a regulator of the glycolysis pathway, is needed for both dietary sugar tolerance and maintenance of circulating glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, we show evidence that fatty acid synthesis, which is a highly conserved Mondo-Mlx-regulated process, does not promote dietary sugar tolerance. In contrast, survival of larvae with reduced fatty acid synthase expression is sugar-dependent. Our data demonstrate that the transcriptional network regulated by Mondo-Mlx is a critical determinant of the healthful dietary spectrum allowing Drosophila to exploit sugar-rich nutrient sources. PMID:23593032

  8. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Acclimation-Primed Processes Involved in the Acquisition of Desiccation Tolerance in Boea hygrometrica.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Wang, Bo; Phillips, Jonathan; Zhang, Zhen-Nan; Du, Hong; Xu, Tao; Huang, Lian-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Guang-Hui; Li, Wen-Long; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Ling; Liu, Yong-Xiu; Deng, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Boea hygrometrica resurrection plants require a period of acclimation by slow soil-drying in order to survive a subsequent period of rapid desiccation. The molecular basis of this observation was investigated by comparing gene expression profiles under different degrees of water deprivation. Transcripts were clustered according to the expression profiles in plants that were air-dried (rapid desiccation), soil-dried (gradual desiccation), rehydrated (acclimated) and air-dried after acclimation. Although phenotypically indistinguishable, it was shown by principal component analysis that the gene expression profiles in rehydrated, acclimated plants resemble those of desiccated plants more closely than those of hydrated acclimated plants. Enrichment analysis based on gene ontology was performed to deconvolute the processes that accompanied desiccation tolerance. Transcripts associated with autophagy and α-tocopherol accumulation were found to be activated in both air-dried, acclimated plants and soil-dried non-acclimated plants. Furthermore, transcripts associated with biosynthesis of ascorbic acid, cell wall catabolism, chaperone-assisted protein folding, respiration and macromolecule catabolism were activated and maintained during soil-drying and rehydration. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that activation of these processes leads to the establishment of an optimal physiological and cellular state that enables tolerance during rapid air-drying. Our study provides a novel insight into the transcriptional regulation of critical priming responses to enable survival following rapid dehydration in B. hygrometrica. PMID:25907569

  9. Intelligent failure-tolerant control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure-tolerant control is presented, beginning with robust control, progressing through parallel and analytical redundancy, and ending with rule-based systems and artificial neural networks. By design or implementation, failure-tolerant control systems are 'intelligent' systems. All failure-tolerant systems require some degrees of robustness to protect against catastrophic failure; failure tolerance often can be improved by adaptivity in decision-making and control, as well as by redundancy in measurement and actuation. Reliability, maintainability, and survivability can be enhanced by failure tolerance, although each objective poses different goals for control system design. Artificial intelligence concepts are helpful for integrating and codifying failure-tolerant control systems, not as alternatives but as adjuncts to conventional design methods.

  10. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  11. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  12. Increased HDL Size and Enhanced Apo A-I Catabolic Rates Are Associated With Doxorubicin-Induced Proteinuria in New Zealand White Rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-Olmos, Victoria; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Luna-Luna, María; Flores-Castillo, Cristobal; Martínez-Ramírez, Miriam; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Franco, Martha; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Roldán, Francisco-Javier; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Vega, Mónica; Fragoso, José-Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    The catabolism and structure of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) may be the determining factor of their atheroprotective properties. To better understand the role of the kidney in HDL catabolism, here we characterized HDL subclasses and the catabolic rates of apo A-I in a rabbit model of proteinuria. Proteinuria was induced by intravenous administration of doxorubicin in New Zealand white rabbits (n = 10). HDL size and HDL subclass lipids were assessed by electrophoresis of the isolated lipoproteins. The catabolic rate of HDL-apo A-I was evaluated by exogenous radiolabelling with iodine-131. Doxorubicin induced significant proteinuria after 4 weeks (4.47 ± 0.55 vs. 0.30 ± 0.02 g/L of protein in urine, P < 0.001) associated with increased uremia, creatininemia, and cardiotoxicity. Large HDL2b augmented significantly during proteinuria, whereas small HDL3b and HDL3c decreased compared to basal conditions. HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3a subclasses were enriched with triacylglycerols in proteinuric animals as determined by the triacylglycerol-to-phospholipid ratio; the cholesterol content in HDL subclasses remained unchanged. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) of [(131)I]-apo A-I in the proteinuric rabbits was faster (FCR = 0.036 h(-1)) compared to control rabbits group (FCR = 0.026 h(-1), P < 0.05). Apo E increased and apo A-I decreased in HDL, whereas PON-1 activity increased in proteinuric rabbits. Proteinuria was associated with an increased number of large HDL2b particles and a decreased number of small HDL3b and 3c. Proteinuria was also connected to an alteration in HDL subclass lipids, apolipoprotein content of HDL, high paraoxonase-1 activity, and a rise in the fractional catabolic rate of the [(131)I]-apo A-I. PMID:26781765

  13. Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Sustained Virological Response on Immunosuppressive Tryptophan Catabolism in ART-Treated HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Mehraj, Vikram; Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Vyboh, Kishanda; Kema, Ido; Rollet, Kathleen; Paulino Ramirez, Robert; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously reported an association between tryptophan (Trp) catabolism and immune dysfunction in HIV monoinfection. Coinfection with HIV is associated with more rapid evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV)–associated liver disease despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), possibly due to immune dysregulation. We hypothesized that liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV coinfection would be associated with immune dysfunction and alterations in Trp metabolism. Methods: Trp catabolism and inflammatory soluble markers were assessed in plasma samples from ART-treated HIV/HCV-coinfected patients (n = 90) compared with ART-treated HIV-monoinfected patients and noninfected subjects. Furthermore, 17 additional coinfected patients with sustained virological response (SVR) were assessed longitudinally 6 months after completion of interferon-α/ribavirin treatment. Results: HIV/HCV patients had higher Trp catabolism compared with HIV-monoinfected and healthy individuals. Elevated kynurenine levels in HIV/HCV patients with liver fibrosis correlated with the prognostic aspartate aminotransaminase to platelet ratio (APRI scores) and insulin levels. Furthermore, HIV/HCV patients had elevated levels of disease progression markers interleukin-6 and induced protein 10 and shared similar levels of markers of microbial translocation (intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) compared with HIV-monoinfected and healthy individuals. Successful HCV treatment improved APRI score and markers of disease progression and microbial translocation although elevated Trp catabolism remained unchanged 6 months after SVR. Conclusion: ART-treated HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had elevated immunosuppressive Trp catabolism when compared with monoinfected HIV-treated patients, which did not normalize after SVR. These findings suggest that a necroinflammatory liver syndrome persists through inflammation by Trp catabolism after 6 month of SVR. PMID:26436613

  14. Fault-tolerant processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A fault-tolerant, fiber optic interconnect, or backplane, which serves as a via for data transfer between modules. Fault tolerance algorithms are embedded in the backplane by dividing the backplane into a read bus and a write bus and placing a redundancy management unit (RMU) between the read bus and the write bus so that all data transmitted by the write bus is subjected to the fault tolerance algorithms before the data is passed for distribution to the read bus. The RMU provides both backplane control and fault tolerance.

  15. Comparative Expression Profiling of Desiccation Tolerant and Sensitive Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought tolerance and desiccation tolerance have often been cited as manifestations of the same mechanism: desiccation tolerance being the extreme form of drought tolerance. However, there is a fundamental difference between drought and desiccation tolerance; drought tolerance mechanisms include way...

  16. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  17. [Radiation Tolerant Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Research work in the providing radiation tolerant electronics to NASA and the commercial sector is reported herein. There are four major sections to this report: (1) Special purpose VLSI technology section discusses the status of the VLSI projects as well as the new background technologies that have been developed; (2) Lossless data compression results provide the background and direction of new data compression pursued under this grant; (3) Commercial technology transfer presents an itemization of the commercial technology transfer; and (4) Delivery of VLSI to the Government is a solution and progress report that shows how the Government and Government contractors are gaining access to the technology that has been developed by the MRC.

  18. Tolerances in panoramic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Dallaire, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Almost every aspect concerning the optical design of panoramic lenses brings new challenges to optical designers. Examples of these include ray tracing programs having problems finding the entrance pupil which is moving through the field-of-view, optimization, production particularities due to the shape of the lenses, and ways of tolerancing these systems having strong distortion. This last topic will be discussed in this paper. We will start from a historical perspective on the understanding of panoramic imagery. This will lead us to the modern panoramic imager called the Panomorph lens. We will discuss the particular case of the tolerance of the front surface (most of the time a freeform surface) and the impact on the image quality, both image footprint and field curvature. We will explain the behavior using first and second order approaches.

  19. Pathways to Tolerance: Student Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Dorothy, Ed.; Stanhope, Victoria, Ed.

    Ideas for schools to support tolerance and celebrate student diversity are presented in this volume of reprinted articles. Titles include: (1) "One of Us, One of Them: Lessons in Diversity for a School Psychologist" (M. M. Chittooran); (2) "The Tolerance-in-Action Campaign" (H. M. Knoff); (3) "Immigrant Parents and the School" (R. Rhodes, D.…

  20. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  1. Somatic hypermutation of human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, a pathway for DNA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Guétard, Denise; Henry, Michel; Eckhoff, Grace; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 (A3A–A3H) locus encodes six cytidine deaminases that edit single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with uridine. Although several cytidine deaminases are clearly restriction factors for retroviruses and hepadnaviruses, it is not known if APOBEC3 enzymes have roles outside of these settings. It is shown here that both human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are vulnerable to somatic hypermutation by A3 deaminases, with APOBEC3A standing out among them. The degree of editing is much greater in patients lacking the uracil DNA-glycolyase gene, indicating that the observed levels of editing reflect a dynamic composed of A3 editing and DNA catabolism involving uracil DNA-glycolyase. Nonetheless, hyper- and lightly mutated sequences went hand in hand, raising the hypothesis that recurrent low-level mutation by APOBEC3A could catalyze the transition from a healthy to a cancer genome. PMID:21368204

  2. The catabolism of phosphatidylethanolamine by the rumen protozoon Entodinium caudatum and its conversion into the N-(1-carboxyethyl) derivative

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, G. S.; Kemp, P.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1971-01-01

    1. The N-(2-hydroxyethyl)alanine esterified to phosphatidic acid in anaerobic ciliate rumen protozoa has the l configuration. 2. Labelling experiments with Entodinium caudatum cultures using [32P]Pi [2-14C]ethanolamine and 32P- and 14C-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine show that phosphatidylethanolamine is the direct lipid precursor of the N-(2-hydroxyethyl)alanine-containing phospholipid. 3. Labelling experiments with [14C]starch, [14C]lactate and [14C]pyruvate with E. caudatum cultures indicate that a three-carbon glycolytic intermediate is probably the precursor of the N-(1-carboxyethyl) grouping which substitutes on the amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine. 4. [32P]phosphatidylethanolamine is catabolized by E. caudatum forming initially glycerylphosphorylethanolamine and subsequently glycerophosphate and Pi. A little phosphorylethanolamine formed may possibly arise from bacterial enzymes ingested by the protozoa. PMID:5001897

  3. The evolution of nutritional support in long term ICU patients: from multisystem organ failure to persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Martin; Gabrielli, Andrea; Moore, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organ failure (MOF) is an evolving pathologic phenotype that plagues intensive care units globally. This manuscript aims to depict the evolution of single organ failure through multiple organ failure, ending in the newest phenotype called persistent inflammation, immunosuppression, catabolism syndrome (PICS). Among the other MOF phenotypes discussed are systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome. Along with a review of the four phenotypes of MOF there is a review of the current literature on nutritional supplementation. Discussed in these sections are possible etiologies for the various progression of MOF, total enteral nutrition (TPN) versus early enteral nutrition (EEN), early versus late parenteral nutrition, glycemic control, and new enteral formulas. Finally, as the newest phenotype, PICS, has evolved we try to make inferences from similar pathologic states to recommend nutritional support that has proven beneficial. PMID:25697882

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 is principally responsible for fibroblast growth factor 2-induced catabolic activities in human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cartilage degeneration driven by catabolic stimuli is a critical pathophysiological process in osteoarthritis (OA). We have defined fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) as a degenerative mediator in adult human articular chondrocytes. Biological effects mediated by FGF-2 include inhibition of proteoglycan production, up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and stimulation of other catabolic factors. In this study, we identified the specific receptor responsible for the catabolic functions of FGF-2, and established a pathophysiological connection between the FGF-2 receptor and OA. Methods Primary human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer (24 hours) or alginate beads (21 days), and stimulated with FGF-2 or FGF18, in the presence or absence of FGFR1 (FGF receptor 1) inhibitor. Proteoglycan accumulation and chondrocyte proliferation were assessed by dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and DNA assay, respectively. Expression of FGFRs (FGFR1 to FGFR4) was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The distinctive roles of FGFR1 and FGFR3 after stimulation with FGF-2 were evaluated using either pharmacological inhibitors or FGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA). Luciferase reporter gene assays were used to quantify the effects of FGF-2 and FGFR1 inhibitor on MMP-13 promoter activity. Results Chondrocyte proliferation was significantly enhanced in the presence of FGF-2 stimulation, which was inhibited by the pharmacological inhibitor of FGFR1. Proteoglycan accumulation was reduced by 50% in the presence of FGF-2, and this reduction was successfully rescued by FGFR1 inhibitor. FGFR1 inhibitors also fully reversed the up-regulation of MMP-13 expression and promoter activity stimulated by FGF-2. Blockade of FGFR1 signaling by either chemical inhibitors or siRNA targeting FGFR1 rather than FGFR3 abrogated the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 13 (MMP-13) and a disintegrin and

  5. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore » and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  6. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  7. [Heterogeneity of leucinosis. Correlations between clinical manifestations, protein tolerance and enzyme deficiency].

    PubMed

    Saudubray, J M; Amédée-Manesme, O; Munnich, A; Ogier, H; Depondt, E; Charpentier, C; Coudé, F X; Rey, F; Frézal, J

    1982-12-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of branched-chain aminoacid (BCAA) catabolism due to a defect of BC ketoacid decarboxylation. Beside the classical form of the disease, general variant forms have been recently reported. From our personal experience in 21 patients consisting of 14 patients with classical MSUD and 7 patients with "variant" forms (1 intermittent, 2 subacute forms, 1 lipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency and 3 composite heterozygotes), we tried to correlate clinical features with protein tolerance and enzyme activity. All classical forms share an acute neonatal presentation, with a low leucine tolerance (m +/- SD = 465 +/- 88 mg per day), and a very low enzyme activity (m +/- SD = 2.5 +/- 1.5% of controls), mild variations being consistent with a possible polyallelism within this group. All "variant" forms share a late onset with a reasonable leucine tolerance (2-3 grams per day) and a fair enzyme activity, ranging from 7 to 20% of controls. However, no strict correlation could be found between the severity of the outcome and the extent of the residual enzyme activity, since acute episodes or chronic deterioration occurred even in "variants", irrespective of the level of their enzyme activity. Finally, our data suggest that variant forms could result from a composite heterozygotism, combining heterozygotism for the gene of classical MSUD and heterozygotism for a "petite" mutation, undetectable when isolated. The occurrence of classical MSUD and "variant" forms of the disease within a single family of our series further supports this hypothesis. PMID:6897702

  8. Identification and characterization of D-xylose reductase involved in pentose catabolism of the zygomycetous fungus Rhizomucor pusillus.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Hidenobu; Yamasaki-Yashiki, Shino; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Rhizomucor pusillus NBRC 4578 efficiently produces ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass because of its ability to ferment not only d-glucose, but also d-xylose. When the strain was cultivated on d-xylose, ethanol was gradually formed in the culture medium with a decrease in d-xylose and the simultaneous accumulation of xylitol, which suggested that the strain catabolized d-xylose with d-xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). XR (RpXR) was purified to homogeneity from the crude extract prepared from the mycelia of the strain grown on d-xylose. The purified enzyme was found to be NADPH-dependent and prefer pentoses such as d-xylose, d-ribose, and l-arabinose as substrates. Isolation of the genomic DNA and cDNA of the xyl1 gene encoding RpXR revealed that the gene was interrupted by two introns and the exon of the gene encoded a protein composed of 322 amino acids with a Mr of 36,724. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RpXR is more related to 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenases from Mucoraseae fungi rather than the previously reported fungal XRs. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that transcription of the xyl1 gene was marked in the presence of d-xylose and l-arabinose, but was week in the presence of d-glucose. These biochemical and expression analyses suggest that RpXR is involved in the catabolism of l-arabinose as well as d-xylose. This is the first report of the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of XR from zygomycetous fungi. PMID:25041710

  9. Administration of deoxyribonucleosides or inhibition of their catabolism as a pharmacological approach for mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Yolanda; González-Vioque, Emiliano; Scarpelli, Mauro; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Caballero, Andrea; Hirano, Michio; Martí, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS) is characterized by a reduction in mtDNA copy number and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in affected tissues. A subgroup of MDS is caused by mutations in genes that disrupt deoxyribonucleotide metabolism, which ultimately leads to limited availability of one or several deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), and subsequent mtDNA depletion. Here, using in vitro experimental approaches (primary cell culture of deoxyguanosine kinase-deficient cells and thymidine-induced mtDNA depletion in culture as a model of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, MNGIE), we show that supplements of those deoxyribonucleosides (dNs) involved in each biochemical defect (deoxyguanosine or deoxycytidine, dCtd) prevents mtDNA copy number reduction. Similar effects can be obtained by specific inhibition of dN catabolism using tetrahydrouridine (THU; inhibitor of cytidine deaminase) or immucillin H (inhibitor of purine nucleoside phosphorylase). In addition, using an MNGIE animal model, we provide evidence that mitochondrial dNTP content can be modulated in vivo by systemic administration of dCtd or THU. In spite of the severity associated with diseases due to defects in mtDNA replication, there are currently no effective therapeutic options available. Only in the case of MNGIE, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has proven efficient as a long-term therapeutic strategy. We propose increasing cellular availability of the deficient dNTP precursor by direct administration of the dN or inhibition of its catabolism, as a potential treatment for mtDNA depletion syndrome caused by defects in dNTP metabolism. PMID:24362886

  10. In situ, real-time catabolic gene expression: Extraction and characterization of naphthalene dioxygenase mRNA transcripts from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Bakermans, C.; Madsen, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors developed procedures for isolating and characterizing in situ-transcribed mRNA from groundwater microorganisms catabolizing naphthalene at a coal tar waste-contaminated site. Groundwater was pumped through 0.22-{micro}m-pore-size filters, which were then frozen to dry ice-ethanol. RNA was extracted from the frozen filters by boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate lysis and acidic phenol-chloroform extraction. Transcript characterization was performed with a series of PCR primers designed to amplify nahAc homologs. Several primer pairs were found to amplify nahAc homologs representing the entire diversity of the naphthalene-degrading genes. The environmental RNA extract was reverse transcribed, and the resultant mixture of cDNAs was amplified by PCR. A digoxigenin-labeled probe mixture was produced by PCR amplification of groundwater cDNA. This probe mixture hybridized under stringent conditions with the corresponding PCR products from naphthalene-degrading bacteria carrying a variety of nahAc homologs, indicating that diverse dioxygenase transcripts had been retrieved from groundwater. Diluted and undiluted cDNA preparations were independently amplified, and 28 of the resulting PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparisons revealed two major groups related to the dioxygenase genes ndoB and dntAc, previously cloned from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 and Burkholderia sp. strain DNT, respectively. A distinctive subgroup of sequences was found only in experiments performed with the undiluted cDNA preparation. To the authors` knowledge, these results are the first to directly document in situ transcription of genes encoding naphthalene catabolism at a contaminated site by indigenous microorganisms. The retrieved sequences represent greater diversity than has been detected at the study site by culture-based approaches.

  11. Lactating Porcine Mammary Tissue Catabolizes Branched-Chain Amino Acids for Glutamine and Aspartate Synthesis1–3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Knabe, Darrell A.; Kim, Sung Woo; Lynch, Christopher J.; Hutson, Susan M.; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-01-01

    The uptake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) from plasma by lactating porcine mammary gland substantially exceeds their output in milk, whereas glutamine output is 125% greater than its uptake from plasma. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that BCAA are catabolized for glutamine synthesis in mammary tissue. Mammary tissue slices from sows on d 28 of lactation were incubated at 37°C for 1 h in Krebs buffer containing 0.5 or 2 mmol/L l-[1-14C]– or l-[U-14C]–labeled leucine, isoleucine, or valine. Rates of BCAA transport and degradation in mammary tissue were high, with ∼60% of transaminated BCAA undergoing oxidative decarboxylation and the remainder being released as branched-chain α-ketoacids (BCKA). Most (∼70%) of the decarboxylated BCAA were oxidized to CO2. Rates of net BCAA transamination were similar to rates of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, asparagine, and alanine synthesis. Consistent with the metabolic data, mammary tissue expressed BCAA aminotransferase (BCAT), BCKA decarboxylase, glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate-oxaloacetate aminotransferase, glutamate-pyruvate aminotransferase, and asparagine synthetase, but no phosphate-activated glutaminase, activity. Western blot analysis indicated relatively high levels of mitochondrial and cytosolic isoforms of BCAT, as well as BCKA dehydrogenase and GS proteins in mammary tissue. Our results demonstrate that glutamine and aspartate (abundant amino acids in milk protein) were the major nitrogenous products of BCAA catabolism in lactating porcine mammary tissue and provide a biochemical basis to explain an enrichment of glutamine and aspartate in sow milk. PMID:19549750

  12. Rewiring of the Ppr1 Zinc Cluster Transcription Factor from Purine Catabolism to Pyrimidine Biogenesis in the Saccharomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Tebung, Walters Aji; Choudhury, Baharul I; Tebbji, Faiza; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2016-07-11

    Metabolic pathways are largely conserved in eukaryotes, but the transcriptional regulation of these pathways can sometimes vary between species; this has been termed "rewiring." Recently, it has been established that in the Saccharomyces lineage starting from Naumovozyma castellii, genes involved in allantoin breakdown have been genomically relocated to form the DAL cluster. The formation of the DAL cluster occurred along with the loss of urate permease (UAP) and urate oxidase (UOX), reducing the requirement for oxygen and bypassing the candidate Ppr1 inducer, uric acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this allantoin catabolism cluster is regulated by the transcription factor Dal82, which is not present in many of the pre-rearrangement fungal species. We have used ChIP-chip analysis, transcriptional profiling of an activated Ppr1 protein, bioinformatics, and nitrogen utilization studies to establish that in Candida albicans the zinc cluster transcription factor Ppr1 controls this allantoin catabolism regulon. Intriguingly, in S. cerevisiae, the Ppr1 ortholog binds the same DNA motif (CGG(N6)CCG) as in C. albicans but serves as a regulator of pyrimidine biosynthesis. This transcription factor rewiring appears to have taken place at the same phylogenetic step as the formation of the rearranged DAL cluster. This transfer of the control of allantoin degradation from Ppr1 to Dal82, together with the repositioning of Ppr1 to the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, may have resulted from a switch to a metabolism that could exploit hypoxic conditions in the lineage leading to N. castellii and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27321996

  13. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  14. Differentiation of carbazole catabolic operons by replacement of the regulated promoter via transposition of an insertion sequence.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Urata, Masaaki; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2006-03-31

    The carbazole catabolic car operons from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 and Janthinobacterium sp. J3 have nearly identical nucleotide sequences in their structural and intergenic regions but not in their flanking regions. Transposition of ISPre1 from the anthranilate catabolic ant operon located an inducible promoter Pant upstream of the carCA10 operon, which is regulated by the AraC/XylS family activator AntR in response to anthranilate. The transposed Pant drives transcription of the carCA10 operon, which is composed of the car-AaAaBaBbCAcAdDFECA10 structural genes. Transcriptional fusion truncating Pant upstream of carAaCA10 resulted in constitutive luciferase expression. Primer extension analysis identified a transcription start point of the constitutive mRNA of the carCA10 operon at 385 nucleotides upstream of the carAaCA10 translation start point, and the PcarAa promoter was found. On the other hand, a GntR family regulatory gene carRJ3 is divergently located upstream of the carJ3 operon. The Pu13 promoter, required for inducible transcription of the carJ3 operon in the presence of carbazole, was identified in the region upstream of carAaJ3, which had been replaced with the Pant promoter in the carCA10 operon. Deletion of carRJ3 from a transcriptional fusion resulted in high level constitutive expression from Pu13. Purified CarRJ3 protein bound at two operator sequences OI and OII, showing that CarRJ3 directly represses Pu13 in the absence of its inducer, which was identified as 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-(2'-aminophenyl)hexa-2,4-dienoate, an intermediate of the carbazole degradation pathway. PMID:16455652

  15. The Use of Amino Sugars by Bacillus subtilis: Presence of a Unique Operon for the Catabolism of Glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Gaugué, Isabelle; Oberto, Jacques; Putzer, Harald; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    B. subtilis grows more rapidly using the amino sugar glucosamine as carbon source, than with N-acetylglucosamine. Genes for the transport and metabolism of N-acetylglucosamine (nagP and nagAB) are found in all the sequenced Bacilli (except Anoxybacillus flavithermus). In B. subtilis there is an additional operon (gamAP) encoding second copies of genes for the transport and catabolism of glucosamine. We have developed a method to make multiple deletion mutations in B. subtilis employing an excisable spectinomycin resistance cassette. Using this method we have analysed the contribution of the different genes of the nag and gam operons for their role in utilization of glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Faster growth on glucosamine is due to the presence of the gamAP operon, which is strongly induced by glucosamine. Although the gamA and nagB genes encode isozymes of GlcN6P deaminase, catabolism of N-acetylglucosamine relies mostly upon the gamA gene product. The genes for use of N-acetylglucosamine, nagAB and nagP, are repressed by YvoA (NagR), a GntR family regulator, whose gene is part of the nagAB yvoA(nagR) operon. The gamAP operon is repressed by YbgA, another GntR family repressor, whose gene is expressed divergently from gamAP. The nagAB yvoA synton is found throughout the Bacilli and most firmicutes. On the other hand the ybgA-gamAP synton, which includes the ybgB gene for a small protein of unknown provenance, is only found in B. subtilis (and a few very close relatives). The origin of ybgBA-gamAP grouping is unknown but synteny analysis suggests lateral transfer from an unidentified donor. The presence of gamAP has enabled B. subtilis to efficiently use glucosamine as carbon source. PMID:23667565

  16. A Cytosolic Acyltransferase Contributes to Triacylglycerol Synthesis in Sucrose-Rescued Arabidopsis Seed Oil Catabolism Mutants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M. Luisa; Whitehead, Lynne; He, Zhesi; Gazda, Valeria; Gilday, Alison; Kozhevnikova, Ekaterina; Vaistij, Fabián E.; Larson, Tony R.; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) levels and oil bodies persist in sucrose (Suc)-rescued Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings disrupted in seed oil catabolism. This study set out to establish if TAG levels persist as a metabolically inert pool when downstream catabolism is disrupted, or if other mechanisms, such as fatty acid (FA) recycling into TAG are operating. We show that TAG composition changes significantly in Suc-rescued seedlings compared with that found in dry seeds, with 18:2 and 18:3 accumulating. However, 20:1 FA is not efficiently recycled back into TAG in young seedlings, instead partitioning into the membrane lipid fraction and diacylglycerol. In the lipolysis mutant sugar dependent1and the β-oxidation double mutant acx1acx2 (for acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase), levels of TAG actually increased in seedlings growing on Suc. We performed a transcriptomic study and identified up-regulation of an acyltransferase gene, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE3 (DGAT3), with homology to a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) cytosolic acyltransferase. The acyl-Coenzyme A substrate for this acyltransferase accumulates in mutants that are blocked in oil breakdown postlipolysis. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed involvement in TAG synthesis and specificity toward 18:3 and 18:2 FAs. Double-mutant analysis with the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter mutant peroxisomal ABC transporter1 indicated involvement of DGAT3 in the partitioning of 18:3 into TAG in mutant seedlings growing on Suc. Fusion of the DGAT3 protein with green fluorescent protein confirmed localization to the cytosol of N. benthamiana. This work has demonstrated active recycling of 18:2 and 18:3 FAs into TAG when seed oil breakdown is blocked in a process involving a soluble cytosolic acyltransferase. PMID:22760209

  17. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kristjánsson, Bjarni K.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-κB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  18. Reversal of the Kynurenine Pathway of Tryptophan Catabolism May Improve Depression in ART-treated HIV-infected Ugandans

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Priscilla; Tsai, Alexander C.; Muzoora, Conrad; Kembabazi, Annet; Weiser, Sheri D.; Huang, Yong; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Bangsberg, David R.; Hunt, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent among HIV-infected persons, and depression symptom severity improves during the course of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART). The potential biologic pathways explaining these phenomena remain unclear. We investigated the extent to which ART-mediated suppression of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism (via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 and potentially other sources) may correlate with improvements in depression symptom severity in this setting. Method We used the first year of data from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes Study, a prospective cohort of 504 HIV-infected individuals initiating their first ART regimen in rural Uganda. We fitted random-effects regression models to estimate the associations between plasma tryptophan, plasma kynurenine, dietary diversity, and self-reported depression symptom severity. Results Greater depressive symptoms were associated with both lower plasma tryptophan and higher plasma kynurenine/tryptophan (KT) ratio over 12-month follow-up. In multivariable-adjusted models, declines in KT ratio and increases in plasma tryptophan levels partially explained ART-mediated improvements in depressive symptom severity. The association between KT ratio and depression symptom severity was stronger among persons with protein-deficient diets than among those with protein-rich diets. Conclusions IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism may contribute to depression symptom severity among HIV-infected individuals, particularly among those with poor dietary protein intake. ART-mediated improvements in depressive symptom severity may also be at least partially mediated by immunologic mechanisms. Interventions to reduce immune activation, and dietary protein supplementation, may be promising strategies to further reduce depression in this setting. PMID:24220289

  19. Catabolism of (64)Cu and Cy5.5-labeled human serum albumin in a tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Choong Mo; Kim, Hyunjung; Koo, Hyun-Jung; Park, Jin Won; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung-Han; Kim, Byung-Tae; Choe, Yearn Seong

    2016-07-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma, has been used as a drug carrier for the last few decades. Residualizingly radiolabeled serum albumin has been reported to be avidly taken up by tumors of sarcoma-bearing mice and to most likely undergo lysosomal degradation. In this study, we prepared (64)Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and Cy5.5-conjugated HSA (dual probe), and evaluated its tumor uptake and catabolism. Two dual probes were prepared using different DOTA conjugation sites of HSA (one via Lys residues and the other via the Cys residue). (64)Cu-DOTA-Lys-HSA-Cy5.5 (dual probe-Lys) exhibited higher uptake by RR1022 sarcoma cells in vitro than (64)Cu-DOTA-Cys-HSA-Cy5.5 (dual probe-Cys). In RR1022 tumor-bearing mice, the two dual probes showed a similar level of tumor uptake, but uptake of dual probe-Lys was reduced in the liver and spleen compared to dual probe-Cys, probably because of the presence of a higher number of DOTA molecules in the former. At 24 and 48 h after injection, dual probe-Lys was intact or partially degraded in blood, liver, kidney, and tumor samples, but (64)Cu-DOTA-Lys was observed in the urine using radioactivity detection. Similarly, Cy5.5-Lys was observed in the urine using fluorescence detection. These results indicate that dual probe-Lys may be useful for predicting the catabolic fate of drug-HSA conjugates. PMID:27098932

  20. Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma Composition on Anabolic and Catabolic Activities in Equine Cartilage and Meniscal Explants

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Rodkey, William G.; Frisbie, David D.; Steadman, J.Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of single- and double-spin preparations of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on anabolic and catabolic activities of cartilage and meniscal explants in vitro. Methods: Single- and double-spin PRP was prepared using laboratory processing or commercial kits. The cellular contents were quantified, and each PRP was mixed in equal quantities with cell culture medium and added to cartilage or meniscus explant cultures, with or without interleukin 1 β (IL-1β). Extracellular matrix synthesis was quantified over 24 hours via 35S-sulfate and 3H-proline incorporation, while gene expression of catabolic enzymes was evaluated using real-time PCR. Results: The platelet concentration in single-spin laboratory PRP was 59% higher than blood. Platelet and white blood cell concentrations in single-spin laboratory and kit PRP were not significantly different, while the double-spin kit resulted in approximately 2.5-fold higher platelet and approximately 400-fold higher white blood cell concentrations. In cartilage cultures without IL-1β, radiolabel incorporation in single-spin PRP cultures was significantly higher than in double-spin cultures. Similar results were obtained for 35S-sulfate incorporation in meniscus cultures without IL-1β. In IL-1β, radiolabel incorporation was largely similar among all PRPs. After 24 hours of culture, ADAMTS-4 gene expression in cartilage was lowest for single-spin PRP, while expression in the double-spin kit was not significantly different from double-spin laboratory PRP in which platelets were concentrated 6-fold. Conclusions This study suggests that single-spin PRP preparations may be the most advantageous for intra-articular applications and that double-spin systems should be considered with caution. PMID:26069637

  1. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit V.; Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  2. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  3. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  4. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases the Levels of Catabolic Molecules and Cellular Dedifferentiation in the Meniscus of a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Se-Il; Kim, Han-Jun; Kim, Sukyoung; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Do, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Despite the susceptibility to frequent intrinsic and extrinsic injuries, especially in the inner zone, the meniscus does not heal spontaneously owing to its poor vascularity. In this study, the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), containing various growth factors, on meniscal mechanisms was examined under normal and post-traumatic inflammatory conditions. Isolated primary meniscal cells of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were incubated for 3, 10, 14 and 21 days with PRP(−), 10% PRP (PRP(+)), IL(+) or IL(+)PRP(+). The meniscal cells were collected and examined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Culture media were examined by immunoblot analyses for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) catabolic molecules. PRP containing growth factors improved the cellular viability of meniscal cells in a concentration-dependent manner at Days 1, 4 and 7. However, based on RT-PCR, meniscal cells demonstrated dedifferentiation, along with an increase in type I collagen in the PRP(+) and in IL(+)PRP(+). In PRP(+), the aggrecan expression levels were lower than in the PRP(−) until Day 21. The protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were higher in each PRP group, i.e., PRP(+) and IL(+)PRP(+), at each culture time. A reproducible 2-mm circular defect on the meniscus of NZW rabbit was used to implant fibrin glue (control) or PRP in vivo. After eight weeks, the lesions in the control and PRP groups were occupied with fibrous tissue, but not with meniscal cells. This study shows that PRP treatment of the meniscus results in an increase of catabolic molecules, especially those related to IL-1α-induced inflammation, and that PRP treatment for an in vivo meniscus injury accelerates fibrosis, instead of meniscal cartilage. PMID:26784189

  5. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Macqueen, Daniel J; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-06-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-kappaB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  6. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases the Levels of Catabolic Molecules and Cellular Dedifferentiation in the Meniscus of a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Se-Il; Kim, Han-Jun; Kim, Sukyoung; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Do, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Despite the susceptibility to frequent intrinsic and extrinsic injuries, especially in the inner zone, the meniscus does not heal spontaneously owing to its poor vascularity. In this study, the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), containing various growth factors, on meniscal mechanisms was examined under normal and post-traumatic inflammatory conditions. Isolated primary meniscal cells of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were incubated for 3, 10, 14 and 21 days with PRP(-), 10% PRP (PRP(+)), IL(+) or IL(+)PRP(+). The meniscal cells were collected and examined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Culture media were examined by immunoblot analyses for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) catabolic molecules. PRP containing growth factors improved the cellular viability of meniscal cells in a concentration-dependent manner at Days 1, 4 and 7. However, based on RT-PCR, meniscal cells demonstrated dedifferentiation, along with an increase in type I collagen in the PRP(+) and in IL(+)PRP(+). In PRP(+), the aggrecan expression levels were lower than in the PRP(-) until Day 21. The protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were higher in each PRP group, i.e., PRP(+) and IL(+)PRP(+), at each culture time. A reproducible 2-mm circular defect on the meniscus of NZW rabbit was used to implant fibrin glue (control) or PRP in vivo. After eight weeks, the lesions in the control and PRP groups were occupied with fibrous tissue, but not with meniscal cells. This study shows that PRP treatment of the meniscus results in an increase of catabolic molecules, especially those related to IL-1α-induced inflammation, and that PRP treatment for an in vivo meniscus injury accelerates fibrosis, instead of meniscal cartilage. PMID:26784189

  7. The N‐acetylglucosamine catabolic gene cluster in Trichoderma reesei is controlled by the Ndt80‐like transcription factor RON1

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Lisa; Gaderer, Romana; Flipphi, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chitin is an important structural constituent of fungal cell walls composed of N‐acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) monosaccharides, but catabolism of GlcNAc has not been studied in filamentous fungi so far. In the yeast C andida albicans, the genes encoding the three enzymes responsible for stepwise conversion of GlcNAc to fructose‐6‐phosphate are clustered. In this work, we analysed GlcNAc catabolism in ascomycete filamentous fungi and found that the respective genes are also clustered in these fungi. In contrast to C . albicans, the cluster often contains a gene for an Ndt80‐like transcription factor, which we named RON1 (regulator of N‐acetylglucosamine catabolism 1). Further, a gene for a glycoside hydrolase 3 protein related to bacterial N‐acetylglucosaminidases can be found in the GlcNAc gene cluster in filamentous fungi. Functional analysis in T richoderma reesei showed that the transcription factor RON1 is a key activator of the GlcNAc gene cluster and essential for GlcNAc catabolism. Furthermore, we present an evolutionary analysis of Ndt80‐like proteins in Ascomycota. All GlcNAc cluster genes, as well as the GlcNAc transporter gene ngt1, and an additional transcriptional regulator gene, csp2, encoding the homolog of N eurospora crassa  CSP2/GRHL, were functionally characterised by gene expression analysis and phenotypic characterisation of knockout strains in T . reesei. PMID:26481444

  8. Role of sdhA and pfkA and catabolism of reduced carbon during colonization of cucumber roots by Enterobacter cloacae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strain A-11 of the plant-beneficial bacterium Enterobacter cloacae was used as a tool to determine the importance of pfkA and catabolism of carbohydrates in exudate to the plant-associated activities of root colonization and suppression of damping-off. E . cloacae A-11 is a near-isogenic mutant of ...

  9. The N-acetylglucosamine catabolic gene cluster in Trichoderma reesei is controlled by the Ndt80-like transcription factor RON1.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Lisa; Gaderer, Romana; Flipphi, Michel; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena

    2016-02-01

    Chitin is an important structural constituent of fungal cell walls composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) monosaccharides, but catabolism of GlcNAc has not been studied in filamentous fungi so far. In the yeast Candida albicans, the genes encoding the three enzymes responsible for stepwise conversion of GlcNAc to fructose-6-phosphate are clustered. In this work, we analysed GlcNAc catabolism in ascomycete filamentous fungi and found that the respective genes are also clustered in these fungi. In contrast to C. albicans, the cluster often contains a gene for an Ndt80-like transcription factor, which we named RON1 (regulator of N-acetylglucosamine catabolism 1). Further, a gene for a glycoside hydrolase 3 protein related to bacterial N-acetylglucosaminidases can be found in the GlcNAc gene cluster in filamentous fungi. Functional analysis in Trichoderma reesei showed that the transcription factor RON1 is a key activator of the GlcNAc gene cluster and essential for GlcNAc catabolism. Furthermore, we present an evolutionary analysis of Ndt80-like proteins in Ascomycota. All GlcNAc cluster genes, as well as the GlcNAc transporter gene ngt1, and an additional transcriptional regulator gene, csp2, encoding the homolog of Neurospora crassa CSP2/GRHL, were functionally characterised by gene expression analysis and phenotypic characterisation of knockout strains in T. reesei. PMID:26481444

  10. [Immune tolerance after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Krajewska, Magdalena; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Progress in immunosuppressive therapy has improved short-term survival of renal allografts by decreasing the frequency of acute rejections. However, the long-term survival of renal grafts has not improved. Transplanted kidneys are lost in the late period after transplantation as a result of vasculopathy and chronic rejection. Immunological tolerance means the lack of immunological activity towards certain antigens while the response towards others remains correct. The induction of immunological tolerance of donor antigens (transplant tolerance) is examined intensively to work out treatment methods which will allow prevention of chronic allograft rejection. The paper includes an overview of current knowledge on allograft tolerance. Immune response to alloantigens is described and the mechanisms of immunological tolerance induction (including clonal deletion, anergy connected with the microchimerism phenomenon, and active suppression caused by regulatory lymphocytes) are characterized. The role of dendritic cells in the process of inducing and maintaining tolerance is highlighted. Tolerance-inducing strategies in renal transplant recipients and clinically applied evaluation methods are presented. At present, optimizing recipient matching is used to decrease the risk of graft rejection. Hopefully, gene therapy will be possible in the near future. However, before introducing such a procedure into clinical studies, optimal therapy conditions and risk evaluation must be defined in tests on animals. PMID:16552396

  11. HipH Catalyzes the Hydroxylation of 4-Hydroxyisophthalate to Protocatechuate in 2,4-Xylenol Catabolism by Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hong-Jun; Chen, Yan-Fei; Fang, Ti; Xu, Ying; Huang, Wei E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to growing on p-cresol, Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 is the only reported strain capable of aerobically growing on 2,4-xylenol, which is listed as a priority pollutant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Several enzymes involved in the oxidation of the para-methyl group, as well as the corresponding genes, have previously been reported. The enzyme catalyzing oxidation of the catabolic intermediate 4-hydroxyisophthalate to the ring cleavage substrate protocatechuate was also purified from strain NCIMB 9866, but its genetic determinant is still unavailable. In this study, the gene hipH, encoding 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylase, from strain NCIMB 9866 was cloned by transposon mutagenesis. Purified recombinant HipH-His6 was found to be a dimer protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. HipH-His6 catalyzed the hydroxylation of 4-hydroxyisophthalate to protocatechuate with a specific activity of 1.54 U mg−1 and showed apparent Km values of 11.40 ± 3.05 μM for 4-hydroxyisophthalate with NADPH and 11.23 ± 2.43 μM with NADH and similar Km values for NADPH and NADH (64.31 ± 13.16 and 72.76 ± 12.06 μM, respectively). The identity of protocatechuate generated from 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylation by HipH-His6 has also been confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Gene transcriptional analysis, gene knockout, and complementation indicated that hipH is essential for 2,4-xylenol catabolism but not for p-cresol catabolism in this strain. This fills a gap in our understanding of the gene that encodes a critical step in 2,4-xylenol catabolism and also provides another example of biochemical and genetic diversity of microbial catabolism of structurally similar compounds. PMID:26567311

  12. Retromer in Osteoblasts Interacts With Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulator Subunit 14C, Terminates Parathyroid Hormone's Signaling, and Promotes Its Catabolic Response.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lei; Xia, Wen-Fang; Tang, Fu-Lei; Pan, Jin-Xiu; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays critical, but distinct, roles in bone remodeling, including bone formation (anabolic response) and resorption (catabolic response). Although its signaling and function have been extensively investigated, it just began to be understood how distinct functions are induced by PTH activating a common receptor, the PTH type 1 receptor (PTH1R), and how PTH1R signaling is terminated. Here, we provide evidence for vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35), a major component of retromer, in regulating PTH1R trafficking, turning off PTH signaling, and promoting its catabolic function. VPS35 is expressed in osteoblast (OB)-lineage cells. VPS35-deficiency in OBs impaired PTH(1-34)-promoted PTH1R translocation to the trans-Golgi network, enhanced PTH(1-34)-driven signaling, and reduced PTH(1-34)'s catabolic response in culture and in mice. Further mechanical studies revealed that VPS35 interacts with not only PTH1R, but also protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 14C (PPP1R14C), an inhibitory subunit of PP1 phosphatase. PPP1R14C also interacts with PTH1R, which is necessary for the increased endosomal PTH1R signaling and decreased PTH(1-34)'s catabolic response in VPS35-deficient OB-lineage cells. Taken together, these results suggest that VPS35 deregulates PTH1R-signaling likely by its interaction with PTH1R and PPP1R14C. This event is critical for the control of PTH(1-34)-signaling dynamics, which may underlie PTH-induced catabolic response and adequate bone remodeling. PMID:27333042

  13. HipH Catalyzes the Hydroxylation of 4-Hydroxyisophthalate to Protocatechuate in 2,4-Xylenol Catabolism by Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hong-Jun; Chen, Yan-Fei; Fang, Ti; Xu, Ying; Huang, Wei E; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to growing on p-cresol, Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 is the only reported strain capable of aerobically growing on 2,4-xylenol, which is listed as a priority pollutant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Several enzymes involved in the oxidation of the para-methyl group, as well as the corresponding genes, have previously been reported. The enzyme catalyzing oxidation of the catabolic intermediate 4-hydroxyisophthalate to the ring cleavage substrate protocatechuate was also purified from strain NCIMB 9866, but its genetic determinant is still unavailable. In this study, the gene hipH, encoding 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylase, from strain NCIMB 9866 was cloned by transposon mutagenesis. Purified recombinant HipH-His6 was found to be a dimer protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. HipH-His6 catalyzed the hydroxylation of 4-hydroxyisophthalate to protocatechuate with a specific activity of 1.54 U mg(-1) and showed apparent Km values of 11.40 ± 3.05 μM for 4-hydroxyisophthalate with NADPH and 11.23 ± 2.43 μM with NADH and similar Km values for NADPH and NADH (64.31 ± 13.16 and 72.76 ± 12.06 μM, respectively). The identity of protocatechuate generated from 4-hydroxyisophthalate hydroxylation by HipH-His6 has also been confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Gene transcriptional analysis, gene knockout, and complementation indicated that hipH is essential for 2,4-xylenol catabolism but not for p-cresol catabolism in this strain. This fills a gap in our understanding of the gene that encodes a critical step in 2,4-xylenol catabolism and also provides another example of biochemical and genetic diversity of microbial catabolism of structurally similar compounds. PMID:26567311

  14. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts. PMID:27449401

  15. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops

  16. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops

  17. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  18. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  19. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  20. Exploiting Tolerance Processes in Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Herman; Cobbold, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    The full potential of organ transplantation has not yet been realized because of the hazards associated with the long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs. Modern research into mechanisms of immune tolerance offers the promise of reprogramming the immune system, so as to harness the body's natural tolerance mechanisms in the service of graft acceptance. This would allow the minimization of immunosuppressive treatment and offers the prospect of eventually weaning transplant recipients off their drugs.

  1. Influence of the linker on the biodistribution and catabolism of actinium-225 self-immolative tumor-targeted isotope generators.

    PubMed

    Antczak, Christophe; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; LeFave, Clare V; Curcio, Michael J; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A

    2006-01-01

    Current limitations to applications of monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeted isotope generators in radioimmunotherapy include the low mAb labeling yields and the nonspecific radiation of normal tissues by nontargeted radioimmunoconjugates (RIC). Radiotoxicity occurs in normal organs that metabolize radiolabeled proteins and peptides, primarily liver and kidneys, or in radiosensitive organs with prolonged exposure to the isotope from the blood, such as the bone marrow. Actinium-225 nanogenerators also have the problem of released agar-emitting daughters. We developed two new bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) in order to address these issues. Thiol-maleimide conjugation chemistry was employed to increase the efficiency of the mAb radiolabelings by up to 8-fold. In addition, one bifunctional chelating agent incorporated a cleavable linker to alter the catabolism of the alpha-particle-emitting mAb conjugate. This linker was designed to be sensitive to cathepsins to allow release and clearance of the chelated radiometal after internalization of the radioimmunoconjugate into the cell. We compared the properties of the cleavable conjugate (mAb-DOTA-G3FC) to noncleavable constructs (mAb-DOTA-NCS and mAb-DOTA-SH). The cleavable RIC was able to release 80% of its radioactive payload when incubated with purified cathepsin B. The catabolism of the constructs mAb-DOTA-G3FC and mAb-DOTA-NCS was investigated in vitro and in vivo. RIC integrity was retained at 85% over a period of 136 h in mouse serum in vivo. Both conjugates were degraded over time inside HL-60 cells after internalization and in mouse liver in vivo. While we found that the rates of degradation of the two RICs in those conditions were similar, the amounts of the radiolabeled product residues were different. The cleavable mAb-DOTA-G3FC conjugate yielded a larger proportion of fragments below 6kDa in size in mouse liver in vivo after 12 h than the DOTA-NCS conjugate. Biodistribution studies in mice showed that the m

  2. Regulation and characterization of the dadRAX locus for D-amino acid catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    He, Weiqing; Li, Congran; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2011-05-01

    D-amino acids are essential components for bacterial peptidoglycan, and these natural compounds are also involved in cell wall remodeling and biofilm disassembling. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the dadAX operon, encoding the D-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA and the amino acid racemase DadX, is essential for D- and L-Ala catabolism, and its expression requires a transcriptional regulator, DadR. In this study, purified recombinant DadA alone was sufficient to demonstrate the proposed enzymatic activity with very broad substrate specificity; it utilizes all D-amino acids tested as substrates except D-Glu and D-Gln. DadA also showed comparable k(cat) and K(m) values on D-Ala and several D-amino acids. dadRAX knockout mutants were constructed and subjected to analysis of their growth phenotypes on amino acids. The results revealed that utilization of L-Ala, L-Trp, D-Ala, and a specific set of D-amino acids as sole nitrogen sources was abolished in the dadA mutant and/or severely hampered in the dadR mutant while growth yield on D-amino acids was surprisingly improved in the dadX mutant. The dadA promoter was induced by several L-amino acids, most strongly by Ala, and only by D-Ala among all tested D-amino acids. Enhanced growth of the dadX mutant on D-amino acids is consistent with the finding that the dadA promoter was constitutively induced in the dadX mutant, where exogenous D-Ala but not L-Ala reduced the expression. Binding of DadR to the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays, and the presence of L-Ala but not D-Ala increased affinity by 3-fold. The presence of multiple DadR-DNA complexes in the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated in vitro, and the formation of these nucleoprotein complexes exerted a complicated impact on promoter activation in vivo. In summary, the results from this study clearly demonstrate DadA to be the enzyme solely responsible for the proposed D-amino acid dehydrogenase activity of broad substrate

  3. A real-time polymerase chain reaction method for monitoring anaerobic, hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria based on a catabolic gene.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Kane, Staci R; Legler, Tina C; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2002-09-15

    We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that can quantify hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in sediment samples based on a catabolic gene associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The target gene, bssA, codes for the alpha-subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase. The primer-probe set for real-time PCR was based on consensus regions of bssA from four denitrifying bacterial strains; bssA sequences for two of these strains were determined during this study. The method proved to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and had a linear range of >7 orders of magnitude. We used the method to investigate how gasohol releases from leaking underground storage tanks could affect indigenous toluene-degrading bacteria. Microcosms inoculated with aquifer sediments from four different sites were incubated anaerobically with BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and nitrate in the presence and absence of ethanol. Overall, population trends were consistent with observed toluene degradation activity: the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation also had the largest numbers of bssA copies. In the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation, numbers of bssA copies increased 100-to 1000-fold over the first 4 days of incubation, during which time most of the toluene had been consumed. These results were supported by slot blot analyses with unamplified DNA and by cloning and sequencing of putative bssA amplicons, which confirmed the real-time PCR method's specificity for bssA. Use of a companion real-time PCR method for estimating total eubacterial populations (based on 16S rDNA) indicated that, in some cases, ethanol disproportionately supported the growth of bacteria that did not contain bssA. The real-time PCR method for bssA could be a powerful tool for monitored natural attenuation of BTEX in fuel-contaminated groundwater. To our knowledge, this is the first reported molecular method that

  4. Effect of dietary fat, carbohydrate, and protein on branched-chain amino acid catabolism during caloric restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, J A; Morse, E L; Adibi, S A

    1985-01-01

    To assess the effect of each dietary caloric source on the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids, we investigated the rate of leucine oxidation before and after obese volunteers consumed one of the following diets for one week: (a) starvation, (b) 300 or 500 cal of fat/d, (c) 300 or 500 cal of carbohydrate/d, (d) 300 or 500 cal of protein/d, (e) a mixture of carbohydrate (300 cal/d) and fat (200 cal/d), or (f) a mixture of carbohydrate (300 cal/d) and protein (200 cal/d). Starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation (1.4 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.16 mmol/h, P less than 0.01). The same occurred with the fat and protein diets. In sharp contrast, the 500-cal carbohydrate diet significantly decreased the rate of leucine oxidation (1.3 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.6 +/- 0.09 mmol/h, P less than 0.01). The same occurred when a portion of the carbohydrate diet was isocalorically replaced with either fat or protein. The cumulative nitrogen excretion during the fat diet and starvation was not significantly different. As compared with the fat diets, the carbohydrate diets on the average reduced the urinary nitrogen excretion by 12 g/wk. Nitrogen balance was positive during the consumption of the 500-cal protein diet, but negative during the consumption of carbohydrate-protein diet. The fat diets, like the protein diets and starvation, greatly increased plasma leucine (119 +/- 13 vs. 222 +/- 15 microM, P less than 0.01) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (0.12 +/- 0.02 vs. 4.08 +/- 0.43 mM, P less than 0.01) concentrations, and significantly decreased plasma glucose (96 +/- 4 vs. 66 +/- 3 mg/dl, P less than 0.01) and insulin (18 +/- 4 vs. 9 +/- 1 microU/ml, P less than 0.05) concentrations. These changes did not occur, or were greatly attenuated, when subjects consumed carbohydrate alone or in combination with fat or protein. We conclude that during brief caloric restriction, dietary lipid and protein, unlike carbohydrate, do not diminish the catabolism of branched-chain amino

  5. Activation of lipid catabolism by the water-soluble fraction of petroleum in the crustacean Macrobrachium borellii.

    PubMed

    Lavarías, S; Pollero, R J; Heras, H

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of the water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolism in invertebrates. The effect of the WSF on the triacylglycerol (TAG) mobilization, fatty acid activation and degradation was evaluated in the decapod Macrobrachium borellii, exposing adult and eggs at different stages of development for 7 days to a sublethal concentration of WSF. Using radioactive tracers, mitochondrial palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), triacylglycerol lipase (TAG-lipase) and fatty acid beta-oxidation system activities were assayed. Before studying the effect of WSF, the kinetic parameters of ACS were determined in purified mitochondria. Its optimal temperature and pH were 32 degrees C and 8.0, respectively, the apparent K(m) 2.48 micromol l(-1), and its V(max) of 1.93 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1). These kinetic parameters differed significantly from this shrimp's microsomal isoform. After 7 days exposure to a sublethal concentration of WSF (0.6 mg/l), changes were observed in the enzymatic activity of all enzymes or enzymatic system assayed in adult midgut gland as well as in stage 5 eggs, a period of active organogenesis. An increase in the mobilization of energy stores was detected as early as stage 4, where TAG-lipase activity increased by 27% in exposed eggs. The increase was even more marked in exposed eggs at stage 5 where a three-fold rise (154%) was determined. Exposed adult shrimp also showed an augmented lipase activity by 38%. Fatty acid beta-oxidation increased by 51.0 and 35.5% in midgut gland and eggs at stage 5, respectively, but no changes were observed at less-developed stages. Mitochondrial fatty acid activation by ACS also increased in adults and stage 5 eggs by 7.4 and 52.0%, respectively. A similar response of the lipid catabolic pathways to WSF contamination in both adult and eggs, suggests that the exposure to this pollutant causes an increase in the energy needs of this shrimp. When validated by field studies, these catabolic

  6. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study of post mortem catabolism and intracellular pH in intact excised rabbit muscle.

    PubMed

    Renou, J P; Canioni, P; Gatelier, P; Valin, C; Cozzone, P J

    1986-04-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to study the post mortem catabolism of high-energy phosphate compounds and the associated intracellular pH variation in pure fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscles and in rabbit muscle with mixed fiber types. Comparative results from pure fiber types are reported for the first time. Large amounts of glycerophosphorylcholine (14.1 mumol/g fresh tissue) are found in the internal conoidal bundle (ICB), a pure oxidative slow twitch muscle, whereas the m. psoas major (PM), a pure glycolytic fast twitch muscle and the m. gastrocnemius caput medialis (GCM), with mixed fiber types, are devoid of the same metabolite. The total content of phosphorylated metabolites is constant among the three muscle types. The time-dependent post mortem changes in phosphorylated metabolites display the expected rapid drop in phosphocreatine and a simultaneous increase in intracellular inorganic phosphate. However, the ATP level remains constant during more than 2 h. Rate constants for metabolite breakdown and apparent ATPase activity have been determined. The comparative kinetics of intracellular acidosis at 25 degrees C yield rates of 3.3 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for PM, 2.7 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for GCM and 3.0 X 10(-3) pH unit/min for ICB. Initial intracellular pH values are 7.07, 7.20 and 7.02, respectively. Upon aging, the heterogeneity of the Pi signal reflects the existence of cellular compartments with different internal pH. The results suggest that the more intense low-pH Pi signal arises from the sarcoplasmic reticulum while the less intense resonance would reflect the sarcoplasmic higher pH. The temperature effect on post mortem catabolism in the 15-25 degrees C range has been documented. As expected, phosphocreatine and ATP breakdown increase with temperature but at a higher rate for slow-twitch ICB than for fast-twitch PM. PMID:3091088

  7. [Isolation and characterization of petroleum catabolic broad-host-range plasmids from Shen-Fu wastewater irrigation zone].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fei; Wang, Ya-Fei; Li, Hui; Li, Xiao-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Based on triparental mating, we isolated a total of eight broad host range (BHR) petroleum hydrocarbon catabolic plasmids from the soils, sediments, and wastewater samples in the Shen-Fu irrigation zone. The antibiotic resistance of the plasmids was tested, and then, the plasmids were transferred to Escherichia coli EC100. The plasmids carrying no antibiotic resistance were tagged by miniTn5 transposon consisting of antibiotic resistant genes. The PCR-based incompatibility test revealed that the pS3-2C and pS4-6G belonged to Inc P group, the pS3-2G, pW22-3G, and pA15-7G belonged to Inc N group, the pS7-2G was identified as Inc W plasmid, and the pA23-1G and pA10-1C were placed into Inc Q group. By adopting the reported PCR amplification methods of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading catabolic genes, the petroleum-degrading capability of these BHR plasmids were preliminarily analyzed. The plasmids pS3-2G, pS7-2G, pA23-1G, pW22-3G, and pA10-1C carried aromatic ring- hydroxylating dioxygenase gene phdA and toluene monooxygenase gene touA; the plasmid pA15-7G carried touA and toluene dioxygenase gene tod; the plasmid pS3-2C carried ben, phdA, and tod; whereas the pS4-6G only carried ben. The host range test showed that all the isolated plasmids except pS3-2C could be transferred and maintained stably in the representative strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, Cupriavidus necator JMP228, and E. coli EC100 of the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-Proteobacteria, respectively. PMID:24564162

  8. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Barquissau, V.; Beuzelin, D.; Pisani, D.F.; Beranger, G.E.; Mairal, A.; Montagner, A.; Roussel, B.; Tavernier, G.; Marques, M.-A.; Moro, C.; Guillou, H.; Amri, E.-Z.; Langin, D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fat depots with thermogenic activity have been identified in humans. In mice, the appearance of thermogenic adipocytes within white adipose depots (so-called brown-in-white i.e., brite or beige adipocytes) protects from obesity and insulin resistance. Brite adipocytes may originate from direct conversion of white adipocytes. The purpose of this work was to characterize the metabolism of human brite adipocytes. Methods Human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells were differentiated into white adipocytes and then treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ or PPARα agonists between day 14 and day 18. Gene expression profiling was determined using DNA microarrays and RT-qPCR. Variations of mRNA levels were confirmed in differentiated human preadipocytes from primary cultures. Fatty acid and glucose metabolism was investigated using radiolabelled tracers, Western blot analyses and assessment of oxygen consumption. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) knockdown was achieved using siRNA. In vivo, wild type and PPARα-null mice were treated with a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist (CL316,243) to induce appearance of brite adipocytes in white fat depot. Determination of mRNA and protein levels was performed on inguinal white adipose tissue. Results PPAR agonists promote a conversion of white adipocytes into cells displaying a brite molecular pattern. This conversion is associated with transcriptional changes leading to major metabolic adaptations. Fatty acid anabolism i.e., fatty acid esterification into triglycerides, and catabolism i.e., lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation, are increased. Glucose utilization is redirected from oxidation towards glycerol-3-phophate production for triglyceride synthesis. This metabolic shift is dependent on the activation of PDK4 through inactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In vivo, PDK4 expression is markedly induced in wild-type mice in response to CL316,243, while this increase is blunted

  9. 76 FR 5704 - Sulfentrazone; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of sulfentrazone in or on multiple commodities. Additionally, this regulation deletes existing tolerances on commodities superseded by the establishment of crop subgroups. This regulation also deletes a time- limited tolerance on bean, succulent seed without pod (lima bean and cowpea), as the tolerance expired on December 31, 2007.......

  10. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test ... The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then ...

  11. 78 FR 55635 - Prometryn; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of prometryn in or on succulent snap bean, dill oil, fresh dillweed leaves, and dried dillweed leaves. This regulation additionally removes the established tolerance with regional restrictions on dill, since it is superseded by the tolerance on fresh dillweed leaves. Interregional Research Project Number 4 (IR-4) requested these tolerances......

  12. A hydrogenosome with pyruvate formate-lyase: anaerobic chytrid fungi use an alternative route for pyruvate catabolism.

    PubMed

    Akhmanova, A; Voncken, F G; Hosea, K M; Harhangi, H; Keltjens, J T; op den Camp, H J; Vogels, G D; Hackstein, J H

    1999-06-01

    The chytrid fungi Piromyces sp. E2 and Neocallimastix sp. L2 are obligatory amitochondriate anaerobes that possess hydrogenosomes. Hydrogenosomes are highly specialized organelles engaged in anaerobic carbon metabolism; they generate molecular hydrogen and ATP. Here, we show for the first time that chytrid hydrogenosomes use pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) and not pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) for pyruvate catabolism, unlike all other hydrogenosomes studied to date. Chytrid PFLs are encoded by a multigene family and are abundantly expressed in Piromyces sp. E2 and Neocallimastix sp. L2. Western blotting after cellular fractionation, proteinase K protection assays and determinations of enzyme activities reveal that PFL is present in the hydrogenosomes of Piromyces sp. E2. The main route of the hydrogenosomal carbon metabolism involves PFL; the formation of equimolar amounts of formate and acetate by isolated hydrogenosomes excludes a significant contribution by PFO. Our data support the assumption that chytrid hydrogenosomes are unique and argue for a polyphyletic origin of these organelles. PMID:10361311

  13. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase mediates inhibition of Th17 differentiation via catabolism of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Geoffrey L; Wang, Qun; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Bhat, Geetha; Kolbeck, Roland; Fung, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a key transcriptional regulator of Th17-cell differentiation. Although endogenous ligands have yet to be identified, evidence suggests that tryptophan metabolites can act as agonists for the AhR. Tryptophan metabolites are abundant in circulation, so we hypothesized that cell intrinsic factors might exist to regulate the exposure of Th17 cells to AhR-dependent activities. Here, we find that Th17 cells preferentially express kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), which is an enzyme involved in catabolism of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenine. KMO inhibition, either with a specific inhibitor or via siRNA-mediated silencing, markedly increased IL-17 production in vitro, whereas IFN-γ production by Th1 cells was unaffected. Inhibition of KMO significantly exacerbated disease in a Th17-driven model of autoimmune gastritis, suggesting that expression of KMO by Th17 cells serves to limit their continuous exposure to physiological levels of endogenous AhR ligands in vivo. PMID:23568529

  14. Contribution of Amino Acid Catabolism to the Tissue Specific Persistence of Campylobacter jejuni in a Murine Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Hofreuter, Dirk; Mohr, Juliane; Wensel, Olga; Rademacher, Sebastian; Schreiber, Kerstin; Schomburg, Dietmar; Gao, Beile; Galán, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of food-borne disease in industrialized countries. Carbohydrate utilization by C. jejuni is severely restricted, and knowledge about which substrates fuel C. jejuni infection and growth is limited. Some amino acids have been shown to serve as carbon sources both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we investigated the contribution of serine and proline catabolism to the in vitro and in vivo growth of C. jejuni 81-176. We confirmed that the serine transporter SdaC and the serine ammonia-lyase SdaA are required for serine utilization, and demonstrated that a predicted proline permease PutP and a bifunctional proline/delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase PutA are required for proline utilization by C. jejuni 81-176. C. jejuni 81-176 mutants unable to utilize serine were shown to be severely defective for colonization of the intestine and systemic tissues in a mouse model of infection. In contrast, C. jejuni 81-176 mutants unable to utilize proline were only defective for intestinal colonization. These results further emphasize the importance of amino acid utilization in C. jejuni colonization of various tissues. PMID:23226358

  15. Integration of chemotaxis, transport and catabolism in Pseudomonas putida and identification of the aromatic acid chemoreceptor PcaY.

    PubMed

    Luu, Rita A; Kootstra, Joshua D; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Brunton, Ceanne N; Parales, Juanito V; Ditty, Jayna L; Parales, Rebecca E

    2015-04-01

    Aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds that are metabolized through the β-ketoadipate catabolic pathway serve as chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida F1. A screen of P. putida F1 mutants, each lacking one of the genes encoding the 18 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs), revealed that pcaY encodes the MCP required for metabolism-independent chemotaxis to vanillate, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoate, benzoate, protocatechuate, quinate, shikimate, as well as 10 substituted benzoates that do not serve as growth substrates for P. putida F1. Chemotaxis was induced during growth on aromatic compounds, and an analysis of a pcaY-lacZ fusion revealed that pcaY is expressed in the presence of β-ketoadipate, a common intermediate in the pathway. pcaY expression also required the transcriptional activator PcaR, indicating that pcaY is a member of the pca regulon, which includes three unlinked gene clusters that encode five enzymes required for the conversion of 4-hydroxybenzoate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as the major facilitator superfamily transport protein PcaK. The 4-hydroxybenzoate permease PcaK was shown to modulate the chemotactic response by facilitating the uptake of 4-hydroxybenzoate, which leads to the accumulation of β-ketoadipate, thereby increasing pcaY expression. The results show that chemotaxis, transport and metabolism of aromatic compounds are intimately linked in P. putida. PMID:25582673

  16. Physicochemical changes effected in activated sludge by the earthworm Eisenia foetida. [Concentration of heavy metals during sludge catabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Hartenstein, F.

    1981-09-01

    Measurements were made of some physicochemical changes effected in activated sludge by the earthworm Eisenia foetida following conversion of the sludge into wormcasts. Mineralization was accelerated 1.3-fold and 2% of the minerals were assimilated. The rate at which heavy metals were concentrated during sludge catabolism was also accelerated. Castings stabilized within 2 weeks, as indexed by respirometry. Nucleic acids, which can be used as an index of microbial biomass, were present at a greater concentration in the wormcasts than in the sludge, while the phenolic content, which may potentially serve as an index of humification, was less concentrated. Other changes included a reduction in pH and an increase in oxidation-reduction potential and cation exchange capacity. The major general effect of E. foetida on the physicochemical properties of activated sludge is to convert a material which has a relatively small surface/volume ratio into numerous particles with an overall large S/V ratio, thus accelerating decomposition, mineralization, drying, and preclusion of malodor.

  17. BCAT1 promotes cell proliferation through amino acid catabolism in gliomas carrying wild-type IDH1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Jung; Wang, Wei; Schlotter, Magdalena; Lindroth, Anders M; Pleier, Sabrina V; Bai, Alfa H C; Karra, Daniela; Piro, Rosario M; Felsberg, Jörg; Addington, Adele; Lemke, Dieter; Weibrecht, Irene; Hovestadt, Volker; Rolli, Claudio G; Campos, Benito; Turcan, Sevin; Sturm, Dominik; Witt, Hendrik; Chan, Timothy A; Herold-Mende, Christel; Kemkemer, Ralf; König, Rainer; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hull, William-Edmund; Pfister, Stefan M; Jugold, Manfred; Hutson, Susan M; Plass, Christoph; Okun, Jürgen G; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that glioblastoma express high levels of branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1), the enzyme that initiates the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Expression of BCAT1 was exclusive to tumors carrying wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes and was highly correlated with methylation patterns in the BCAT1 promoter region. BCAT1 expression was dependent on the concentration of α-ketoglutarate substrate in glioma cell lines and could be suppressed by ectopic overexpression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes, providing a link between IDH1 function and BCAT1 expression. Suppression of BCAT1 in glioma cell lines blocked the excretion of glutamate and led to reduced proliferation and invasiveness in vitro, as well as significant decreases in tumor growth in a glioblastoma xenograft model. These findings suggest a central role for BCAT1 in glioma pathogenesis, making BCAT1 and BCAA metabolism attractive targets for the development of targeted therapeutic approaches to treat patients with glioblastoma. PMID:23793099

  18. Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, N.C.; Fry, J.C.; Weightman, A.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even following inoculation at a high concentration (3 x 10(8) CFU/ml). The emergence of a natural, 3CB-degrading population appeared to have a detrimental effect on the survival of strain UWC1 in the ASU. The fate of two 3CB-utilizing bacteria, derived from activated-sludge microflora, was studied in experiments in which these strains were inoculated into the ASU. Both strains, AS2, an unmanipulated natural isolate which flocculated readily in liquid media, and P. putida ASR2.8, a transconjugant containing the recombinant plasmid pD10, survived for long periods in the ASU and enhanced 3CB breakdown at 15 degrees C. The results reported in this paper illustrate the importance of choosing strains which are well adapted to environmental conditions if the use of microbial inoculants for the breakdown of target pollutants is to be successful.

  19. Interplay of Aro80 and GATA activators in regulation of genes for catabolism of aromatic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyusung; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2013-06-01

    Aro80, a member of the Zn(2)Cys(6) family proteins, activates expression of the ARO9 and ARO10 genes involved in catabolism of aromatic amino acids in response to aromatic amino acids that act as inducers. ARO9 and ARO10 are also under the control of nitrogen catabolite repression, but the direct roles for GATA factors, Gat1 and Gln3, in this regulation have not yet been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that Aro80 is constitutively bound to its target promoters and activated by inducers at the level of transactivation. Although Aro80 also binds to its own promoter, ARO80 expression is induced only by rapamycin, but not by tryptophan. We show that Aro80 is absolutely required for Gat1 binding to the ARO9, ARO10 and ARO80 promoters upon rapamycin treatment. Gln3 binding to these promoters shows a partial requirement for Aro80. Rapamycin-dependent Gat1 and Gln3 binding to the Aro80 target promoters is not affected by tryptophan availability, suggesting that transactivation activity of Aro80 is not necessary for the recruitment of GATA factors. Rapamycin-dependent induction of Aro80 target genes also requires PP2A phosphatase complex, but not Sit4 phosphatase, acting downstream of TORC1. PMID:23651256

  20. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, A.; Pelzmann, H. J.; Pessentheiner, A. R.; Huber, K.; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C. T.; Drougard, A.; Schittmayer, M.; Kolb, D.; Magnes, C.; Trausinger, G.; Graier, W. F.; Birner-Gruenberger, R.; Pospisilik, J. A.; Bogner-Strauss, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes. PMID:27045997

  1. A Post-Genomic View of the Ecophysiology, Catabolism and Biotechnological Relevance of Sulphate-Reducing Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Venceslau, Sofia S; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction is the unifying and defining trait of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). In their predominant habitats, sulphate-rich marine sediments, SRP have long been recognized to be major players in the carbon and sulphur cycles. Other, more recently appreciated, ecophysiological roles include activity in the deep biosphere, symbiotic relations, syntrophic associations, human microbiome/health and long-distance electron transfer. SRP include a high diversity of organisms, with large nutritional versatility and broad metabolic capacities, including anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons. Elucidation of novel catabolic capacities as well as progress in the understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks, energy metabolism, evolutionary processes and adaptation to changing environmental conditions has greatly benefited from genomics, functional OMICS approaches and advances in genetic accessibility and biochemical studies. Important biotechnological roles of SRP range from (i) wastewater and off gas treatment, (ii) bioremediation of metals and hydrocarbons and (iii) bioelectrochemistry, to undesired impacts such as (iv) souring in oil reservoirs and other environments, and (v) corrosion of iron and concrete. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of SRPs focusing mainly on works published after 2000. The wealth of publications in this period, covering many diverse areas, is a testimony to the large environmental, biogeochemical and technological relevance of these organisms and how much the field has progressed in these years, although many important questions and applications remain to be explored. PMID:26210106

  2. Characterization of the Mycobacterial Acyl-CoA Carboxylase Holo Complexes Reveals Their Functional Expansion into Amino Acid Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ehebauer, Matthias T.; Zimmermann, Michael; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Noens, Elke E.; Laubitz, Daniel; Cichocki, Bogdan; Marrakchi, Hedia; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Daffé, Mamadou; Sachse, Carsten; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Sauer, Uwe; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these - the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α−β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications. PMID:25695631

  3. Metabolomic and Proteomic Insights into Carbaryl Catabolism by Burkholderia sp. C3 and Degradation of Ten N-Methylcarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. C3, an efficient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degrader, can utilize 9 of the 10 N-methylcarbamate insecticides including carbaryl as a sole source of carbon. Rapid hydrolysis of carbaryl in C3 is followed by slow catabolism of the resulting 1-naphthol. This study focused on metabolomes and proteomes in C3 cells utilizing carbaryl in comparison to those using glucose or nutrient broth. Sixty of the 867 detected proteins were involved in primary metabolism, adaptive sensing and regulation, transport, stress response, and detoxification. Among the 41 proteins expressed in response to carbaryl were formate dehydrogenase, aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and ethanolamine utilization protein involved in one carbon metabolism. Acetate kinase and phasin were 2 of the 19 proteins that were not detected in carbaryl-supported C3 cells, but detected in glucose-supported C3 cells. Down-production of phasin and polyhydroxyalkanoates in carbaryl-supported C3 cells suggests insufficient carbon sources and lower levels of primary metabolites to maintain an ordinary level of metabolism. Differential metabolomes (approximately 196 identified polar metabolites) showed up-production of metabolites in pentose phosphate pathways and metabolisms of cysteine, cystine and some other amino acids, disaccharides and nicotinate, in contract to down-production of most of the other amino acids and hexoses. The proteomic and metabolomic analyses showed that carbaryl-supported C3 cells experienced strong toxic effects, oxidative stresses, DNA/RNA damages and carbon nutrient deficiency. PMID:23463356

  4. A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Static Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Cartilage Biokinetics Model

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asit K.; Kohles, Sean S.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding physicochemical interactions during biokinetic regulation will be critical for the creation of relevant nanotechnology supporting cellular and molecular engineering. The impact of nanoscale influences in medicine and biology can be explored in detail through mathematical models as an in silico testbed. In a recent single-cell biomechanical analysis, the cytoskeletal strain response due to fluid-induced stresses was characterized (Wilson, Z. D., and Kohles, S. S., 2010, “Two-Dimensional Modeling of Nanomechanical Strains in Healthy and Diseased Single-Cells During Microfluidic Stress Applications,” J. Nanotech. Eng. Med., 1(2), p. 021005). Results described a microfluidic environment having controlled nanometer and piconewton resolution for explorations of multiscale mechanobiology. In the present study, we constructed a mathematical model exploring the nanoscale biomolecular response to that controlled microenvironment. We introduce mechanical stimuli and scaling factor terms as specific input values for regulating a cartilage molecule synthesis. Iterative model results for this initial multiscale static load application have identified a transition threshold load level from which the mechanical input causes a shift from a catabolic state to an anabolic state. Modeled molecule homeostatic levels appear to be dependent upon the mechanical stimulus as reflected experimentally. This work provides a specific mathematical framework from which to explore biokinetic regulation. Further incorporation of nanomechanical stresses and strains into biokinetic models will ultimately lead to refined mechanotransduction relationships at the cellular and molecular levels. PMID:21152243

  5. Catabolism and detoxification of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids: N-acetylation by the phnO gene product.

    PubMed

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; McSorley, Fern R; Zechel, David L

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli uptake and catabolism of organophosphonates are governed by the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon. The phnO cistron is shown to encode aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase, which utilizes acetylcoenzyme A as acetyl donor and aminomethylphosphonate, (S)- and (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, 2-aminoethyl- and 3-aminopropylphosphonate as acetyl acceptors. Aminomethylphosphonate, (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, 2-aminoethyl- and 3-aminopropylphosphonate are used as phosphate source by E. coli phn(+) strains. 2-Aminoethyl- or 3-aminopropylphosphonate but not aminomethylphosphonate or (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate is used as phosphate source by phnO strains. Neither phn(+) nor phnO strains can use (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonate as phosphate source. Utilization of aminomethylphosphonate or (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate requires the expression of phnO. In the absence of phnO-expression (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate is bacteriocidal and rescue of phnO strains requires the simultaneous addition of d-alanine and phosphate. An intermediate of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway, 5'-phospho-α-d-ribosyl 1'-(2-N-acetamidoethylphosphonate), a substrate for carbon-phosphorus lyase, was found to accumulate in cultures of a phnP mutant strain. The data show that the physiological role of N-acetylation by phnO-specified aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase is to detoxify (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, an analog of d-alanine, and to prepare (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate and aminomethylphosphonate for utilization of the phosphorus-containing moiety. PMID:23056305

  6. Monolayer-bilayer equilibrium of phospholipid: stabilization of neutral lipid droplets in aqueous medium and catabolism of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Handa, T; Nakagaki, M

    1992-03-23

    Phospholipid spreads as monolayer at air/water and oil/water interfaces. Interfacial pressure of the monolayer in equilibrium with a definite bulk phase of the lipid, (equilibrium) spreading pressure, depends on lyotropic and thermotropic polymorphic state of the lipid bulk phase. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) in hydrated liquid crystalline state (bilayers in L alpha state) gives an appreciably large value of spreading pressure, 45-46 mN/m. Monolayer-bilayer equilibrium of a neutral lipid-phospholipid mixture is determined by miscibilities of the lipids in mixed monolayer, PC bilayer and bulk (liquid or solid) phase of the neutral lipid. A neutral lipid of limited solubility in PC bilayer forms a separate phase in aqueous medium. The phase is stabilized as small particles in the medium by PC monolayer at the particle surface. The monolayer is in equilibrium with the bilayer. This sort of equilibrium plays important roles in formation and catabolism of triglyceride- and cholesteryl ester-rich lipoprotein particles in animal plasma. The equilibrium is a critical factor also in stabilization of aqueous dispersion of lipophilic vitamin (neutral lipid). Coexistence of emulsion particles (neutral lipid core covered with PC monolayer) and vesicles made of PC bilayer are observed in a stable dispersion. PMID:1575933

  7. Additive effects of glucagon and non-metabolizable analogue of leucine on glutamine catabolism in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, J.; Erecinska, M.

    1986-05-01

    ..beta..-2-Aminobicyclo-(2.2.1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), at 10 mM, a known activator of glutamate dehydrogenase, doubled the rate of urea synthesis in hepatocytes from fed rats incubated with 10 mM glutamine (gln) and 2 mM ornithine. The stimulation of urea formation was accompanied by 1.4-fold activation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release from (U-/sup 14/C)gln and 2.5-fold decline in intracellular gln content. There was no significant change in glutamate level while 2-oxoglutarate and malate increased by 1.3- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In hepatocytes from fasted rats BCH was similarly effective in stimulation of urea and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ formation and it also doubled the rate of glucose synthesis. Effects of BCH on hepatocytes from fasted rats were associated with about 2-fold elevation of glutamate, aspartate and alanine levels. The effects of BCH and glucagon (a putative glutaminase activator) on urea, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and glucose formation were additive. The results suggest that BCH-induced activation of gln catabolism in hepatocytes is caused primarily by stimulation of glutaminase rather than glutamate dehydrogenase. It seems that the mechanisms of activation of glutaminase by BCH and glucagon are different.

  8. Biochanin-A antagonizes the interleukin-1β-induced catabolic inflammation through the modulation of NFκB cellular signaling in primary rat chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji-Su; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; You, Jae-Seek; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Seo, Young-Woo; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2016-09-01

    Biochanin-A, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, protected from the IL-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans through the suppression of matrix degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, MMP-1, and ADAMTS-5 in primary rat chondrocytes and the knee articular cartilage. It also suppressed the expression of IL-1β-induced catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase 2, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, biochanin-A suppressed the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NFκB, and inhibited its nuclear translocation in primary rat chondrocytes. These results indicate that biochanin-A antagonizes the IL-1β-induced catabolic effects through its anti-inflammatory activity that involves the modulation of NFκB signaling. PMID:27363337

  9. Ethylene-enhanced catabolism of ( sup 14 C)indole-3-acetic acid to indole-3-carboxylic acid in citrus leaf tissues. [Citrus sinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sagee, O.; Riov, J.; Goren, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous ({sup 14}C)indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is conjugated in citrus (Citrus sinensis) leaf tissues to one major substance which has been identified as indole-3-acetylaspartic acid (IAAsp). Ethylene pretreatment enhanced the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)IAA to indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA), which accumulated as glucose esters (ICGlu). Increased formation of ICGlu by ethylene was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in IAAsp formation. IAAsp and ICGlu were identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Formation of ICGlu was dependent on the concentration of ethylene and the duration of the ethylene pretreatment. It is suggested that the catabolism of IAA to ICA may be one of the mechanisms by which ethylene endogenous IAA levels.

  10. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  11. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite's production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  12. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite’s production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  13. A Two-Component para-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase Initiates a Novel 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300 (DSM 45091) grows on 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, a novel 2C4NP catabolic pathway different from those of all other 2C4NP utilizers was identified with hydroxyquinol (hydroxy-1,4-hydroquinone or 1,2,4-benzenetriol [BT]) as the ring cleavage substrate. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnp cluster located in three operons is likely involved in the catabolism of both 2C4NP and PNP. The oxygenase component (PnpA1) and reductase component (PnpA2) of the two-component PNP monooxygenase were expressed and purified to homogeneity, respectively. The identification of chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) and BT during 2C4NP degradation catalyzed by PnpA1A2 indicated that PnpA1A2 catalyzes the sequential denitration and dechlorination of 2C4NP to BT and catalyzes the conversion of PNP to BT. Genetic analyses revealed that pnpA1 plays an essential role in both 2C4NP and PNP degradations by gene knockout and complementation. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of CHQ to BT, PnpA1A2 was also found to be able to catalyze the hydroxylation of hydroquinone (HQ) to BT, revealing the probable fate of HQ that remains unclear in PNP catabolism by Gram-positive bacteria. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the 2C4NP degradation mechanism in Gram-positive bacteria and also enhances our understanding of the genetic and biochemical diversity of 2C4NP catabolism. PMID:26567304

  14. The Involvement of Mig1 from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous in Catabolic Repression: An Active Mechanism Contributing to the Regulation of Carotenoid Production.

    PubMed

    Alcaíno, Jennifer; Bravo, Natalia; Córdova, Pamela; Marcoleta, Andrés E; Contreras, Gabriela; Barahona, Salvador; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Fernández-Lobato, María; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    The red yeast X. dendrorhous is one of the few natural sources of astaxanthin, a carotenoid used in aquaculture for salmonid fish pigmentation and in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries for its antioxidant properties. Genetic control of carotenogenesis is well characterized in this yeast; however, little is known about the regulation of the carotenogenesis process. Several lines of evidence have suggested that carotenogenesis is regulated by catabolic repression, and the aim of this work was to identify and functionally characterize the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene encoding the catabolic repressor Mig1, which mediates transcriptional glucose-dependent repression in other yeasts and fungi. The identified gene encodes a protein of 863 amino acids that demonstrates the characteristic conserved features of Mig1 proteins, and binds in vitro to DNA fragments containing Mig1 boxes. Gene functionality was demonstrated by heterologous complementation in a S. cerevisiae mig1- strain; several aspects of catabolic repression were restored by the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene. Additionally, a X. dendrorhous mig1- mutant was constructed and demonstrated a higher carotenoid content than the wild-type strain. Most important, the mig1- mutation alleviated the glucose-mediated repression of carotenogenesis in X. dendrorhous: the addition of glucose to mig1- and wild-type cultures promoted the growth of both strains, but carotenoid synthesis was observed only in the mutant strain. Transcriptomic and RT-qPCR analyses revealed that several genes were differentially expressed between X. dendrorhous mig1- and the wild-type strain when cultured with glucose as the sole carbon source. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that catabolic repression in X. dendrorhous is an active process in which the identified MIG1 gene product plays a central role in the regulation of several biological processes, including carotenogenesis. PMID:27622474

  15. β-L-1-[5-(E-2-Bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (L-BHDU) prevents varicella-zoster virus replication in a SCID-Hu mouse model and does not interfere with 5-fluorouracil catabolism

    PubMed Central

    De, Chandrav; Liu, Dongmei; Zheng, Bo; Singh, Uma S.; Chavre, Satish; White, Catherine; Arnold, Robert D.; Hagen, Fred K.; Chu, Chung K.; Moffat, Jennifer F.

    2014-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirus varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles. Current treatments are acyclovir (ACV) and its derivatives, foscarnet and brivudine (BVdU). Additional antiviral compounds with increased potency and specificity are needed to treat VZV, especially to treat post-herpetic neuralgia. We evaluated β-L-1-[5-(E-2-Bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (L-BHDU, 1) and 5′-O-valyl-L-BHDU (2) in three models of VZV replication: primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), skin organ culture (SOC) and in SCID-Hu mice with skin xenografts. The efficacy of L-BHDU in vivo and its drug-drug interactions were previously not known. In HFFs, 200 μM L-BHDU was noncytotoxic over 3 days, and L-BHDU treatment reduced VZV genome copy number and cell to cell spread. The EC50 in HFFs for L-BHDU and valyl-L-BHDU were 0.22 and 0.03 μM, respectively. However, L-BHDU antagonized the activity of ACV, BVdU and foscarnet in cultured cells. Given its similar structure to BVdU, we asked if L-BHDU, like BVdU, inhibits 5-fluorouracil catabolism. BALB/c mice were treated with 5-FU alone or in combination with L-BHDU or BVdU. L-BHDU did not interfere with 5-FU catabolism. In SCID-Hu mice implanted with human skin xenografts, L-BHDU and valyl-L-BHDU were superior to ACV and valacyclovir. The maximum concentration (Cmax) levels of L-BHDU were determined in mouse and human tissues at 2 h after dosing, and comparison of concentration ratios of tissue to plasma indicated saturation of uptake at the highest dose. For the first time, an L-nucleoside analog, L-BHDU, was found to be effective and well tolerated in mice. PMID:25051026

  16. β-l-1-[5-(E-2-bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (l-BHDU) prevents varicella-zoster virus replication in a SCID-Hu mouse model and does not interfere with 5-fluorouracil catabolism.

    PubMed

    De, Chandrav; Liu, Dongmei; Zheng, Bo; Singh, Uma S; Chavre, Satish; White, Catherine; Arnold, Robert D; Hagen, Fred K; Chu, Chung K; Moffat, Jennifer F

    2014-10-01

    The alphaherpesvirus varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles. Current treatments are acyclovir (ACV) and its derivatives, foscarnet and brivudine (BVdU). Additional antiviral compounds with increased potency and specificity are needed to treat VZV, especially to treat post-herpetic neuralgia. We evaluated β-l-1-[5-(E-2-bromovinyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-(dioxolan-4-yl)] uracil (l-BHDU, 1) and 5'-O-valyl-l-BHDU (2) in three models of VZV replication: primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), skin organ culture (SOC) and in SCID-Hu mice with skin xenografts. The efficacy of l-BHDU in vivo and its drug-drug interactions were previously not known. In HFFs, 200μM l-BHDU was noncytotoxic over 3days, and l-BHDU treatment reduced VZV genome copy number and cell to cell spread. The EC50 in HFFs for l-BHDU and valyl-l-BHDU were 0.22 and 0.03μM, respectively. However, l-BHDU antagonized the activity of ACV, BVdU and foscarnet in cultured cells. Given its similar structure to BVdU, we asked if l-BHDU, like BVdU, inhibits 5-fluorouracil catabolism. BALB/c mice were treated with 5-FU alone or in combination with l-BHDU or BVdU. l-BHDU did not interfere with 5-FU catabolism. In SCID-Hu mice implanted with human skin xenografts, l-BHDU and valyl-l-BHDU were superior to ACV and valacyclovir. The maximum concentration (Cmax) levels of l-BHDU were determined in mouse and human tissues at 2h after dosing, and comparison of concentration ratios of tissue to plasma indicated saturation of uptake at the highest dose. For the first time, an l-nucleoside analog, l-BHDU, was found to be effective and well tolerated in mice. PMID:25051026

  17. Intelligent fault-tolerant controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chien Y.

    1987-01-01

    A system with fault tolerant controls is one that can detect, isolate, and estimate failures and perform necessary control reconfiguration based on this new information. Artificial intelligence (AI) is concerned with semantic processing, and it has evolved to include the topics of expert systems and machine learning. This research represents an attempt to apply AI to fault tolerant controls, hence, the name intelligent fault tolerant control (IFTC). A generic solution to the problem is sought, providing a system based on logic in addition to analytical tools, and offering machine learning capabilities. The advantages are that redundant system specific algorithms are no longer needed, that reasonableness is used to quickly choose the correct control strategy, and that the system can adapt to new situations by learning about its effects on system dynamics.

  18. Linking Microbial Community and Catabolic Gene Structures during the Adaptation of Three Contaminated Soils under Continuous Long-Term Pollutant Stress.

    PubMed

    Lima-Morales, Daiana; Jáuregui, Ruy; Camarinha-Silva, Amelia; Geffers, Robert; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Three types of contaminated soil from three geographically different areas were subjected to a constant supply of benzene or benzene/toluene/ethylbenzene/xylenes (BTEX) for a period of 3 months. Different from the soil from Brazil (BRA) and Switzerland (SUI), the Czech Republic (CZE) soil which was previously subjected to intensive in situ bioremediation displayed only negligible changes in community structure. BRA and SUI soil samples showed a clear succession of phylotypes. A rapid response to benzene stress was observed, whereas the response to BTEX pollution was significantly slower. After extended incubation, actinobacterial phylotypes increased in relative abundance, indicating their superior fitness to pollution stress. Commonalities but also differences in the phylotypes were observed. Catabolic gene surveys confirmed the enrichment of actinobacteria by identifying the increase of actinobacterial genes involved in the degradation of pollutants. Proteobacterial phylotypes increased in relative abundance in SUI microcosms after short-term stress with benzene, and catabolic gene surveys indicated enriched metabolic routes. Interestingly, CZE soil, despite staying constant in community structure, showed a change in the catabolic gene structure. This indicates that a highly adapted community, which had to adjust its gene pool to meet novel challenges, has been enriched. PMID:26850298

  19. Arabidopsis CYP94B3 encodes jasmonyl-L-isoleucine 12-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Matsubara, Takuya; Sato, Michio; Takahashi, Kosaku; Wakuta, Shinji; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu; Nabeta, Kensuke; Matsuura, Hideyuki

    2011-10-01

    The hormonal action of jasmonate in plants is controlled by the precise balance between its biosynthesis and catabolism. It has been shown that jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is the bioactive form involved in the jasmonate-mediated signaling pathway. However, the catabolism of JA-Ile is poorly understood. Although a metabolite, 12-hydroxyJA-Ile, has been characterized, detailed functional studies of the compound and the enzyme that produces it have not been conducted. In this report, the kinetics of wound-induced accumulation of 12-hydroxyJA-Ile in plants were examined, and its involvement in the plant wound response is described. Candidate genes for the catabolic enzyme were narrowed down from 272 Arabidopsis Cyt P450 genes using Arabidopsis mutants. The candidate gene was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris to reveal that CYP94B3 encodes JA-Ile 12-hydroxylase. Expression analyses demonstrate that expression of CYP94B3 is induced by wounding and shows specific activity toward JA-Ile. Plants grown in medium containing JA-Ile show higher sensitivity to JA-Ile in cyp94b3 mutants than in wild-type plants. These results demonstrate that CYP94B3 plays a major regulatory role in controlling the level of JA-Ile in plants. PMID:21849397

  20. HbNIN2, a cytosolic alkaline/neutral-invertase, is responsible for sucrose catabolism in rubber-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujin; Lan, Jixian; Zhou, Binhui; Qin, Yunxia; Zhou, Yihua; Xiao, Xiaohu; Yang, Jianghua; Gou, Jiqing; Qi, Jiyan; Huang, Yacheng; Tang, Chaorong

    2015-04-01

    In Hevea brasiliensis, an alkaline/neutral invertase (A/N-Inv) is responsible for sucrose catabolism in latex (essentially the cytoplasm of rubber-producing laticifers, the source of natural rubber) and implicated in rubber yield. However, neither the gene encoding this enzyme nor its molecular and biochemical properties have been well documented. Three Hevea A/N-Inv genes, namely HbNIN1, 2 and 3, were first cloned and characterized in planta and in Escherichia coli. Cellular localizations of HbNIN2 mRNA and protein were probed. From latex, active A/N-Inv proteins were purified, identified, and explored for enzymatic properties. HbNIN2 was identified as the major A/N-Inv gene functioning in latex based on its functionality in E. coli, its latex-predominant expression, the conspicuous localization of its mRNA and protein in the laticifers, and its expressional correlation with rubber yield. An active A/N-Inv protein was partially purified from latex, and determined as HbNIN2. The enhancement of HbNIN2 enzymatic activity by pyridoxal is peculiar to A/N-Invs in other plants. We conclude that HbNIN2, a cytosolic A/N-Inv, is responsible for sucrose catabolism in rubber laticifers. The results contribute to the studies of sucrose catabolism in plants as a whole and natural rubber synthesis in particular. PMID:25581169

  1. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  2. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  3. A novel pathway for fungal D-glucuronate catabolism contains an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Sugai-Guérios, Maura H.; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For the catabolism of D-glucuronate, different pathways are used by different life forms. The pathways in bacteria and animals are established, however, a fungal pathway has not been described. In this communication, we describe an enzyme that is essential for D-glucuronate catabolism in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The enzyme has an NADH dependent 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase activity forming L-idonate. The deletion of the corresponding gene, the gluC, results in a phenotype of no growth on D-glucuronate. The open reading frame of the A. niger 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase was expressed as an active protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A histidine tagged protein was purified and it was demonstrated that the enzyme converts 2-keto-L-gulonate to L-idonate and, in the reverse direction, L-idonate to 2-keto-L-gulonate using the NAD(H) as cofactors. Such an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate dehydrogenase has not been described previously. In addition, the finding indicates that the catabolic D-glucuronate pathway in A. niger differs fundamentally from the other known D-glucuronate pathways. PMID:27189775

  4. A novel pathway for fungal D-glucuronate catabolism contains an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Sugai-Guérios, Maura H; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For the catabolism of D-glucuronate, different pathways are used by different life forms. The pathways in bacteria and animals are established, however, a fungal pathway has not been described. In this communication, we describe an enzyme that is essential for D-glucuronate catabolism in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The enzyme has an NADH dependent 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase activity forming L-idonate. The deletion of the corresponding gene, the gluC, results in a phenotype of no growth on D-glucuronate. The open reading frame of the A. niger 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase was expressed as an active protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A histidine tagged protein was purified and it was demonstrated that the enzyme converts 2-keto-L-gulonate to L-idonate and, in the reverse direction, L-idonate to 2-keto-L-gulonate using the NAD(H) as cofactors. Such an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate dehydrogenase has not been described previously. In addition, the finding indicates that the catabolic D-glucuronate pathway in A. niger differs fundamentally from the other known D-glucuronate pathways. PMID:27189775

  5. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  6. Organ-specific Differences in Achieving Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Kreisel, Daniel; Madsen, Joren C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review When it comes to tolerance induction, kidney allografts behave differently from heart allografts which behave differently from lung allografts. Here, we examine how and why different organ allografts respond differently to the same tolerance induction protocol. Recent findings Allograft tolerance has been achieved in experimental and clinical kidney transplantation. However, inducing tolerance in experimental recipients of heart and lung allografts has proven to be more challenging. New protocols being developed in nonhuman primates based on mixed chimerism and co-transplantation of tolerogenic organs may provide mechanistic insights to help overcome these challenges. Summary Tolerance induction protocols that are successful in patients transplanted with “tolerance-prone” organs such as kidneys and livers will most likely not succeed in recipients of “tolerance-resistant” organs such as hearts and lungs. Separate clinical trials using more robust tolerance protocols will be required to achieve tolerance in heart and lung recipients. PMID:26147678

  7. [Do the variations in water carbon dioxide pressure and PH have an effect on the nature of end products of protein catabolism, ammonia and urea, in the clawed frog Xenopus laevis?].

    PubMed

    Dejours, P; Armand, J; Beekenkamp, H

    1991-01-01

    The effects of PCO2 and pH changes in the ambient water on the nitrogen catabolism and the proportions of the excreted nitrogenous end products, ammonia and urea, were studied in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, at 24 degrees C. In animals living in artificial fresh water, the exposure to a hypocapnic alkalosis (PCO2 = 0.7 Torr instead of 10 Torr) did not entail any change in the nitrogen catabolism. In animals who lived in a water loaded with NaCl and had therefore a higher oxygen consumption, an intense nitrogen catabolism and a marked ureotelism, the hypocapnic alkalosis seems to have increased the intensity of the nitrogen catabolism. In neither group were there signs of ammonia toxicity. PMID:1913240

  8. Lessons on dehydration tolerance from desiccation tolerant plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extremophiles: organisms that thrive (a relative term) in environments where conditions are such that the majority of organisms cannot survive. This is not strictly true if one is describing desiccation-tolerant plants, as other plants do grow around them, but it is certainly true that they can surv...

  9. Statistical Tolerance and Clearance Analysis for Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Yi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Tolerance is inevitable because manufacturing exactly equal parts is known to be impossible. Furthermore, the specification of tolerances is an integral part of product design since tolerances directly affect the assemblability, functionality, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness of a product. In this paper, we present statistical tolerance and clearance analysis for the assembly. Our proposed work is expected to make the following contributions: (i) to help the designers to evaluate products for assemblability, (ii) to provide a new perspective to tolerance problems, and (iii) to provide a tolerance analysis tool which can be incorporated into a CAD or solid modeling system.

  10. Catabolism of streptokinase and polyethylene glycol-streptokinase: Evidence for transport of intact forms through the biliary system in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Brucato, F.H.; Pizzo, S.V. )

    1990-07-01

    The catabolism of streptokinase (SK) and polyethylene glycol derivatives of SK (PEG-SK) were studied in mice. The clearance and catabolism of SK:plasmin (SK:Pm) and PEG-SK:Pm activator complexes were also investigated. Native 125I-SK cleared rapidly (t1/2 = 15 minutes) from the circulation, with the majority of the ligand accumulating in the liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract and a substantial fraction also localizing in the kidneys. SK, which was removed from the plasma by the liver, was secreted into bile and then the GI tract. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that 125I-SK recovered from liver and bile was homogeneous and of the same molecular weight (mol wt approximately 50,200) as native SK. PEG-125I-SK cleared slowly (t1/2 greater than 200 minutes), with more than 80% of the preparation localizing in liver and GI tract. The PEG-125I-SK secreted into the bile was also intact. The bile containing 125I-SK was incubated with stoichiometric amounts of plasminogen and electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions. This study demonstrated that the secreted SK was able to form SK:Pg complexes. SDS-PAGE also showed activation of 125I-Pg that was incubated with recovered bile containing the SK. 125I-SK:Pm catabolism was also studied. In these experiments, the mol wt approximately 42,000 fragment obtained when SK is cleaved by plasmin was found in the bile. This fragment of 125I-SK was not recovered as part of a complex with plasmin, consistent with our previous observations that catabolism of SK:Pm involves transfer of the plasmin to plasma proteinase inhibitors while SK is catabolized independently. By contrast, when PEG-125I-SK:Pm was injected into mice, only intact PEG-125I-SK was found in the bile, consistent with our previous observations that the PEG derivatization blocks its degradation by plasmin.

  11. Characterization of the metabolic pathway and catabolic gene expression in biphenyl degrading marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jaya; Das, Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic pathway of biphenyl assimilation and the catabolic gene expression in a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11, isolated from the coastal sediments of Odisha, India have been studied. This strain utilized 98.86% ± 2.29% of biphenyl within 72 h when supplied as the sole source of carbon, however, preferential utilization of glucose was observed over catechol and biphenyl when grown in a complex medium. Combination of chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed the catechol pathway and identified 2-Hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate as the intermediate metabolic product. Assimilation of biphenyl was initiated by its dioxygenation, forming cis-2, 3-dihydro-2, 3-dihydroxybiphenyl subsequently transformed to 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate. In the lower pathway, cis-1, 6-dihydroxy-2, 4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylic acid was detected which formed catechol before entering into the Krebs cycle. Detection of key enzyme catechol-1, 2-dioxygenase in the cell-free extract of P. aeruginosa JP-11 supported the proposed degradation pathway. The primary enzyme for biphenyl assimilation, biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by bphA gene was found in the genome of the isolate. On increasing biphenyl stress (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)), bphA gene showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 43.5 folds. Production of biosurfactant was confirmed and the rhamnolipid synthesizing gene rhlAB was amplified. This gene also showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 258 folds on increasing biphenyl stress. PMID:26519802

  12. Cytosolic re-localization and optimization of valine synthesis and catabolism enables inseased isobutanol production with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The branched chain alcohol isobutanol exhibits superior physicochemical properties as an alternative biofuel. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae naturally produces low amounts of isobutanol as a by-product during fermentations, resulting from the catabolism of valine. As S. cerevisiae is widely used in industrial applications and can easily be modified by genetic engineering, this microorganism is a promising host for the fermentative production of higher amounts of isobutanol. Results Isobutanol production could be improved by re-locating the valine biosynthesis enzymes Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 from the mitochondrial matrix into the cytosol. To prevent the import of the three enzymes into yeast mitochondria, N-terminally shortened Ilv2, Ilv5 and Ilv3 versions were constructed lacking their mitochondrial targeting sequences. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed expression and re-localization of the truncated enzymes. Growth tests or enzyme assays confirmed enzymatic activities. Isobutanol production was only increased in the absence of valine and the simultaneous blockage of the mitochondrial valine synthesis pathway. Isobutanol production could be even more enhanced after adapting the codon usage of the truncated valine biosynthesis genes to the codon usage of highly expressed glycolytic genes. Finally, a suitable ketoisovalerate decarboxylase, Aro10, and alcohol dehydrogenase, Adh2, were selected and overexpressed. The highest isobutanol titer was 0.63 g/L at a yield of nearly 15 mg per g glucose. Conclusion A cytosolic isobutanol production pathway was successfully established in yeast by re-localization and optimization of mitochondrial valine synthesis enzymes together with overexpression of Aro10 decarboxylase and Adh2 alcohol dehydrogenase. Driving forces were generated by blocking competition with the mitochondrial valine pathway and by omitting valine from the fermentation medium. Additional deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase genes

  13. CebR as a master regulator for cellulose/cellooligosaccharide catabolism affects morphological development in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Marushima, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2009-10-01

    Streptomyces griseus mutants exhibiting deficient glucose repression of beta-galactosidase activity on lactose-containing minimal medium supplemented with a high concentration of glucose were isolated. One of these mutants had a 12-bp deletion in cebR, which encodes a LacI/GalR family regulator. Disruption of cebR in the wild-type strain caused the same phenotype as the mutant, indicating that CebR is required for glucose repression of beta-galactosidase activity. Recombinant CebR protein bound to a 14-bp inverted-repeat sequence (designated the CebR box) present in the promoter regions of cebR and the putative cellobiose utilization operon, cebEFG-bglC. The DNA-binding activity of CebR was impaired by cellooligosaccharides, including cellobiose, cellotriose, cellotetraose, cellopentaose, and cellohexaose. In agreement with this observation, transcription from the cebE and cebR promoters was greatly enhanced by the addition of cellobiose to the medium. Seven other genes containing one or two CebR boxes in their upstream regions were found in the S. griseus genome. Five of these genes encode putative secreted proteins: two cellulases, a cellulose-binding protein, a pectate lyase, and a protein of unknown function. These five genes and cebEFG-bglC were transcribed at levels 4 to 130 times higher in the DeltacebR mutant than in the wild-type strain, as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. These findings indicate that CebR is a master regulator of cellulose/cellooligosaccharide catabolism. Unexpectedly, the DeltacebR mutant formed very few aerial hyphae on lactose-containing medium, demonstrating a link between carbon source utilization and morphological development. PMID:19648249

  14. Catabolism of Tritiated Thymidine by Aquatic Microbial Communities and Incorporation of Tritium into RNA and Protein †

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Andrew M.; Karl, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of tritiated thymidine by five microbial ecosystems and the distribution of tritium into DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. All microbial assemblages tested exhibited significant labeling of RNA and protein (i.e., nonspecific labeling), as determined by differential acid-base hydrolysis. Nonspecific labeling was greatest in sediment samples, for which ≥95% of the tritium was recovered with the RNA and protein fractions. The percentage of tritium recovered in the DNA fraction ranged from 15 to 38% of the total labeled macromolecules recovered. Nonspecific labeling was independent of both incubation time and thymidine concentration over very wide ranges. Four different RNA hydrolysis reagents (KOH, NaOH, piperidine, and enzymes) solubilized tritium from cold trichloroacetic acid precipitates. High-pressure liquid chromatography separation of piperidine hydrolysates followed by measurement of isolated monophosphates confirmed the labeling of RNA and indicated that tritium was recovered primarily in CMP and AMP residues. We also evaluated the specificity of [2-3H]adenine incorporation into adenylate residues in both RNA and DNA in parallel with the [3H]thymidine experiments and compared the degree of nonspecific labeling by [3H]adenine with that derived from [3H]thymidine. Rapid catabolism of tritiated thymidine was evaluated by determining the disappearance of tritiated thymidine from the incubation medium and the appearance of degradation products by high-pressure liquid chromatography separation of the cell-free medium. Degradation product formation, including that of both volatile and nonvolatile compounds, was much greater than the rate of incorporation of tritium into stable macromolecules. The standard degradation pathway for thymidine coupled with utilization of Krebs cycle intermediates for the biosynthesis of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines readily accounts for the observed nonspecific labeling in environmental samples. PMID

  15. SKI306X inhibition of glycosaminoglycan degradation in human cartilage involves down-regulation of cytokine-induced catabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Choong Hyeok; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Na, Young-In; Yoo, Hunseung

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims SKI306X, a mixed extract of three herbs, Clematis mandshurica (CM), Prunella vulgaris (PV), and Trichosanthes kirilowii (TK), is chondroprotective in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this study were to investigate its effect on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced degradation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the basis of its action in human OA cartilage, as well as to screen for the presence of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4 in SKI306X and its component herbs, as well as in fractions from SKI306X. Methods Human OA chondrocytes and cartilage explants were obtained during total knee replacements and incubated with IL-1β ± oncostatin M with or without SKI306X or its component herb extracts. GAG degradation was assayed in cartilage explants using a commercial kit. Expression of genes involved in cartilage destruction was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction using chondrocyte RNA. SKI306X was fractionated by preparative liquid chromatography to test for the presence of inhibitors of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. Results SKI306X and PV inhibited IL-1β-induced GAG release from cartilage explants, and SKI306X, CM, PV, and TK inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP gene expression. Unexpectedly, SKI306X greatly stimulated IL-1β + oncostatin M-induced ADAMTS-4 gene expression, probably due to its TK component. Some fractions of SKI306X also inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity. Conclusions SKI306X and its herbal components inhibit GAG degradation and catabolic gene expression in human OA chondrocytes and cartilage explants. SKI306X likely also contains one or more ADAMTS-4 inhibitor. PMID:25228841

  16. Cytochrome P450 CYP94B3 mediates catabolism and inactivation of the plant hormone jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J. K.; Cooke, Thomas F.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) signals through the COI1-JAZ coreceptor complex to control key aspects of plant growth, development, and immune function. Despite detailed knowledge of the JA-Ile biosynthetic pathway, little is known about the genetic basis of JA-Ile catabolism and inactivation. Here, we report the identification of a wound- and jasmonate-responsive gene from Arabidopsis that encodes a cytochrome P450 (CYP94B3) involved in JA-Ile turnover. Metabolite analysis of wounded leaves showed that loss of CYP94B3 function in cyp94b3 mutants causes hyperaccumulation of JA-Ile and concomitant reduction in 12-hydroxy-JA-Ile (12OH-JA-Ile) content, whereas overexpression of this enzyme results in severe depletion of JA-Ile and corresponding changes in 12OH-JA-Ile levels. In vitro studies showed that heterologously expressed CYP94B3 converts JA-Ile to 12OH-JA-Ile, and that 12OH-JA-Ile is less effective than JA-Ile in promoting the formation of COI1-JAZ receptor complexes. CYP94B3-overexpressing plants displayed phenotypes indicative of JA-Ile deficiency, including defects in male fertility, resistance to jasmonate-induced growth inhibition, and susceptibility to insect attack. Increased accumulation of JA-Ile in wounded cyp94b3 leaves was associated with enhanced expression of jasmonate-responsive genes. These results demonstrate that CYP94B3 exerts negative feedback control on JA-Ile levels and performs a key role in attenuation of jasmonate responses. PMID:21576464

  17. Mechanical Loading of Cartilage Explants with Compression and Sliding Motion Modulates Gene Expression of Lubricin and Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marková, Michala; Torzilli, Peter A.; Gallo, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Translation of the contact zone in articulating joints is an important component of joint kinematics, yet rarely investigated in a biological context. This study was designed to investigate how sliding contact areas affect cartilage mechanobiology. We hypothesized that higher sliding speeds would lead to increased extracellular matrix mechanical stress and the expression of catabolic genes. Design A cylindrical Teflon indenter was used to apply 50 or 100 N normal forces at 10, 40, or 70 mm/s sliding speed. Mechanical parameters were correlated with gene expressions using a multiple linear regression model. Results In both loading groups there was no significant effect of sliding speed on any of the mechanical parameters (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force). However, an increase in vertical force (from 50 to 100 N) led to a significant increase in extracellular matrix strain and stress. For 100 N, significant correlations between gene expression and mechanical parameters were found for TIMP-3 (r2 = 0.89), ADAMTS-5 (r2 = 0.73), and lubricin (r2 = 0.73). Conclusions The sliding speeds applied do not have an effect on the mechanical response of the cartilage, this could be explained by a partial attainment of the “elastic limit” at and above a sliding speed of 10 mm/s. Nevertheless, we still found a relationship between sliding speed and gene expression when the tissue was loaded with 100 N normal force. Thus despite the absence of speed-dependent mechanical changes (strain, stress, modulus, tangential force), the sliding speed had an influence on gene expression. PMID:26175864

  18. Cyclic GMP catabolism up-regulation in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice is associated with organ remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yougbaré, Issaka; Keravis, Thérèse; Abusnina, Abdurazzag; Decossas, Marion; Schall, Nicolas; Muller, Sylviane; Lugnier, Claire

    2014-07-01

    Production of high titer of antibodies against nuclear components is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease characterized by the progressive chronic inflammation of multiple joints and organs. Organ damage and dysfunction such as renal failure are typical clinical features in lupus. Cell hypermetabolism and hypertrophy can accelerate organ dysfunction. In this study we focus on a specific murine model of lupus, the MRL/lpr strain, and investigated the role of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) catabolism in organ remodeling of main target tissues (kidney, spleen and liver) in comparison with age-matched control mice. In MRL/lpr-prone mice, the cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activities were significantly increased in the kidney (3-fold, P<0.001), spleen (2-fold, P<0.001) and liver (1.6-fold, P<0.05). These raised activity levels were paralleled by both an increased activity of PDE1 in the kidney (associated with nephromegaly) and in the liver, and PDE2 in the spleen of lupus-prone mice. The up-regulation of PDE1 and PDE2 activities were associated with a decrease in intracellular cGMP levels. This underlines an alteration of cGMP-PDE signaling in the kidney, spleen and liver targeting different PDEs according to organs. In good agreement with these findings, a single intravenous administration to MRL/lpr mice of nimodipine (PDE1 inhibitor) but not of EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor) was able to significantly lower peripheral hypercellularity (P=0.0401), a characteristic feature of this strain of lupus-prone mice. Collectively, our findings are important for generating personalized strategies to prevent certain forms of the lupus disease as well as for understanding the role of PDEs and cGMP in the pathophysiology of lupus. PMID:24631654

  19. Phthalate catabolic gene cluster is linked to the angular dioxygenase gene in Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63.

    PubMed

    Habe, H; Miyakoshi, M; Chung, J; Kasuga, K; Yoshida, T; Nojiri, H; Omori, T

    2003-03-01

    Phthalate is a metabolic intermediate of the pathway of fluorene (FN) degradation via angular dioxygenation. A gene cluster responsible for the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate was cloned from the dibenzofuran (DF)- and FN-degrading bacterium Terrabacter sp. strain DBF63 and sequenced. The genes encoding seven catabolic enzymes, oxygenase large subunit of phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (phtA1), oxygenase small subunit of phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase (phtA2), cis-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase (phtB), [3Fe-4S] or [4Fe-4S] type of ferredoxin (phtA3), ferredoxin reductase (phtA4), 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase (phtC) and putative regulatory protein (phtR), were found in the upstream region of the angular dioxygenase gene (dbfA1A2), encoded in this order. Escherichia coli carrying phtA1A2BA3A4 genes converted phthalate to 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate, and the 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase activity by E. coli cells carrying phtC was finally detected with the introduction of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the upstream region of its initiation codon. Homology analysis on the upstream region of the pht gene cluster revealed that there was an insertion sequence (IS) (ISTesp2; ORF14 and its flanking region), part of which was almost 100% identical to the orf1 and its flanking region adjacent to the extradiol dioxygenase gene ( bphC1) involved in the DF degradation of Terrabacter sp. strain DPO360 [Schmid et al. (1997) J Bacteriol 179:53-62]. This suggests that ISTesp2 plays a role in the metabolism of aromatic compounds in Terrabacter sp. strains DBF63 and DPO360. PMID:12658514

  20. Combined fluxomics and transcriptomics analysis of glucose catabolism via a partially cyclic pentose phosphate pathway in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Tanja; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Polen, Tino; Bringer, Stephanie; Sahm, Hermann; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bott, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the distribution and regulation of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H with glucose were studied by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) in combination with transcriptomics and enzyme assays. For (13)C-MFA, cells were cultivated with specifically (13)C-labeled glucose, and intracellular metabolites were analyzed for their labeling pattern by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In growth phase I, 90% of the glucose was oxidized periplasmically to gluconate and partially further oxidized to 2-ketogluconate. Of the glucose taken up by the cells, 9% was phosphorylated to glucose 6-phosphate, whereas 91% was oxidized by cytoplasmic glucose dehydrogenase to gluconate. Additional gluconate was taken up into the cells by transport. Of the cytoplasmic gluconate, 70% was oxidized to 5-ketogluconate and 30% was phosphorylated to 6-phosphogluconate. In growth phase II, 87% of gluconate was oxidized to 2-ketogluconate in the periplasm and 13% was taken up by the cells and almost completely converted to 6-phosphogluconate. Since G. oxydans lacks phosphofructokinase, glucose 6-phosphate can be metabolized only via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP). (13)C-MFA showed that 6-phosphogluconate is catabolized primarily via the oxidative PPP in both phases I and II (62% and 93%) and demonstrated a cyclic carbon flux through the oxidative PPP. The transcriptome comparison revealed an increased expression of PPP genes in growth phase II, which was supported by enzyme activity measurements and correlated with the increased PPP flux in phase II. Moreover, genes possibly related to a general stress response displayed increased expression in growth phase II. PMID:23377928