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Sample records for catalytic h2o-3h exchange

  1. Multidimentional Normal Mode Calculations for the OH Vibrational Spectra of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Han; Tan, Jake Acedera; Takahashi, Kaito; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-06-01

    Recent experimental observations of (H_2O)_3^+, (H_2O)_3^+Ar, H^+(H_2O)_3, and H^+(H_2O)_3Ar clusters in the region 1400-3800 wn show that the OH stretching vibration has distinct characteristics. Multidimensional normal mode calculations were carried out for OH stretching vibrations in the 1200-4000 wn photon energy range. The potential energy and dipole surfaces were evaluated by using first-principles methods. By comparing the calculated frequencies and intensities of OH stretching vibration with experimental spectra, we found that the assignment of OH strecthing of H_3O^+ moiety and free OH strectching vibration have resonable agreement with experimental data. Jeffrey M. Headrick, Eric G. Diken, Richard S. Walters, Nathan I. Hammer, Richard A. Christie, Jun Cui, Evgeniy M. Myshakin, Michael A. Duncan, Mark A. Johnson, Kenneth D. Jordan, Science, 2005, 17, 1765. Kenta Mizuse, Jer-Lai Kuo and Asuka Fujii, Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 868 Kenta Mizuse and Asuka Fujii, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 929.

  2. Metal-containing ligands for mixed-metal polymers: novel Cu(II)-Ag(I) mixed-metal coordination polymers generated from [Cu(2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate)2(H2O)].3H2O and silver(I) salts.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y B; Smith, M D; zur Loye, H C

    2000-05-01

    One Cu(II)-containing ligand and two Cu(II)-Ag(I) mixed-metal coordination polymers have been synthesized. [Cu(2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate)2(H2O)].3H2O (1) was obtained as a molecular complex with two uncoordinated nitrogen donors by the reaction of 2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate sodium with CuCl(2).2H2O in water. Compound 1 crystallized in the triclinic space group P1, with a = 10.498(2) A, b = 11.000(2) A, c = 8.1424(16) A, alpha = 98.33(3) degrees, beta = 101.83(3) degrees, gamma = 66.68(3) degrees, and Z = 2. Reactions of 1 with silver(I) salts have been studied. Two Cu(II)-Ag(I) mixed-metal coordination polymers, namely, Ag[Cu(2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate)2.(H2O)2](BF4) (2) and Ag[Cu(2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate)2.(H2O)2](NO3) (3), have been generated by treating 1 with AgBF4 and AgNO3, respectively. Compound 2 crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2/c, with a = 25.827(5) A, b = 9.6430(19) A, c = 7.4525(15) A, beta = 94.74(3) degrees, and Z = 4. Compound 3 also crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2/c, with a = 25.855(5) A, b = 9.782(2) A, c = 7.1201(14) A, beta = 96.90(3) degrees, and Z = 4. The main structural feature in both 2 and 3 is a zigzag Cu(II)-Ag(I) mixed-metal chain, in which the alternating Cu(II) and Ag(I) centers are linked by 2-methylpyrazine-5-carboxylate spacers. The effect of the nitrate counterion was illustrated by compound 3, in which a novel [Ag+...NO3-] coordination chain has been found which acts as the connector to cross-link the one-dimensional zigzag chains into a three-dimensional network. In addition, an identical interchain O-H...O hydrogen bonding system has been found in both 2 and 3 and has been shown to play a significant role in directing the alignment of the one-dimensional mixed-metal polymer chains in the crystalline state. The magnetic susceptibilities of 2 and 3 were measured and found to follow the Curie law (mu eff = 1.85 for 2 and 1.83 for 3). PMID:11428114

  3. Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.; Rogers, M.L.

    1980-09-30

    Starting from an effort to control airborne emissions, the Mound tritium containment program has evolved to include development of the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process. This process separates tritiated aqueous streams into detritiated water and an enriched hydrogen stream that is suitable for use by other tritium recovery processes. Experimentation has shown that the process performs as predicted by bench-scale measurements, and that available process components exhibit acceptable resistance to damage by radiation from tritium exposure. Planned future efforts are concentrated on finalizing automatic control of the process and on developing feed treatment methods for the protection of process components.

  4. Feedwater cleanup for combined electrolysis catalytic exchange. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, J.E.; Sienkiewicz, C.J.; Ellis, R.E.

    1982-07-30

    Chemical analyses were performed on a series of samples of tritiated wastewater from the Mound Effluent Recovery System (ERS). These analyses indicated that a wide range of organic impurities, as well as several specific inorganic impurities, was present in the water. One of the more damaging organic contaminants found was oil; therefore laboratory experiments were conducted to develop an oil removal method. Based on results of these analyses and experiments, a pilot scale system was designed and built to remove impurities from Mound ERS water. This system successfully removed impurities from ERS water making it suitable as feed for the combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) system.

  5. Development of combined electrolysis catalytic exchange. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.E.; Lentz, J.E.; Rogers, M.L.; Sienkiewicz, C.J.

    1982-06-24

    Aqueous wastes contaminated with tritium in the form of HTO pose a difficult disposal problem. Since the only difference between HTO and the major constituent (H/sub 2/O) of such wastes is the isotopic form of the hydrogen, an isotopic separation process is required for decontamination of these wastes. Several processes were tried experimentally before the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process was chosen for pilot-scale development. This process concentrates tritium in the water phase by contacting gaseous hydrogen with water over a catalyst. Experimental work was performed to determine the effects of tritium radiolysis on the electrolysis cells and exchange catalyst. Processes to remove impurities from the feed stream were developed, and in order to evaluate feasibility, a small, pilot-scale CECE system was designed, built, and operated. Several potential applications are discussed, and results of experimenta work for two of these applications are given.

  6. Olefin fractionation and catalytic conversion system with heat exchange means

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.S.; Owen, H.; Hsia, C.H

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a continuous catalytic system for converting an olefinic feedstock comprising ethylene and C/sub 3/+ olefins to heavier liquid hydrocarbon product comprising: means for prefractionating the olefinic feedstock to obtain a gaseous stream rich in ethylene and a liquid stream containing C/sub 3/+ olefin; means for vaporizing and contacting the liquid stream from the prefractionating means with hydrocarbon conversion oligomerization catalyst in at least one exothermic catalytic reaction zone to provide a heavier hydrocarbon effluent stream comprising distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbons; means for cooling and fractionating the effluent stream to recover distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbons separately; means for recycling at least a portion of the recovered gasoline as a liquid sorbent stream to the prefractionating means thereby reacting the recycled gasoline together with sorbed C/sub 3/+ olefin in the catalytic reactor system; and means for exchanging heat between hot effluent from the exothermic reaction zone and fractionator liquid rich in C/sub 3/+ olefin in the prefractionator reboiler loop.

  7. Heterogeneous catalytic isotopic exchange of benzylic compounds in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Azran, J; Shimoni, M.; Buchman, O. )

    1994-08-01

    Isotopic exchange reactions of bibenzyl and benzylic derivatives with deuterium (D[sub 2]) and tritium (T[sub 2]) gas, catalyzed by Pd/C, have been performed in solution. Catalyst pre-washed with the reacting gas showed improved H/D or H/T exchange. In aprotic solvents such as dioxane, ethyl acetate, and cyclohexane, 3.1 to 3.5 D atoms were exchanged under standard conditions in 1 h, while in benzene 1 D atom was exchanged. D atoms adsorbed on the catalyst surface were rapidly replaced by H from methanol, diluting the D[sub 2] gas phase. Compounds containing O or N atoms enhanced the rate of exchange, while S atoms inhibited the catalyst activity. The H/D exchange obeyed pseudo-first order kinetics when D[sub 2] gas was used in large excess. When T[sub 2] gas replaced D[sub 2], a substantial decrease in rate of exchange was observed, due to the slower dissociative chemisorption of T[sub 2] on the catalyst surface. The results indicated that this exchange process occurred through two simultaneous mechanisms. The breaking of the C-H bond appeared to be the rate-determining step. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Tritiated water processing using liquid phase catalytic exchange and solid oxide electrolyte cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamai, H.; Konishi, S.; Hara, M.; Okuno, K.; Yamamoto, I.

    1995-10-01

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) is an effective method for enrichment and removal of tritium from tritiated water. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process is an attractive application of a LPCE column. We proposed a new process that improves the CECE process. Using a solid oxide electrolyte (SOE) cell for electrolysis makes the CECE process more energy efficient and eliminates other disadvantages such as large tritium inventory and extremely slow system response. When the cell is used for recombination, the system becomes even more simple, efficiently, reliable and safe. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Iyoki, Kenta; Dinh, Kimberly; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-22

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C-H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483-498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions. PMID:27413787

  10. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C–H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483–498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions. PMID:27413787

  11. Detritiation of low-level aqueous waste by Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) technology is, at present, the only viable means for removing tritium from low level aqueous waste. The CECE process will be described and the results of experimentation at Mound will be discussed. Several specific low level applications that might benefit from this technology will be outlined. 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  13. Vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) of organosulfur compounds over supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    Sulfur in transportation fuels remains a leading source of SOx emissions from vehicle engines and is a major source of air pollution. The very low levels of sulfur globally mandated for transportation fuels in the near future cannot be achieved by current practices of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for sulfur removal, which operate under severe conditions (high T, P) and use valuable H2. Novel vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) processes of selectively oxidizing various organosulfur compounds (carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), thiophene, 2,5-dimenthylthiophene) typically found in various industrial streams (e.g., petroleum refining, pulp and paper) into valuable chemical intermediates (H 2CO, CO, H2, maleic anhydride and concentrated SO2) has been extensively studied. This research has primarily focused on establishing the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of these selective oxidation reactions over well-defined supported metal oxide catalysts. The selective oxidation reactions of COS + O2 → CO + SO2; 2CS2 + 5O2 → 2CO + 4SO2; CH3SH + 2O 2 → H2CO + SO2 + H2O; C4 H4S + 3O2 → C4H2O 3 + H2O + SO2; were studied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the supported metal oxide phases were 100% dispersed on the oxide substrate. All the catalysts were highly active and selective for the oxidesulfurization of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, and thiophene between 290--330°C, 230--270°C, 350--400°C, and 250--400°C, respectively and did not deactivate. The TOFs (turnover frequency, normalized activity per active catalytic site) for all ODS reactions over supported vanadia catalysts, only containing molecularly dispersed surface vanadia species, varied within one order of magnitude and revealed the V-O-Support bridging bond was involved in the critical rate-determining kinetic steps. The surface reaction mechanism for each reaction was revealed by in situ IR (infrared) and

  14. Experimental study of an integral catalytic combustor: Heat exchanger for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using catalytic combustion with heat removal for the Stirling engine to reduce exhaust emissions and also improve heat transfer to the working fluid was studied using spaced parallel plates. An internally air-cooled heat exchanger was placed between two noble metal catalytic plates. A preheated fuel-air mixture passed between the plates and reacted on the surface of the catalyzed plates. Heat was removed from the catalytic surface by radiation and convection to the aircooled heat exchangers to control temperature and minimize thermal nitrogen oxide emissions. Test conditions were inlet combustion air temperatures from 850 to 900 K, inlet velocities of about 10 m/s, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 0.9, and pressures from 1.3x10 to the 5th power to 2.0x10 to the 5th power Pa. Propane fuel was used for all testing. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were measured. Nitrogen oxide emissions ranged from 1.7 to 3.3 g NO2/kg fuel. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and indicate that further investigation of the concept is warranted.

  15. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  16. Synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic reduction for complete decomposition of perchlorate in waste water.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Na; Choi, Minkee

    2014-07-01

    Ion-exchange has been frequently used for the treatment of perchlorate (ClO4(-)), but disposal or regeneration of the spent resins has been the major hurdle for field application. Here we demonstrate a synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic decomposition by using Pd-supported ion-exchange resin as an adsorption/catalysis bifunctional material. The ion-exchange capability of the resin did not change after generation of the Pd clusters via mild ethanol reduction, and thus showed very high ion-exchange selectivity and capacity toward ClO4(-). After the resin was saturated with ClO4(-) in an adsorption mode, it was possible to fully decompose the adsorbed ClO4(-) into nontoxic Cl(-) by the catalytic function of the Pd catalysts under H2 atmosphere. It was demonstrated that prewetting the ion-exchange resin with ethanol significantly accelerate the decomposition of ClO4(-) due to the weaker association of ClO4(-) with the ion-exchange sites of the resin, which allows more facile access of ClO4(-) to the catalytically active Pd-resin interface. In the presence of ethanol, >90% of the adsorbed ClO4(-) could be decomposed within 24 h at 10 bar H2 and 373 K. The ClO4(-) adsorption-catalytic decomposition cycle could be repeated up to five times without loss of ClO4(-) adsorption capacity and selectivity. PMID:24894447

  17. Synthesis of ultrasmall Li-Mn spinel oxides exhibiting unusual ion exchange, electrochemical, and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yumi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Uematsu, Tsubasa; Oshikawa, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    The efficient surface reaction and rapid ion diffusion of nanocrystalline metal oxides have prompted considerable research interest for the development of high functional materials. Herein, we present a novel low-temperature method to synthesize ultrasmall nanocrystalline spinel oxides by controlling the hydration of coexisting metal cations in an organic solvent. This method selectively led to Li-Mn spinel oxides by tuning the hydration of Li(+) ions under mild reaction conditions (i.e., low temperature and short reaction time). These particles exhibited an ultrasmall crystallite size of 2.3 nm and a large specific surface area of 371 ± 15 m(2) g(-1). They exhibited unique properties such as unusual topotactic Li(+)/H(+) ion exchange, high-rate discharge ability, and high catalytic performance for several aerobic oxidation reactions, by creating surface phenomena throughout the particles. These properties differed significantly from those of Li-Mn spinel oxides obtained by conventional solid-state methods. PMID:26456216

  18. Synthesis of ultrasmall Li–Mn spinel oxides exhibiting unusual ion exchange, electrochemical, and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yumi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Uematsu, Tsubasa; Oshikawa, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    The efficient surface reaction and rapid ion diffusion of nanocrystalline metal oxides have prompted considerable research interest for the development of high functional materials. Herein, we present a novel low-temperature method to synthesize ultrasmall nanocrystalline spinel oxides by controlling the hydration of coexisting metal cations in an organic solvent. This method selectively led to Li–Mn spinel oxides by tuning the hydration of Li+ ions under mild reaction conditions (i.e., low temperature and short reaction time). These particles exhibited an ultrasmall crystallite size of 2.3 nm and a large specific surface area of 371 ± 15 m2 g−1. They exhibited unique properties such as unusual topotactic Li+/H+ ion exchange, high-rate discharge ability, and high catalytic performance for several aerobic oxidation reactions, by creating surface phenomena throughout the particles. These properties differed significantly from those of Li–Mn spinel oxides obtained by conventional solid-state methods. PMID:26456216

  19. Water Detritiation: Better SCK-CEN Catalysts for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, Aime; Braet, Johan; Vanderbiesen, Sven

    2005-07-15

    A technically and economically sound technology for water detritiation is mandatory for the future of fusion. This technology is expected to be based on water electrolysis and Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE). LPCE requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past, which is prepared by depositing platinum on an activated charcoal carrier and mixing it with polytetrafluorethylene as a hydrophobic material. In combination with an appropriate wettable packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing us to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. Recently we succeeded in reproducing this catalyst and preparing a slightly different but clearly ameliorated type. By extrapolation these new results would allow us to obtain, at 40 deg. C and under typical but conservative operating conditions, a decontamination factor of 10000 with a column of less than 3 meters long. Such performances would make this catalyst an excellent candidate for application at JET or ITER. To confirm the performances of our improved catalyst for a longer period of time and in a longer column, we are now starting experiments in a newly built installation and we are collaborating with ICSI, Romania.

  20. Hydrogen Isotope Separation by Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange Under Reduced Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, T.; Asakura, Y.; Uda, T.; Abe, Y.; Shiozaki, T.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2005-07-15

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science experimental studies on hydrogen isotope separation by a Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process have been carried out in order to apply it to the system of water detritiation for D-D burning experiments of the Large Helical Device. As an improvement of the CECE process, we have developed a reduced-pressure method as a means of enhancing the separation factor. The feasibility of this method is examined through application to a CECE process using a prototype separation column. Hydrogen-deuterium isotope separation experiments are performed in the two cases where column pressures are 12 and 101 kPa, and the separation factors for hydrogen and deuterium are obtained as 6.8 and 5.6, respectively. It is confirmed that the present method is applicable and useful to the CECE process. The values of Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP) are estimated by analyses with the equilibrium stage model. The HETP values are 15 cm at 12 kPa and 13 cm at 101 kPa. The increase of superficial velocity with decreasing pressure may spoil the efficiency of the mass transfer.

  1. TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, I.; Cristescu, I.R.; Doerr, L.; Glugla, M.; Hellriegel, G.; Schaefer, P.; Welte, S.; Kveton, O.; Murdoch, D

    2005-07-15

    One of the most used methods for tritium recovery from different sources of tritiated water is based on the combination between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) and Cryogenic Distillation (CD) processes. The development, i.e. configuration, design and performance testing of critical components, of a tritium recovery system based on the combination CECE-CD is essential for both JET and ITER. For JET, a Water Detritiation System (WDS) is not only needed to process tritiated water which has already been accumulated from operation, but also for the tritiated water which will be generated during decommissioning. For ITER, the WDS is one of the key systems to control the tritium content in the effluents streams, to recover as much tritium as possible and consequently to minimize the impact on the environment. A cryogenic distillation facility with the aim to investigate the trade-off between CECE-CD, to validate different components and mathematical modelling software is current under development at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) as an extension of the existing CECE facility.

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of Cu-SAPO-34 Catalysts for Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction. 1. Aqueous Solution Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Washton, Nancy M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-09-06

    SAPO-34 molecular sieves are synthesized using various structure directing agents (SDAs). Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts are prepared via aqueous solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Catalytic properties are examined using standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and ammonia oxidation reactions. During solution ion exchange, different SAPO-34 samples undergo different extent of structural damage via irreversible hydrolysis. Si content within the samples (i.e., Al-O-Si bond density) and framework stress are key factors that affect irreversible hydrolysis. Even using very dilute Cu acetate solutions, it is not possible to generate Cu-SAPO-34 samples with only isolated Cu2+ ions. Small amounts of CuOx species always coexist with isolated Cu2+ ions. Highly active and selective Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for NH3-SCR are readily generated using this synthesis protocol, even for SAPO-34 samples that degrade substantially during solution ion exchange. High-temperature aging is found to improve the catalytic performance. This is likely due to reduction of intracrystalline mass-transfer limitations via formation of additional porosity in the highly defective SAPO-34 particles formed after ion exchange. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract number DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  3. Physical and Catalytic Properties of the Na-exchanged Y-Zeolites with Different Si/Al Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang Seop; Noh, Sun Hye; Kim, Sung Soo; Suh, Soong-Hyuk; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-01-01

    A series of sodium-exchanged Y-zeolites with different Si/Al ratios have been prepared from the proton and ammonium ion forms of Y-zeolite(faujasite) by means of a solution ion exchange. The prepared catalysts have been characterized by the various analytical techniques and the NOx conversion rates of the catalysts were measured with non-thermal plasma assisted catalytic system. Specific surface areas measured by the BET increased in the order of the NaY series 708, 712, 100, 720, 760. The results of the elemental analyses showed that the Si/Al ratio of the catalysts increased gradually in the order of NaY 100, NaY 712, NaY 720, NaY 760, NaY 780.

  4. Using the water signal to detect invisible exchanging protons in the catalytic triad of a serine protease

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Carolyn B.; van Zijl, Peter; Stivers, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) is an MRI approach that can indirectly detect exchange broadened protons that are invisible in traditional NMR spectra. We modified the CEST pulse sequence for use on high-resolution spectrometers and developed a quantitative approach for measuring exchange rates based upon CEST spectra. This new methodology was applied to the rapidly exchanging Hδ1 and Hε2 protons of His57 in the catalytic triad of bovine chymotrypsinogen-A (bCT-A). CEST enabled observation of Hε2 at neutral pH values, and also allowed measurement of solvent exchange rates for His57-Hδ1 and His57-Hε2 across a wide pH range (3–10). Hδ1 exchange was only dependent upon the charge state of the His57 (kex,Im+ = 470 s−1, kex,Im = 50 s−1), while Hε2 exchange was found to be catalyzed by hydroxide ion and phosphate base (kOH− = 1.7 × 1010 M−1s−1, kHPO42−=1.7×106M−1s−1), reflecting its greater exposure to solute catalysts. Concomitant with the disappearance of the Hε2 signal as the pH was increased above its pKa, was the appearance of a novel signal (δ = 12 ppm), which we assigned to Hγ of the nearby Ser195 nucleophile, that is hydrogen bonded to Nε2 of neutral His57. The chemical shift of Hγ is about 7 ppm downfield from a typical hydroxyl proton, suggesting a highly polarized O-Hγ bond. The significant alkoxide character of Oγ indicates that Ser195 is preactivated for nucleophilic attack before substrate binding. CEST should be generally useful for mechanistic investigations of many enzymes with labile protons involved in active site chemistry. PMID:21809183

  5. The DUSP–Ubl domain of USP4 enhances its catalytic efficiency by promoting ubiquitin exchange

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Marcello; Luna-Vargas, Mark P. A.; Faesen, Alex C.; Sixma, Titia K.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease USP4 is emerging as an important regulator of cellular pathways, including the TGF-β response, NF-κB signalling and splicing, with possible roles in cancer. Here we show that USP4 has its catalytic triad arranged in a productive conformation. Nevertheless, it requires its N-terminal DUSP–Ubl domain to achieve full catalytic turnover. Pre-steady-state kinetics measurements reveal that USP4 catalytic domain activity is strongly inhibited by slow dissociation of ubiquitin after substrate hydrolysis. The DUSP–Ubl domain is able to enhance ubiquitin dissociation, hence promoting efficient turnover. In a mechanism that requires all USP4 domains, binding of the DUSP–Ubl domain promotes a change of a switching loop near the active site. This ‘allosteric regulation of product discharge’ provides a novel way of regulating deubiquitinating enzymes that may have relevance for other enzyme classes. PMID:25404403

  6. SUSTAINABLE CATALYTIC TREATMENT OF WASTE ION EXCHANGE BRINES FOR REUSE DURING OXYANION TREATMENT IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We expect the proposed work to result in the design of full-scale treatment systems for catalytic brine treatment that provides a more economical and sustainable option for removing mixtures of oxyanions from drinking water at small water treatment utilities. This will allo...

  7. CATALYTIC PROMOTION OF THE ADSORPTION OF VANADIUM ON AN ANIONIC EXCHANGE RESIN

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement in the process for the recovery of vanadium from acidic phosphatic solutions is presented. In this process the vanadium is first oxidized to the pentavaleat state, and is then separated by contacting such solutions with an anion exchange resin whereby adsorption of the complexed pentavalent vanadium is effected. The improvement lies in the fact that adsorp tion of the vanadium complex by the anion exchange resin is promoted and improved by providing fiuoride ions in solution to be contacted.

  8. Production of an ion-exchange membrane-catalytic electrode bonded material for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, H.; Torikai, E.

    1986-01-01

    A good bond is achieved by placing a metal salt in solution on one side of a membrane and a reducing agent on the other side so that the reducing agent penetrates the membrane and reduces the metal. Thus, a solution containing Pt, Rh, etc., is placed on one side of the membrane and a reducing agent such as NaBH, is placed on the other side. The bonded metal layer obtained is superior in catalytic activity and is suitable as an electrode in a cell such as for solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis.

  9. Interplay of light transmission and catalytic exchange current in photoelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountaine, Katherine T.; Lewerenz, Hans J.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2014-10-01

    We develop an analytic current-voltage expression for a variable junction photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and use it to investigate and illustrate the influence of the optical and electrical properties of catalysts on the optoelectronic performance of PEC devices. Specifically, the model enables a simple, yet accurate accounting of nanostructured catalyst optical and electrical properties through incorporation of an optical transmission factor and active catalytic area factor. We demonstrate the utility of this model via the output power characteristics of an exemplary dual tandem solar cell with indium gallium phosphide and indium gallium arsenide absorbers with varying rhodium catalyst nanoparticle loading. The approach highlights the importance of considering interactions between independently optimized components for optimal PEC device design.

  10. Interplay of light transmission and catalytic exchange current in photoelectrochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fountaine, Katherine T.; Lewerenz, Hans J.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2014-10-27

    We develop an analytic current-voltage expression for a variable junction photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and use it to investigate and illustrate the influence of the optical and electrical properties of catalysts on the optoelectronic performance of PEC devices. Specifically, the model enables a simple, yet accurate accounting of nanostructured catalyst optical and electrical properties through incorporation of an optical transmission factor and active catalytic area factor. We demonstrate the utility of this model via the output power characteristics of an exemplary dual tandem solar cell with indium gallium phosphide and indium gallium arsenide absorbers with varying rhodium catalyst nanoparticle loading. The approach highlights the importance of considering interactions between independently optimized components for optimal PEC device design.

  11. Enrichment and volume reduction of tritiated water using combined electrolysis catalytic exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Everatt, A.E.; Seto, P.W.K.; Chuang, K.T.

    1988-09-01

    The CECE process with AECL hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. A simple linear expression that relates the overall rate constant (K/sub y/a) to the inverse of the equilibrium slope (m) for H/sub 2//H/sub 2/O isotope exchange was developed from the two-film mass transfer model. Laboratory and pilot data were used to demonstrate the applicability of this simple relationship which allows reaction rates for any pair of hydrogen isotope species at any given concentration to be predicted from rate dat of any other isotope pair and/or concentration range. This approach was used to design a hypothetical CECE plant for concentrating tritiated light water to 100 Ci/L (3.7 TBq.L) to give a 250-fold reduction in waste volume.

  12. Thiol–disulfide exchange is involved in the catalytic mechanism of peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. Todd; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Honek, John F.; Matthews, Brian W.

    2000-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (MsrA; EC 1.8.4.6) reverses the inactivation of many proteins due to the oxidation of critical methionine residues by reducing methionine sulfoxide, Met(O), to methionine. MsrA activity is independent of bound metal and cofactors but does require reducing equivalents from either DTT or a thioredoxin-regenerating system. In an effort to understand these observations, the four cysteine residues of bovine MsrA were mutated to serine in a series of permutations. An analysis of the enzymatic activity of the variants and their free sulfhydryl states by mass spectrometry revealed that thiol–disulfide exchange occurs during catalysis. In particular, the strictly conserved Cys-72 was found to be essential for activity and could form disulfide bonds, only upon incubation with substrate, with either Cys-218 or Cys-227, located at the C terminus. The significantly decreased activity of the Cys-218 and Cys-227 variants in the presence of thioredoxin suggested that these residues shuttle reducing equivalents from thioredoxin to the active site. A reaction mechanism based on the known reactivities of thiols with sulfoxides and the available data for MsrA was formulated. In this scheme, Cys-72 acts as a nucleophile and attacks the sulfur atom of the sulfoxide moiety, leading to the formation of a covalent, tetracoordinate intermediate. Collapse of the intermediate is facilitated by proton transfer and the concomitant attack of Cys-218 on Cys-72, leading to the formation of a disulfide bond. The active site is returned to the reduced state for another round of catalysis by a series of thiol—disulfide exchange reactions via Cys-227, DTT, or thioredoxin. PMID:10841552

  13. Tritium waste control: October 1980-March 1981. [Catalytic exchange detritiation; fixation of aqueous tritiated wastes in polymer impregnated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberger, P.H.; Rogers, M.L.

    1981-10-19

    The Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) pilot system was operated for 88 days and processed over 500 liters of tritiated water. Two complete electrolysis systems, each using a General Electric Company solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) cell, have been built. One of these is being used for the 10 Ci/ml tritiated water test and the other as a control with nontritiated water. The first SPE failed after seven weeks of exposure to the 10 Ci/ml water. A new SPE was installed and has been operated for eight weeks without failure at 10 Ci/ml. Analyses for 10 types of impurities were made on each of 15 Effluent Recovery System (ERS) liquid waste samples. A pilot-scale system for removal of these impurities has been designed and is being built. Gas generation rates caused by radiolysis of tritium waste materials were determined for polymer and nonpolymer impregenated tritiated concrete, and fixated and nonfixated tritiated waste vacuum pump oil. The construction of the new addition to the liquid waste handling facility was completed. The inert-atmosphere gloveboxes and other equipment are being installed for the polystyrene impregnated, tritiated-concrete wastewater process. The study of tritium release from representative burial packages was continued. The two wastewater drums which have the highest tritium release (29.8 mCi and 98.2 mCi) also contain the highest amounts of tritium, originally 34,480 Ci and 52,128 Ci, respectively. The tritium release from the polymer-impregnated, tritiated concrete (PITC) and the control (non-PITC) remain too low to be illustrated on the current figures.

  14. Performance and life cycle environmental benefits of recycling spent ion exchange brines by catalytic treatment of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Bergquist, Allison M; Jeong, Sangjo; Guest, Jeremy S; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Salt used to make brines for regeneration of ion exchange (IX) resins is the dominant economic and environmental liability of IX treatment systems for nitrate-contaminated drinking water sources. To reduce salt usage, the applicability and environmental benefits of using a catalytic reduction technology to treat nitrate in spent IX brines and enable their reuse for IX resin regeneration were evaluated. Hybrid IX/catalyst systems were designed and life cycle assessment of process consumables are used to set performance targets for the catalyst reactor. Nitrate reduction was measured in a typical spent brine (i.e., 5000 mg/L NO3(-) and 70,000 mg/L NaCl) using bimetallic Pd-In hydrogenation catalysts with variable Pd (0.2-2.5 wt%) and In (0.0125-0.25 wt%) loadings on pelletized activated carbon support (Pd-In/C). The highest activity of 50 mgNO3(-)/(min - g(Pd)) was obtained with a 0.5 wt%Pd-0.1 wt%In/C catalyst. Catalyst longevity was demonstrated by observing no decrease in catalyst activity over more than 60 days in a packed-bed reactor. Based on catalyst activity measured in batch and packed-bed reactors, environmental impacts of hybrid IX/catalyst systems were evaluated for both sequencing-batch and continuous-flow packed-bed reactor designs and environmental impacts of the sequencing-batch hybrid system were found to be 38-81% of those of conventional IX. Major environmental impact contributors other than salt consumption include Pd metal, hydrogen (electron donor), and carbon dioxide (pH buffer). Sensitivity of environmental impacts of the sequencing-batch hybrid reactor system to sulfate and bicarbonate anions indicate the hybrid system is more sustainable than conventional IX when influent water contains <80 mg/L sulfate (at any bicarbonate level up to 100 mg/L) or <20 mg/L bicarbonate (at any sulfate level up to 100 mg/L) assuming 15 brine reuse cycles. The study showed that hybrid IX/catalyst reactor systems have potential to reduce resource consumption and

  15. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  16. Role of associated defects in oxygen ion conduction and surface exchange reaction for epitaxial samaria-doped ceria thin films as catalytic coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jennifer L. M. Rupp; Aruta, Carmela; et al

    2016-05-18

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as micro-solid oxide fuel cells, electrolysers, sensors and memristors. In this paper we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol% of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such defect associates on the films` oxygen ion transport and exchange was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has amore » sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drop in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol% doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol%, raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of two. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first order reversal curve measurements indicate that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol% of samaria. We reveal in a model experiment through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films that the occurrence of associate defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the films to increase the exchange rates. Lastly, the implication of these findings are the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by control of bulk associate clusters for future electro-catalytic applications.« less

  17. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    PubMed

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  19. Recent Advances in Solid Catalysts Obtained by Metalloporphyrins Immobilization on Layered Anionic Exchangers: A Short Review and Some New Catalytic Results.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Shirley; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Machado, Guilherme Sippel; Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials are a very interesting class of compounds obtained by stacking of two-dimensional layers along the basal axis. A remarkable property of these materials is their capacity to interact with a variety of chemical species, irrespective of their charge (neutral, cationic or anionic). These species can be grafted onto the surface of the layered materials or intercalated between the layers, to expand or contract the interlayer distance. Metalloporphyrins, which are typically soluble oxidation catalysts, are examples of molecules that can interact with layered materials. This work presents a short review of the studies involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on two different anionic exchangers, Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) and Layered Hydroxide Salts (LHSs), published over the past year. After immobilization of anionic porphyrins, the resulting solids behave as reusable catalysts for heterogeneous oxidation processes. Although a large number of publications involving metalloporphyrin immobilization on LDHs exist, only a few papers have dealt with LHSs as supports, so metalloporphyrins immobilized on LHSs represent a new and promising research field. This work also describes new results on an anionic manganese porphyrin (MnP) immobilized on Mg/Al-LDH solids with different nominal Mg/Al molar ratios (2:1, 3:1 and 4:1) and intercalated with different anions (CO₃(2-) or NO₃(-)). The influence of the support composition on the MnP immobilization rates and the catalytic performance of the resulting solid in cyclooctene oxidation reactions will be reported. PMID:26938518

  20. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  1. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  2. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over a Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst prepared by a solid state ion exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Gao, Feng; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Junhui; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Epling, William S.

    2014-06-01

    A novel solid state method was developed to synthesize Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with excellent NH3-SCR performance and durable hydrothermal stability. After the solid state ion exchange (SSIE) process, the SSZ framework structure and surface area was maintained. In-situ DRIFTS and NH3-TPD experiments provide evidence that isolated Cu ions were successfully exchanged into the pores, which are the active centers for the NH3-SCR reaction.

  4. Role of Associated Defects in Oxygen Ion Conduction and Surface Exchange Reaction for Epitaxial Samaria-Doped Ceria Thin Films as Catalytic Coatings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alex; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rupp, Jennifer L M; Aruta, Carmela

    2016-06-15

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as microsolid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, and memristors. In this paper, we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol % of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association is observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such associated defects on the films̀ oxygen ion transport and exchange is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has a sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drops in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol % doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol %, it raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of 2. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first-order reversal curve measurements indicates that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol % of samaria. In a model experiment, through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films, we reveal that the occurrence of associated defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the SDC films to increase the exchange rates. The implication of these findings is the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by controlling the bulk associated clusters for future electrocatalytic applications. PMID:27192540

  5. Economical way to synthesize SSZ-13 with abundant ion-exchanged Cu+ for an extraordinary performance in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biaohua; Xu, Ruinian; Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an economical way for SSZ-13 preparation with the essentially cheap choline chloride as template has been attempted. The as-synthesized SSZ-13 zeolite after ion exchange by copper nitrate solution exhibited a superior SCR performance (over 95% NOx conversion across a broad range from 150 to 400 °C) to the traditional zeolite-based catalysts of Cu-Beta and Cu-ZSM-5. Furthermore, the opportune size of pore opening (∼3.8 Å) made Cu-SSZ-13 exhibiting the best selectivity to N2 as well as satisfactory tolerance toward SO2 and C3H6 poisonings. The characterization (XRD, XPS, XRF, and H2-TPR) of samples confirmed that Cu-SSZ-13 possessed the most abundant Cu cations among three investigated Cu-zeolites; furthermore, either on the surface or in the bulk the ratio of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) ions for Cu-SSZ-13 is also the highest. New finding was announced that CHA-type topology is in favor of the formation of copper cations, especially generating much more Cu(+) ions than the others, rather than CuO. The activity test of Cu(CuCl)-ZSM-5 (prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method) clearly indicated that Cu(+) ions could make a major contribution to the low-temperature deNOx activity. The activity of protonic zeolites (H-SSZ-13, H-Beta, H-ZSM-5) revealed the topology effect on SCR performances. PMID:25365767

  6. Physicochemical and catalytic characteristics of La-H-ZSM-5 zeolite in converting dimethyl ether to the mixtures of gasoline hydrocarbons: Effect of ion exchange conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaev, L. E.; Bukina, Z. M.; Yushchenko, V. V.; Ionin, D. A.; Kolesnichenko, N. V.; Khadzhiev, S. N.

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the manner and conditions of introducing lanthanum cations into NH4-ZSM-5 zeolite on the properties of catalysts for the conversion of dimethyl ether into the mixtures of gasoline hydrocarbons is studied. The physicochemical properties of synthesized catalysts are studied by means of temperature-programmed ammonia desorption, the adsorption of benzene, atomic absorption spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetry. It is shown that the degree to which lanthanum cations are replaced by ammonium cations both depends on the conditions of ion exchange in the zeolite and affects its acidity spectrum and the selectivity of the formation of paraffin hydrocarbons with isostructure. It is concluded that an increase in the amount of introduced lanthanum leads to an increase in the content of iso-paraffins from 69 to 76 wt % and a decrease in the content of aromatic hydrocarbons from 10.5 to 5.5 wt % and that of durene from 1.5 to 0.2 wt % in the products.

  7. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  8. Central-metal exchange, improved catalytic activity, photoluminescence properties of a new family of d(10) coordination polymers based on the 5,5'-(1H-2,3,5-triazole-1,4-diyl)diisophthalic acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huarui; Huang, Chao; Han, Yanbing; Shao, Zhichao; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2016-05-01

    The rigid and planar tetracarboxylic acid 5,5'-(1H-2,3,5-triazole-1,4-diyl)diisophthalic acid (H4L), incorporating a triazole group, has been used with no or different pyridine-based linkers to construct a family of d(10) coordination polymers, namely, {[H2N(CH3)2]3[Cd3(L)2(HCOO)]}n (), {[Cd2(L)(py)6]·H2O}n (), {[H2N(CH3)2] [Cd2(L)(HCOO)(H2O)4]}n (), {[Zn(H2L)]·H2O}n (), and {[Zn(H2L)(4,4'-bipy)0.5]·C2H5OH·H2O}n () (py = pyridine, 4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine). constructs a 3D porous network containing two kinds of channels: one is filled with coordinated HCOO(-) anions, and the other with [H2N(CH3)2](+) cations. The framework of can be described as a rare (5,6,7)-connected net with the Schläfli symbol of (4(12)·5·6(2))(4(5)·5(3)·6(2))2(4(8)·5(3)·6(8)·8(2))2. The Cd(ii) ions in are connected through the carboxylate ligands to form a 2D layer, with aperture dimensions of ∼15.1 Å × 16.2 Å. The network of features a 3D (3,4)-connected (6·8·10)2(6·8(3)·10(2)) topology. A 3D network with the (4(2)·6·8(3)) topology of possesses an open 1D channel with the free volume of 29.2%. is a 2D layer structure with the (4(2)·6(3)·8)(4(2)·6) topology. The fluorescence lifetime τ values of are on the nanosecond timescale at room temperature. In particular, central-metal exchange in leads to a series of isostructural M(ii)-Cd frameworks [M = Cu (), Co (), Ni ()] showing improved catalytic activity for the synthesis of 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine derivatives. Based on this, a plausible mechanism for the catalytic reaction has been proposed and the reactivity-structure relationship has been further clarified. PMID:27063339

  9. Si-H bond activation at {(NHC)₂Ni⁰} leading to hydrido silyl and bis(silyl) complexes: a versatile tool for catalytic Si-H/D exchange, acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of hydrosilanes, and hydrogenation of disilanes to hydrosilanes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David; Zell, Thomas; Schaub, Thomas; Radius, Udo

    2014-07-28

    The unique reactivity of the nickel(0) complex [Ni2(iPr2Im)4(COD)] (1) (iPr2Im = 1,3-di-isopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene) towards hydrosilanes in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions is reported. A series of nickel hydrido silyl complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))] (n = 1, 2) and nickel bis(silyl) complexes cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(SiH(n-1)R(4-n))2] (n = 1, 2, 3) were synthesized by stoichiometric reactions of 1 with hydrosilanes H(n)SiR(4-n), and fully characterized by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods. These hydrido silyl complexes are examples where the full oxidative addition step is hindered. They have, as a result of the remaining Si-H interactions, remarkably short Si-H distances and feature a unique dynamic behavior in solution. Cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(H)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5) shows in solution at room temperature a dynamic site exchange of the NHC ligands, H-D exchange with C6D6 to give the deuteride complex cis-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (cis-5-D), and at elevated temperatures an irreversible isomerization to trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2(D)(SiMePh2)] (trans-5-D). Reactions with sterically less demanding silanes give cis-configured bis(silyl) complexes accompanied by the release of dihydrogen. These complexes display, similarly to the hydrido silyl complexes, interestingly short Si-Si distances. Complex 1 reacts with 4 eq. HSi(OEt)3, in contrast to all the other silanes used in this study, to give the trans-configured bis(silyl) complex trans-[Ni(iPr2Im)2Ni(Si(OEt)3)2] (trans-12). The addition of two equivalents of Ph2SiH2 to 1 results, at elevated temperatures, in the formation of the dinuclear complex [{(iPr2Im)Ni-μ(2)-(HSiPh2)}2] (6). This diamagnetic, formal Ni(I) complex exhibits a long Ni-Ni bond in the solid state, as established by X-ray diffraction. The capability of the electron rich {Ni(iPr2Im)2} complex fragment to activate Si-H bonds was applied catalytically in the deuteration of Et3Si-H to Et3Si-D employing C6D6 as a convenient deuterium source

  10. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  11. Computer model of catalytic combustion/Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    The basic Acurex HET code was modified to analyze specific problems for Stirling engine heater head applications. Specifically, the code can model: an adiabatic catalytic monolith reactor, an externally cooled catalytic cylindrical reactor/flat plate reactor, a coannular tube radiatively cooled reactor, and a monolithic reactor radiating to upstream and downstream heat exchangers.

  12. Catalytic gasification: Isotopic labeling and transient reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 K and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous carbon dioxide, the complexes promoted carbon and oxygen exchange between the gas-phase CO/sub 2/ and the surface. Oxygen exchanged between the surface complexes; but carbon did not exchange between the carbonate and the carbon black. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed to produce carbon dioxide, and catalytic gasification then began. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex.

  13. Preparation of catalysts via ion-exchangeable coatings on supports

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed are: new catalytic compositions which comprise an inert support coated with a hydrous alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, or quaternary ammonium titanate, niobate, zirconate, or tantalate, in which the alkali or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium cations have been exchanged for a catalytically effective quantity of a catalytically effective metal.

  14. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  15. Hydrous oxide ion-exchange compound catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    A catalytic material of improved activity which comprises a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium titanate, zirconate, niobate, or tantalate, in which the metal or ammonium cations have been exchange with a catalytically effective quantity of a catalyst metal, and which has been subsequently treated with a solution of a Bronsted acid.

  16. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  17. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  18. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  20. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  1. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  2. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  3. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  4. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  5. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  6. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  7. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  8. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  9. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  10. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Improved hydrous oxide ion-exchange compound catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.

    1986-04-09

    Disclosed is a catalytic material of improved activity which comprises a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal or quaternary ammonium titanate, zirconate, niobate, or tantalate, in which the metal or ammonium cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective quantity of a catalyst metal, and which has been subsequently treated with a solution of a Bronsted acid.

  13. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  14. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  15. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  16. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  17. Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

    2003-04-30

    A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

  18. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  19. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  20. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  1. New aryloxybenzylidene ruthenium chelates – synthesis, reactivity and catalytic performance in ROMP

    PubMed Central

    Żak, Patrycja; Rogalski, Szymon; Majchrzak, Mariusz; Kubicki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Summary New phenoxybenzylidene ruthenium chelates were synthesised from the second generation Grubbs catalysts bearing a triphenylphosphine ligand (or its para-substituted analogues) by metathesis exchange with substituted 2-vinylphenols. The complexes behave like a latent catalyst and are characterized by an improved catalytic behaviour as compared to that of the known analogues, i.e., they exhibit high catalytic inactivity in their dormant forms and a profound increase in activity after activation with HCl. The strong electronic influence of substituents in the chelating ligand on the catalytic activity was demonstrated. The catalytic properties were tested in ROMP of cyclooctadien (COD) and a single selected norbornene derivative. PMID:26664610

  2. Catalytic Antioxidants and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Tamara R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, or neuroinflammation, is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative conditions. Damage due to superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite has been observed in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as in acute conditions that lead to neuronal death, such as stroke and epilepsy. Antioxidant therapies to remove these toxic compounds have been of great interest in treating these disorders. Catalytic antioxidants mimic the activities of superoxide dismutase or catalase or both, detoxifying superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases, peroxynitrite and other toxic species as well. Several compounds have demonstrated efficacy in in vitro and in animal models of neurodegeneration, leading to optimism that catalytic antioxidants may prove to be useful therapies in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 555–569. PMID:18754709

  3. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  4. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  5. Modeling the Complete Catalytic Cycle of Aspartoacylase.

    PubMed

    Kots, Ekaterina D; Khrenova, Maria G; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Varfolomeev, Sergei D; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-05-12

    The complete catalytic cycle of aspartoacylase (ASPA), a zinc-dependent enzyme responsible for cleavage of N-acetyl-l-aspartate, is characterized by the methods of molecular modeling. The reaction energy profile connecting the enzyme-substrate (ES) and the enzyme-product (EP) complexes is constructed by the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method assisted by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM/MM potentials. Starting from the crystal structure of ASPA complexed with the intermediate analogue, the minimum-energy geometry configurations and the corresponding transition states are located. The stages of substrate binding to the enzyme active site and release of the products are modeled by MD calculations with the replica-exchange umbrella sampling technique. It is shown that the first reaction steps, nucleophilic attack of a zinc-bound nucleophilic water molecule at the carbonyl carbon and the amide bond cleavage, are consistent with the glutamate-assisted mechanism hypothesized for the zinc-dependent hydrolases. The stages of formation of the products, acetate and l-aspartate, and regeneration of the enzyme are characterized for the first time. The constructed free energy diagram from the reactants to the products suggests that the enzyme regeneration, but not the nucleophilic attack of the catalytic water molecule, corresponds to the rate-determining stage of the full catalytic cycle of ASPA. PMID:27089954

  6. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  7. Catalytic combustion nears application

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This article is a brief review of efforts to develope a catalytic combustion system with emissions levels less than 10 ppm. Two efforts are discussed: (1) tests by General Electric using a GE Frame 7E/9E and 7F/9F gas turbine, and (2) tests by AES using a Kawasaki M1A-13A industrial gas turbine. The latter also employs a heat recovery steam generator and produces 3 MWe and 28,000 lbm/hr of steam.

  8. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics. PMID:22221540

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Mi-Jin; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Man; Sohn, Jung Min; Lee, See-Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics.

  11. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  12. Catalytic considerations in temperature measurement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Crossman, G. R.; Chitnis, R. V.

    1972-01-01

    Literature discussing catalytic activity in platinum group temperature sensors is surveyed. Methods for the determination and/or elimination of catalytic activity are reported. A particular application of the literature is discussed in which it is possible to infer that a shielded platinum total temperature probe does not experience significant catalytic activity in the wake of a supersonic hydrogen burner, while a bare iridium plus rhodium, iridium thermocouple does. It is concluded that catalytic data corrections are restricted and that it is preferable to coat the temperature sensor with a noncatalytic coating. Furthermore, the desirability of transparent coatings is discussed.

  13. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  14. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  15. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  16. Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

  17. Nanoparticle conversion chemistry: Kirkendall effect, galvanic exchange, and anion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bryan D.; Tracy, Joseph B.

    2014-10-01

    Conversion chemistry is a rapidly maturing field, where chemical conversion of template nanoparticles (NPs) into new compositions is often accompanied by morphological changes, such as void formation. The principles and examples of three major classes of conversion chemical reactions are reviewed: the Kirkendall effect for metal NPs, galvanic exchange, and anion exchange, each of which can result in void formation in NPs. These reactions can be used to obtain complex structures that may not be attainable by other methods. During each kind of conversion chemical reaction, NPs undergo distinct chemical and morphological changes, and insights into the mechanisms of these reactions will allow for improved fine control and prediction of the structures of intermediates and products. Conversion of metal NPs into oxides, phosphides, sulphides, and selenides often occurs through the Kirkendall effect, where outward diffusion of metal atoms from the core is faster than inward diffusion of reactive species, resulting in void formation. In galvanic exchange reactions, metal NPs react with noble metal salts, where a redox reaction favours reduction and deposition of the noble metal (alloying) and oxidation and dissolution of the template metal (dealloying). In anion exchange reactions, addition of certain kinds of anions to solutions containing metal compound NPs drives anion exchange, which often results in significant morphological changes due to the large size of anions compared to cations. Conversion chemistry thus allows for the formation of NPs with complex compositions and structures, for which numerous applications are anticipated arising from their novel catalytic, electronic, optical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties.

  18. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  19. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  20. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. Catalytic conversions of chlorodecalin

    SciTech Connect

    Takhistov, U.V.; Kovyazin, V.E.

    1985-10-01

    This paper studies catalytic conversions of chlorinated decahydronaphthalene (chlorodecalin), since the introduction of chlorine into the hydrocarbon molecule would facilitate formation of the original carbonium ion required for conversion to adamantane. Analysis of the fractions obtained showed that two main products are formed: the tricyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/ and the bicyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/. Therefore, the C/sub 10/H/sub 17/ cation formed by removal of chlorine from chlorodecalin, C/sub 10/H/sub 17/CI, undergoes changes in two directions: addition of hydride ions from other chlorodecalin molecules to form Decalin, and loss of a proton to give a tricyclic system of the adamantane weries and its isomer. Introduction of a substituent (chlorine) into the Decalin molecule made it possible to conduct the process at low temperatures.

  3. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  4. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  5. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  6. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  7. Thermal performance of a catalytic/oxidizer for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedel, R. K.; Djordjevic, N.; Faulkner, F.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal analysis and testing have been performed for the High Temperature Catalytic/Oxidizer (HTCO) for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS). The HTCO consists of a counterflow, plate-fin heat exchanger, a resistance heater, and a charcoal catalytic oxidizer bed. The unit removes various inorganics and hydrocarbons from the SSF cabin air. A thermal model of the unit was developed which was used to design the HEX and catalytic bed. The model has been used to predict both steady state and transient results. Accurate predictions of ground test data have led to confidence in proper operation of the unit in the SSF.

  8. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  9. Catalytic Mechanisms for Phosphotriesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Andrew N.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphotriesters are one class of highly toxic synthetic compounds known as organophosphates. Wide spread usage of organophosphates as insecticides as well as nerve agents has lead to numerous efforts to identify enzymes capable of detoxifying them. A wide array of enzymes has been found to have phosphotriesterase activity including phosphotriesterase (PTE), methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA), diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFP), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1). These enzymes differ widely in protein sequence and three-dimensional structure, as well as in catalytic mechanism, but they also share several common features. All of the enzymes identified as phosphotriesterases are metal-dependent hydrolases that contain a hydrophobic active site with three discrete binding pockets to accommodate the substrate ester groups. Activation of the substrate phosphorus center is achieved by a direct interaction between the phosphoryl oxygen and a divalent metal in the active site. The mechanistic details of the hydrolytic reaction differ among the various enzymes with both direct attack of a hydroxide as well as covalent catalysis being found. PMID:22561533

  10. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Halocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Pons, Amandine; Ivashkin, Pavel; Poisson, Thomas; Charette, André B; Pannecoucke, Xavier; Jubault, Philippe

    2016-04-25

    A catalytic asymmetric synthesis of halocyclopropanes is described. The developed method is based on a carbenoid cyclopropanation of 2-haloalkenes with tert-butyl α-cyano-α-diazoacetate using a chiral rhodium catalyst that permits access to a broad range of highly functionalized chiral halocyclopropanes (F, Cl, Br, and I) in good yields, moderate diastereoselectivity, and excellent enantiomeric ratios. The reported methodology represents the first general catalytic enantioselective approach to halocyclopropanes. PMID:26945553

  11. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties. PMID:25335915

  12. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  13. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  14. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  15. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  16. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-08-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern synthetic chemistry. However, the high reactivity and poor selectivity of common organolithium reagents have largely prohibited their use as a viable partner in direct catalytic cross-coupling. Here we report that in the presence of a Pd-phosphine catalyst, a wide range of alkyl-, aryl- and heteroaryl-lithium reagents undergo selective cross-coupling with aryl- and alkenyl-bromides. The process proceeds quickly under mild conditions (room temperature) and avoids the notorious lithium halogen exchange and homocoupling. The preparation of key alkyl-, aryl- and heterobiaryl intermediates reported here highlights the potential of these cross-coupling reactions for medicinal chemistry and material science.

  17. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  18. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of white oak wood in-situ using a bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis was performed on white oak wood using two zeolite-type catalysts as bed material in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The two catalysts chosen, based on a previous screening study, were Ca2+ exchanged Y54 (Ca-Y54) and a proprietary ß-zeolite type catalyst (catalyst M) both ...

  19. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic pyrolysis of biomass over fe-modified HZSM-5 zeolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by partial ion exchange of NH4ZSM-5 with Fe (II) at three different loadings (1.4, 2.8 and 4.2 wt%), and their effectiveness for producing aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose, cellobiose, lignin and switchgrass by catalytic pyrolysis were screened using ...

  20. Catalytic Enantioselective Carboannulation with Allylsilanes

    PubMed Central

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R.; Badillo, Joseph J.; Tran, Ngon T.; Franz, Annaliese K.

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a Sc(III)-indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (via trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  1. Catalytic enantioselective carboannulation with allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R; Badillo, Joseph J; Tran, Ngon T; Franz, Annaliese K

    2014-09-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a scandium(III)/indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon center are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (by trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  2. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  3. Single-chain folding of polymers for catalytic systems in water.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Takaya; Mes, Tristan; De Greef, Tom F A; Gillissen, Martijn A J; Besenius, Pol; Palmans, Anja R A; Meijer, E W

    2011-04-01

    Enzymes are a source of inspiration for chemists attempting to create versatile synthetic catalysts. In order to arrive at a polymeric chain carrying catalytic units separated spatially, it is a prerequisite to fold these polymers in water into well-defined compartmentalized architectures thus creating a catalytic core. Herein, we report the synthesis, physical properties, and catalytic activity of a water-soluble segmented terpolymer in which a helical structure in the apolar core is created around a ruthenium-based catalyst. The supramolecular chirality of this catalytic system is the result of the self-assembly of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide side chains, while the catalyst arises from the sequential ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization of the different monomers followed by ligand exchange. The polymers exhibit a two-state folding process and show transfer hydrogenation in water. PMID:21405022

  4. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  5. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  7. Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddock, Sandra A.; Post, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Social entrepreneurs are private citizens who play critical roles in bringing about catalytic changes in the public sector agenda and the perception of social issues. Factors that make their projects--such as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Earth Day--successful include problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to a collective…

  8. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION COMPONENT AND SYSTEM PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop the components required for catalytic combustion system operation and evaluation. The systems investigated (firetube boiler, watertube boiler, and gas turbine), when integrated with the catalytic combustor, have potential for both ...

  9. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  10. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  11. Shape control of multi-material heterostructures for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Susan Ellen

    Shape control of nanomaterials has become increasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical properties are highly dependent on morphology. A tremendous amount of effort has been spent in attempt to control these properties through manipulation of size, composition, and shape. Nanocrystal shape control for both single- and multiple-material systems, however, remains largely empirical and still presents a major challenge. In this dissertation, new methods are described for the rational synthetic design of heterostructures with controlled morphology which is essential for tailoring the catalytic properties of these multi-material systems. Catalytic activity and selectivity are governed by the nature of the catalyst surface, making shaped nanocrystals ideal substrates for understanding the influence of surface structure on heterogeneous catalysis at the nanoscale. First, synthetic methods were developed to produce catalytically active platinum nanocrystals with control over their shape and surface chemistry. Initially, the focus was on the removal of strongly-bound surface stabilizing molecules by ligand exchange to give catalytically clean surfaces. However, the presence of foreign ions used as a shape control agent to produce cubic, cuboctahedral, and octahedrally shaped nanocrystals was found to inhibit catalytic activity. In response, a method was developed for the shape control of uniform platinum nanoparticles stabilized by weakly interacting alkylammonium ions in the absence of foreign metal ions, which showed improved activity for ethylene hydrogenation. The next section describes the application of these highly-faceted platinum nanocrystals as nucleation centers for overgrowth of a secondary metal to obtain shape-controlled heterostructures. Seeded growth allows for the use of the surface structure and corresponding chemical identity of a well-defined seed to control nucleation and growth of another material. Cubic platinum seeds can direct the

  12. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  13. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  14. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  15. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation of acylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiawei; Oost, Rik; Desmarchelier, Alaric; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R

    2015-03-01

    The highly enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to acylsilanes is catalyzed by copper diphosphine complexes. This transformation affords α-silylated tertiary alcohols in up to 97% yield and 98:2 enantiomeric ratio. The competing Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction is suppressed by the use of a mixture of Lewis acid additives. The chiral catalyst can be recovered as a copper complex and used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25403641

  16. Catalytic nanomotors: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-06-01

    The fabrication of integrated nanomachinary systems can enable break-through applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, bioengineering, and drug delivery or disease treatment. Naturally occurring nanomotors are biological motor proteins powered by catalytic reactions, which convert the chemical energy from the environment into mechanical energy directly. It has been demonstrated recently that using a simple catalytic reaction and an asymmetric bimetallic nanorod, one can produce catalytic nanomotors that mimic the autonomous motions of bionanomotors. Yet the construction of artificial nanomachines remains a major contemporary challenge due to the lack of a flexible fabrication technique that can design the desired dynamic components. We use a design technique called dynamic shadowing growth that allows for the fabrication of a wide range of various geometries and the asymmetric placement of the catalyst is easily accomplished as well which is necessary for directed propulsion. Programming nanomotor behavior is possible through geometrically-focused design and by incorporating different materials into the nanomotor structure is a simple process as well. A propulsion mechanism based upon bubble ejection from the catalyst surface is introduced to explain the driving force, and the comparison of this driving mechanism with the self-electrophoresis mechanism is also studied. We have also successfully incorporated multiple parts to form complex nanomotor assemblies which exhibit motions not observed from individual parts by using magnetic interactions.

  17. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  18. Predicting the Catalytic Reactions using Random Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Olsen, T.; Mortensen, J. J.; Jacobsen, K. W.; Thygesen, K. S.; Abild-Pedersen, F.; Norskov, J. K.

    2012-02-01

    Density functional theory has became the workhorse for simulations of catalytic reactions and computational design of novel catalysis. The generally applied semi-local exchange-correlation functionals have successfully predicted catalytic reaction trends over a variety of surfaces. However, in order to achieve quantitative predictions of reaction rates for molecule-surface systems, in particular where there is weak Van der Waals interactions or strong correlation, it is of vital importance to include non-local correlation effects. The use of random phase approximation (RPA) to construct the correlation energy, combined with the exact, self-interaction free exchange energy, offers a non-empirical way for accurately describe the adsorption energies [1] and dispersion forces [2]. We have recently implemented RPA in the GPAW code [3-4], an electronic structure package using projector augmented wave method and real space grids. In this talk I will present our initial results comparing RPA and generalized gradient functionals for the activation energies and reaction energies for transition metal or metal oxide surfaces. [4pt] [1] L. Schimka, et.al, Nature Mat. 9, 741 (2010) [2] T. Olsen, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 156401 (2011) [3] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. B 83, 245122 (2011). [4] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 146803 (2011)

  19. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:23680063

  20. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  1. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  2. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  3. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  4. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  5. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  6. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  7. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC CHEMICALS: CATALYTIC HYDRODECHLORINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED PESTICIDES AND RELATED SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study has been undertaken of the catalytic conversion of chlorinated pesticides and other environmentally undesirable chlorinated materials into acceptable compounds. The results of this study show that chlorine can be catalytically removed and replaced by hydrogen to produce r...

  8. Endurance Test for SCK-CEN Catalytic Mixed Packing, Proposed for Water Detritiation System at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Gh.; Bornea, A.; Braet, J.; Popescu, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Varlam, C; Postolache, Cr.; Mateic, L.

    2005-07-15

    JET machine's operation lead to continuously generation of tritiated water and therefore, it is necessary to consider the development of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) for JET and also for ITER. The key point of WDS is the efficiency and stability of liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column, that has to achieve a high decontamination of tritiated streams.Two catalytic mixed packing based on hydrophobic Pt-catalyst, and having closed separation performances have been proposed for LPCE column. A complete data base concerning the influence of {beta}-radiation of tritium and the influence of impurities from feed streams on the catalytic mixed packing' s performances and parameters is absolutely necessary.The results of 3 months endurance test for one of these packing (SCK-CEN packing), are presented in this paper. No significant modifications of performances and physico-structural parameters have been observed.

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  10. Evolution of a Catalytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rauwerdink, Alissa; Lunzer, Mark; Devamani, Titu; Jones, Bryan; Mooney, Joanna; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Jian-He; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Dean, Antony M

    2016-04-01

    The means by which superfamilies of specialized enzymes arise by gene duplication and functional divergence are poorly understood. The escape from adaptive conflict hypothesis, which posits multiple copies of a gene encoding a primitive inefficient and highly promiscuous generalist ancestor, receives support from experiments showing that resurrected ancestral enzymes are indeed more substrate-promiscuous than their modern descendants. Here, we provide evidence in support of an alternative model, the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, which posits a single-copied ancestor as efficient and specific as any modern enzyme. We argue that the catalytic mechanisms of plant esterases and descendent acetone cyanohydrin lyases are incompatible with each other (e.g., the reactive substrate carbonyl must bind in opposite orientations in the active site). We then show that resurrected ancestral plant esterases are as catalytically specific as modern esterases, that the ancestor of modern acetone cyanohydrin lyases was itself only very weakly promiscuous, and that improvements in lyase activity came at the expense of esterase activity. These observations support the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, in which an ancestor gains a weak promiscuous activity that is improved by selection at the expense of the ancestral activity, and not the escape from adaptive conflict in which an inefficient generalist ancestral enzyme steadily loses promiscuity throughout the transition to a highly active specialized modern enzyme. PMID:26681154

  11. Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    During the last quarter, we studied selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ethylene over Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clay and the important effect of O{sub 2} concentration. Also, the mechanism of the reaction was discussed. Details are presented in this report.

  12. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  13. FEASIBILITY OF BURNING COAL IN CATALYTIC COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study, showing that pulverized coal can be burned in a catalytic combustor. Pulverized coal combustion in catalytic beds is markedly different from gaseous fuel combustion. Gas combustion gives uniform bed temperatures and reaction rates over the ent...

  14. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  15. Nitrene Metathesis and Catalytic Nitrene Transfer Promoted by Niobium Bis(imido) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Benjamin M; Bergman, Robert G; Arnold, John

    2016-01-13

    We report a metathesis reaction in which a nitrene fragment from an isocyanide ligand is exchanged with a nitrene fragment of an imido ligand in a series of niobium bis(imido) complexes. One of these bis(imido) complexes also promotes nitrene transfer to catalytically generate asymmetric dialkylcarbodiimides from azides and isocyanides in a process involving the Nb(V)/Nb(III) redox couple. PMID:26698833

  16. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  17. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  18. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  19. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  20. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  1. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  2. Formation of a metalloporphyrin-based nanoreactor by postsynthetic metal-ion exchange of a polyhedral-cage containing a metal-metalloporphyrin framework.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-Sen; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Wojtas, Lukasz; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Ma, Shengqian

    2013-03-01

    A change for the better: Exchange of Cd(II) in the catalytically inactive framework MMPF-5 (see scheme) with Co(II) afforded a metalloporphyrin-based nanoreactor, MMPF-5(Co). This framework, consisting of small cubicuboctahedral cages, demonstrated interesting performances in the catalytic epoxidation of trans-stilbene with tBuOOH. PMID:23386517

  3. Formation of a Metalloporphyrin-Based Nanoreactor by Postsynthetic Metal-Ion Exchange of a Polyhedral-Cage Containing a Metal-Metalloporphyrin Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-Sen; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Wojtas, Lukasz; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Ma, Shengqian

    2013-03-19

    A change for the better: Exchange of CdII in the catalytically inactive framework MMPF-5 (see scheme) with CoII afforded a metalloporphyrin-based nanoreactor, MMPF-5(Co). This framework, consisting of small cubicuboctahedral cages, demonstrated interesting performances in the catalytic epoxidation of trans-stilbene with tBuOOH.

  4. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  5. Catalytic decarbonylation of biosourced substrates.

    PubMed

    Ternel, Jérémy; Lebarbé, Thomas; Monflier, Eric; Hapiot, Frédéric

    2015-05-11

    Linear α-olefins (LAO) are one of the main targets in the field of surfactants, lubricants, and polymers. With the depletion of petroleum resources, the production of LAO from renewable feedstocks has gained increasing interest in recent years. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ir catalysts were suitable to decarbonylate a wide range of biosourced substrates under rather mild conditions (160 °C, 5 h reaction time) in the presence of potassium iodide and acetic anhydride. The resulting LAO were obtained with good conversion and selectivity provided that the purity of the substrate, the nature of the ligand, and the amounts of the additives were controlled accurately. The catalytic system could be recovered efficiently by using a Kugelrohr distillation apparatus and recycled. PMID:25855489

  6. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  7. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  8. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  9. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  10. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  11. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  12. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  13. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  14. Experimental Investigation in Order to Determine Catalytic Package Performances in Case of Tritium Transfer from Water to Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bornea, Anisia; Peculea, M.; Zamfirache, M.; Varlam, Carmen

    2005-07-15

    The processes for hydrogen isotope's separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen.Our catalytic package consists of Romanian patented catalysts with platinum on charcoal and polytetrafluoretylene (Pt/C/PTFE) and the ordered Romanian patented package B7 type. The catalytic package was tested in an isotope exchange facility for water detritiation at the Experimental Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm.Valcea.In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered package. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered package was B7 type consists of wire mesh phosphor bronze 4 x 1 wire and the mesh dimension is 0.18 x 0.48 mm.We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system.The mass transfer coefficient which characterized the isotopic exchange on the package, were determined as function of experimental parameters.

  15. Catalytic reactor system for the tritium emissions reduction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wieneke, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Two platinum catalyst reactor subsystems have been built for the new Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) at Mound. The two parallel subsystems each consist of three major components: a passive conservation heat exchanger, an electric preheater, and a catalytic reactor. All subsystem components and interconnecting piping are fabricated from Inconel 625 for high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. System connections are welded for longevity and reliability. Active elements are backed up by installed spares, and the reactor catalyst is replaceable. Since double containment of tritium processing systems is an important safety concept, the entire subsystem is enclosed in a stainless steel glovebox. Careful planning during the design phase created thermal isolation from the glovebox, and the ability to translate the entire subsystem from the glovebox for major maintenance. 4 refs.

  16. Catalytic reactor system for the tritium emissions reduction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wieneke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two platinum catalyst reactor subsystems have been built for the new Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) at Mound. The two parallel subsystems each consist of three major components: a passive conservation heat exchanger, an electric preheater, and a catalytic reactor. All subsystem components and interconnecting piping are fabricated from Inconel 625 for high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. System connections are welded for longevity and reliability. Active elements are backed up by installed spares, and the reactor catalyst is replaceable. Since double containment of tritium processing systems is an important safety concept, the entire subsystem is enclosed in a stainless steel glovebox. Careful planning during the design phase created thermal isolation from the glovebox, and the ability to translate the entire subsystem from the glovebox for major maintenance. 4 refs.

  17. Refiners discuss fluid catalytic cracking at technology meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-24

    At the National Petroleum Refiners Association`s question and answer session on refining and petrochemical technology, engineers and technical specialists from around the world gather each year to exchange experience and information on refining and petrochemical issues. Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts were a topic of great interest at the most recent NPRA Q and A session, held Oct. 11--13, 1994, in Washington, DC. The discussions of FCC catalysts included questions about: reduction of olefins in FCC naphtha; tolerance of FCC catalysts to oxygen enrichment; use of mild hydrocracking catalyst in an FCC feed hydrotreater. At this renowned meeting, a panel of industry representatives answers presubmitted questions. Moderator and NPRA technical director Terrence S. Higgins then invites audience members to respond or ask additional questions on the subjects under discussion. This paper presents the discussions of the above three topics.

  18. Fluid catalytic cracking catalyst for reformulated gasolines: Kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetto, A. ); Farag, H.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Blasetti, A.P. . Dept. de Procesos); Lasa, H.I. de . Faculty of Engineering Science)

    1994-12-01

    Changes of the relative importance of intradiffusion on USY zeolite crystals were studied as a way of affecting selectivity of catalytic cracking reactions. Zeolite crystals were synthesized (Si/Al = 2.4), activated and stabilized using ion exchange and steam calcination to obtain USSY (Ultra Stable Submicron Y) zeolites. After the activation the zeolites were pelletized (45--60 [mu]m particles). USSYs were tested in a novel Riser Simulator. Results obtained show that total aromatics (BTX), benzene, C[sub 4] olefins, and coke were significantly affected with the change of zeolite crystal sizes. Gasolines produced with USSY zeolites contain less aromatics and particularly lower benzene levels. Experimental results were analyzed with a model including several lumps: unconverted gas oil, gasoline, light gases, and coke. This model also accounts for catalyst deactivation as a function of coke on catalyst. Various kinetic parameters were determined with their corresponding spans for the 95% level of confidence.

  19. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  20. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  1. The catalytic properties of murine carbonic anhydrase VII.

    PubMed

    Earnhardt, J N; Qian, M; Tu, C; Lakkis, M M; Bergenhem, N C; Laipis, P J; Tashian, R E; Silverman, D N

    1998-07-28

    Carbonic anhydrase VII (CA VII) appears to be the most highly conserved of the active mammalian carbonic anhydrases. We have characterized the catalytic activity and inhibition properties of a recombinant murine CA VII. CA VII has steady-state constants similar to two of the most active isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, CA II and IV; also, it is very strongly inhibited by the sulfonamides ethoxzolamide and acetazolamide, yielding the lowest Ki values measured by the exchange of 18O between CO2 and water for any of the mammalian isozymes of carbonic anhydrase. The catalytic measurements of the hydration of CO2 and the dehydration of HCO3- were made by stopped-flow spectrophotometry and the exchange of 18O using mass spectrometry. Unlike the other isozymes of this class of CA, for which Kcat/K(m) is described by the single ionization of zinc-bound water, CA VII exhibits a pH profile for Kcat/K(m) for CO2 hydration described by two ionizations at pKa 6.2 and 7.5, with a maximum approaching 8 x 10(7) M-1 s-1. The pH dependence of kcat/K(m) for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate could also be described by these two ionizations, yielding a maximum of 71 M-1 s-1 at pH > 9. Using a novel method that compares rates of 18O exchange and dehydration of HCO3-, we assigned values for the apparent pKa at 6.2 to the zinc-bound water and the pKa of 7.5 to His 64. The magnitude of Kcat, its pH profile, 18O-exchange data for both wild-type and a H64A mutant, and inhibition by CuSO4 and acrolein suggest that the histidine at position 64 is functioning as a proton-transfer group and is responsible for one of the observed ionizations. A truncation mutant of CA VII, in which 23 residues from the amino-terminal end were deleted, has its rate constant for intramolecular proton transfer decreased by an order of magnitude with no change in Kcat/K(m). This suggests a role for the amino-terminal end in enhancing proton transfer in catalysis by carbonic anhydrase. PMID:9692974

  2. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z-scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: 1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both type I and type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; 2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and 3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets – one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously-evaluated datasets – our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  3. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  4. Effect of Porosity on Surface Catalytic Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Pallix, Joan; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface porosity of thermal protection materials on surface catalytic efficiency using test data taken from both arc-jet and side-arm reactor facilities. Relative surface porosity of the samples varied from 6% to 50%. Surface porosity was measured using a flow apparatus and Bernoulli equation. The surface catalytic efficiency of the materials was calculated using aerothermodynamic, and kinetic theories. The catalytic efficiency of the materials are compared at surface temperatures between room temperature and 2500 F. The data are presented in the form of graphs and tables.

  5. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  6. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  7. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  8. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  9. A review of tin oxide-based catalytic systems: Preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the important aspects of the preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior of tin oxide-based catalytic systems including doped tin oxide, mixed oxides which contain tin oxide, Pt supported on tin oxide and Pt/Sn supported on alumina. These systems have a broad range of applications and are continually increasing in importance. However, due to their complex nature, much remains to be understood concerning how they function catalytically.

  10. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. LONG; R.T. YANG

    1998-09-30

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by hydrocarbons was investigated on Pt doped MCM-41 and copper ion and/or cerium ion-exchanged Al-MCM-41 in the presence of excess oxygen. It was found that Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts reported in the literature, such as Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/ZSM-5. For different hydrocarbons, the catalytic activity decreased according to the sequence of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} {approx} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} >> C{sub 3}H{sub 8} > CH{sub 4}. This catalyst was also stable in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Cu exchanged Al-MCM-41 and cerium promoted Cu-Al-MCM-41 (i.e., Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41) were also found to be active in this reaction. Higher NO{sub x} conversions to N2 were obtained on the Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 as compared with Cu-Al-MCM-41. The activity of Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 was approximately the same as that of Cu-ZSM-5; but the former had a wider temperature window. TPR results indicated that only isolated Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +} ions were detected in the Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged Al-MCM-41 samples, which may play an important role in the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. After some cerium ions were introduced into Cu-Al-MCM-41, Cu{sup 2+} in the molecular sieve became more easily reducible by H{sub 2}. This may be related to the increase of catalytic activity of NO{sub x} reduction by ethylene.

  11. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  12. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  13. Chemical and catalytic properties of elemental carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Brodzinsky, R.; Gundel, L.A.; Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    Elemental carbon particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel are one of the major constituents of airborne particulate matter. These particles are a chemically and catalytically active material and can be an effective carrier for other toxic air pollutants through their adsorptive capability. The chemical, adsorptive, and catalytic behaviors of carbon particles depend very much on their crystalline structure, surface composition, and electronic properties. This paper discusses these properties and examines their relevance to atmospheric chemistry.

  14. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Chemler, Sherry R.; Bovino, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review. PMID:23828735

  15. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  16. Correlation of Catalytic Rates With Solubility Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; England, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Catalyst maximizes activity when its solubility parameter equals that of reactive species. Catalytic activities of some binary metal alloys at maximum when alloy compositions correspond to Hildebrand solubility parameters equal to those of reactive atomic species on catalyst. If this suggestive correlation proves to be general, applied to formulation of other mixed-metal catalysts. Also used to identify reactive species in certain catalytic reactions.

  17. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  18. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  19. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid).

    PubMed

    Costa, M I C F; Steter, J R; Purgato, F L S; Romero, J R

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H(+) with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H(+) was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  20. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M. I. C. F.; Steter, J. R.; Purgato, F. L. S.; Romero, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H+ with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H+ was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  2. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  3. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  4. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  5. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  6. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  7. Money and Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walstad, William B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This teaching guide begins with an explanation of the role of money in the economy, focusing on its circulation or exchange. The use of money as a unit of account, a store of value, and a medium of exchange are explained. Three brief teaching units are included. The grade K-2 unit, "Money Counts," provides games and activities which develop the…

  8. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  9. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  10. Handicapping Social Exchange Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishler, Barbara

    The economic theory of social exchange has some serious shortcomings when applied to minorities--especially the disabled. First, it assumes dyads comprise the basic unit where exchange occurs and that rewards and costs must occur at that level. Second, the model standardizes the experience of white, Western European and American males. The model…

  11. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  12. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  13. Expression and purification of correctly processed, active human TACE catalytic domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R; Wolfson, M F; Rauch, C T; Castner, B J; Huang, C P; Gerhart, M J; Johnson, R S; Cerretti, D P; Paxton, R J; Price, V L; Black, R A

    1998-06-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) converting enzyme (TACE) releases soluble TNF alpha from cells. It is a member of the adamalysin family of metalloproteases. A truncated form of TACE cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified to homogeneity in order to study TACE structure and function. Recombinant TACE was expressed as a preproprotein including the pro- and catalytic (PROCAT) domains fused to the yeast alpha-factor leader. A C-terminal immunoreactive FLAG peptide was added for Western blot detection and anti-FLAG antibody column purification. We constructed two glycosylation mutant PROCAT TACE isoforms to facilitate purification. A PROCAT isoform, mutated to eliminate two N-linked glycosylation sites, was buffer exchanged and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and an anti-FLAG antibody affinity step. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the mutant preproprotein was processed in yeast at the furin protease cleavage site and yielded an active catalytic domain which has TNF alpha peptide-specific protease activity. Mass spectrometry of the purified catalytic domain showed that removal of both N-linked sites results in a homogeneous sized polypeptide lacking further posttranslational modifications. PMID:9631522

  14. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  15. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  16. Ligand Binding Enhances Millisecond Conformational Exchange in Xylanase B2 from Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Donald; Narayanan, Chitra; Nguyen-Thi, Nhung; Roux, Louise D; Bernard, David N; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Couture, Jean-François; Agarwal, Pratul K; Doucet, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Xylanases catalyze the hydrolysis of xylan, an abundant carbon and energy source with important commercial ramifications. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the catalytic improvement of xylanases, success remains limited because of our relatively poor understanding of their molecular properties. Previous reports suggested the potential role of atomic-scale residue dynamics in modulating the catalytic activity of GH11 xylanases; however, dynamics in these studies was probed on time scales orders of magnitude faster than the catalytic time frame. Here, we used nuclear magnetic resonance titration and relaxation dispersion experiments ((15)N-CPMG) in combination with X-ray crystallography and computational simulations to probe conformational motions occurring on the catalytically relevant millisecond time frame in xylanase B2 (XlnB2) and its catalytically impaired mutant E87A from Streptomyces lividans 66. Our results show distinct dynamical properties for the apo and ligand-bound states of the enzymes. The apo form of XlnB2 experiences conformational exchange for residues in the fingers and palm regions of the catalytic cleft, while the catalytically impaired E87A variant displays millisecond dynamics only in the fingers, demonstrating the long-range effect of the mutation on flexibility. Ligand binding induces enhanced conformational exchange of residues interacting with the ligand in the fingers and thumb loop regions, emphasizing the potential role of residue motions in the fingers and thumb loop regions for recognition, positioning, processivity, and/or stabilization of ligands in XlnB2. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first experimental characterization of millisecond dynamics in a GH11 xylanase family member. These results offer new insights into the potential role of conformational exchange in GH11 enzymes, providing essential dynamic information to help improve protein engineering and design applications. PMID:27387012

  17. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  18. Materials for high-temperature catalytic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Cox, J.L.; Parks, W.P. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Catalytic combustion systems for gas turbines must operate at temperatures of at least 1200{degrees}C. Support structure material must retain its integrity under prolonged exposure to high temperature, thermal cycling, and severe chemical conditions; and the material must be capable of being formed into thin sections. The performance requirements of a high-temperature stable ceramic support must be balanced with reasonable costs of preparation. An increasing number of materials have potential for successful exposure to high-temperature conditions. Two major problems of high-temperature catalyst systems are loss of surface area and catalytic activity. Incorporation of the catalytic component into the host lattice can circumvent this problem. Use of supporting active metal oxides on carrier materials with high thermal resistance appears to be a very promising way to make stable catalysts. The challenge will be to provide sufficient low-temperature activity and high-temperature stability; therefore, there exists a need to engineer catalytic materials for high-temperature combustion environments. Developments in catalytic materials and preparation procedures are reviewed. Future areas of research are discussed.

  19. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  20. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  1. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  2. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  3. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  4. Heat and mass exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  5. Heat and mass exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  6. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  7. Investigation of aligned carbon nanotubes as a novel catalytic electrodes for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. J.; Yang, J.; Gosztola, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in synthesizing and characterizing aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNT) as the electrode catalyst material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is reported. Catalytically functionalized ACNT active towards the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition method. The electrocatalytic activities and the nanostructures of the ACNT layers were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. To understand the nature of the transition metal as the catalytically active site in the ACNT, we also conducted an in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The oxidation state and coordination structure of the transition metals embedded inside the nanotubes were monitored by examining the EXAFS spectra collected under different polarization potentials. We clearly observed the change in the electronic and coordinational structures during the oxygen reduction reaction.

  8. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  9. The catalytic core of RNase P.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Rivera-León, R; Vold, B S

    1996-01-01

    A deletion mutant of the catalytic RNA component of Escherichia coli RNase P missing residues 87-241 retains the ability to interact with the protein component to form a functional catalyst. The deletion of this phylogenetically conserved region significantly increases the Km, indicating that the deleted structures may be important for binding to the precursor tRNA substrate but not for the cleavage reaction. Under some reaction conditions, this RNase P deletion mutant can become a relatively non-specific nuclease, indicating that this RNA's catalytic center may be more exposed. The catalytic core of the RNase P is formed by less than one third of the 377 residues of the RNase P RNA. PMID:8628683

  10. Asymmetric catalytic transformations in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shaoguang; Tumas, W.; Gross, M.F.; Burk, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Supercritical carbon dioxide can be a useful environmentally benign solvent for a wide range of catalytic reactions. We have been exploring the utility of supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction medium for catalytic asymmetric transformations. We will present results on the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins, ketones, and unsaturated acids by Rh and Ru catalysts containing chiral phosphine ligands using hydrogen or hydrogen transfer agents. We have found that asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation reactions of enamide esters work as well or better in CO{sub 2} than in conventional solvents. We have been able to effect high conversions and ee`s using hydrogen transfer systems such as HCOOH/NEt{sub 3}, We will discuss temperature, pressure and solvent density effects on selectivity and reactivity. Kinetic studies will also be presented in order to understand the enhanced enantioselectivity that we observed in SC CO{sub 2}.

  11. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  12. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brauns, Eike; Morsbach, Eva; Kunz, Sebastian; Baeumer, Marcus; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (<150 ms) was developed. Operation with modulated temperature allows analysis of the signal spectrum with advanced information content, based on the Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal. PMID:25356643

  13. Olefin fractionation and catalytic conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, H.; Hsia, C.H.; Wright, B.S.

    1989-05-23

    A continuous catalytic system is described for converting a fraction of olefinic feedstock comprising ethylene and C/sub 3/+ olefins to heavier liquid hydrocarbon product comprising: (a) means for prefractionating the olefinic feedstock to obtain a gaseous stream rich in ethylene and a liquid stream containing C/sub 3/+ olefin; (b) means for vaporizing and contacting the liquid stream from the prefractionating step with hydrocarbon conversion oligomerization catalyst in a catalytic reactor system to provide a heavier hydrocarbon effluent stream comprising distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbons; (c) means for fractionating the effluent stream to recover distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbon separately; (d) means for recycling at least a portion of the recovered gasoline as a liquid sorption stream to prefractionating step (a); and (e) means for further reacting the recycled gasoline together with sorbed C/sub 3/+ olefin in the catalytic reactor system of step (b).

  14. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  15. Mass transfer in composite catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Langhendries, G.; Claessens, R.; Baron, G.V.

    1996-12-31

    The partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in a composite polymer-zeolite catalytic membrane reactor. In a first step the equilibrium and mass transfer properties (swelling, diffusion and sorption) of dense composite membranes were examined. The swelling behavior of the crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) network was determined for several solvents and related to the differences between the Hildebrand solubility parameters of solvent and polymer. Time lag experiments, which enable us to measure simultaneously diffusion and partition coefficients, were carried out on a dense poly(dimethylsiloxane) membrane. A mathematical model describing the mass transfer behavior of these catalytic membranes was derived and validated with experimental data. Mass transfer through composite catalytic membranes can be predicted using the properties of pure catalyst and polymer material, and a single tortuosity factor. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Catalytic nanomotors: fabrication, mechanism, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-03-01

    Catalytic nanomotors are nano-to-micrometer-sized actuators that carry an on-board catalyst and convert local chemical fuel in solution into mechanical work. The location of this catalyst as well as the geometry of the structure dictate the swimming behaviors exhibited. The nanomotors can occur naturally in organic molecules, combine natural and artificial parts to form hybrid nanomotors or be purely artificial. Fabrication techniques consist of template directed electroplating, lithography, physical vapor deposition, and other advanced growth methods. Various physical and chemical propulsion mechanisms have been proposed to explain the motion behaviors including diffusiophoresis, bubble propulsion, interfacial tension gradients, and self-electrophoresis. The control and manipulation based upon external fields, catalytic alloys, and motion control through thermal modulation are discussed as well. Catalytic nanomotors represent an exciting technological challenge with the end goal being practical functional nanomachines that can perform a variety of tasks at the nanoscale.

  17. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  18. Isotopic exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Sylva, Sean P.; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The increasing popularity of compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses for investigating sedimentary organic matter raises numerous questions about the exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales. Important questions include the rates of isotopic exchange, methods for diagnosing exchange in ancient samples, and the isotopic consequences of that exchange. This article provides a review of relevant literature data along with new data from several pilot studies to investigate such issues. Published experimental estimates of exchange rates between organic hydrogen and water indicate that at warm temperatures (50-100°C) exchange likely occurs on timescales of 10 4 to 10 8 yr. Incubation experiments using organic compounds and D-enriched water, combined with compound-specific D/H analyses, provide a new and highly sensitive method for measuring exchange at low temperatures. Comparison of δD values for isoprenoid and n-alkyl carbon skeletons in sedimentary organic matter provides no evidence for exchange in young (<1 Ma), cool sediments, but strong evidence for exchange in ancient (>350 Ma) rocks. Specific rates of exchange are probably influenced by the nature and abundance of organic matter, pore-water chemistry, the presence of catalytic mineral surfaces, and perhaps even enzymatic activity. Estimates of equilibrium fractionation factors between organic H and water indicate that typical lipids will be depleted in D relative to water by ˜75 to 140‰ at equilibrium (30°C). Thus large differences in δD between organic molecules and water cannot be unambiguously interpreted as evidence against hydrogen exchange. A better approach may be to use changes in stereochemistry as a proxy for hydrogen exchange. For example, estimated rates of H exchange in pristane are similar to predicted rates for stereochemical inversion in steranes and hopanes. The isotopic consequences of this exchange remain in question. Incubations of cholestene with D 2O

  19. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  20. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... her back, usually under a radiant warmer. The umbilical vein is catheterized with a fluid-filled catheter. ... plasma is injected. After the exchange transfusion, an umbilical catheter may be left in place in case ...

  1. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  2. Outdoor heat exchanger section

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, A.F.; Smiley, W.A. III; Wendt, M.E.

    1988-02-09

    An outdoor section for an air conditioning system is described comprising: a compressor; a heat exchanger; a cabinet having an upper cabinet section, a lower cabinet section and a louvered lower section top cover, the heat exchanger and the compressor being housed in the lower cabinet section and the upper cabinet section having a solid top which overlies the louvers in the lower section top cover; and a fan disposed in the lower cabinet section to draw air through the sides of the lower cabinet section and through the heat exchanger housed therein, the fan discharging air, after having been drawn through the heat exchanger, upward through the louvers in the lower cabinet section top cover and into the interior of the upper cabinet section.

  3. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  4. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  5. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Wright, M C; Joyce, G F

    1997-04-25

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely. PMID:9110984

  6. A premixed hydrogen/oxygen catalytic igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants was studied using a premixing hydrogen/oxygen injector. The premixed injector was designed to eliminate problems associated with catalytic ignition caused by poor propellant mixing in the catalyst bed. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, and propellant inlet temperature were varied parametrically in testing, and a pulse mode life test of the igniter was conducted. The results of the tests showed that the premixed injector eliminated flame flashback in the reactor and increased the life of the igniter significantly. The results of the experimental program and a comparison with data collected in a previous program are given.

  7. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  8. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely.

  9. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  10. Data exchange in metrology.

    PubMed

    Badger, P

    1996-01-01

    The adoption of the directives 71/316/EEC on measuring instruments and 90/384/EEC on non-automatic weighing instruments has resulted in a considerable quantity of certificates to be exchanged between the Central Metrological Authorities and the Local Metrological Authorities, in the member states. This requirement to exchange data, prompted the setting up of the WELMEC working group, to explore how computerisation could help the member states perform their tasks. PMID:10172832