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Sample records for catalytic membranes operated

  1. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  2. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  3. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  4. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  5. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  6. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  7. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  8. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  9. Enzyme catalytic membrane based on a hybrid mesoporous membrane.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wensheng; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kaneda, Hideaki; Teramae, Norio

    2008-02-21

    Immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) within a hybrid mesoporous membrane with 12 nm pore diameter was successfully achieved, resulting in catalytically high efficiency during flow of a glucose solution across the membrane. PMID:18253526

  10. Mass transfer in composite catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Langhendries, G.; Claessens, R.; Baron, G.V.

    1996-12-31

    The partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in a composite polymer-zeolite catalytic membrane reactor. In a first step the equilibrium and mass transfer properties (swelling, diffusion and sorption) of dense composite membranes were examined. The swelling behavior of the crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) network was determined for several solvents and related to the differences between the Hildebrand solubility parameters of solvent and polymer. Time lag experiments, which enable us to measure simultaneously diffusion and partition coefficients, were carried out on a dense poly(dimethylsiloxane) membrane. A mathematical model describing the mass transfer behavior of these catalytic membranes was derived and validated with experimental data. Mass transfer through composite catalytic membranes can be predicted using the properties of pure catalyst and polymer material, and a single tortuosity factor. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  12. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  13. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammels, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  14. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2005-09-27

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  15. Thin film porous membranes for catalytic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Boyle, T.J.; Gardner, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on new and surprising experimental data for catalytic film gas sensing resistors coated with nanoporous sol-gel films to impart selectivity and durability to the sensor structure. This work is the result of attempts to build selectivity and reactivity to the surface of a sensor by modifying it with a series of sol-gel layers. The initial sol-gel SiO{sub 2} layer applied to the sensor surprisingly showed enhanced O{sub 2} interaction with H{sub 2} and reduced susceptibility to poisons such as H{sub 2}S.

  16. Catalytic membrane reactor for conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Khassin, A.A.

    2005-07-01

    Plug-through catalytically-active contractor membranes can combine high permeability ({gt} 20 m Darcy), high mechanical strength ({gt} 20 kg cm{sup -2}) and high heat-conductivity ({gt} 4 W(mK){sup -1}). Therefore, it provides isothermicity and low pressure drop. The intense mass-transfer within transport pores, high specific area of these pores and small distances between two adjacent transport pores weaken the mass-transfer constraints. Using the PCM one can achieve high space time yield of hydrocarbons and high selectivity towards heavy hydrocarbons and olefins. These advantages allow supposing the effective usage of the PCM catalytic membrane reactors in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Also the same approach could be efficient for some other multiphase catalytic processes, like hydrogenation of the unsaturated fatty acids. 5 figs.

  17. Catalytic membrane reactor for water and wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Samuel

    A double membrane reactor was fabricated and assessed for continuous treatment of water containing organic contaminants by ozonation. This innovative reactor consisted of a zeolite membrane prepared on the inner surface of a porous a-alumina support, which served as water selective extractor and active contactor, and a porous stainless membrane which was the ozone gas diffuser. The coupling of membrane separation and chemical oxidation was found to be highly beneficial to both processes. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate at the retentate was enhanced by up to 2.2 times, as compared to membrane ozonation. Simultaneously, clean water (< 2 mg C.L-1 ) was consistently produced on the permeate side, using a feed solution containing up to 1000 mg C.L-1, while the retentate was concentrated and treated. Most significantly, the addition of an adsorbing material, as a bed or a coated layer, onto the pores of the membrane support, was shown to further enhance TOC degradation, permeated TOC concentration, permeate flux, and moreover, ozone yield. The achievements of this project included: (1) The development of a novel low-temperature zeolite membrane activation method that generates consistently high quality membranes (i.e. high reproducibility and fewer defects). (2) The demonstration that gamma-alumina and gamma-alumina supported catalysts do not have significant activity and that the TOC removal enhancement usually observed during catalytic ozonation was due primarily to the contribution of adsorption and metal leaching. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA) of the spent catalyst showed that, during catalytic ozonation, oxygenated by-products of increased adsorbability were concentrated onto the gamma-alumina contactor, and were subsequently degraded. (3) The development of a method for coating high surface area gamma-alumina layers onto the grains of zeolite membrane support used as the active membrane contactor.

  18. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  19. A hybrid process combining homogeneous catalytic ozonation and membrane distillation for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Peng; Li, Jie; Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    A novel catalytic ozonation membrane reactor (COMR) coupling homogeneous catalytic ozonation and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was developed for refractory saline organic pollutant treatment from wastewater. An ozonation process took place in the reactor to degrade organic pollutants, whilst the DCMD process was used to recover ionic catalysts and produce clean water. It was found that 98.6% total organic carbon (TOC) and almost 100% salt were removed and almost 100% metal ion catalyst was recovered. TOC in the permeate water was less than 16 mg/L after 5 h operation, which was considered satisfactory as the TOC in the potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) feed water was as high as 1000 mg/L. Meanwhile, the membrane distillation flux in the COMR process was 49.8% higher than that in DCMD process alone after 60 h operation. Further, scanning electron microscope images showed less amount and smaller size of contaminants on the membrane surface, which indicated the mitigation of membrane fouling. The tensile strength and FT-IR spectra tests did not reveal obvious changes for the polyvinylidene fluoride membrane after 60 h operation, which indicated the good durability. This novel COMR hybrid process exhibited promising application prospects for saline organic wastewater treatment. PMID:27372262

  20. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed electron- and proton-conducting metal oxide materials are provided. These materials are useful in fabrication of membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactions, particularly for promoting dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons, oligomerization of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of hydrogen-containing gases. Membrane materials are perovskite compounds of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y where A=Ca, Sr, or Ba; B=Ce, Tb, Pr or Th; B'=Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni or Cu; 0.2

  1. [Nitric Oxide Removal with a Fe-TiO₂/PSF Hybrid Catalytic Membrane Bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-ren; Chen, Zhou-yang; Wang, Jian-bin; Zhang, Zai-li; Fan, Qing-juan; Wei, Zai-shan

    2016-03-15

    The Fe-doped titanium dioxide (Fe-TiO₂) was prepared by the sol-gel method and was loaded on polysulfone (PSF) hollow fiber membrane. A novel Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBfR) was investigated for nitric oxide removal, to further improve the elimination capacity. HCMBfR exhibited a good stability in the 180-day operation period, the NO removal efficiency was up to 93.2% and the maximum elimination capacity reached 167.1 g · (m³ · h)⁻1. The additional use of the biofilm to wet Fe-TiO₂/PSF membrane catalysis reactor led to the enhancement of NO removal efficiency from 59. 5% to 66% . The NO removal efficiency in the intimate coupling of Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane and biofilm reactor ( HCMBfR) increased from 1.4% to 13% as compared to that of the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) only. The optimal illumination intensity, gas residence time, pH and nC/nN were 670 lx, 9 a, 6.8-7.2 and 3.7, respectively. PMID:27337874

  2. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B' is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated-by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B' ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B' is 1:1-x:x where 0.2.ltoreq..times.0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the singlephase material to obtain a membrane.

  3. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, J.H.; Schwartz, M.; Sammells, A.F.

    1998-10-13

    This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB{sub 1{minus}x}B{prime}{sub x}O{sub 3{minus}y} wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B{prime} is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B{prime} ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B{prime} is 1:1{minus}x:x where 0.2{<=}{times}0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the single phase material to obtain a membrane. 6 figs.

  4. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail; Heinz, Robert

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  5. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOEpatents

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2001-01-01

    Mixed electron- and proton-conducting metal oxide materials are provided. These materials are useful in fabrication of membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactions, particularly for promoting dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons, oligomerization of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of hydrogen-containing gases. Membrane materials are perovskite compounds of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y where A=Ca, Sr, or Ba; B=Ce, Tb, Pr or Th; B'=Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni or Cu; 0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, and y is a number sufficient to neutralize the charge in the mixed metal oxide material.

  6. Development of high temperature catalytic membrane reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, G.; Gerdes, T.; Gregg, R.

    1992-02-28

    Early efforts in 1992 were focused on relocating the membrane reactor system from Alcoa Separation Technology, Inc.`s Warrendale, PA facility to laboratory space at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (UPARC) in Harmarville, PA following the divestiture of Alcoa Separations to US Filter, Inc. Reconstruction was completed in March, 1992, at which time the reactor was returned to ethylbenzene dehydrogenation service. Efforts on ethylbenzene dehydrogenation to styrene focused on optimizing hybrid reactor performance relative to packed bed operation. Following this, the reactor system was converted to isobutane dehydrogenation. Experimentation on isobutane dehydrogenation focused on design of an inert reactor, evaluation of commercial light alkane dehydrogenation catalysts, and modeling of membrane reactor performance relative to the performance of a packed bed reactor. This report summarizes the effort in 1992 on the development of ceramic membranes as dehydrogenation reactors. In addition, outside interactions on behalf of this investigation are discussed.

  7. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  8. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  9. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOEpatents

    Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  10. A mesoporous catalytic membrane architecture for lithium-oxygen battery systems.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Schwab, Mark; Goh, Tenghooi; Taylor, André D

    2015-01-14

    Controlling the mesoscale geometric configuration of catalysts on the oxygen electrode is an effective strategy to achieve high reversibility and efficiency in Li-O2 batteries. Here we introduce a new Li-O2 cell architecture that employs a catalytic polymer-based membrane between the oxygen electrode and the separator. The catalytic membrane was prepared by immobilization of Pd nanoparticles on a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membrane and is adjacent to a carbon nanotube electrode loaded with Ru nanoparticles. During oxide product formation, the insulating PAN polymer scaffold restricts direct electron transfer to the Pd catalyst particles and prevents the direct blockage of Pd catalytic sites. The modified Li-O2 battery with a catalytic membrane showed a stable cyclability for 60 cycles with a capacity of 1000 mAh/g and a reduced degree of polarization (∼ 0.3 V) compared to cells without a catalytic membrane. We demonstrate the effects of a catalytic membrane on the reaction characteristics associated with morphological and structural features of the discharge products via detailed ex situ characterization. PMID:25546408

  11. Esterification of acidified oil with methanol by SPES/PES catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Li, Jianxin

    2011-05-01

    A sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES)/polyethersulfone (PES) blend catalytic membrane was prepared and used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the esterification of the acidified oil (acid value 153 mg KOH/g) with methanol for producing biodiesel. The results showed that the free fatty acids conversion reached 97.6% using SPES/PES catalytic membrane under the optimal esterification conditions. Meanwhile, the SPES/PES membrane with 20.3% degree of sulfonation showed a good catalytic stability. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model was established. The results indicated that the reaction rate constant increased with increasing methanol/acidified oil molar ratio, the loading of catalytic membrane and reaction temperature. The reaction order was 2 and the activation energy decreased from 74.65 to 21.07 kJ/mol with increasing catalytic membrane loading from 0 to 0.135 meq/g(oil). It implies that the esterification is not diffusively controlled but kinetically controlled. The predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:20951577

  12. Catalytic membranes for CO oxidation in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Sandi-Tapia, Giselle; Carrado Gregar, Kathleen; Kizilel, Riza

    2010-06-08

    A hydrogen permeable membrane, which includes a polymer stable at temperatures of about 200 C having clay impregnated with Pt or Au or Ru or Pd particles or mixtures thereof with average diameters of less than about 10 nanometers (nms) is disclosed. The membranes are useful in fuel cells or any device which requires hydrogen to be separated from carbon monoxide.

  13. Mn oxide coated catalytic membranes for a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration: comparison of Ti, Fe and Mn oxide coated membranes for water quality.

    PubMed

    Byun, S; Davies, S H; Alpatova, A L; Corneal, L M; Baumann, M J; Tarabara, V V; Masten, S J

    2011-01-01

    In this study the performance of catalytic membranes in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system was investigated. The catalytic membranes were produced by coating commercial ceramic ultrafiltration membranes with manganese or iron oxide nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. A commercial membrane with a titanium oxide filtration layer was also evaluated. The performance of the coated and uncoated membranes was evaluated using water from a borderline eutrophic lake. The permeate flux and removal of the organic matter was found to depend on the type of the metal oxide present on the membrane surface. The performance of the manganese oxide coated membrane was superior to that of the other membranes tested, showing the fastest recovery in permeate flux when ozone was applied and the greatest reduction in the total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate. The removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) precursors using the membrane coated 20 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles was significantly better than that for the membranes coated with 30 or 40 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles or 40 times with iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20822791

  14. Long life catalytic membrane reactors for spontaneous conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M., White, J., Deych, S., Millard, J., Myers, M., Sammells, A.

    1997-10-01

    This program is focusing on the development of mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials based on the brown millerite structure for use in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs). These CMRs are being evaluated for promoting the spontaneous and highly selective oxidative reforming of carbon dioxide / natural gas mixtures to synthesis gas.

  15. Modification of tubular ceramic membranes with carbon nanotubes using catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duc Trung; Thieffry, Guillemette; Jacob, Matthieu; Batiot-Dupeyrat, Catherine; Teychene, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were successfully grown on tubular ceramic membranes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. CNTs were synthesized at 650°C for 3-6 h under a 120 mL min(-1) flow of C2H6 on ceramic membranes impregnated with iron salt. The synthesis procedure was beforehand optimized in terms of catalyst amount, impregnation duration and reaction temperature, using small pieces of tubular ceramic membranes. The yield, size and structure of the CNTs produced were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis and microscopic imaging techniques. Afterwards, preliminary filtration tests with alginate and phenol were performed on two modified tubular membranes. The results indicate that the addition of CNTs on the membrane material increased the permeability of ceramic membrane and its ability to reject alginate and adsorb phenol, yet decreased its fouling resistance. PMID:26465312

  16. Production of an ion-exchange membrane-catalytic electrode bonded material for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, H.; Torikai, E.

    1986-01-01

    A good bond is achieved by placing a metal salt in solution on one side of a membrane and a reducing agent on the other side so that the reducing agent penetrates the membrane and reduces the metal. Thus, a solution containing Pt, Rh, etc., is placed on one side of the membrane and a reducing agent such as NaBH, is placed on the other side. The bonded metal layer obtained is superior in catalytic activity and is suitable as an electrode in a cell such as for solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis.

  17. Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem operational improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Winkler, H. E.; Reysa, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A three-man preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporation Subsystem (TIMES) has been developed to provide high quality water recovery from waste fluids on extended duration space flights. In the most recent effort, a number of improvements have been made to simplify subsystem operation and increase performance. These modifications include changes to the hollow fiber membrane evaporator, the condensing section of the thermoelectric heat pump, and the electronic controller logic and display. This paper describes the results of the test program that was conducted to evaluate the implemented improvements. In addition, an advanced design concept is discussed that will provide lower electrical power consumption, greater water production capacity, lower weight, and a smaller package than the present subsystem configuration.

  18. Processes of particle deposition in membrane operation and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, M R; Tarabara, V; Cortalezzi, M

    2005-01-01

    The processes that control particle deposition on surfaces that are of interest in understanding operational aspects of membrane filtration, also hold significance in controlling the morphology of particle deposits as intermediate steps in membrane fabrication. This paper summarizes processes controlling particle deposit morphology. The implications of these processes for understanding membrane fouling by particles and in fabricating membranes are then considered. PMID:16003995

  19. Hollow microgel based ultrathin thermoresponsive membranes for separation, synthesis, and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Stamm, Manfred

    2014-10-22

    Thermoresponsive core-shell microgels with degradable core are synthesized via surfactant based free radical polymerization using N,N'-(1,2-dihydroxy-ethylene)bis(acrylamide) (DHEA) as a cross-linker for core preparation. The 1,2-glycol bond present in DHEA is susceptible to NaIO4 solution, and thus, the structure can be cleaved off resulting in hollow microgel. Ultrathin membranes are prepared by suction filtration of a dilute suspension of core-shell microgels over a sacrificial layer of Cd(OH)2 nanostrand coated on track etched membrane. After removal of the degraded cores from microgels, the membranes are cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and the nanostrands are removed by passing a 10 mM HCl solution. The prepared membranes are thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and dynamic contact angle for morphology, thermoresponsive, and hydrophilic properties, respectively. The prepared membranes showed thermoresponsive permeation behavior and remarkable separation performance for low molecular weight dyes and lysozyme protein. These membranes are also used to synthesize gold nanoparticles and immobilize lactate dehydrogenase enzyme for catalytic and biocatalytic application. The results for water permeation, solute rejection, and ability to immobilize gold nanoparticles and enzymes showed its wide range of applicability. Furthermore, the synthesis of hollow microgel is simple and environmentally friendly, and the membrane preparation is easy, scalable, and other microgel systems can also be used. These responsive membranes constitute a significant contribution to advanced separation technology. PMID:25272373

  20. Ag Nanoparticle/Polydopamine-Coated Inverse Opals as Highly Efficient Catalytic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gwan H; Rhee, Do Kyung; Park, A Reum; Oh, Min Jun; Hong, Sunghwan; Richardson, Joseph J; Guo, Junling; Caruso, Frank; Yoo, Pil J

    2016-02-10

    Polymeric three-dimensional inverse-opal (IO) structures provide unique structural properties useful for various applications ranging from optics to separation technologies. Despite vast needs for IO functionalization to impart additional chemical properties, this task has been seriously challenged by the intrinsic limitation of polymeric porous materials that do not allow for the easy penetration of waterborne moieties or precursors. To overcome this restriction, we present a robust and straightforward method of employing a dipping-based surface modification with polydopamine (PDA) inside the IO structures, and demonstrate their application to catalytic membranes via synthetic incorporation of Ag nanoparticles. The PDA coating offers simultaneous advantages of achieving the improved hydrophilicity required for the facilitated infiltration of aqueous precursors and successful creation of nucleation sites for a reduction of growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The resulting Ag nanoparticle-incorporated IO structures are utilized as catalytic membranes for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to its amino derivatives in the presence of NaBH4. Synergistically combined characteristics of high reactivity of Ag nanoparticles along with a greatly enhanced internal surface area of IO structures enable the implementation of remarkably improved catalytic performance, exhibiting a good conversion efficiency greater than 99% while minimizing loss in the membrane permeability. PMID:26780371

  1. Ethylene production by ODHE in catalytically modified Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Lobera, M Pilar; Escolástico, Sonia; Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Serra, José M

    2012-08-01

    Process intensification by the integration of membranes and high-temperature reactors offers several advantages with regard to conventional process schemes, that is, energy saving, safe operation, reduced plant/unit size, and higher process performance, for example, higher productivity, catalytic activity, selectivity, or stability. We present the study of oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 °C on a catalytic membrane reactor based on a mixed ionic-electronic conducting membrane. The surface of the membrane made of Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ) has been activated by using different porous catalytic layers based on perovskites. The layer was deposited by screen printing, and the porosity and thickness was studied for the catalyst composition. The different catalyst formulations are based on partial substitution of A- and B-site atoms of doped strontium ferrite/cobaltites (A(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(3-δ) and Ba(0.6)Sr(0.4)BO(3-δ)) and were synthesized by an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-citrate complexation route. The use of a disk-shaped membrane in the reactor enabled the direct contact of gaseous oxygen and hydrocarbons to be avoided, and thus, the ethylene content increased. High ethylene yields (up to ≈81 %) were obtained by using a catalytic coating based on Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-δ), which included macropores produced by the addition of graphite platelets into the screen-printing ink. The promising catalytic results obtained with this catalytically modified membrane reactor are attributed to the combination of 1) the high activity, as a result of the high temperature and oxygen species diffusing through the membrane; 2) the control of oxygen dosing and the low concentration of molecules in the gas phase; and 3) suitable fluid dynamics, which enables appropriate feed contact with the membrane and the rapid removal of products. PMID:22791570

  2. Conversion of elemental mercury with a novel membrane delivery catalytic oxidation system (MDCOs).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongfu; Yan, Naiqiang; Yang, Shijian; Qu, Zan; Wu, Zhongbiao; Liu, Yue; Liu, Ping; Jia, Jinping

    2011-01-15

    In order to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional catalytic oxidation (TCO) mode for the conversion of the trace level of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in flue gas, we put forward a novel and unique assembly that integrated membrane delivery with catalytic oxidation systems (MDCOs), which combined the controlled delivery of oxidants with the catalytic oxidation of Hg(0). The results show that the demanded HCl for Hg(0) conversion in the MDCOs was less than 5% of that in the TCO mode, and over 90% of Hg(0) removal efficiency can be obtained in the MDCOs with less than 0.5 mg m(-3) of HCl escaped. Meanwhile, the inhibition of SO(2) to Hg(0) catalytic conversion in the MDCOs was also less significant than in the TCO. The MDCOs have high retainability for HCl, which is quite favorable to Hg(0) conversion and HCl utilization. The reaction mechanism on mercury conversion in the MDCOs is discussed. The MDCOs appear to be a promising method for emission control of elemental mercury. PMID:21158439

  3. Instantaneous Click Chemistry by a Copper-Containing Polymeric-Membrane-Installed Microflow Catalytic Reactor.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi M A; Ohno, Aya; Sato, Takuma; Uozumi, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-23

    The copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition (azide-alkyne cycloaddition) is an important reaction in click chemistry that ideally proceeds instantaneously. An instantaneous Huisgen cycloaddition has been developed that uses a novel catalytic dinuclear copper complex-containing polymeric membrane-installed microflow device. A polymeric membranous copper catalyst was prepared from poly(4-vinylpyridine), copper(II) sulfate, sodium chloride, and sodium ascorbate at the interface of two laminar flows inside microchannels. Elucidation of the structure by XANES, EXAFS, and elemental analysis, as well as second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations assigned the local structure near Cu as a μ-chloro dinuclear Cu(I) complex. The microflow device promotes the instantaneous click reaction of a variety of alkynes and organic azides to afford the corresponding triazoles in quantitative yield. PMID:26439220

  4. Simple fabrication of a Pd-P film on a polymer membrane and its catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Young-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Composites were prepared by a surface activation by aerosol deposition of Pd nanoparticles (Pd nano seeds) on a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) membrane and subsequent Pd-P film formation by electroless deposition. Activation of the membrane processed by an ambient Pd spark discharge and subsequent fixation of the spark produced Pd nano seeds. Characterizations for electroless Pd-P films indicated that P entered into the crystal lattice of Pd and formed an alloy. The fabricated composites were applied to catalytic applications of formic acid oxidation (FAO) and toluene conversion (TC). The composite catalysts from the simple activation had more stable performances of FAO and TC than those from the conventional Sn-Pd activation, and their better performances might have originated from better purity due to the simple activation that only introduced pure Pd nano seeds. PMID:21736292

  5. Comparative catalytic activity of PET track-etched membranes with embedded silver and gold nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashentseva, Anastassiya; Borgekov, Daryn; Kislitsin, Sergey; Zdorovets, Maxim; Migunova, Anastassiya

    2015-12-01

    Irradiated by heavy ions nanoporous polyethylene terephthalate track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) after +15Kr84 ions bombardment (1.75 MeV/nucl with the ion fluency of 1 × 109 cm-2) and sequential etching was applied in this research as a template for development of composites with catalytically enriched properties. A highly ordered silver and gold nanotubes arrays were embedded in 100 nm pores of PET TeMs via electroless deposition technique at 4 °C during 1 h. All "as-prepared" composites were examined for catalytic activity using reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by sodium borohydride as a common reaction to test metallic nanostructures catalysts. The effect of temperature on the catalytic activity was investigated in range of 292-313 K and activation energy were calculated. Kapp of Ag/PET composites linearly increase with an increase of the temperature thus normal Arrhenius behavior have been seen and the activation energy was calculated to be 42.13 kJ/mol. Au/PET composites exhibit not only more powerful catalytic activity but also non-linear dependence of rate constant from temperature. Kapp increased with increasing temperature throughout the 292-308 K temperature range; the reaction had an activation energy 65.32 kJ/mol. In range 311-313 K rate constant dramatically decreased and the apparent activation energy at this temperature rang was -91.44 kJ/mol due some structural changes, i.e. agglomeration of Au nanoparticles on the surface of composite.

  6. Green Fabrication of Ag Coated Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibrous Composite Membrane with High Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lingdi; Yu, Lina; Wang, Min; Wang, Xuefen; Zhu, Meifang; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2015-07-01

    Ag-coated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers have been prepared by a novel, facile and green way that combined electrospinning technique and poly(dopamine)-assisted electroless plating method. Poly(dopamine) (PDOP) was formed by oxidation polymerization of dopamine on the surface of PAN nanofibers to promote the electroless plating of silver. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and structure of Ag/PDOP/PAN nanofibrous composite mem- brane and Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) Spectroscopy was used to investigate its catalytic performance. The results indicated that silver clusters composed of face-centred cubic crystal Ag with average crystallite size of about 18 nm were well distributed on the surface of dopamine-modified electrospun PAN nanofibers (PDOP/PAN). The prepared silver coated PDOP/PAN (Ag/PDOP/PAN) nanofibrous composite membrane exhibited an outstanding catalytic performance, and showed good reusabil- ity for completely degradating methylene blue (MB) dyes and reducing o-nitroaniline very quickly, respectively. PMID:26373068

  7. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  8. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer.

    PubMed

    Monk, Brian C; Tomasiak, Thomas M; Keniya, Mikhail V; Huschmann, Franziska U; Tyndall, Joel D A; O'Connell, Joseph D; Cannon, Richard D; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-03-11

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  9. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrock, Steven J

    2011-06-30

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA's comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20ºC to 120ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA's, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen

  10. MAP-1 and IAP-1, two novel AAA proteases with catalytic sites on opposite membrane surfaces in mitochondrial inner membrane of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Klanner, C; Prokisch, H; Langer, T

    2001-09-01

    Eukaryotic AAA proteases form a conserved family of membrane-embedded ATP-dependent proteases but have been analyzed functionally only in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we have identified two novel members of this protein family in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, which were termed MAP-1 and IAP-1. Both proteins are localized to the inner membrane of mitochondria. They are part of two similar-sized high molecular mass complexes, but expose their catalytic sites to opposite membrane surfaces, namely, the intermembrane and the matrix space. Disruption of iap-1 by repeat-induced point mutation caused a slow growth phenotype at high temperature and stabilization of a misfolded inner membrane protein against degradation. IAP-1 could partially substitute for functions of its yeast homolog Yme1, demonstrating functional conservation. However, respiratory growth at 37 degrees C was not restored. Our results identify two components of the quality control system of the mitochondrial inner membrane in N. crassa and suggest that AAA proteases with catalytic sites exposed to opposite membrane surfaces are present in mitochondria of all eukaryotic cells. PMID:11553723

  11. Operating envelope of a short contact time fuel reformer for propane catalytic partial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Michael G.; Walluk, Mark R.; Trabold, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has yet to realize widespread deployment, in part because of the hydrogen fuel infrastructure required for proton exchange membrane systems. One option to overcome this barrier is to produce hydrogen by reforming propane, which has existing widespread infrastructure, is widely used by the general public, easily transported, and has a high energy density. The present work combines thermodynamic modeling of propane catalytic partial oxidation (cPOx) and experimental performance of a Precision Combustion Inc. (PCI) Microlith® reactor with real-time soot measurement. Much of the reforming research using Microlith-based reactors has focused on fuels such as natural gas, JP-8, diesel, and gasoline, but little research on propane reforming with Microlith-based catalysts can be found in literature. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal operating parameters for the reformer that maximizes efficiency and minimizes solid carbon formation. The primary parameters evaluated were reformate composition, carbon concentration in the effluent, and reforming efficiency as a function of catalyst temperature and O2/C ratio. Including the lower heating values for product hydrogen and carbon monoxide, efficiency of 84% was achieved at an O2/C ratio of 0.53 and a catalyst temperature of 940 °C, resulting in near equilibrium performance. Significant solid carbon formation was observed at much lower catalyst temperatures, and carbon concentration in the effluent was determined to have a negative linear relationship at T < 750 °C. The Microlith reactor displayed good stability during more than 80 experiments with temperature cycling from 360 to 1050 °C.

  12. Phosphatidylserine-containing membranes alter the thermal stability of prothrombin's catalytic domain: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Lentz, B R; Zhou, C M; Wu, J R

    1994-05-10

    Denaturation profiles of bovine prothrombin and its isolated fragments were examined in the presence of Na2EDTA, 5 mM CaCl2, and CaCl2 plus membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) in combination with bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS). We have shown previously [Lentz, B. R., Wu, J. R., Sorrentino, A. M., & Carleton, J. A. (1991) Biophys. J. 60, 70] that binding to PS/POPC (25/75) large unilamellar vesicles resulted in an enthalpy loss in the main endotherm of prothrombin denaturation (Tm approximately 57-58 degrees C) and a comparable enthalpy gain in a minor endotherm (Tm approximately 59 degrees C) accompanying an upward shift in peak temperature (Tm approximately 73 degrees C). This minor endotherm was also responsive to Ca2+ binding and, in the absence of PS/POPC membranes, corresponded to melting of the N-terminal, Ca2+ and membrane binding domain (fragment 1). Peak deconvolution analysis of the prothrombin denaturation profile and extensive studies of the denaturation of isolated prothrombin domains in the presence and absence of PS/POPC vesicles suggested that membrane binding induced changes in the C-terminal catalytic domain of prothrombin (prethrombin 2) and in a domain that links fragment 1 with the catalytic domain (fragment 2). Specifically, the results have confirmed that the fragment 2 domain interacts with the stabilizes the prethrombin 2 domain and also have shown that fragment 2 interacts directly with the membrane. In addition, the results have demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized interaction between the catalytic and membrane binding domains. This interaction can account for another portion of the denaturation enthalpy that appears at high temperatures in the presence of membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180168

  13. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  14. Sustainable operation of submerged Anammox membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin; Xu, Xindi; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, FengLin; Zhang, ShuShen

    2015-12-01

    A submerged anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling has been successfully operated for 100d. Based on the batch tests, a recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2m(3)h(-1) was fixed as an ultimate value for the sustainable operation. The mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (VSS) of the inoculum for the long operation was around 3000mgL(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate increasing stepwise from 0 to 0.2m(3)h(-1), the reactor reached an influent total nitrogen (TN) up to 1.7gL(-1), a stable TN removal efficiency of 83% and a maximum specific Anammox activity (SAA) of 0.56kg TNkg(-1) VSSd(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2 m(3) h(-1) (corresponding to an aeration intensity of 118m(3)m(-2)h(-1)), the membrane operation circle could prolong by around 20 times compared to that without gas sparging. Furthermore, mechanism of membrane fouling was proposed. And with recycling biogas sparging, the VSS and EPS content increasing rate in cake layer were far less than the ones without biogas sparging. The TN removal performance and sustainable membrane operation of this system showed the appealing potential of the submerged Anammox MBR with recycling biogas sparging in treating high-strength nitrogen-containing wastewaters. PMID:25311769

  15. Microwave assisted esterification of acidified oil from waste cooking oil by CERP/PES catalytic membrane for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-11-01

    The traditional heating and microwave assisted method for biodiesel production using cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP)/PES catalytic membrane were comparatively studied to achieve economic and effective method for utilization of free fatty acids (FFAs) from waste cooking oil (WCO). The optimal esterification conditions of the two methods were investigated and the experimental results showed that microwave irradiation exhibited a remarkable enhanced effect for esterification compared with that of traditional heating method. The FFAs conversion of microwave assisted esterification reached 97.4% under the optimal conditions of reaction temperature 60°C, methanol/acidified oil mass ratio 2.0:1, catalytic membrane (annealed at 120°C) loading 3g, microwave power 360W and reaction time 90min. The study results showed that it is a fast, easy and green way to produce biodiesel applying microwave irradiation. PMID:22940301

  16. The development of manganese oxide coated ceramic membranes for combined catalytic ozonation and ultrafiltration of drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corneal, Lindsay Marie

    A novel method for the preparation of hydrated MnO2 by the ozonation of MnCl2 in water is described. The hydrated MnO 2 was used to coat titania water filtration membranes using a layer-by-layer technique. The coated membranes were then sintered in air at 500°C for 45 minutes. Upon sintering, the MnO2 is converted to alpha-Mn 2O3 (as characterized by x-ray and electron diffraction). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed no significant change in the roughness or height of the surface features of coated membranes, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed an increase in grain size with increasing number of coating layers. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping and line scans revealed manganese present throughout the membrane, indicating that manganese dispersed into the porous membrane during the coating process and diffused into the titania grains during sintering. Selected area diffraction (SAD) of the coated and sintered membrane was used to index the surface layer as alpha-Mn2O3. The surface layer was uneven, although there was a trend of increasing thickness with increasing coating layers. The coating acts as a catalyst for the oxidation of organic matter when coated membranes are used in a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration system. A trend of decreasing total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate water was observed with increasing number of coating layers. The catalytic activity also manifests itself as improved recovery of the water flux due to oxidation of foulants on the membrane surface. Ceramic nanoparticle coatings on ceramic water filtration membranes must undergo high temperature sintering. However, this means that the underlying membrane, which has been engineered for a given molecular weight cut-off (MWCO), also undergoes a high temperature heat treatment that serves to increase pore size that have resulted in increases in permeability of titania membranes. Coating the titania membrane with manganese oxide followed

  17. Fast Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: An Integrated Catalytic and Membrane Approach for Improved Bio-oils. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Huber; Upadhye, Aniruddha A.; Ford, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Badger, Phillip C.

    2012-10-19

    with model AFBO excluding guaiacol were also conducted. NF membranes showed retention factors of glucose greater than 80% and of acetic acid less than 15% when operated at transmembrane pressures near 60 bar. Task 3.0 Acid Removal by Catalytic Processing It was found that the TAN reduction in bio-oil was very difficult using low temperature hydrogenation in flow and batch reactors. Acetic acid is very resilient to hydrogenation and we could only achieve about 16% conversion for acetic acid. Although it was observed that acetic acid was not responsible for instability of aqueous fraction of bio-oil during ageing studies (described in task 5). The bimetallic catalyst PtRe/ceria-zirconia was found to be best catalyst because its ability to convert the acid functionality with low conversion to gas phase carbon. Hydrogenation of the whole bio-oil was carried out at 125°C, 1450 psi over Ru/C catalyst in a flow reactor. Again, negligible acetic acid conversion was obtained in low temperature hydrogenation. Hydrogenation experiments with whole bio-oil were difficult to perform because of difficulty to pumping the high viscosity oil and reactor clogging. Task 4.0 Acid Removal using Ion Exchange Resins DOWEX M43 resin was used to carry out the neutralization of bio-oil using a packed bed column. The pH of the bio-oil increased from 2.43 to 3.7. The GC analysis of the samples showed that acetic acid was removed from the bio-oil during the neutralization and recovered in the methanol washing. But it was concluded that process would not be economical at large scale as it is extremely difficult to regenerate the resin once the bio-oil is passed over it. Task 5.0 Characterization of Upgraded Bio-oils We investigated the viscosity, microstructure, and chemical composition of bio-oils prepared by a fast pyrolysis approach, upon aging these fuels at 90ºC for periods of several days. Our results suggest that the viscosity increase is not correlated with the acids or char present in the

  18. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 28 Table 28 to Subpart UUU of Part 63...—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As... catalyst rejuvenation by . . . 1. Wet scrubber a. The daily average pH or alkalinity of the water...

  19. Stabilized composite membranes and membrane electrode assemblies for elevated temperature/low relative humidity PEFC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Vijay; Kunz, H. R.; Fenton, J. M.

    An approach is presented to combine existing heteropolyacid (HPA) additive and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) stabilization techniques to yield a stabilized MEA for operation at 120 °C and 35% relative humidity (RH). MEAs were prepared using Nafion ®/phosphotungstic acid composite membranes with a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) particle size of 30-50 nm. The PTA additive was stabilized by substituting its protons with cesium counter ions. The Nafion ® in the membrane and electrodes was simultaneously converted to the Cs + form by an ion-exchange process. The melt processability of the Nafion ® in the Cs + form permitted the MEA to be heat treated at 200 °C and 30 atm, promoting the development of a durable membrane/electrode interface. The prior stabilization of the PTA permitted MEA re-protonation with minimal additive loss. FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to present evidence of ion-exchange and protonation. In situ electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements confirmed ion-exchange and protonation within the active portion of the stabilized MEA. The stabilization process did not affect the integrity of the MEA, with the hydrogen crossover currents through the membrane remaining unchanged at 2 mA cm -2. The MEA was evaluated at 120 °C and 35% relative humidity in an operating fuel cell environment and yielded respectable performance under these conditions.

  20. A Novel Family of Soluble Minimal Scaffolds Provides Structural Insight into the Catalytic Domains of Integral Membrane Metallopeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    López-Pelegrín, Mar; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Cintas-Pedrola, Anna; Canals, Albert; Peinado, Juan R.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Arolas, Joan L.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In the search for structural models of integral-membrane metallopeptidases (MPs), we discovered three related proteins from thermophilic prokaryotes, which we grouped into a novel family called “minigluzincins.” We determined the crystal structures of the zymogens of two of these (Pyrococcus abyssi proabylysin and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii projannalysin), which are soluble and, with ∼100 residues, constitute the shortest structurally characterized MPs to date. Despite relevant sequence and structural similarity, the structures revealed two unique mechanisms of latency maintenance through the C-terminal segments previously unseen in MPs as follows: intramolecular, through an extended tail, in proabylysin, and crosswise intermolecular, through a helix swap, in projannalysin. In addition, structural and sequence comparisons revealed large similarity with MPs of the gluzincin tribe such as thermolysin, leukotriene A4 hydrolase relatives, and cowrins. Noteworthy, gluzincins mostly contain a glutamate as third characteristic zinc ligand, whereas minigluzincins have a histidine. Sequence and structural similarity further allowed us to ascertain that minigluzincins are very similar to the catalytic domains of integral membrane MPs of the MEROPS database families M48 and M56, such as FACE1, HtpX, Oma1, and BlaR1/MecR1, which are provided with trans-membrane helices flanking or inserted into a minigluzincin-like catalytic domain. In a time where structural biochemistry of integral-membrane proteins in general still faces formidable challenges, the minigluzincin soluble minimal scaffold may contribute to our understanding of the working mechanisms of these membrane MPs and to the design of novel inhibitors through structure-aided rational drug design approaches. PMID:23733187

  1. Solid support membrane-aerated catalytic biofilm reactor for the continuous synthesis of (S)-styrene oxide at gram scale.

    PubMed

    Halan, Babu; Letzel, Thomas; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic biofilms minimize reactant toxicity and maximize biocatalyst stability in selective transformations of chemicals to value-added products in continuous processes. The scaling up of such catalytic biofilm processes is challenging, due to fluidic and biological parameters affording a special reactor design affecting process performance. A solid support membrane-aerated biofilm reactor was optimized and scaled-up to yield gram amounts of (S)-styrene oxide, a toxic and instable high value chemical synthon. A sintered stainless steel membrane unit was identified as an optimal choice as biofilm substratum and for high oxygen mass transfer. A stable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane was best suited for in situ substrate delivery and product extraction. For the verification of scalability, catalytic biofilms of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120ΔC produced (S)-styrene oxide to an average concentration of 390 mM in the organic phase per day (equivalent to 24.4 g Laq (-1) day(-1) ). This productivity was gained by efficiently using the catalyst with an excellent product yield on biomass of 13.6 gproduct gbiomass (-1) . This product yield on biomass is in the order of magnitude reported for other continuous systems based on artificially immobilized biocatalysts and is fulfilling the minimum requirements for industrial biocatalytic processes. Overall, 46 g of (S)-styrene oxide were produced and isolated (purity: 99%; enantiomeric excess [ee]: >99.8%. yield: 30%). The productivity is in a similar range as in comparable small-scale biofilm reactors highlighting the large potential of this methodology for continuous bioprocessing of bulk chemicals and biofuels. PMID:25111808

  2. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for phenol biodegradation under continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-03-15

    Continuous phenol biodegradation was accomplished in a two-phase partitioning osmotic membrane bioreactor (TPPOMBR) system, using extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) as the partitioning phase. The EIMs alleviated substrate inhibition during prolonged operation at influent phenol concentrations of 600-2000mg/L, and also at spiked concentrations of 2500mg/L phenol restricted to 2 days. Filtration of the effluent through forward osmosis maintained high biomass concentration in the bioreactor and improved effluent quality. Steady state was reached in 5-6 days at removal rates varying between 2000 and 5500mg/L-day under various conditions. Due to biofouling and salt accumulation, the permeate flux varied from 1.2-7.2 LMH during 54 days of operation, while maintaining an average hydraulic retention time of 7.4h. A washing cycle, comprising 1h osmotic backwashing using 0.5M NaCl and 2h washing with water, facilitated biofilm removal from the membranes. Characterization of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) through FTIR showed peaks between 1700 and 1500cm(-1), 1450-1450cm(-1) and 1200-1000cm(-1), indicating the presence of proteins, phenols and polysaccharides, respectively. The carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS was estimated to be 0.3. These results indicate that TPPOMBR can be promising in continuous treatment of phenolic wastewater. PMID:26651068

  3. Discrepant membrane fouling of partial nitrification and anammox membrane bioreactor operated at the same nitrogen loading rate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhao; Zhang, Zuotao; Liu, Sitong; Miyoshi, Taro; Matsuyama, Hideo; Ni, Jinren

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two times more serious membrane fouling was found in anammox membrane bioreactor, compared to partial nitrification membrane bioreactor (PN-MBR) operated at the same nitrogen loading rate. By protein, polysaccharide, amino acids and functional groups analysis, it was found that the discrepancy in membrane fouling was virtually due to the difference in microbial products of nitrifiers and anammox bacteria. Protein and polysaccharide were main foulants on membrane surface; meanwhile theirs content and ratio in the EPS, supernatant and membrane surface were significantly different in PN-MBR and anammox-MBR. The anammox metabolism products contained much more hydrophobic organics, hydrophobic amino acids, and hydrophobic functional groups than nitrifiers. A mass of anammox bacteria as well as hydrophobic metabolism products deposited on the hydrophobic membrane surface and formed serious fouling. In further, hydrophilic modification is more urgently needed to mitigate membrane fouling when running anammox-MBR, than PN-MBR. PMID:27209455

  4. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of catalytic ultrasound oxidation and membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Xu, Peng; Hou, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were conducted to investigate a novel system integrating catalytic ultrasound oxidation (CUO) with membrane bioreactor (CUO-MBR) on advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coal gasification wastewater. Results indicated that CUO with catalyst of FeOx/SBAC (sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) which loaded Fe oxides) represented high efficiencies in eliminating TOC as well as improving the biodegradability. The integrated CUO-MBR system with low energy intensity and high frequency was more effective in eliminating COD, BOD5, TOC and reducing transmembrane pressure than either conventional MBR or ultrasound oxidation integrated MBR. The enhanced hydroxyl radical oxidation, facilitation of substrate diffusion and improvement of cell enzyme secretion were the mechanisms for CUO-MBR performance. Therefore, the integrated CUO-MBR was the promising technology for advanced treatment in engineering applications. PMID:25936898

  5. PKC-ε pseudosubstrate and catalytic activity are necessary for membrane delivery during IgG-mediated phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Tiffany R.; Chow, Rachel Y.; Hanes, Cheryl M.; Zhang, Xuexin; Kashiwagi, Kaori; Shirai, Yasuhito; Trebak, Mohamed; Loegering, Daniel J.; Saito, Naoaki; Lennartz, Michelle R.

    2013-01-01

    In RAW 264.7 cells [1], PKC-ε regulates FcγR-mediated phagocytosis. BMDM behave similarly; PKC-ε concentrates at phagosomes and internalization are reduced in PKC-ε−/− cells. Two questions were asked: what is the role of PKC-ε? and what domains are necessary for PKC-ε concentration? Function was studied using BMDM and frustrated phagocytosis. On IgG surfaces, PKC-ε−/− macrophages spread less than WT. Patch-clamping revealed that the spreading defect is a result of the failure of PKC-ε−/− macrophages to add membrane. The defect is specific for FcγR ligation and can be reversed by expression of full-length (but not the isolated RD) PKC-ε in PKC-ε−/− BMDM. Thus, PKC-ε function in phagocytosis requires translocation to phagosomes and the catalytic domain. The expression of chimeric PKC molecules in RAW cells identified the εPS as necessary for PKC-ε targeting. When placed into (nonlocalizing) PKC-δ, εPS was sufficient for concentration, albeit to a lesser degree than intact PKC-ε. In contrast, translocation of δ(εPSC1B) resembled that of WT PKC-ε. Thus, εPS and εC1B cooperate for optimal phagosome targeting. Finally, cells expressing εK437W were significantly less phagocytic than their PKC-ε-expressing counterparts, blocked at the pseudopod-extension phase. In summary, we have shown that εPS and εC1B are necessary and sufficient for targeting PKC-ε to phagosomes, where its catalytic activity is required for membrane delivery and pseudopod extension. PMID:23670290

  6. Continuous esterification to produce biodiesel by SPES/PES/NWF composite catalytic membrane in flow-through membrane reactor: experimental and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Cao, Yuping; Li, Jianxin; Yan, Feng; Cui, Zhenyu; Zou, Zhiqun; Guo, Shiwei; Qian, Xiaomin

    2013-02-01

    A novel composite catalytic membrane (CCM) was prepared from sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) and polyethersulfone (PES) blend supported by non-woven fabrics, as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from continuous esterification of oleic acid with methanol in a flow-through mode. A kinetic model of esterification was established based on a plug-flow assumption. The effects of the CCM structure (thickness, area, porosity, etc.), reaction temperature and the external and internal mass transfer resistances on esterification were investigated. The results showed that the CCM structure had a significant effect on the acid conversion. The external mass transfer resistance could be neglected when the flow rate was over 1.2 ml min(-1). The internal mass transfer resistance impacted on the conversion when membrane thickness was over 1.779 mm. An oleic acid conversion kept over 98.0% for 500 h of continuous running. The conversions obtained from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:23232226

  7. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  8. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  9. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  10. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  11. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP... for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(a)(2), you... daily average pH or alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber must not...

  12. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP... for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(a)(2), you... daily average pH or alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber must not...

  13. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP... for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(a)(2), you... daily average pH or alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber must not...

  14. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-01

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability. PMID:27493179

  15. Specific features of operation of a membrane-electrode assembly of an air-hydrogen fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailov, A. A.; Glebova, N. V.; Koshkina, D. V.; Tomasov, A. A.; Zelenina, N. K.; Terukova, E. E.

    2013-09-01

    Specific features of the operation of the membrane-electrode assembly with high catalytic activity that are a part of the simplified design of a low-temperature air-hydrogen fuel cell under conditions of forced and natural convection of air on the cathode are studied. The governing effect of water balance on the specific power of the fuel cell in the stationary mode (˜1 h) is shown, and the range of the operating conditions of the cell with self-control is determined. The power of the fuel cell at an efficiency of ˜50% and the surface density of platinum on a cathode of ≈0.2 mg/cm2 is 200-250 and 100 mW/cm2 in the forced and natural air-convection modes, respectively, which is comparable with the advanced results.

  16. Porous Au-Ag Alloy Particles Inlaid AgCl Membranes As Versatile Plasmonic Catalytic Interfaces with Simultaneous, in Situ SERS Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Yuan, Kaiping; Liu, Qinghe; Liang, Chongyun; Wang, Xiang; Cheng, Yi-Feng; Li, Qingqing; Wang, Min; Che, Renchao

    2015-08-26

    We present a novel porous Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membrane as plasmonic catalytic interfaces with real-time, in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) monitoring. The Au-Ag alloy particles inlaid AgCl membranes were obtained via a facile two-step, air-exposed, and room-temperature immersion reaction with appropriate annealing process. Owing to the designed integration of semiconductor component AgCl and noble metal Au-Ag particles, both the catalytic reduction and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities toward organic contaminants were attained. Specifically, the efficiencies of about 94% of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP, 5 × 10(-5) M) reduction after 8 min of reaction, and degradation of rhodamine 6G (R6G, 10(-5) M) after 12 min of visible light irradiation were demonstrated. Moreover, efficiencies of above 85% of conversion of 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and 90% of R6G degradation were achieved as well after 6 cycles of reactions, by which robust recyclability was confirmed. Further, with distinct SERS signals generated simultaneously from the surfaces of Au-Ag particles under laser excitation, in situ SERS monitoring of the process of catalytic reactions with superior sensitivity and linearity has been realized. Overall, the capability of the Au-Ag particles inlaid AgCl membranes to provide SERS monitored catalytic and visible-light-driven photocatalytic conversion of organic pollutants, along with their mild and cost-effective fabrication method, would make sense for in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of (photo)catalytic reactions, and also future development of potable, multifunctional and integrated catalytic and sensing devices. PMID:26263301

  17. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation.

    PubMed

    Ciambelli, P; Arurault, L; Sarno, M; Fontorbes, S; Leone, C; Datas, L; Sannino, D; Lenormand, P; Du Plouy, S Le Blond

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects. PMID:21576783

  18. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambelli, P.; Arurault, L.; Sarno, M.; Fontorbes, S.; Leone, C.; Datas, L.; Sannino, D.; Lenormand, P.; Le Blond Du Plouy, S.

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects.

  19. Catalytic and electrochemical behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell operated with simulated-biogas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang-Long, T.; Quang-Tuyen, T.; Shiratori, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Being produced from organic matters of wastes (bio-wastes) through a fermentation process, biogas mainly composed of CH4 and CO2 and can be considered as a secondary energy carrier derived from solar energy. To generate electricity from biogas through the electrochemical process in fuel cells is a state-of-the-art technology possessing higher energy conversion efficiency without harmful emissions compared to combustion process in heat engines. Getting benefits from high operating temperature such as direct internal reforming ability and activation of electrochemical reactions to increase overall system efficiency, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with biogas becomes a promising candidate for distributed power generator for rural applications leading to reductions of environmental issues caused by greenhouse effects and bio-wastes. CO2 reforming of CH4 and electrochemical oxidation of the produced syngas (H2-CO mixture) are two main reaction processes within porous anode material of SOFC. Here catalytic and electrochemical behavior of Ni-ScSZ (scandia stabilized-zirconia) anode in the feed of CH4-CO2 mixtures as simulated-biogas at 800 °C were evaluated. The results showed that CO2 had strong influences on both reaction processes. The increase in CO2 partial pressure resulted in the decrease in anode overvoltage, although open-circuit voltage was dropped. Besides that, the simulation result based on a power-law model for equimolar CH4-CO2 mixture revealed that coking hazard could be suppressed along the fuel flow channel in both open-circuit and closed-circuit conditions.

  20. Sustainable membrane operation design for the treatment of the synthetic coke wastewater in SMBR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Xu, Zhen-Liang; Munib, Shahda; Chen, Gui-e; Lu, Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Membrane fouling in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) is typically caused by the interaction of microbial characteristics, hydrodynamic behavior, operation environment, wastewater characteristics and membrane properties, which result in the deterioration of performance and increasing energy consumption and cost of membrane replacement. The effect of the crucial MBR parameters (the microbial loading and characteristics, dissolved oxygen (DO), hydraulic retention time (HRT), backwashing conditions and membrane characteristics) on membrane fouling was investigated in a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) during the long term treatment of synthetic coke wastewater. Also the optimum operation strategies were further utilized in order to satisfy the minimal membrane fouling operation through a long-term evaluation of the MBR performance. It has been demonstrated that with application of these optimal designed conditions, significant membrane fouling improvements were achieved over a long operating time, so it was possible to perform in sustainable operation for MBR. In this study, the upper limit of the sustainable flux is found to be as much as 18.6 L/m(2) h and the optimum sustainable flux value should be 50 approximately 75% of critical flux to satisfy the desired sustainable operation period. PMID:19844058

  1. High-Yield Expression of a Catalytically Active Membrane-Bound Protein: Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Sandee, Duanpen

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17α-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 μm, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 μm and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  2. The identification of an integral membrane, cytochrome c urate oxidase completes the catalytic repertoire of a therapeutic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Doniselli, Nicola; Monzeglio, Enrico; Dal Palù, Alessandro; Merli, Angelo; Percudani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In living organisms, the conversion of urate into allantoin requires three consecutive enzymes. The pathway was lost in hominid, predisposing humans to hyperuricemia and gout. Among other species, the genomic distribution of the two last enzymes of the pathway is wider than that of urate oxidase (Uox), suggesting the presence of unknown genes encoding Uox. Here we combine gene network analysis with association rule learning to identify the missing urate oxidase. In contrast with the known soluble Uox, the identified gene (puuD) encodes a membrane protein with a C-terminal cytochrome c. The 8-helix transmembrane domain corresponds to DUF989, a family without similarity to known proteins. Gene deletion in a PuuD-encoding organism (Agrobacterium fabrum) abolished urate degradation capacity; the phenotype was fully restored by complementation with a cytosolic Uox from zebrafish. Consistent with H2O2 production by zfUox, urate oxidation in the complemented strain caused a four-fold increase of catalase. No increase was observed in the wild-type, suggesting that urate oxidation by PuuD proceeds through cytochrome c-mediated electron transfer. These findings identify a missing link in purine catabolism, assign a biochemical activity to a domain of unknown function (DUF989), and complete the catalytic repertoire of an enzyme useful for human therapy. PMID:26349049

  3. Facile in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on procyanidin-grafted eggshell membrane and their catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Liang, Miao; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Yu, Yanjun; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2014-04-01

    Facile, efficient, and robust immobilization of metal nanostructures on porous bioscaffolds is an interesting topic in materials chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. This study reports a facile in situ method for the synthesis and immobilization of small silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature on natural eggshell membrane (ESM), which presents interwoven fibrous structure and can be used as a unique protein-based biotemplate. Procyanidin (Pro), a typical plant polyphenol extracted from grape seeds and skins, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both reductant and stabilizer during the synthesis process. As a result, the AgNPs were facilely synthesized and robustly immobilized on the ESM fibers without additional chemical reductant or physical treatments. The morphology and microstructure of the as-prepared AgNPs@Pro-ESM composites were characterized by combined microscopy and spectroscopy technologies. The results indicate that small AgNPs with mean diameter of 2.46 nm were successfully prepared on the Pro-ESM biotemplate. The composites exhibited good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). More importantly, these composite catalysts can be easily recovered and reused for more than eight cycles because of their high stability. PMID:24624939

  4. Shape-dependent plasma-catalytic activity of ZnO nanomaterials coated on porous ceramic membrane for oxidation of butane.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva Gandhi, M; Mok, Young Sun

    2014-12-01

    In order to explore the effects of the shape of ZnO nanomaterials on the plasma-catalytic decomposition of butane and the distribution of byproducts, three types of ZnO nanomaterials (nanoparticles (NPs), nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs)) were prepared and coated on multi-channel porous alumina ceramic membrane. The structures and morphologies of the nanomaterials were confirmed by X-ray diffraction method and scanning electron microscopy. The observed catalytic activity of ZnO in the oxidative decomposition of butane was strongly shape-dependent. It was found that the ZnO NWs exhibited higher catalytic activity than the other nanomaterials and could completely oxidize butane into carbon oxides (COx). When using the bare or ZnO NPs-coated ceramic membrane, several unwanted partial oxidation and decomposition products like acetaldehyde, acetylene, methane and propane were identified during the decomposition of butane. When the ZnO NWs- or ZnO NRs-coated membrane was used, however, the formation of such unwanted byproducts except methane was completely avoided, and full conversion into COx was achieved. Better carbon balance and COx selectivity were obtained with the ZnO NWs and NRs than with the NPs. PMID:25195119

  5. High performance RO membranes for desalination and wastewater reclamation and their operation results.

    PubMed

    Henmi, M; Fusaoka, Y; Tomioka, H; Kurihara, M

    2010-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane is one of the most powerful tools for solving the global water crisis, and is used in a variety of water treatment scenes such as drinking water purification, waste-water treatment, boiler feed water production, ultra pure water production for semiconductor industry, etc. The desired performance of RO membrane varies according to quality of feed water being treated, and Toray has been developing RO membranes with suitable characteristic for each operating condition. RO membranes for seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation are especially regarded as most promising targets. Recently, high boron removal and energy saving RO membrane for seawater desalination and low fouling RO membrane for wastewater reclamation have been developed. In this paper, the prospect of attaining these renovative RO membrane, and furthermore, job references will be discussed. PMID:21045342

  6. Membrane Operational Impedance Spectra in Chara corallina Estimated by Laplace Transforms Analysis 1

    PubMed Central

    Homblé, Fabrice; Jenard, André

    1986-01-01

    The membrane operational impedance spectrum of Chara corallina Klein ex Willd. (R. Brown) cells is investigated using Laplace transform analysis. The spectrum changes with both amplitude and sign of the electrical stimulation when time- and voltage-dependent K+ channels contribute to the membrane conductance. We compare the advantages and disadvantage of this technique for studying membrane impedance with those of the alternating current method and the white noise method. PMID:16664925

  7. Influence of electrolytes and membranes on cell operation for syn-gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

    2012-02-01

    The impact of membrane type and electrolyte composition for the electrochemical generation of synthesis gas (CO + H2) using a Ag gas diffusion electrode are presented. Changing from a cation exchange membrane to an anion exchange membrane (AEM) extended the cell operational time at low Ecell values (up to 4x) without impacting product composition. The use of KOH as the catholyte decreased the Ecell and resulted in a minimum electrolyte cost reduction of 39%. The prime factor in determining operational time at low Ecell values was the ability to maintain a sufficiently high anolyte pH.

  8. Membrane fouling behavior in anaerobic baffled membrane bioreactor under static operating condition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiadong; Jia, Xiaolan; Gao, Bo; Bo, Longli; Wang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    A novel AnMBR combined with ABR as the anaerobic baffled membrane bioreactor (ABMBR) was developed for membrane fouling mitigation without any turbulence intensifying strategy to reduce the energy consumption further. The filtration time of this system lasted 14-25days under stable condition only with back-flushing every 48h. The polysaccharide accounted for 6.85±3.1% amount of total filter cake and the protein accounted for 4.12±2.1%, which took 79.12% and 11.12% of total area in laser scanning confocal microscope (CLSM) image. After filtration, 83.72±10.97% of turbidity, 59.28±16.46% of polysaccharide, 16.51% of tryptophan and 37.61% of humic-like substrates were rejected, respectively. The total membrane resistance at the end of each cycle was (4.47±0.99)×10(13)m(-1). And the resistance from filter cake was (4.15±1.00)×10(13)m(-1), which accounted for of 92.6±3.4% of total membrane resistance. PMID:27179954

  9. A triple fouling layers perspective on evaluation of membrane fouling under different scenarios of membrane bioreactor operation.

    PubMed

    Pourabdollah, Mehdi; Torkian, Ayoob; Hashemian, Seyed Jamalodin; Bakhshi, Bita

    2014-01-01

    One of the main factors affecting membrane fouling in MBRs is operational conditions. In this study the influence of aeration rate, filtration mode, and SRT on hollow fiber membrane fouling was investigated using a triple fouling layers perspective. The sludge microbial population distribution was also determined by PCR method. Through various applied operational scenarios the optimal conditions were: aeration rate of 15 LPM; relaxation mode with 40s duration and 8 min. interval; and SRT of 30 days. The similarity between SMP variations in triple fouling layers with its corresponding hydraulic resistance confirmed the effect of SMP on membrane fouling. Among three fouling fractions, the upper (rinsed) layer found to have the most effect on membrane fouling which implies the critical role of aeration, but as for multilateral effects of aeration, the optimal aeration rate should be determined more precisely. Relaxation interval was more effective than its duration for fouling control. SRT variations in addition to influencing the amount of SMP, also affect on the structure of these material. At longer SRTs (20, 30 days) a greater percentage of SMP could penetrate into the membrane pores and for shorter SRTs they accumulate more on membrane surface. Results showed that there is a very good correlation between total hydraulic resistance (Log R) and protein to carbohydrate ratio at the rinsed layer (P1/C1). Considering significant effects of aeration and SRT conditions on this ratio (according to data), it is very determinative to apply the optimal aeration and SRT conditions. PMID:25002969

  10. Recent operating experience with Flexicracking commercial developments in short contact time catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, P.K.; Bienstock, M.G.; Citarella, V.A.; Draemel, D.C. )

    1994-01-01

    Short contact time (SCT) catalytic cracking applications have been receiving high attention in recent years, with a large number of revamps of existing FCCU's as well as construction of new facilities. This paper will recap some of these developments and discuss the benefits demonstrated by the application of state-of-the-art riser termination, stripping, and feed injection technologies. Commercial projects demonstrating fast-track project execution, and confirming the outstanding improvements in yields and yield selectivities possible, will also be discussed.

  11. Hybrid membrane with TiO2 based bio-catalytic nanoparticle suspension system for the degradation of bisphenol-A.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingwei; Dong, Guangxi; Luu, Belinda; Sengpiel, Robert G; Ye, Yun; Wessling, Matthias; Chen, Vicki

    2014-10-01

    The removal of micropollutant in wastewater treatment has become a key environmental challenge for many industrialized countries. One approach is to use enzymes such as laccase for the degradation of micropollutants such as bisphenol-A. In this work, laccase was covalently immobilized on APTES modified TiO2 nanoparticles, and the effects of particle modification on the bio-catalytic performance were examined and optimized. These bio-catalytic particles were then suspended in a hybrid membrane reactor for BPA removal with good BPA degradation efficiency observed. Substantial improvement in laccase stability was achieved in the hybrid system compared with free laccase under simulated harsh industrial wastewater treatment conditions (such as a wide range of pH and presence of inhibitors). Kinetic study provided insight of the effect of immobilization on the bio-degradation reaction. PMID:25084046

  12. Modified by air plasma polymer tack membranes as drainage material for antiglaucomatous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantseva, T. V.; Kravets, L. I.; Elinson, V. M.

    2014-06-01

    The morphological and clinical studies of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by air plasma as drainage materials for antiglaucomatous operations were performed. It was demonstrated their compatibility with eye tissues. Moreover, it was shown that a new drainage has a good lasting hypotensive effect and can be used as operation for refractory glaucoma surgery.

  13. Operation of mixed conducting metal oxide membrane systems under transient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, Michael Francis

    2008-12-23

    Method of operating an oxygen-permeable mixed conducting membrane having an oxidant feed side, an oxidant feed surface, a permeate side, and a permeate surface, which method comprises controlling the differential strain between the permeate surface and the oxidant feed surface at a value below a selected maximum value by varying the oxygen partial pressure on either or both of the oxidant feed side and the permeate side of the membrane.

  14. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. PMID:26725083

  15. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12095.001 PMID:26725083

  16. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  17. Removals of pharmaceutical compounds from hospital wastewater in membrane bioreactor operated under short hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Prasertkulsak, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Itonaga, T; Yamamoto, K

    2016-05-01

    Pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was operated at a short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 h for the treatment of hospital wastewater. The removals of eleven pharmaceutical compounds in MBR operated at different mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) level were investigated during which nitrification degree was differed. The results experiments revealed the importance of immediate adsorption onto the colloidal particles in supernatant of MBR sludge and subsequently removed by membrane filtration for the recalcitrant pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, the removals through biodegradation during short HRT were also found significant for some compounds. DGGE profile revealed the development of pharmaceutical degrading microorganisms in MBR. PMID:26852096

  18. Calpain cleavage of the B isoform of Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase separates the catalytic domain from the membrane anchoring domain.

    PubMed Central

    Pattni, Krupa; Millard, Thomas H; Banting, George

    2003-01-01

    Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] is one of the key intracellular second messengers in cells and mobilizes Ca2+ stores in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). Ins(1,4,5)P3 has a short half-life within the cell, and is rapidly metabolized through one of two pathways, one of which involves further phosphorylation of the inositol ring: Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase (IP3-3K) phosphorylates Ins(1,4,5)P3, resulting in the formation of inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4]. There are three known isoforms of IP3-3K, designated IP3-3KA, IP3-3KB and IP3-3KC. These have differing N-termini, but highly conserved C-termini harbouring the catalytic domain. The three IP3-3K isoforms have different subcellular locations and the B-kinase is uniquely present in both cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. As it is the N-terminus of the B-kinase that differs most from the A- and C-kinases, we have hypothesized that this portion of the protein may be responsible for membrane localization. Although there are no known membrane-targeting protein motifs within the sequence of IP3-3KB, it is found to be tightly associated with the ER membrane. Here, we show that specific regions of the N-terminus of IP3-3KB are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane localization of the protein. We also report that, in the presence of Ca2+, the kinase domain of IP3-3KB is cleaved from the membrane-anchoring region by calpain. PMID:12906709

  19. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  20. Reverse osmosis filtration for space mission wastewater: membrane properties and operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a compact process that has potential for the removal of ionic and organic pollutants for recycling space mission wastewater. Seven candidate RO membranes were compared using a batch stirred cell to determine the membrane flux and the solute rejection for synthetic space mission wastewaters. Even though the urea molecule is larger than ions such as Na+, Cl-, and NH4+, the rejection of urea is lower. This indicates that the chemical interaction between solutes and the membrane is more important than the size exclusion effect. Low pressure reverse osmosis (LPRO) membranes appear to be most desirable because of their high permeate flux and rejection. Solute rejection is dependent on the shear rate, indicating the importance of concentration polarization. A simple transport model based on the solution-diffusion model incorporating concentration polarization is used to interpret the experimental results and predict rejection over a range of operating conditions. Grant numbers: NAG 9-1053.

  1. Flux-step method for the assessment of operational conditions in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Ezio; Goffredo, Vito; Campanella, Mariachiara; Falk, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    A flux-step method was used for monitoring the pressure variation in a solids separation membrane at different operating conditions. A submerged membrane bioreactor pilot plant, used during the short-term tests, was used to purify actual restaurant wastewater. The influence of membrane backwash and relaxation on the variation of pressure variation was also evaluated. In order to reduce the deposition of irreversible fouling, the authors modified the literature-supported filtration to backwash cycling with filtration and relaxation cycling. The trials maintained a constant filtration to relaxation ratio that was in line with optimal filtration to backwashing ratios found in the literature. The relaxation cycling between two constant flux-steps effectively counteracted membrane fouling and the excessive decrease in average pressure, and it results in a lower waste of energy and water than a backwashing strategy. PMID:27148724

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of water content across the Nafion membrane in an operational PEM fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Haijiang; Promislow, Keith; Balcom, Bruce J

    2008-08-01

    Water management is critical to optimize the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. At present, numerical models are employed to guide water management in such fuel cells. Accurate measurements of water content variation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are required to validate these models and to optimize fuel cell behavior. We report a direct water content measurement across the Nafion membrane in an operational polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, employing double half k-space spin echo single point imaging techniques. The MRI measurements with T2 mapping were undertaken with a parallel plate resonator to avoid the effects of RF screening. The parallel plate resonator employs the electrodes inherent to the fuel cell to create a resonant circuit at RF frequencies for MR excitation and detection, while still operating as a conventional fuel cell at DC. Three stages of fuel cell operation were investigated: activation, operation and dehydration. Each profile was acquired in 6 min, with 6 microm nominal resolution and a SNR of better than 15. PMID:18555714

  3. Upgrading naphtha in a multiple riser fluid catalytic cracking operation employing a catalyst mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, J.A.; Owen, H.; Schipper, P.H.

    1989-05-16

    A process is described for producing gasoline comprising contacting a hydrocarbon feed having an initial boiling-point of at least 400/sup 0/F., a 50% boiling of at least 500/sup 0/F. and an end boiling point of at least 600/sup 0/F., in a first riser, with a two component catalyst under fluid catalytic cracking conditions. At least one component of the catalyst is stripped in a stripping unit to remove entrained hydrocarbons, and regenerated wherein the two component catalyst comprises a first catalyst component selected from the group consisting of an amorphous cracking catalyst and a large pore cracking catalyst, whereby a product comprising olefins and naphtha is produced. Ethylene introduced together with the two component catalyst to a second riser, for contacting ethylene with a second catalyst component which is a shape selective medium pore crystalline silicate zeolite to produce products heavier than ethylene and to increase the temperature of the catalyst to an optimum temperature for upgrading naphtha; and naphtha is introduced to the second riser, down stream of the point of ethylene introduction, for contact with the catalyst at the optimum temperature and the naphtha is upgraded to gasoline product.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction operation with heavy fuel oil: NOx, NH3, and particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Kati; Vesala, Hannu; Koponen, Päivi; Korhonen, Satu

    2015-04-01

    To meet stringent NOx emission limits, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is increasingly utilized in ships, likely also in combination with low-priced higher sulfur level fuels. In this study, the performance of SCR was studied by utilizing NOx, NH3, and particle measurements. Urea decomposition was studied with ammonia and isocyanic acid measurements and was found to be more effective with heavy fuel oil (HFO) than with light fuel oil. This is suggested to be explained by the metals found in HFO contributing to metal oxide particles catalyzing the hydrolysis reaction prior to SCR. At the exhaust temperature of 340 °C NOx reduction was 85-90%, while at lower temperatures the efficiency decreased. By increasing the catalyst loading, the low temperature behavior of the SCR was enhanced. The drawback of this, however, was the tendency of particle emissions (sulfate) to increase at higher temperatures with higher loaded catalysts. The particle size distribution results showed high amounts of nanoparticles (in 25-30 nm size), the formation of which SCR either increased or decreased. The findings of this work provide a better understanding of the usage of SCR in combination with a higher sulfur level fuel and also of ship particle emissions, which are a growing concern. PMID:25780953

  5. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity

    PubMed Central

    Murashko, Oleg N.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane–protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E–membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1–499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (Kd) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the “large” domain (amino acids 1–400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5′-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E–membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  6. Enzymatic cleaning of biofouled thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operated in a biofilm membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohiuddin; Danielsen, Steffen; Johansen, Katja; Lorenz, Lindsey; Nelson, Sara; Camper, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Application of environmentally friendly enzymes to remove thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis (RO) membrane biofoulants without changing the physico-chemical properties of the RO surface is a challenging and new concept. Eight enzymes from Novozyme A/S were tested using a commercially available biofouling-resistant TFC polyamide RO membrane (BW30, FilmTech Corporation, Dow Chemical Co.) without filtration in a rotating disk reactor system operated for 58 days. At the end of the operation, the accumulated biofoulants on the TFC RO surfaces were treated with the three best enzymes, Subtilisin protease and lipase; dextranase; and polygalacturonase (PG) based enzymes, at neutral pH (~7) and doses of 50, 100, and 150 ppm. Contact times were 18 and 36 h. Live/dead staining, epifluorescence microscopy measurements, and 5 μm thick cryo-sections of enzyme and physically treated biofouled membranes revealed that Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzymes at 100 ppm and 18 h contact time were optimal for removing most of the cells and proteins from the RO surface. Culturable cells inside the biofilm declined by more than five logs even at the lower dose (50 ppm) and shorter incubation period (18 h). Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme cleaning at 100 ppm and for 18 h contact time restored the hydrophobicity of the TFC RO surface to its virgin condition while physical cleaning alone resulted in a 50° increase in hydrophobicity. Moreover, at this optimum working condition, the Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme treatment of biofouled RO surface also restored the surface roughness measured with atomic force microscopy and the mass percentage of the chemical compositions on the TFC surface estimated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to its virgin condition. This novel study will encourage the further development and application of enzymes to remove biofoulants on the RO surface without changing its surface properties. PMID:24329165

  7. Design and operating experiences of full-scale municipal membrane bioreactors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Itokawa, H; Tsuji, K; Yamashita, K; Hashimoto, T

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, membrane bioreactor (MBRs) have been installed in 17 small-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the past 8 years, together with two recently installed MBRs for larger-scale WWTPs. In this study, design and operating data were collected from 17 of them as part of a follow-up survey, and aspects including system design, biological treatment, membrane operation, problems and costs were overviewed. Because most of the MBRs were designed according to standardized guidance, system configuration of the plants was similar; pre-denitrification using the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process with membrane units submerged in aerobic tanks, following a fine screen and flow equalization tank. This led to effluent quality with biochemical oxygen demand and T-N of less than 3.5 and 7.4 mg/L, respectively, for nine plants on an annual average basis. It was a common practice in extremely under-loaded plants to operate the membrane systems intermittently. Frequency of recovery cleaning events was plant-specific, mostly ranging from 1 to 5 times/year. Cost evaluation revealed that specific construction costs for the small-scale MBRs were no more than for oxidation ditch plants. Although specific energy consumption values tended to be high in the under-loaded plants, the demonstration MBR, where several energy reducing measures had been incorporated, attained specific energy consumption of 0.39 kWh/m(3) under full-capacity operation. PMID:24622560

  8. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  9. Concentrated microalgae cultivation in treated sewage by membrane photobioreactor operated in batch flow mode.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Li, Chen; Wang, Yu-jie; Jin, Wei-hong; Deng, Yi-bing

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the microalgae biomass production and nutrients removal efficiency from treated sewage by newly developed membrane photobioreactor in which Chlorella vulgaris was cultured in batch flow mode. Its performance was compared with conventional photobioreactor. The results show that the volumetric microalgae productivity was 39.93 and 10.36 mg L(-1)d(-1) in membrane photobioreactor and conventional photobioreactor, respectively. The nutrients removal rate in membrane photobioreactor was 4.13 mg N L(-1)d(-1) and 0.43 mg P L(-1)d(-1), which was obviously higher than that in conventional photobioreactor (0.59 mg N L(-1)d(-1) and 0.08 mg P L(-1)d(-1)). The better performance of membrane photobioreactor was due to the submerged membrane module in the reactor which acted as a solid-liquid separator and thereby enabled the reactor to operate with higher supply flow rate of cultivation medium. Moreover, in the outflow stage of the membrane photobioreactor, the microalgae culture liquor in the reactor could be further concentrated. PMID:25006019

  10. Pressure retarded osmosis for energy production: membrane materials and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Choi, J-S; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a novel membrane process to produce energy. PRO has the potential to convert the osmotic pressure difference between fresh water (i.e. river water) and seawater to electricity. Moreover, it can recover energy from highly concentrated brine in seawater desalination. Nevertheless, relatively little research has been undertaken for fundamental understanding of the PRO process. In this study, the characteristics of the PRO process were examined using a proof-of-concept device. Forward osmosis (FO), reverse osmosis (RO), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were compared in terms of flux rate and concentration polarization ratio. The results indicated that the theoretical energy production by PRO depends on the membrane type as well as operating conditions (i.e. back pressure). The FO membrane had the highest energy efficiency while the NF membrane had the lowest efficiency. However, the energy production rate was low due to high internal concentration polarization (ICP) in the PRO membrane. This finding suggests that the control of the ICP is essential for practical application of PRO for energy production. PMID:22546793

  11. Membrane resistance and current distribution measurements under various operating conditions in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, D. J. L.; Atkins, S.; Brandon, N. P.; Vasileiadis, N.; Vesovic, V.; Kucernak, A. R.

    The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise their performance. Localised membrane resistance and current density measurements for a single channel polymer electrolyte fuel cell are presented for a range of operating conditions. The current density distribution results are compared with an analytical model that exhibited generally good agreement across a broad range of operating conditions. However, under conditions of high air flow rate, an increase in current is observed along the channel which is not predicted by the model. Under such circumstances, localised electrochemical impedance measurements show a decrease in membrane resistance along the channel. This phenomenon is attributed to drying of the electrolyte at the start of the channel and is more pronounced with increasing operating temperature. Under conditions of reactant depletion, an increase in electrolyte resistance with decreasing current is observed. This is due to the hydrating effect of product water and electro-osmotic drag through the membrane when ionic current is flowing. Localised conduction is shown to be an effective means of conditioning previously unused membrane electrode assemblies by forcing passage of ionic current through the electrolyte.

  12. The effect of intermittent operation on a wind-powered membrane system for brackish water desalination.

    PubMed

    Park, G L; Schäfer, A I; Richards, B S

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy powered membrane systems that are directly-connected must take account of both the inherent fluctuations and the intermittency of the energy resource. In order to determine the effect of intermittent operation, a membrane system was tested with variables of (i) amplitude from 60 to 300 W and (ii) length of time with no power from 0.5 to 3 min. This was performed over one hour periods with six on/off cycles to simulate the system operating under intermittent operation for short periods of time when directly-connected to a small wind turbine. The setup used a Filmtec BW30-4040 brackish water reverse osmosis membrane with feed waters of 2,750 mg/L and 5,500 mg/L NaCl. The results showed that the membrane system produced potable water under the majority of intermittency experiments performed. There was a relatively large increase in the average salt concentration of the permeate, especially when the system was off for shorter periods of time (0.5-1 min). Longer periods of no power (1-3 min) did not have as significant an effect on the average water quality. This is important when the need for energy buffering or short term storage is considered for these systems as it shows the potential for improving the overall flux and water quality using temporary energy storage. PMID:22339021

  13. Evaluation of ceramic and membrane diffusers under operating conditions with the dynamic offgas method.

    PubMed

    Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Schuchardt, A; Handschag, J; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2005-01-01

    The aeration systems of two full-scale, activated-sludge basins were compared during a period of three years, under the same operating conditions, using dynamic offgas testing. Only the material of the diffuser was different (membrane versus ceramic-tube diffusers). The investigation has shown that, although the membrane diffusers have higher initial standard-oxygen-transfer efficiency (alphaSOTE) and standard-aeration efficiency (alphaSAE), these decreased over time, while the alphaSAE of the ceramic diffusers started lower, but increased slightly over the whole period. A cost comparison makes clear how important it is to evaluate the aeration system under process conditions. The operating costs were the dominant factor (approximately 10x higher than capital costs), and operating costs were approximately 20% higher for membrane versus ceramic diffusers. The poor performance of the membrane-tube diffusers under process conditions could be explained on the basis of the actual alphaAE values in the basin, not the standardized values. PMID:16274078

  14. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate by catalytic wet air oxidation: Assessment of the role of operating parameters by factorial design

    SciTech Connect

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Landfill leachates can be treated effectively by catalytic wet oxidation. > Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of transition metals promotes degradation. > Factorial design evaluates the statistically significant operating conditions. > H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, reaction time and temperature are critical in determining performance. - Abstract: The wet air oxidation (WAO) of municipal landfill leachate catalyzed by cupric ions and promoted by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effect of operating conditions such as WAO treatment time (15-30 min), temperature (160-200 deg. C), Cu{sup 2+} concentration (250-750 mg L{sup -1}) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration (0-1500 mg L{sup -1}) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated by factorial design considering a two-stage, sequential process comprising the heating-up of the reactor and the actual WAO. The leachate, at an initial COD of 4920 mg L{sup -1}, was acidified to pH 3 leading to 31% COD decrease presumably due to the coagulation/precipitation of colloidal and other organic matter. During the 45 min long heating-up period of the WAO reactor under an inert atmosphere, COD removal values up to 35% (based on the initial COD value) were recorded as a result of the catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to reactive hydroxyl radicals. WAO at 2.5 MPa oxygen partial pressure advanced treatment further; for example, 22 min of oxidation at 200 deg. C, 250 mg L{sup -1} Cu{sup 2+} and 0-1500 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in an overall (i.e. including acidification and heating-up) COD reduction of 78%. Amongst the operating variables in question, temperature had the strongest influence on both the heating-up and WAO stages, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration strongly affected the former and reaction time the latter. Nonetheless, the effects of temperature and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were found to depend on the concentration levels of catalyst as suggested by the

  15. Recent Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas removal performance and operational lifetime of the gas trap have been affected by contamination in the ITCS coolant. However, the gas trap has performed flawlessly with regard to its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. This paper discusses on-orbit events over the course of the last year related to the performance and functioning of the gas trap.

  16. Influence of feedstock quality on operation of 1A/1M commercial catalytic cracking unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pryanikov, E.I.; Abdullaev, M.A.; Aleksanyan, A.P.; Guseinov, A.M.; Mkrtychev, A.A.; Rustamov, I.I.

    1983-03-01

    This article summarizes and correlates the results from the operation of the unit in 2-stage cracking, in which the fresh feed is cracked in the reactor with rising cocurrent flow of catalyst, and the bottom product from the distillation tower (cut distilling above 195/sup 0/C) is cracked in the reactor with rising semicocurrent flow of catalyst. The presence of heavy aromatic hydrocarbons in the feed has a significant effect on the yields of naphtha and stabilizer heat cut. With increasing amounts of the light cuts in the feed, the yield of desired products and the conversion level decreased.

  17. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  18. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  19. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  20. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  1. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  2. Intermittent operation of low pressure UF membranes for sewage reuse at household level.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Vasileios I; Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos; Melidis, Paraschos; Ntougias, Spyridon; Aivasidis, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A household-scale wastewater treatment system was operated with domestic sewage. The system could recover gardening/irrigation water from raw sewage or secondary effluent by low pressure ultrafiltration (UF). The UF membranes (surface area = 3.5 m(2), pore size = 0.04 μm) were operated at constant transmembrane pressure (0.13 bar). The proposed technology was examined for approximately 2 months without membrane cleaning. Membrane operation was performed periodically (one or two times per week), simulating water usage for gardening irrigation. During raw sewage filtration (chemical oxygen demand (COD) total = 242 ± 71 mg L(-1), COD soluble = 105 ± 51 mg L(-1), suspended solids = 188 ± 58 mg L(-1)), low permeate COD was achieved (52 ± 25 mg L(-1)), whereas nitrogen and phosphorus were recovered in the permeate. The water recovered during 1 h of operation displayed a gradual decrease from 42 to 22 L m(-2)h(-1) during the 50-d time period. For the secondary effluent filtration, the UF module achieved consistently a recovery rate of 39.6 ± 8.0 L m(-2)h(-1), with an average permeate COD of 37 mg L(-1). In this case, the fouling layer (cake layer) was completely reversible after the relaxation period, rendering the process suitable for unattended household applications. PMID:23985509

  3. Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the NCG. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped NCG to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The purpose of the gas trap is to prevent gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump, and the current gas trap has performed flawlessly in this regard. However, because of actual operational conditions on-orbit, its gas removal performance and operational lifetime have been affected. This paper discusses experiences with several of these dual- membrane gas traps, including on-orbit gas venting rate, effects due to the presence of nickel in the ITCS coolant, and subsequent refurbishing to remove the nickel from the gas trap.

  4. Durability of Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) in PEM Fuel Cells Operated on Pure Hydrogen and Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanic, Vesna; Braun, James; Hoberecht, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy sources that have the potential to replace alkaline fuel cells for space programs. Broad power ranges, high peak-to-nominal power capabilities, low maintenance costs, and the promise of increased life are the major advantages of PEM technology in comparison to alkaline technology. The probability of PEM fuel cells replacing alkaline fuel cells for space applications will increase if the promise of increased life is verified by achieving a minimum of 10,000 hours of operating life. Durability plays an important role in the process of evaluation and selection of MEAs for Teledyne s Phase I contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center entitled Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel cell (PEMFC) Power Plant Technology Development for 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). For this contract, MEAs that are typically used for H2/air operation were selected as potential candidates for H2/O2 PEM fuel cells because their catalysts have properties suitable for O2 operation. They were purchased from several well-established MEA manufacturers who are world leaders in the manufacturing of diverse products and have committed extensive resources in an attempt to develop and fully commercialize MEA technology. A total of twelve MEAs used in H2/air operation were initially identified from these manufacturers. Based on the manufacturers specifications, nine of these were selected for evaluation. Since 10,000 hours is almost equivalent to 14 months, it was not possible to perform continuous testing with each MEA selected during Phase I of the contract. Because of the lack of time, a screening test on each MEA was performed for 400 hours under accelerated test conditions. The major criterion for an MEA pass or fail of the screening test was the gas crossover rate. If the gas crossover rate was higher than the membrane intrinsic permeability after 400 hours of testing, it was considered that the MEA had failed the test. Three types of

  5. Fast and quantitative measurement of benzene, toluene and C 2-benzenes in automotive exhaust during transient engine operation with and without catalytic exhaust gas treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeb, Norbert V.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Bach, Christian

    Time-Resolved Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) has been used to investigate the emission profiles of benzene, toluene and the C 2-benzenes (xylenes and ethyl benzene) in automotive exhaust during transient engine operation. On-line emission measurements with a frequency of 1-5 Hz clearly identified the critical driving conditions that are mainly responsible for the overall aromatic hydrocarbon emissions. The passenger car, equipped with a catalytic converter showed significant BTXE-emissions only in the first part of the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) due to sub-optimal catalyst temperature. On the same car without a catalytic converter, emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were detected over the entire test run and the benzene-toluene mixing ratios of the exhaust gas were rather constant. With catalytic exhaust gas treatment the observed benzene-toluene mixing ratios varied to a greater extent reflecting predominantly different catalytic converter conditions. The average molar ratio of benzene over toluene rose from 0.33 to 0.53 upon exhaust gas treatment. With catalytic converter the emissions during extra urban (EUDC) driving repeatedly showed benzene-toluene mixing ratios >1 and an average molar benzene/toluene ratio of 0.74 was detected during the EUDC part of the driving cycle. Whereas the total hydrocarbon (T.HC) emissions were decreased by 83% upon exhaust gas treatment the overall reduction of the benzene emissions was only 70%.

  6. CO{sub 2} Capture by Sub-ambient Membrane Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.; Hasse, D.; Sanders, E.; Chaubey, T.

    2012-11-30

    The main objective of the project was to develop a CO{sub 2} capture process based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The program aims to reach the eventual DOE program goal of > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from existing PC fired power plants with < 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project involves closed-loop testing of commercial fiber bundles under simulated process conditions to test the mechanical integrity and operability of membrane module structural component under sub ambient temperature. A commercial MEDAL 12” bundle exhibited excellent mechanical integrity for 2 months. However, selectivity was ~25% lower than expected at sub-ambient conditions. This could be attributed to a small feed to permeate leak or bundle non-ideality. To investigate further, and due to compressor flow limitations, the 12” bundle was replaced with a 6” bundle to conduct tests with lower permeate/feed ratios, as originally planned. The commercial 6” bundle was used for both parametric testing as well as long-term stability testing at sub-ambient conditions. Parametric studies were carried out both near the start and end of the long-term test. The parametric studies characterized membrane performance over a broad range of feed conditions: temperature (-25°C to -45°C), pressure (160 psig to 200 psig), and CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18% to 12%). Performance of the membrane bundle was markedly better at lower temperature (-45ºC), higher pressure (200 psig) and higher CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18%). The long-term test was conducted at these experimentally determined “optimum” feed conditions. Membrane performance was stable over 8 months at sub-ambient temperature operation. The experimentally measured high performance of the membrane bundle at sub-ambient operating conditions provides justification for interest in sub-ambient membrane processing of flue gas. In a parallel activity, the impact of contaminants (100 ppm SOx and NOx

  7. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  8. Investigation of high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjemian, Kevork Tro

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have garnered much attention in the media over the past years as they can provide a clean, environmentally friendly alternative to internal combustion engines. PEMFCs also have the flexibility to operate on many different types of fuels, thereby diminishing our reliance on foreign oil. PEMFCs, however, suffer from many drawbacks which need to be overcome before mass production becomes viable. One drawback is the expense of the fuel cell system, costing several times more than existing technologies. Another problem is that if the fuel cell is running on reformed fuels, trace amounts of carbon monoxide (10 ppm) in the hydrogen gas stream will completely poison the anode electrocatalyst, killing the PEMFC. Also, as a lot of waste heat is generated, a very elaborate cooling system needs to be used, making the overall system more expensive and complex. A possible solution to both the carbon monoxide poisoning and thermal management of a PEMFC is to elevate its operating temperature above 100°C. Unfortunately, current state-of-the-art electrolytes used in PEMFCs, i.e. Nafion 115, rely on water for the conduction of protons and by elevating the temperature, water loss occurs due to evaporation resulting in inadequate PEMFC performance. This thesis delves into the modification of Nafion and similar electrolytes to permit PEMFC operation above 100°C. This was accomplished by impregnating the pores of the Nafion with hydrophilic inorganic materials-silicon oxide via sol-gel processing and various inorganic particles. By performing these modifications to the various electrolytes, several composite membranes performed exceptionally well at an operating temperature of 130°C and demonstrated carbon monoxide tolerance of up to 500 ppm. In addition, a theory on how these materials help improve the water management characteristics of Nafion was developed, laying the foundation for the development of a completely novel membrane to

  9. R&D on an Ultra-Thin Composite Membrane for High-Temperature Operation in PEMFC. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.-Y.

    2003-10-06

    FuelCell Energy developed a novel high-temperature proton exchange membrane for PEM fuel cells for building applications. The laboratory PEM fuel cell successfully operated at 100-400{supdegree}C and low relative humidity to improve CO tolerance, mitigate water and thermal management challenges, and reduce membrane cost. The developed high-temperature membrane has successfully completed 500h 120C endurance testing.

  10. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  11. Nonlinear dynamics analysis of a membrane Stirling engine: Starting and stable operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, Fabien

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the work devoted to the study of the operation of a miniaturized membrane Stirling engine. Indeed, such an engine relies on the dynamic coupling of the motion of two membranes to achieve a prime mover Stirling thermodynamic cycle. The modelling of the system introduces the large vibration amplitudes of the membrane as well as the nonlinear dissipative effects associated to the fluid flow within the engine. The nonlinearities are expressed as polynomial functions with quadratic and cubic terms. This paper displays the stability analysis to predict the starting of the engine and the instability problem which leads to the steady-state behaviour. The centre manifold-normal form theory is used to obtain the simplest expression for the limit cycle amplitudes. The approach allows the reduction of the number of equations of the original system in order to obtain a simplified system, without loosing the dynamics of the original system as well as the contributions of nonlinear terms. The model intends to be used as a semi-analytical design tool for the optimization of miniaturized Stirling machines from the starting to the steady operation.

  12. Numerical simulation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at high operating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jie; Lee, Seung Jae

    A three-dimensional, single-phase, non-isothermal numerical model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell at high operating temperature (T ≥ 393 K) was developed and implemented into a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for convective and diffusive transport and allows predicting the concentration of species. The heat generated from electrochemical reactions, entropic heat and ohmic heat arising from the electrolyte ionic resistance were considered. The heat transport model was coupled with the electrochemical and mass transport models. The product water was assumed to be vaporous and treated as ideal gas. Water transportation across the membrane was ignored because of its low water electro-osmosis drag force in the polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The results show that the thermal effects strongly affect the fuel cell performance. The current density increases with the increasing of operating temperature. In addition, numerical prediction reveals that the width and distribution of gas channel and current collector land area are key optimization parameters for the cell performance improvement.

  13. Changed membrane integration and catalytic site conformation are two mechanisms behind the increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer-linked mutations.

    PubMed

    Wanngren, Johanna; Lara, Patricia; Ojemalm, Karin; Maioli, Silvia; Moradi, Nasim; Chen, Lu; Tjernberg, Lars O; Lundkvist, Johan; Nilsson, IngMarie; Karlström, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme complex γ-secretase generates amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), a 37-43-residue peptide associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1), the catalytical subunit of γ-secretase, result in familial AD (FAD). A unifying theme among FAD mutations is an alteration in the ratio Aβ species produced (the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio), but the molecular mechanisms responsible remain elusive. In this report we have studied the impact of several different PS1 FAD mutations on the integration of selected PS1 transmembrane domains and on PS1 active site conformation, and whether any effects translate to a particular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing phenotype. Most mutations studied caused an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, but via different mechanisms. The mutations that caused a particular large increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio did also display an impaired APP intracellular domain (AICD) formation and a lower total Aβ production. Interestingly, seven mutations close to the catalytic site caused a severely impaired integration of proximal transmembrane/hydrophobic sequences into the membrane. This structural defect did not correlate to a particular APP processing phenotype. Six selected FAD mutations, all of which exhibited different APP processing profiles and impact on PS1 transmembrane domain integration, were found to display an altered active site conformation. Combined, our data suggest that FAD mutations affect the PS1 structure and active site differently, resulting in several complex APP processing phenotypes, where the most aggressive mutations in terms of increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio are associated with a decrease in total γ-secretase activity. PMID:24918054

  14. Membrane reactor for water detritiation: a parametric study on operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarade, J.; Liger, K.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study done on a single stage finger-type packed-bed membrane reactor (PBMR) used for heavy water vapor de-deuteration. Parametric studies have been done on 3 operating parameters which are: the membrane temperature, the total feed flow rate and the feed composition through D{sub 2}O content variations. Thanks to mass spectrometer analysis of streams leaving the PBMR, speciation of deuterated species was achieved. Measurement of the amounts of each molecular component allowed the calculation of reaction quotient at the packed-bed outlet. While temperature variation mainly influences permeation efficiency, feed flow rate perturbation reveals dependence of conversion and permeation properties to contact time between catalyst and reacting mixture. The study shows that isotopic exchange reactions occurring on the catalyst particles surface are not thermodynamically balanced. Moreover, the variation of the heavy water content in the feed exhibits competition between permeation and conversion kinetics.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hideaki; Decaneto, Elena; Grossman, Moran; Havenith, Martina; Sagi, Irit; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Knipp, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) belongs to the large family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases termed MMPs that are located in the extracellular matrix. MT1-MMP was crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitating agent. Data sets for MT1-MMP were collected to 2.24 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.99, c = 122.60 Å. The crystal contained one molecule per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.90 Å3 Da−1; the solvent content is estimated to be 57.6%. PMID:24637763

  16. Directed evolution of Tau class glutathione transferases reveals a site that regulates catalytic efficiency and masks co-operativity.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irine; Muleta, Abdi W; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Kotzia, Georgia; Maltezos, Anastasios; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2016-03-01

    A library of Tau class GSTs (glutathione transferases) was constructed by DNA shuffling using the DNA encoding the Glycine max GSTs GmGSTU2-2, GmGSTU4-4 and GmGSTU10-10. The parental GSTs are >88% identical at the sequence level; however, their specificity varies towards different substrates. The DNA library contained chimaeric structures of alternated segments of the parental sequences and point mutations. Chimaeric GST sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activities towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and the herbicide fluorodifen (4-nitrophenyl α,α,α-trifluoro-2-nitro-p-tolyl ether) were determined. A chimaeric clone (Sh14) with enhanced CDNB- and fluorodifen-detoxifying activities, and unusual co-operative kinetics towards CDNB and fluorodifen, but not towards GSH, was identified. The structure of Sh14 was determined at 1.75 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione. Analysis of the Sh14 structure showed that a W114C point mutation is responsible for the altered kinetic properties. This was confirmed by the kinetic properties of the Sh14 C114W mutant. It is suggested that the replacement of the bulky tryptophan residue by a smaller amino acid (cysteine) results in conformational changes of the active-site cavity, leading to enhanced catalytic activity of Sh14. Moreover, the structural changes allow the strengthening of the two salt bridges between Glu(66) and Lys(104) at the dimer interface that triggers an allosteric effect and the communication between the hydrophobic sites. PMID:26637269

  17. Advanced treatment of municipal wastewater by nanofiltration: Operational optimization and membrane fouling analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Jianxing; Liu, Jibao; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue

    2016-05-01

    Municipal sewage from an oxidation ditch was treated for reuse by nanofiltration (NF) in this study. The NF performance was optimized, and its fouling characteristics after different operational durations (i.e., 48 and 169hr) were analyzed to investigate the applicability of nanofiltration for water reuse. The optimum performance was achieved when transmembrane pressure=12bar, pH=4 and flow rate=8L/min using a GE membrane. The permeate water quality could satisfy the requirements of water reclamation for different uses and local standards for water reuse in Beijing. Flux decline in the fouling experiments could be divided into a rapid flux decline and a quasi-steady state. The boundary flux theory was used to predict the evolution of permeate flux. The expected operational duration based on the 169-hr experiment was 392.6hr which is 175% longer than that of the 48-hr one. High molecular weight (MW) protein-like substances were suggested to be the dominant foulants after an extended period based on the MW distribution and the fluorescence characteristics. The analyses of infrared spectra and extracellular polymeric substances revealed that the roles of both humic- and polysaccharide-like substances were diminished, while that of protein-like substances were strengthened in the contribution of membrane fouling with time prolonged. Inorganic salts were found to have marginally influence on membrane fouling. Additionally, alkali washing was more efficient at removing organic foulants in the long term, and a combination of water flushing and alkali washing was appropriate for NF fouling control in municipal sewage treatment. PMID:27155415

  18. Chimaeras reveal the role of the catalytic core in the activation of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump.

    PubMed

    Ba-Thein, W; Caride, A J; Enyedi, A; Pászty, K; Croy, C L; Filoteo, A G; Penniston, J T

    2001-05-15

    Isoform 2b of the plasma membrane calcium pump differs from the ubiquitous isoform 4b in the following: (a) higher basal activity in the absence of calmodulin; (b) higher affinity for calmodulin; and (c) higher affinity for Ca(2+) in the presence of calmodulin [Elwess, Filoteo, Enyedi and Penniston (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 17981-17986]. To investigate which parts of the molecule determine these kinetic differences, we made four chimaeric constructs in which portions of isoform 2b were grafted into isoform 4b: chimaera I contains only the C-terminal regulatory region of isoform 2b; chimaera II contains the N-terminal moiety of isoform 2b, including both cytoplasmic loops; chimaera III contains the sequence of isoform 2b starting from the N-terminus to after the end of the first (small) cytoplasmic loop; and chimaera IV contains only the second (large) cytoplasmic loop. Surprisingly, chimaera I showed low basal activity in the absence of calmodulin and low affinity for calmodulin, unlike isoform 2b. In contrast, the chimaera containing both loops showed high basal activity, and Ca(2+) activation curves (both in the absence and in the presence of calmodulin) similar to those of isoform 2b. The rates of activation by calmodulin and of inactivation by calmodulin removal were measured, and the apparent K(d) for calmodulin was calculated from the ratio between these rate constants. The order of affinity was: 2b=II>4b=IV>III=I. From these results it is clear that the construct that most closely resembles isoform 2b is chimaera II. This shows that, in order to obtain an enzyme with properties similar to those of isoform 2b, both cytoplasmic loops are needed. PMID:11336657

  19. Operational experience and evaluation of a dual-element stretched-membrane heliostat

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.W.; Van Der Geest, J.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-element, stretched-membrane central receiver heliostat was designed and manufactured in 1989, by a private US company engaged in the development of commercial central receiver solar technology. The two-module collector, with a collection area of 97.5 m{sup 2}, extends stretched-membrane mirror technology on several fronts with face-down stow capability and a digital controller that integrates tracking and focusing control on a single programmable control board. The solar collector was installed at Sandia`s National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico and evaluated over a three-and-a-half year period which ended in September 1993. The measured performance and the operational and maintenance characteristics of this commercial prototype are the subject of this report. The results of beam quality measurements, tracking repeatability tests, measurements of beam movement in elevated winds, performance tests of the focusing system, and all-day beam quality and tracking tests are presented, and the authors offer a detailed discussion of the knowledge gained through operation and maintenance and of the improvements made or suggested to the heliostat`s design.

  20. Effect of filtration flux on the development and operation of a dynamic membrane for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mubashir; Alibardi, Luca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Cossu, Raffaello; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic membrane represents a cost effective alternative to conventional membranes by employing fouling as a means of solid-liquid separation. This study evaluated the effects of initial flux on both development rate of dynamic membrane and bioreactor performance during two consecutive experiments. The dynamic membrane was developed over a 200 μm mesh and the reactor was operated under anaerobic conditions. It was found that the effect of an initial higher applied flux on dynamic membrane development was more pronounced than mixed liquor suspended solid concentration inside the bioreactor. The development of the dynamic membrane was therefore positively associated with the applied flux. The rapid development of the dynamic membrane during the second experimental run at high initial fluxes and lower MLSS concentrations also affected the performance of the bioreactor in terms of more efficient COD removal and biogas production. A major shortcoming of applying higher initial applied flux was the formation of a denser and robust dynamic membrane layer that was resistant to applied hydraulic shear to control desired permeability and thus represented an obstacle in maintaining a long term operation with sustainable flux at lower transmembrane pressure (TMP). PMID:27280854

  1. The effect of porous support composition and operating parameters on the performance of supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y. )

    1992-03-01

    Supported liquid membranes (SLMs) of varying porous support compositions and structures were studied for the transport of metal ions. A microporous polybenzimidazole support was synthesized and prepared in the form of an SLM. This SLM, containing the selective extractant di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid, was evaluated for the transport of copper and neodymium. Metal ion transport reaches near completion in less than 3 h, whereas Celgard-polypropylene and Nucleopore-polycarbonate reaches only 50% completion even after 15 h. The transport driving force for acidic extractants is a pH gradient between the feed and strip solutions. Polybenzimidazole, an acid-and radiation-resistant polymer, has two protonatable tertiary nitrogens per repeat unit that may help sustain the pH driving force. Another factor may be the ability of the polybenzimidazole to hydrogen bond with the extractant. Transport through the flat-sheet SLMs was tested by using a unique cell design. Countercurrent flow of the feed and strip solutions was established through machined channels in half-cell face plates that are in a spiral, mirror-image pattern with respect to each other, with the flat-sheet SLM interposed between the two channeled solutions. Advantages comprised in the design of the two clamped half-cells (tangential entry, zero primary pressure, zero pressure differential, controlled flow regimes, no sharp turns, and channeled flow) give operating parameters that will not physically dislodge the liquid membrane from the porous support; consequently, the lifetime of the support is increased. Permeability coefficients remained unchanged after a month of daily use versus 20 to 100% declines for membranes in other cell configurations.

  2. Pre-steady-state kinetic study of the effects of K+ on the partial reactions of the catalytic cycle of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Herscher, C J; Rega, A F; Adamo, H P

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 100 mM K+ on the partial reactions that take place during ATP hydrolysis on the calcium ion-dependent ATPase from plasma membrane (PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase) were studied at 37 degrees C on fragmented intact membranes from pig red cells by means of a rapid chemical quenching technique. At 10 microM [gamma-32P]ATP plus non-limiting concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of formation by 140% to 84 11 s-1 and the steady-state level of phosphoenzyme (EP) by 25% to 3.4 0.17 pmol/mg of protein. If added together with [gamma-32P]ATP at the beginning of phosphorylation, K+ was much less effective than if added earlier, indicating that it did not act on the phosphorylation reaction. Measurements of the E2 --> E1 transition by phosphorylation showed that in medium with Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of the transition by 55% to 14 3 s-1 and the apparent concentration of E1 by 45%, suggesting that this may be the cause of the increased rate of phosphorylation observed in enzyme preincubated with K+. The presence of K+ did not change the slow decay of EP without Mg2+ but activated the decay of EP made with Mg2+, increasing its k(app) by 60% to 91 12 s-1. In contrast with observations made during phosphorylation, if added at the beginning of dephosphorylation K+ was fully effective in favouring decomposition of EP made in medium containing no K+. In the presence of either 3mM ATP or 3 mM ATP plus calmodulin, which activate hydrolysis of CaE2P, the effect of K+ on dephosphorylation was conserved. Because the sites for K+ are intracellular and the concentration of K+ in normal red cells is above 100 mM, the effects described here must be taken into account to describe the catalytic cycle of the PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase under physiological conditions. PMID:8615846

  3. Restrained expression, a method to overproduce toxic membrane proteins by exploiting operator-repressor interactions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anoop; Ridilla, Marc; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2011-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step in determining structures of membrane proteins is heterologous protein production. Toxicity often associated with rapid overexpression results in reduced biomass along with low yields of target protein. Mitigation of toxic effects was achieved using a method we call "restrained expression," a controlled reduction in the frequency of transcription initiation by exploiting the infrequent transitions of Lac repressor to a free state from its complex with the lac-operator site within a T7lac promoter that occur in the absence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. In addition, production of the T7 RNA polymerase that drives transcription of the target is limited using the tightly regulated arabinose promoter in Escherichia coli strain BL21-AI. Using this approach, we can achieve a 200-fold range of green fluorescent protein expression levels. Application to members of a family of ion pumps results in 5- to 25-fold increases in expression over the benchmark BL21(DE3) host strain. A viral ion channel highly toxic to E. coli can also be overexpressed. In comparative analyses, restrained expression outperforms commonly used E. coli expression strategies. The mechanism underlying improved target protein yield arises from minimization of protein aggregation and proteolysis that reduce membrane integrity and cell viability. This study establishes a method to overexpress toxic proteins. PMID:21031485

  4. The effect of porous support composition and operating parameters on the performance of supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1991-02-01

    Factors, such as porous support composition and operating parameters, that influence the performance of supported liquid membranes (SLMs) were investigated. SLMs of varying porous support compositions and structures were studied for the transport of metal ions. A microporous polybenzimidazole support was synthesized and prepared in the form of an SLM. This SLM containing the selective extractant di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid was evaluated for the transport of copper and neodymium. Dramatically improved performance over that of commercially available membranes was found in tests for removing the metal ions from solution. Metal ion transport reaches near completion in less than 3 hours, whereas Celgard-polypropylene and Nuclepore-polycarbonate reaches only 50% completion even after 15 hours. The transport driving force for acidic extractants is a pH gradient between the feed and strip solutions. Polybenzimidazole, an acid- and radiation-resistant polymer, has two protonatable tertiary nitrogens per repeat unit that may help sustain the pH driving force. Another factor may be the ability of the polybenzimidazole to hydrogen bond with the extractant. Transport through the flat-sheet SLMs were tested using a unique cell design. Countercurrent flow of the feed and strip solutions was established through machined channels in half-cell faceplates that are in a spiral, mirror-image pattern with respect to each other, with the flat-sheet SLM interposed between the two channeled solutions. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Fate of proteins and carbohydrates in membrane bioreactor operated at high sludge age.

    PubMed

    Hocaoglu, Selda Murat; Orhon, Derin

    2010-01-01

    The paper evaluated the fate of proteins and carbohydrates in the course of substrate removal by membrane bioreactor (MBR), which was used for the biological treatment of black and grey water components of a controlled decentralized residential area. The MBRs were operated at a high sludge age of 60 days to better observe the magnitude of soluble residual products. Both groups were detected in the raw wastewater and represented 15% of the soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) content for black water and 9% for grey water. Corresponding ratios in the process effluent were significantly increased to 70% and 24% respectively, indicating that both proteins and carbohydrates were likely to be generated as residual soluble microbial products. Residual soluble organics accumulated in the reactor at much higher levels as compared to the effluent due to cake filtration occurring on the surface of the membrane, entrapping fractions larger than 4-8 nm for proteins, and around 14 nm for carbohydrates. Mass balance showed that proteins and carbohydrates accumulated in the reactor were partially removed due to longer retention and possible acclimation of the biomass. The observed removal rate was much lower for carbohydrates compared with proteins. PMID:20560086

  6. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube electrodes for high current density operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Shigeaki; Imanishi, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Shigeki; Namba, Ryoichi

    2014-05-01

    We successfully developed cathode electrodes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) that enable operation at high current densities by incorporating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the catalyst support; additionally, we prepared 236 cm2 membrane electrodes assemblies (MEAs) for vehicular use. The electrode structure improved the mass transport of reactants, i.e. oxygen, proton, electron and water, in systems performing at a 2.6 A cm-2 current density and 0.6 V with extremely low platinum (Pt) loading at the cathode (0.1 mg cm-2). The improved mass transport caused the 70 mV dec-1 Tafel slope to continue up to 1.0 A cm-2. The mass transport was improved because the pores were continuous, the catalyst support materials did not agglomerate and the catalyst layer made good electrical contact with the microporous layer. Utilizing wavy coil-shaped CNTs was also crucial. These CNTs displayed anti-agglomerative characteristics during the wet manufacturing process and maintained a continuous pore structure framing the layered catalyst structure. Because the CNTs had elastic characteristics, they might fill the space between catalyst and microporous layers to prevent flooding. However, the compressed CNTs in the cells were no longer vertically aligned. Therefore, vertically aligning the nanotubes was important during the MEA manufacturing process but was irrelevant for cell performance.

  7. Dual-Phase Oxygen Transport Membranes for Stable Operation in Environments Containing Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Balaguer, María; Serra, José M

    2015-12-21

    Dual-phase membranes are appealing candidates for oxygen transport membranes owing to their unique combination of ambipolar electron-ion transport and endurance. However, O2 separation in industrial environments demands very high stability and effectiveness in the presence of CO2- and SO2-bearing process gases. Here, the composition of dual-phase membranes based on NiFe2O4-Ce(0.8) Tb(0.2)O(2-δ) (NFO-CTO) was optimized and the effective performance of catalytically-activated membranes was assessed in presence of CO2 and SO2. Further insight into the limiting mechanisms in the permeation was gained through electrical conductivity studies, permeation testing in several conditions and impedance spectroscopy analysis. The dual-phase membranes were prepared by one-pot sol-gel method and their permeability increases with increasing fluorite content. An O2 flux of 0.25 (ml min(-1)  cm(-2)) mm at 1000 °C was obtained for a thick self-standing membrane with 40:60 NFO/CTO composition. An in-depth study mimicking typical harsh conditions encountered in oxyfuel flue gases was performed on a 50:50 NFO/CTO membrane. CO2 content as well as SO2 presence in the sweep gas stream were evaluated in terms of O2 permeation. O2 fluxes of 0.13 and 0.09 mL min(-1)  cm(-2) at 850 °C were obtained for a 0.59 mm thick membrane under CO2 and 250 ppm SO2 in CO2 sweep conditions, respectively. Extended periods at work under CO2- and SO2-containing atmospheres revealed good permeation stability over time. Additionally, XRD, backscattered electrons detector (BSD)-SEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the spent membrane confirmed material stability upon prolonged exposure to SO2. PMID:26586419

  8. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that catalytic oxidation is an effective technique for the removal of trace organic contaminants in a multifiltration potable processor's effluent. Essential elements of this technology are devices that deliver oxygen to the influent, and remove gaseous reaction byproducts from the effluent, via hollow-tube, gas-permeable membranes. Iodine, which poisons existing catalysis, is removed by a small deiodination bed prior to catalytic reactor entrance. The catalyst used is a mixture of Pt and Ru deposited on carbon, operating at 125-160 C and 39-90 psi pressures.

  9. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications. PMID:24623577

  10. Membrane-mirror-based autostereoscopic display for tele-operation and teleprescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Stuart; Mair, Gordon M.; Mason, Steven; Revie, Kenneth

    2000-05-01

    An autostereoscopic display for telepresence and tele- operation applications has been developed at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. The research is a collaborative effort between the Imaging Group and the Transparent Telepresence Research Group, both based at Strathclyde. A key component of the display is the directional screen; a 1.2-m diameter Stretchable Membrane Mirror is currently used. This patented technology enables large diameter, small f No., mirrors to be produced at a fraction of the cost of conventional optics. Another key element of the present system is an anthropomorphic and anthropometric stereo camera sensor platform. Thus, in addition to mirror development, research areas include sensor platform design focused on sight, hearing, research areas include sensor platform design focused on sight, hearing, and smell, telecommunications, display systems for all visual, aural and other senses, tele-operation, and augmented reality. The sensor platform is located at the remote site and transmits live video to the home location. Applications for this technology are as diverse as they are numerous, ranging from bomb disposal and other hazardous environment applications to tele-conferencing, sales, education and entertainment.

  11. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units. PMID:21252428

  12. Catalytic hydropyrolysis of microalgae: influence of operating variables on the formation and composition of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhoufan; Duan, Peigao; Xu, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic hydropyrolysis of microalgae has been studied by using a batch reactor. Nine different heterogenous catalysts of Pd/C, Pt/C, Ru/C, Rh/C, CoMo/γ-Al2O3, Mo2C, MoS2, and activated carbon were screened. Mo2C was identified as the most suitable catalyst. With Mo2C catalyst, influence of reaction conditions on the yield and properties of the hydropyrolysis oil (HPO) was examined. Temperature was the most influential factor affecting the yield and quality of the HPO. Higher temperature will produce HPO with higher C and H content and lower N and O content but at the cost of lowering the yield of HPO. Mo2C promoted the in situ deoxygenation and desulfurization of the HPO which has a HHVs varying between 35.3 and 39.3 MJ/kg. The highest energy recovery of 87.5% was achieved. Thus, this work shows that the catalytic hydropyrolysis is an effective way to produce high quality bio-oil from microalgae. PMID:25160747

  13. Continuous operation of membrane capacitive deionization cells assembled with dissimilar potential of zero charge electrode pairs.

    PubMed

    Omosebi, Ayokunle; Gao, Xin; Rentschler, Jeffery; Landon, James; Liu, Kunlei

    2015-05-15

    The performance of single stack membrane assisted capacitive deionization cells configured with pristine and nitric acid oxidized Zorflex (ZX) electrode pairs was evaluated. The potentials of zero charge for the pristine and oxidized electrodes were respectively -0.2V and 0.2V vs. SCE. Four cell combinations of the electrodes including a pristine anode-pristine cathode, oxidized anode-pristine cathode, pristine anode-oxidized cathode, and oxidized anode-oxidized cathode were investigated. When the PZC was located within the polarization window of the electrode, diminished performance was observed. The cells were operated at 1.2 V and based on potential distribution results, the effective working potentials were ∼0.9, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.1 V for the pristine anode-pristine cathode, oxidized anode-pristine cathode, pristine anode-oxidized cathode, and oxidized anode-oxidized cathode cells, respectively. The highest electrosorption capacity of 17 mg NaCl/g ZX was observed for the pristine anode-oxidized cathode cell, where both PZCs were outside of the polarization window. PMID:25432447

  14. Alternate anoxic/aerobic operation for nitrogen removal in a membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, G; Andreottola, G

    2011-01-01

    A large pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a conventional denitrification/nitrification scheme for municipal wastewater treatment has been run for one year under two different aeration strategies in the oxidation/nitrification compartment. During the first five months air supply was provided according to the dissolved-oxygen set-point and the system run as a conventional predenitrification MBR; then, an intermittent aeration strategy based on effluent ammonia nitrogen was adopted in the aerobic compartment in order to assess the impact on process performances in terms of N and P removal, energy consumption and sludge reduction. The experimental inferences show a significant improvement of the effluent quality as COD and total nitrogen, both due to a better utilization of the denitrification potential which is a function of the available electron donor (biodegradable COD) and electron acceptor (nitric nitrogen); particularly, nitrogen removal increased from 67% to 75%. At the same time, a more effective biological phosphorus removal was observed as a consequence of better selection of denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (dPAO). The longer duration of anoxic phases also reflected in a lower excess sludge production (12% decrease) compared with the standard pre-denitrification operation and in a decrease of energy consumption for oxygen supply (about 50%). PMID:22335118

  15. Linking operation parameters and environmental variables to population dynamics of Mycolata in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Maza-Márquez, P; Gómez-Silván, C; Gómez, M A; González-López, J; Martínez-Toledo, M V; Rodelas, B

    2015-03-01

    The community structure and population dynamics of Mycolata were monitored in a full-scale membrane bioreactor during four experimental phases under changing operating and environmental conditions, by means of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis of partial 16S-rRNA genes amplified from community DNA and RNA templates (total and active populations). Non-metric multidimensional scaling and BIO-ENV analyses demonstrated that population dynamics were mostly explained (30-32%) by changes in the input of nutrients in the influent water and the accumulation of biomass in the bioreactors, while the influence of hydraulic and solid retention times, temperature and F/M ratio was minor. Significant correlations were observed between particular Mycolata phylotypes and one or more variables, contributing information for the prediction of their abundance and activity under changing conditions. Fingerprinting and multivariate analyses demonstrated that two foaming episodes, recorded at temperatures <20°C, were connected to the increase of the relative abundance of Mycolata unrelated to Gordonia amarae. PMID:25621724

  16. Operative findings of conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane and normal temporal bone computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hyung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent technological advances in diagnostic methods including imaging technology, it is often difficult to establish a preoperative diagnosis of conductive hearing loss (CHL) in patients with an intact tympanic membrane (TM). Especially, in patients with a normal temporal bone computed tomography (TBCT), preoperative diagnosis is more difficult. We investigated middle ear disorders encountered in patients with CHL involving an intact TM and normal TBCT. We also analyzed the surgical results with special reference to the pathology. We reviewed the medical records of 365 patients with intact TM, who underwent exploratory tympanotomy for CHL. Fifty nine patients (67 ears, eight bilateral surgeries) had a normal preoperative TBCT findings reported by neuro-radiologists. Demographic data, otologic history, TM findings, preoperative imaging findings, intraoperative findings, and pre- and postoperative audiologic data were obtained and analyzed. Exploration was performed most frequently in the second and fifth decades. The most common postoperative diagnosis was stapedial fixation with non-progressive hearing loss. The most commonly performed hearing-restoring procedure was stapedotomy with piston wire prosthesis insertion. Various types of hearing-restoring procedures during exploration resulted in effective hearing improvement, especially with better outcome in the ossicular chain fixation group. In patients with CHL who have intact TM and normal TBCT, we should consider an exploratory tympanotomy for exact diagnosis and hearing improvement. Information of the common operative findings from this study may help in preoperative counseling. PMID:23744181

  17. A flexible all-inorganic fuel cell membrane with conductivity above Nafion, and durable operation at 150 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Y.; Tucker, T. G.; Huang, W.; Klein, I. S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Yarger, J. L.; Angell, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    The search for fuel cell membranes has focused on carbon backbone polymers, among which Nafion seems to best survive the most severe of the degradation mechanisms - attack by peroxide radicals. Less attention has been given to inorganic membranes because of their generally inflexible nature and lower conductivity, though some SiO2-Nafion composites have shown improved properties. Nafion dominates, despite needing hydration, which then restricts operation to below 100 °C (so CO poisoning problems persist). Described herein is a low cost, flexible, and all-inorganic fiberglass reinforced gel membrane with conductivity exceeding that of Nafion at any temperature above 60 °C. Using Teflon fuel cells, maximum currents > 1 Acm-2 and OCV of 1.03 V at 150 °C are demonstrated. No detectable loss of cell potential was observed over 24 h during 50 mAcm-2 constant current operation at 120 °C while, at 150 °C and maximum power, the degradation rate is intermediate among other high conductivity H3PO4-PBI type membranes. The structure of the membrane is deduced, mainly from 29Si solid state-NMR. The -115 ppm resonance, which is extreme for Q4 Si(O) structures, identifies a zeolite-like SiO2 network, which is "floppy". 31P and 1H NMR establish nano-permeating H3PO4 as the source of the exceptional conductivity.

  18. Biofouling and pollutant removal during long-term operation of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Robledo, M; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2010-01-01

    Two different sludge retention times (SRTs) were tested in order to assess the impact on membrane fouling and effluent quality in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Two up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors (1 l volume) coupled to external tubular ultrafiltration membranes (filtration area = 81 cm(2)) were operated at a hydraulic retention time of 3 h and two different SRTs (100 and 60 days). The transmembrane pressure (TMP), flux (J) and relevant parameters to assess water quality were measured. Effluents from UASB reactors were filtered for 500 h without intermediate cleaning. The permeate met Mexican standards for wastewater reclamation in both tested conditions. Abrupt and periodical changes in the TMP and J were noticed during the experimental period. A fouling layer collapse and compression hypothesis was set forth in order to explain these changes. An autopsy performed on biofouled membranes indicated that deposited mass was mainly composed of volatile solids (85%) and the rest related to mineral matter, with the presence of inorganic salts containing Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Si. Biomass in the fouling layer was estimated at 0.27% based on the DNA/biomass ratio for the bacterial biofilm. No clear difference in membrane fouling was detected under the two SRTs applied to the systems. However, when operated over 500 h, repetitive sudden TMP and flux changes occurred later in system A (SRT of 100 days) than in system B (SRT of 60 days) suggesting a stronger fouling layer structure in the former. PMID:20390553

  19. Stable closure of the cytoplasmic half-channel is required for efficient proton transport at physiological membrane potentials in the bacteriorhodopsin catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Oppawsky, Christoph; Duan, Yong; Tittor, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Facciotti, Marc T

    2014-04-15

    The bacteriorhodopsin (BR) Asp96Gly/Phe171Cys/Phe219Leu triple mutant has been shown to translocate protons 66% as efficiently as the wild-type protein. Light-dependent ATP synthesis in haloarchaeal cells expressing the triple mutant is 85% that of the wild-type BR expressing cells. Therefore, the functional activity of BR seems to be largely preserved in the triple mutant despite the observations that its ground-state structure resembles that of the wild-type M state (i.e., the so-called cytoplasmically open state) and that the mutant shows no significant structural changes during its photocycle, in sharp contrast to what occurs in the wild-type protein in which a large structural opening and closing occurs on the cytoplasmic side. To resolve the contradiction between the apparent functional robustness of the triple mutant and the presumed importance of the opening and closing that occurs in the wild-type protein, we conducted additional experiments to compare the behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins under different operational loads. Specifically, we characterized the ability of the two proteins to generate light-driven proton currents against a range of membrane potentials. The wild-type protein showed maximal conductance between -150 and -50 mV, whereas the mutant showed maximal conductance at membrane potentials >+50 mV. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the triple mutant were also conducted to characterize structural changes in the protein and in solvent accessibility that might help to functionally contextualize the current-voltage data. These simulations revealed that the cytoplasmic half-channel of the triple mutant is constitutively open and dynamically exchanges water with the bulk. Collectively, the data and simulations help to explain why this mutant BR does not mediate photosynthetic growth of haloarchaeal cells, and they suggest that the structural closing observed in the wild-type protein likely plays a key role in minimizing substrate

  20. Stable Closure of the Cytoplasmic Half-Channel Is Required for Efficient Proton Transport at Physiological Membrane Potentials in the Bacteriorhodopsin Catalytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin (BR) Asp96Gly/Phe171Cys/Phe219Leu triple mutant has been shown to translocate protons 66% as efficiently as the wild-type protein. Light-dependent ATP synthesis in haloarchaeal cells expressing the triple mutant is 85% that of the wild-type BR expressing cells. Therefore, the functional activity of BR seems to be largely preserved in the triple mutant despite the observations that its ground-state structure resembles that of the wild-type M state (i.e., the so-called cytoplasmically open state) and that the mutant shows no significant structural changes during its photocycle, in sharp contrast to what occurs in the wild-type protein in which a large structural opening and closing occurs on the cytoplasmic side. To resolve the contradiction between the apparent functional robustness of the triple mutant and the presumed importance of the opening and closing that occurs in the wild-type protein, we conducted additional experiments to compare the behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins under different operational loads. Specifically, we characterized the ability of the two proteins to generate light-driven proton currents against a range of membrane potentials. The wild-type protein showed maximal conductance between −150 and −50 mV, whereas the mutant showed maximal conductance at membrane potentials >+50 mV. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the triple mutant were also conducted to characterize structural changes in the protein and in solvent accessibility that might help to functionally contextualize the current–voltage data. These simulations revealed that the cytoplasmic half-channel of the triple mutant is constitutively open and dynamically exchanges water with the bulk. Collectively, the data and simulations help to explain why this mutant BR does not mediate photosynthetic growth of haloarchaeal cells, and they suggest that the structural closing observed in the wild-type protein likely plays a key role in minimizing

  1. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control device . . . You shall meet this operating limit during initial catalyst depressuring and purging... catalyst purging conditions that must be met prior to allowing uncontrolled purge releases....

  2. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control device . . . You shall meet this operating limit during initial catalyst depressuring and purging... catalyst purging conditions that must be met prior to allowing uncontrolled purge releases....

  3. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  4. 40 CFR Table 23 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emission Limitations for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 23 Table 23 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP... alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber must not fall below the limit...

  5. A comparison of low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systems for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Preiß, G.; Gores, F.; Griebenow, M.; Heitmann, S.

    2016-08-01

    Multifunctional fuel cell systems are competitive solutions aboard future generations of civil aircraft concerning energy consumption, environmental issues, and safety reasons. The present study compares low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with respect to performance and efficiency criteria. This is motivated by the challenge of pressure-dependent fuel cell operation aboard aircraft with cabin pressure varying with operating altitude. Experimental investigations of low-pressure fuel cell operation use model-based design of experiments and are complemented by numerical investigations concerning supercharged fuel cell operation. It is demonstrated that a low-pressure operation is feasible with the fuel cell device under test, but that its range of stable operation changes between both operating modes. Including an external compressor, it can be shown that the power demand for supercharging the fuel cell is about the same as the loss in power output of the fuel cell due to low-pressure operation. Furthermore, the supercharged fuel cell operation appears to be more sensitive with respect to variations in the considered independent operating parameters load requirement, cathode stoichiometric ratio, and cooling temperature. The results indicate that a pressure-dependent self-humidification control might be able to exploit the potential of low-pressure fuel cell operation for aircraft applications to the best advantage.

  6. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION COMPONENT AND SYSTEM PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop the components required for catalytic combustion system operation and evaluation. The systems investigated (firetube boiler, watertube boiler, and gas turbine), when integrated with the catalytic combustor, have potential for both ...

  7. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for carbon monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 Continuous emission monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR...

  8. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for carbon monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 Continuous emission monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR...

  9. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for carbon monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 Continuous emission monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR...

  10. In situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes for the production of lactic acid: operational compatibility and uniformity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaoming; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Tongwen

    2012-12-01

    An in situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes was customized for the production of lactic acid to achieve their operational compatibility and uniformity. Primarily, fermentation experiments for lactic acid production were conducted by Lactobacillus plantarum with an average lactate productivity of 1.76 g/(Lh) and yield coefficient of 56.77%. Subsequently, an electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBMs) stack was established with the fermented lactate mixtures as a feed. Effect of operating current density on the production of lactic acid and alkali liquor was investigated. Results indicated that only the current density of no less than 50 mA/cm(2) can produce enough alkali liquor to meet the need for fermentation. Ultimately, a combination of fermentation and EDBM process was carried out and the integration can achieve a lactic acid recovery ratio of 86.05% at the current density 60 mA/cm(2). PMID:23026329

  11. A method for the modulation of membrane fluidity: homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of phospholipids and phospholipids and phospholipid-water model biomembranes.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D; Quinn, P J

    1976-01-01

    The fatty acids associated with phospholipids of cell membranes, and particularly their degree of unsaturation, contribute to the fluidity of their structure and hance determine many of their biological properties. We describe a technique for modulating membrane fluidity which consists of hydrogenating the unsaturated double bonds of membrane phospholipids. This has been accomplished using a homogeneous catalyst. The process has been applied to phospholipids in organic solvents, to phospholipids dispersed as multibilayers in aqueous systems, and also to sonicated preparations of phospholipids arranged as single bilayer vesicles. Preliminary experiments have also been performed with biological membranes. These results indicate that the process of homogeneous catalysis for the modulation of lipid fluidity of biological cell membranes may have considerable future biological and biochemical application. PMID:1069280

  12. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  13. Effect of operation parameters on the flux stabilization of gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system for decentralized water supply.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaobin; Ding, An; Qu, Fangshu; Jia, Ruibao; Chang, Haiqing; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Bin; Li, Guibai; Liang, Heng

    2016-08-01

    A pilot-scale gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration system under low gravitational pressure without any pre-treatment, backwash, flushing, or chemical cleaning was carried out to investigate the effect of operation parameters (including operation pressure, aeration mode, and intermittent filtration) on the effluent quality and permeability development. The results revealed that GDM system exhibited an efficient performance for the removal of suspended substances and organic compounds. The stabilization of flux occurred and the average values of stable flux were 6.6, 8.1, and 8.6 Lm(-2) h(-1) for pressures of 65, 120, and 200 mbar, respectively. In contrast, flux stabilization was not observed under continuous and intermittent aeration conditions. However, aeration (especially continuous aeration) was effective to improve flux and alleviate membrane fouling during 1-month operation. Moreover, intermittent filtration would influence the stabilization of permeate flux, resulting in a higher stable flux (ranging from 6 to 13 Lm(-2) h(-1)). The stable flux significantly improved with the increase of intermittent period. Additionally, GDM systems exhibited an efficient recovery of flux after simple physical cleaning and the analyses of resistance reversibility demonstrated that most of the total resistance was hydraulic reversible resistance (50-75 %). Therefore, it is expected that the results of this study can develop strategies to increase membrane permeability and reduce energy consumption in GDM systems for decentralized water supply. PMID:27189452

  14. Model-based analysis of the effect of different operating conditions on fouling mechanisms in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sabia, Gianpaolo; Ferraris, Marco; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a model-based evaluation of the effect of different operating conditions with and without pre-denitrification treatment and applying three different solids retention times on the fouling mechanisms involved in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). A total of 11 fouling models obtained from literature were used to fit the transmembrane pressure variations measured in a pilot-scale MBR treating real wastewater for more than 1 year. The results showed that all the models represent reasonable descriptions of the fouling processes in the MBR tested. The model-based analysis confirmed that membrane fouling started by pore blocking (complete blocking model) and by a reduction of the pore diameter (standard blocking) while cake filtration became the dominant fouling mechanism over long-term operation. However, the different fouling mechanisms occurred almost simultaneously making it rather difficult to identify each one. The membrane "history" (i.e. age, lifespan, etc.) seems the most important factor affecting the fouling mechanism more than the applied operating conditions. Nonlinear regression of the most complex models (combined models) evaluated in this study sometimes demonstrated unreliable parameter estimates suggesting that the four basic fouling models (complete, standard, intermediate blocking and cake filtration) contain enough details to represent a reasonable description of the main fouling processes occurring in MBRs. PMID:26377972

  15. Characterization of dual-electrode CMUTs: demonstration of improved receive performance and pulse echo operation with dynamic membrane shaping.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Rasim O; Balantekin, Mujdat; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-10-01

    A 1-D dual-electrode CMUT array for intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) with a center frequency of 8 MHz has been designed, fabricated, and used to demonstrate the potential of dual-electrode CMUTs. Using a dual-electrode CMUT, 9 dB higher receive signal level is obtained over the 6 dB fractional bandwidth as compared with a conventional CMUT with an identical center electrode biased close to its collapse voltage. Because the same device shows a 7.4 dB increase in maximum pressure output, 16.4 dB overall improvement in transduction performance has been achieved as compared with conventional CMUT. A net peak output pressure of 1.6 MPa on the dual-electrode CMUT membrane with tone burst excitation at 12 MHz is also reported. The frequency response of the dual-electrode CMUT is similar to that of a conventional CMUT with the same membrane geometry with about 15% increase in the center frequency. Monostatic operation of dual-electrode CMUTs shows that the high performance of the transducer is applicable in typical pulse-echo imaging mode of operation. With dynamic shaping of the CMUT membrane to optimize the transmit-and-receive modes of operation separately during each pulse-echo cycle, dual-electrode CMUT is a highly competitive alternative to its piezoelectric counterparts. PMID:18986882

  16. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring exhaust gas flow rate in 40 CFR 63.1573(a) of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air... to part 60. (ii) The owner or operator shall conduct performance evaluations of each CO2, O2 and CO... part 60, including quarterly accuracy determinations for CO2 and CO monitors, annual...

  17. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring exhaust gas flow rate in 40 CFR 63.1573(a) of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air... to part 60. (ii) The owner or operator shall conduct performance evaluations of each CO2, O2 and CO... part 60, including quarterly accuracy determinations for CO2 and CO monitors, annual...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity... PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. a. Continuous opacity monitoring...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity... PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. a. Continuous opacity monitoring...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... this operating limit . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity... PM in 40 CFR 60.102. Continuous opacity monitoring system. Not applicable Not applicable. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102. a. Continuous opacity monitoring...

  1. Nonoperative Damage Control: The Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Traumatic Bronchial Avulsion as a Bridge to Definitive Operation.

    PubMed

    Schmoekel, Nathan H; O'Connor, James V; Scalea, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    The conventional treatment for an avulsed bronchus is emergent thoracotomy and repair or lobectomy. The principles of damage control thoracic operations include initial hemorrhage control with delayed definite repair after physiologic resuscitation. We report a multiply injured patient with avulsion of the left lower lobe bronchus. Profound acidosis, hypercarbia, and hypoxia precluded an emergent operation, and venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO) was used for organ support during physiologic resuscitation. After the achievement of physiologic repletion, a thoracotomy and lobectomy were performed while the patient was supported by V-V ECMO. PMID:27211954

  2. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  3. The installation and operation of a production scale membrane filtration system to treat and reuse waste water from a dyehouse

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A.

    1997-11-01

    The waste water from the dyeing of cotton and poly-cotton blends is characterized by high levels of salts and color. The discharged salts are felt to contribute to effluent toxicity and the color is aesthetically unacceptable in the receiving streams. The system of selective membrane filtration offers a method to address both of these problems. By treating only the waste water having the most color and salt concentration, the expensive membrane equipment can be considerably downsized. The volume of the color to be removed is drastically reduced as filtrate material. At these low volumes of color more economical means of removal can be employed. The membranes are designed so that the color and other pollutant materials are rejected but the salt solution is allowed to pass through the membrane. This produces clean water containing the recovered salt suitable for reuse, greatly reducing the salt content of the effluent. After the successful completion of a small pilot scale system, the installation and operation of a production sized system was desired prior to the full incorporation of this technology.

  4. Design and characterization of a modular membrane protein anchor to functionalize the moss Physcomitrella patens with extracellular catalytic and/or binding activities.

    PubMed

    Morath, Volker; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Albrecht, Florian; Polte, Ingmar; Ciccone, Rosario Adriano; Funke, Louise Friederike; Reichart, Leonie; Wolf, Christopher Guy; Brunner, Andreas-David; Fischer, Katrin; Schneider, Philipp Constantin; Brüggenthies, Johanna Barbara; Fröhlich, Fabian; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Skerra, Arne

    2014-12-19

    Heterologous enzymes and binding proteins were secreted by the moss Physcomitrella patens or anchored extracellularly on its cell membrane in order to functionalize the apoplast as a biochemical reaction compartment. This modular membrane anchoring system utilizes the signal peptide and the transmembrane segment of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK), which were identified in a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the P. patens genome. By fusing the soluble enzyme NanoLuc luciferase to the signal peptide, its secretion capability was confirmed in vivo. The membrane localization of hybrid proteins comprising the SERK signal peptide, NanoLuc or other functional modules, the SERK transmembrane anchor, and a C-terminal GFP reporter was demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy as well as site-specific proteolytic release of the extracellular enzyme domain. Our membrane anchoring system enables the expression of various functional proteins in the apoplast of P. patens, empowering this photoautotrophic organism for biotechnological applications. PMID:25524107

  5. Influence of membrane structure on the operating current densities of non-aqueous redox flow batteries: Organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Hee; Kim, Yekyung; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Maurya, Sandip; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2015-11-01

    We develop three types of organic-inorganic composite membranes based on a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN) to explore the effects of membrane structure on the possible operating current densities of a non-aqueous redox flow battery (RFB) system. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF) is selected as a supporting polymer matrix for improving the chemical and thermal stability of the organic-inorganic composite membranes. We also introduce silica nanoparticles (5 wt% of PVdF) into the membranes to ensure the low crossover of active species. The fabrication of SIPN through the addition of glycidyl methacrylate, 4-vinylpyridine, or N-vinylcarbazole enables control of the membrane structure. Depending on monomer type, the membrane structure is determined to be either aliphatic or aromatic in terms of chemical properties and either dense or porous in terms of physical properties. These chemical and physical structures affect the electrochemical properties that correspond to charge/discharge performance and to the range of possible operating current densities. An important requirement is to examine charge/discharge performance at the possible range of operating current densities by using various membrane structures. This requirement is discussed in relation to a proposed design strategy for non-aqueous RFB membranes.

  6. Zeolite membrane cascade for tritium extraction and recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, O.; Demange, D.; Lefebvre, X.; Kind, M.

    2015-03-15

    Membrane separation by zeolite membranes has been proposed as a pre-concentration stage for the tritium extraction from the purge helium of the breeding blanket combined with a final recovery by the catalytic membrane reactor PERMCAT. This fully continuous operation improves the tritium management in fusion machines, minimizing the tritium inventory. For the first time, the permeation measurements for H{sub 2} - He mixtures through a MFI-alumina hollow fibre membrane has been measured for different compositions (0.1 - 20% H{sub 2}) and temperatures. Such a highly permeable membrane, although it shows a limited selectivity, appears attractive for tritium recovery in the blanket. This will imply its operation in a membrane cascade, for which simulation work is ongoing. Mathematically the process is modeled using mass balance equations that can be transformed into the matrix form and solved iteratively assuming a permeate concentration on the first step of iteration, until the separation requirements are fulfilled.

  7. Assemblies of protective anion exchange membrane on air electrode for its efficient operation in aqueous alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline metal-air batteries represent promising energy storage devices when supplied with atmospheric air. However, under this condition, the air electrode shows a very short life time (i.e. 50 h of operation in 5 M LiOH at -10 mA cm-2), mainly due to the precipitation of carbonates inside the electrode porosity. The air electrode can then be protected by an anion exchange membrane on the electrolyte side. In this paper, we demonstrate that the efficiency of this protective membrane depends on the assembly method on the electrode. When a modified poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) network is synthesized directly on the electrode, the polymer seeps inside the electrode porosity, and a suitable interface inducing negligible additional polarization in comparison with classical pressure-assembled membranes is obtained. This protected electrode shows improved stability of up to 160 h of operation in 5 M LiOH. This performance is improved to 350 h by adjusting the conductivity and the ionic exchange capacity. Finally, the interest of interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture compared to a single network is confirmed. Indeed, an electrode protected with a PECH/poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) IPN is stable for 650 h in 5 M LiOH. In addition, degradation process becomes reversible since the assembly can be regenerated, which is not possible for the bare electrode.

  8. Thermal properties of lateral-current-injection semiconductor membrane Fabry-Perot laser under continuous-wave operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratani, Takuo; Doi, Kyohei; Lee, Jieun; Inoue, Daisuke; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2015-04-01

    For the realization of on-chip optical interconnects, light sources enabling ultralow power consumption and high-efficiency operation are required. With this aim, we fabricated lateral-current-injection-type membrane Fabry-Perot lasers with a threshold current of 3.5 mA and an external differential quantum efficiency of 11% under a room temperature-continuous wave (RT-CW) condition. To the best of our knowledge, we experimentally evaluated the thermal properties of a membrane laser for the first time. From the measurement, we obtained a thermal resistance of 330 K/W, which well agreed with the theoretical value of 340 K/W. From the theoretical analysis, it was found that a reduction of the benzocyclobutene thickness was effective for reducing the thermal resistance of the membrane laser. Finally, we determined that the increase in thermal resistance for short cavity (less than 50 µm) devices is not a problem because self-heating is small for low operation current.

  9. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. PMID:23810998

  10. Dry gas operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with parallel channels: Non-porous versus porous plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litster, Shawn; Santiago, Juan G.

    We present a study of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with parallel channel flow fields for the cathode, dry inlet gases, and ambient pressure at the outlets. The study compares the performance of two designs: a standard, non-porous graphite cathode plate design and a porous hydrophilic carbon plate version. The experimental study of the non-porous plate is a control case and highlights the significant challenges of operation with dry gases and non-porous, parallel channel cathodes. These challenges include significant transients in power density and severe performance loss due to flooding and electrolyte dry-out. Our experimental study shows that the porous plate yields significant improvements in performance and robustness of operation. We hypothesize that the porous plate distributes water throughout the cell area by capillary action; including pumping water upstream to normally dry inlet regions. The porous plate reduces membrane resistance and air pressure drop. Further, IR-free polarization curves confirm operation free of flooding. With an air stoichiometric ratio of 1.3, we obtain a maximum power density of 0.40 W cm -2, which is 3.5 times greater than that achieved with the non-porous plate at the same operating condition.

  11. A large-signal model for CMUT arrays with arbitrary membrane geometry operating in non-collapsed mode.

    PubMed

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A large-signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For modeling of linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using commercial software. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array. The force-to-array-displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the time-domain transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high- and low-aspect-ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall software model is verified by comparison to transient 3-D finite element analysis and experimental results for different large drive signals, and an example for a phased array simulation is given. PMID:24158297

  12. A Large Signal Model for CMUT Arrays with Arbitrary Membrane Geometries Operating in Non-Collapsed Mode

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    A large signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using Simulink. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array, respectively. The force to array displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the transient transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large signal drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high and low aspect ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall Simulink model is verified by comparison to transient 3D FEA and experimental results for different large drive signals; and an example for a phased array simulation is given. PMID:24158297

  13. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  14. Favorable effect of in-situ generated platinum in the membrane on fuel cell membrane durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, Natalia; Wong, Ka Hung; Watson, Mark; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-12-01

    The overall lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is often determined by the membrane durability. Platinum, which may dissolve from the catalyst layers during fuel cell operation and deposit in the membrane, has been shown to have both positive and negative effects on membrane stability. In the present work, we analyze what specific conditions are required in order to reach a favorable, membrane stabilizing effect with the controlled use of platinum in the membrane. Using accelerated membrane durability testing, field operated membrane samples, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that a high platinum concentration with specific particle shapes and sizes is essential for enhanced membrane stability. Specifically, star shaped and dendritic particles with high particle density and high surface area are shown to be preferable. These particles contain high levels of Pt(111) and are expected to have high catalytic activity toward peroxide quenching and crossover gas consumption, thereby mitigating chemical membrane degradation. On the other hand, small, dispersed cubic particles are found to have no effect or the opposite, negative effect on membrane stability.

  15. Mesoporous catalysts, supports and catalytic membranes based on MCM-41. Final report for the period January 15,2000 - January 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Gary L.

    2001-07-01

    The research had two objectives: to understand the effect of pore size on the chemistry and activity of active sites, and to investigate both the pore size and anchoring effect of Me-MCM-41 on Pt clusters (where Me is a metal incorporated in silica-based MCM-41). The focus is not on the effect of pore size on transport of reactants and products, but on how the local radius of curvature might affect the properties of a foreign ion embedded in a silicon wall that acts as a catalytic site or anchor for the catalytic site. The mesoporous molecular sieve, MCM-41, allows the variation of pore size with constant composition and pore geometry so these new materials allow this scientific question to be addressed for the first time. For the anchoring effect, concentration was on Sn-MCM-41 to prepare Pt/Sn-MCM-41 catalysts, by characterizing these and by testing them with probe reforming reactions (dehydrogenation, isomerization and aromatization). Although this is a final report on activity January 15, 2000 - January 14, 2001, this was a continuation of work initiated in the three-year grant period January 15, 1997 - January 14, 2000, so the summary of progress for these three years is appended for completeness.

  16. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  17. Association with the Plasma Membrane Is Sufficient for Potentiating Catalytic Activity of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins of the R7 Subfamily.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Brian S; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-25

    Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) promote deactivation of heterotrimeric G proteins thus controlling the magnitude and kinetics of responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the nervous system, RGS7 and RGS9-2 play essential role in vision, reward processing, and movement control. Both RGS7 and RGS9-2 belong to the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins that form macromolecular complexes with R7-binding protein (R7BP). R7BP targets RGS proteins to the plasma membrane and augments their GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity, ultimately accelerating deactivation of G protein signaling. However, it remains unclear if R7BP serves exclusively as a membrane anchoring subunit or further modulates RGS proteins to increase their GAP activity. To directly answer this question, we utilized a rapidly reversible chemically induced protein dimerization system that enabled us to control RGS localization independent from R7BP in living cells. To monitor kinetics of Gα deactivation, we coupled this strategy with measuring changes in the GAP activity by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay in a cellular system containing μ-opioid receptor. This approach was used to correlate changes in RGS localization and activity in the presence or absence of R7BP. Strikingly, we observed that RGS activity is augmented by membrane recruitment, in an orientation independent manner with no additional contributions provided by R7BP. These findings argue that the association of R7 RGS proteins with the membrane environment provides a major direct contribution to modulation of their GAP activity. PMID:26811338

  18. Carbogenic molecular sieves for reaction and separation by design: A novel approach to shape selective super base, super acid and catalytic membranes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Henry C.

    2002-03-18

    This report details the findings of three years of research plus one year of a no-cost extension. Primary results are the work with supported nanoporous carbon membranes for separation and reaction as well as with cesium-nanoporous carbon catalysts. The work resulted in 17 plus 2 papers (2 are in progress) and partial or full support for five Ph.D. students. Two patents were filed based on this research.

  19. Research on degradation product and reaction kinetics of membrane electro-bioreactor (MEBR) with catalytic electrodes for high concentration phenol wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Huanping; Wang, Hui; Liu, Botan; Li, Chunqing

    2016-07-01

    The membrane electro-bioreactor (MEBR) is a novel technology, it treats wastewater by combining membrane filtration, electrokinetic phenomena, and biological processes in one reactor. This paper aims to deal with hard biodegradation and high concentration phenol wastewater. Investigating the influence factors such as initial concentration, voltage, pH value, temperature and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) toward phenol degradation process in electrocatalytic process and membrane bioreactor (MBR), and then apply the optimum conditions in the MEBR system. Results of continuous flow experiments demonstrated that MEBR increased the quality of the treated wastewater than conventional MBR. The above technics followed the zero-order reaction kinetics. The removal efficiency of MEBR was about 11.1% higher for phenol than the sum of the two individual processes. With the help of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), this qualitative analysis looks at the degradation products of phenol generated in MEBR, through which 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone was confirmed as the main degradation product. PMID:27108366

  20. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Hector M; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop K; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  1. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Hector M.; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop k.; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  2. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  3. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  4. Correlation between the phospholipids domains of the target cell membrane and the extent of Naja kaouthia PLA(2)-induced membrane damage: evidence of distinct catalytic and cytotoxic sites in PLA(2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2007-02-01

    Two phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzymes (NK-PLA(2)-A and NK-PLA(2)-B) were purified from the venom of the monocled cobra Naja kaouthia. The molecular weights of NK-PLA(2)-A and NK-PLA(2)-B, as estimated by mass spectrometry, were 13,619 and 13,303 Da respectively. Both phospholipases were highly thermostable, had maximum catalytic activity at basic pH, and showed preferential hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. Intravenous injection of either PLA(2) up to a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight was non-toxic to mice and did not show neurotoxic symptoms. The N. kaouthia PLA(2)s displayed anticoagulant and cytotoxic activity, but poor hemolytic activity. Both the PLA(2)s were more toxic to Sf9 and Tn cells compared to VERO cells. NK-PLA(2) exhibited selective lysis of wild-type baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells compared to normal cells. Amino acid modification studies and heating experiments suggest that separate sites in the NK-PLA(2) molecules are responsible for their catalytic, anticoagulant and cytotoxic activities. PMID:17127009

  5. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  6. Degradation analysis and modeling of reinforced catalyst coated membranes operated under OCV conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumit; Fowler, Michael W.; Simon, Leonardo C.; Abouatallah, Rami; Beydokhti, Natasha

    This paper studies the degradation of Gore™ PRIMEA ® series 5510 catalyst coated membranes with an ePTFE reinforcement layer under open circuit voltage conditions at 90 °C, 75% RH, and no backpressure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of cross-sections revealed extensive cathode-side ionomer degradation and the presence of a platinum band. Cumulative fluoride release measurements show more fluoride exiting with the cathode effluent. Furthermore, both anode and cathode cumulative fluoride release plateau after long degradation times. Open circuit voltage was also monitored and the degradation rate was found to decrease after a long duration. It is proposed that all fluoride species are generated from the cathode-side ionomer degradation process and that the fluoride then diffuses to the anode and cathode channels. Further, once the cathode-side ionomer is consumed the degradation reaction slows as the "degradation front" passes through the inert reinforcement layer. This process was modeled using a semi-empirical transient model and compared to experimental results.

  7. Effects of operating conditions on durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell Pt cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyagi, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Toshihiko; Iseki, Yohei; Sasaki, Tatsuyoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    In this study, we investigated the effects of humidity and oxygen reduction on the degradation of the catalyst of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in a voltage cycling test. To elucidate the effect of humidity on the voltage cycling corrosion of a carbon-supported Pt catalyst with 3 nm Pt particles, voltage cycling tests based on 10,000 cycles were conducted using 100% relative humidity (RH) hydrogen as anode gas and nitrogen of varying humidities as cathode gas. The degradation rate of an electrochemical surface area (ECSA) was almost 50% under 189% RH nitrogen atmosphere and the Pt average particle diameter after 10,000 cycles under these conditions was about 2.3 times that of a particle of fresh catalyst because of the agglomeration of Pt particles. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that facilitated Pt catalyst agglomeration when oxygen was employed as the cathode gas also demonstrated that Pt agglomeration was prominent in higher concentrations of oxygen. The ECSA degradation figure in 100% RH oxygen was similar to that in 189% RH nitrogen. It was concluded that liquid water, which was dropped under a supersaturated condition or generated by ORR, accelerated Pt agglomeration. In this paper, we suggest that the Pt agglomeration degradation occurs in a flooding area in a cell plane.

  8. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  9. Interlinkages between bacterial populations dynamics and the operational parameters in a moving bed membrane bioreactor treating urban sewage.

    PubMed

    Reboleiro-Rivas, P; Martín-Pascual, J; Morillo, J A; Juárez-Jiménez, B; Poyatos, J M; Rodelas, B; González-López, J

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are key players in biological wastewater treatments (WWTs), thus a firm knowledge of the bacterial population dynamics is crucial to understand environmental/operational factors affecting the efficiency and stability of the biological depuration process. Unfortunately, little is known about the microbial ecology of the advanced biological WWTs combining suspended biomass (SB) and attached biofilms (AB). This study explored in depth the bacterial community structure and population dynamics in each biomass fraction from a pilot-scale moving bed membrane bioreactor (MBMBR) treating municipal sewage, by means of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and 454-pyrosequencing. Eight experimental phases were conducted, combining different carrier filling ratios, hydraulic retention times and concentrations of mixed liquor total suspended solids. The bacterial community, dominated by Proteobacteria (20.9-53.8%) and Actinobacteria (20.6-57.6%), was very similar in both biomass fractions and able to maintain its functional stability under all the operating conditions, ensuring a successful and steady depuration process. Multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated that solids concentration, carrier filling ratio, temperature and organic matter concentration in the influent were the significant factors explaining population dynamics. Bacterial diversity increased as carrier filling ratio increased (from 20% to 35%, v/v), and solids concentration was the main factor triggering the shifts of the community structure. These findings provide new insights on the influence of operational parameters on the biology of the innovative MBMBRs. PMID:26599433

  10. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e, the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  11. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  12. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell reversible performance loss induced by carbon monoxide produced during operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decoopman, B.; Vincent, R.; Rosini, S.; Paganelli, G.; Thivel, P.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic voltammetry measurements at the anode have been carried out and reveal the presence of carbon monoxide in steady-state operation, with pure hydrogen. Experiments have been performed both in single cell and in stack to find out its origin. The contamination of the anode catalyst is partly due the reverse-water gas shift (RWGS) with carbon dioxide from the cathode. However, this study shows a temperature-activated and time-related corrosion mechanism which appears under humidified hydrogen. Due to this degradation mechanism, a reversible 25 mV-loss of performances is observed and can be recovered by oxidizing carbon monoxide on the anode.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell reversible performance loss induced by carbon monoxide produced during operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decoopman, B.; Vincent, R.; Rosini, S.; Paganelli, G.; Thivel, P.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic voltammetry measurements at the anode have been carried out and reveal the presence of carbon monoxide in steady-state operation, with pure hydrogen. Experiments have been performed both in single cell and in stack to find out its origin. The contamination of the anode catalyst is partly due the reverse-water gas shift (RWGS) with carbon dioxide from the cathode. However, this study shows a temperature-activated and time-related corrosion mechanism which appears under humidified hydrogen. Due to this degradation mechanism, a reversible 25 mV-loss of performances is observed and can be recovered by oxidizing carbon monoxide on the anode.

  14. Facile synthesis of porous metal oxide nanotubes and modified nafion composite membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells operated under low relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Ketpang, Kriangsak; Lee, Kibong; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2014-10-01

    We describe a facile route to fabricate mesoporous metal oxide (TiO2, CeO2 and ZrO1.95) nanotubes for efficient water retention and migration in a Nafion membrane operated in polymer electrolyte fuel cell under low relative humidity (RH). Porous TiO2 nanotubes (TNT), CeO2 nanotubes (CeNT), and ZrO1.95 (ZrNT) were synthesized by calcining electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers embedded with metal precursors. The nanofibers were prepared using a conventional single spinneret electrospinning technique under an ambient atmosphere. Their porous tubular morphology was observed by SEM and TEM analyses. HR-TEM results revealed a porous metal oxide wall composed of small particles joined together. The mesoporous structure of the samples was analyzed using BET. The tubular morphology and outstanding water absorption ability of the TNT, CeNT, and ZrNT fillers resulted in the effective enhancement of proton conductivity of Nafion composite membranes under both fully humid and dry conditions. Compared to a commercial membrane (Nafion, NRE-212) operated under 100% RH at 80 °C, the Nafion-TNT composite membrane delivered approximately 1.29 times higher current density at 0.6 V. Compared to the Nafion-TiO2 nanoparticles membrane, the Nafion-TNT membrane also generated higher current density at 0.6 V. Additionally, compared to a NRE-212 membrane operated under 50% RH at 80 °C, the Nafion-TNT composite membrane exhibited 3.48 times higher current density at 0.6 V. Under dry conditions (18% RH at 80 °C), the Nafion-TNT, Nafion-CeNT, and Nafion-ZrNT composite membranes exhibited 3.4, 2.4, and 2.9 times higher maximum power density, respectively, than the NRE-212 membrane. The remarkably high performance of the Nafion composite membrane was mainly attributed to the reduction of ohmic resistance by the mesoporous hygroscopic metal oxide nanotubes, which can retain water and effectively enhance water diffusion through the membrane. PMID:25203667

  15. Intracellular calcium affects prestin's voltage operating point indirectly via turgor-induced membrane tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent identification of a calmodulin binding site within prestin's C-terminus indicates that calcium can significantly alter prestin's operating voltage range as gauged by the Boltzmann parameter Vh (Keller et al., J. Neuroscience, 2014). We reasoned that those experiments may have identified the molecular substrate for the protein's tension sensitivity. In an effort to understand how this may happen, we evaluated the effects of turgor pressure on such shifts produced by calcium. We find that the shifts are induced by calcium's ability to reduce turgor pressure during whole cell voltage clamp recording. Clamping turgor pressure to 1kPa, the cell's normal intracellular pressure, completely counters the calcium effect. Furthermore, following unrestrained shifts, collapsing the cells abolishes induced shifts. We conclude that calcium does not work by direct action on prestin's conformational state. The possibility remains that calcium interaction with prestin alters water movements within the cell, possibly via its anion transport function.

  16. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  17. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. In-situ combination of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes for the production of lactic acid: continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Yaoming; Zhang, Xu; Feng, Hongyan; Xu, Tongwen

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to achieve a continuous integrated operation of fermentation and electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBM). There need three steps to accomplish this experiment: (1) individual continuous fermentation; (2) individual continuous EDBM; (3) integrated operation of fermentation and EDBM under continuous condition. The results indicate that the maximum feed rate (fermenter can afford) is 0.24 L/h, which is also equal to the feed rate of the subsequent individual continuous EDBM. During continuous EDBM, the recovery ratio of lactate from the fermentation broth can reach 69.5% under a current density of 40 mA/cm(2). The net end concentration and total molar quantity for lactic acid can reach 1.46 mol/L and 2.18 mol, and for OH(-) are 1.32 mol/L and 1.70 mol, respectively. The integration can be achieved only under an initial alkali concentration of no less than 1 mol/L and a current density of no less than 30 mA/cm(2). PMID:24012733

  19. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  20. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  1. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  2. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  3. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Koehler, R.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  4. Lactate clearance for initiating and weaning off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a child with regressed left ventricle after arterial switch operation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Chauhan, Sandeep; Bisoi, A. K.; Sahoo, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We hereby report a child with transposition of great arteries and regressed ventricle who underwent arterial switch operation (ASO) with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and “integrated” extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit. The significance of lactate clearance as a guide to initiate and terminate veno-arterial ECMO in a post ASO child with regressed left ventricle is discussed. PMID:26750700

  5. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  6. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  7. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  8. Seasonal variations in fate and removal of trace organic chemical contaminants while operating a full-scale membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Trang; van den Akker, Ben; Coleman, Heather M; Stuetz, Richard M; Drewes, Jörg E; Le-Clech, Pierre; Khan, Stuart J

    2016-04-15

    Trace organic chemical (TrOC) contaminants are of concern for finished water from water recycling schemes because of their potential adverse environmental and public health effects. Understanding the impacts of seasonal variations on fate and removal of TrOCs is important for proper operation, risk assessment and management of treatment systems for water recycling such as membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Accordingly, this study investigated the fate and removal of a wide range of TrOCs through a full-scale MBR plant during summer and winter seasons. TrOCs included 12 steroidal hormones, 3 xeno-estrogens, 2 pesticides and 23 pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Seasonal differences in the mechanisms responsible for removing some of the TrOCs were evident. In particular the contribution of biotransformation and biomass adsorption to the overall removal of estrone, bisphenol A, 17β-estradiol and triclosan were consistently different between the two seasons. Substantially higher percentage removal via biotransformation was observed during the summer sampling period, which compensated for a reduction in removal attributed to biomass adsorption. The opposite was observed during winter, where the contribution of biotransformation to the overall removal of these TrOCs had decreased, which was offset by an improvement in biomass adsorption. The exact mechanisms responsible for this shift are unknown, however are likely to be temperature related as warmer temperatures can lower sorption efficiency, yet enhance biotransformation of these TrOCs. PMID:26815294

  9. Modulated ionomer distribution in the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells for high temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Choo, Min-Ju; Oh, Keun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Tak; Park, Jung-Ki

    2014-08-01

    Ionomer distribution is an important design parameter for high performance polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); however, the nano-scale modulation of the ionomer morphology has not been intensively explored. Here, we propose a new route to modulate the ionomer distribution that features the introduction of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the cathode catalyst layer and the leaching the PEG phase from the catalyst layer using a water effluent during operation. The key concept in the approach is the expansion of the ionomer thin film through the PEG addition. We demonstrate that the modulated ionomer distribution increases the electrochemical active area and proton transport property, without loss in oxygen transport, at a fixed ionomer content. At a high temperature of 120 °C, the power performance at 0.6 V is increased by 1.73-fold with the modulated ionomer distribution as a result of 1.25-fold increase in the electrochemical active area and two-fold increase in the proton transport rate in the catalyst layer. PMID:24777945

  10. Important operational parameters of membrane bioreactor-sludge disintegration (MBR-SD) system for zero excess sludge production.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seong-Hoon

    2003-04-01

    In order to prevent excess sludge production during wastewater treatment, a membrane bioreactor-sludge disintegration (MBR-SD) system has been introduced, where the disintegrated sludge is recycled to the bioreactor as a feed solution. In this study, a mathematical model was developed by incorporating a sludge disintegration term into the conventional activated sludge model and the relationships among the operational parameters were investigated. A new definition of F/M ratio for the MBR-SD system was suggested to evaluate the actual organic loading rate. The actual F/M ratio was expected to be much higher than the apparent F/M ratio in MBR-SD. The kinetic parameters concerning the biodegradability of organics hardly affect the system performance. Instead, sludge solubilization ratio (alpha) in the SD process and particulate hydrolysis rate constant (k(h)) in biological reaction determine the sludge disintegration number (SDN), which is related with the overall economics of the MBR-SD system. Under reasonable alpha and k(h) values, SDN would range between 3 and 5 which means the amount of sludge required to be disintegrated would be 3-5 times higher for preventing a particular amount of sludge production. Finally, normalized sludge disintegration rate (q/V) which is needed to maintain a certain level of MLSS in the MBR-SD system was calculated as a function of F/V ratio. PMID:12697235

  11. Effective treatment of olive mill effluents from two-phase and three-phase extraction processes by batch membranes in series operation upon threshold conditions.

    PubMed

    Ochando-Pulido, J M; Hodaifa, G; Victor-Ortega, M D; Rodriguez-Vives, S; Martinez-Ferez, A

    2013-12-15

    Production of olive oil results in the generation of high amounts of heavy polluted effluents characterized by extremely variable contaminants degree, leading to sensible complexity in treatment. In this work, batch membrane processes in series comprising ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) are used to purify the effluents exiting both the two-phase and tree-phase extraction processes to a grade compatible to the discharge in municipal sewer systems in Spain and Italy. However, one main problem in applying this technology to wastewater management issues is given by membrane fouling. In the last years, the threshold flux theory was introduced as a key tool to understand fouling problems, and threshold flux measurement can give valuable information regarding optimal membrane process design and operation. In the present manuscript, mathematical approach of threshold flux conditions for membranes operation is addressed, also implementing proper pretreatment processes such as pH-T flocculation and UV/TiO2 photocatalysis with ferromagnetic-core nanoparticles in order to reduce membranes fouling. Both influence the organic matter content as well as the particle size distribution of the solutes surviving in the wastewater stream, leading, when properly applied, to reduced fouling, higher rejection and recovery values, thus enhancing the economic feasibility of the process. PMID:23602253

  12. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  13. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  14. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  15. Long-term operation of a pilot scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for the treatment of municipal wastewater under psychrophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, J; Plaza, F; Garralon, G; Fdz-Polanco, F; Peña, M

    2015-06-01

    The performance of a pilot scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), comprising an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor coupled to an external ultrafiltration membrane treating municipal wastewater at 18±2°C, was evaluated over three years of stable operation. The reactor was inoculated with a mesophilic inoculum without acclimation. The AnMBR supported a tCOD removal efficiency of 87±1% at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 7h, operating at a volumetric loading rate (VLR) of between 2 and 2.5kgtCOD/m(3)d, reaching effluent tCOD concentrations of 100-120mg/L and BOD5 concentrations of 35-50mgO2/L. Specific methane yield varied from 0.18 to 0.23Nm(3)CH4/kgCODremoved depending on the recirculation between the membrane module and the UASB reactor. The permeate flow rate, using cycles of 15s backwash, 7.5min filtration, and continuous biogas sparging (40-60m/h), ranged from 10 to 14Lm(2)/h with trans-membrane pressure (TMP) values of 400-550mbar. PMID:25770470

  16. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  17. Repellents for Escherichia coli operate neither by changing membrane fluidity nor by being sensed by periplasmic receptors during chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbach, M; Constantinou, C; Aloni, H; Shinitzky, M

    1990-01-01

    A long-standing question in bacterial chemotaxis is whether repellents are sensed by receptors or whether they change a general membrane property such as the membrane fluidity and this change, in turn, is sensed by the chemotaxis system. This study addressed this question. The effects of common repellents on the membrane fluidity of Escherichia coli were measured by the fluorescence polarization of the probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in liposomes made of lipids extracted from the bacteria and in membrane vesicles. Glycerol, indole, and L-leucine had no significant effect on the membrane fluidity. NiSO4 decreased the membrane fluidity but only at concentrations much higher than those which elicit a repellent response in intact bacteria. This indicated that these repellents are not sensed by modulating the membrane fluidity. Aliphatic alcohols, on the other hand, fluidized the membrane, but the concentrations that elicited a repellent response were not equally effective in fluidizing the membrane. The response of intact bacteria to alcohols was monitored in various chemotaxis mutants and found to be missing in mutants lacking all the four methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) or the cytoplasmic che gene products. The presence of any single MCP was sufficient for the expression of a repellent response. It is concluded (i) that the repellent response to aliphatic alcohols can be mediated by any MCP and (ii) that although an increase in membrane fluidity may take part in a repellent response, it is not the only mechanism by which aliphatic alcohols, or at least some of them, are effective as repellents. To determine whether any of the E. coli repellents are sensed by periplasmic receptors, the effects of repellents from various classes on periplasm-void cells were examined. The responses to all the repellents tested (sodium benzoate, indole, L-leucine, and NiSO4) were retained in these cells. In a control experiment, the response of the attractant maltose

  18. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  19. Electrostatic interactions in catalytic centers of F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnaya, Alexandra F.; Romanovsky, Yury M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2003-10-01

    F1-ATPase is one of the most important enzymes of membrane bioenergetics. F1-ATPase is the constituent complex that provides the ATP formation from ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) at the expense of energy of electrochemical gradient of hydrogen ions generated across the energy transducing mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial membrane. F1-ATPase is a reversible molecular machine that can work as a proton pump due to energy released in the course of ATP hydrolysis (ATPase reaction). The unusual feature of this enzyme is that it operates as a rotary molecular motor. Recently, using the fluorescence microscopy method for the real time visualization of molecular mobility of individual molecules, it was demonstrated directly that the ATP hydrolysis by F1-ATPase is accompanied by unidirectional rotations of mobile subunits (rotor) of F1F0-ATP synthase. In this work, we calculated the contribution of electrostatic interactions between charged groups of a substrate (MgATP), products molecules (MgADP and Pi), and charged amino acid residuals of ATPase molecule to the energy changes associated with the substrate binding and their chemical transformations in the catalytic centers located at the interface of α and β subunits of the enzyme (oligomer complex α3β3γ of bovine mitochondria ATPase). A catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis considered in our work includes conformational changes of α and β subunits caused by unidirectional rotations of an eccentric γ subunit. The knowledge of energy characteristics and force field in catalytic center of an enzyme in different conformational states may be important for further simulation dynamic properties of ATP synthase complex.

  20. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  1. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  2. Effects of FeCl3 addition on the operation of a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunseok; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The effects on sulfur removal and membrane fouling resulting from FeCl(3) addition to an anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) in a staged AFMBR (SAF-MBR) was investigated. Total sulfur removal in the SAF-MBR was 42-59% without FeCl(3) addition, but increased to 87-95% with FeCl(3) addition. Sulfide removal in the AFMBR increased to 90% with addition of FeCl(3) at a molar Fe(3+)/S ratio of 0.54 and to 95% when the ratio was increased to 0.95. Effluent sulfide concentration then decreased to 0.3-0.6 mg/L. Phosphate removals were only 19 and 37% with the above added FeCl(3) ratios, indicating that iron removed sulfide more readily than phosphate. Neither chemical oxygen demand nor biochemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were affected by the addition of FeCl(3). When the AFMBR permeate became exposed to air, light brown particles were formed from effluent Fe(2+) oxidation to Fe(3+). FeCl(3) addition, while beneficial for sulfide removal, did increase the membrane fouling rate due to the deposition of inorganic precipitates in the membrane pores. PMID:27386990

  3. Navigating environmental, economic, and technological trade-offs in the design and operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs).

    PubMed

    Pretel, R; Shoener, B D; Ferrer, J; Guest, J S

    2015-12-15

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) enable energy recovery from wastewater while simultaneously achieving high levels of treatment. The objective of this study was to elucidate how detailed design and operational decisions of submerged AnMBRs influence the technological, environmental, and economic sustainability of the system across its life cycle. Specific design and operational decisions evaluated included: solids retention time (SRT), mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, sludge recycling ratio (r), flux (J), and specific gas demand per membrane area (SGD). The possibility of methane recovery (both as biogas and as soluble methane in reactor effluent) and bioenergy production, nutrient recovery, and final destination of the sludge (land application, landfill, or incineration) were also evaluated. The implications of these design and operational decisions were characterized by leveraging a quantitative sustainable design (QSD) framework which integrated steady-state performance modeling across seasonal temperatures (using pilot-scale experimental data and the simulating software DESASS), life cycle cost (LCC) analysis, and life cycle assessment (LCA). Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were used to characterize the relative importance of individual design decisions, and to navigate trade-offs across environmental, economic, and technological criteria. Based on this analysis, there are design and operational conditions under which submerged AnMBRs could be net energy positive and contribute to the pursuit of carbon negative wastewater treatment. PMID:26206622

  4. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... purging operations by . . . 1. Option 1 Flare that meets the requirements in § 63.11(b) The flare pilot... monitoring plan regarding minimum purging conditions that must be met prior to allowing uncontrolled...

  5. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this…

  6. Development of membrane electrode assembly for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by catalyst coating membrane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Huagen; Su, Huaneng; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-08-01

    Membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which contains cathode and anode catalytic layer, gas diffusion layers (GDL) and electrolyte membrane, is the key unit of a PEMFC. An attempt to develop MEA for ABPBI membrane based high temperature (HT) PEMFC is conducted in this work by catalyst coating membrane (CCM) method. The structure and performance of the MEA are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and I-V curve. Effects of the CCM preparation method, Pt loading and binder type are investigated for the optimization of the single cell performance. Under 160 °C and atmospheric pressure, the peak power density of the MEA, with Pt loading of 0.5 mg cm-2 and 0.3 mg cm-2 for the cathode and the anode, can reach 277 mW cm-2, while a current density of 620 A cm-2 is delivered at the working voltage of 0.4 V. The MEA prepared by CCM method shows good stability operating in a short term durability test: the cell voltage maintained at ∼0.45 V without obvious drop when operated at a constant current density of 300 mA cm-2 and 160 °C under ambient pressure for 140 h.

  7. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 2, December 21, 1989--March 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  9. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 8, June 21, 1991--September 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will also be investigated.

  10. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 7, March 21, 1991--June 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  11. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  12. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  13. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  14. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  15. Preparation of Pd-Loaded Hierarchical FAU Membranes and Testing in Acetophenone Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Raffaele; Lavorato, Cristina; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Argurio, Pietro; Drioli, Enrico; Poerio, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Pd-loaded hierarchical FAU (Pd-FAU) membranes, containing an intrinsic secondary non-zeolitic (meso)porosity, were prepared and tested in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone (AP) to produce phenylethanol (PE), an industrially relevant product. The best operating conditions were preliminarily identified by testing different solvents and organic hydrogen donors in a batch hydrogenation process where micron-sized FAU seeds were employed as catalyst support. Water as solvent and formic acid as hydrogen source resulted to be the best choice in terms of conversion for the catalytic hydrogenation of AP, providing the basis for the design of a green and sustainable process. The best experimental conditions were selected and applied to the Pd-loaded FAU membrane finding enhanced catalytic performance such as a five-fold higher productivity than with the unsupported Pd-FAU crystals (11.0 vs. 2.2 mgproduct gcat(-1)·h(-1)). The catalytic performance of the membrane on the alumina support was also tested in a tangential flow system obtaining a productivity higher than that of the batch system (22.0 vs. 11.0 mgproduct gcat(-1)·h(-1)). PMID:27011163

  16. Membrane technology as a promising alternative in biodiesel production: a review.

    PubMed

    Shuit, Siew Hoong; Ong, Yit Thai; Lee, Keat Teong; Subhash, Bhatia; Tan, Soon Huat

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, environmental problems caused by the use of fossil fuels and the depletion of petroleum reserves have driven the world to adopt biodiesel as an alternative energy source to replace conventional petroleum-derived fuels because of biodiesel's clean and renewable nature. Biodiesel is conventionally produced in homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalysed processes, as well as by supercritical technology. All of these processes have their own limitations, such as wastewater generation and high energy consumption. In this context, the membrane reactor appears to be the perfect candidate to produce biodiesel because of its ability to overcome the limitations encountered by conventional production methods. Thus, the aim of this paper is to review the production of biodiesel with a membrane reactor by examining the fundamental concepts of the membrane reactor, its operating principles and the combination of membrane and catalyst in the catalytic membrane. In addition, the potential of functionalised carbon nanotubes to serve as catalysts while being incorporated into the membrane for transesterification is discussed. Furthermore, this paper will also discuss the effects of process parameters for transesterification in a membrane reactor and the advantages offered by membrane reactors for biodiesel production. This discussion is followed by some limitations faced in membrane technology. Nevertheless, based on the findings presented in this review, it is clear that the membrane reactor has the potential to be a breakthrough technology for the biodiesel industry. PMID:22366515

  17. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarter report No. 9, September 21, 1991--December 20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-07-01

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e, the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  18. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 12, June 21, 1992--September 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    In this project we intend to study a novel process concept, i.e.,the use of ceramic membranes reactors in upgrading of coal derived liquids. Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. They have, furthermore, the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step. Thus they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, as those typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. In this project we wig evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  19. Nanomaterial-enabled membranes for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogensues, Adam Roy

    Incorporating engineered nanomaterials as components of synthetic membranes can improve their separation performance and endow membranes with additional functions. This work explores two approaches to the design of membranes modified with nanomaterials. In the first chapter, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) decorated with gold nanoparticles were embedded in a polysulfone matrix to fabricate phase inversion nanocomposite membranes. The cast membranes were evaluated as flow-through membrane reactors in experiments on the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The nanocomposite membranes were not as catalytically efficient as those fabricated by modifying anodized alumina membranes polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) containing gold nanoparticles. However, because of the facility of membrane casting by phase inversion and new opportunities enabled by the demonstrated hierarchy-based approach to nanocomposite membrane design, such membrane may hold commercial promise. In the second part of the study, the practicability of PEM-based nanofiltration was evaluated under conditions of precipitative fouling (i.e. scaling) by calcium sulfate. Polyelectrolytes were deposited onto 50 kDa polyethersulfone membranes to create PEM-based nanofiltration membranes. The prepared membranes were compared with the commercial NF270 membrane in terms of flux and rejection performance, as well as the morphology of gypsum crystals formed on the membrane surface. None of the PEM coatings tested inhibited scale formation.

  20. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  1. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  2. Sub-milliampere threshold operation of butt-jointed built-in membrane DFB laser bonded on Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Lee, Jieun; Hiratani, Takuo; Atsuji, Yuki; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2015-03-23

    We fabricated GaInAsP/InP waveguide-integrated lateral-current-injection (LCI) membrane distributed feedback (DFB) lasers on a Si substrate by using benzocyclobutene (BCB) adhesive bonding for on-chip optical interconnection. The integration ofa butt-jointed built-in (BJB) GaInAsP passive waveguide was performed by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE).By introducing a strongly index-coupled DFB structure with a 50-µm-long cavity, a threshold current of 230 µA was achieved for a stripe width of 0.8 µm under room-temperature continuous-wave (RT-CW) conditions. The maximum output power of 32 µW was obtained. The lasing wavelength and submode suppression ratio (SMSR) were 1534 nm and 28 dB, respectively, at a bias current of 1.2 mA. PMID:25837115

  3. Modelling of operation of a lithium-air battery with ambient air and oxygen-selective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahapatsombut, Ukrit; Cheng, Hua; Scott, Keith

    2014-03-01

    A macro-homogeneous model has been developed to evaluate the impact of replacing pure oxygen with ambient air on the performance of a rechargeable non-aqueous Li-air battery. The model exhibits a significant reduction in discharge capacity, e.g. from 1240 to 226 mAh gcarbon-1 at 0.05 mA cm-2 when using ambient air rather than pure oxygen. The model correlates the relationship between the performance and electrolyte decomposition and formation of discharge products (such as Li2O2 and Li2CO3) under ambient air conditions. The model predicts a great benefit of using an oxygen-selective membrane on increasing capacity. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model.

  4. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  5. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  6. Functional nanofibers and membranes by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formo, Eric Victor

    This research focuses on advances in the fabrication of functional membranes through the process of electrospinning to either alter the arrangement or composition of nanofiber arrays. To control nanofiber arrangement, easily reconfigurable collectors were constructed that could direct the deposition over large areas (>50 cm2) and pattern the membranes into various designs, including parallel, fan-out, and spiral arrays. Subsequently, the composition of electrospun membranes was modified using the sol-gel method to yield fibers composed of TiO2 (anatase and rutile) and ZrO 2 (tetragonal) phases. Implementing the polyol reduction method, these nanofiber surfaces were coated with Pt, Pd, and Rh nanoparticles of 2-5 nm or Pt nanowires with lengths up to 125 nm. Interestingly, by calcining the ZrO2 at a lower temperature, the nanofibers could mediate the growth of Pt nanostars or Pt nanowires by adjusting the Pt precursor concentration in the polyol reduction bath. The anatase membranes could also be modified through the self-assembly of various silanes to give either thiol or amine surface groups. The functionalized membranes were then tested for a number of applications associated with the catalysis field. Specifically, anatase fiber membranes coated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles were used as catalysts in a continuous flow reactor for either hydrogenation or cross-coupling reactions, respectively, which was proven to operate with a high yield, a rapid flow rate, and were readily recyclable. The effects of both the coverage and morphology of the Pt-decorated anatase fibers on the methanol oxidation reaction were then studied. Nanofibers with a submonolayer of Pt nanoparticles or Pt nanowires were found to display improved catalytic durability over commercial Pt/C as determined by chronoamperometry. Further, by utilizing the oxygen reduction reaction, results showed that the Pt nanostars had superior electrochemical properties in comparison to Pt black. Finally, the

  7. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  8. Efficient process for previous metal recovery from cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail; Heinz, Robert

    2010-05-04

    A method is provided for recovering a catalytic element from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. The method includes grinding the membrane electrode assembly into a powder, extracting the catalytic element by forming a slurry comprising the powder and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve the catalytic element into a soluble salt, and separating the slurry into a depleted powder and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt. The depleted powder is washed to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted powder and the catalytic element is purified from the salt.

  9. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  10. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  11. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  12. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 11, March 21, 1992--June 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Membrane reactors have been used in a number of catalytic reaction processes in order to overcome the limitations on conversion imposed by thermodynamic equilibrium. Having the inherent capability for combining reaction and separation in a single step, they offer promise for improving and optimizing yield, selectivity and performance of processes involving complex liquids, such as these typically found in coal liquid upgrading. Ceramic membranes are a new class of materials, which have shown promise in a variety of industrial applications. Their mechanical and chemical stability coupled with a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures make them suitable for environments found in coal liquid upgrading. This project will evaluate the performance of Sol-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. Development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated.

  13. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  14. Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Zeltner, Walter A.

    1992-08-11

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

  15. Application of an automation system and a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the optimal operation of a membrane adsorption hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Vigneswaran, S; Ngo, H H; Nguyen, H T; Ben-Aim, R

    2006-01-01

    The application of automation and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems to municipal water and wastewater treatment plants is rapidly increasing. However, the application of these systems is less frequent in the research and development phases of emerging treatment technologies used in these industries. This study involved the implementation of automation and a SCADA system to the submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system for use in a semi-pilot scale research project. An incremental approach was used in the development of the automation and SCADA systems, leading to the development of two new control systems. The first system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash initiation, based upon a pressure increase, leading to productivity improvements as the backwash is only activated when required, not at a fixed time. This system resulted in a 40% reduction in the number of backwashes required and also enabled optimised operations under unsteady concentrations of wastewater. The second system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash duration, whereby the backwash was terminated when the pressure reached a steady state. This system resulted in a reduction of the duration of the backwash of up to 25% and enabled optimised operations as the foulant build-up within the reactor increased. PMID:16722068

  16. Prevalence of Nitrosomonas cluster 7 populations in the ammonia-oxidizing community of a submerged membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater under different operation conditions.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, F; Poyatos, J M; Molina-Muñoz, M; Cortés-Lorenzo, C; González-López, J; Rodelas, B

    2013-07-01

    A pilot-scale ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used for the aerobic treatment of urban wastewater in four experimental stages influenced by seasonal temperature and different sets of operation conditions. The structure of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community was profiled by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), based on the amplification and separation of partial ammonia-monoxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that temperature, hydraulic retention time and percentage of ammonia removal had a significant effect on the fingerprints of AOB communities. Phylogenetic analysis conducted on amoA/AmoA sequences of reamplified TGGE bands showed, however, that closely related ammonia-oxidizing populations inhabited the sludge of the MBR in all experimental stages. Nitrosomonas cluster 7 populations (N. europaea-N. eutropha cluster) prevailed under all conditions tested, even when the MBR was operated under complete biomass retention or at low temperatures, suggesting that the high ammonia concentrations in the system were determinant to select r-strategist AOB. PMID:22976820

  17. Transient analysis of gas transport in anode channel of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with dead-ended anode under pressure swing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Ikezoe, Keigo

    2014-12-01

    Further cost reduction is a critical issue for commercialization of fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) based on polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The cost of the fuel-cell system is driven by the multiple parts required to maximize stack performance and maintain durability and robustness. The fuel-cell system of the FCEV must be simplified while maintaining functionality. The dead-ended anode is considered as a means of simplification in this study. Generally, if hydrogen is supplied under constant pressure during dead-ended operation, stable power generation is impossible because of accumulation of liquid water produced by power generation and of nitrogen via leakage from the cathode through the membrane. Herein, pressure oscillation is applied to address this issue. Empirical and CFD data are employed to elucidate the mechanism of stable power generation using the pressure swing supply. Simultaneous and time-continuous measurements of the current distribution and gas concentration distribution are also conducted. The results demonstrate that the nitrogen concentration in the anode channel under pressure constant operation differs from that under pressure swing supply conditions. The transient two-dimensional CFD results indicate that oscillatory flow is generated by pressure swing supply, which periodically sweeps out nitrogen from the active area, resulting in stable power generation.

  18. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  19. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  20. Studies on operational and dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide gas-sensing probe by using a Teflon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Roditaki, A.; Nikolelis, D.P.; Papastathopoulos, D.S. )

    1993-03-01

    The performance and dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide gas sensor with an alternative to the commercially available silicon rubber membrane are studied in this paper. This study was performed in the course to choose a low cost membrane and possibly to further optimize the time response of this sensor. The membrane used was a microporous Teflon membrane which is used in ammonia gas sensors. The results have shown that the CO[sub 2] gas-sensing probe with the Teflon membrane shows similar performance characteristics as the silicon rubber membrane, but improved stability with time. Convolution mathematics were also used to study the dynamic response characteristics of the gas sensor with the Teflon membrane and the results have shown that practically similar time constants are obtained as when a silicon rubber membrane is used. Therefore, the less costly membrane can replace the silicon rubber membrane when CO[sub 2] is being monitored and a gas-sensing probe can be constructed through this means, by using a Teflon membrane and a 1 mM NaHCO[sub 3]-100 mM NaCl internal filling solution. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  1. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  2. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  3. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  4. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  5. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brauns, Eike; Morsbach, Eva; Kunz, Sebastian; Baeumer, Marcus; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (<150 ms) was developed. Operation with modulated temperature allows analysis of the signal spectrum with advanced information content, based on the Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal. PMID:25356643

  6. A new integrated approach for dye removal from wastewater by polyoxometalates functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Zhang, Lizhi; Wang, Rong; Chou, Shuren; Dong, ZhiLi

    2016-01-15

    Membrane technique is a promising way for the removal of dyes from wastewater. A unique approach combining both the adsorptive and the catalytic membrane processes was proposed on the basis of a new functionalized membrane. The membrane integrating both the adsorptive and catalytic activities was developed by introducing polyoxometalates (POMs) as an ideal candidate for the membrane functionalization via a novel sol-gel method. A two-step protocol, adsorptive separation and catalytic degradation, was designed for dye removal, realizing an excellent dye rejection with easy and economic membrane regeneration through simply soaking the membrane in a limited volume of dilute oxidant solution. This approach is feasible and versatile owing to the flexible selection of distinct POMs and design of catalytic degradation routes as required. As a result, the current research provides insight into a new methodology of the membrane technique in dye removal applications. PMID:26410275

  7. Materials for high-temperature catalytic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Cox, J.L.; Parks, W.P. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Catalytic combustion systems for gas turbines must operate at temperatures of at least 1200{degrees}C. Support structure material must retain its integrity under prolonged exposure to high temperature, thermal cycling, and severe chemical conditions; and the material must be capable of being formed into thin sections. The performance requirements of a high-temperature stable ceramic support must be balanced with reasonable costs of preparation. An increasing number of materials have potential for successful exposure to high-temperature conditions. Two major problems of high-temperature catalyst systems are loss of surface area and catalytic activity. Incorporation of the catalytic component into the host lattice can circumvent this problem. Use of supporting active metal oxides on carrier materials with high thermal resistance appears to be a very promising way to make stable catalysts. The challenge will be to provide sufficient low-temperature activity and high-temperature stability; therefore, there exists a need to engineer catalytic materials for high-temperature combustion environments. Developments in catalytic materials and preparation procedures are reviewed. Future areas of research are discussed.

  8. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  9. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  10. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  11. Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

  12. Evolution of catalytic RNA in the laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    We are interested in the biochemistry of existing RNA enzymes and in the development of RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. The focal point of our research program has been the design and operation of a laboratory system for the controlled evolution of catalytic RNA. This system serves as working model of RNA-based life and can be used to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. Evolution requires the integration of three chemical processes: amplification, mutation, and selection. Amplification results in additional copies of the genetic material. Mutation operates at the level of genotype to introduce variability, this variability in turn being expressed as a range of phenotypes. Selection operates at the level of phenotype to reduce variability by excluding those individuals that do not conform to the prevailing fitness criteria. These three processes must be linked so that only the selected individuals are amplified, subject to mutational error, to produce a progeny distribution of mutant individuals. We devised techniques for the amplification, mutation, and selection of catalytic RNA, all of which can be performed rapidly in vitro within a single reaction vessel. We integrated these techniques in such a way that they can be performed iteratively and routinely. This allowed us to conduct evolution experiments in response to artificially-imposed selection constraints. Our objective was to develop novel RNA enzymes by altering the selection constraints in a controlled manner. In this way we were able to expand the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Our long-range objective is to develop an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity. If such an enzyme had the ability to produce additional copies of itself, then RNA evolution would operate autonomously and the origin of life will have been realized in the laboratory.

  13. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  14. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  15. Catalytic activity of trypsin entrapped in electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Susana C; Rodrigues, Ana R; Saraiva, Jorge A; Lopes-da-Silva, José A

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin was successfully entrapped in situ into nanofibers of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) prepared by electrospinning. The spinning dope was an emulsion consisting of an aqueous phase with the solubilized enzyme in a pH buffer plus an oil phase of the polymer solubilized in chloroform (CF)/dimethylformamide (DMF). The optimized materials were composed by random arrays of bead-free fibers with outer diameters in the range 110-180 nm without showing core-shell structure. The fiber size and morphology, membrane porosity and surface properties were shown to be influenced by the polymer concentration and the composition ratio of the solvent mixture, and also by the presence of the enzyme. The activity of the immobilized trypsin was studied toward both a low-molecular weight synthetic substrate (BAPNA) and a protein (casein). Fluorescence microscopy, the increasing hydrophilicity of the fibrous membrane and the observed catalytic activity confirmed the entrapment of the enzyme into the PCL nanofibers. The best activity retention (∼66% toward BAPNA) was achieved using 0.20 g/mL PCL in CF/DMF [75:25], with trypsin in an aqueous buffer at pH 7.1 in the presence of benzamidine and Span80. The immobilized enzyme showed satisfactory operational stability retaining ∼59% of its initial activity after five reaction cycles. Compared with the free enzyme, the storage (at 4 °C) and thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme were highly improved. The retained catalytic activity and the observed reusability can be explained by a heterogeneous distribution of the enzyme within the polymer fiber influenced by the electrostatic field during the electrospinning process, enabling a preferential location near the fiber surface but simultaneously assuring minimal leaching out during operations. Results suggest that trypsin-PCL fibrous membranes may be useful for concomitant proteolytic and separation commercial applications. PMID:26320709

  16. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  17. Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

    2003-04-30

    A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

  18. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    PubMed Central

    Omotayo, T.I.; Akinyemi, G.S.; Omololu, P.A.; Ajayi, B.O.; Akindahunsi, A.A.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Kade, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  19. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity.

    PubMed

    Omotayo, T I; Akinyemi, G S; Omololu, P A; Ajayi, B O; Akindahunsi, A A; Rocha, J B T; Kade, I J

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe(2+)-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe(2+) inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe(2+) inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe(2+) may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe(2+) and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  20. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  1. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  2. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  3. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  4. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:26360742

  5. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  6. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  7. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  8. Membrane projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  9. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 25, 1995--December 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-15

    The performance of the third type of catalytic membrane reactor configuration, with catalyst deposited in the membrane and no catalyst or inert materials in the tube side, was evaluated. The C{sub 2} selectivity obtained was about 10% due to the gas phase reaction in the empty tube side of the reactor. The membrane reactor with an oxygen-permeable dense membrane has been built. The use of a dense membrane will eliminate the loss of hydrocarbon from the tube side to the shell side, as observed in the Vycor glass membrane reactor. Also, air can be used as the oxygen source without contaminating the product. La/MgO was synthesized and will be used as the catalyst for the dense membrane reactor. This catalyst was reported in the literature to show significant improvement of C{sub 2} selectivity and yield for oxidative coupling of methane in a packed-bed reactor by using the operation mode of staged-feed of oxygen. A reactor mode for methane oxidative coupling in reactors with both distributed oxygen feed and C{sub 2} product removal was developed based on the general model of cross-flow reactors reported in the last quarterly report. A distributed oxygen feed could give rise to much higher C{sub 2} yield than the co-feed reactor as long as the space time is long enough. In the case of a two-membrane reactor, where oxygen is supplied by one membrane and products are removed through the other membrane, a high separation factor of C{sub 2} product to methane for the product-removal membrane is critical to achieve high C{sub 2} yield.

  10. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  11. Catalytic Antioxidants and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Tamara R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, or neuroinflammation, is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative conditions. Damage due to superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite has been observed in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as in acute conditions that lead to neuronal death, such as stroke and epilepsy. Antioxidant therapies to remove these toxic compounds have been of great interest in treating these disorders. Catalytic antioxidants mimic the activities of superoxide dismutase or catalase or both, detoxifying superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases, peroxynitrite and other toxic species as well. Several compounds have demonstrated efficacy in in vitro and in animal models of neurodegeneration, leading to optimism that catalytic antioxidants may prove to be useful therapies in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 555–569. PMID:18754709

  12. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  13. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  14. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  15. Catalytic combustion nears application

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This article is a brief review of efforts to develope a catalytic combustion system with emissions levels less than 10 ppm. Two efforts are discussed: (1) tests by General Electric using a GE Frame 7E/9E and 7F/9F gas turbine, and (2) tests by AES using a Kawasaki M1A-13A industrial gas turbine. The latter also employs a heat recovery steam generator and produces 3 MWe and 28,000 lbm/hr of steam.

  16. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  17. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  18. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Wijmans

    2003-11-17

    In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane

  19. Hybrid nanomotor: a catalytically/magnetically powered adaptive nanowire swimmer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Manesh, Kalayil Manian; Hua, Joe; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Wang, Joseph

    2011-07-18

    A synthetic hybrid nanomotor, which combines chemically powered propulsion and magnetically driven locomotion, is described. The new catalytic-magnetic nanomotor consists of a flexible multisegment Pt-Au-Ag(flex)-Ni nanowire, with the Pt-Au and Au-Ag(flex)-Ni portions responsible for the catalytic and magnetic propulsion modes, respectively. The experimental data and theoretical considerations indicate that the hybrid design only minimally compromises the individual propulsion modes. Rapid and convenient switching from the catalytic to the magnetic mode is illustrated. The resulting catalytic-magnetic adaptive nanomotor can address the fuel depletion and salt limitation common to chemically powered motors by switching to magnetic propulsion. Reversal of the motion direction is also achieved upon applying the magnetic field. Such use of two sources to power a hybrid device offers a broader scope of operation and holds considerable promise for designing adaptive nanovehicles that reconfigure their operation in response to environmental changes or unexpected events. PMID:21626685

  20. Deep catalytic cracking, maximize olefin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, L.; Letzsch, W. )

    1994-01-01

    Recent environmental regulations coupled with lead phase out have shifted the focus of the FCC from that of an octane barrel machine to that of a light olefins generator. The light olefins are the necessary feedstock for premium reformulated gasoline (RFG) blending components such as MTBE, TAME and alkylate. The demand for these light olefins will impact the operation of the FCC and Steam Cracker (SC). There will be a need for economical olefin generating processing alternatives to supplement SC's for C[sub 3]= and FCC's for C[sub 3]= through C[sub 5]= RFG component feedstocks. To this end, Stone Webster has recently entered into an agreement with the Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP) and Sinopec International, both located in the People's Republic of China, to exclusively license RIPP's Deep Catalytic Cracking (DCC) technology outside of China. DCC is a newly developed catalytic cracking process for producing light olefins (C[sub 3]--C[sub 5]) from heavy feedstocks. DCC is a fluidized bed process for selectively cracking a variety of hydrocarbon feedstocks to light olefins. Unlike s steam cracker, the predominate products are propylenes and butylenes, the direct result of catalytic cracking rather than free radical thermal reactions. There are two distinct modes of DCC operation: maximum propylene (Type 1) and maximum iso-olefin production (Type 2). Each mode of operation employs a unique catalyst as well as reaction conditions.

  1. 160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    L.G. Marianowski

    2001-12-21

    The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at

  2. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  3. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

    2007-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center

  4. Catalytic considerations in temperature measurement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Crossman, G. R.; Chitnis, R. V.

    1972-01-01

    Literature discussing catalytic activity in platinum group temperature sensors is surveyed. Methods for the determination and/or elimination of catalytic activity are reported. A particular application of the literature is discussed in which it is possible to infer that a shielded platinum total temperature probe does not experience significant catalytic activity in the wake of a supersonic hydrogen burner, while a bare iridium plus rhodium, iridium thermocouple does. It is concluded that catalytic data corrections are restricted and that it is preferable to coat the temperature sensor with a noncatalytic coating. Furthermore, the desirability of transparent coatings is discussed.

  5. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  6. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  7. Ultrasonic Membrane Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    A membrane is a sermipermeable material that permits the passage of some molecules while retaining others. Ultrasound can enhance membrane operation through the asymmetric collapse of cavitating bubbles and through the turbulence associated with acoustic streaming. The added turbulence can lead to a looser, more porous fouling cake layer and may agglomerate fine particles, reducing pore blockage and cake compaction.These effects are dependent upon the ultrasonic intensity, the operating pressure, crossflow velocity and solids concentration.Membrane cleaning can also be enhanced by the use of ultrasound, but this application may not be economic when used in isolation. One of the greatest challenges facing the technology is the generation of a uniform acoustic field across the entire membrane surface in a full-scale module.

  8. Membrane tethering

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Membrane trafficking depends on transport vesicles and carriers docking and fusing with the target organelle for the delivery of cargo. Membrane tethers and small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) mediate the docking of transport vesicles/carriers to enhance the efficiency of the subsequent SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor)-mediated fusion event with the target membrane bilayer. Different classes of membrane tethers and their specific intracellular location throughout the endomembrane system are now well defined. Recent biochemical and structural studies have led to a deeper understanding of the mechanism by which membrane tethers mediate docking of membrane carriers as well as an appreciation of the role of tethers in coordinating the correct SNARE complex and in regulating the organization of membrane compartments. This review will summarize the properties and roles of membrane tethers of both secretory and endocytic systems. PMID:25343031

  9. DESTRUCTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the effect of catalytic incinerator design and operation on the destruction of specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), both singly and in mixtures. A range of operating and design parameters were tested on a wide variety of compo...

  10. DESTRUCTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the effect of catalytic incinerator design and operation the destruction of specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), both singly and in mixtures. A range of operating and design parameters were tested on a wide variety of compound...

  11. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Bowser, John

    2004-04-13

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

  12. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  13. Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

  14. Catalytic conversions of chlorodecalin

    SciTech Connect

    Takhistov, U.V.; Kovyazin, V.E.

    1985-10-01

    This paper studies catalytic conversions of chlorinated decahydronaphthalene (chlorodecalin), since the introduction of chlorine into the hydrocarbon molecule would facilitate formation of the original carbonium ion required for conversion to adamantane. Analysis of the fractions obtained showed that two main products are formed: the tricyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/ and the bicyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/. Therefore, the C/sub 10/H/sub 17/ cation formed by removal of chlorine from chlorodecalin, C/sub 10/H/sub 17/CI, undergoes changes in two directions: addition of hydride ions from other chlorodecalin molecules to form Decalin, and loss of a proton to give a tricyclic system of the adamantane weries and its isomer. Introduction of a substituent (chlorine) into the Decalin molecule made it possible to conduct the process at low temperatures.

  15. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  16. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  17. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  18. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  19. Membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Surya (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Atti, Anthony (Inventor); Olah, George (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst ink for a fuel cell including a catalytic material and poly(vinylidene fluoride). The ink may be applied to a substrate to form an electrode, or bonded with other electrode layers to form a membrane electrode assembly (MEA).

  20. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane. PMID:26673736

  1. Use of stable emulsion to improve stability, activity, and enantioselectivity of lipase immobilized in a membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Giorno, L; Li, N; Drioli, E

    2003-12-20

    The enantiocatalytic performance of immobilized lipase in an emulsion membrane reactor using stable emulsion prepared by membrane emulsification technology was studied. The production of optical pure (S)-naproxen from racemic naproxen methyl ester was used as a model reaction system. The O/W emulsion, containing the substrate in the organic phase, was fed to the enzyme membrane reactor from shell-to-lumen. The enzyme was immobilized in the sponge layer (shell side) of capillary polyamide membrane with 50 kDa cut-off. The aqueous phase was able to permeate through the membrane while the microemulsion was retained by the thin selective layer. Therefore, the substrate was kept in the enzyme-loaded membrane while the water-soluble product was continuously removed from the reaction site. The results show that lipase maintained stable activity during the entire operation time (more than 250 h), showing an enantiomeric excess (96 +/- 2%) comparable to the free enzyme (98 +/- 1%) and much higher compared to similar lipase-loaded membrane reactors used in two-separate phase systems (90%). The results demonstrate that immobilized enzymes can achieve high stability as well as high catalytic activity and enantioselectivity. PMID:14595780

  2. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  3. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOEpatents

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  5. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  6. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  7. Membrane bioreactors for water reclamation.

    PubMed

    Tao, G; Kekre, K; Wei, Z; Lee, T C; Viswanath, B; Seah, H

    2005-01-01

    Singapore has been using dual membrane technology (MF/UF RO) to produce high-grade water (NEWater) from secondary treated sewage. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) has very high potential and will lead to the further improvement of the productivity and quality of high-grade water. This study was focused on the technical feasibility of MBR system for water reclamation in Singapore, making a comparison between various membrane systems available and to get operational experience in terms of membrane cleaning and other issues. Three MBR plants were built at Bedok Water Reclamation Plant with a design flow of 300 m3/day each. They were commissioned in March 2003. Three different types of submerged membranes were tested. They are Membrane A, plate sheet membrane with pore size of 0.4 microm; Membrane B, hollow fibre membrane with pore size of 0.4 microm; and Membrane C, hollow fibre membrane with pore size of 0.035 microm. The permeate quality of all the three MBR Systems were found equivalent to or better than that of the conventional tertiary treatment by ultrafiltration. MBR permeate TOC was about 2 mg/l lower than UF permeate TOC. GC-MS, GC-ECD and HPLC scan results show that trace organic contaminants in MBR permeate and UF permeate were in the same range. MBR power consumption can be less than 1 kwh/m3. Gel layer or dynamic membrane generated on the submerged membrane surface played an important role for the lower MBR permeate TOC than the supernatant TOC in the membrane tank. Intensive chemical cleaning can temporarily remove this layer. During normal operation conditions, the formation of dynamic membrane may need one day to obtain the steady low TOC levels in MBR permeate. PMID:16004005

  8. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic membranes for hydrocarbon processing

    DOEpatents

    Van Calcar, Pamela; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to mixed phase materials for the preparation of catalytic membranes which exhibit ionic and electronic conduction and which exhibit improved mechanical strength compared to single phase ionic and electronic conducting materials. The mixed phase materials are useful for forming gas impermeable membranes either as dense ceramic membranes or as dense thin films coated onto porous substrates. The membranes and materials of this invention are useful in catalytic membrane reactors in a variety of applications including synthesis gas production. One or more crystalline second phases are present in the mixed phase material at a level sufficient to enhance the mechanical strength of the mixture to provide membranes for practical application in CMRs.

  9. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  10. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors. PMID:26285032

  11. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  12. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  13. Natural gas cleanup by means of membranes.

    PubMed

    Ohlrogge, Klaus; Brinkmann, Torsten

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the use of membranes for hydrocarbon dewpointing and dehydration of natural gas. Based on experience gained from membrane applications in separating organic vapors from off-gas and process streams, as well as the dehydration of compressed air, membranes have been developed and tested for use in high pressure applications. Membranes and membrane modules have been modified to withstand the high operating pressure. Calculation programs were developed to understand the separation performance and to provide the necessary information for optimizing membrane design. A real challenge was the introduction of the vacuum mode dehydration operation in order to achieve the highest possible dewpoint reduction with minimum methane loss. PMID:12783826

  14. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  15. Catalytic Mechanisms for Phosphotriesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Andrew N.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphotriesters are one class of highly toxic synthetic compounds known as organophosphates. Wide spread usage of organophosphates as insecticides as well as nerve agents has lead to numerous efforts to identify enzymes capable of detoxifying them. A wide array of enzymes has been found to have phosphotriesterase activity including phosphotriesterase (PTE), methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA), diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFP), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1). These enzymes differ widely in protein sequence and three-dimensional structure, as well as in catalytic mechanism, but they also share several common features. All of the enzymes identified as phosphotriesterases are metal-dependent hydrolases that contain a hydrophobic active site with three discrete binding pockets to accommodate the substrate ester groups. Activation of the substrate phosphorus center is achieved by a direct interaction between the phosphoryl oxygen and a divalent metal in the active site. The mechanistic details of the hydrolytic reaction differ among the various enzymes with both direct attack of a hydroxide as well as covalent catalysis being found. PMID:22561533

  16. Catalytic combustion with incompletely vaporized residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of fuel lean mixtures of incompletely vaporized residual fuel and air was investigated. The 7.6 cm diameter, graded cell reactor was constructed from zirconia spinel substrate and catalyzed with a noble metal catalyst. Streams of luminous particles exited the rector as a result of fuel deposition and carbonization on the substrate. Similar results were obtained with blends of No. 6 and No. 2 oil. Blends of shale residual oil and No. 2 oil resulted in stable operation. In shale oil blends the combustor performance degraded with a reduced degree of fuel vaporization. In tests performed with No. 2 oil a similar effect was observed.

  17. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  18. Membrane-electrode assemblies for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Swathirajan, Sundararajan; Mikhail, Youssef M.

    1993-01-01

    A combination, unitary, membrane and electrode assembly with a solid polymer electrolyte membrane, and first and second electrodes at least partially embedded in opposed surfaces of the membrane. The electrodes each comprise a respective group of finely divided carbon particles, very finely divided catalytic particles supported on internal and external surfaces of the carbon particles and a proton conductive material intermingled with the catalytic and carbon particles. A first group of finely divided carbon particles forming the first electrode has greater water attraction and retention properties, and is more hydrophilic than a second group of carbon particles forming the second electrode. In a preferred method, the membrane electrode assembly of the invention is prepared by forming a slurry of proton conductive material and at least one group of the carbon and catalyst particles. The slurry is applied to the opposed surfaces of the membrane and heated while being pressed to the membrane for a time and at a temperature and compressive load sufficient to embed at least a portion of the particles into the membrane.

  19. Lowering the platinum loading of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Li, Q.; Jensen, J. O.

    2015-10-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer was established by the acid transfer from the acid doped membrane to the electrodes and can therefore be tailored by using catalysts with varied Pt to C ratios. With a loading of ca. 0.1 mgPtcm-2 on each electrode the best performance was obtained with electrodes prepared from 10 wt.% Pt/C due to the improved Pt dispersion, extended triple phase boundary upon the acid transfer and the alleviated acid flooding of the catalytic layer. The MEA delivered a peak power density of 482 mW cm-2 for H2/O2 and 321 mW cm-2 for H2/air, corresponding to an overall Pt utilization of 2.5 and 1.7 kW gPt-1, respectively. The durability test revealed no net voltage decay during more than 1700 h of uninterrupted operation at 200 mA cm-2 and 160 °C.

  20. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Halocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Pons, Amandine; Ivashkin, Pavel; Poisson, Thomas; Charette, André B; Pannecoucke, Xavier; Jubault, Philippe

    2016-04-25

    A catalytic asymmetric synthesis of halocyclopropanes is described. The developed method is based on a carbenoid cyclopropanation of 2-haloalkenes with tert-butyl α-cyano-α-diazoacetate using a chiral rhodium catalyst that permits access to a broad range of highly functionalized chiral halocyclopropanes (F, Cl, Br, and I) in good yields, moderate diastereoselectivity, and excellent enantiomeric ratios. The reported methodology represents the first general catalytic enantioselective approach to halocyclopropanes. PMID:26945553

  1. Graphene oxide based ultrafiltration membranes for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants in salty water.

    PubMed

    Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa M; Morales-Torres, Sergio; Figueiredo, José L; Faria, Joaquim L; Silva, Adrián M T

    2015-06-15

    Flat sheet ultrafiltration (UF) membranes with photocatalytic properties were prepared with lab-made TiO2 and graphene oxide-TiO2 (GOT), and also with a reference TiO2 photocatalyst from Evonik (P25). These membranes were tested in continuous operation mode for the degradation and mineralization of a pharmaceutical compound, diphenhydramine (DP), and an organic dye, methyl orange (MO), under both near-UV/Vis and visible light irradiation. The effect of NaCl was investigated considering simulated brackish water (NaCl 0.5 g L(-1)) and simulated seawater (NaCl 35 g L(-1)). The results indicated that the membranes prepared with the GOT composite (M-GOT) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, outperforming those prepared with bare TiO2 (M-TiO2) and P25 (M-P25), both inactive under visible light illumination. The best performance of M-GOT may be due to the lower band-gap energy (2.9 eV) of GOT. In general, the permeate flux was also higher for M-GOT probably due to a combined effect of its highest photocatalytic activity, highest hydrophilicity (contact angles of 11°, 17° and 18° for M-GOT, M-TiO2 and M-P25, respectively) and higher porosity (71%). The presence of NaCl had a detrimental effect on the efficiency of the membranes, since chloride anions can act as hole and hydroxyl radical scavengers, but it did not affect the catalytic stability of these membranes. A hierarchically ordered membrane was also prepared by intercalating a freestanding GO membrane in the structure of the M-GOT membrane (M-GO/GOT). The results showed considerably higher pollutant removal in darkness and good photocatalytic activity under near-UV/Vis and visible light irradiation in continuous mode experiments. PMID:25875927

  2. Advanced catalytic combustors for low pollutant emissions, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing the known attractive and distinguishing features of catalytic combustion technology to reduce nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine engines during subsonic, stratospheric cruise operation was investigated. Six conceptual combustor designs employing catalytic combustion were defined and evaluated for their potential to meet specific emissions and performance goals. Based on these evaluations, two parallel-staged, fixed-geometry designs were identified as the most promising concepts. Additional design studies were conducted to produce detailed preliminary designs of these two combustors. Results indicate that cruise nitric oxide emissions can be reduced by an order of magnitude relative to current technology levels by the use of catalytic combustion. Also, these combustors have the potential for operating over the EPA landing-takeoff cycle and at cruise with a low pressure drop, high combustion efficiency and with a very low overall level of emission pollutants. The use of catalytic combustion, however, requires advanced technology generation in order to obtain the time-temperature catalytic reactor performance and durability required for practical aircraft engine combustors.

  3. Inorganic membranes and solid state sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cot, Louis; Ayral, André; Durand, Jean; Guizard, Christian; Hovnanian, Nadine; Julbe, Anne; Larbot, André

    2000-05-01

    The latest developments in inorganic membranes are closely related to recent advances in solid state science. Sol-gel processing, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hydrothermal synthesis are methods that can be used for inorganic membrane preparation. Innovative concepts from material science (templating effect, nanophase materials, growing of continuous zeolite layers, hybrid organic-inorganic materials) have been applied by our group to the preparation of inorganic membrane materials. Sol-gel-derived nanophase ceramic membranes are presented with current applications in nanofiltration and catalytic membrane reactors. Silica membranes with an ordered porosity, due to liquid crystal phase templating effect, are described with potential application in pervaporation. Defect-free and thermally stable zeolite membranes can be obtained through an original synthesis method, in which zeolite crystals are grown inside the pores of a support. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials with permselective properties for gas separation and facilitated transport of solutes in liquid media, have been successfully adapted to membrane applications. Potential membrane developments offered by CVD deposition techniques are also illustrated through several examples related to the preparation of purely inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic membrane materials.

  4. Develpment of Higher Temperature Membrane and Electrode Assembly (MEA) for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Agro, Anthony DeCarmine, Shari Williams

    2005-12-30

    Our work will fucus on developing higher temperature MEAs based on SPEKK polymer blends. Thse MEAs will be designed to operatre at 120 degrees C Higher temperatures, up to 200 degrees C will also be explored. This project will develop Nafion-free MEAs using only SPEKK blends in both membrane and catalytic layers.

  5. Spatial proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance under carbon monoxide poisoning at a low concentration using a segmented cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; Bethune, Keith; Rocheleau, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The impact of the fuel contaminant CO, which was intentionally injected in to the hydrogen stream at a concentration of 2 ppm, on proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance distribution was studied using a segmented cell system and spatial electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The cell was operated under a galvanostatic control of the overall cell current at 0.8 A cm-2, and tests were carried out under H2/O2, H2/air, and H2/H2 gas configurations. Upon CO injection the voltage decreased by 0.080, 0.300, and 0.320 V for O2, air, and H2 cathode gases, respectively. The voltage drop was accompanied by changes in the current density distributions. Inlet segments 1-4 showed a decrease in current due to CO adsorption on Pt, while, downstream segments 7-10 exhibited an increase in current. The performance completely recovered within 1-2 h after CO injection was stopped. The conversion of CO proceeds through a combination of catalytic and electrochemical oxidation reactions; however, the catalytic oxidation of CO is likely the dominant process. It was found that an increased membrane gas permeability can mitigate the impact of CO, mainly due to the catalytic oxidation of adsorbed CO on the Pt anode by the permeated O2.

  6. Consider nanofiltration for membrane separations

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, L.P. ); Cheryna, M.; Rajagopalan, N. )

    1994-03-01

    The best known liquid-phase membrane processes are reverse osmosis (RO), ultrafiltration (UF), microfiltration (MF), dialysis, and electrodialysis (ED). However, over the past few years, a new membrane process called nanofiltration (NF) has emerged that promises to significantly widen the application of membranes in liquid-phase separations. This paper discusses the following: NF operating range, membrane properties, and the following applications: demineralizing water, cleaning up contaminated groundwater, ultrapure water, effluents containing heavy metals, offshore oil platforms, yeast production, pulp and paper mills, textile production, electroless copper plating, and cheese whey production.

  7. Supported membrane nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Anrather, Dorothea; Smetazko, Michaela; Saba, Miriam; Alguel, Yilmaz; Schalkhammer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    well as various chemical modifications of these polymers, were employed as membrane supports. With optimized assemblies, the membrane support did allow the formation of stable bilayer membranes, proved by "gigaseal" (electrical sealing with giga-ohm resistance) to be free of any point defects in the lipid assembly. Supports with and without hydrophilic and hydrophobic anchors were studied with reference to promoting the formation of a self-assembled membrane, to their electric resistance, and to the capability to insert functional ionophores. All components, including novel chemically engineered ion channels, novel amphiphilic lipids, a microlithographically designed chip, isolating polymer frames, and a hydrogel membrane support, are combined in the new bionanodevice. Sensitivity and specificity were proved, for example, with the use of an antibody-antigen couple down-regulating the ion flux through the membrane channel. Single ion channels incorporated in the supported lipid bilayer gave stable signals at an operational stability of several hours, which is already sufficient to test and screen for membrane receptors but still insufficient to use this device as a sensor for off-site application. Further optimization to increase operational and storage stability is done by a number of groups to allow a broad application of these devices. PMID:15112538

  8. DESTRUCTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING CATALYTIC OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the application of catalytic oxidation to four types of air emission sources: (1) groundwater stripping operations, (2) graphic arts facilities, (3) f1exographic printing plants, and (4) latex monomer production. Characteristics of each of these emissions are ...

  9. Effect of loading rate and HRT on the removal of cephalosporin and their intermediates during the operation of a membrane bioreactor treating pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, S; Saravanane, R

    2010-01-01

    The viability of treating high-concentration antibiotic wastewater by a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was studied using submerged flat sheet membrane. The major problems for these modules are concentration polarization and subsequent fouling. By using gas-liquid two-phase flow, these problems can be ameliorated. A case study has been identified and the current issues in one of the major pharmaceutical industry (manufacturing cephalosporin drugs) located in Chennai, India, has been discussed for the possible removal of anaerobically transformed intermediates of antibiotic pharmaceutical wastewater. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of organic loading rate and hydraulic retention time on the removal of cephalosporin derivative, viz., cephalexin (C(16)H(17)N(3)O(4)S.H(2)O) and the intermediates [7-amino-3-deacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA) and acyl group (Phenyl acetic acid)] in the MBR with enhanced biodegradation using bioaugmentation technique. Based on the critical examination of results, the industry is looking for the alternatives of either direct disposal of 7-ADCA and phenyl acetic acid or for further degradation and disposal, which will essentially require additional cost and maintenance. The present regulatory standard implemented at a global level, (meaning the intermediates which are transformed during its course of travel within the industry and in the treatments plants, i.e., in the present study it is, 7-ADCA and phenyl acetic acid are not allowed to discharge on water bodies), does not envisage such disposal alternatives and hence the present study was aimed at the complete removal of intermediates (7-ADCA) and phenyl acetic acid prior to discharge. PMID:20371950

  10. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  11. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  12. High temperature size selective membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.F.; Swamikannu, A.X.

    1993-09-01

    The high temperature membrane, capable of operation above 550{degree}C, is designed to be a composite membrane composed of a thin layer of a size selective membrane supported by a microporous ceramic support. The kinetic diameters of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are 2.96 {Angstrom} and 4.00 {Angstrom}. The thin layer will be made from CMS whose pore size will be controlled to be less than 4 {Angstrom}. The membrane will be truly size selective and be impermeable to carbon dioxide. The membrane will have higher selectivity than membranes which operate on Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The ceramic support will be fabricated from Allied Signal`s proprietary Blackglas{trademark} resin. The ceramic material, noted for its high thermal and oxidative resistance, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which matches closely that of CMS. The close match will insure mechanical integrity when the membrane is subjected to thermal cycles. The CMS layer will be produced by controlled pyrolysis of polymeric precursors. Pore size will be suitably modified by post-treatments to the carbon. The composite membrane will be tested for its permeation properties at 550{degree}C or higher. Thermal, mechanical and chemical stability of the membrane will be assessed. We have produced several samples of CMS from polymeric precursors. We have initiated work also on the preparation of microporous supports from Blackglas{trademark} resin. We have completed the design of the high temperature membrane pilot plant. The membrane cell was fabricated out of two kinds of stainless steel. The inner parts are made of SS 316 and the outer ring made of SS 420. The greater thermal expansion of the SS 316 will help obtain a leak free seal at the operating temperatures.

  13. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  14. Membranous nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels (most often statins) may be recommended. A low-salt diet may ... of membranous nephropathy Your symptoms get worse or don't go away You develop new symptoms You have ...

  15. Biofuel from fast pyrolysis and catalytic hydrodeoxygenation.

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-09-04

    This review addresses recent developments in biomass fast pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading by catalytic hydrotreating. The research in the field has expanded dramatically in the past few years with numerous new research groups entering the field while existing efforts from others expand. The issues revolve around the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Much work in batch reactor tests with precious metal catalysts needs further validation to verify long-term operability in continuous flow systems. The effect of the low level of sulfur in bio-oil needs more study to be better understood. Utilization of the upgraded bio-oil for feedstock to finished fuels is still in an early stage of understanding.

  16. Catalytic reforming of heart cut fcc naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsen, L.A.

    1985-03-01

    The anticipated lead phasedown in the USA and the growing demand for unleaded gasoline will require a higher gasoline pool octane number. One of the possibilities to achieve this increase of pool octane will be catalytic reforming of FCC naphtha. In this paper we evaluate the effects of FCC naphtha reforming on the reformer operation and gasoline pool volume for various lead phasedown scenarios. High-stability reforming catalysts, like TPR-8/CK-522 TRILOBE catalyst, will be required to maintain acceptable cycle lengths at the more severe reformer operating conditions. The properties and octane distribution of FCC naphtha are discussed, as well as its hydrotreating with high-active NiMo catalysts.

  17. Peptide Membranes in Chemical Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Childers, W. Seth; Ni, Rong; Mehta, Anil K.; Lynn, David G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Simple surfactants achieve remarkable long-range order in aqueous environments. This organizing potential is seen most dramatically in biological membranes where phospholipid assemblies both define cell boundaries and provide a ubiquitous structural scaffold for controlling cellular chemistry. Here we consider simple peptides that also spontaneously assemble into exceptionally ordered scaffolds, and review early data suggesting that these structures maintain the functional diversity of proteins. We argue that such scaffolds can achieve the required molecular order and catalytic agility for the emergence of chemical evolution. PMID:19879180

  18. Advanced low emissions catalytic combustor program at General Electric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The Advanced Low Emissions Catalytic Combustors Program (ALECC) is being undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of employing catalytic combustion technology in aircraft gas turbine engines as a means to control emission of oxides of nitrogen during subsonic stratospheric cruise operation. The ALECC Program is being conducted in three phases. The first phase, which was completed in November, 1978, consisted of a design study to identify catalytic combustor designs having the greatest potential to meet the emissions and performance goals specified. The primary emissions goal of this program was to obtain cruise NO emissions of less than 1g/kg (compared with levels of 15 to 20 g/x obtained with current designs)/ However, good overall performance and feasibility for engine development were heavily weighted in the evaluation of combustor designs.

  19. Development of a methane premixed catalytic burner for household applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Geobaldo, F.; Specchia, V.

    2000-01-01

    A catalytic premixed burner prototype for domestic-boiler applications was developed on the basis of a perovskite-type catalyst (LaMnO{sub 3}) deposited over a FeCrAlloy fiber panel. An economic and simple catalyst-deposition route, based on in situ pyrolysis of suitable precursors, was conceived and optimized on purpose. Finally, a catalytic burner and a reference noncatalytic one were comparatively tested in a pilot plant (maximum power, 30 kW, corresponding to about 2,000 kW/m{sup 2}). The catalytic burner allowed a strong reduction of CO and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions to very low and acceptable levels (down to 3--5 times lower than those of the noncatalytic burner) when operated below 800 kW/m{sup 2}. In these conditions, the NO{sub x} emissions remained quite acceptable and practically unaffected by the presence of the catalyst.

  20. High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 1, September 21, 1989--December 20, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.

    1992-06-19

    In this project we well evaluate the performance of Sel-Gel alumina membranes in coal liquid upgrading processes under realistic temperature and pressure conditions and investigate the feasibility of using such membranes in a membrane reactor based coal liquid upgrading process. In addition, the development of novel ceramic membranes with enhanced catalytic activity for coal-liquid upgrading applications, such as carbon-coated alumina membranes, will be also investigated. (VC)

  1. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A2 treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and phospholipid

  2. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-04-05

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A{sup 2} treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and

  3. Catalytic Enantioselective Carboannulation with Allylsilanes

    PubMed Central

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R.; Badillo, Joseph J.; Tran, Ngon T.; Franz, Annaliese K.

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a Sc(III)-indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (via trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  4. Catalytic enantioselective carboannulation with allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R; Badillo, Joseph J; Tran, Ngon T; Franz, Annaliese K

    2014-09-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a scandium(III)/indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon center are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (by trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  5. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  6. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Greene; Patricia A. Kirk; Richard Hayes; Joshua Riley

    2005-10-28

    SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, has engineered and developed a system for use within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. SpinTek II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System is a unique compact crossflow membrane system that has large, demonstrable advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems: (1) High fluid shear prevents membrane fouling even with very high solids content; hazardous and radioactive components can be concentrated to the consistency of a pasty slurry without fouling. (2) Induced turbulence and shear across the membrane increases membrane flux by a factor of ten over existing systems and allows operation on fluids not otherwise treatable. (3) Innovative ceramic membrane and mechanical sealing technology eliminates compatibility problems with aggressive DOE waste streams. (4) System design allows rapid, simple disassembly for inspection or complete decontamination. (5) Produces colloidal- and suspended-solids-free filtrate without the addition of chemicals. The first phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 5) completed the physical scale-up of the SpinTek unit and verified successful scale-up with surrogate materials. Given successful scale-up and DOE concurrence, the second phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 6) will provide for the installation and

  7. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered. PMID:23450281

  8. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing –SH, –SSR, and –SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered. PMID:23450281

  9. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  10. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  11. Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for α-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and −4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by −2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

  12. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  13. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  14. Applicability of dynamic membrane technology in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ersahin, Mustafa Evren; Ozgun, Hale; Tao, Yu; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the applicability of dynamic membrane technology in anaerobic membrane bioreactors for the treatment of high strength wastewaters. A monofilament woven fabric was used as support material for dynamic membrane formation. An anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) was operated under a variety of operational conditions, including different sludge retention times (SRTs) of 20 and 40 days in order to determine the effect of SRT on both biological performance and dynamic membrane filtration characteristics. High COD removal efficiencies exceeding 99% were achieved during the operation at both SRTs. Higher filtration resistances were measured during the operation at SRT of 40 days in comparison to SRT of 20 days, applying a stable flux of 2.6 L/m(2) h. The higher filtration resistances coincided with lower extracellular polymeric substances concentration in the bulk sludge at SRT of 40 days, likely resulting in a decreased particle flocculation. Results showed that dynamic membrane technology achieved a stable and high quality permeate and AnDMBRs can be used as a reliable and satisfactory technology for treatment of high strength wastewaters. PMID:24156951

  15. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  16. Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddock, Sandra A.; Post, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Social entrepreneurs are private citizens who play critical roles in bringing about catalytic changes in the public sector agenda and the perception of social issues. Factors that make their projects--such as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Earth Day--successful include problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to a collective…

  17. Determining Catalytic Cycles in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Joachim; Boxe, Christopher; Grenfell, Lee; Lehmann, Ralph; Patzer, Beate; Rauer, Heike; Yung, Yuk

    2010-05-01

    Chemical trace species play an important role in the chemical composition of terrestrial planetary atmospheres. These species can operate in catalytic cycles, which critically affect the concentrations of major chemical constituents and hence the whole structure of the atmosphere itself. The determination of chemical pathways in such complex systems is generally a challenging task, so effective methods are desirable for the investigation of such problems. In order to address this question to the chemical catalytic cycles in the atmosphere of Mars, we use a new analysis tool (Pathway Analysis Program - PAP), which was originally developed and applied to automatically identify and quantify ozone and methane cycles in Earth's stratosphere. The implemented algorithm determines and quantifies all significant pathways by treating each species one after the other as a branching point. Pathways are formed by connecting shorter pathways producing those branching point species with pathways consuming them. Reaction rates are assigned to the pathways proportional to the branching probabilities. In order to identify and analyze the dominant chemical processes in the Martian atmosphere, we apply PAP to the CalTech photochemical column model. The methodology of the algorithm is presented and first results of our analysis are discussed in view of the relevant chemical trace species.

  18. Catalytic combustion of actual low and medium heating value gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of both low and medium heating value gases using actual coal derived gases obtained from operating gasifiers was demonstrated. A fixed bed gasifier with a complete product gas cleanup system was operated in an air blown mode to produce low heating value gas. A fluidized bed gasifier with a water quench product gas cleanup system was operated in both an air enriched and an oxygen blown mode to produce low and medium, heating value gas. Noble metal catalytic reactors were evaluated in 12 cm flow diameter test rigs on both low and medium heating value gases. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5% were obtained with all coal derived gaseous fuels. The NOx emissions ranged from 0.2 to 4 g NO2 kg fuel.

  19. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX. PMID:26470855

  20. Negatively Charged Lipid Membranes Catalyze Supramolecular Hydrogel Formation.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Elsland, Daphne M; Mytnyk, Serhii; Perrier, Dayinta L; Trausel, Fanny; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; le Sage, Vincent A A; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-20

    In this contribution we show that biological membranes can catalyze the formation of supramolecular hydrogel networks. Negatively charged lipid membranes can generate a local proton gradient, accelerating the acid-catalyzed formation of hydrazone-based supramolecular gelators near the membrane. Synthetic lipid membranes can be used to tune the physical properties of the resulting multicomponent gels as a function of lipid concentration. Moreover, the catalytic activity of lipid membranes and the formation of gel networks around these supramolecular structures are controlled by the charge and phase behavior of the lipid molecules. Finally, we show that the insights obtained from synthetic membranes can be translated to biological membranes, enabling the formation of gel fibers on living HeLa cells. PMID:27359373

  1. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  2. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  3. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  4. MTBE, methane, ethylene and regulated exhaust emissions from vehicles with deactivated catalytic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulopoulos, S. G.; Philippopoulos, C. J.

    In the present work, the effect of the gradual deactivation of a three-way catalytic converter on the exhaust emissions was studied. The exhaust gases were analyzed for CO, HC (i.e. total unburned organic compounds), MTBE, methane and ethylene, before and after their catalytic treatment, in a wide range of engine operating conditions. The thermal aging of the catalytic converter resulted in an increase in the required time for the start of its operation and loss of its auto thermal operation. The catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased after each thermal aging step, especially at idle conditions. As a result, CO and especially HC emissions were increased, whereas ethylene and MTBE emissions were multiplied by a factor of 6-7 at 3.81 hp, in the case of the deactivated catalyst.

  5. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  6. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-17

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. As a result, the active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  7. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution. PMID:26673816

  8. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  9. Membrane magic

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2005-09-01

    The Kansas Power and Light Co.'s La Cyne generating station has found success with membrane filtration water pretreatment technology. The article recounts the process followed in late 2004 to install a Pall Aria 4 microfilter in Unit 1 makeup water system at the plant to produce cleaner water for reverse osmosis feed. 2 figs., 2 photos.

  10. Translocation of the Catalytic Domain of Diphtheria Toxin across Planar Phospholipid Bilayers by Its Own T Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyoung Joon; Senzel, Lisa; Collier, R. John; Finkelstein, Alan

    1999-07-01

    The T domain of diphtheria toxin is known to participate in the pH-dependent translocation of the catalytic C domain of the toxin across the endosomal membrane, but how it does so, and whether cellular proteins are also required for this process, remain unknown. Here, we report results showing that the T domain alone is capable of translocating the entire C domain across model, planar phospholipid bilayers in the absence of other proteins. The T domain therefore contains the entire molecular machinery for mediating transfer of the catalytic domain of diphtheria toxin across membranes.

  11. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  12. Hydrophilic membrane-based humidity control.

    PubMed

    Scovazzo, P; Burgos, J; Hoehn, A; Todd, P

    1998-10-14

    A dehumidification system for low gravity plant growth experiments requires the generation of no free-liquid condensate and the recovery of water for reuse. In the systems discussed in this paper, the membrane is a barrier between the humid air phase and a liquid-coolant water phase. The coolant water temperature combined with a transmembrane pressure differential establishes a water flux from the humid air into the coolant water. Building on the work of others, we directly compared different hydrophilic membranes for humidity control. In a direct comparison of the hydrophilic membranes, hollow fiber cellulose ester membranes were superior to metal and ceramic membranes in the categories of condensation flux per surface area, ease of start-up, and stability. However, cellulose ester membranes were inferior to metal membranes in one significant category, durability. Dehumidification systems using mixed cellulose ester membranes failed after operational times of only hours to days. We propose that the ratio of fluid surface area to membrane material area (approximately = membrane porosity) controls the relative performances among membranes. In addition, we clarified design equations for operational parameters such as the transmembrane pressure differential. This technology has several potential benefits related to earth environmental issues including the minimization of airborne pathogen release and higher energy efficiency in air conditioning equipment. Utilizing these study results, we designed, constructed, and flew on the space shuttle missions a membrane-based dehumidification system for a plant growth chamber. PMID:11543067

  13. Membranes for Environmentally Friendly Energy Processes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuezhong; Hägg, May-Britt

    2012-01-01

    Membrane separation systems require no or very little chemicals compared to standard unit operations. They are also easy to scale up, energy efficient, and already widely used in various gas and liquid separation processes. Different types of membranes such as common polymers, microporous organic polymers, fixed-site-carrier membranes, mixed matrix membranes, carbon membranes as well as inorganic membranes have been investigated for CO2 capture/removal and other energy processes in the last two decades. The aim of this work is to review the membrane systems applied in different energy processes, such as post-combustion, pre-combustion, oxyfuel combustion, natural gas sweetening, biogas upgrading, hydrogen production, volatile organic compounds (VOC) recovery and pressure retarded osmosis for power generation. Although different membranes could probably be used in a specific separation process, choosing a suitable membrane material will mainly depend on the membrane permeance and selectivity, process conditions (e.g., operating pressure, temperature) and the impurities in a gas stream (such as SO2, NOx, H2S, etc.). Moreover, process design and the challenges relevant to a membrane system are also being discussed to illustrate the membrane process feasibility for a specific application based on process simulation and economic cost estimation. PMID:24958426

  14. Membranes for environmentally friendly energy processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xuezhong; Hägg, May-Britt

    2012-01-01

    Membrane separation systems require no or very little chemicals compared to standard unit operations. They are also easy to scale up, energy efficient, and already widely used in various gas and liquid separation processes. Different types of membranes such as common polymers, microporous organic polymers, fixed-site-carrier membranes, mixed matrix membranes, carbon membranes as well as inorganic membranes have been investigated for CO2 capture/removal and other energy processes in the last two decades. The aim of this work is to review the membrane systems applied in different energy processes, such as post-combustion, pre-combustion, oxyfuel combustion, natural gas sweetening, biogas upgrading, hydrogen production, volatile organic compounds (VOC) recovery and pressure retarded osmosis for power generation. Although different membranes could probably be used in a specific separation process, choosing a suitable membrane material will mainly depend on the membrane permeance and selectivity, process conditions (e.g., operating pressure, temperature) and the impurities in a gas stream (such as SO2, NOx, H2S, etc.). Moreover, process design and the challenges relevant to a membrane system are also being discussed to illustrate the membrane process feasibility for a specific application based on process simulation and economic cost estimation. PMID:24958426

  15. Degradation and reliability modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Michael William

    To date there has been very little reliability or end of life analysis conducted for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Voltage degradation as a fuel cell ages is a widely observed phenomenon, but little systematic information has been reported, nor has this phenomenon been included in electrochemical models. This work documents and classifies the failure modes that can be experienced in PEM fuel cells. A test station was adapted for the long term operation of a single, 50 cm2, internally hydrated, PEM fuel cell. An endurance test was conducted to age the cell under normal operating conditions for 1350 hours, at which time membrane failure was experienced. Changes in the polarization curve predicted by the Generalized Steady State Electrochemical Degradation Model (GSSEDM) are demonstrated from the data for the performance of typical PEM fuel cell hardware. This work develops and applies the generalized steady state electrochemical model for a PEM cell, and introduces two new terms to account for membrane electrode assembly (MEA) ageing, specifically the ageing of the MEA materials. One term is based on the concept that the water carrying capacity of the membrane deteriorates with time-in-service. The second term involves intrinsic rate constants associated with the reactions on the anode and cathode side, and the changes in catalytic activity due to catalyst degradation. The resulting model is largely mechanistic with most terms being derived from theory or including coefficients that have a theoretical basis, but also includes empirical parameters to deal with the changing performance. The value of such a generic model to predict or correlate PEM fuel cell stack voltages over the life of the fuel cell is demonstrated in this work. From the experimental data a membrane conductivity degradation rate, lambdaDR, was determined, and the value for lambdaDR was found to be -0.0007 hr -1. A term was introduced for degradation rate of the fuel cell due

  16. Temperature polarization coefficients in membrane distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Diez, L.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, M.I.; Florido-Diaz, F.J.

    1998-04-01

    Membrane distillation is a membrane process in which two liquid phases at different temperatures are separated by a microporous hydrophobic membrane. The membrane plays the role of a physical support for the vapor-liquid interface. The aim of this paper is to study pure water transport by membrane distillation through a PTFE flat membrane. The dependence of the phenomenon on average temperature and recirculation rate at the membrane sides is investigated. The influence of these operating conditions on water transport is discussed by taking into account mass and heat transfer within the membrane and the adjoining liquid phases. The concept of temperature polarization is introduced into the transport equations and shown to be important in the interpretation of the experimental results.

  17. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  18. An assessment of oxygen transfer efficiency in a gas permeable hollow fibre membrane biological reactor.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, G; Lishman, L; Dunlop, S; Behmann, H; Seto, P

    2010-01-01

    The clean water oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) of a full scale non-porous hollow fibre gas permeable (GP) membrane (surface area of 500 m(2)) was evaluated at inlet air pressures of 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 atm using two established testing methods. To form a basis of comparison with traditional aeration technologies, additional testing was done with conventional aerators (fine bubble and coarse bubble diffusers) replacing the GP membrane. OTE can be established based on the re-aeration of deoxygenated water or by monitoring the catalytic oxidation of a sodium sulphite (Na(2)SO(3)) solution. In this study, OTE values determined by sulphite oxidation (SOTE(S)) were consistently higher than those established during re-aeration (SOTE(R)) suggesting that the chemical reaction was enhancing the mass transfer. The chemical reaction was sufficiently fast in the case of the GP membrane, that the gas phase limited the mass transfer. The GP membrane operating at 1.2 atm had a SOTE(S) of 70.6% and a SOTER of 52.2%. SOTE(R) for the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusers were 3.8% and 23.6%, respectively. This is comparable to the manufacturer's values, corrected for depth of 3.4% and 18.3%, respectively. Particularly, the derived OTE values were used to evaluate differences in energy consumption for a conventional treatment plant achieving carbon removal and nitrification. This analysis highlights the potential energy efficiency of GP membranes, which could be considered for the design of the membrane modules. PMID:20220238

  19. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep; Pfefferle, William

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines

  20. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation of acylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiawei; Oost, Rik; Desmarchelier, Alaric; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R

    2015-03-01

    The highly enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to acylsilanes is catalyzed by copper diphosphine complexes. This transformation affords α-silylated tertiary alcohols in up to 97% yield and 98:2 enantiomeric ratio. The competing Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction is suppressed by the use of a mixture of Lewis acid additives. The chiral catalyst can be recovered as a copper complex and used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25403641

  1. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  2. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  3. Catalytic nanomotors: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-06-01

    The fabrication of integrated nanomachinary systems can enable break-through applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, bioengineering, and drug delivery or disease treatment. Naturally occurring nanomotors are biological motor proteins powered by catalytic reactions, which convert the chemical energy from the environment into mechanical energy directly. It has been demonstrated recently that using a simple catalytic reaction and an asymmetric bimetallic nanorod, one can produce catalytic nanomotors that mimic the autonomous motions of bionanomotors. Yet the construction of artificial nanomachines remains a major contemporary challenge due to the lack of a flexible fabrication technique that can design the desired dynamic components. We use a design technique called dynamic shadowing growth that allows for the fabrication of a wide range of various geometries and the asymmetric placement of the catalyst is easily accomplished as well which is necessary for directed propulsion. Programming nanomotor behavior is possible through geometrically-focused design and by incorporating different materials into the nanomotor structure is a simple process as well. A propulsion mechanism based upon bubble ejection from the catalyst surface is introduced to explain the driving force, and the comparison of this driving mechanism with the self-electrophoresis mechanism is also studied. We have also successfully incorporated multiple parts to form complex nanomotor assemblies which exhibit motions not observed from individual parts by using magnetic interactions.

  4. [Membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Mercadal, Lucile

    2013-12-01

    Membranous nephropathy is characterized by immune complex deposits on the outer side of the glomerular basement membrane. Activation of complement and of oxidation lead to basement membrane lesions. The most frequent form is idiopathic. At 5 and 10 years, renal survival is around 90 and 65% respectively. A prognostic model based on proteinuria, level and duration, progression of renal failure in a few months can refine prognosis. The urinary excretion of C5b-9, β2 and α1 microglobuline and IgG are strong predictors of outcome. Symptomatic treatment is based on anticoagulation in case of nephrotic syndrome, angiotensin conversion enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins. Immunosuppressive therapy should be discussed for patients having a high risk of progression. Corticoids alone has no indication. Treatment should include a simultaneous association or more often alternating corticoids and alkylant agent for a minimum of 6 months. Adrenocorticoid stimulating hormone and steroids plus mycophenolate mofetil may be equally effective. Steroids plus alkylant decrease the risk of end stage renal failure. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus decrease proteinuria but are associated with a high risk of recurrence at time of withdrawal and are nephrotoxic. Rituximab evaluated on open studies needs further evaluations to define its use. PMID:24315535

  5. Hybrid lean premixing catalytic combustion system for gas turbines

    DOEpatents

    Critchley, Ian L.

    2003-12-09

    A system and method of combusting a hydrocarbon fuel is disclosed. The system combines the accuracy and controllability of an air staging system with the ultra-low emissions achieved by catalytic combustion systems without the need for a pre-heater. The result is a system and method that is mechanically simple and offers ultra-low emissions over a wide range of power levels, fuel properties and ambient operating conditions.

  6. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  7. Thermal performance of a catalytic/oxidizer for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedel, R. K.; Djordjevic, N.; Faulkner, F.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal analysis and testing have been performed for the High Temperature Catalytic/Oxidizer (HTCO) for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS). The HTCO consists of a counterflow, plate-fin heat exchanger, a resistance heater, and a charcoal catalytic oxidizer bed. The unit removes various inorganics and hydrocarbons from the SSF cabin air. A thermal model of the unit was developed which was used to design the HEX and catalytic bed. The model has been used to predict both steady state and transient results. Accurate predictions of ground test data have led to confidence in proper operation of the unit in the SSF.

  8. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  9. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation and hydroconversion process

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; McLean, Joseph B.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    1989-01-01

    A process for two-stage catalytic hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent and fed at temperature below about 650.degree. F. into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils at conditions favoring hydrogenation reactions. The first stage reactor is maintained at 650.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-60 lb coal/hr/ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The partially hydrogenated material from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the close-coupled second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at a temperature at least about 25.degree. F. higher than for the first stage reactor and within a range of 750.degree.-875.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and thermal hydroconversion reactions. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, which results in significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of undesirable residuum and unconverted coal and hydrocarbon gases, with use of less energy to obtain the low molecular weight products, while catalyst life is substantially increased.

  10. ULTRA LOW NOx CATALYTIC COMBUSTION FOR IGCC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lance L. Smith

    2004-03-01

    Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using PCI's two-stage (catalytic / gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage is a Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{trademark}) catalytic reactor, wherein a fuel-rich mixture contacts the catalyst and reacts while final and excess combustion air cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, wherein the catalyst cooling air mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During the reporting period, PCI successfully achieved NOx = 0.011 lbs/MMBtu at 10 atm pressure (corresponding to 2.0 ppm NOx corrected to 15% O{sub 2} dry) with near-zero CO emissions, surpassing the project goal of < 0.03 lbs/MMBtu NOx. These emissions levels were achieved at scaled (10 atm, sub-scale) baseload conditions corresponding to Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station operation on 100% syngas (no co-firing of natural gas).

  11. Characterization of a Membrane-active Peptide from the Bordetella pertussis CyaA Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Subrini, Orso; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Hessel, Audrey; Spiaczka-Karst, Johanna; Selwa, Edithe; Sapay, Nicolas; Veneziano, Rémi; Pansieri, Jonathan; Chopineau, Joel; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, secretes several virulence factors, among which is the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in the early stages of human respiratory tract colonization. CyaA invades target cells by translocating its catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane and overproduces cAMP, leading to cell death. The molecular process leading to the translocation of the catalytic domain remains largely unknown. We have previously shown that the catalytic domain per se, AC384, encompassing residues 1–384 of CyaA, did not interact with lipid bilayer, whereas a longer polypeptide, AC489, spanning residues 1–489, binds to membranes and permeabilizes vesicles. Moreover, deletion of residues 375–485 within CyaA abrogated the translocation of the catalytic domain into target cells. Here, we further identified within this region a peptidic segment that exhibits membrane interaction properties. A synthetic peptide, P454, corresponding to this sequence (residues 454–485 of CyaA) was characterized by various biophysical approaches. We found that P454 (i) binds to membranes containing anionic lipids, (ii) adopts an α-helical structure oriented in plane with respect to the lipid bilayer, and (iii) permeabilizes vesicles. We propose that the region encompassing the helix 454–485 of CyaA may insert into target cell membrane and induce a local destabilization of the lipid bilayer, thus favoring the translocation of the catalytic domain across the plasma membrane. PMID:24064217

  12. Lipid membranes for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of membrane proteins requires the setup of an accurate representation of lipid bilayers. This chapter describes the setup of a lipid bilayer system from scratch using generally available tools, starting with a definition of the lipid molecule POPE, generation of a lipid bilayer, energy minimization, MD simulation, and data analysis. The data analysis includes the calculation of area and volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, self-diffusion constant, and the electron density profile. PMID:25330959

  13. Hydrogen Permeability of Palladium Membrane for Steam-Reforming of Bio-Ethanol Using the Membrane Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinouchi, Kouji; Katoh, Masahiro; Horikawa, Toshihide; Yoshikawa, Takushi; Wada, Mamoru

    A Palladium membrane was prepared by electro-less plating method on porous stainless steel. The catalytic hydrogen production by steam-reforming of biomass-derived ethanol (bio-ethanol) using a Pd membrane was analyzed by comparing it with those for the reaction using reagent ethanol (the reference sample). And the hydrogen permeability of the palladium membrane was investigated using the same palladium membrane (H2/He selectivity = 249, at ΔP = 0.10 MPa, 873 K). As a result, for bio-ethanol, deposited carbon had a negative influence on the hydrogen-permeability of the palladium membrane and hydrogen purity. The sulfur content in the bio-ethanol may have promoted carbon deposition. By using a palladium membrane, it was confirmed that H2 yield (%) was increased. It can be attributed that methane was converted from ethanol and produced more hydrogen by steam reforming, due to the in situ removal of hydrogen from the reaction location.

  14. Energy efficiency in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Barillon, B; Martin Ruel, S; Langlais, C; Lazarova, V

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption remains the key factor for the optimisation of the performance of membrane bioreactors (MBRs). This paper presents the results of the detailed energy audits of six full-scale MBRs operated by Suez Environnement in France, Spain and the USA based on on-site energy measurement and analysis of plant operation parameters and treatment performance. Specific energy consumption is compared for two different MBR configurations (flat sheet and hollow fibre membranes) and for plants with different design, loads and operation parameters. The aim of this project was to understand how the energy is consumed in MBR facilities and under which operating conditions, in order to finally provide guidelines and recommended practices for optimisation of MBR operation and design to reduce energy consumption and environmental impacts. PMID:23787304

  15. Membranes for corrosive oxidations. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this project is to develop porous hydrophilic membranes that are highly resistant to oxidative and corrosive conditions and to deploy them for recovery and purification of high tonnage chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide and other oxychemicals. The research team patented a process for membrane-based separation of hydrogen peroxide (US Patent No. 5,662,878). The process is based on using a hydrophilic membrane to separate hydrogen peroxide from the organic working solution. To enable this process, a new method for producing hydrophilic membrane materials (Patent No.6,464,880) was reported. We investigated methods of producing these hydrophilic materials and evaluated separations performance in comparison to membrane stability. It was determined that at the required membrane flux, membrane stability was not sufficient to design a commercial process. This work was published (Hestekin et al., J. Membrane Science 2006). To meet the performance needs of the process, we developed a membrane contactor method to extract the hydrogen peroxide, then we surveyed several commercial and pre-commercial membrane materials. We identified pre-commercial hydrophilic membranes with the required selectivity, flux, and stability to meet the needs of the process. In addition, we invented a novel reaction/separations format that greatly increases the performance of the process. To test the performance of the membranes and the new formats we procured and integrated reactor/membrane separations unit that enables controlled mixing, flow, temperature control, pressure control, and sampling. The results were used to file a US non-provisional patent application (ANL-INV 03-12). Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in pulp and paper applications, environmental treatment, and other industries. Virtually all hydrogen peroxide production is now based on a process featuring catalytic hydrogenation followed by auto-oxidation of suitable organic carrier molecules. This process has several

  16. Omniphobic Membrane for Robust Membrane Distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, SH; Nejati, S; Boo, C; Hu, YX; Osuji, CO; Ehmelech, M

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we fabricate an omniphobic microporous membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a hydrophilic glass fiber membrane with silica nanoparticles followed by surface fluorination and polymer coating. The modified glass fiber membrane exhibits an anti-wetting property not only against water but also against low surface tension organic solvents that easily wet a hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane that is commonly used in MD applications. By comparing the performance of the PTFE and omniphobic membranes in direct contact MD experiments in the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), we show that SDS wets the hydrophobic PTFE membrane but not the omniphobic membrane. Our results suggest that omniphobic membranes are critical for MD applications with feed waters containing surface active species, such as oil and gas produced water, to prevent membrane pore wetting.

  17. Binderless electrodes for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Li, Q.; Steenberg, T.; Jensen, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    A new electrode concept was proved with no polymeric binder in the catalyst layer for acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane fuel cells. It shows that a stable interface between the membrane and the catalyst layer can be retained when a proton conducting acid phase is established. The absence of the polymer in the catalytic layer turned out to be beneficial for the PBI cell performance particularly under high load operation. The influence on performance of the Pt loading of the cathode was studied in a range from 0.11 to 2.04 mgPt cm-2 showing saturation of the maximum performance for Pt loadings higher than 0.5 mgPt cm-2. For fuel cell operation on H2 and air supplied under ambient pressure, a peak power density as high as 471 mW cm-2 was measured. The tolerance to carbon monoxide (CO) was also studied with Pt loadings of the anode ranging from 0.24 to 1.82 mgPt cm-2. Lifetime test for a MEA loaded with 0.96 mgPt cm-2 on both electrodes revealed no voltage decay during 900 h of uninterrupted operation at 200 mA cm-2 and 160 °C.

  18. Advanced Low-Emissions Catalytic-Combustor Program, phase 1. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgess, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Six catalytic combustor concepts were defined, analyzed, and evaluated. Major design considerations included low emissions, performance, safety, durability, installations, operations and development. On the basis of these considerations the two most promising concepts were selected. Refined analysis and preliminary design work was conducted on these two concepts. The selected concepts were required to fit within the combustor chamber dimensions of the reference engine. This is achieved by using a dump diffuser discharging into a plenum chamber between the compressor discharge and the turbine inlet, with the combustors overlaying the prediffuser and the rear of the compressor. To enhance maintainability, the outer combustor case for each concept is designed to translate forward for accessibility to the catalytic reactor, liners and high pressure turbine area. The catalytic reactor is self-contained with air-cooled canning on a resilient mounting. Both selected concepts employed integrated engine-starting approaches to raise the catalytic reactor up to operating conditions. Advanced liner schemes are used to minimize required cooling air. The two selected concepts respectively employ fuel-rich initial thermal reaction followed by rapid quench and subsequent fuel-lean catalytic reaction of carbon monoxide, and, fuel-lean thermal reaction of some fuel in a continuously operating pilot combustor with fuel-lean catalytic reaction of remaining fuel in a radially-staged main combustor.

  19. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  20. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  1. Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.; Rogers, M.L.

    1980-09-30

    Starting from an effort to control airborne emissions, the Mound tritium containment program has evolved to include development of the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process. This process separates tritiated aqueous streams into detritiated water and an enriched hydrogen stream that is suitable for use by other tritium recovery processes. Experimentation has shown that the process performs as predicted by bench-scale measurements, and that available process components exhibit acceptable resistance to damage by radiation from tritium exposure. Planned future efforts are concentrated on finalizing automatic control of the process and on developing feed treatment methods for the protection of process components.

  2. Modulated mechanism of phosphatidylserine on the catalytic activity of Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yi-Ling; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization is a hallmark for apoptotic death of cells. Previous studies showed that Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 (NnaPLA2) and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin induced apoptosis of human cancer cells. However, NnaPLA2 and notexin did not markedly disrupt the integrity of cellular membrane as evidenced by membrane permeability of propidium iodide. These findings reflected that the ability of NnaPLA2 and notexin to hydrolyze membrane phospholipids may be affected by PS externalization. To address that question, this study investigated the membrane-interacted mode and catalytic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin toward outer leaflet (phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol, PC/SM/Chol) and inner leaflet (phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine/cholesterol, PS/PE/Chol) of plasma membrane-mimicking vesicles. PS incorporation promoted enzymatic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin on PC and PC/SM vesicles, but suppressed NnaPLA2 and notexin activity on PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS incorporation increased the membrane fluidity of PC vesicles but reduced membrane fluidity of PC/SM, PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS increased the phospholipid order of all the tested vesicles. Moreover, PS incorporation did not greatly alter the binding affinity of notexin and NnaPLA2 with phospholipid vesicles. Acrylamide quenching studies and trinitrophenylation of Lys residues revealed that membrane-bound mode of notexin and NnaPLA2 varied with the targeted membrane compositions. The fine structure of catalytic site in NnaPLA2 and notexin in all the tested vesicles showed different changes. Collectively, the present data suggest that membrane-inserted PS modulates PLA2 interfacial activity via its effects on membrane structure and membrane-bound mode of NnaPLA2 and notexin, and membrane compositions determine the effect of PS on PLA2 activity. PMID:25449100

  3. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  4. Thin membranes of new hard/soft segment copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.S.; Sartori, G.; Thaler, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    Thin membranes of new hard/soft segment copolymers have been synthesized for the separation of aromatics from saturates through high temperature pervaporation. In the membranes, hard segments provide temperature stability and solvent resistance, while soft segments govern aromatic/saturate selectivity and flux. We have synthesized new chlorinated polyurethane/polyester and polyimide/polyester copolymers. Based on a polyimide copolymer membrane, a new technology has been developed recently to separate heavy catalytically cracked naphtha into an aromatics-rich permeate and an aromatics-lean retentate.

  5. Membrane Assembly Driven by a Biomimetic Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Itay; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major goals of synthetic biology is the development of non-natural cellular systems. In this work we describe a catalytic biomimetic coupling reaction capable of driving the de novo self-assembly of phospholipid membranes. Our system features a copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition that results in the formation of a triazole containing phospholipid analog. Concomitant assembly of membranes occurs spontaneously, not requiring preexisting membranes to house catalysts or precursors. The substitution of efficient synthetic reactions for key biochemical processes may offer a general route toward synthetic biological systems. PMID:22239722

  6. Advanced composite polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, T.A.; Gottesfeld, S.; Kolde, J.A.; Bahar, B.

    1995-09-01

    A new type of reinforced composite perfluorinated polymer electrolyte membrane, GORE-SELECT{trademark} (W.L. Gore & Assoc.), is characterized and tested for fuel cell applications. Very thin membranes (5-20 {mu}m thick) are available. The combination of reinforcement and thinness provides high membrane, conductances (80 S/cm{sup 2} for a 12 {mu}m thick membrane at 25{degrees}C) and improved water distribution in the operating fuel cell without sacrificing longevity or durability. In contrast to nonreinforced perfluorinated membranes, the x-y dimensions of the GORE-SELECT membranes are relatively unaffected by the hydration state. This feature may be important from the viewpoints of membrane/electrode interface stability and fuel cell manufacturability.

  7. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC CHEMICALS: CATALYTIC HYDRODECHLORINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED PESTICIDES AND RELATED SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study has been undertaken of the catalytic conversion of chlorinated pesticides and other environmentally undesirable chlorinated materials into acceptable compounds. The results of this study show that chlorine can be catalytically removed and replaced by hydrogen to produce r...

  8. Catalytic cracking of bio-oil to organic liquid product (OLP).

    PubMed

    Hew, K L; Tamidi, A M; Yusup, S; Lee, K T; Ahmad, M M

    2010-11-01

    The main objective of this paper is to find the optimum operating condition to upgrade the EFB-derived pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) to liquid fuel, mainly gasoline using Taguchi Method. From the analysis that has been done, it is found that the optimum operating condition for heterogeneous catalytic cracking process is at 400 degrees C, 15min of reaction time using 30g of catalyst weight where operating at this condition produced the highest yield of gasoline fraction which is 91.67 wt.%. This observation proves that EFB-derived pyrolysis oil could be upgraded via heterogeneous catalytic cracking to produce gasoline. PMID:20621470

  9. Catalytic combustion of alcohols for microburner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Douglas A.; Lee, Ivan C.; Waits, C. Michael

    The combustion of energy dense liquid fuels in a catalytic micro-combustor, whose temperatures can be used in energy conversion devices, is an attractive alternative to cumbersome batteries. To miniaturize the reactor, an evaporation model was developed to calculate the minimum distance required for complete droplet vaporization. By increasing the ambient temperature from 298 to 350 K, the distance required for complete evaporation of a 6.5 μm droplet decreases from 3.5 to 0.15 cm. A platinum mesh acted as a preliminary measurement and demonstrated 75% conversion of ethanol. We then selected a more active rhodium-coated alumina foam with a larger surface area and attained 100% conversion of ethanol and 95% conversion of 1-butanol under fuel lean conditions. Effluent post-combustion gas analysis showed that varying the equivalence ratio results in three possible modes of operation. A regime of high carbon selectivity for CO 2 occurs at low equivalence ratios and corresponds to complete combustion with a typical temperature of 775 K that is ideal for PbTe thermoelectric energy conversion devices. Conversely for equivalence ratios greater than 1, carbon selectivity for CO 2 decreases as hydrogen, olefin and paraffin production increases. By tuning the equivalence ratio, we have shown that a single device can combust completely for thermoelectric applications, operate as a fuel reformer to produce hydrogen gas for fuel cells or perform as a bio-refinery for paraffin and olefin synthesis.

  10. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  11. Extractive biofilm membrane bioreactor with energy recovery from excess aeration and new membrane fouling control.

    PubMed

    Phattaranawik, Jirachote; Leiknes, TorOve

    2011-02-01

    Hybrid biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) system featuring new mechanisms for recovering the excess energy from air bubbling flow in the biofilm reactor and for controlling membrane biofouling was preliminarily investigated in this study. Alternative design of the biofilm reactor was developed to utilize the bubbling flow from the lower aerobic chamber to generate a mechanical mixing in the upper anoxic chamber in the vertical biofilm reactor. Suspended solid (SS) concentration in the system was hydrodynamically controlled to be lower than 70 mg/L. The ultraviolet (UV) inactivation unit was integrated with the membrane filtration tank to limit biological activities for biofoulant productions and to decelerate the unwanted biofilm formation in the permeate tube. Membrane relaxations at various operating conditions were studied for optimum membrane fouling reductions under low SS environment. Combinations of membrane relaxation and the UV inactivation significantly prolonged sustainable operation periods of the membrane filtration in the BF-MBR process. PMID:21074416

  12. Membranes and separators for flowing-electrolyte batteries: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C., Jr.; Assink, R. A.

    1983-04-01

    Membranes and separators for flowing electrolyte batteries are reviewed. Simple descriptive models are used to illustrate their functions and to distinguish between the operation of separators and membranes. Several studies which investigated the relationships between membrane structure and properties are reviewed. The many methods of separator and membrane preparation are compared. Finally, the specific separator and membrane requirements of three flowing electrolyte battery systems currently under development are described. Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of membrane fouling in iron/chromium redox battery, oxidative degradation of the membrane in the zinc/ferricyanide battery and separator impurities in the zinc/bromine battery.

  13. Membrane patterned by pulsed laser micromachining for proton exchange membrane fuel cell with sputtered ultra-low catalyst loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuynet, S.; Caillard, A.; Kaya-Boussougou, S.; Lecas, T.; Semmar, N.; Bigarré, J.; Buvat, P.; Brault, P.

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membranes were nano- and micro-patterned on their cathode side by pressing them against stainless steel molds previously irradiated by a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser. The membranes were associated to ultra-low loaded thin catalytic layers (25 μgPt cm-2) prepared by plasma magnetron sputtering. The Pt catalyst was sputtered either on the membrane or on the porous electrode. The fuel cell performance in dry conditions were found to be highly dependent on the morphology of the membrane surface. When nanometric ripples covered by a Pt catalyst were introduced on the surface of the membrane, the fuel cell outperformed the conventional one with a flat membrane. By combining nano- and micro-patterns (nanometric ripples and 11-24 μm deep craters), the performance of the cells was clearly enhanced. The maximum power density achieved by the fuel cell was multiplied by a factor of 3.6 (at 50 °C and 3 bar): 438 mW cm-2 vs 122 mW cm-2. This improvement is due to high catalyst utilization with a high membrane conductivity. When Pt is sputtered on the porous electrode (and not on the membrane), the contribution of the patterned membrane to the fuel cell efficiency was less significant, except in the presence of nanometric ripples. This result suggests that the patterning of the membrane must be consistent with the way the catalyst is synthesized, on the membrane or on the porous electrode.

  14. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  15. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  16. Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2010-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion®, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 °C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation

  17. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  18. Evolution of a Catalytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rauwerdink, Alissa; Lunzer, Mark; Devamani, Titu; Jones, Bryan; Mooney, Joanna; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Jian-He; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Dean, Antony M

    2016-04-01

    The means by which superfamilies of specialized enzymes arise by gene duplication and functional divergence are poorly understood. The escape from adaptive conflict hypothesis, which posits multiple copies of a gene encoding a primitive inefficient and highly promiscuous generalist ancestor, receives support from experiments showing that resurrected ancestral enzymes are indeed more substrate-promiscuous than their modern descendants. Here, we provide evidence in support of an alternative model, the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, which posits a single-copied ancestor as efficient and specific as any modern enzyme. We argue that the catalytic mechanisms of plant esterases and descendent acetone cyanohydrin lyases are incompatible with each other (e.g., the reactive substrate carbonyl must bind in opposite orientations in the active site). We then show that resurrected ancestral plant esterases are as catalytically specific as modern esterases, that the ancestor of modern acetone cyanohydrin lyases was itself only very weakly promiscuous, and that improvements in lyase activity came at the expense of esterase activity. These observations support the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, in which an ancestor gains a weak promiscuous activity that is improved by selection at the expense of the ancestral activity, and not the escape from adaptive conflict in which an inefficient generalist ancestral enzyme steadily loses promiscuity throughout the transition to a highly active specialized modern enzyme. PMID:26681154

  19. Novel selective surface flow (SSF{sup TM}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogren from waste gas streams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.

    1995-08-01

    The waste streams are off-gas streams from various chemical/refinery operations. In Phase I, the architecture of the membrane and the separation device were defined and demonstrated. The system consists of a shell-and-tube separator in which the gas to be separated is fed to the tube side, the product is collected as high pressure effluent and the permeate constitutes the waste/fuel stream. Each tube, which has the membrane coated on the interior, does the separation. A multi- tube separator device containing 1 ft{sup 2} membrane area was built and tested. The engineering data were used for designing a process for hydrogen recovery from a fluid catalytic cracker off-gas stream. First-pass economics showed that overall cost for hydrogen production is reduced by 35% vs on-purpose production of hydrogen by steam- methane reforming. The hydrogen recovery process using the SSF membrane results in at least 15% energy reduction and significant decrease in CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions.

  20. Gas separations using ceramic membranes. Final report, September 1988--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Gallaher, G.R.; Smith, G.W.; Flowers, D.L.; Gerdes, T.E.; Liu, P.K.T.

    1993-02-01

    This study covers a comprehensive evaluation of existing ceramic membranes for high temperature gas separations. Methodology has been established for microporous characterization stability and gas separation efficiency. A mathematical model was developed to predict gas separations with existing membranes. Silica and zeolitic modifications of existing membranes were pursued to enhance its separation efficiency. Some of which demonstrate unique separations properties. Use of the dense-silica membranes for hydrogen enrichment was identified as a promising candidate for future development. In addition, the decomposition of trace ammonia contaminant via a catalytic membrane reactor appears feasible. A further economic analysis is required to assess its commercial viability.

  1. Membrane fouling control using a rotary disk in a submerged anaerobic membrane sponge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungmin; Shin, Jaewon; Kim, Hyemin; Lee, Jung-Yeol; Yoon, Min-Hyuk; Won, Seyeon; Lee, Byung-Chan; Song, Kyung Guen

    2014-11-01

    Despite significant research efforts over the last few decades, membrane fouling in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) remains an unsolved problem that increases the overall operational costs and obstructs the industrial applications. Herein, we developed a method for effectively controlling the membrane fouling in a sponge-submerged AnMBRs using an anaerobic rotary disk MBR (ARMBR). The disk rotation led the effective collision between the sponge and membrane surface; thus successfully enhanced the membrane permeability in the ARMBR. The effect of the disk rotational speed and sponge volume fraction on the membrane permeability and the relationship between the water flow direction and membrane permeability were investigated. The long-term feasibility was tested over 100days of synthetic wastewater treatment. As a result, stable and economical performance was observed without membrane replacement and washing. The proposed integrated rotary disk-supporting media appears to be a feasible and even beneficial option in the AnMBR technology. PMID:25277260

  2. Liquid membrane purification of biogas

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. . Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

  3. Reactive nanostructured membranes for water purification.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Scott R; Datta, Saurav; Gui, Minghui; Coker, Eric L; Huggins, Frank E; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2011-05-24

    Many current treatments for the reclamation of contaminated water sources are chemical-intensive, energy-intensive, and/or require posttreatment due to unwanted by-product formation. We demonstrate that through the integration of nanostructured materials, enzymatic catalysis, and iron-catalyzed free radical reactions within pore-functionalized synthetic membrane platforms, we are able to conduct environmentally important oxidative reactions for toxic organic degradation and detoxification from water without the addition of expensive or harmful chemicals. In contrast to conventional, passive membrane technologies, our approach utilizes two independently controlled, nanostructured membranes in a stacked configuration for the generation of the necessary oxidants. These include biocatalytic and organic/inorganic (polymer/iron) nanocomposite membranes. The bioactive (top) membrane contains an electrostatically immobilized enzyme for the catalytic production of one of the main reactants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), from glucose. The bottom membrane contains either immobilized iron ions or ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to form powerful free radical oxidants. By permeating (at low pressure) a solution containing a model organic contaminant, such as trichlorophenol, with glucose in oxygen-saturated water through the membrane stack, significant contaminant degradation was realized. To illustrate the effectiveness of this membrane platform in real-world applications, membrane-immobilized ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to form free radicals for the degradation of a chlorinated organic contaminant in actual groundwater. Although we establish the development of these nanostructured materials for environmental applications, the practical and methodological advances demonstrated here permit the extension of their use to applications including disinfection and/or virus inactivation. PMID

  4. Reactive nanostructured membranes for water purification

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Scott R.; Datta, Saurav; Gui, Minghui; Coker, Eric L.; Huggins, Frank E.; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2011-01-01

    Many current treatments for the reclamation of contaminated water sources are chemical-intensive, energy-intensive, and/or require posttreatment due to unwanted by-product formation. We demonstrate that through the integration of nanostructured materials, enzymatic catalysis, and iron-catalyzed free radical reactions within pore-functionalized synthetic membrane platforms, we are able to conduct environmentally important oxidative reactions for toxic organic degradation and detoxification from water without the addition of expensive or harmful chemicals. In contrast to conventional, passive membrane technologies, our approach utilizes two independently controlled, nanostructured membranes in a stacked configuration for the generation of the necessary oxidants. These include biocatalytic and organic/inorganic (polymer/iron) nanocomposite membranes. The bioactive (top) membrane contains an electrostatically immobilized enzyme for the catalytic production of one of the main reactants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), from glucose. The bottom membrane contains either immobilized iron ions or ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to form powerful free radical oxidants. By permeating (at low pressure) a solution containing a model organic contaminant, such as trichlorophenol, with glucose in oxygen-saturated water through the membrane stack, significant contaminant degradation was realized. To illustrate the effectiveness of this membrane platform in real-world applications, membrane-immobilized ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to form free radicals for the degradation of a chlorinated organic contaminant in actual groundwater. Although we establish the development of these nanostructured materials for environmental applications, the practical and methodological advances demonstrated here permit the extension of their use to applications including disinfection and/or virus inactivation. PMID

  5. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

  6. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Guiver, Michael D; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-28

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks ('nanocracks') in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance. PMID:27121841

  7. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M.; Thornton, Aaron W.; Hill, Anita J.; Guiver, Michael D.; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks (‘nanocracks’) in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance.

  8. Adaptive Model Predictive Control of Diesel Engine Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Selective catalytic reduction or SCR is coming into worldwide use for diesel engine emissions reduction for on- and off-highway vehicles. These applications are characterized by broad operating range as well as rapid and unpredictable changes in operating conditions. Significant nonlinearity, input and output constraints, and stringent performance…

  9. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts on the synthesis of polymer anion redox membranes were mainly concentrated in two areas, membrane development and membrane fabrication. Membrane development covered the preparation and evaluation of experimental membranes systems with improved resistance stability and/or lower permeability. Membrane fabrication covered the laboratory scale production of prime candidate membranes in quantities of up to two hundred and sizes up to 18 inches x 18 inches (46 cm x 46 cm). These small (10 in x 11 in) and medium sized membranes were mainly for assembly into multicell units. Improvements in processing procedures and techniques for preparing such membrane sets lifted yields to over 90 percent.

  10. Virus separation using membranes.

    PubMed

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies). PMID:24297430

  11. Tissue printing on nitrocellulose membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Song, Yanru; Pont-Lezica, R.; Lin, Liangshiou; Ye, Zhenghua; Varner, J.E. )

    1989-04-01

    In the 1950's Daoust developed substrate film printing on gelatin and starch films to localize protease, amylase, DNAase and RNAase activities. These procedures were adapted to plant tissues by Yomo and Taylor (1973) and by Jacobsen and Knox (1973). Membranes such as nitrocellulose bind cellular materials from cut tissue surfaces with little lateral diffusion. Thus accurate chemical prints are obtained. When the tissue is pressed firmly onto nitrocellulose a physical impression is obtained which shows the anatomy of the tissue. We have used the tissue-print technique to localize (1) proteins with labeled antibodies, (2) RNA with labeled nucleic acid probes, (3) enzymes by catalytic activity, (4) glycoproteins by fluorescent lectins, (5) lectins by fluorescent sugars, (6) cysteine-rich proteins by dansylated iodoacetamide, (7) ascorbic acid by silver nitrate, (8) soluble fluorescent compounds by direct observation.

  12. Selecting a Roof Membrane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Larry W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers a brief synopsis of the unique characteristics of the following roof membranes: (1) built-up roofing; (2) elastoplastic membranes; (3) modified bitumen membranes; (4) liquid applied membranes; and (5) metal roofing. A chart compares the characteristics of the raw membranes only. (MLF)

  13. Self-catalytic conversion of pure quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Cristhiano; Drumond, Raphael C.; Terra Cunha, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Conversion of entangled states under (stochastic) local operations and classical communication ((S)LOCC) admits the phenomenon of catalysis. Here we explore the possibility of a copy of the initial state itself performing as a catalyst, which we call a self-catalytic process. We show explicit examples of self-catalysis. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the phenomenon to take place are discussed. We numerically estimate how frequent it is and we show that increasing the number of copies used as catalyst can increase the probability of conversion, but does not make the process deterministic. By the end we conjecture that under LOCC the probability of finding a self-catalytic reaction does not increase monotonically with the dimensions whereas under SLOCC, it does increase.

  14. Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

    2002-01-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To

  15. Zein Recovery Using Non-Porous Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mairal, Anurag P.; Ng, Alvin; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    2005-01-25

    A membrane process for treating zein solutions to increase the zein concentration in the solution. The process uses a non-porous membrane that preferentially permeates the solvent and rejects the zein. Optionally, the process can be operated as a diafiltration process to yield a concentrate of high zein purity.

  16. Composite Membrane with Underwater-Oleophobic Surface for Anti-Oil-Fouling Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Hou, Deyin; Lin, Shihong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we fabricated a composite membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a commercial hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane with a nanocomposite coating comprising silica nanoparticles, chitosan hydrogel and fluoro-polymer. The composite membrane exhibits asymmetric wettability, with the modified surface being in-air hydrophilic and underwater oleophobic, and the unmodified surface remaining hydrophobic. By comparing the performance of the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in direct contact MD experiments using a saline emulsion with 1000 ppm crude oil (in water), we showed that the fabricated composite membrane was significantly more resistant to oil fouling compared to the pristine hydrophobic PVDF membrane. Force spectroscopy was conducted for the interaction between an oil droplet and the membrane surface using a force tensiometer. The difference between the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in their interaction with an oil droplet served to explain the difference in the fouling propensities between these two membranes observed in MD experiments. The results from this study suggest that underwater oleophobic coating can effectively mitigate oil fouling in MD operations, and that the fabricated composite membrane with asymmetric wettability can enable MD to desalinate hypersaline wastewater with high concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants. PMID:26958985

  17. COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-10-18

    phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

  18. Coal conversion wastewater treatment by catalytic oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-10-20

    rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

  19. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  20. FEASIBILITY OF BURNING COAL IN CATALYTIC COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study, showing that pulverized coal can be burned in a catalytic combustor. Pulverized coal combustion in catalytic beds is markedly different from gaseous fuel combustion. Gas combustion gives uniform bed temperatures and reaction rates over the ent...

  1. The effect of catalyst length and downstream reactor distance on catalytic combustor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects on catalytic combustor performance which resulted from independently varying the length of a catalytic reactor and the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalyst. Monolithic combustion catalysts from three manufacturers were tested in a combustion test rig with no. 2 diesel fuel. Catalytic reactor lengths of 2.5 and 5.4 cm, and downstream gas-phase reaction distances of 7.3, 12.4, 17.5, and 22.5 cm were evaluated. Measurements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and pressure drop were made. The catalytic-reactor pressure drop was less than 1 percent of the upstream total pressure for all test configurations and test conditions. Nitrogen oxides and unburned hydrocarbons emissions were less than 0.25 g NO2/kg fuel and 0.6 g HC/kg fuel, respectively. The minimum operating temperature (defined as the adiabatic combustion temperature required to obtain carbon monoxide emissions below a reference level of 13.6 g CO/kg fuel) ranged from 1230 K to 1500 K for the various conditions and configurations tested. The minimum operating temperature decreased with increasing total (catalytic-reactor-plus-downstream-gas-phase-reactor-zone) residence time but was independent of the relative times spent in each region when the catalytic-reactor residence time was greater than or equal to 1.4 ms.

  2. Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.; Lee, Lap-Keung

    2001-01-01

    A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

  3. Unique behaviour of dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complexes bearing pincer ligand towards catalytic formation of ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Arashiba, Kazuya; Kuriyama, Shogo; Sasada, Akira; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to design effective nitrogen fixation systems that operate under mild conditions, and to this end we recently reported an example of the catalytic formation of ammonia using a dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing a pincer ligand, where up to twenty three equivalents of ammonia were produced based on the catalyst. Here we study the origin of the catalytic behaviour of the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing the pincer ligand with density functional theory calculations, based on stoichiometric and catalytic formation of ammonia from molecular dinitrogen under ambient conditions. Comparison of di- and mono-molybdenum systems shows that the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum core structure plays a critical role in the protonation of the coordinated molecular dinitrogen in the catalytic cycle. PMID:24769530

  4. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  5. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  6. Sampling the membrane: function of rhomboid-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, Marius K

    2013-05-01

    Rhomboids constitute a conserved protein superfamily that specifically binds membrane proteins and directs them into various different cellular pathways ranging from regulated secretion to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD). Rhomboid proteases are known to release protein domains from membranes by a cut in their membrane anchor, whereas an emerging new class of rhomboid-family proteins lacks key catalytic residues and is not proteolytically active. Recent work has shown that these rhomboid pseudoproteases, including iRhoms and derlins, bind membrane proteins to regulate their fate, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not known. This review summarizes recent advances in the molecular understanding of rhomboid-family proteins and discusses common principles in how they recognize and bind proteins in the plane of the membrane. PMID:23369641

  7. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  8. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  9. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  10. Catalytic decarbonylation of biosourced substrates.

    PubMed

    Ternel, Jérémy; Lebarbé, Thomas; Monflier, Eric; Hapiot, Frédéric

    2015-05-11

    Linear α-olefins (LAO) are one of the main targets in the field of surfactants, lubricants, and polymers. With the depletion of petroleum resources, the production of LAO from renewable feedstocks has gained increasing interest in recent years. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ir catalysts were suitable to decarbonylate a wide range of biosourced substrates under rather mild conditions (160 °C, 5 h reaction time) in the presence of potassium iodide and acetic anhydride. The resulting LAO were obtained with good conversion and selectivity provided that the purity of the substrate, the nature of the ligand, and the amounts of the additives were controlled accurately. The catalytic system could be recovered efficiently by using a Kugelrohr distillation apparatus and recycled. PMID:25855489

  11. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  12. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  13. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  14. Do Membranes Dream of Electric Tubes? Advanced Membranes Using Carbon Nanotube - Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lannoy, Charles-Francois Pedro Claude Karolek Ghislain

    Membrane technologies represent an energy efficient, effective solution for treating municipal and commercial waters/wastewaters. Membranes are predominantly polymer-based and despite steady advances in polymeric materials, they continue to suffer from operational problems including biofouling and breakages. This work addresses these two disparate problems by developing novel CNT-polymer nanocomposite materials that contain variously functionalized carbon nanotubes (fCNTs) in low quantities (<0.5wt%). Several strategies have been employed to achieve highly functional CNT-polymer nanocomposite membranes including blend mixing, ionic charge association, and covalent cross-linking with monomer and oligomer constituents. These CNT-polymer nanocomposite membranes were compared to traditional polymer membranes across various properties including increased Young's Modulus, changes in surface hydrophilicity, fine control over molecular weight cut-off and flux, and surface electrical conductivity. Membranes with high surface electrical conductivity were further tested for their anti-biofouling properties. Finally, CNT stability and polymer compatibility were evaluated throughout membrane manufacture, use, and cleaning. The incorporation of CNTs mixed in bulk phase and linked through ionic associations in polymer matrices showed significant (50%) increases in Young's modulus for certain CNT functionalizations and derivatization percent. Membranes formed with high surface electrical conductivity demonstrated almost complete resistance to biofouling (> 95%) in long-term bacterially challenged experiments. CNTs and polymer mixtures that lacked covalent or ionic bonds were susceptible to significant (up to 10%) loss of CNTs during membrane non-solvent gelation and aggressive chemical cleaning treatment. Functionalized carbon nanotubes endow polymer membranes with their unique strength and electrically conductive properties. These added properties were demonstrated to greatly

  15. Durability of ceramic catalytic converters for motorcycles

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.P.; Scott, P.L.; Hwang, H.S.; Mooney, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Motorcycle exhaust emission standards throughout the world are becoming more stringent. Emission control systems utilizing the catalytic converter are already in production in Taiwan for 2-stroke engine motorcycles. Catalysts designed for 2-stroke engines encounter a more severe exhaust environment than do those designed for 4-stroke engines. The two aspects of increased severity are the higher temperatures and higher stresses due to engine vibrations. Precious metal catalysts have been designed to operate in the thermal environment of 2-stroke engines and such catalysts have been successfully applied to both metal and ceramic substrates. However, until now, only the metal substrate catalysts have been utilized in motorcycle application. Ceramic based catalysts have not been considered because the mounting material that holds the catalyst substrate in place did not have enough durability to withstand the thermal/vibrational forces encountered in 2-stroke engine exhaust. Ceramic substrates have many advantages such as superior high temperature strength, which is especially important for the 2-stroke engine application, flexibility in cell shape and density, and lower cost. To realize these benefits, efforts were made in this study to develop better mounting systems. The results of this effort indicate that the durability requirements of 2-stroke engine can be met with the ceramic catalyst substrates if the improved mounting designs reported in the present study are employed.

  16. Catalytic thermal treatment of desizing wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M; Chand, Shri

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, catalytic thermal treatment (thermolysis) was investigated for the reduction of COD and color of the desizing wastewater under moderate temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions using various catalysts. The experimental runs were performed in a glass reactor equipped with a vertical condenser. The homogeneous copper sulfate catalyst was found to be the most active in comparison to other catalysts under similar operating conditions. A removal of about 71.6% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 87.2% color of desizing wastewater was obtained with a catalyst concentration of 4 kg/m(3) at pH 4. The initial pH value of the wastewater showed a pronounced effect on the precipitation process. During the thermolysis, copper gets leached to the aqueous phase, the residue obtained after the treatment is rich in copper and it can be blended with organic manure for use in agricultural fields. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the thermal oxidation of the solid residue obtained after thermolysis gets oxidized at a higher temperature range than that of the residue obtained from the desizing wastewater. The results lead to the conclusion that thermochemical precipitation is a very fast (instantaneous) process and would need a very small reactor vessel in comparison to other processes. PMID:17459578

  17. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  18. Functionalization of a membrane sublayer using reverse filtration of enzymes and dopamine coating.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S; Mateiu, R V; Kalyani, Dayanand; Pinelo, Manuel

    2014-12-24

    High permeability, high enzyme loading, and strong antifouling ability are the desired features for a biocatalytic membrane to be used in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). To achieve these goals, the membrane sublayer was enriched with laccase by reverse filtration in this case, and the resulting enzyme-loaded sublayer was covered with a dopamine coating. After membrane reversal, the virgin membrane skin layer was facing the feed and the enzymes were entrapped by a polydopamine network in the membrane sublayer. Thus, the membrane sublayer was functionalized as a catalytically active layer. The effects of the original membrane properties (i.e., materials, pore size, and structure), enzyme type (i.e., laccase and alcohol dehydrogenase), and coating conditions (i.e., time and pH) on the resulting biocatalytic membrane permeability, enzyme loading, and activity were investigated. Using a RC10 kDa membrane with sponge-like sublayer to immobilize laccase with dopamine coating, the trade-off between permeability and enzyme loading was broken, and enzyme loading reached 44.5% without any permeability loss. After 85 days of storage and reuse 14 times, more than 80% of the immobilized laccase activity was retained for the membrane with a dopamine coating, while the relative activity was less than 40% without the coating. The resistance to high temperature and acidic/alkaline pH was also improved by the dopamine coating for the immobilized laccase. Moreover, this biocatalytic membrane could resist mild hydrodynamic cleaning (e.g., back-flushing), but the catalytic ability was reduced by chemical cleaning at extreme pH (e.g., 1.5 and 11.5). Since the immobilized enzyme is not directly facing the bulk of EMRs and the substrate can be specifically selected by the separation skin layer, this biocatalytic membrane is promising for cascade catalytic reactions. PMID:25420028

  19. Function and expression study uncovered hepatocyte plasma membrane ecto-ATP synthase as a novel player in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Federica; Giannoccaro, Caterina; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; De Luca, Elisa; Santacroce, Salvatore; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    ATP synthase, canonically mitochondrially located, is reported to be ectopically expressed on the plasma membrane outer face of several cell types. We analysed, for the first time, the expression and catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase during liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was induced in rats by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The protein level and the ATP synthase and/or hydrolase activities of the hepatocyte ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase were analysed on freshly isolated hepatocytes and mitochondria from control, sham-operated and partial hepatectomized rats. During the priming phase of liver regeneration, 3 h after partial hepatectomy, liver mitochondria showed a marked lowering of the ATP synthase protein level that was reflected in the impairment of both ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. The ecto-ATP synthase level, in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, was decreased similarly to the level of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, associated with a lowering of the ecto-ATP hydrolase activity coupled to proton influx. Noteworthily, the ecto-ATP synthase activity coupled to proton efflux was completely inhibited in 3 h partial hepatectomized hepatocytes, even in the presence of a marked intracellular acidification that would sustain it as in control and sham-operated hepatocytes. At the end of the liver regeneration, 7 days after partial hepatectomy, the level and the catalytic activities of the ecto- and mitochondrial ATP synthase reached the control and sham-operated values. The specific modulation of hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase catalytic activities during liver regeneration priming phase may modulate the extracellular ADP/ATP levels and/or proton influx/efflux trafficking, making hepatocyte ecto-ATP synthase a candidate for a novel player in the liver regeneration process. PMID:27287557

  20. Examination of Bacterial Inhibition Using a Catalytic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Long; Ali, M. Monsur; Aguirre, Sergio D.; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang; Li, Yingfu

    2014-01-01

    Determination of accurate dosage of existing antibiotics and discovery of new antimicrobials or probiotics entail simple but effective methods that can conveniently track bacteria growth and inhibition. Here we explore the application of a previously reported fluorogenic E. coli-specific DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD-EC1, as a molecular probe for monitoring bacterial inhibition exerted by antibiotics and for studying bacterial competition as a result of cohabitation. Because the DNAzyme method provides a convenient way to monitor the growth of E. coli, it is capable of determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics much faster than the conventional optical density (OD) method. In addition, since the target for RFD-EC1 is an extracellular protein molecule from E. coli, RFD-EC1 is able to identify pore-forming antibiotics or compounds that can cause membrane leakage. Finally, RFD-EC1 can be used to analyse the competition of cohabitating bacteria, specifically the inhibition of growth of E. coli by Bacillus subtilis. The current work represents the first exploration of a catalytic DNA for microbiological applications and showcases the utility of bacteria-sensing fluorogenic DNAzymes as simple molecular probes to facilitate antibiotic and probiotic research. PMID:25531274