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Sample records for catalytic reaction studies

  1. An experimental study of catalytic and non-catalytic reaction in heat recirculating reactors and applications to power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongmin

    An experimental study of the performance of a Swiss roll heat exchanger and reactor was conducted, with emphasis on the extinction limits and comparison of results with and without Pt catalyst. At Re<40, the catalyst was required to sustain reaction; with the catalyst self-sustaining reaction could be obtained at Re less than 1. Both lean and rich extinction limits were extended with the catalyst, though rich limits were extended much further. At low Re, the lean extinction limit was rich of stoichiometric and rich limit had equivalence ratios 80 in some cases. Non-catalytic reaction generally occurred in a flameless mode near the center of the reactor. With or without catalyst, for sufficiently robust conditions, a visible flame would propagate out of the center, but this flame could only be re-centered with catalyst. Gas chromatography indicated that at low Re, CO and non-C3 H8 hydrocarbons did not form. For higher Re, catalytic limits were slightly broader but had much lower limit temperatures. At sufficiently high Re, catalytic and gas-phase limits merged. Experiments with titanium Swiss rolls have demonstrated reducing wall thermal conductivity and thickness leads to lower heat losses and therefore increases operating temperatures and extends flammability limits. By use of Pt catalysts, reaction of propane-air mixtures at temperatures 54°C was sustained. Such low temperatures suggest that polymers may be employed as a reactor material. A polyimide reactor was built and survived prolonged testing at temperatures up to 500°C. Polymer reactors may prove more practical for microscale devices due to their lower thermal conductivity and ease of manufacturing. Since the ultimate goal of current efforts is to develop combustion driven power generation devices at MEMS like scales, a thermally self-sustaining miniature power generation device was developed utilizing a single-chamber solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) placed in a Swiss roll. With the single-chamber design

  2. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-09-07

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-{sigma} bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as {pi}-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  3. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  4. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.; Somorjai, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 [degree]C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  5. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  6. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  7. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  8. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

    2003-05-23

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO {yields} 1/2 N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was also studied by STM on Rh

  9. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  10. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  11. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  12. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  13. Improved catalytic activity of rhodium monolayer modified nickel (110) surface for the methane dehydrogenation reaction: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothra, Pallavi; Pati, Swapan K.

    2014-05-01

    The catalytic activity of pure Ni (110) and single Rh layer deposited Ni (110) surface for the complete dehydrogenation of methane is theoretically investigated by means of gradient-corrected periodic density functional theory. A detailed kinetic study, based on the analysis of the optimal reaction pathway for the transformation of CH4 to C and H through four elementary steps (CH4 --> CH3 + H; CH3 --> CH2 + H; CH2 --> CH + H; CH -->C + H) is presented for pure Ni (110) and Rh/Ni (110) surfaces and compared with pure Rh (110) surface. Through systematic examination of adsorbed geometries and transition states, we show that single layer deposition of Rh on Ni (110) surface has a striking influence on lowering the activation energy barrier of the dehydrogenation reaction. Moreover, it is found that a pure Ni (110) surface has a tendency for carbon deposition on the catalytic surface during the methane dissociation reaction which decreases the stability of the catalyst. However, the deposition of carbon is largely suppressed by the addition of a Rh overlayer on the pure Ni (110) surface. The physical origin of stronger chemisorption of carbon on Ni (110) relative to Rh/Ni (110) has been elucidated by getting insight into the electronic structures and d-band model of the catalytic surfaces. Considering the balance in both the catalytic activity as well as the catalyst stability, we propose that the Rh/Ni (110) surface possesses much improved catalytic property compared to pure Ni (110) and pure Rh (110) surfaces.

  14. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  15. Modeling coal chemistry: One electron catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.; Hunter, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The complexity of the coal structure, in general, and of its organic part, in particular, prevents a rigorous study of coal chemistry. The use of model compounds with less complicated chemical structures to model specific reactions relevant to coal transformation into useful products is necessary and helpful. This is true, however, only if the modeling is properly applied and especially if the results are not excessively extrapolated to all aspects of coal reactivity. The emphasis on all catalytic routes in coal liquefaction has enhanced the interest in the study of the chemistry involved in heterogeneous catalytic reactions relevant to the first stage, solubilization, of coal. One of the important reactions associated with this first stage is the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds linking aromatic rings with aliphatic moieties. In previous publications (1,2,3) we have used a model compound 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (1) in which the bond linking the naphthalene ring to a methylene carbon can be selectively cleaved by specific catalysts (i.e. carbon materials, some iron catalysts) at temperatures at which thermal, free radical-initiated reactions, do not take place. Our data suggest that the above-mentioned catalytic cleavage is initiated by the ion radical of 1, with the unpaired electron localized in the naphthalene ring.

  16. Modeling coal chemistry: One electron catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.; Hunter, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    The complexity of the coal structure, in general, and of its organic part, in particular, prevents a rigorous study of coal chemistry. The use of model compounds with less complicated chemical structures to model specific reactions relevant to coal transformation into useful products is necessary and helpful. This is true, however, only if the modeling is properly applied and especially if the results are not excessively extrapolated to all aspects of coal reactivity. The emphasis on all catalytic routes in coal liquefaction has enhanced the interest in the study of the chemistry involved in heterogeneous catalytic reactions relevant to the first stage, solubilization, of coal. One of the important reactions associated with this first stage is the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds linking aromatic rings with aliphatic moieties. In previous publications (1,2,3) we have used a model compound 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (1) in which the bond linking the naphthalene ring to a methylene carbon can be selectively cleaved by specific catalysts (i.e. carbon materials, some iron catalysts) at temperatures at which thermal, free radical-initiated reactions, do not take place. Our data suggest that the above-mentioned catalytic cleavage is initiated by the ion radical of 1, with the unpaired electron localized in the naphthalene ring.

  17. Study of liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin with sodium butyrate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Meng, Qingyi; Ban, Chunlan; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yingyu

    2016-08-01

    The liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin and sodium butyrate with tetrabutylammonium bromide as a phase transfer catalyst was studied in this paper. The shrinking core model was applied. The analysis of the reaction based on the kinetic model showed a reaction-controlled regime at temperatures varying from 90 to 100°C. The exterior diffusivity was removed between 300 and 400 rpm. The internal diffusivity was removed when the particle size was 2 × 10-4 m. Reaction rate constants were calculated at different temperatures. The correlation was obtained when the proposed kinetic model was applied to all the experimental data for predictive evaluations and the activation energy was 37.01 kJ mol-1.

  18. Catalytic gasification: Isotopic labeling and transient reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 K and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous carbon dioxide, the complexes promoted carbon and oxygen exchange between the gas-phase CO/sub 2/ and the surface. Oxygen exchanged between the surface complexes; but carbon did not exchange between the carbonate and the carbon black. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed to produce carbon dioxide, and catalytic gasification then began. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex.

  19. Ubiquitous ``glassy'' relaxation in catalytic reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Akinori; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-10-01

    Study of reversible catalytic reaction networks is important not only as an issue for chemical thermodynamics but also for protocells. From extensive numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, slow relaxation dynamics to sustain nonequlibrium states are commonly observed. These dynamics show two types of salient behaviors that are reminiscent of glassy behavior: slow relaxation along with the logarithmic time dependence of the correlation function and the emergence of plateaus in the relaxation-time course. The former behavior is explained by the eigenvalue distribution of a Jacobian matrix around the equilibrium state that depends on the distribution of kinetic coefficients of reactions. The latter behavior is associated with kinetic constraints rather than metastable states and is due to the absence of catalysts for chemicals in excess and the negative correlation between two chemical species. Examples are given and generality is discussed with relevance to bottleneck-type dynamics in biochemical reactions as well.

  20. A near-ambient-pressure XPS study on catalytic CO oxidation reaction over a Ru(101¯0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Shimura, Masahiro; Yoshida, Masaaki; Monya, Yuji; Suzuki, Kazuma; Amemiya, Kenta; Mase, Kazuhiko; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the interactions of CO and O2 with Ru(101¯0) single crystal surfaces, and studied the in-situ catalytic oxidation reaction of CO on the surface under near realistic pressure conditions by using a combination of near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential pumping mass spectroscopy. At lower temperatures (T < 190 °C), most of the surface keeps metallic and is covered by both chemisorbed atomic oxygen and CO, and the CO2 formation rate is relatively slow. At higher temperatures, the reaction rate significantly increases and reaches the saturation, where the Ru surface is dominated by a bulk oxide (i.e. RuO2).

  1. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  2. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  3. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  4. Computational Study of Catalytic Reaction of Quercetin 2,4-Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2015-06-11

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and QM-only study on the oxidative ring-cleaving reaction of quercetin catalyzed by quercetin 2,4-dioxygenase (2,4-QD). 2,4-QD has a mononuclear type 2 copper center and incorporates two oxygen atoms at C2 and C4 positions of the substrate. It has not been clear whether dioxygen reacts with a copper ion or a substrate radical as the first step. We have found that dioxygen is more likely to bind to a Cu(2+) ion, involving the dissociation of the substrate from the copper ion. Then a Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex can be generated. Comparison of geometry and stability between QM-only and QM/MM results strongly indicates that steric effects of the protein environment contribute to maintain the orientation of the substrate dissociated from the copper center. The present QM/MM results also highlight that a prior rearrangement of the Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex and a subsequent hydrogen bond switching assisted by the movement of Glu73 can facilitate formation of an endoperoxide intermediate selectively. PMID:25990020

  5. Study of the dynamics of the MoO2-Mo2C system for catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuba Torres, Christian Martin

    On a global scale, the energy demand is largely supplied by the combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels. However, their rapid depletion coupled with environmental and sustainability concerns are the main drivers to seek for alternative energetic strategies. To this end, the sustainable generation of hydrogen from renewable resources such as biodiesel would represent an attractive alternative solution to fossil fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen's lower environmental impact and greater independence from foreign control make it a strong contender for solving this global problem. Among a wide variety of methods for hydrogen production, the catalytic partial oxidation offers numerous advantages for compact and mobile fuel processing systems. For this reaction, the present work explores the versatility of the Mo--O--C catalytic system under different synthesis methods and reforming conditions using methyl oleate as a surrogate biodiesel. MoO2 exhibits good catalytic activity and exhibits high coke-resistance even under reforming conditions where long-chain oxygenated compounds are prone to form coke. Moreover, the lattice oxygen present in MoO2 promotes the Mars-Van Krevelen mechanism. Also, it is introduced a novel beta-Mo2C synthesis by the in-situ formation method that does not utilize external H2 inputs. Herein, the MoO 2/Mo2C system maintains high catalytic activity for partial oxidation while the lattice oxygen serves as a carbon buffer for preventing coke formation. This unique feature allows for longer operation reforming times despite slightly lower catalytic activity compared to the catalysts prepared by the traditional temperature-programmed reaction method. Moreover, it is demonstrated by a pulse reaction technique that during the phase transformation of MoO2 to beta-Mo2C, the formation of Mo metal as an intermediate is not responsible for the sintering of the material wrongly assumed by the temperature-programmed method.

  6. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Evans, Tabitha J.; Cheng, Lei; Nimlos, Mark R.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  7. From Catalytic Reaction Networks to Protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-12-01

    In spite of recent advances, there still remains a large gape between a set of chemical reactions and a biological cell. Here we discuss several theoretical efforts to fill in the gap. The topics cover (i) slow relaxation to equilibrium due to glassy behavior in catalytic reaction networks (ii) consistency between molecule replication and cell growth, as well as energy metabolism (iii) control of a system by minority molecules in mutually catalytic system, which work as a carrier of genetic information, and leading to evolvability (iv) generation of a compartmentalized structure as a cluster of molecules centered around the minority molecule, and division of the cluster accompanied by the replication of minority molecule (v) sequential, logical process over several states from concurrent reaction dynamics, by taking advantage of discreteness in molecule number.

  8. Cage-like copper(II) silsesquioxanes: transmetalation reactions and structural, quantum chemical, and catalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Dronova, Marina S; Yalymov, Alexey I; Lamaty, Frédéric; Bantreil, Xavier; Martinez, Jean; Bizet, Christelle; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Arkhipov, Dmitry E; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shubina, Elena S; Kirillov, Alexander M; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2015-06-01

    The transmetalation of bimetallic copper-sodium silsesquioxane cages, namely, [(PhSiO1.5 )10 (CuO)2 (NaO0.5 )2 ] ("Cooling Tower"; 1), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 ] ("Globule"; 2), and [(PhSiO1.5 )6 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 (PhSiO1.5 )6 ] ("Sandwich"; 3), resulted in the generation of three types of hexanuclear cylinder-like copper silsesqui- oxanes, [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H9 OH)2 (C2 H5 OH)6 ] (4), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H8 O2 )4 (PhCN)2 (MeOH)4 ] (5), and [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (NaCl)(C4 H8 O2 )12 (H2 O)2 ] (6). The products show a prominent "solvating system-structure" dependency, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Topological analysis of cages 1-6 was also performed. In addition, DFT theory was used to examine the structures of the Cooling Tower and Cylinder compounds, as well as the spin density distributions. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 were applied as catalysts for the direct oxidation of alcohols and amines into the corresponding amides. Compound 6 is an excellent catalyst in the oxidation reactions of benzene and alcohols. PMID:25950426

  9. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years. PMID:26031492

  10. Embedded-cluster approach to the study of catalytic reactions in zeolite cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, C.; Birkenheuer, U.

    1995-12-31

    This communication compares three different approaches to the study of ammonia protonation in acidic chabazite: the cluster model, the supercell model, and the embedded cluster model. In all cases, the Hartree-Fock approximation has been adopted, and a minimal Slater-type orbital basis set has been used. To calculate the interaction energies of ammonia by means of the periodic model, the CRYSTAL92 program has been used. The same program has been employed to generate the Madelung field in which a molecular cluster may be embedded. It also provides the reference solution necessary for the embedded cluster model calculations, which in turn have been performed with the EMBED93 program. All three techniques lead to similar interaction energies, however, the embedded cluster approach allows for the most natural way of performing the present adsorption study. Only those atoms which are chemically involved in the interaction have to be treated explicitly, while the rest of the system, though chemically inert, is treated as a consistently described background acting on the adsorption complex. The present investigation suggests that cooperative interaction between molecules trapped in the cavities of zeolites is of crucial importance for the protonation of ammonia to occur. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Study of catalytic reaction processes on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chemiluminescence-based gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Nishiyama, K.; Takechi, S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have investigated a new chemiluminescence (CL)-based gas sensor made of aluminum oxide ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) which emits CL during the catalytic oxidation of combustible vapors in air. The CL intensity is proportional to the concentration in the wide region from 1 to 1000 ppm of ethanol, butanol and acetone in air. However, it has a tendency to saturate in concentrations above 1000 ppm. For the detection of vapors in the environmental atmosphere, improvements of the sensitivity and the linear characteristics of the sensor are necessary. Catalytic reaction processes on the sensor were studied for this purpose.

  12. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Jason; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Mullins, David R; Suib, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  13. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    J Durand; S Senanayake; S Suib; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  14. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  15. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  16. The nature of hot electrons generated by exothermic catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-02-01

    We review recent progress in studies of the nature of hot electrons generated in metal nanoparticles and thin films on oxide supports and their role in heterogeneous catalysis. We show that the creation of hot electrons and their transport across the metal-oxide interface is an inherent component of energy dissipation accompanying catalytic and photocatalytic surface reactions. The intensity of hot electron flow is well correlated with turnover rates of corresponding reactions. We also show that controlling the flow of hot electrons crossing the interface can lead to the control of chemical reaction rates. Finally, we discuss perspectives of hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry that promise the capability to drive catalytic reactions with enhanced efficiency and selectivity through electron-mediated, non-thermal processes.

  17. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide: the water gas shift reaction and related processes. Technical progress report, December 1, 1983-November 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed are investigations related to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide. These studies will be concerned with the design of catalysts for the water gas shift reaction and related processes such as the hydroformylation of olefins by homogeneous solution phase systems as well as by selected metal catalysts heterogenized by complexation to functionalized polymers. Also under investigation will be quantitative mechanistic aspects of reactions considered key to probable catalyst cycles. These are principally concerned with the fundamental chemistry of metal carbonyl and metal carbonyl hydride complexes including acid/base properties, reductive elimination, substitution and cluster fragmentation reactions and the nucleophilic activation of metal coordinated carbonyls toward reaction with water or dihydrogen. The goal of these studies is to provide chemical guidelines for the molecular design of new and more efficient catalysts for the utilization of carbonaceous materials such as coal for the production of fuels and other organic chemicals. 70 references.

  18. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  19. The doping effect on the catalytic activity of graphene for oxygen evolution reaction in a lithium-air battery: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaodong; Wang, Beizhou; Zhu, Jinzhen; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-06-14

    A lithium-air battery as an energy storage technology can be used in electric vehicles due to its large energy density. However, its poor rate capability, low power density and large overpotential problems limit its practical usage. In this paper, the first-principles thermodynamic calculations were performed to study the catalytic activity of X-doped graphene (X = B, N, Al, Si, and P) materials as potential cathodes to enhance charge reactions in a lithium-air battery. Among these materials, P-doped graphene exhibits the highest catalytic activity in reducing the charge voltage by 0.25 V, while B-doped graphene has the highest catalytic activity in decreasing the oxygen evolution barrier by 0.12 eV. By combining these two catalytic effects, B,P-codoped graphene was demonstrated to have an enhanced catalytic activity in reducing the O2 evolution barrier by 0.70 eV and the charge voltage by 0.13 V. B-doped graphene interacts with Li2O2 by Li-sited adsorption in which the electron-withdrawing center can enhance charge transfer from Li2O2 to the substrate, facilitating reduction of O2 evolution barrier. In contrast, X-doped graphene (X = N, Al, Si, and P) prefers O-sited adsorption toward Li2O2, forming a X-O2(2-)···Li(+) interface structure between X-O2(2-) and the rich Li(+) layer. The active structure of X-O2(2-) can weaken the surrounding Li-O2 bonds and significantly reduce Li(+) desorption energy at the interface. Our investigation is helpful in developing a novel catalyst to enhance oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in Li-air batteries. PMID:25970821

  20. Periodic perturbation of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2004-09-01

    Periodic forcing of reaction kinetics via, e.g., variation of reactant pressure(s), temperature or flow reversal is one of the useful tools employed in basic and applied studies of heterogeneous catalytic processes. In the case of conventional (stable) kinetics, this strategy is used to clarify the mechanisms of reactions and obtain data on reaction rate constants or to improve the reaction performance, e.g., to increase reaction rate and/or selectivity with respect to desired products. In experiments, that are focused on oscillatory catalytic reactions, periodic perturbations are employed to stabilize period-1 oscillations. This is easily achieved if the external and internal frequencies are equal. In a more general context, periodic perturbation of chemical reactions, that exhibit period-1 oscillations, may result in complex reaction behaviour, including period doubling and irregular kinetics provided that the external and internal frequencies do not coincide. We consider in this review both the relevant data available in the literature and the results of systematic calculations for a few generic models.

  1. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures. PMID:17909495

  2. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    anion of the organic dye perylenediimide is excited by a second photon allowing the one electron reduction of acceptor substituted aryl chlorides. The radical anion of the aryl halide fragments under the loss of a halide ion and the aryl radical undergoes C-H arylation with biologically important pyrrole derivatives or adds to a double bond. Rhodamine 6G as an organic photocatalyst allows an even higher degree of control of the reaction. The dye is photoreduced in the presence of an amine donor under irradiation with green light (e.g., 530 nm), yielding its radical anion, which is a mild reducing reagent. The hypsochromic shift of the absorption of the rhodamine 6G radical anion toward blue region of the visible light spectrum allows its selective excitation using blue light (e.g., 455 nm). The excited radical anion is highly reducing and able to activate even bromoanisole for C-H arylation reactions, although only in moderate yield. Photoredox catalytic C-H arylation reactions are valuable alternatives to metal catalyzed reactions. They have an excellent functional group tolerance, could potentially avoid metal containing catalysts, and use visible light as a traceless reagent for the activation of arylating reagents. PMID:27482835

  3. High-Pressure Catalytic Reactions of C6 Hydrocarbons on PlatinumSingle-Crystals and nanoparticles: A Sum Frequency Generation VibrationalSpectroscopic and Kinetic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bratlie, Kaitlin

    2007-12-19

    Catalytic reactions of cyclohexene, benzene, n-hexane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, and 1-hexene on platinum catalysts were monitored in situ via sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and gas chromatography (GC). SFG is a surface specific vibrational spectroscopic tool capable of monitoring submonolayer coverages under reaction conditions without gas-phase interference. SFG was used to identify the surface intermediates present during catalytic processes on Pt(111) and Pt(100) single-crystals and on cubic and cuboctahedra Pt nanoparticles in the Torr pressure regime and at high temperatures (300K-450K). At low pressures (<10{sup -6} Torr), cyclohexene hydrogenated and dehydrogenates to form cyclohexyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}) and {pi}-allyl C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, respectively, on Pt(100). Increasing pressures to 1.5 Torr form cyclohexyl, {pi}-allyl C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene, illustrating the necessity to investigate catalytic reactions at high-pressures. Simultaneously, GC was used to acquire turnover rates that were correlated to reactive intermediates observed spectroscopically. Benzene hydrogenation on Pt(111) and Pt(100) illustrated structure sensitivity via both vibrational spectroscopy and kinetics. Both cyclohexane and cyclohexene were produced on Pt(111), while only cyclohexane was formed on Pt(100). Additionally, {pi}-allyl c-C{sub 6}H{sub 9} was found only on Pt(100), indicating that cyclohexene rapidly dehydrogenates on the (100) surface. The structure insensitive production of cyclohexane was found to exhibit a compensation effect and was analyzed using the selective energy transfer (SET) model. The SET model suggests that the Pt-H system donates energy to the E{sub 2u} mode of free benzene, which leads to catalysis. Linear C{sub 6} (n-hexane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, and 1-hexene) hydrocarbons were also investigated in the presence and absence of excess hydrogen on Pt(100). Based on spectroscopic signatures

  4. Theory and Modeling of Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yu-Hong; Grayson, Matthew N; Holland, Mareike C; Simon, Adam; Houk, K N

    2016-04-19

    Modern density functional theory and powerful contemporary computers have made it possible to explore complex reactions of value in organic synthesis. We describe recent explorations of mechanisms and origins of stereoselectivities with density functional theory calculations. The specific functionals and basis sets that are routinely used in computational studies of stereoselectivities of organic and organometallic reactions in our group are described, followed by our recent studies that uncovered the origins of stereocontrol in reactions catalyzed by (1) vicinal diamines, including cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines, (2) vicinal amidophosphines, and (3) organo-transition-metal complexes. Two common cyclic models account for the stereoselectivity of aldol reactions of metal enolates (Zimmerman-Traxler) or those catalyzed by the organocatalyst proline (Houk-List). Three other models were derived from computational studies described in this Account. Cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines and other vicinal diamines are venerable asymmetric organocatalysts. For α-fluorinations and a variety of aldol reactions, vicinal diamines form enamines at one terminal amine and activate electrophilically with NH(+) or NF(+) at the other. We found that the stereocontrolling transition states are cyclic and that their conformational preferences are responsible for the observed stereoselectivity. In fluorinations, the chair seven-membered cyclic transition states is highly favored, just as the Zimmerman-Traxler chair six-membered aldol transition state controls stereoselectivity. In aldol reactions with vicinal diamine catalysts, the crown transition states are favored, both in the prototype and in an experimental example, shown in the graphic. We found that low-energy conformations of cyclic transition states occur and control stereoselectivities in these reactions. Another class of bifunctional organocatalysts, the vicinal amidophosphines, catalyzes the (3 + 2) annulation

  5. A kinetic and theoretical study of the borate catalysed reactions of hydrogen peroxide: the role of dioxaborirane as the catalytic intermediate for a wide range of substrates.

    PubMed

    Deary, Michael E; Durrant, Marcus C; Davies, D Martin

    2013-01-14

    Our recent work has provided new insights into the equilibria and species that exist in aqueous solution at different pHs for the boric acid - hydrogen peroxide system, and the role of these species in oxidation reactions. Most recently, (M. C. Durrant, D. M. Davies and M. E. Deary, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 7249-7254), we have produced strong theoretical and experimental evidence for the existence of a previously unreported monocyclic three membered peroxide species, dioxaborirane, that is the likely catalytic species in borate mediated electrophilic reactions of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solution. In the present paper, we extend our study of the borate-peroxide system to look at a wide range of substrates that include substituted dimethyl anilines, methyl-p-tolyl sulfoxide, halides, hydrogen sulfide anion, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, and hydrazine. The unusual selectivity-reactivity pattern of borate catalysed reactions compared with hydrogen peroxide and inorganic or organic peracids previously observed for the organic sulfides (D. M. Davies, M. E. Deary, K. Quill and R. A. Smith, Chem.-Eur. J., 2005, 11, 3552-3558) is also seen with substituted dimethyl aniline nucleophiles. This provides evidence that the pattern is not due to any latent electrophilic tendency of the organic sulfides and further supports dioxaborirane being the likely reactive intermediate, thus broadening the applicability of this catalytic system. Moreover, density functional theory calculations on our proposed mechanism involving dioxaborirane are consistent with the experimental results for these substrates. Results obtained at high concentrations of both borate and hydrogen peroxide require the inclusion the diperoxodiborate dianion in the kinetic analysis. A scheme detailing our current understanding of the borate-peroxide system is presented. PMID:23188177

  6. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  7. Role of substrate positioning in the catalytic reaction of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase-A QM/MM Study.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Anna; Broclawik, Ewa; Siegbahn, Per E M; Lundberg, Marcus; Moran, Graham; Borowski, Tomasz

    2014-10-15

    Ring hydroxylation and coupled rearrangement reactions catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase were studied with the QM/MM method ONIOM(B3LYP:AMBER). For electrophilic attack of the ferryl species on the aromatic ring, five channels were considered: attacks on the three ring atoms closest to the oxo ligand (C1, C2, C6) and insertion of oxygen across two bonds formed by them (C1-C2, C1-C6). For the subsequent migration of the carboxymethyl substituent, two possible directions were tested (C1→C2, C1→C6), and two different mechanisms were sought (stepwise radical, single-step heterolytic). In addition, formation of an epoxide (side)product and benzylic hydroxylation, as catalyzed by the closely related hydroxymandelate synthase, were investigated. From the computed reaction free energy profiles it follows that the most likely mechanism of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase involves electrophilic attack on the C1 carbon of the ring and subsequent single-step heterolytic migration of the substituent. Computed values of the kinetic isotope effect for this step are inverse, consistent with available experimental data. Electronic structure arguments for the preferred mechanism of attack on the ring are also presented. PMID:25157877

  8. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  9. Catalytic bismetallative multicomponent coupling reactions: scope, applications, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reactions have played an indispensable role in organic chemistry for the last several decades. In particular, catalytic multicomponent reactions have attracted a lot of attention due to their efficiency and expediency towards complex molecule synthesis. The presence of bismetallic reagents (e.g. B–B, Si–Si, B–Si, Si–Sn, etc.) in this process renders the products enriched with various functional groups and multiple stereocenters. For this reason, catalytic bismetallative coupling is considered an effective method to generate the functional and stereochemical complexity of simple hydrocarbon substrates. This review highlights key developments of transition-metal catalyzed bismetallative reactions involving multiple π components. Specifically, it will highlight the scope, synthetic applications, and proposed mechanistic pathways of this process. PMID:24736839

  10. Catalytic Friedel-Crafts reaction of aminocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    de Nanteuil, Florian; Loup, Joachim; Waser, Jérôme

    2013-07-19

    A Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts reaction between donor-acceptor aminocyclopropanes and indoles and other electron-rich aromatic compounds is reported. Indole alkylation at the C3 position was generally obtained for a broad range of functional groups and substitution patterns. In the case of C3-substituted indoles, C2 alkylation was observed. The reaction gives a rapid access to gamma amino acid derivatives present in numerous bioactive molecules. PMID:23815365

  11. Catalytic activity of transition metal-N4 moieties in graphene toward the oxygen reduction reaction: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Walter

    2013-03-01

    The search for non-precious metal cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that replace platinum in proton exchange membrane fuel cells is one of the main challenges toward the use of hydrogen as clean energy for transportation. Most current works on ORR catalysts focuses on N-coordinated iron in a carbon matrix. Although the nature of the active site is still a mystery, different carbon-supported Fe-Nx active sites have been proposed. In this work, The O2 dissociation after the interaction with the metal center of M-N4 moieties in graphene (with M = Mn, Fe, and Co) are addressed by density functional theory calculations. Both, saddle points and minimum energy paths for the ORR in the allowed spin channels have been identified. Our results show that the Mn-N4 center in graphene exhibits the lowest activation barrier in all spin channel, less than 1 eV, suggesting improved ORR activity, while for Fe-N4 and Co-N4 they range between 1.2 and 1.6 eV. Our calculations suggest that the O2 dissociation would proceed through different spin channel which would increase the reaction rate, particularly for Mn-O2 and Fe-O2 moieties. We also investigate energetically favorable routes to incorporate the M-N4 centers in graphene. Work supported by FONDECYT under Grant No. 1090489

  12. Catalytic Asymmetric Umpolung Reactions of Imines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongwei; Hu, Lin; Li, Zhe; Deng, Li

    2015-01-01

    Imines, carbon-nitrogen double bonds, are fundamentally important functional groups in organic chemistry. This is largely due to the fact that imines act as electrophiles in C–C bond forming reactions towards carbon nucleophiles, thereby serving one of the most widely used precursors for the formation of amines in both synthetic and biosynthetic settings.1–5 If the carbon atom of the imine could be rendered electron-rich, the imine could react as a nucleophile instead of as an electrophile. Such a reversal in the electronic characteristics of the imine functionality would facilitate the development of new chemical transformations that convert imines into amines via C–C bond forming reactions with carbon electrophiles, thereby creating new opportunities for the efficient synthesis of amines. The development of asymmetric ‘umpolung’ reactions of imines remains an uncharted ground, in spite of the far-reaching impact of such reactions in organic synthesis. Here we report the discovery and development of new chiral phase transfer catalysts that promote the highly efficient asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines and enals. These catalysts mediate the deprotonation of imines and direct the 2-azaallylanions thus formed to react in a highly chemoselective, regioselective, diastereoselective and enantioselective fashion with enals. The reaction tolerates a broad range of imines and enals, and can be carried out in high yield with as little as 0.01 mol % catalyst with a moisture and air-tolerant operational protocol. These umpolung reactions provide a conceptually new and practical approach towards chiral amino compounds. PMID:26201597

  13. New insights in understanding plasma-catalysis reaction pathways: study of the catalytic ozonation of an acetaldehyde saturated Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauce, Sonia; Vega-González, Arlette; Jia, Zixian; Touchard, Sylvain; Hassouni, Khaled; Kanaev, Andrei; Duten, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a preliminary study intended to straighten out the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation mechanisms occurring in a plasma driven catalysis process for acetaldehyde decomposition. For this purpose, the interaction between the surface, the pollutant and one of the main oxidative species generated by non-thermal plasma, namely ozone, was studied. Acetaldehyde catalytic ozonation over a nanostructured Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst is carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, and followed by diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). For this, the catalyst is firstly saturated with acetaldehyde. At the end of the saturation, acetaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, its condensation product, are identified as the major adsorbed species. In a second step, the surface ozonation is carried out and three additional intermediates are identified, namely, acetone, formic acid and acetic acid. Gaseous CO, CO2, methyl formate and methyl acetate are detected at the DRIFTS outlet, evidencing the partial mineralization of the adsorbed species. A global reaction scheme is proposed for explaining the formation of those adsorbed intermediates and gaseous products. This proposed heterogeneous ozone induced chemistry has to be taken into account when associating non-thermal plasma in air to a catalyst. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  14. An FTIR study on the catalytic effect of water molecules on the reaction of CO successive hydrogenation at 3 and 10K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, C.; Krim, L.

    2011-05-01

    The ubiquitous presence of water and the relative high abundance of H2, H and CO molecules in the interstellar medium motivated numerous studies on their potential interaction. The reaction of successive hydrogenation of CO is of large interest in astrochemistry because of its implication in the formation of formaldehyde and methanol in interstellar grains and in comets. The catalytic effect of water on the successive hydrogenation of CO has been investigated by two methods. The first is the hydrogenation of a CO/H2O surface. The second is a co-injection of (CO/H2O) mixtures and H atoms. Both methods have been performed at 3 and 10 K. When the hydrogenation of a CO surface is performed at 3 K, no products are observed. In fact, the presence of solid hydrogen screens the hydrogenation process. However, when performed at 10 K, the experiment shows that water molecules increase the concentration of the H2CO and CH3OH species. At 3 and 10K, [(CO/H2O)+H] co-depositions confirm a subtantial impact on by-products formation. We show that water molecules increase the probability of reactive to encounter H atoms either physically, or chemically, by raising the number of chemical pathways. A coordinated theoretical study of the possible chemical pathways is currently under way.

  15. Fe/N/C composite in Li-O2 battery: studies of catalytic structure and activity toward oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Karan, Naba K; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Li, Shu-You; Liu, Di-Jia

    2012-10-10

    Atomically dispersed Fe/N/C composite was synthesized and its role in controlling the oxygen evolution reaction during Li-O(2) battery charging was studied by use of a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether-based electrolyte. Li-O(2) cells using Fe/N/C as the cathode catalyst showed lower overpotentials than α-MnO(2)/carbon catalyst and carbon-only material. Gases evolved during the charge step contained only oxygen for Fe/N/C cathode catalyst, whereas CO(2) was also detected in the case of α-MnO(2)/C or carbon-only material; this CO(2) was presumably generated from electrolyte decomposition. Our results reiterate the catalytic effect in reducing overpotentials, which not only enhances battery efficiency but also improves its lifespan by reducing or eliminating electrolyte decomposition. The structure of the Fe/N/C catalyst was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Iron was found to be uniformly distributed within the carbon matrix, and on average, Fe was coordinated by 3.3 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.3 low Z elements (C/N/O) at bond distances of ~1.92 and ~2.09 Å, respectively. PMID:22998563

  16. A combined experimental and computational study of the catalytic dehydration of glycerol on microporous zeolites: an investigation of the reaction mechanism and acrolein selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xufeng; Lv, Yanhong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guodong; Xi, Yanyan; Phillips, David L; Liu, Chenguang

    2013-12-14

    The catalytic activity and the acrolein selectivity for liquid phase glycerol dehydration on β zeolites (HNa-β-k) were found to be dependent on the reaction temperature as well as on the amount of acid sites on the zeolites. An increase in the reaction temperature favors the acrolein selectivity. The acrolein selectivity increases with the Na(+)/H(+) ratio and the glycerol conversion decreases with it so that a maximum acrolein yield is obtained when a certain amount of acidic sites are replaced by non-active Na(+) sites. The computational results indicate that 3-hydoxylpropanal (HPA) is an important intermediate that determines the final product selectivity. The relative rates of the different reaction pathways for HAP can be affected by the amount of water molecules involved in its homogeneous reaction. Based on the reaction mechanism proposed, it was hypothesized that smaller pores reduce activity but increase selectivity to acrolein, and results of the H-MFI zeolite were consistent with this hypothesis. Our work provides important insight into the overall landscape of the reaction mechanism and can be used to help design reaction systems that have good acrolein selectivity for the liquid phase glycerol dehydration reactions. PMID:24158544

  17. [Lipases in catalytic reactions of organic chemistry].

    PubMed

    Bezborodov, A M; Zagustina, N A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of enzymatic catalysis in lipase-catalyzed reactions of organic synthesis are discussed in the review. The data on modern methods of protein engineering and enzyme modification allowing a broader range of used substrates are briefly summarized. The application of lipase in the preparation of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals containing no inactive enantiomers and in the synthesis of secondary alcohol enantiomers and optically active amides is demonstrated. The subject of lipase involvement in the C-C bond formation in the Michael reaction is discussed. Data on the enzymatic synthesis of construction materials--polyesters, siloxanes, etc.--are presented. Examples demonstrating the application of lipase enzymatic catalysis in industry are given. PMID:25707112

  18. Controlling Catalytic Selectivity via Adsorbate Orientation on the Surface: From Furfural Deoxygenation to Reactions of Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Pang, Simon H; Medlin, J Will

    2015-04-16

    Specificity to desired reaction products is the key challenge in designing solid catalysts for reactions involving addition or removal of oxygen to/from organic reactants. This challenge is especially acute for reactions involving multifunctional compounds such as biomass-derived aromatic molecules (e.g., furfural) and functional epoxides (e.g., 1-epoxy-3-butene). Recent surface-level studies have shown that there is a relationship between adsorbate surface orientation and reaction selectivity in the hydrogenation pathways of aromatic oxygenates and the ring-opening or ring-closing pathways of epoxides. Control of the orientation of reaction intermediates on catalytic surfaces by modifying the surface or near-surface environment has been shown to be a promising method of affecting catalytic selectivity for reactions of multifunctional molecules. In this Perspective, we review recent model studies aimed at understanding the surface chemistry for these reactions and studies that utilize this insight to rationally design supported catalysts. PMID:26263134

  19. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  20. Catalytic ignition model in a monolithic reactor with in-depth reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Ta-Ching; Tien, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Two transient models have been developed to study the catalytic ignition in a monolithic catalytic reactor. The special feature in these models is the inclusion of thermal and species structures in the porous catalytic layer. There are many time scales involved in the catalytic ignition problem, and these two models are developed with different time scales. In the full transient model, the equations are non-dimensionalized by the shortest time scale (mass diffusion across the catalytic layer). It is therefore accurate but is computationally costly. In the energy-integral model, only the slowest process (solid heat-up) is taken as nonsteady. It is approximate but computationally efficient. In the computations performed, the catalyst is platinum and the reactants are rich mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. One-step global chemical reaction rates are used for both gas-phase homogeneous reaction and catalytic heterogeneous reaction. The computed results reveal the transient ignition processes in detail, including the structure variation with time in the reactive catalytic layer. An ignition map using reactor length and catalyst loading is constructed. The comparison of computed results between the two transient models verifies the applicability of the energy-integral model when the time is greater than the second largest time scale of the system. It also suggests that a proper combined use of the two models can catch all the transient phenomena while minimizing the computational cost.

  1. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme–cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes. PMID:26537172

  2. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  3. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  4. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  5. Pre-steady-state kinetic study of the effects of K+ on the partial reactions of the catalytic cycle of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Herscher, C J; Rega, A F; Adamo, H P

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 100 mM K+ on the partial reactions that take place during ATP hydrolysis on the calcium ion-dependent ATPase from plasma membrane (PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase) were studied at 37 degrees C on fragmented intact membranes from pig red cells by means of a rapid chemical quenching technique. At 10 microM [gamma-32P]ATP plus non-limiting concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of formation by 140% to 84 11 s-1 and the steady-state level of phosphoenzyme (EP) by 25% to 3.4 0.17 pmol/mg of protein. If added together with [gamma-32P]ATP at the beginning of phosphorylation, K+ was much less effective than if added earlier, indicating that it did not act on the phosphorylation reaction. Measurements of the E2 --> E1 transition by phosphorylation showed that in medium with Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of the transition by 55% to 14 3 s-1 and the apparent concentration of E1 by 45%, suggesting that this may be the cause of the increased rate of phosphorylation observed in enzyme preincubated with K+. The presence of K+ did not change the slow decay of EP without Mg2+ but activated the decay of EP made with Mg2+, increasing its k(app) by 60% to 91 12 s-1. In contrast with observations made during phosphorylation, if added at the beginning of dephosphorylation K+ was fully effective in favouring decomposition of EP made in medium containing no K+. In the presence of either 3mM ATP or 3 mM ATP plus calmodulin, which activate hydrolysis of CaE2P, the effect of K+ on dephosphorylation was conserved. Because the sites for K+ are intracellular and the concentration of K+ in normal red cells is above 100 mM, the effects described here must be taken into account to describe the catalytic cycle of the PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase under physiological conditions. PMID:8615846

  6. Stereodivergent catalytic doubly diastereoselective nitroaldol reactions using heterobimetallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Sohtome, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yuko; Handa, Shinya; Aoyama, Naohiro; Nagawa, Keita; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2008-06-01

    Stereodivergent construction of three contiguous stereocenters in catalytic doubly diastereoselective nitroaldol reactions of alpha-chiral aldehydes with nitroacetaldehyde dimethyl acetal using two types of heterobimetallic catalysts is described. A La-Li-BINOL (LLB) catalyst afforded anti,syn-nitroaldol products in >20:1-14:1 selectivity, and a Pd/La/Schiff base catalyst afforded complimentary syn,syn-nitroaldol products in 10:1-5:1 selectivity. PMID:18465868

  7. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Heinemann, H.; Perry, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes work in progress on three tasks: (1) Catalytic steam gasification of coals and cokes; (2) Oxidative coupling of methane; and (3) Synthesis and characterization of catalysts. Since Task 1 is complete, a final report has been written. This report describes membrane reactors, cyclic methane conversion reactors, theoretical descriptions of reaction-separation schemes, and time-space relationships in cyclic and membrane reactors, all subtasks of Task 2. Initial studies under Task 3 are briefly described.

  8. Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-28

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  9. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  10. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  11. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells. PMID:21867233

  12. Predicting the Catalytic Reactions using Random Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Olsen, T.; Mortensen, J. J.; Jacobsen, K. W.; Thygesen, K. S.; Abild-Pedersen, F.; Norskov, J. K.

    2012-02-01

    Density functional theory has became the workhorse for simulations of catalytic reactions and computational design of novel catalysis. The generally applied semi-local exchange-correlation functionals have successfully predicted catalytic reaction trends over a variety of surfaces. However, in order to achieve quantitative predictions of reaction rates for molecule-surface systems, in particular where there is weak Van der Waals interactions or strong correlation, it is of vital importance to include non-local correlation effects. The use of random phase approximation (RPA) to construct the correlation energy, combined with the exact, self-interaction free exchange energy, offers a non-empirical way for accurately describe the adsorption energies [1] and dispersion forces [2]. We have recently implemented RPA in the GPAW code [3-4], an electronic structure package using projector augmented wave method and real space grids. In this talk I will present our initial results comparing RPA and generalized gradient functionals for the activation energies and reaction energies for transition metal or metal oxide surfaces. [4pt] [1] L. Schimka, et.al, Nature Mat. 9, 741 (2010) [2] T. Olsen, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 156401 (2011) [3] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. B 83, 245122 (2011). [4] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 146803 (2011)

  13. The Influence of Elastic Strain on Catalytic Activity in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Khorshidi, Alireza; Sethuraman, Vijay A; Peterson, Andrew A; Guduru, Pradeep R

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the role of elastic strain in modifying catalytic reaction rates is crucial for catalyst design, but experimentally, this effect is often coupled with a ligand effect. To isolate the strain effect, we have investigated the influence of externally applied elastic strain on the catalytic activity of metal films in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We show that elastic strain tunes the catalytic activity in a controlled and predictable way. Both theory and experiment show strain controls reactivity in a controlled manner consistent with the qualitative predictions of the HER volcano plot and the d-band theory: Ni and Pt's activities were accelerated by compression, while Cu's activity was accelerated by tension. By isolating the elastic strain effect from the ligand effect, this study provides a greater insight into the role of elastic strain in controlling electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27079940

  14. The "Fully Catalytic System" in Mitsunobu Reaction Has Not Been Realized Yet.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Daisuke; Gazvoda, Martin; Košmrlj, Janez; Taniguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-19

    An investigation of the recently reported "fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction" using catalytic amounts of a phosphine reagent and an azo reagent has shown that although benzyl 4-nitrobenzoate is formed under the fully catalytic conditions, the same result is obtained if the hydrazine catalyst is omitted, indicating that this is not a Mitsunobu reaction. In addition, when the reaction between (-)-ethyl lactate and 4-nitrobenzoic acid was carried out using the "fully catalytic" method, the corresponding ester was formed but in very low yield and with predominant retention of configuration. Unfortunately, the system catalytic in phosphine reagent is incompatible with that in the azo reagent. PMID:27481065

  15. Catalytic Transfer Hydogenation Reactions for Undergraduate Practical Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. W.

    1997-04-01

    A brief review of catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) reactions is given. Attention is drawn, particularly, to the utility of ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor in this type of reaction. The reduction of aryl carbonyl compounds to the corresponding methylene derivatives by ammonium formate in the presence of 10% Pd/C at 110°C is compared to their reductive ammonation which occurs at higher temperatures in the absence of the catalyst (the Leuckart reaction). It is suggested that the low cost and simplicity of CTH reactions using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor, together with the high yields obtained in many cases, make them excellent candidates for inclusion in undergraduate practical programmes. Laboratory instructions are given for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline (isolated as benzanilide), benzophenone to diphenylmethanol and fluorenone to fluorene, in all cases using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor and 10% Pd/C as the catalyst. Thin layer chromatography shows that in each case the product is homogeneous; the yields are essentially quantitative.

  16. [Study on bromate formation of catalytic ozonation process].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Yang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Shao-Xia; Lü, Miao; Cheng, Wen

    2011-08-01

    In a batch reactor, the BrO3(-) formation was investigated in the ozonation and catalytic ozonation of Br(-)-containing Yellow river water, using the different heterogeneous catalysts. The results showed that BrO3(-) minimization was achieved in the catalytic ozonation with NiO, CuO, Fe3O4 and Al2O3 as catalysts and the percent reductions of BrO3(-) were 34.0%, 32.8%, 29.2% and 20.8% respectively. In the reaction R(ct), the ratio of concentration of *OH to O3, decreased with the reaction time, and the range of R(ct) was from 10(-8) to 10(-6). In the ozonation process, one of the main reaction pathways of BrO3(-) formation was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by *OH and then O3, another was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by O3 and then *OH. In the catalytic ozonation with Fe3O4 catalyst, the main pathway was the combination oxidation by *OH and then O3. Moreover, about 60.7% removal for UV254 was obtained after 20 min in the catalytic ozonation reaction. In our study, it was found that the catalytic ozonation process can effectively minimize the formation of BrO3(-) and also oxidize organic compounds. PMID:22619950

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of vanadium nitride and modulation of its catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Taizhong; Mao, Shun; Zhou, Guihua; Wen, Zhenhai; Huang, Xingkang; Ci, Suqin; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    A creative hydrothermal synthesis method followed by calcination for vanadium nitride (VN) is reported. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) study of the catalyst shows that VN possesses a comparable catalytic performance to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The ORR catalytic activity study of vanadium nitride, vanadium carbonitride, and vanadium carbide reveals that tuning anions offers a promising route for the activity enhancement of the non-precious metal catalysts.A creative hydrothermal synthesis method followed by calcination for vanadium nitride (VN) is reported. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) study of the catalyst shows that VN possesses a comparable catalytic performance to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The ORR catalytic activity study of vanadium nitride, vanadium carbonitride, and vanadium carbide reveals that tuning anions offers a promising route for the activity enhancement of the non-precious metal catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods; SEM characterization of the catalysts; Tafel test of Pt/C catalyst; BET and cyclic performance tests of VN. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02646b

  18. Study of the oxidative half-reaction catalyzed by a non-heme ferrous catalytic center by means of structural and computational methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicero, Giancarlo; Carbonera, Chiara; Valegård, Karin; Hajdu, Janos; Andersson, Inger; Ranghino, Graziella

    Deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) is a mononuclear ferrous enzyme that catalyzes the expansion of the five-membered thiazolidine ring of the penicillin nucleus into the six-membered dihydrothiazine ring of the cephalosporins. In the first half-reaction with dioxygen and 2-oxoglutarate, a reactive iron-oxygen species is produced that can subsequently react with the penicillin substrate to yield the cephalosporin. We describe quantum mechanical calculations of the first part of the reaction based on the high-resolution structures of the active site of DAOCS and its complexes with ligands. These studies are aimed at understanding how the reactive species can be produced and contained in the active site of the enzyme. The results demonstrate the priming of the active site by the co-substrate for oxygen binding and hint to the presence of a stable iron-peroxo intermediate in equilibrium with a more reactive ferryl species and the formation of CO2 as a leaving group by decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate. A conclusion from these studies is that substitution of CO2 by the penicillin substrate triggers the oxidation reaction in a booby-trap-like mechanism.

  19. Graphene-Semiconductor Catalytic Nanodiodes for Quantitative Detection of Hot Electrons Induced by a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Changhwan; Choi, Hongkyw; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Direct detection of hot electrons generated by exothermic surface reactions on nanocatalysts is an effective strategy to obtain insight into electronic excitation during chemical reactions. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel catalytic nanodiode based on a Schottky junction between a single layer of graphene and an n-type TiO2 layer that enables the detection of hot electron flows produced by hydrogen oxidation on Pt nanoparticles. By making a comparative analysis of data obtained from measuring the hot electron current (chemicurrent) and turnover frequency, we demonstrate that graphene's unique electronic structure and extraordinary material properties, including its atomically thin nature and ballistic electron transport, allow improved conductivity at the interface between the catalytic Pt nanoparticles and the support. Thereby, graphene-based nanodiodes offer an effective and facile way to approach the study of chemical energy conversion mechanisms in composite catalysts with carbon-based supports. PMID:26910271

  20. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  1. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest

  2. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  3. Study on the Catalytic Activity of Noble Metal Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Evolution Reactions in Lithium-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Jung, Hun-Gi; Kim, Jooho; Luo, Xiangyi; Lu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Lee, Yun Jung

    2015-07-01

    Among many challenges present in Li-air batteries, one of the main reasons of low efficiency is the high charge overpotential due to the slow oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, we present systematic evaluation of Pt, Pd, and Ru nanoparticles supported on rGO as OER electrocatalysts in Li-air cell cathodes with LiCF3SO3-tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME) salt-electrolyte system. All of the noble metals explored could lower the charge overpotentials, and among them, Ru-rGO hybrids exhibited the most stable cycling performance and the lowest charge overpotentials. Role of Ru nanoparticles in boosting oxidation kinetics of the discharge products were investigated. Apparent behavior of Ru nanoparticles was different from the conventional electrocatalysts that lower activation barrier through electron transfer, because the major contribution of Ru nanoparticles in lowering charge overpotential is to control the nature of the discharge products. Ru nanoparticles facilitated thin film-like or nanoparticulate Li2O2 formation during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which decomposes at lower potentials during charge, although the conventional role as electrocatalysts during OER cannot be ruled out. Pt-and Pd-rGO hybrids showed fluctuating potential profiles during the cycling. Although Pt- and Pd-rGO decomposed the electrolyte after electrochemical cycling, no electrolyte instability was observed with Ru-rGO hybrids. This study provides the possibility of screening selective electrocatalysts for Li-air cells while maintaining electrolyte stability. PMID:26115340

  4. Artificial reaction coordinate "tunneling" in free-energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free-energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free-energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of Bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (approximately 10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free-energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  5. Artificial reaction coordinate “tunneling” in free energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (~10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  6. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles. PMID:26938837

  7. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  8. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  9. State and catalytic activity of iridium compounds in the reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Khomutova, E.G.; Rysev, A.P.; Romanovskaya, L.E.; Malysheva, N.M.

    1995-12-01

    Kinetic methods of determining Ir are insufficiently selective and sensitive as compared to the methods of determining Os and Ru. These characteristics may be improved by increasing the catalytic activity of iridium. All other factors being equal, catalytic activity depends on the state and form of iridium that enters the catalytic process. This is why one of the ways of improving the performance characteristics of a method of determining iridium involves searching for forms of the catalyst with higher catalytic activity. The aim of this work was to study the state and catalytic activity of iridium compounds. The method based on the iridium-catalyzed reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV) was chosen for the investigation. This method is most commonly used for analyzing complex samples. It was found previously that both the catalytic activity and selectivity of iridium determination increase when the reaction is conducted in the medium of perchloric acid or the sample is pretreated with nitric acid.

  10. A computational study of detoxification of lewisite warfare agents by British anti-lewisite: catalytic effects of water and ammonia on reaction mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Chandan; Pakhira, Srimanta; Sen, Kaushik; Das, Abhijit K

    2013-04-25

    trans-2-Chlorovinyldichloroarsine (lewisite, L agent, Lew-I) acts as a blistering agents. British anti-lewisite (BAL, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol) has long been used as an L-agent antidote. The main reaction channels for the detoxification proceed via breaking of As-Cl bonds and formation of As-S bonds, producing stable, nontoxic ring product [(2-methyl-1,3,2-dithiarsolan-4-yl)methanol]. M06-2X/GENECP calculations have been carried out to establish the enhanced rate of detoxification mechanism in the presence of NH3 and H2O catalysts in both gas and solvent phases, which has been modeled by use of the polarized continuum model (PCM). In addition, natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis have been performed to characterize the intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the transition states. Transition-state theory (TST) calculation establishes that the rates of NH3-catalyzed (2.88 × 10(-11) s(-1)) and H2O-catalyzed (2.42 × 10(-11) s(-1)) reactions are reasonably faster than the uncatalyzed detoxification (5.44 × 10(-13) s(-1)). The results obtained by these techniques give new insight into the mechanism of the detoxification process, identification and thermodynamic characterization of the relevant stationary species, the proposal of alternative paths on modeled potential energy surfaces for uncatalyzed reaction, and the rationalization of the mechanistic role played by catalysts and solvents. PMID:23540856

  11. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  12. Catalytic Enantioselective Desymmetrization Reactions to All-Carbon Quaternary Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing-Ping; Cao, Zhong-Yan; Wang, Yu-Hui; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-06-22

    This Review summarizes the advances in the construction of all-carbon quaternary stereocenters via catalytic enantioselective desymmetrization of prochiral and meso-compounds, highlights the power and potential of this strategy in the total synthesis of natural products and biologically active compounds, and outlines the synthetic opportunities still available. PMID:27251100

  13. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  15. Mg(II) -Mediated Catalytic Asymmetric Dearomatization (CADA) Reaction of β-Naphthols with Dialkyl Acetylenedicarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqing; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Dan; Wang, Pengxin; Wang, Kezhou; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Xianxing; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-13

    A Mg(II) -mediated catalytic asymmetric dearomatization (CADA) reaction of β-naphthols has been developed. The reaction proceeds under ambient temperature and give a series of chiral trisubstituted olefins with good chemoselectivities, Z/E ratios, and excellent enantioselectivities. A fluorinated β-naphthol was designed to generate chiral organofluorine skeletons through the current CADA reaction. Moreover, an interesting tandem cyclization reaction was observed in the following transformation process through an undiscovered intramolecular hydride transfer pathway. PMID:27139904

  16. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  17. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  18. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  19. Revealing structural dynamics in catalytic reactions using ultrafast transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Liu, D.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-03-02

    Progression of a typical heterogeneous catalytic process as a function of a reaction parameter such as temperature can often be segmented, according to Fig. 1. Reactants first bind to active sites to form reaction intermediates with increases in temperature and kinetic energy (Region I). Further temperature increase leads to a full 'light-off' of the catalytic conversion and the reaction is dominated by the intra-particulate diffusion (Region II). The characteristic 'light-off' temperature at the boundary of region I and II often defines the activity of the catalyst. At even higher temperature enters the bulk diffusion region (III), where the catalytic reaction is limited mainly by mass transport between different phases. Significant efforts in practical catalyst design involve improving catalytic activities in the kinetic region (I) and reducing the 'light-off' temperature. Reaction rates at the kinetic region are defined by potential saddle points on top of which a series of 'transitional state' complexes are formed between the active sites and the adsorbed reactants (Fig. 2). Capturing structures of the 'transition state complexes' from the active center's perspective will provide ultimate understanding of catalytic mechanisms and insight into new catalyst design. Experimentally, however, it is a very challenging proposition.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  1. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  2. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  3. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  4. Mass transfer during catalytic reaction in electroosmotically driven flow in a channel microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Vasu, Nadapana; de, Sirshendu

    2011-05-01

    Analytical solution for concentration profile in a microreactor is obtained during heterogeneous catalytic reaction. Reaction occurs in rectangular microchannel with catalyst-coated walls. Flow is induced electroosmotically in the microchannel. A general solution is obtained for first order reaction using a power series solution. Profiles of conversion, cup-mixing concentration of reactant, etc. and variation of Sherwood number is analyzed as function of operating variables. Analytical solution is compared with numerical results.

  5. Sum frequency generation and catalytic reaction studies of the removal of the organic capping agents from Pt nanoparticles by UV-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga, Cesar; Park, Jeong Y.; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Hyun Sook; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-12-10

    We report the structure of the organic capping layers of platinum colloid nanoparticles and their removal by UV-ozone exposure. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS) studies identify the carbon-hydrogen stretching modes on poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and tetradecyl tributylammonium bromide (TTAB)-capped platinum nanoparticles. We found that the UV-ozone treatment technique effectively removes the capping layer on the basis of several analytical measurements including SFGVS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The overall shape of the nanoparticles was preserved after the removal of capping layers, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SFGVS of ethylene hydrogenation on the clean platinum nanoparticles demonstrates the existence of ethylidyne and di-{sigma}-bonded species, indicating the similarity between single-crystal and nanoparticle systems.

  6. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  7. Metal Vinylidenes as Catalytic Species in Organic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    McClory, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Organic vinylidene species have found limited use in organic synthesis due to their inaccessibility. In contrast, metal vinylidenes are much more stable, and may be readily accessed through transition metal activation of terminal alkynes. These electrophilic species may be trapped by a number of nucleophiles. Additionally, metal vinylidenes can participate in pericyclic reactions and processes involving migration of a metal ligand to the vinylidene species. This review addresses the reactions and applications of metal vinylidenes in organic synthesis. PMID:18172846

  8. SpaciMS: spatial and temporal operando resolution of reactions within catalytic monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Sa, Jacinto; Fernandes, Daniel; Aiouache, Farid; Goguet, Alexandre; Hardacdre, Christopher; Lundie, David; Naeem, Wasif; Partridge Jr, William P; Stere, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts are widely used as structured catalysts, especially in the abatement of pollutants. Probing what happens inside these monoliths during operation is, therefore, vital for modelling and prediction of the catalyst behavior. SpaciMS is a spatially resolved capillary-inlet mass spectroscopy system allowing for the generation of spatially resolved maps of the reactions within monoliths. In this study SpaciMS results combined with 3D CFD modelling demonstrate that SpaciMS is a highly sensitive and minimally invasive technique that can provide reaction maps as well as catalytic temporal behavior. Herein we illustrate this by examining kinetic oscillations during a CO oxidation reaction over a Pt/Rh on alumina catalyst supported on a cordierite monolith. These oscillations were only observed within the monolith by SpaciMS between 30 and 90% CO conversion. Equivalent experiments performed in a plug-flow reactor using this catalyst in a crushed form over a similar range of reaction conditions did not display any oscillations demonstrating the importance of intra monolith analysis. This work demonstrates that the SpaciMS offers an accurate and comprehensive picture of structured catalysts under operation.

  9. Two-dimensional reaction free energy surfaces of catalytic reaction: effects of protein conformational dynamics on enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Xie, X Sunney; Bagchi, Biman

    2008-01-17

    We introduce a two-dimensional (2D) multisurface reaction free energy description of the catalytic cycle that explicitly connects the recently observed multi-time-scale conformational dynamics as well as dispersed enzymatic kinetics to the classical Michaelis-Menten equation. A slow conformational motion on a collective enzyme coordinate Q facilitates the catalytic reaction along the intrinsic reaction coordinate X, providing a dynamic realization of Pauling's well-known idea of transition-state stabilization. The catalytic cycle is modeled as transitions between multiple displaced harmonic wells in the XQ space representing different states of the cycle, which is constructed according to the free energy driving force of the cycle. Subsequent to substrate association with the enzyme, the enzyme-substrate complex under strain exhibits a nonequilibrium relaxation toward a new conformation that lowers the activation energy of the reaction, as first proposed by Haldane. The chemical reaction in X is thus enslaved to the down hill slow motion on the Q surface. One consequence of the present theory is that, in spite of the existence of dispersive kinetics, the Michaelis-Menten expression of the catalysis rate remains valid under certain conditions, as observed in recent single-molecule experiments. This dynamic theory builds the relationship between the protein conformational dynamics and the enzymatic reaction kinetics and offers a unified description of enzyme fluctuation-assisted catalysis. PMID:18085768

  10. Cyanoalkylation: Alkylnitriles in Catalytic C-C Bond-Forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Alkylnitriles are one of the most ubiquitous nitrogen-containing chemicals and are widely employed in reactions which result in nitrile-group conversion into other functionalities. Nevertheless, their use as carbon pronucleophiles in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions has been hampered by difficulties associated mainly with the catalytic generation of active species, that is, α-cyano carbanions or metalated nitriles. Recent investigations have addressed this challenge and have resulted in different modes of alkylnitrile activation. This review illustrates these findings, which have set the foundation for the development of practical and conceptually new catalytic, direct cyanoalkylation methodologies. PMID:26387483

  11. Structural and spectroscopic study of reactions between chelating zinc-binding groups and mimics of the matrix metalloproteinase and disintegrin metalloprotease catalytic sites: the coordination chemistry of metalloprotease inhibition.

    PubMed

    He, Hongshan; Puerta, David T; Cohen, Seth M; Rodgers, Kenton R

    2005-10-17

    To understand the coordination chemistry of zinc-binding groups (ZBGs) with catalytic zinc centers in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and disintegrin metalloproteases (ADAMs), we have undertaken a model compound study centered around tris(3,5-methylphenypyrazolyl)hydroboratozinc(II) hydroxide and aqua complexes ([Tp(Ph,Me)ZnOH] and [Tp(Ph,Me)Zn(OH2)]+, respectively, wherein (Tp(Ph,Me))- = hydrotris(3,5-methylphenylpyrazolyl)borate) and the products of their reactions with a class of chelating Schiff's base ligands. The results show that the protic ligands, HL (HL = N-propyl-1-(5-methyl-2-imidazolyl)methanimine (5-Me-4-ImHPr), N-propyl-1-(4-imidazolyl)methanimine (4-ImHPr), and N-propyl-1-(2-imidazolyl)methanimine (2-ImHPr)), react with [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnOH] and give products with the general formula [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnL], whereas reactions with neutral aprotic ligands, L' (L' = N-propyl-1-(1-methyl-2-imidazolyl)methanimine (1-Me-2-ImPr) and N-propyl-1-(2-thiazolyl)methanimine (2-TaPr)), yield the corresponding [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnL]+ complexes. Although the phenol group of N-propyl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)methanimine (2-HOPhPr) is protic, this ligand forms a cationic four-coordinate complex containing an intraligand hydrogen bond. The solid-state structures of these complexes were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the results showed that the protic ligands form five-membered chelates of the Zn2+ ion. All ligands displace the aqua ligand in [Tp(Ph,Me)Zn(OH2)]+ to yield complexes having 1H NMR spectra consistent with the formation of five membered chelates. The 1H resonance frequencies of the chelating ligands typically shift upfield upon coordination to the zinc center, due to ring current effects from the pendant phenyl groups of the (Tp(Ph,Me))- ligand. Thus, the 1H NMR spectra provide a convenient and sensitive means of tracking the solution reactions by titration. The resulting series of spectra showed that the stabilities of the chelates in solution depend on the

  12. Facilitating ZnO nanostructure growths by making seeds for self-catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Liang; Yu, Choongho

    2012-03-15

    Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were successfully synthesized on ZnCl{sub 2}-coated Zn foils in oxygen environment by using simple thermal annealing processes. With relatively low reaction temperatures (410 and 700 Degree-Sign C), nanowires whose lengths and diameters are up to {approx}50 {mu}m and 10-100 nm were obtained. We found that ZnO seeds created from ZnCl{sub 2} played an important role in facilitating the ZnO nanowire growth via self-catalytic reactions. Systematic studies by altering critical synthesis factors that determine shape, length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were performed in order to unveil the growth mechanisms. We also compared the nanowires synthesized from Zn foils with tetrapod ZnO nanostructures synthesized from Zn powders at various temperatures. - Graphical abstract: (Left panel) ZnO seeds from ZnCl{sub 2} after thermal annealing at 500 Degree-Sign C for 5 min, (right panel) dense ZnO nanowires grown from Zn foils with ZnCl{sub 2} coating after thermal annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C for 60 min. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnCl{sub 2} facilitated ZnO nanowire growth by creating ZnO seeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanowires were synthesized via self-catalytic reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Key parameters in thermal annealing processes were identified.

  13. Reaction network and kinetics for the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V sub 2 O sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Andersson, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The oxidation of three methyl-diphenylmethane isomers and of bibenzyl, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde, which are intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, has been studied to elucidate the reaction network and relative importance of various reactions. Selectivity dependences reveal that the network is composed mainly of three parallel reaction routes: (1) side-chain oxidation with consecutive reactions, (2) oxidative coupling with both parallel and consecutive reactions, and (3) carbon oxide formation. Coupling products are not negligible, with an initial selectivity of 29% (400{degree}C). Anthraquinone is produced mainly from o-methyl-diphenylmethane conditions and catalyst used. Selectivity dependences suggested product lumping and a simplified network. Kinetic analysis of this reaction network indicates that higher temperatures favor route 2 over route 1. The same initial intermediates for route 1 of side-chain oxidation and for route 2 of oxidative coupling are suggested.

  14. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources. PMID:27329206

  15. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon–carbon bond forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki–Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon–carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki–Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  16. Sulfur and Nitrogen Co-Doped Graphene for Metal-Free Catalytic Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoguang; O'Donnell, Kane; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Yuxian; Wang, Shaobin

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen co-doped reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized by a facile method and demonstrated remarkably enhanced activities in metal-free activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for catalytic oxidation of phenol. Based on first-order kinetic model, S-N co-doped rGO (SNG) presents an apparent reaction rate constant of 0.043 ± 0.002 min(-1) , which is 86.6, 22.8, 19.7, and 4.5-fold as high as that over graphene oxide (GO), rGO, S-doped rGO (S-rGO), and N-doped rGO (N-rGO), respectively. A variety of characterization techniques and density functional theory calculations are employed to investigate the synergistic effect of sulfur and nitrogen co-doping. Co-doping of rGO at an optimal sulfur loading can effectively break the inertness of carbon systems, activate the sp(2) -hybridized carbon lattice and facilitate the electron transfer from covalent graphene sheets for PMS activation. Moreover, both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and classical quenching tests are employed to investigate the generation and evolution of reactive radicals on the SNG sample for phenol catalytic oxidation. This study presents a novel metal-free catalyst for green remediation of organic pollutants in water. PMID:25786381

  17. Catalytic reduction of CN−, CO and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions**

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent and added in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-free, organic solvent-based reaction medium to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN−), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) when samarium (II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are supplied as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors not only catalytically reduce CN− or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, but also catalytically reduce CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The observation of C-C coupling from CO2 reveals a unique, Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate; whereas the achievement of catalytic turnover of CN−, CO and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon production from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  18. Possibility of a catalytic reaction of H/sub 2/ + Cl/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Kurlyandskaya, I.I.; Rozlovskii, A.I.

    1988-12-01

    It is shown that the amount of conversion of hydrogen in its reaction with chlorine in a mixture passing through a layer of activated carbon at 200/degrees/C corresponds to an effective rate constant that is three orders of magnitude larger than that calculated for the homogeneous reaction in the regime of equilibrium dissociation of chlorine. On the basis of this, the conclusion is drawn that a heterogeneous catalytic process predominates in this case. It is established that with an increase in the temperature up to 300/degrees/, the rate of the homogeneous reaction, having the larger temperature coefficient, becomes commensurate with the heterogeneous rate. In the general case, the ratio of the rates of chlorination for the homogeneous, chain mechanism and for the heterogeneous catalytic reaction mechanism depend on the experimental conditions.

  19. Robustness and modularity properties of a non-covalent DNA catalytic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu

    2010-01-01

    The biophysics of nucleic acid hybridization and strand displacement have been used for the rational design of a number of nanoscale structures and functions. Recently, molecular amplification methods have been developed in the form of non-covalent DNA catalytic reactions, in which single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules catalyze the release of ssDNA product molecules from multi-stranded complexes. Here, we characterize the robustness and specificity of one such strand displacement-based catalytic reaction. We show that the designed reaction is simultaneously sensitive to sequence mutations in the catalyst and robust to a variety of impurities and molecular noise. These properties facilitate the incorporation of strand displacement-based DNA components in synthetic chemical and biological reaction networks. PMID:20194118

  20. Modular, Catalytic Enantioselective Construction of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters by Sequential Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Potter, Bowman; Edelstein, Emma K; Morken, James P

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling with chiral γ,γ-disubstituted allylboronates in the presence of RuPhos ligand occurs with high regioselectivity and enantiospecificity, furnishing nonracemic compounds with quaternary centers. Mechanistic experiments suggest that the reaction occurs by transmetalation with allyl migration, followed by rapid reductive elimination. PMID:27310927

  1. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  2. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reaction of α- and β-Fluorinated Amides.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Lennart; Arteaga, Fernando Arteaga; Yin, Liang; Alagiri, Kaliyamoorthy; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-12-23

    The last two decades have witnessed the emergence of direct enolization protocols providing atom-economical and operationally simple methods to use enolates for stereoselective C-C bond-forming reactions, eliminating the inherent drawback of the preformation of enolates using stoichiometric amounts of reagents. In its infancy, direct enolization relied heavily on the intrinsic acidity of the latent enolates, and the reaction scope was limited to readily enolizable ketones and aldehydes. Recent advances in this field enabled the exploitation of carboxylic acid derivatives for direct enolization, offering expeditious access to synthetically versatile chiral building blocks. Despite the growing demand for enantioenriched fluorine-containing small molecules, α- and β-fluorinated carbonyl compounds have been neglected in direct enolization chemistry because of the competing and dominating defluorination pathway. Herein we present a comprehensive study on direct and highly stereoselective Mannich-type reactions of α- and β-fluorine-functionalized 7-azaindoline amides that rely on a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalytic system to guarantee an efficient enolization while suppressing undesired defluorination. This protocol contributes to provide a series of fluorinated analogs of enantioenriched β-amino acids for medicinal chemistry. PMID:26652911

  3. Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Acetylcholinesterase Determined by Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanzi; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yingkai

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a remarkably efficient serine hydrolase responsible for the termination of impulse signaling at cholinergic synapses. By employing Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with B3LYP/6-31G(d) QM/MM potential and the umbrella sampling method, we have characterized its complete catalytic reaction mechanism for hydrolyzing neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and determined its multi-step free energy reaction profiles for the first time. In both acylation and deacylation reaction stages, the first step involves the nucleophilic attack to the carbonyl carbon with the triad His447 serving as the general base, and leads to a tetrahedral covalent intermediate stabilized by the oxyanion hole. From the intermediate to the product, the orientation of His447 ring needs to be adjusted very slightly, and then the proton transfers from His447 to the product and the break of the scissile bond happen spontaneously. For the three-pronged oxyanion hole, it only makes two hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at either the initial reactant or the final product state, but the third hydrogen bond is formed and stable at all transition and intermediate states during the catalytic process. At the intermediate state of the acylation reaction, a short and low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) is found to be formed between two catalytic triad residues His447 and Glu334, and the spontaneous proton transfer between two residues has been observed. However, it is only about 1 ~ 2 kcal/mol stronger than the normal hydrogen bond. In comparison with previous theoretical investigations of the AChE catalytic mechanism, our current study clearly demonstrates the power and advantages of employing Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM MD simulations in characterizing enzyme reaction mechanisms. PMID:20550161

  4. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-04-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The reaction of furan on sulfided Mo(110) closely resembles that on the (100) surface, consisting mainly of fragmentation. Some differences in detail are apparent that need further study. After pre-dosing with hydrogen, or in a hydrogen (deuterium) atmosphere (up to 5 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} torr), the reaction pathways for furan change little, though there is evidence for the production of surface formyl radicals. We will attempt to induce HDO activity by using (a) using higher H{sub 2} pressures and (b) performing reactions on a preformed C/S/H{sub x} surface layer. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10−11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on. PMID:26522142

  6. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10-11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on.

  7. Revisiting catalytic model reaction p-nitrophenol/NaBH4 using metallic nanoparticles coated on polymeric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maolin; Chen, Guofang

    2013-11-01

    The early reported pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics of the polymer-supported metallic nanocatalysts for the model reaction of p-nitrophenol (p-NP)/NaBH4 were probably oversimplified. Here a detailed study of p-NP reduction by NaBH4 in the presence of the raspberry-like poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-modified polymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate) composite sub-microspheres with tunable gold nanoparticles (PGMA@PAH@AuNPs) was presented. Effects of polyelectrolyte concentration, the ratio of polymer spheres to gold nanoparticles, and the solution pH value for composite synthesis on the induction period, reaction time, average reaction rate and average turnover frequency were systematically investigated. Experimental results in all cases of our study revealed an nth order (n > 1) of the p-NP/NaBH4 catalytic reaction by the prepared polymer composite particles. The apparent order of reaction, n, is dependent on the total surface area of the coated gold nanoparticles on the polymer spheres, which can be closely correlated with the tunable gold nanoparticle surface coverage. The mechanism of the observed catalytic activity enhancement was proposed based on active epoxy groups of the polymer spheres and a large adsorption of p-nitrophenolate anions onto the positively-charged spheres.

  8. Structural effects in the reaction between carbon dioxide and coke doped with various potassium bearing catalytic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.; Debroy, T.

    1986-09-01

    The rate of reaction between carbon dioxide and coke with and without the additions of KCN, KOCN, and K2CO3 was studied using thermogravimetry. Since both potassium and carbon are lost during the reaction, the concentration of potassium in the coke samples was determined as a function of the extent of the reaction by atomic absorption spectrometry. The changes in the specific surface area due to the reaction were studied by the nitrogen adsorption technique. The changes in the pore structure of coke were investigated by mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The distribution of potassium in the coke structure was examined as a function of the reaction time by the energy dispersion X-ray technique. Furthermore, since sulfur is known to influence the rate of the C-CO2 reaction, the sulfur content of the coke samples with or without the addition of catalytic precursors was monitored as a function of the extent of reaction. The influences of the structural parameters and the concentration of potassium on the rate of the coke-CO2 reaction were determined. The rate data were analyzed on the basis of a structural model to examine the contributions of the chemical reaction and the pore diffusion on the overall rate of the coke-CO2 reaction.

  9. Generalized Hydrodynamic Treatment of the Interplay between Restricted Transport and Catalytic Reactions in Nanoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David M.; Wang, Jing; Evans, James W.

    2012-06-01

    Behavior of catalytic reactions in narrow pores is controlled by a delicate interplay between fluctuations in adsorption-desorption at pore openings, restricted diffusion, and reaction. This behavior is captured by a generalized hydrodynamic formulation of appropriate reaction-diffusion equations (RDE). These RDE incorporate an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The RDE elucidate the nonexponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth.

  10. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery. PMID:26436336

  11. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  12. Preparation of palladium containing cubic mesoporous materials and their application towards catalytic hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasanthiran, Vagulejan

    Pd --MCM-48 materials were synthesized by modified Stober synthesis in four hours at room temperature. In this procedure using Pd(0) nanoparticles, Na2[PdCl]4 and Pd(acac)2 were used as Pd precursors and Pd containing cubic MCM-48 mesoporous materials were successfully synthesized with metal loadings 1 to ˜5% wt. These materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Physisorption, and chemisorption studies. Selected Pd-MCM-48 catalysts were employed for hydrogenation and coupling reactions. These materials provide excellent activity for regio- and chemoselective hydrogenation of olefins with a turnover frequency of 4400 mol/h. At the same time, these catalysts are very reactive for the coupling reactions such as Suzuki, Heck, etc. Pd-MCM-48 provides higher activity and selectivity compared with other reported Pd containing siliceous materials. The Pd-MCM-48 catalyst can be reused more than 10 times with minimal loss of cubic phase catalytic activity.

  13. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity. PMID:21428607

  14. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-01-22

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces.

  15. Infrared Laser Generation Of Heterogeneous Catalysts And Laser-Induced Reactions At Catalytic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Cheng, , Sheng-San; Iyer, Pradeep K.; Chiou, Shane-Jaw

    1984-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that continuous wave infrared CO2 laser radiation can be util-ized to rapidly produce active catalysts from inert precursors. The activity and selectiv-ity of Ca0 produced from Ca(OH)2 for the isomerization of 1-butene to cis- and trans-2-but-ene is discussed. Variation of the laser irradiation time produces catalytic activity and selectivity qualitatively similar to that resulting from conventional calcination at different temperatures. Pulsed infrared laser-induced reactions at catalytic surfaces are also discussed with emphasis on the dehydrobromination of 2-bromopropane and ethylene elimination from glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride at BaSO4 , A1PO4, and similar surfaces. Correlations are made of the extent of reaction with various experimental parameters including nature of the catalyst, laser frequency, laser fluence, number of laser pulses, and reagent-catalyst ratio.

  16. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

  17. The Non-innocent Phenalenyl Unit: An Electronic Nest to Modulate the Catalytic Activity in Hydroamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arup; Sen, Tamal K.; Ghorai, Pradip Kr; Mandal, Swadhin K.

    2013-01-01

    The phenalenyl unit has played intriguing role in different fields of research spanning from chemistry, material chemistry to device physics acting as key electronic reservoir which has not only led to the best organic single component conductor but also created the spin memory device of next generation. Now we show the non-innocent behaviour of phenalenyl unit in modulating the catalytic behaviour in a homogeneous organic transformation. The present study establishes that the cationic state of phenalenyl unit can act as an organic Lewis acceptor unit to influence the catalytic outcome of intermolecular hydroamination reaction of carbodiimides. For the present study, we utilized organoaluminum complexes of phenalenyl ligands in which the phenalenyl unit maintains the closed shell electronic state. The DFT calculation reveals that the energy of LUMO of the catalyst is mainly controlled by phenalenyl ligands which in turn determines the outcome of the catalysis. PMID:24084653

  18. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-01-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. The investigators are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. They then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The original plans for this quarter called for continuing study of the interesting reactions of furan on sulfided Mo(100) surfaces presented in the last report. Due to the unfortunate accidental destruction of this sample, the investigators have in fact proceeded on two alternate fronts. First they have improved the sample heating system, the malfunction of which caused the loss of the Mo crystal. Secondly, they have prepared a Mo(110) surface and performed initial experiments to understand the sulfur phases that form on this surface of Mo. These efforts have been worthwhile - they have accomplished on the (110) surface in two months what required almost six months on the (100) surface, and are in a good position to repeat the furan reaction experiments on Mo(110) surfaces. The heating system design is described and results of surface properties are given. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  20. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  1. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-10-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  2. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  3. Continuous-flow stereoselective organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions in a chiral catalytic "homemade" HPLC column.

    PubMed

    Chiroli, Valerio; Benaglia, Maurizio; Cozzi, Franco; Puglisi, Alessandra; Annunziata, Rita; Celentano, Giuseppe

    2013-07-19

    Continuous-flow organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions have been performed with excellent enantioselectivity for the first time in a chiral "homemade" HPLC column, packed with silica on which a MacMillan catalyst has been supported by a straightforward immobilization procedure. The versatility of the system was also proven by running with the same column continuous-flow stereoselective reactions with three different substrates, showing that the catalytic reactor may efficiently work in continuo for more than 150 h; the regeneration of the HPLC column was also demonstrated, allowing to further extend the activity of the reactor to more than 300 operating hours. PMID:23808663

  4. Catalytic properties of intermetallic compounds Ln(NiM)/sub 5/ and their hydrides in hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Konenko, I.R.; Starodubtseva, E.V.; Urazbaeva, K.A.; Fedorovskaya, E.A.; Klabunovskii, E.I.; Slinkin, A.A.; Mordovin, V.P.

    1989-02-01

    The catalytic (hydrogenation of propylene), asymmetric (enantioselective hydrogenation of ethyl acetoacetate), and magnetic properties of intermetallic compounds with the composition Ln(NiM)/sub 5/(IMC), where Ln = La, Sm, Gd; M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, and of their hydrides have been studied. The data obtained indicate that the catalytic activity of the above compounds in both reactions is due to structural peculiarities of IMC and to the affinity of IMC to H/sub 2/. The observed changes in the total and the optical yield of the product of hydrogenation in the presence of IMC hydrides, modified with R,R-(+) tartaric acid, as functions of the nature of d-metals and their combinations, in the initial complex catalyst lead to the assumption that different metal tartrate complexes are formed on the hydride surface which act as centers of enantioselective hydrogenation.

  5. Evaluation of the catalytic activity of Pd-Ag alloys on ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Rego, R.; Fernandes, L. S.; Tavares, P. B.

    2011-08-01

    Pd-Ag alloys containing different amounts of Ag (8, 21 and 34 at.%) were prepared in order to evaluate their catalytic activity towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and oxygen reduction (ORR) reactions. A sequential electroless deposition of Ag and Pd on a stainless steel disc, followed by annealing at 650 °C under Ar stream, was used as the alloy electrode deposition process. From half-cell measurements in a 1.0 M NaOH electrolyte at ≅20 °C, it was found that alloying Pd with Ag leads to an increases of the ORR and EOR kinetics, relative to Pd. Among the alloys under study, the 21 at.% Ag content alloy presents the highest catalytic activity for the EOR and the lowest Ag content alloy (8 at.% Ag) shows the highest ORR activity. Moreover, it was found that the selectivity of Pd-Ag alloys towards ORR is sustained when ethanol is present in the electrolyte.

  6. Kinetics and reaction chemistry of catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorinated benzenes on sulfided NiMo/. gamma. Al sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hagh, B.F.

    1989-01-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has recently emerged as a treatment and recycling process for waste streams containing chlorinated organics. Compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) can be effectively treated using this chemistry. These applications have created a need for rate and mechanism data for these reactions. In this work, the catalytic hydrodechlorination reactions of hexachlorobenzene and all of its partially dechlorinated intermediates over NiMo/{gamma}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydroprocessing catalyst were examined in a differential microflow reactor. The NiMo catalyst was chosen after a screening study revealed that it had high activity and selectivity for dechlorination. Based on chlorobenzene hydrodechlorination data at 275-375C, a kinetic model was proposed where the rates of adsorption and surface reaction were comparable and neither controlled the overall reaction rate. The dechlorination rate data of hexachlorobenzene and other chlorinated benzenes point toward the presence of steps that involve multiple chlorine removal. Not all possible intermediates are formed; all of the observed intermediate dechlorination steps proceed at comparable rates.

  7. Accelerated Catalytic Fenton Reaction with Traces of Iron: An Fe-Pd-Multicatalysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Anett; Velasco Polo, Miriam; Crincoli, Klara; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    An accelerated catalytic Fenton (ACF) reaction was developed based upon a multicatalysis approach, facilitating efficient contaminant oxidation at trace levels of dissolved iron. Beside the Fe(II)/H2O2 catalyst/oxidant pair for production of OH-radicals, the ACF system contains Pd/H2 as catalyst/reductant pair for fast reduction of Fe(III) back to Fe(II) which accelerates the Fenton cycle and leads to faster contaminant degradation. By this means, the concentration of the dissolved iron catalyst can be reduced to trace levels (1 mg L(-1)) below common discharge limits, thus eliminating the need for iron sludge removal, which is one of the major drawbacks of conventional Fenton processes. ACF provides fast degradation of the model contaminant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, C0 = 0.17 mM) with a half-life of 11 min with 1 mg L(-1) dissolved iron, 500 mg L(-1) H2O2, 5 mg L(-1) Pd (as suspended Pd/Al2O3 catalyst) and 0.1 MPa H2, pH 3. The effects of pH, H2 partial pressure and H2O2 concentration on MTBE degradation rates were studied. Results on kinetic deuterium isotope effect and quenching studies are in conformity with OH-radicals as main oxidant. The heterogeneous Pd/Al2O3 catalyst was reused within six cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27167833

  8. Plant lipases: biocatalyst aqueous environment in relation to optimal catalytic activity in lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Caro, Yanis; Pina, Michel; Turon, Fabrice; Guilbert, Stephane; Mougeot, Estelle; Fetsch, David V; Attwool, Philip; Graille, Jean

    2002-03-20

    Adsorption and desorption isotherms of two commercial enzyme preparations of papain and bromelain were determined with a Dynamic Vapor System. The Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) modeling of the obtained sorption isotherms allowed the definition of different levels of hydration of those samples. Afterward, these enzyme preparations were used as biocatalysts in water and solvent-free esterification and alcoholysis reactions. The evolution of the obtained fatty acid ester level as a function of the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst, i.e., thermodynamic water activity (a(w)) and water content, was studied. The results show an important correlation between the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst and its catalytic activity during the lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions. Thus, the Carica papaya lipase (crude papain preparation) catalytic activity is highly dependent on the biocatalyst hydration state. The optimized synthesis reaction yield is obtained when the a(w) value of the enzyme preparation is stabilized at 0.22, which corresponds to 2% water content. This optimal level of hydration occurs on the linear part of the biocatalyst's sorption isotherm, where the water molecules can form a mono- or multiple layer with the protein network. The synthesis reaction yield decreases when the a(w) of the preparation is higher than 0.22, because the excess water molecules modify the system equilibrium leading to the reverse and competitive reaction, i.e., hydrolysis. These results show also that an optimal storage condition for the highly hydrophilic crude papain preparation is a relative humidity strictly lower than 70% to avoid an irreversible structural transition leading to a useless biocatalyst. Concerning the bromelain preparation, no effect of the hydration level on the catalytic activity during esterification reactions was observed. This biocatalyst has too weak a catalytic activity which makes it difficult to observe any differences. Furthermore, the

  9. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In

  10. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  12. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation with a Methandiide-Based Carbene Complex: An Experimental and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Julia; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2015-11-01

    The transfer hydrogenation (TH) reaction of ketones with catalytic systems based on a methandiide-derived ruthenium carbene complex was investigated and optimised. The complex itself makes use of the noninnocent behaviour of the carbene ligand (M=CR2 →MH-C(H)R2 ), but showed only moderate activity, thus requiring long reaction times to achieve sufficient conversion. DFT studies on the reaction mechanism revealed high reaction barriers for both the dehydrogenation of iPrOH and the hydrogen transfer. A considerable improvement of the catalytic activity could be achieved by employing triphenylphosphine as additive. Mechanistic studies on the role of PPh3 in the catalytic cycle revealed the formation of a cyclometalated complex upon phosphine coordination. This ruthenacycle was revealed to be the active species under the reaction conditions. The use of the isolated complex resulted in high catalytic activities in the TH of aromatic as well as aliphatic ketones. The complex was also found to be active under base-free conditions, suggesting that the cyclometalation is crucial for the enhanced activity. PMID:26403918

  13. Catalytic reduction of CN-, CO, and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-01-19

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN(-)), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) without using adenosine triphosphate (ATP), when samarium(II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are employed as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors catalytically reduce CN(-) or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, and CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The C-C coupling from CO2 indicates a unique Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate, whereas the catalytic turnover of CN(-), CO, and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  14. Catalytic mechanism of transition-metal compounds on Mg hydrogen sorption reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Gagik; Klassen, Thomas; Bormann, Rüdiger

    2006-06-01

    The catalytic mechanisms of transition-metal compounds during the hydrogen sorption reaction of magnesium-based hydrides were investigated through relevant experiments. Catalytic activity was found to be influenced by four distinct physico-thermodynamic properties of the transition-metal compound: a high number of structural defects, a low stability of the compound, which however has to be high enough to avoid complete reduction of the transition metal under operating conditions, a high valence state of the transition-metal ion within the compound, and a high affinity of the transition-metal ion to hydrogen. On the basis of these results, further optimization of the selection of catalysts for improving sorption properties of magnesium-based hydrides is possible. In addition, utilization of transition-metal compounds as catalysts for other hydrogen storage materials is considered. PMID:16771356

  15. Catalytic reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol with alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Avetisyan, K.G.; Matnishyan, A.A.

    1987-01-10

    The cyclic ketal 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-bis(3-phenyl-2-propynyloxy)-1,4-dioxane was obtained by the reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1=ol with propargyl alcohol in the presence of the HgO-BF/sub 3/ O(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/ catalytic system. The transformation of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol and its ethers in methanol and ethanol by the action of the above-mentioned catalytic system leads to 1-phenyl-3-alkoxy-1-propanone, 1-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxypropane, and 1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one. The intermediate organomercury compound, which is the product from regioselective addition of mercuric oxide and the saturated alcohol at the triple bond, was isolated. Its protodemercuration led to the above-mentioned linear products. The formation of the cyclic ketal is presumably due to the preferred formation of mercury bis-hydroxypropargylide.

  16. Parallelization of Catalytic Packed-Bed Microchannels with Pressure-Drop Microstructures for Gas-Liquid Multiphase Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Sunao; Ohtaki, Kenichiro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Inoue, Tomoya

    2012-06-01

    High-throughput and stable treatments are required to achieve the practical production of chemicals with microreactors. However, the flow maldistribution to the paralleled microchannels has been a critical problem in achieving the productive use of multichannel microreactors for multiphase flow conditions. In this study, we newly designed and fabricated a glass four-channel catalytic packed-bed microreactor for the scale-up of gas-liquid multiphase chemical reactions. We embedded microstructures generating high pressure losses at the upstream side of each packed bed, and experimentally confirmed the efficacy of the microstructures in decreasing the maldistribution of the gas-liquid flow to the parallel microchannels.

  17. TiO2-sludge carbon enhanced catalytic oxidative reaction in environmental wastewaters applications.

    PubMed

    Athalathil, Sunil; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Stüber, Frank; Bengoa, Christophe; Font, Josep; Fortuny, Agusti; Pintar, Albin; Fabregat, Azael

    2015-12-30

    The enhanced oxidative potential of sludge carbon/TiO2 nano composites (SNCs), applied as heterogeneous catalysts in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), was studied. Fabrification of efficient SNCs using different methods and successful evaluation of their catalytic oxidative activity is reported for the first time. Surface modification processes of hydrothermal deposition, chemical treatment and sol-gel solution resulted in improved catalytic activity and good surface chemistry of the SNCs. The solids obtained after chemical treatment and hydrothermal deposition processes exhibit excellent crystallinity and photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic rate was obtained for the material prepared using hydrothermal deposition technique, compared to other nanocomposites. Further, improved removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous phase by means of catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet air oxidation processes is achieved over the solid synthesized using chemical treatment method. The present results demonstrate that the addition of TiO2 on the surface of sludge carbon (SC) increases catalytic oxidative activity of SNCs. The latter produced from harmful sludge materials can be therefore used as cost-effective and efficient sludge derived catalysts for the removal of hazardous pollutants. PMID:26223014

  18. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes. PMID:24619034

  19. Reactions of hypochlorous acid with biological substrates are activated catalytically by tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Prütz, W A

    1998-09-15

    The activation of reactions of HOCl with a variety of model substrates by tertiary amines was investigated spectroscopically by tandem-mix and stopped-flow techniques. HOCl-induced chlorination of salicylate can be sped up by several orders of magnitude by catalytic amounts of trimethylamine (TMN). The effect is obviously due to the fast generation of reactive quarternary chloramonium ions, TMN+ Cl, which act as chain carrier in a catalytic reaction cycle. Of various catalysts tested, quinine shows the highest activity; this is attributable to the quinuclidine (QN) substituent, a bicyclic tertiary amine, forming a particularly reactive chloro derivative, QN+ Cl, which does not decompose autocatalytically. The rate of catalytic salicylate chlorination as a function of pH (around pH 7) depends not at least on the basicity of the tertiary amine; the rate increases with pH in the cases of TMN and quinuclidine (high basicity), but decreases with pH in the case of MES (low basicity). Tertiary amines also catalyze the interaction between HOCl and alkenes, as shown using sorbate as model. Reaction of HOCl with the nucleotides GMP and CMP is sped up remarkably by catalytic amounts of tertiary amines. In the case of GMP the same product spectrum is produced by HOCl in absence and presence of catalyst, but a change in the product spectra is obtained when AMP and CMP are reacted with HOCl in presence of catalyst. Using poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) as DNA model, it is shown that HOCl primarily induces an absorbance increase at 263 nm, which indicates unfolding of the double strand due to fast chlorination of thymidine; a subsequent secondary absorbance decrease can be explained by slow chlorination of adenosine. Both the primary and secondary processes are activated by catalytic amounts of quinine. No evidence was found for a radical pathway in TMN-mediated oxidation of formate by HOCl. The present results suggest that low concentrations of certain tertiary amines have the potential

  20. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect. PMID:23990024

  1. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation PMID:23213902

  2. Synthesis and the thermal and catalytic dehydrogenation reactions of amine-thioboranes.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alasdair P M; Haddow, Mairi F; Manners, Ian

    2012-08-01

    A series of trimethylamine-thioborane adducts, Me(3)N·BH(2)SR (R = tBu [2a], nBu [2b], iPr [2c], Ph [2d], C(6)F(5) [2e]) have been prepared and characterized. Attempts to access secondary and primary amine adducts of thioboranes via amine-exchange reactions involving these species proved unsuccessful, with the thiolate moiety shown to be vulnerable to displacement by free amine. However, treatment of the arylthioboranes, [BH(2)-SPh](3) (9) and C(6)F(5)SBH(2)·SMe(2) (10) with Me(2)NH and iPr(2)NH successfully yielded the adducts Me(2)NH·BH(2)SR (R = Ph [11a], C(6)F(5) [12a]) and iPr(2)NH·BH(2)SR (R = Ph [11b], C(6)F(5) [12b]) in high yield. These adducts were also shown to be accessible via thermally induced hydrothiolation of the aminoboranes Me(2)N═BH(2), derived from the cyclic dimer [Me(2)N-BH(2)](2) (13), and iPr(2)N═BH(2) (14), respectively. Attempts to prepare the aliphatic thiolate substituted adducts R(2)NH·BH(2)SR' (R = Me, iPr; R' = tBu, nBu, iPr) via this method, however, proved unsuccessful, with the temperatures required to facilitate hydrothiolation also inducing thermal dehydrogenation of the amine-thioborane products to form aminothioboranes, R(2)N═BH(SR'). Thermal and catalytic dehydrogenation of the targeted amine-thioboranes, 11a/11b and 12a/12b were also investigated. Adducts 11b and 12b were cleanly dehydrogenated to yield iPr(2)N═BH(SPh) (22) and iPr(2)N═BH(SC(6)F(5)) (23), respectively, at 100 °C (18 h, toluene), with dehydrogenation also possible at 20 °C (42 h, toluene) with a 2 mol % loading of [Rh(μ-Cl)cod](2) in the case of the former species. Similar studies with adduct 11a evidenced a competitive elimination of H(2) and HSPh upon thermolysis, and other complex reactivity under catalytic conditions, whereas the fluorinated analogue 12a was found to be resistant to dehydrogenation. PMID:22800118

  3. Contributions of Phase, Sulfur Vacancies, and Edges to the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalytic Activity of Porous Molybdenum Disulfide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Xinghong; Xu, Ping; Yuan, Quan; Samad, Leith; Wang, Xianjie; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhihua; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong; Song, Bo; Jin, Song

    2016-06-29

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising nonprecious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that has been extensively studied due to its excellent performance, but the lack of understanding of the factors that impact its catalytic activity hinders further design and enhancement of MoS2-based electrocatalysts. Here, by using novel porous (holey) metallic 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets synthesized by a liquid-ammonia-assisted lithiation route, we systematically investigated the contributions of crystal structure (phase), edges, and sulfur vacancies (S-vacancies) to the catalytic activity toward HER from five representative MoS2 nanosheet samples, including 2H and 1T phase, porous 2H and 1T phase, and sulfur-compensated porous 2H phase. Superior HER catalytic activity was achieved in the porous 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets that have even more edges and S-vacancies than conventional 1T phase MoS2. A comparative study revealed that the phase serves as the key role in determining the HER performance, as 1T phase MoS2 always outperforms the corresponding 2H phase MoS2 samples, and that both edges and S-vacancies also contribute significantly to the catalytic activity in porous MoS2 samples. Then, using combined defect characterization techniques of electron spin resonance spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to quantify the S-vacancies, the contributions of each factor were individually elucidated. This study presents new insights and opens up new avenues for designing electrocatalysts based on MoS2 or other layered materials with enhanced HER performance. PMID:27269185

  4. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  5. Asphaltene cracking in catalytic hydrotreating of heavy oils. 2. study of changes in asphaltene structure during catalytic hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Sachio, A.; Chisato, T.; Shinichi, N.; Yoshimi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Characteristics in catalytic conversion of asphaltenes in petroleum heavy residues were studied in the hydrotreating process. A Boscan crude, an Athabasca bitumen, and a Khafji vacuum residue were tested as typical feedstocks. Various analyses were made to obtain the properties of asphaltenes before and after the reaction, e.g., changes of heteroatoms such as sulfur and metals, and decreases of molecular weight. The characteristic changes of asphaltene molecules were also investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and X-ray analyses. The association and coordination of vanadyl in asphaltenes were studied by the temperature dependence on the ESR spectra, and the sizes of the stacked crystallites and the aggregated asphaltene micelles were measured with X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering. In the asphaltene cracking mechanism, it was clarified that the main reactions were the destruction of asphaltene micelles caused by vanadium removal and the depolymerization of asphaltene molecules by removal of heteroatoms such as sulfur.

  6. Joint catalytic activation of CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in reaction with butadiene under the action of palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Kunakova, R.V.; Sidorova, V.V.

    1987-08-20

    In a continuation of the study of catalytic reactions in which small molecules participate they have examined the reaction of butadiene simultaneously with CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in the presence of homogeneous Pd-containing catalyst complexes with the object of developing a single-step method for the synthesis of unsaturated higher formamides. The possibility of joint catalytic activation of small molecules (CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/) has been demonstrated in their reaction with butadiene with the participation of palladium complexes, the products being mono- and bis-(2,7-octadienyl)formamides. It has been found that 2-pyrrolidone can take part in a telomerization reaction with butadiene in solutions containing palladium complexes, ammonia and carbon dioxide with the formation of N-2,7-octadienylpyrrolidone.

  7. Computational Approach for Ranking Mutant Enzymes According to Catalytic Reaction Rates

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasiri, Malika; Baker, Gregory A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally efficient approach for ranking mutant enzymes according to the catalytic reaction rates is presented. This procedure requires the generation and equilibration of the mutant structures, followed by the calculation of partial free energy curves using an empirical valence bond potential in conjunction with biased molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella integration. The individual steps are automated and optimized for computational efficiency. This approach is used to rank a series of 15 dihydrofolate reductase mutants according to the hydride transfer reaction rate. The agreement between the calculated and experimental changes in the free energy barrier upon mutation is encouraging. The computational approach predicts the correct direction of the change in free energy barrier for all mutants, and the correlation coefficient between the calculated and experimental data is 0.82. This general approach for ranking protein designs has implications for protein engineering and drug design. PMID:19235997

  8. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LX. Reactions of di-2-furyldimethylgermane under catalytic-hydrogenation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lukevits, E.; Ignatovich, L.M.; Yuskovets, Zh.G.; Golender, L.O.; Shimanskaya, M.V.

    1987-11-20

    In the reaction of di-2-furyldimethylgermane with hydrogen in the presence of the homogeneous metal-complex catalyst RhH(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/ the selective hydrogenation of one of the furan rings occurs, but over heterogeneous catalysts (Raney Ni, Rh black, Pd/C) hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis reactions occur. Di-2-furyldimethylgermane is converted into (2-furyl)dimethyl(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-germane by the catalytic transfer of hydrogen from 2-propanol and cyclohexene. On the basis of the kinetic relations and quantum-chemical calculations of the electron structures of the original and partially hydrogenated furylgermanes a stagewise scheme is proposed of the hydrogenation of the furan ring and the further hydrogenolysis of the semihydrogenated germane molecule.

  9. Application of 3-Methyl-2-vinylindoles in Catalytic Asymmetric Povarov Reaction: Diastereo- and Enantioselective Synthesis of Indole-Derived Tetrahydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Ji-Yu; Shi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The first application of 3-methyl-2-vinylindoles in catalytic asymmetric Povarov reactions has been established via the three-component reactions of 3-methyl-2-vinylindoles, aldehydes, and anilines in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, providing easy access to chiral indole-derived tetrahydroquinolines with three contiguous stereogenic centers at high yields (up to 99%) and with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (all >95:5 dr, up to 96% ee). This mode of catalytic asymmetric three-component reaction offers a step-economic and atom-economic strategy for accessing enantioenriched indole-derived tetrahydroquinolines with structural diversity and complexity. PMID:26652222

  10. Nanosheet-enhanced asymmetric induction of chiral α-amino acids in catalytic aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Shi, Hui-Min; Wang, Jiu-Zhao; He, Jing

    2012-11-26

    An efficient ligand design strategy towards boosting asymmetric induction was proposed, which simply employed inorganic nanosheets to modify α-amino acids and has been demonstrated to be effective in vanadium-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic alcohols. Here, the strategy was first extended to zinc-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction, a versatile bottom-up route to make complex functional compounds. Zinc, the second-most abundant transition metal in humans, is an environment-friendly catalytic center. The strategy was then further proved valid for organocatalyzed metal-free asymmetric catalysis, that is, α-amino acid catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction. Visible improvement of enantioselectivity was experimentally achieved irrespective of whether the nanosheet-attached α-amino acids were applied as chiral ligands together with catalytic Zn(II) centers or as chiral catalysts alone. The layered double hydroxide nanosheet was clearly found by theoretical calculations to boost ee through both steric and H-bonding effects; this resembles the role of a huge and rigid substituent. PMID:23074138

  11. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed. PMID:25375530

  12. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: a platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Ming; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ke Xin; Han, Yu

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. PMID:23675958

  13. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-14

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs. PMID:27043428

  14. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  15. Asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions for constructing diverse scaffolds and complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Lu, Hong; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-21

    With the increasing concerns about chemical pollution and sustainability of resources, among the significant challenges facing synthetic chemists are the development and application of elegant and efficient methods that enable the concise synthesis of natural products, drugs, and related compounds in a step-, atom- and redox-economic manner. One of the most effective ways to reach this goal is to implement reaction cascades that allow multiple bond-forming events to occur in a single vessel. This Account documents our progress on the rational design and strategic application of asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions in constructing diverse scaffolds and synthesizing complex chiral molecules. Our research is aimed at developing robust cascade reactions for the systematic synthesis of a range of interesting molecules that contain structural motifs prevalent in natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological probes. The strategies employed to achieve this goal can be classified into three categories: bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis, covalent aminocatalysis/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, and asymmetric organocatalytic relay cascades. By the use of rationally designed substrates with properly reactive sites, chiral oxindole, chroman, tetrahydroquinoline, tetrahydrothiophene, and cyclohexane scaffolds were successfully assembled under bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis from simple and readily available substances such as imines and nitroolefins. We found that some of these reactions are highly efficient since catalyst loadings as low as 1 mol % can promote the multistep sequences affording complex architectures with high stereoselectivities and yields. Furthermore, one of the bifunctional base/Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade reactions for the synthesis of chiral cyclohexanes has been used as a key step in the construction of the tetracyclic core of lycorine-type alkaloids and the formal synthesis of α-lycorane. Guided by the principles of

  16. A combinatorial study on catalytic synergism in supported metal catalysts for fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Yusuke; Shioyama, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    In order to accelerate the catalyst development for the increasing demand on the fuel cell technology, it has been attempted to adopt a combinatorial approach. The catalytic synergism, often observed on the supported metal catalysts for the fuel cell utilization, has been subjected to study. It is proposed herein that not only a comparison of catalysts in one reaction, but also the comparison of interrelated reactions by use of a common catalyst library brings about important information to elucidate the catalytic synergism. Preliminary results of the comparison between the water-gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of MeOH on a given set of catalyst library are presented. An important indicator to predict the serendipitous synergism is expected to be obtained from such information by use of artificial intelligence.

  17. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25393151

  18. Energy-efficient syngas production through catalytic oxy-methane reforming reactions.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Tushar V; Choudhary, Vasant R

    2008-01-01

    The considerable recent interest in the conversion of stranded methane into transportable liquids as well as fuel cell technology has provided a renewed impetus to the development of efficient processes for the generation of syngas. The production of syngas (CO/H2), a very versatile intermediate, can be the most expensive step in the conversion of methane to value-added liquid fuels. The catalytic oxy reforming of methane, which is an energy-efficient process that can produce syngas at extremely high space-time yields, is discussed in this Review. As long-term catalyst performance is crucial for the wide-scale commercialization of this process, catalyst-related studies are abundant. Correspondingly, herein, emphasis is placed on discussing the different issues related to the development of catalysts for oxy reforming. Important aspects of related processes such as catalytic oxy-steam, oxy-CO2, and oxy-steam-CO2 processes will also be discussed. PMID:18188848

  19. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Bingham, Laura M.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  20. Systematic analysis of palladium-graphene nanocomposites and their catalytic applications in Sonogashira reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Hoon; Han, Sang-Wook; Kwon, Ki-Young; Park, Joon B

    2013-08-01

    Graphene has been modified with palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) to develop high performance catalysts for the Sonogashira cross coupling reaction. In this research, graphite oxide (GO) sheets exfoliated from graphite were impregnated with Pd(OAc)2 to prepare Pd(2+)/GO. Thermal treatments of the Pd(2+)/GO in H2 flow at 100°C produced Pd/graphene (Pd/G) nanocomposites. TEM images show that Pd NPs were distributed quite uniformly on the graphene sheet without obvious aggregation, and the mean size of Pd NPs was determined to be less than 2 nm in diameter. Morphological and chemical structures of the GO, Pd(2+)/GO, and Pd/G were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, XPS, and XAFS. The resulting Pd/G showed excellent catalytic efficiency in the Sonogashira reaction and offers significant advantages over inorganic supported catalysts such as simple recovery and recycling. Finally, deactivation process of the Pd/G in recycling was investigated. We believe that the remarkable reactivity of the Pd/G catalyst toward the Sonogashira reaction is attributed to the high degree of the Pd NP dispersion and thus the increased low coordination numbers of smaller Pd NPs. PMID:23673006

  1. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, Jr, H W; Wentworth, W E

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  2. The Catalytic Activity of Proline Racemase: a QM/MM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenta, Marco; Calvaresi, Matteo; Altoè, Piero; Spinelli, Domenico; Garavelli, Marco; Bottoni, Andrea

    2007-12-01

    The catalytic activity of an interesting enzyme (involved in the life cycle of the Trypanosoma Cruzi eucariotic parasite) has been elucidated by mean of a QM/MM study. The reaction mechanism of the stereo-inversion of the substrate has been studied by characterizing the associated PES. The nature of the found critical point has been checked by means of numerical frequencies calculations. The role of the various residues in the catalysis has been pointed out.

  3. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni.

    PubMed

    Iles, Gail N; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials. PMID:25053313

  4. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  5. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Gail N.; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F.; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-01

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  6. Mechanistic and Catalytic Studies of β-Nitroalcohol Crosslinking with Polyamine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Yongjun; Rao, Yi; Solomon, Marissa R; Paik, David C; Turro, Nicholas J

    2013-06-15

    β-Nitroalcohols (βNAs) are promising corneoscleral crosslinking agents for the treatment of diseases such as keratoconus and myopia. Although it is believed that formaldehyde is released from the crosslinking reactions of βNAs, the mechanism by which βNAs react with amine-functionalized polymers has yet to be known. In this study, we present the reaction mechanism of the βNA crosslinking. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data provide strong evidence that formaldehyde is released during the reaction. Catalytic studies show that sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and salmon testes DNA accelerate the reaction while hydroxynitrile lyase from Arabidopsis thaliana decelerates the crosslinking reaction. These results suggest that βNAs are potential self-administered crosslinking agents for future clinical use. PMID:24596431

  7. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Raymond C; Hitomi, Kenichi; Arvai, Andrew S; House, Paul G; Kurtz, Andrew J; Dodson, M L; McCullough, Amanda K; Tainer, John A; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2004-11-01

    The Escherichia coli adenine DNA glycosylase, MutY, plays an important role in the maintenance of genomic stability by catalyzing the removal of adenine opposite 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or guanine in duplex DNA. Although the x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MutY revealed a mechanism for catalysis of the glycosyl bond, it appeared that several opportunistically positioned lysine side chains could participate in a secondary beta-elimination reaction. In this investigation, it is established via site-directed mutagenesis and the determination of a 1.35-A structure of MutY in complex with adenine that the abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase activity is alternatively regulated by two lysines, Lys142 and Lys20. Analyses of the crystallographic structure also suggest a role for Glu161 in the apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase chemistry. The beta-elimination reaction is structurally and chemically uncoupled from the initial glycosyl bond scission, indicating that this reaction occurs as a consequence of active site plasticity and slow dissociation of the product complex. MutY with either the K142A or K20A mutation still catalyzes beta and beta-delta elimination reactions, and both mutants can be trapped as covalent enzyme-DNA intermediates by chemical reduction. The trapping was observed to occur both pre- and post-phosphodiester bond scission, establishing that both of these intermediates have significant half-lives. Thus, the final spectrum of DNA products generated reflects the outcome of a delicate balance of closely related equilibrium constants. PMID:15326180

  8. Catalytic Mechanism Investigation of Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1): A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhongjie; Lu, Junyan; Chen, Liang; Shen, Bairong; Li, Donghai; Zheng, Mingyue; Li, Keqin Kathy; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang

    2011-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase which specifically demethylates mono- or dimethylated H3K4 and H3K9 via a redox process. It participates in a broad spectrum of biological processes and is of high importance in cell proliferation, adipogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosome segregation and embryonic development. To date, as a potential drug target for discovering anti-tumor drugs, the medical significance of LSD1 has been greatly appreciated. However, the catalytic mechanism for the rate-limiting reductive half-reaction in demethylation remains controversial. By employing a combined computational approach including molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, the catalytic mechanism of dimethylated H3K4 demethylation by LSD1 was characterized in details. The three-dimensional (3D) model of the complex was composed of LSD1, CoREST, and histone substrate. A 30-ns MD simulation of the model highlights the pivotal role of the conserved Tyr761 and lysine-water-flavin motif in properly orienting flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with respect to substrate. The synergy of the two factors effectively stabilizes the catalytic environment and facilitated the demethylation reaction. On the basis of the reasonable consistence between simulation results and available mutagenesis data, QM/MM strategy was further employed to probe the catalytic mechanism of the reductive half-reaction in demethylation. The characteristics of the demethylation pathway determined by the potential energy surface and charge distribution analysis indicates that this reaction belongs to the direct hydride transfer mechanism. Our study provides insights into the LSD1 mechanism of reductive half-reaction in demethylation and has important implications for the discovery of regulators against LSD1 enzymes. PMID:21984927

  9. On the catalytic effects of UO 2(s) and Pd(s) on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    The possible catalytic effects of UO 2 and Pd (as a model for noble metal particles) on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 have been studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in aqueous solution using an autoclave. The aqueous solutions were pressurized with H 2 or N 2 and the H 2O 2 concentration was measured as a function of time. The experiments clearly showed that Pd catalyzes the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 while UO 2 has no catalytic effect. The rate constant of the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 catalyzed by Pd was found to be close to diffusion controlled and independent of the H 2 pressure in the range 1-40 bar. The impact of the catalytic effect on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 on spent nuclear fuel dissolution is, however, fairly small. Other possible effects of noble metal particles are also discussed, e.g. reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the liquid and solid phase.

  10. Structural insights into the catalytic reaction trigger and inhibition of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroki; Hoque, Md Mominul; Tsunoda, Masaru; Suzuki, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Kawai, Gota; Kondo, Jiro; Takénaka, Akio

    2016-07-01

    D-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase catalyzes the reversible conversion of acetoacetate and D-3-hydroxybutyrate. These ketone bodies are both energy-storage forms of acetyl-CoA. In order to clarify the structural mechanisms of the catalytic reaction with the cognate substrate D-3-hydroxybutyrate and of the inhibition of the reaction by inhibitors, the enzyme from Alcaligenes faecalis has been analyzed by X-ray crystallography in liganded states with the substrate and with two types of inhibitor: malonate and methylmalonate. In each subunit of the tetrameric enzyme, the substrate is trapped on the nicotinamide plane of the bound NAD(+). An OMIT map definitively shows that the bound ligand is D-3-hydroxybutyrate and not acetoacetate. The two carboxylate O atoms form four hydrogen bonds to four conserved amino-acid residues. The methyl group is accommodated in the nearby hydrophobic pocket so that the formation of a hydrogen bond from the OH group of the substrate to the hydroxy group of Tyr155 at the active centre is facilitated. In this geometry, the H atom attached to the C(3) atom of the substrate in the sp(3) configuration is positioned at a distance of 3.1 Å from the nicotinamide C(4) atom in the direction normal to the plane. In addition, the donor-acceptor relationship of the hydrogen bonds suggests that the Tyr155 OH group is allowed to ionize by the two donations from the Ser142 OH group and the ribose OH group. A comparison of the protein structures with and without ligands indicates that the Gln196 residue of the small movable domain participates in the formation of additional hydrogen bonds. It is likely that this situation can facilitate H-atom movements as the trigger of the catalytic reaction. In the complexes with inhibitors, however, their principal carboxylate groups interact with the enzyme in a similar way, while the interactions of other groups are changed. The crucial determinant for inhibition is that the inhibitors have no active H atom at C

  11. Pyranone natural products as inspirations for catalytic reaction discovery and development.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Benjamin R; Scheidt, Karl A

    2015-04-21

    Natural products continue to provide a wealth of opportunities in the areas of chemical and therapeutic development. These structures are effective measuring sticks for the current state of chemical synthesis as a field and constantly inspire new approaches and strategies. Tetrahydropryans and tetrahydropyran-4-ones are found in numerous bioactive marine natural products and medicinal compounds. Our interest in exploring the therapeutic potential of natural products containing these motifs provided the impetus to explore new methods to access highly functionalized, chiral pyran molecules in the most direct and rapid fashion possible. This goal led to exploration and development of a Lewis acid-mediated Prins reaction between a chiral β-hydroxy-dioxinone and aldehyde to produce a pyran-dioxinone fused product that can be processed in a single pot operation to the desired tetrahydropyran-4-ones in excellent yield and stereoselectivity. Although the Prins reaction is a commonly employed approach toward pyrans, this method uniquely provides a 3-carboxy-trisubstituted pyran and utilizes dioxinones in a manner that was underexplored at the time. The 3-carboxy substituent served as a key synthetic handhold when this method was applied to the synthesis of highly functionalized pyrans within the macrocyclic natural products neopeltolide, okilactiomycin, and exiguolide. When employed in challenging macrocyclizations, this tetrahydropyranone forming reaction proved highly stereoselective and robust. Another major thrust in our lab has been the synthesis of benzopyranone natural products, specifically flavonoids, because this broad and diverse family of compounds possesses an equally broad range of biological and medicinal applications. With the goal of developing a broad platform toward the synthesis of enantioenriched flavonoid analogs and natural products, a biomimetic, asymmetric catalytic approach toward the synthesis of 2-aryl benzopyranones was developed. A

  12. Pd@[nBu₄][Br] as a Simple Catalytic System for N-Alkylation Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Cacciuttolo, Bastien; Pascu, Oana; Aymonier, Cyril; Pucheault, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles, simply and briefly generated in commercial and cheap onium salts using supercritical carbon dioxide, have been found to be an effective catalytic system for additive free N-alkylation reaction using alcohols via cascade oxidation/condensation/reduction steps. PMID:27517898

  13. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering. PMID:11429307

  14. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models: application to catalytic reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Chiara; Filisetti, Alessandro; Graudenzi, Alex; Lecca, Paola

    2013-02-01

    A general numerical methodology for parametric sensitivity analysis is proposed, which allows to determine the parameters exerting the greatest influence on the output of a stochastic computational model, especially when the knowledge about the actual value of a parameter is insufficient. An application of the procedure is performed on a model of protocell, in order to detect the kinetic rates mainly affecting the capability of a catalytic reaction network enclosed in a semi-permeable membrane to retain material from its environment and to generate a variety of molecular species within its boundaries. It is shown that the former capability is scarcely sensitive to variations in the model parameters, whereas a kinetic rate responsible for profound modifications of the latter can be identified and it depends on the specific reaction network. A faster uptaking of limited resources from the environment may have represented a significant advantage from an evolutionary point of view and this result is a first indication in order to decipher which kind of structures are more suitable to achieve a viable evolution. PMID:23246776

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. PMID:27106147

  16. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites. PMID:27420904

  17. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-01

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs.Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the

  18. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  19. Initial Reaction Mechanism of Platinum Nanoparticle in Methanol-Water System and the Anomalous Catalytic Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangming; Yang, Qingying; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Ye, Qing; Song, Li

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the detailed reaction mechanism in the early stage of noble metal nanoparticles is very critical for controlling the final crystal's size, morphology, and properties. Here, we report a systematic study on the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles in methanol-water system and demonstrate an anomalous catalytic effect of H2O on the reduction of H2PtCl6 to Pt nanoparticles using a combination of UV-vis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and first-principles calculation methods. The observations reveal the transformation route [PtCl6](2-) → [PtCl5(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl4](2-) → [PtCl3(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl2](2-) and finally to form Pt nanoparticles in a pure CH3OH solution. With 10 vol % water adding in the CH3OH solution, a new and distinct chemical reduction pathway is found in which the precursors change from [PtCl6](2-) to [PtCl5(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl4](2-) to [PtCl3(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl2](2-) and to Pt nanoparticles. Notably, the supernumerary water molecular can significantly accelerate the rate of chemical reduction and greatly shorten the reaction time. This work not only elucidates the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles but also highlights the pronounced influence of H2O on the reaction pathway, which will provide useful insights for understanding the formation mechanism of noble metal nanoparticles and open up a high efficient way to synthesize new functional nanomaterial. PMID:26258551

  20. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:27601199

  1. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:27601199

  2. Classical Keggin Intercalated into Layered Double Hydroxides: Facile Preparation and Catalytic Efficiency in Knoevenagel Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yueqing; Fang, Yanjun; Zhang, Yingkui; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-10-12

    The family of polyoxometalate (POM) intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite materials has shown great promise for the design of functional materials with numerous applications. It is known that intercalation of the classical Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) of [PW12 O40 ](3-) (PW12 ) into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is very unlikely to take place by conventional ion exchange methods due to spatial and geometrical restrictions. In this paper, such an intercalated compound of Mg0.73 Al0.22 (OH)2 [PW12 O40 ]0.04 ⋅0.98 H2 O (Mg3 Al-PW12 ) has been successfully obtained by applying a spontaneous flocculation method. The Mg3 Al-PW12 has been fully characterized by using a wide range of methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDX, XPS, FT-IR, NMR, BET). XRD patterns of Mg3 Al-PW12 exhibit no impurity phase usually observed next to the (003) diffraction peak. Subsequent application of the Mg3 Al-PW12 as catalyst in Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various aldehydes and ketones with Z-CH2 -Z' type substrates (ethyl cyanoacetate and malononitrile) at 60 °C in mixed solvents (V2-propanol :Vwater =2:1) demonstrated highly efficient catalytic activity. The synergistic effect between the acidic and basic sites of the Mg3 Al-PW12 composite proved to be crucial for the efficiency of the condensation reactions. Additionally, the Mg3 Al-PW12 -catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate demonstrated the highest turnover number (TON) of 47 980 reported so far for this reaction. PMID:26337902

  3. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  4. In Situ Infrared Study of Catalytic Decomposition of NO

    SciTech Connect

    Cher-Dip Tan; Steven S.C. Chuang

    1997-07-17

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emmissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccesful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  5. Surface characterization and catalytic CO + H 2 reaction on Fe 82.2B 17.8 amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisfaludi, G.; Lázár, K.; Schay, Z.; Guczi, L.; Fetzer, Cs.; Konczos, G.; Lovas, A.

    1985-09-01

    Fe 82.2B 17.8 amorphous ribbon has been used as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch-type reaction of CO+H 2. Specific activity has been found to be at least an order of magnitude higher than that of either the crystallized ribbon of identical composition or the supported iron catalyst. Before and after the catalytic tests the ribbons were characterized by XRD, XPS, UPS and Mössbauer spectroscopy in transmission and in conversion electron modes. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and UPS proved that the surface of the amorphous ribbons is being partially crystallized during 8000 min reaction time at a maximum reaction temperature of 560 K. The superior catalytic activity has been explained by stabilization of the small iron particles and Fe 2O 3 by boron atoms at the surface and by suppressed carbide formation.

  6. First-principles quantum mechanical investigations: Catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111) and at the water/Pd(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua

    Bio-oils have drawn more and more attention from scientists as a promising new clean, cheap energy source. One of the most interesting relevant issues is the effect of catalysts on the catalytic reactions that are used for producing bio-oils. Furfural, as a very important intermediate during these reactions, has attracted significant studies. However, the effect of catalysts, including particularly the liquid/solid interface formed by a metal catalyst and liquid water, in the catalytic reactions involving furfural still remains elusive. In this research, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of catalytic hydrogenation of furfural on the palladium surface and at the liquid/state interface formed by the palladium surface and liquid water. We studied all the possible mechanisms that lead to formation of furfuryl alcohol (FOL), formation of tetrahydrofurfural (THFAL), and formation of tetrahydrofurfurfuryl alcohol (THFOL). We found that liquid water plays a significant role in the hydrogenation reactions. During the reaction in the presence of water and the palladium catalyst, in particular, water directly participates in the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group of furfural and facilitates the formation of FOL by reducing the activation energy. Our calculations show that water provides hydrogen for the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group, and at the same time, a pre-existing hydrogen atom, which is resulted from dissociation of molecular hydrogen (experimentally, molecular hydrogen is always supplied for hydrogenation) on the palladium surface, is bonded to water, making the water molecule intact in structure. In the absence of water, on the other hand, formation of FOL and THFAL on the palladium surface involves almost the same energy barriers, suggesting a comparable selectivity. Overall, as water reduces the activation energy for the formation of FOL

  7. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  8. Preparation of Low Molecular Weight Heparin by Microwave Discharge Electrodeless Lamp/TiO2 Photo-Catalytic Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Jin; Kim, Byung Hoon; Kim, Sun-Jae; Kim, Jung-Sik; Lee, Heon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2015-01-01

    An MDEL/TiO2 photo-catalyst hybrid system was applied, for the first time, for the production of low molecular weight heparin. The molecular weight of produed heparin decreased with increasing microwave intensity and treatment time. The abscission of the chemical bonds between the constituents of heparin by photo-catalytic reaction did not alter the characteristics of heparin. Formation of by-products due to side reaction was not observed. It is suggested that heparin was depolymerized by active oxygen radicals produced during the MDEL/TiO2 photo-chemical reaction. PMID:26328426

  9. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  10. Novel plasma catalytic reaction for structural-controlled growth of graphene and graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    2013-09-01

    An advanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has outstanding advantages for the structural-controlled growth and functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Graphene nanoribbons combine the unique electronic and spin properties of graphene with a transport gap. This makes them an attractive candidate material for the channels of next-generation transistors. However, the reliable site and alignment control of nanoribbons with high on/off current ratios remains a challenge. We have developed a new, simple, scalable method based on novel plasma catalytic reaction for directly fabricating narrow (23 nm) graphene nanoribbon devices with a clear transport gap (58.5 meV) and a high on/off ratio (10000). Indeed, graphene nanoribbons can be grown at any desired position on an insulating substrate without any post-growth treatment, and large-scale, two- and three dimensional integration of graphene nanoribbon devices should be realizable, thereby accelerating the practical evolution of graphene nanoribbon-based electrical applications.

  11. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  12. Green synthesis of silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots: enhanced photoluminescence and high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minmin; Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance.Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance. Electronic

  13. Differential divalent cation requirements uncouple the assembly and catalytic reactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Hazuda, D J; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A L

    1997-01-01

    Previous in vitro analyses have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase uses either manganese or magnesium to assemble as a stable complex on the donor substrate and to catalyze strand transfer. We now demonstrate that subsequent to assembly, catalysis of both 3' end processing and strand transfer requires a divalent cation cofactor and that the divalent cation requirements for assembly and catalysis can be functionally distinguished based on the ability to utilize calcium and cobalt, respectively. The different divalent cation requirements manifest by these processes are exploited to uncouple assembly and catalysis, thus staging the reaction. Staged 3' end processing and strand transfer assays are then used in conjunction with exonuclease III protection analysis to investigate the effects of integrase inhibitors on each step in the reaction. Analysis of a series of related inhibitors demonstrates that these types of compounds affect assembly and not either catalytic process, therefore reconciling the apparent disparate results obtained for such inhibitors in assays using isolated preintegration complexes. These studies provide evidence for a distinct role of the divalent cation cofactor in assembly and catalysis and have implications for both the identification and characterization of integrase inhibitors. PMID:9261430

  14. Oxidative catalytic evolution of redox- and spin-states of a Fe-phthalocyanine studied by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletsa, Eleni; Solakidou, Maria; Louloudi, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-04-01

    The catalytic-oxidative evolution of the redox/spin states of a Fe-phthalocyanine (Fe-Pc) catalyst was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Under oxidative catalytic conditions, Fe-Pc may evolve via multiple redox/spin conformations. Axial ligation of imidazole, O2 or t-Bu-OOH as oxidant, results in a complex multipath redox/spin landscape that was determined in detail herein. The high-spin conformations of Fe-Pc/imidazole evolve more slowly than the low-spin conformations. Catalytically active vs. inactive conformations were distinguished. A unified physicochemical catalytic reaction mechanism is discussed herein based on the distinct role of the various structural, spin and redox forms.

  15. Chloromethyl chlorosulfate: a new, catalytic method of preparation and reactions with some nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Power, Nicholas P; Bethell, Donald; Proctor, Lee; Latham, Elliot; Dawson, Paul

    2004-05-21

    The reaction of liquid (gamma-) SO3 with CH2Cl2 at room temperature leads to SO3 insertion into the C-Cl bonds, giving the useful chloromethylating agent chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS). The process is very slow but becomes rapid on addition of catalytic quantities of trimethyl borate. The product mixture consists almost entirely of CMCS and the product of further sulfation, methylene bis(chlorosulfate)(MBCS), in a ratio of ca. 2 : 1, but typical yields of CMCS, isolated by distillation, are only 30-35%. The catalysed reaction in the homogeneous liquid phase at -45 degrees C has been followed as a function of time and of reactant concentration by 1H nmr spectroscopy. It is observed that, besides CMCS and MBCS, three additional, transient products (designated A, B and C) are formed. Products A, B and C decompose slowly at -45 degrees C but much more rapidly if the reaction mixture is raised to room temperature, giving additional CMCS and MBCS. From an analysis of the SO3 balance, it is inferred that products A, B and C arise from the reaction of one molecule of CH2Cl2 with respectively two, three and four molecules of SO3; they are suggested to be chloromethyl chloropolysulfates. By measuring initial rates of CMCS formation or total CH2Cl2 consumption, it is shown that the reaction is first order in the catalyst and roughly third order in SO3. A mechanistic scheme is proposed in which SO3 forms equilibrating zwitterionic molecular complexes with CH2Cl2. of 1 : 1, 2 : 1 and higher stoichiometries. The boron-containing catalyst can activate these complexes towards nucleophilic attack at carbon by the negatively charged oxygen of another zwitterion. An analogous mechanism can be written for the conversion of CMCS into MBCS by SO3 in the presence of trimethyl borate. CMCS reacts rapidly with anionic nucleophiles, such as halide or acetate ions (X-), in homogeneous solution of their tetrabutylammonium salts in CD3CN, or in a two-phase system (CDCl3/H2O) using alkali

  16. Enantioselective construction of a 2,2'-bisindolylmethane scaffold via catalytic asymmetric reactions of 2-indolylmethanols with 3-alkylindoles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-Xin; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhu, Qiu-Ning; Shi, Feng

    2015-08-01

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric reaction of 2-indolylmethanols with 3-alkylindoles has been established, which constructed a biologically important 2,2'-bisindolylmethane scaffold in high yields and good enantioselectivities (up to 98% yield, 94:6 er). This protocol not only provides an efficient method for constructing a 2,2'-bisindolylmethane framework in an enantioselective form, but also promotes the development of 2-indolylmethanol-involved catalytic asymmetric transformations. PMID:26111901

  17. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction.

  18. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  19. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd(2+) ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  20. Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Studies of Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. H.

    2004-11-23

    This project investigates the catalytic properties of oxides for the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes and for hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}. Various vanadium oxide based catalysts were investigated to elucidate the relationship between the chemical and structural properties of the catalysts and their selectivity for the formation of alkenes. It was found that vanadium oxide units that are less reducible give higher selectivities. For hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}, it was found that alumina-based catalysts can be effective at higher temperatures than the corresponding zeolite-based catalysts. On some catalysts, such as SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the alumina participates directly in the reaction, making the catalyst bifunctional. These results are useful in research to improve the performance of this stress of catalysts.

  1. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  2. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  3. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm(-2) was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. PMID:26133744

  4. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use. PMID:26000867

  5. Enhanced coal liquefaction by low-severity catalytic reactions: Technical progress report for the period March to May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Schobert, H.H.

    1987-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine the potential and limitations of temperature-staged catalytic liquefaction. Experiments have been planned to examine the chemical reactions which occur during the low- and high-severity stages, the effects of coal rank and process conditions, the function of catalyst and influence of solvent donor capability. In our dry, catalytic experiments the key to high conversions is the use of hydrogen at 425/sup 0/C. Pretreatment with nitrogen gave essentially no advantage, and with hydrogen resulted in a slight improvement in oil yield. For the non-catalytic reactions, with a solvent, the result demonstrates the importance of a hydrogen donor (tetralin compared to naphthalene). The use of hydrogen in the pretreatment stage has little influence on the total level of conversion, but gives a somewhat better oil-asphaltene ratio. In fact, regardless of whether a hydrogen donor is present, the best oil/asphaltene ratios were always obtained whenever hydrogen was used in the first stage and nitrogen in the second stage. In order to understand what kinds of bonds are broken during a low-temperature stage in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, five model compounds have been reacted and evaluated in terms of product yield and boiling point distribution. For the reactions conducted at 275/sup 0/C, biphenyl was found to be unreactive, even in the presence of a catalyst; pyrene, diphenyl ketone and phenyl ether are relatively reactive under these conditions. Temperature-staging with MoS/sub 2/ as the catalyst, for most of the model compounds, resulted in more products with boiling points below the starting material, than with any other conditions employed. Observations were made which suggest that minerals can act as catalysts during ''non-catalytic runs''. 12 refs.

  6. Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D.; Maier, L.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

  7. Soybean epoxide hydrolase: identification of the catalytic residues and probing of the reaction mechanism with secondary kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Summerer, Stephan; Flenet, Martine; Rogniaux, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schuber, Francis

    2005-02-25

    Soybean epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the oxirane ring opening of 9,10-epoxystearate via a two-step mechanism involving the formation of an alkylenzyme intermediate, which, in contrast to most epoxide hydrolases studied so far, was found to be the rate-limiting step. We have probed residues potentially involved in catalysis by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of His(320), a residue predicted from sequence analysis to belong to the catalytic triad of the enzyme, considerably slowed down the second half-reaction. This kinetic manipulation provoked an accumulation of the reaction intermediate, which could be trapped and characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. As expected, mutation of Asp(126) totally abolished the activity of the enzyme from its crucial function as nucleophile involved in the formation of the alkylenzyme. In line with its role as the partner of His(320) in the "charge relay system," mutation of Asp(285) dramatically reduced the rate of catalysis. However, the mutant D285L still exhibited a very low residual activity, which, by structural analysis and mutagenesis, has been tentatively attributed to Glu(195), another acidic residue of the active site. Our studies have also confirmed the fundamental role of the conserved Tyr(175) and Tyr(255) residues, which are believed to activate the oxirane ring. Finally, we have determined the secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects on the epoxide opening step of 9,10-epoxystearate. The large observed values, i.e. (T)(V/K(m)) approximately 1.30, can be interpreted by the occurrence of a very late transition state in which the epoxide bond is broken before the nucleophilic attack by Asp(126) takes place. PMID:15596432

  8. The role of acidic sites and the catalytic reaction pathways on the Rh/ZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ziyi; Ang, Hanwee; Choong, Catherine; Chen, Luwei; Huang, Lin; Lin, Jianyi

    2009-02-01

    Rh catalysts supported on ZrO(2)-based oxides were studied for ethanol steam reforming (SR) reaction. Pure ZrO(2) as the support resulted in higher H(2) production yield compared to the ZrO(2) oxide decorated with CeO(2), Al(2)O(3), La(2)O(3) or Li(2)O at the reaction temperature of 300 degrees C. Above 450 degrees C, all the catalysts exhibited similar catalytic activity. However, at low reaction temperatures (below 400 degrees C), a significant enhancement in the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability was achieved by replacing the ZrO(2) support prepared by a precipitation method (ZrO(2)-CP) with that prepared by a hydrothermal method (ZrO(2)-HT). A deactivation was observed during the EtOH SR reaction at 300 degrees C on the two catalysts of Rh/ZrO(2)-CP and Rh/ZrO(2)-HT. NH(3)-TPD experiments confirmed that the ZrO(2)-HT support had two types of acidic sites while the ZrO(2)-CP support had only one type of weak acidic sites. DRIFTS studies showed that the absorption of EtOH molecules was strong on the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst and a number of C(2) oxygenates were accumulated on the catalyst surface. Meanwhile, the EtOH absorption on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst was weak and the accumulation of CO, carbonate and CH(x) was observed. It is concluded that the relatively strong Lewis acidic sites in the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst is responsible for the strong absorption of EtOH molecules, and the subsequent C-H breakage step (formation of acetaldehyde or called as dehydrogenation reaction) is a fast reaction on it; on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst, the EtOH adsorption was weak and the C-C breakage was the dominating reaction which led to the accumulation of surface CO, CH(x) and CO(2) species. Therefore, it is believed that, in order to promote the absorption of EtOH molecules and to reduce the formation of metastable carbonaceous species (C(2) oxygenates) during the reaction, the catalyst should be enhanced both with Lewis acidity and with C-C bond breakage function. Also

  9. Catalytic effect of gallium chloride in the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride and its derivatives and unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1985-11-10

    The stability of n, v complexes between gallium chloride and unsubstituted and substituted maleic anhydrides was determined in benzene by a thermochemical method; it was shown that the stability of the complexes decreases in the transition from maleic anhydrides with electron-donating substituents to maleic anhydrides with electron-withdrawing substituents. The reactivity of these dienophiles in the uncatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions with unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes in benzene and in the reactions catalyzed by gallium chloride was studied. The reactivity of the dienophiles varies similarly in the reactions with the investigated dienes, and this rules out treatment of steric hindrances as the reason for the reduced reactivity of the substituted dienophiles. A decrease in the catalytic effect was observed for the unreactive diene-dienophile pairs.

  10. Theoretical insights on the catalytic activity and mechanism for oxygen reduction reaction at Fe and P codoped graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Li, Kai; Xie, Guangyou; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Menggai; Tang, Hao; Wu, Zhijian

    2016-05-14

    The non-precious metal graphene catalyst doped with Fe-Px are recently proposed as a promising candidate in substituting Pt for catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Systematic DFT calculations are performed to investigate the catalytic activity and the ORR mechanism on the Fe-Px (x = 1-4) system in acid medium in this work. Our results indicated that the configuration with one Fe and two P atoms codoped at zigzag edge site (Fe-P2-zig-G) is the most stable, in excellent agreement with the experimental observation that the ratio of Fe and P is nearly 1 : 2. The four-electron reduction mechanism for ORR on the Fe-P2-zig-G is via the competing OOH hydrogenation pathways (to form either OH + OH or O + H2O). The rate determining step is the O2 hydrogenation with an energy barrier of 0.43 eV, much smaller that of calculated 0.80 eV for pure Pt. In addition, the highest energy barrier of the studied ORR mechanism is the O2 dissociation with an energy barrier of 0.70 eV, a value also smaller than that of pure Pt. This demonstrated that the zigzag edge site of the Fe-P2 codoped graphene should be active for the ORR. PMID:27094325

  11. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (<5%) in α-MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2. PMID:25284796

  12. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  13. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  14. Oxygen assisted reconstructions of rhodium and platinum nanocrystals and their effects on local catalytic activity of hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroo, C.; Gilis, N.; Lambeets, S. V.; Devred, F.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.

    2014-06-01

    The reconstruction of rhodium and platinum crystals of some tens of nanometres diameter was investigated during the ongoing hydrogenation of oxygen atoms resulting from the dissociation of O2 and NO2 species. Field ion and field emission electron microscopies (FIM and FEM) were used to characterise the apex of tip samples before, during and after the catalytic reactions. On rhodium samples, the exposure of less than 10 Langmuir of O2 is sufficient to induce significant morphological changes. At higher exposures, the presence of subsurface oxygen causes surface reconstructions illustrated with atomic resolution by FIM at 50 K. The same pattern is also visible at 505 K in the presence of H2 and O2 during water production. Upon the decrease of H2 pressure, surface oxidation shows a strong sensitivity to the local surface initiated along the <0 0 1> zone lines. On platinum, the kinetic instabilities of the NO2-H2 reaction are followed by FEM at 390 K starting from a hemispherical tip sample. The instabilities are expressed as surface explosions occurring randomly in time, but synchronised over {0 1 1} facets. These instabilities expand along the <0 0 1> lines over the (0 0 1) pole and exhibit self-sustained kinetic oscillations. The analysis of the tips by FIM after the reaction shows dark regions over the {1 1 3} facets, suggesting the extension of those to the detriment of vicinal ones. A well-controlled field evaporation procedure reveals that these regions appear dark due to the presence of surface oxygen. Structural reconstructions are observed but do not lead to the drastic morphological changes suggested by the FIM and FEM patterns. Nanoparticle dynamics must be accounted in models describing the non-linear features of catalytic reactions and more generally included in the description of catalytic properties of nanosized particles.

  15. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

    1994-09-01

    Research continued on the study of catalysts and membrane materials involved in the oxidative coupling of methane and coal gasification processes. Membranes studied and fabricated included Sr-Zr-Y-O, Sr-Zr-Y, and Sr-Ce-Y-O systems.

  16. Effect of electronic structures on catalytic properties of CuNi alloy and Pd in MeOH-related reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, An-Pang; Kimura, Tomofumi; Suzuki, Yukinori; Kameoka, Satoshi; Shimoda, Masahiko; Ishii, Yasushi

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the catalytic properties of a CuNi solid solution and Pd for methanol-related reactions and associated valence electronic structures. Calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that the CuNi alloy has a similar valence electronic structure to Pd and hence they exhibited similar CO selectivities in steam reforming of methanol and decomposition of methanol. Samples prepared by various processes were found to have similar CO selectivities. We conjecture that alloying of Cu and Ni dramatically alters the valence electronic structures, making it similar to that of Pd so that the alloy exhibits similar catalytic properties to Pd. First-principles slab calculations of surface electronic structures support this conjecture.

  17. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-07-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm-2 was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature.Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111

  18. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E; Stoppiello, Craig T; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor. PMID:27222094

  19. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  20. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-01

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times. PMID:26256345

  1. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E.; Stoppiello, Craig T.; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor.A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction

  2. [A structure-activity study of a catalytic antiidiotypic antibody to the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E S; Koralevski, F; Titov, M I; Demin, A V; Kozyr', A V; Kolesnikov, A V; Tramontano, A; Paul, S; Thomas, D; Gabibov, A G; Gnuchev, N V; Friboulet, A

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic monoclonal antibody 9A8 (MA 9A8), antiidiotypic to the antibody AE-2 (MA AE2) produced to the active site of acetyl cholinesterase from human erythrocytes, was subjected to a structure-function study. The specific binding of MA 9A8 to MA AE2 (K 2.26 x 10(9) M-1) was shown by the method of surface plasmon resonance, and the functional activity of MA 9A8 was demonstrated. Unlike acetyl cholinesterase, this antibody specifically reacted with the irreversible phosphonate inhibitors of esterases. A peptide map of MA 9A8 was analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The Ser99 residue of its heavy chain was shown to be within the active site of the catalytic antibody. A computer modeling of the MA 9A8 active site suggested the existence of a catalytic dyad formed by Ser99 and His35. A comparison of the tertiary structures of the MA 9A8 and the 17E8 monoclonal antibody, which also exhibited an esterase activity and was produced to the stable analogue of the reaction transition state, indicated a practically complete coincidence of the structures of their presumed active sites. PMID:11962233

  3. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.; Perry, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    During the fourth quarter of FY93, additional studies were undertaken to quantify the effect of adding alkali to coal during charring. Figure 1 shows that the rate of gasification of Ill{number_sign}6 char prepared by charring the coal in the presence of different amounts of NAOH increases with the amount of NAOH used between 0 and 2 wt %. However, most of the improvement occurs with the addition of small amounts of alkali, while doubling the proportion of alkali from 0.9 to 1.7% gives a small additional improvement. In fact it appears that 0.8 to 1% alkali during charring is optimal. This is demonstrated in Figure 2. The chars prepared in the presence of NAOH were water washed and extracted at room temperature until the water was alkali free, dried and then gasified. Figure 2 presents the same data as Figure 1 but additionally shows the gasification rate at 640{degree}C for the water washed chars. The water washed char originally prepared with .85% NAOH had the same gasification rate as before water washing, while the gasification rate of the char originally prepared with 1.7% NAOH dropped to the level of the .85% NAOH containing char after water washing. This may be interpreted as an indication of about 1% alkali being incorporated into the char in a water insoluble form.

  4. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  5. Impairment of the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid polymerase by a unique reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan.

    PubMed Central

    Bratcher, S C; Nitta, K; Kronman, M J

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase loses 55-65% of its catalytic activity on reaction with Nbf-Cl (4-choro-7-nitrobenzofurazan). This partial inactivation was shown to be the result of specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation, since initiation of RNA chains was not altered after treatment with Nbf-Cl. The site of reaction was shown to be a unique thiol on the beta-subunit. This thiol is not accessible to reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). No protection of the enzyme against reaction with Nbf-Cl could be obtained with the inhibitor rifamycin nor with calf thymus DNA, GTP or 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the unique thiol is probably not within the active site. The specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation thus appears to be the result of a local conformational change which leaves chain initiation unimpaired. Changes observed in the tryptophan fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme or reaction with Nbf-Cl are consistent with formation of a Meisenheimer complex of the reagent with a nucleophilic group on the enzyme near the reactive thiol. It is proposed that formation of such a complex and a subsequent conformational change renders this thiol unusually susceptible to reaction with Nbf-Cl. PMID:393251

  6. Controllable Assembly of Hierarchical Macroporous-Mesoporous LnFeO₃ and Their Catalytic Performance in the CO + NO Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Shi, Fu-Bo; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-08-11

    A new synthesis strategy to prepare hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous materials employing poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(phenylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) as a single template and an acid adjusting agent was reported. There is a hierarchical structure including macropores with a size of 50-100 nm and mesopores in the macroporous walls with a size of 3-5 nm. The macroporous walls are composed of rare earth orthoferrite nanoparticles with a size of 5-10 nm. These hierarchically porous materials show high catalytic activities for the CO + NO reaction, and NO can be fully converted to N2 at temperatures as low as 350 °C, indicating their potential in the catalytic conversion of automotive exhaust gas and other catalysis-related fields. This synthesis strategy is a facile method for the preparation of hierarchical porous materials and may give us a guideline for the synthesis of functional materials with further catalytic applications. PMID:26196258

  7. Alternative substrates reveal catalytic cycle and key binding events in the reaction catalysed by anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Castell, Alina; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Short, Francesca L; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2014-07-01

    AnPRT (anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase), required for the biosynthesis of tryptophan, is essential for the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AnPRT catalyses the Mg2+-dependent transfer of a phosphoribosyl group from PRPP (5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate) to anthranilate to form PRA (5'-phosphoribosyl anthranilate). Mtb-AnPRT was shown to catalyse a sequential reaction and significant substrate inhibition by anthranilate was observed. Antimycobacterial fluoroanthranilates and methyl-substituted analogues were shown to act as alternative substrates for Mtb-AnPRT, producing the corresponding substituted PRA products. Structures of the enzyme complexed with anthranilate analogues reveal two distinct binding sites for anthranilate. One site is located over 8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) from PRPP at the entrance to a tunnel leading to the active site, whereas in the second, inner, site anthranilate is adjacent to PRPP, in a catalytically relevant position. Soaking the analogues for variable periods of time provides evidence for anthranilate located at transient positions during transfer from the outer site to the inner catalytic site. PRPP and Mg2+ binding have been shown to be associated with the rearrangement of two flexible loops, which is required to complete the inner anthranilate-binding site. It is proposed that anthranilate first binds to the outer site, providing an unusual mechanism for substrate capture and efficient transfer to the catalytic site following the binding of PRPP. PMID:24712732

  8. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the

  9. Crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic study of the first ligninolytic peroxidase presenting a catalytic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Calviño, Fabiola R; Pogni, Rebecca; Giansanti, Stefania; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, María Jesús; Basosi, Riccardo; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-04-29

    Trametes cervina lignin peroxidase (LiP) is a unique enzyme lacking the catalytic tryptophan strictly conserved in all other LiPs and versatile peroxidases (more than 30 sequences available). Recombinant T. cervina LiP and site-directed variants were investigated by crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The crystal structure shows three substrate oxidation site candidates involving His-170, Asp-146, and Tyr-181. Steady-state kinetics for oxidation of veratryl alcohol (the typical LiP substrate) by variants at the above three residues reveals a crucial role of Tyr-181 in LiP activity. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c show that its ability to oxidize large molecules (a requisite property for oxidation of the lignin polymer) originates in Tyr-181. This residue is also involved in the oxidation of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene, a reaction initiated by the one-electron abstraction with formation of substrate cation radical, as described for the well known Phanerochaete chrysosporium LiP. Detailed spectroscopic and kinetic investigations, including low temperature EPR, show that the porphyrin radical in the two-electron activated T. cervina LiP is unstable and rapidly receives one electron from Tyr-181, forming a catalytic protein radical, which is identified as an H-bonded neutral tyrosyl radical. The crystal structure reveals a partially exposed location of Tyr-181, compatible with its catalytic role, and several neighbor residues probably contributing to catalysis: (i) by enabling substrate recognition by aromatic interactions; (ii) by acting as proton acceptor/donor from Tyr-181 or H-bonding the radical form; and (iii) by providing the acidic environment that would facilitate oxidation. This is the first structure-function study of the only ligninolytic peroxidase described to date that has a catalytic tyrosine. PMID:21367853

  10. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  11. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  12. Kinetic evaluation of phenolase activity of tyrosinase using simplified catalytic reaction system.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2003-10-29

    A very simple tyrosinase reaction system has been developed using borate anion as a trapping agent of catechols and hydroxylamine as an external reductant to evaluate the phenolase activity without the interference of catecholase activity. Reactivities of variously para-substituted phenols in this system were compared directly to those of the phenols in the model reactions, demonstrating that the enzymatic oxygenation reaction of phenols proceeds via the same mechanism as the model reaction, that is, electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. PMID:14570470

  13. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  14. Gas-phase reactions of methane and natural-gas with air and steam in non-catalytic regions of a solid-oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Gaurav K.; Hecht, Ethan S.; Zhu, Huayang; Dean, Anthony M.; Kee, Robert J.

    This paper uses a large elementary reaction mechanism to study the homogeneous chemistry of methane and natural-gas mixed with air and steam. Temperatures and residence times are chosen to represent SOFC operating conditions, including within feed lines that may be at elevated temperature but without any electrochemical or catalytic interactions. Mole fractions of six major species (CH 4, O 2, H 2O, H 2, CO, and CO 2) are presented as contour maps as functions of temperature, residence time, and initial fuel mixture compositions. In addition, deposit propensity is predicted by the sum of mole fractions of all species containing five or more carbon atoms, designated as C5+ . Comparison with chemical equilibrium predictions shows that the homogeneous reactions are far from equilibrium. These results indicate that the composition of the fuel mixture entering the active SOFC region might be significantly different from that originally entering the fuel cell.

  15. Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

  16. Computational Design of Enone-Binding Proteins with Catalytic Activity for the Morita-Baylis-Hillman Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Nivon, Lucas G.; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Kiss, Gert; Rosewall, Carolyn F.; Lovick, Helena M.; Ingalls, Erica L.; Gallaher, Jasmine Lynn; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Lew, Scott; Montelione, Gaetano Thomas; Hunt, John Francis; Michael, Forrest Edwin; Houk, K. N.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    The Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction forms a carbon-carbon bond between the alpha carbon of a conjugated carbonyl compound and a carbon electrophile. The reaction mechanism involves Michael addition of a nucleophile catalyst at the carbonyl beta carbon, followed by bond formation with the electrophile and catalyst disassociation to release the product. We used Rosetta to design 48 proteins containing active sites predicted to carry out this mechanism, of which two show catalytic activity by mass spectrometry (MS). Substrate labeling measured by MS and site-directed mutagenesis experiments show that the designed active-site residues are responsible for activity, although rate acceleration over background is modest. To characterize the designed proteins, we developed a fluorescence-based screen for intermediate formation in cell lysates, carried out microsecond molecular dynamics simulations, and solved X-ray crystal structures. These data indicate a partially formed active site, and suggest several clear avenues for designing more active catalysts. PMID:23330600

  17. Plasma-catalytic hybrid system using spouted bed with a gliding arc discharge: CH4 reforming as a model reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Sekiguchi, H.

    2011-07-01

    A combination of a gliding arc discharge and a spouted catalytic bed was used to investigate a plasma-catalytic hybrid system using CH4 reforming as a model reaction. Alumina-supported catalysts that contained 0.5 wt% of Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ru (denoted as Pt/Al2O3, Pd/Al2O3, Rh/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3, respectively) were used. For comparison, active Al2O3 particles were also examined. The conversion of CH4 and the selectivity of the product were investigated by changing the feed flow rate and reaction time. The production of C2H2, H2 and soot was observed in the gliding arc discharge without a catalyst. Using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3with the gliding arc discharge, C2H4, C2H6 and C2H2 were produced. It is considered that C2H4 and C2H6 were formed by the hydrogenation of C2H2 on the active site of Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3. A stronger resistance to deactivation was shown in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 than in the presence of Pt/Al2O3, whereas the selectivity of hydrocarbon using Rh/Al2O3 and Ru/Al2O3 showed a tendency similar to that in active Al2O3 and non-catalytic experiments. The proposed reactor has a potential to improve the selectivity of the plasma process.

  18. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate. PMID:24790940

  19. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M.; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P.; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K.

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02822d

  20. Catalytic activity of bimetallic nickel alloys for solid-oxide fuel cell anode reactions from density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Wei; Gatewood, Daniel; Dunlap, Brett; Turner, C. Heath

    2011-05-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the chemisorption of atomic species O, S, C, H and reaction intermediates OH, SH, and CHn (n = 1, 2, and 3) on M/Ni alloy model catalysts (M = Bi, Mo, Fe, Co, and Cu). The activity of the Ni alloy catalysts for solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode oxidation reactions is predicted, based on a simple descriptor, i.e., the binding energy of oxygen. First, we find that the binding of undesirable intermediates, such as C and S, can be inhibited and the catalytic activity of planar Ni-based anodes can be tuned towards oxidation by selectively forming a bimetallic surface alloy. In particular, Cu/Ni, Fe/Ni, and Co/Ni anode catalysts are found to be most active towards anode oxidation. On the other hand, the Mo/Ni alloy surface is predicted to be the most effective catalyst in terms of inhibiting the deposition of C and S (while still preserving relatively high catalytic activity). The formation of a surface alloy, which has the alloy element enriched on the topmost surface, was found to be critical to the activity of the Ni alloy catalysts.

  1. Catalytic, Enantioselective Sulfenofunctionalisation of Alkenes: Mechanistic, Crystallographic, and Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denmark, Scott E.; Hartmann, Eduard; Kornfilt, David J. P.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The stereocontrolled introduction of vicinal heteroatomic substituents into organic molecules is one of the most powerful ways of adding value and function. Whereas many methods exist for the introduction of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing substituents, the number stereocontrolled methods for the introduction of sulfur-containing substituents pales by comparison. Previous reports from these laboratories have described the sulfenofunctionalization of alkenes that construct vicinal carbon-sulfur and carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen as well as carbon-carbon bonds with high levels of diastereospecificity and enantioselectivity. This process is enabled by the concept of Lewis base activation of Lewis acids that provides activation of Group 16 electrophiles. To provide a foundation for expansion of substrate scope and improved selectivities, we have undertaken a comprehensive study of the catalytically active species. Insights gleaned from kinetic, crystallographic and computational methods have led to the introduction of a new family of sulfenylating agents that provide significantly enhanced selectivities. PMID:25411883

  2. Reproduction of a Protocell by Replication of a Minority Molecule in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2010-12-01

    For understanding the origin of life, it is essential to explain the development of a compartmentalized structure, which undergoes growth and division, from a set of chemical reactions. In this study, a hypercycle with two chemicals that mutually catalyze each other is considered in order to show that the reproduction of a protocell with a growth-division process naturally occurs when the replication speed of one chemical is considerably slower than that of the other chemical, and molecules are crowded as a result of replication. It is observed that the protocell divides after a minority molecule is replicated at a slow synthesis rate, and thus, a synchrony between the reproduction of a cell and molecule replication is achieved. The robustness of such protocells against the invasion of parasitic molecules is also demonstrated.

  3. Transfer Reaction Studies with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Linhardt, L. E.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target system was designed to provide a gas target that was pure, localized, and dense. Several commissioning experiments with the JENSA target, performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), were undertaken to demonstrate the unique capability of JENSA for transfer reaction studies. JENSA has since completed its move from ORNL to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). An overview of the JENSA design and operation will be presented, as well as a brief discussion of the experiments performed at ORNL with JENSA, with a focus on preliminary results from the 20Ne(p,t)18Ne commissioning experiment.

  4. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real

  5. Asn-150 of Murine Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Modulates the Catalytic Balance between the Rates of the Reversible Reaction.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2015-12-25

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) catalyzes the first step in mammalian heme biosynthesis, the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and reversible reaction between glycine and succinyl-CoA to generate CoA, CO2, and 5-aminolevulinate (ALA). Apart from coordinating the positioning of succinyl-CoA, Rhodobacter capsulatus ALAS Asn-85 has a proposed role in regulating the opening of an active site channel. Here, we constructed a library of murine erythroid ALAS variants with substitutions at the position occupied by the analogous bacterial asparagine, screened for ALAS function, and characterized the catalytic properties of the N150H and N150F variants. Quinonoid intermediate formation occurred with a significantly reduced rate for either the N150H- or N150F-catalyzed condensation of glycine with succinyl-CoA during a single turnover. The introduced mutations caused modifications in the ALAS active site such that the resulting variants tipped the balance between the forward- and reverse-catalyzed reactions. Although wild-type ALAS catalyzes the conversion of ALA into the quinonoid intermediate at a rate 6.3-fold slower than the formation of the same quinonoid intermediate from glycine and succinyl-CoA, the N150F variant catalyzes the forward reaction at a mere 1.2-fold faster rate than that of the reverse reaction, and the N150H variant reverses the rate values with a 1.7-fold faster rate for the reverse reaction than that for the forward reaction. We conclude that the evolutionary selection of Asn-150 was significant for optimizing the forward enzymatic reaction at the expense of the reverse, thus ensuring that ALA is predominantly available for heme biosynthesis. PMID:26511319

  6. Catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels: optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Tamunaidu, Pramila; Bhatia, Subhash

    2007-12-01

    Oil palm is widely grown in Malaysia. Palm oil has attracted the attention of researchers to develop an 'environmentally friendly' and high quality fuel, free of nitrogen and sulfur. In the present study, the catalytic cracking of palm oil to biofuel was studied over REY catalyst in a transport riser reactor at atmospheric pressure. The effect of reaction temperature (400-500 degrees C), catalyst/palm oil ratio (5-10) and residence time (10-30s) was studied over the yield of bio-gasoline and gas as fuel. Design of experiments was used to study the effect of operating variables over conversion of palm oil and yield of hydrocarbon fuel. The response surface methodology was used to determine the optimum value of the operating variables for maximum yield of bio-gasoline fraction in the liquid product obtained. PMID:17208441

  7. Catalytic reactor and organometallic model studies of the mechanism of thiophene hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.

    1987-06-01

    The reactivity of transition metal complexes of thiophene (Th) and 2,3- and 2,5-dihydrothiophenes (DHT) and catalytic reactor studies of thiophene and the dihydrothiophenes have been used to examine the mechanism for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of thiophene. Catalytic deuterium exchange of thiophene over HDS catalysts was modeled by the reaction of ..pi..-thiophene complexes, CpRu(Th)/sup +/ (where Th=thiophene, 2, or 3 methylthiophene or 2,5-dimethylthiophene) in CD/sub 3/OD with OH/sup -/. Reactor studies with thiophene and 2,3- and 2,5-DHT were done at 300/sup 0/ and 400/sup 0/C over a Re/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ HDS catalyst. Deuterodesulfurization studies established that 2,5-DHT directly eliminates butadiene while butadiene formation from 2,3-DHT must involve several surface steps over the catalyst. Several reactions of the dihydrothiophenes over HDS catalysts were modeled using transition metal complexes of 2,3 and 2,5-DHT. The S-bound 2,3-DHT in W(CO)/sub 5/(2,3-DHT) is converted to tetrohydrothiophene upon treatment with HCl. When Fe/sub 2/(CO)/sub 9/ is reacted in THF with 2,3-DHT though, no isolable Fe(CO)/sub 4/(2,3-DHT) complex is obtained, but small amounts of 2,5-DHT are observed by /sup 1/H NMR. Reaction of 2,5-DHT with Fe/sub 2/(CO)/sub 9/ does result in the formation of Fe(CO)/sub 4/(2,5-DHT), which readily eliminates butadiene.

  8. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    During the previous quarter, a new approach for the deploymerization of the coal macromolecule was tried. This was aimed towards carbon-carbon bond cleavage in presence of strong bases. Such bond cleavage reactions are well known with the alkali metals. Electron transfer reactions take place from the metals to the aromatic nuclei resulting in the formation ofanion-radicals (or dianions) which subsequently undergo carbon-carbon bond cleavage. In our work instead of using the alkali metals, we have used strong bases to cleave the carbon-carbon bonds in hydrocarbons, and have suggested that hydrocarbon elimination reactions occur. Such anionic fragmentation reactions involving strong bases are not very well established. However, we have obtained circumstantial evidence that such bond cleavage reactions do take place in some coal systems. For example, when the high rank Lower Kittaming coal, PSOC 1197, was treated with Lochmann's base (equimolar mixture of n-butyllithiun and potassium tert-butoxide) in refluxing heptane and quenched with ammonium chloride and reethanol, the pyridine solubility of the product increased from 5% (raw coal) to 39%. A similar increase in solubility due to base treatment was also observed in a separate study for another high rank coal, Pocahontas No. 3 from the Argonne National Laboratory Premium Sample Program. The solubility of the coal increased frcm 5% to 32% after the base treatment. These results, together with the absence of literature studies on base promoted fragmentation reactions prompted us to perfom reactions on some pure compounds to assess this concept in more detail.

  9. Chemicals from Lignin by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis, from Product Control to Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Custodis, Victoria; Hemberger, Patrick; Bährle, Christian; Vogel, Frédéric; Jeschk, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of lignin into renewable and value-added chemicals by thermal processes, especially pyrolysis, receives great attention. The products may serve as feedstock for chemicals and fuels and contribute to the development of a sustainable society. However, the application of lignin conversion is limited by the low selectivity from lignin to the desired products. The opportunities for catalysis to selectively convert lignin into useful chemicals by catalytic fast pyrolysis and our efforts to elucidate the mechanism of lignin pyrolysis are discussed. Possible research directions will be identified. PMID:26598403

  10. Catalytic combustion of ethane over palladium foil in the 300--450 C range: Kinetics and surface composition studies

    SciTech Connect

    Descorme, C.; Jacobs, P.W.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1998-09-10

    Catalytic oxidation of ethane over palladium foils was studied and the kinetic parameters were determined for the reaction. The studies were carried out at 800 Torr total pressure over a wide range of reaction conditions in the temperature range of 300--425 C. The catalyst surface composition was characterized before and after reaction by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). While the authors detected only metallic palladium before reaction, the postreaction analysis showed significant formation of PdO{sub x}, a surface oxide, at all temperatures and under all ethane/oxygen ratios. The catalyst that exhibits optimum combustion activity is the one covered with 0.3 to 0.5 monolayer of oxygen. Carbon monoxide temperature-programmed desorption (CO-TPD) was used to evaluate the surface area of the metallic and oxidized palladium in order to normalize the measured catalytic reaction rates. Apparent activation energies of 104, 116, and 189 kJ/mol under fuel lean, stoichiometric, and fuel-rick conditions, respectively, were observed. While CO{sub 2} is the main carbonaceous product, unoxidized and partially oxidized species, methane and ethylene, are produced in small amounts. The product distribution is typically 98.6 mol% CO{sub 2}, 0.9 mol% C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and 0.5 mol% CH{sub 4} at 10% conversion during a reaction at 350 C under stoichiometric conditions.

  11. Reaction mechanism for the highly efficient catalytic decomposition of peroxynitrite by the amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe.

    PubMed

    Avidan-Shlomovich, Shlomit; Gross, Zeev

    2015-07-21

    The amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe is one of the most efficient catalysts for the decomposition of peroxynitrite, the toxin involved in numerous diseases. This research focused on the mechanism of that reaction at physiological pH, where peroxynitrite is in equilibrium with its much more reactive conjugated acid, by focusing on the elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle. Kinetic investigations uncovered the formation of a reaction intermediate in a process that is complete within a few milliseconds (k1 ∼ 3 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 5 °C, about 7 orders of magnitude larger than the first order rate constant for the non-catalyzed process). Multiple evidence points towards iron-catalyzed homolytic O-O bond cleavage to form nitrogen dioxide and hydroxo- or oxo-iron(iv) corrole. The iron(iv) intermediate was found to decay via multiple pathways that proceed at similar rates (k2 about 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)): reaction with nitrogen dioxide to form nitrate, nitration of the corrole macrocyclic, and dimerization to binuclear iron(iv) corrole. Catalysis in the presence of substrates affects the decay of the iron intermediate by either oxidative nitration (phenolic substrates) or reduction (ascorbate). A large enough excess of ascorbate accelerates the catalytic decomposition of PN by 1-Fe by orders of magnitude, prevents other decay routes of the iron intermediate, and eliminates nitration products as well. This suggests that the beneficial effect of the iron corrole under the reducing conditions present in most biological media might be even larger than in the purely chemical system. The acquired mechanistic insight is of prime importance for the design of optimally acting catalysts for the fast and safe decomposition of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. PMID:25747957

  12. Nuclear Structure and Reaction Mechanism Studies with Multinucleon Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, P. H.; Jones, G. A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Abdullah, M.; Gelletly, W.; Langdown, S. D.; Wollel, G.; De Angelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Kroell, Th.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Napoli, D. R.; Rusu, C.; Tonev, D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ur, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reports on the results of an experiment to study the near-yrast states in selenium- and osmium-like nuclei, following their population in thick-target, multinucleon transfer reactions between an 82Se beam and a 192Os target. The experimental results for the level scheme for 84Se are presented together with investigations into the use of multi-dimensional gamma-ray energy gating to investigate angular momentum population in such heavy-ion binary reactions.

  13. Transient kinetic studies of the catalytic reduction of NO by CO on platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Banse, B.A.; Wickham, D.T.; Koel, B.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Transient kinetic experiments were performed in order to study the catalytic reduction of NO by CO over a polycrystalline platinum surface. The experiments were performed by preadsorbing one reactant on the Pt surface at the reaction temperature and then rapidly introducing the second reactant in a pressure jump while monitoring the transient production of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} production rate, R{sub CO{sub 2}}, was modeled as a function of NO and CO coverages ({theta}{sub NO} and {theta}{sub CO}). When NO was preadsorbed, the reaction rate can be described by R{sub CO{sub 2}} = k{theta}{sub NO}{theta}{sub CO} (for the onset of the reaction) and R{sub CO}{sub 2} = k'{theta}{sub NO}{theta}{sub free sites} (for the final portion). The onset of CO{sub 2} production showed no detectable induction period in these experiments. When CO was preadsorbed, the reaction rate is described by R{sub CO{sub 2}} = k{double prime}{theta}{sub NO}{theta}{sub free sites} (for the onset of the reaction) and R{sub CO{sub 2}} = k{double prime}({theta}{sub CO}){sup 2} (for the final portion). For CO preadsorption, a time delay in the onset of CO{sub 2} production which varied with temperature and the initial amount of preadsorbed CO was observed. Our transient kinetic results indicate that the reaction proceeds over a wide range of reaction conditions via a dissociative mechanism in which NO{sub (a)} first dissociates into N{sub (a)} and O{sub (a)}, and then O{sub (a)} reacts with CO{sub (a)} to form CO{sub 2}.

  14. A Diode Laser Study of the Catalytic Oxidation Dynamics of Acetaldehyde on Polycrystalline Platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edington, Sean Coleman

    The catalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde on platinum was studied using a flow reactor equipped with a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Reaction mixtures containing this molecule in varying proportion with oxygen and with argon as a carrier gas were flowed over a polycrystalline platinum mesh, which was resistively heated to different temperatures between 700 and 1000 K. The products of these reactions were monitored using mass spectrometry and the state-resolved spectra of CO 2 produced were collected using high-resolution tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. These data were analyzed to yield information about the dynamics of the reaction. Results indicate that production of CO and CO2 by this reaction proceeds via two distinct pathways. Acetaldehyde adsorbed on the surface decomposes to acetyl, which in turn decomposes CO and CHx. The adsorbed CO so prepared desorbs to yield the bulk of CO generated across all reaction conditions and also yields CO2 with a relatively deactivated asymmetric stretching mode under conditions of high temperature and low oxygen coverage. The acetyl-derived CHx dehydrogenates to yield surface carbon and H adatoms. Total oxidation of this surface carbon is the primary source of CO2 produced under all reaction conditions except those mentioned previously and is found to yield products with a preferentially excited asymmetric stretch. Combination of the CHx-derived H adatoms with surface oxygen drives the production of water by this reaction. During the course of the work described here, two notable improvements were made to our experimental apparatus. The first of these was the modification of the data acquisition process to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio achievable by our laser spectrometer with no increase in data collection time. The second was the development of data analysis software which significantly improved the efficiency and thoroughness of the process by

  15. Economic feasibility of ethanol production from biomass and waste resources via catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Sun-Hwa; Shin, Dae-Hyun; Nho, Nam-Sun; Shin, Kyoung-Hee; Jin, Chang-Soo

    2013-04-01

    An economic evaluation of ethanol (EtOH) production from a thermo-chemical process derived from biomass/waste feedstocks was conducted. The influence of feed amounts, catalytic conversions, and EtOH selling prices was examined as these are the major variables for the economic evaluation of biomass/wastes conversion to EtOH. Among the three feedstock systems of biomass, high-moisture municipal solid waste (MSW), and plastic waste, the plastic waste has far better economic feasibility, with a payback period of 2-5 years at maximum CO conversion (40%) from syngas to ethanol, due to its higher heating value in comparison with biomass and high-moisture MSW. The heating value of the feedstock is a key factor in determining the overall economic efficiency in a thermo-chemical EtOH production system. Furthermore, enhancement of the CO conversion (related to catalytic activity) from syngas to EtOH using a low cost catalyst is necessary to retain economic efficiency because the CO conversion and cost consideration of catalyst are crucial factors to reduce the payback period. PMID:23179512

  16. Catalytic Effects of Oxide Surfaces on Diels-Alder Cycloaddition between Furan and Methyl Acrylate: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Fard, Taha; Jenness, Glen; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas

    Using density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions, we study the catalytic effects of oxide surfaces such as ZrO_2 and HfO_2 on Diels-Alder reaction between furan and methyl acrylate. The cycloadduct can be dehydrated later to produce methyl benzoic which is an important step toward benzoic acid production. The gas-phase and on-surface reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. The surface hydration effects on the reaction mechanism and energy profile are studied as well. Our calculations show that the oxide surfaces catalyze the reaction significantly through the interaction of metal sites with methyl acrylate. The calculations are interpreted by making use of electronic density of states and band structure of the catalyst.

  17. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation. PMID:25853669

  18. High-temperature catalytic oxidative conversion of propane to propylene and ethylene involving coupling of exothermic and endothermic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, V.R.; Rane, V.H.; Rajput, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Coupling of the exothermic catalytic oxidative conversion and endothermic thermal cracking (noncatalytic) reactions of propane to propylene and ethylene over the SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SA5205 catalyst in the presence of steam and limited oxygen was investigated at different process conditions (temperature, 700--850 C; C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} ratio in feed, 2.0--8.0; H{sub 2}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 8} ratio, 0.5--2.5; space velocity, 2,000--15,000 cm{sup 3}/g h). In the presence of steam and limited O{sub 2}, the endothermic thermal cracking and exothermic oxidative conversion reactions occur simultaneously and there is no coke formation on the catalyst. Because of the direct coupling of exothermic and endothermic reactions, this process occurs in a most energy efficient and safe manner. The propane conversion, selectivity for propylene, and net heat of reaction ({Delta}H{sub r}) in the process are strongly influenced by the temperature and concentration of O{sub 2} relative to the propane in the feed. The C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} product ratio is also strongly influenced by the temperature, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} feed ratio, and space velocity. The net heat of reaction can be controlled by manipulating the reaction temperature and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} ratio in the feed; the process exothermicity is reduced drastically with increasing the temperature and/or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} feed ratio.

  19. Synthesis of α-Amidoketones from Vinyl Esters via a Catalytic/Thermal Cascade Reaction.

    PubMed

    Holthusen, Katharina; Leitner, Walter; Franciò, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    A straightforward, modular, and atom-efficient method is reported for the synthesis of α-amidoketones from vinyl esters via a cascade reaction including hydroformylation, condensation with a primary amine, and a rearrangement step giving water as the only byproduct. The reaction sequence can be performed in one pot or as a three-step procedure. The synthetic applicability is demonstrated by the preparation of different α-amidoketones in moderate to good yields. PMID:27196947

  20. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  1. Simple relationships for estimating intraparticle transport effects for catalytically promoted endothermic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.

    1998-06-16

    Relationships for estimating effectiveness factors for porous-solid-catalyzed fluid reactions can result from assuming approximations to temperature and concentration profiles. Approximations designed to simplify the outcome result in simple, explicit, analytic relationships for both isothermal and nonisothermal nth-order reaction systems. For isothermal systems, formulas developed predict effectiveness within 25% of the true isothermal effectiveness factors ({eta}`s) over the range 0.1 > {eta} > 0.99. For isothermal or endothermic reaction systems with {eta} > 0.65, errors are less than 10%. Even in the maximum-error region, estimates for endothermic systems are within a factor of two of those obtained by solution of the rigorous heat and mass transfer equations. For isothermal or endothermic systems with {eta} > 0.95, errors are less than 1%. Thus the formulas can also serve diagnostic uses that confirm presence or absence of significant internal heat or mass transport effects in porous reacting systems. Extension of the approach to non-nth-order reactions is possible; formulas are derived for simple isothermal and nonisothermal Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction systems. Application of the work to exothermic reactions was not tested, but steeper gradients in such systems would tend to degrade accuracy of the relationships. The equations derived in this work are simpler and easier of application than any others proposed thus far.

  2. Catalytic solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace rhamnose based on its condensation reaction with calcein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Xin; Lin, Shao-Qin; Zhang, Li-Hong; Cai, Wen-Lian; Lin, Xuan; Pan, You-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Calcein (R) could not only emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper using I - as perturber, but also could be oxidized by H 2O 2 to form a non-phosphorescence compound (R'), resulting in the quenching of RTP signal of R. Moreover, the ortho-hydrogen of phenolic hydroxyl in R took condensation reaction with rhamnose (Rha) to produce non-phosphorescence compound (R-Rha) causing the RTP signal of R to further quench, and R-Rha was oxidized by H 2O 2 to form R' and Rha, bringing about the sharp RTP signal quenching of R. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace Rha based on its strong catalytic effect on H 2O 2 oxidizing R has been established, with the detection limit (LD) of 7.8 zg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 2.0 × 10 -17 g ml -1, sample volume: 0.40 μl spot -1). This method has been applied to determine trace Rha in cigarettes and jujubes, with the results coinciding well with those determined by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The component of R-Rha also was analyzed by means of HPLC, mass spectrometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The mechanism of catalytic SSRTP for the determination of trace Rha was discussed.

  3. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  4. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Parlett, Christopher M A; Isaacs, Mark A; Beaumont, Simon K; Bingham, Laura M; Hondow, Nicole S; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions. PMID:26569475

  5. Spectrophotometric reaction rate method for the determination of osmium by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of gallocyanine by bromate.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, A A; Shamss-E-Sollari, E

    1994-10-01

    A simple kinetic spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of osmium. The method is based on the catalytic effect of osmium as osmium tetroxide on the oxidation of gallocyanine by bromate at pH 7. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decreasing absorbance of gallocyanine at 620 nm by the fixed-time method. A detection limit of 0.01 ng/ml and linear calibration curve from 0.1 to 100 and from 100 to 1200 ng/ml Os(VIII) is reported. The relative standard deviation for 0.0100 microg/ml Os(VIII) is 0.8% (N = 10). The method is free from most interferences. Osmium in synthetic samples is determined by this method, with satisfactory results. PMID:18966116

  6. Insight into the Catalytic Mechanism of Bimetallic Platinum–Copper Core–Shell Nanostructures for Nonaqueous Oxygen Evolution Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lu; Luo, Xiangyi; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Wen, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoping; Lee, Sungsik; Myers, Deborah J.; Miller, Dean; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a critical role in multiple energy conversion and storage applications. However, its sluggish kinetics usually results in large voltage polarization and unnecessary energy loss. Therefore, designing efficient catalysts that could facilitate this process has become an emerging topic. Here, we present a unique Pt–Cu core–shell nanostructure for catalyzing the nonaqueous OER. The catalysts were systematically investigated with comprehensive spectroscopic techniques, and applied in nonaqueous Li–O2 electrochemical cells, which exhibited dramatically reduced charging overpotential (<0.2 V). The superior performance is explained by the robust Cu(I) surface sites stabilized by the Pt core in the nanostructure. The insights into the catalytic mechanism of the unique Pt–Cu core–shell nanostructure gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design of other nanostructured bimetallic OER catalysts.

  7. Investigation of catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of Pt dispersed on boron doped graphene in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Pullamsetty, Ashok; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2016-10-01

    Boron doped graphene was prepared by a facile method and platinum (Pt) decoration over boron doped graphene was done in various chemical reduction methods such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), polyol and modified polyol. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the synthesized catalyst particles are present in a nanocrystalline structure and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the morphology and particle distribution. The electrochemical properties were investigated with the help of the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place by a four-electron process. The kinetics of the ORR was evaluated using K-L and Tafel plots. The electrocatalyst obtained in modified polyol reduction method has shown the better catalytic activity compared to other two electrocatalysts. PMID:27393888

  8. Insight into the Catalytic Mechanism of Bimetallic Platinum-Copper Core-Shell Nanostructures for Nonaqueous Oxygen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Luo, Xiangyi; Kropf, A Jeremy; Wen, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoping; Lee, Sungsik; Myers, Deborah J; Miller, Dean; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-01-13

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a critical role in multiple energy conversion and storage applications. However, its sluggish kinetics usually results in large voltage polarization and unnecessary energy loss. Therefore, designing efficient catalysts that could facilitate this process has become an emerging topic. Here, we present a unique Pt-Cu core-shell nanostructure for catalyzing the nonaqueous OER. The catalysts were systematically investigated with comprehensive spectroscopic techniques, and applied in nonaqueous Li-O2 electrochemical cells, which exhibited dramatically reduced charging overpotential (<0.2 V). The superior performance is explained by the robust Cu(I) surface sites stabilized by the Pt core in the nanostructure. The insights into the catalytic mechanism of the unique Pt-Cu core-shell nanostructure gained in this work are expected to serve as a guide for future design of other nanostructured bimetallic OER catalysts. PMID:26709945

  9. Lanthanide derivatives comprising arylhydrazones of β-diketones: cooperative E/Z isomerization and catalytic activity in nitroaldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Mahmudov, Kamran T; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Sutradhar, Manas; Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Huseynov, Fatali E; Shamilov, Nazim T; Voronina, Anna A; Buslaeva, Tatyana M; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-03-28

    Two complexes [KLa(HL(1))2{(CH3)2NCHO}2(H2O)3] (1) and [Sm(H2O)9](E-H2L(2))3·2H2O (2) were synthesized by the reaction of lanthanum(III) and samarium(III) nitrates with potassium 3-(2-(2,4-dioxopentan-3-ylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzenesulfonate (KH2L(1)) and potassium (E,Z)-5-chloro-3-(2-(1,3-dioxo-1-phenylbutan-2-ylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (KH2L(2)), respectively. Both complexes were fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Cooperative E,Z→E isomerization of KH2L(2), induced by resonance assisted hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions, occurs upon the interaction with Sm(III). Catalytic activities of KH2L(1,2) and their lanthanide derivatives were evaluated in the Henry reaction of nitroethane with a variety of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. Good yields (up to 91%) and diastereoselectivities (syn/anti 3 : 1) were observed in the reactions catalyzed by 1 in water. PMID:25698467

  10. Intramolecular hydroarylation of aryl propargyl ethers catalyzed by indium: the mechanism of the reaction and identifying the catalytic species.

    PubMed

    Menkir, Mengistu Gemech; Lee, Shyi-Long

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism and regioselectivity of the intramolecular hydroarylation of phenyl propargyl ether catalyzed by indium in gas and solvent phases were investigated by means of the density functional theory method. The computed results revealed that the reaction proceeds through initial π-coordination of the propargyl moiety to the catalyst, which triggers the nucleophilic attack of the phenyl ring via an exo- or endo-dig pathway in a Friedel-Crafts type mechanism. Calculation results obtained employing InI2(+) as the possible catalyst show similar activation energies for the 5-exo-dig and 6-endo-dig pathways. In contrast, the neural catalyst InI3 shows a kinetic preference for 6-endo-dig versus 5-exo-dig cyclizations leading to the experimentally observed product, 2H-chromene. The calculation results suggest that InI3 could be the real catalytic species for this reaction as it shows regioselectivity in agreement with the experimental observation. Furthermore, the 6-endo-dig cyclization through deprotonation/protonation steps is kinetically more favored than the stepwise two consecutive [1,2]-H shift steps. The rate determining step of the whole catalytic cycle is the deprotonation step with an energy barrier of 18.9 kcal mol(-1) in toluene solvent. The effects of substituents on both the phenyl ring and the propargyl moiety on the selectivity and elementary steps of the hydroarylation process were investigated. A methoxy group, particularly at the meta-position, on the phenyl ring largely decreases the energy barrier of the first step for the 6-endo path, though it shows little effect on the activation energies of the second and third steps. Our calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27298068

  11. Dielectric characterization and catalytic activity studies of nickel chloride doped carboxymethyl cellulose films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bahy, Zeinhom M.; Mahmoud, Khaled H.

    Cast technique was used to prepare films of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with different ratios of NiCl2·6H2O in the range of 0-40 Ni2+ wt.%. Thermal analysis (DTA) in the range of 25-600 °C and dielectric properties in the temperature range of 30-150 °C and frequency range of 0.1-100 kHz were measured for the prepared samples. DTA analysis showed new exothermic peaks which were attributed to structural phase transitions. Different molecular motions are separated via dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. In the high temperature range (higher than 100 °C), the σ-relaxation, which is associated with the hopping motion of ions through polymer material, was detected. The detailed analysis of the results showed that the dielectric dispersion consists of both dipolar and interfacial polarization. Measurements of ac conductivity as a function of frequency at different temperatures indicated that the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH) is the most suitable mechanism for the ac conduction behavior. The catalytic activity of CMC doped with Ni2+ was tested in the reduction of the hazardous pollutant 4-nitrophenol to the functional 4-aminophenol with an excess amount of NaBH4. Ni-free CMC did not exhibit any catalytic activity for the studied reaction. However, Ni2+-doped CMC showed a significant catalytic activity that is proportional to the ratio of Ni2+ included in CMC. The activation energy (Ea) was estimated in the temperature range of 25-40 °C. The estimated value of Ea decreased with increasing the ratio of Ni2+. Finally, the optimum catalyst mass was found to be ≈0.6 g/l.

  12. Submonolayer-Pt-Coated Ultrathin Au Nanowires and Their Self-Organized Nanoporous Film: SERS and Catalysis Active Substrates for Operando SERS Monitoring of Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-Fu; Zhang, Zong-Mian; Zhang, Li-Qiang; Sun, Jie-Fang; Sun, Meng-Tao; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2014-03-20

    For their unique properties, core-shell bimetal nanostructures are currently of immense interest. However, their synthesis is not a trivial work, and most works have been conducted on nanoparticles. We report herein a new synthetic tactic for submonolyer-Pt coated ultrathin Au nanowires (NWs). Besides providing a strong electromagnetic field for Raman signal enhancing, the underlined Au NWs markedly enhanced the catalytic activity of Pt atoms through increasing their dispersity and altering their electronic state. The integration of excellent SERS and high catalytic activity within Au@Pt NWs enable it work as platform for catalyzed reaction study. As a proof of principle, the self-organized Au@Pt NWs thin film is employed in operando SERS monitoring of the p-nitrothiophenol reduction process. In addition to providing kinetic data for structure-activity relationship study, the azo-intermidate independent path is also directly witnessed. This synthetic tactic can be extended to other metals, thus offering a general approach to modulate the physical/chemical properties of both core and shell metals. PMID:26270975

  13. Multifunctional phosphine stabilized gold nanoparticles: an active catalytic system for three-component coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Borah, Bibek Jyoti; Borah, Subrat Jyoti; Dutta, Dipak Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Multifunctional phosphine based ligands, 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane [CH3C(CH2 PPh2)3][P3] and 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane trisulphide [CH3C(CH2P(S)Ph2)3][P3S3] have been introduced to stabilize Au(o)-nanoparticles having small core diameter and narrow size distribution. The Au(o)-nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of HAuCl4 precursor with NaBH4 in the presence of ligand P3 or P3S3 using two phases, one pot reaction at room temperature. The Au(o)-nanoparticles exhibit face centered cubic (fcc) lattice having different crystalline shape i.e., single crystallite stabilized by P3 while P3S3 forms decahedral shapes. Surface plasmon bands at -520 nm and TEM study indicate particle size below 2 and 4 nm for Au(o)-nanoparticles stabilized by P3 and P3S3 respectively, which are attributable to the stronger interaction of Au(o) (Soft) with P (Soft) than Au(o) (Soft) with S (less Softer than P). Au(o)-nanoparticles stabilized by P3S3 shows higher thermal stability than that of P3. The synthesized Au(o)-nanoparticles serve as an efficient catalyst for one-pot, three-component (A3) coupling of an aldehyde, an amine and an alkyne via C-H alkyne-activation to synthesize propargylamines (85-96%) without any additives and precaution to exclude air. PMID:23901533

  14. Catalytic Asymmetric Reactions of 4-Substituted Indoles with Nitroethene: A Direct Entry to Ergot Alkaloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Simone; Galletti, Emilio; Caruana, Lorenzo; Mazzanti, Andrea; Himo, Fahmi; Santoro, Stefano; Fochi, Mariafrancesca; Bernardi, Luca

    2015-12-01

    A domino Friedel-Crafts/nitro-Michael reaction between 4-substituted indoles and nitroethene is presented. The reaction is catalyzed by BINOL-derived phosphoric acid catalysts, and delivers the corresponding 3,4-ring-fused indoles with very good results in terms of yields and diastereo- and enantioselectivities. The tricyclic benzo[cd]indole products bear a nitro group at the right position to serve as precursors of ergot alkaloids, as demonstrated by the formal synthesis of 6,7-secoagroclavine from one of the adducts. DFT calculations suggest that the outcome of the reaction stems from the preferential evolution of a key nitronic acid intermediate through a nucleophilic addition pathway, rather than to the expected "quenching" through protonation. PMID:26486074

  15. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  16. Catalytic Asymmetric Ring-Opening Reactions of Aziridines with 3-Aryl-Oxindoles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqing; Li, Dan; Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Kezhou; Wang, Jie; Wang, Pengxin; Su, Wu; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-01

    A highly enantioselective ring-opening alkylation reaction between 3-aryl-oxindole and N-(2-picolinoyl) aziridine has been realized for the first time. The reaction is efficiently mediated by a simple in-situ-generated magnesium catalyst and 3,3'-fluorinated-BINOL (BINOL=1,1'-binaphthalene-2,2'-diol) has been identified as a powerful chiral ligand. Notably, the fluorine atom on the chiral ligand plays a key role in providing the desired chiral 3-alkyl-3-aryl oxindoles with excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:26763482

  17. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds. PMID:20825023

  18. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the HIV-1 Integrase Catalytic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Briggs, J. M.; Straatsma, TP; Carlson, Heather A.; Greenwald, Jason; Choe, Senyon; Mccammon, Andy

    1999-06-30

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome, thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. Two 1-ns molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on completely hydrated models of the HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain, one with no metal ions and another with one magnesium ion in the catalytic site. The simulations predict that the region of the active site that is missing in the published crystal structures has (at the time of this work) more secondary structure than previously thought. The flexibility of this region has been discussed with respect to the mechanistic function of the enzyme. The results of these simulations will be used as part of inhibitor design projects directed against the catalytic domain of the enzyme.

  19. Studies on green and efficient catalytic oxidation of a triazole compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Liu, Y. C.; Huang, K. H.; Chai, T.; Wang, J. H.; Yu, Y. W.; Yuan, J. M.; Chang, S. J.; Guo, J. H.; Zhang, J.

    2016-07-01

    1-Methyl-3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole is an insensitive energetic compound that can be prepared by oxidizing the nitrate salt of 1-methylguanazole. The influence of the reaction time, reaction temperature, reactant ratio, feeding method and catalytic oxidation method on the yield were discussed. The results show that the optimum reaction conditions are as follows: mass ratio of sodium tungstate to nitrate salt to 1-methylguanazole, 4:4.4; time, 5.5h; and temperature, 65-75°C. The yield of this oxidation reaction reached 51.36%.

  20. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  1. Mechanistic Studies of Gold and Palladium Cooperative Dual-Catalytic Cross-Coupling Systems

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Roth, Katrina E.; Blum, Suzanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Double-label crossover, modified-substrate, and catalyst comparison experiments in the gold and palladium dual-catalytic rearrangement/cross-coupling of allenoates were performed in order to probe the mechanism of this reaction. The results are consistent with a cooperative catalysis mechanism whereby 1) gold activates the substrate prior to oxidative addition by palladium, 2) gold acts as a carbophilic rather than oxophilic Lewis acid, 3) competing olefin isomerization is avoided, 4) gold participates beyond the first turnover and therefore does not serve simply to generate the active palladium catalyst, and 5) single-electron transfer is not involved. These experiments further demonstrate that the cooperativity of both gold and palladium in the reaction is essential because significantly lower to zero conversion is achieved with either metal alone in comparison studies that examined multiple potential gold, palladium, and silver catalysts and precatalysts. Notably, employment of the optimized cocatalysts, PPh3AuOTf and Pd2dba3, separately (i.e., only Au or only Pd) results in zero conversion to product at all monitored time points compared to quantitative conversion to product when both are present in cocatalytic reactions. PMID:24757581

  2. Visual detection of thrombin using a strip biosensor through aptamer-cleavage reaction with enzyme catalytic amplification.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunyan; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-11-21

    A new class of strip biosensors has been established based on well-distributed thrombin aptamer-linked gold nanoparticle aggregates, which will undergo a cracking reaction when the target recognizes its homologous aptamer. Combining the aptamer-cleavage reaction with the enzyme catalytic amplification system, our proposed lateral flow strip biosensor (LFB) is capable of visually detecting 6.4 pM of thrombin without instrumentation within 12 minutes. Under the optimal conditions, the quantitative detection of thrombin by a portable strip reader exhibited a linear relationship between the peak area and the concentration of thrombin in the range of 6.4 pM-500 nM with a detection limit of 4.9 pM, which is three orders of magnitude lower than that of the aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticle-based LFB (2.5 nM, Xu et al., Anal. Chem., 2009, 81, 669-675). As the aptamers have no special requirements and the gold nanoparticles can also be replaced by other metallic nanoparticles, this method for strip sensing is expected to be generally applicable in point of care testing, home testing, medical diagnostics, clinical diagnosis, and environmental monitoring. PMID:26451394

  3. Visual discrimination of phenolic group β₂-agonists and the ultrasensitive identification of their oxidation products by use of a tyrosinase-based catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huayu; Guo, Chunhui; Liu, Ping; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2014-05-20

    The fast, visual discrimination of β2-agonist drugs is needed for the on-site screening of various types of β2-agonists in blood and urine samples. We developed a simple, rapid, one-step colorimetric method to detect phenolic β2-agonists by use of a tyrosinase catalytic reaction, which involved the oxidation of the phenol group on the benzene rings of β2-agonists. The enzymatic oxidation products of β2-agonists with phenolic groups exhibited different color transitions based on the different substituent groups on the aromatic ring, whereas β2-agonists with the aniline group or the resorcinol group remained colorless. This visual color discrepancy has been used to intuitively and conveniently differentiate the phenolic group β2-agonists, such as ractopamine, isoxsuprine, ritodrine, and fenoterol. The oxidation products of these compounds have been identified using mass spectrometry, and the possible reaction mechanisms between β2-agonists and tyrosinase have been deduced. The parameters that govern the analytical performance of the reaction product, including the pH of the buffer solution, the concentration of tyrosinase, and the incubation time, have been studied and optimized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the absorbance intensity and electrochemical signal were found to increase proportionally to the concentrations of the phenolic group β2-agonists, which gave a quantitative description of the β2-agonists in solution. PMID:24785981

  4. Transient kinetics study of catalytic char gasification in carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzio, A.A.; Radovic, L.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, the deactivation behavior of K, Ca, and Ni catalysts during carbon (char) gasification in CO{sub 2} is investigated. Correlations were sought between gasification rates and reactive surface areas (RSA) of the chars. In addition, the results allowed some speculation on recently proposed mechanisms of catalysis. An excellent correlation was found in the case of K catalysis, suggesting the rate-determining step in the overall mechanism to be the same as in the uncatalyzed reaction, i.e., desorption of the reactive C(O) intermediate. For the Ca-catalyzed reaction, the quality of the correlation depended on catalyst dispersion, suggesting that an additional process, besides the direct decomposition of the reactive C(O) intermediate, contributed to the transient evolution of CO (e.g., oxygen spillover). No correlation was found for Ni-catalyzed gasification; an oxygen-transfer mechanism is proposed to explain these findings. Mixed catalyst systems (Ca/K, K/Ni, Ca/Ni) were also studied. An excellent correlation between reactivity and RSA was observed in cases where the K-catalyzed reaction was dominant.

  5. Catalytic constructive deoxygenation of lignin-derived phenols: new C-C bond formation processes from imidazole-sulfonates and ether cleavage reactions.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Stuart M; Harkness, Gavin J; Clarke, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    As part of a programme aimed at exploiting lignin as a chemical feedstock for less oxygenated fine chemicals, several catalytic C-C bond forming reactions utilising guaiacol imidazole sulfonate are demonstrated. These include the cross-coupling of a Grignard, a non-toxic cyanide source, a benzoxazole, and nitromethane. A modified Meyers reaction is used to accomplish a second constructive deoxygenation on a benzoxazole functionalised anisole. PMID:25130565

  6. Experimental study of humic acid degradation and theoretical modelling of catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Turkay, Ozge; Inan, Hatice; Dimoglo, Anatoli

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of TiO2 as a catalyst in the ozonation of humic acid (HA) was evaluated in a comprehensive manner. Ozonation, catalytic ozonation and adsorption experiments were conducted using both synthetic HA solution and natural water. HA degradation was evaluated in terms of DOC, VIS400 and UV254. It was shown that the addition of catalyst positively affects the mechanism of ozonation. An increase in HA degradation was observed for all these parameters. The impact of catalyst dose and initial pH value of HA on the efficacy of catalytic ozonation was investigated. The highest removal efficiencies were achieved with the dose of 1 g l(-1) of TiO2 (Degussa P-25) and in the acidic pH region. The catalytic ozonation process was efficient also on natural water component although not at the same level as it was on synthetic water. The adsorptive feature of P-25 was considered to have a clear evidence of the catalytic ozonation mechanism. The mechanism of catalysis on the surface of metal oxides was elucidated with the help of quantum-chemical calculations. In the framework of Density Function Theory (DFT), the O3 decomposition was calculated in the catalytic and non-catalytic processes. Donor-acceptor properties of the frontier (highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, HOMO/LUMO) orbitals are discussed. Electron density distribution and reaction mechanism of superoxide particles formation, which participate in the process of HA ozonation are analyzed. PMID:25056748

  7. PdCu Nanoalloy Electrocatalysts in Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Role of Composition and Phase State in Catalytic Synergy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinfang; Shan, Shiyao; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Petkov, Valeri; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-25

    The catalytic synergy of nanoalloy catalysts depends on the nanoscale size, composition, phase state, and surface properties. This report describes findings of an investigation of their roles in the enhancement of electrocatalytic activity of PdCu alloy nanoparticle catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Pd(n)Cu(100-n) nanoalloys with controlled composition and subtle differences in size and phase state were synthesized by two different wet chemical methods. Detailed electrochemical characterization was performed to determine the surface properties and the catalytic activities. The atomic-scale structures of these catalysts were also characterized by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with atomic pair distribution function analysis. The electrocatalytic activity and stability were shown to depend on the size, composition, and phase structure. With Pd(n)Cu(100-n) catalysts from both methods, a maximum ORR activity was revealed at Pd/Cu ratio close to 50:50. Structurally, Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys feature a mixed phase consisting of chemically ordered (body-centered cubic type) and disordered (face-centered cubic type) domains. The phase-segregated structure is shown to change to a single phase upon electrochemical potential cycling in ORR condition. While the surface Cu dissolution occurred in PdCu catalysts from the two different synthesis methods, the PdCu with a single-phase character is found to exhibit a tendency of a much greater dissolution than that with the phase segregation. Analysis of the results, along theoretical modeling based on density functional theory calculation, has provided new insights for the correlation between the electrocatalytic activity and the catalyst structures. PMID:26569372

  8. Structural Basis on the Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Novel 1,2-Alpha L-Fucosidase (AFCA) From Bifidobacterium Bifidum

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, M.; Tsuchiya, A.; Katayama, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Wakatsuki, S.; Kato, R.

    2009-06-03

    1,2-alpha-L-fucosidase (AfcA), which hydrolyzes the glycosidic linkage of Fucalpha1-2Gal via an inverting mechanism, was recently isolated from Bifidobacterium bifidum and classified as the first member of the novel glycoside hydrolase family 95. To better understand the molecular mechanism of this enzyme, we determined the x-ray crystal structures of the AfcA catalytic (Fuc) domain in unliganded and complexed forms with deoxyfuconojirimycin (inhibitor), 2'-fucosyllactose (substrate), and L-fucose and lactose (products) at 1.12-2.10 A resolution. The AfcA Fuc domain is composed of four regions, an N-terminal beta region, a helical linker, an (alpha/alpha)6 helical barrel domain, and a C-terminal beta region, and this arrangement is similar to bacterial phosphorylases. In the complex structures, the ligands were buried in the central cavity of the helical barrel domain. Structural analyses in combination with mutational experiments revealed that the highly conserved Glu566 probably acts as a general acid catalyst. However, no carboxylic acid residue is found at the appropriate position for a general base catalyst. Instead, a water molecule stabilized by Asn423 in the substrate-bound complex is suitably located to perform a nucleophilic attack on the C1 atom of L-fucose moiety in 2'-fucosyllactose, and its location is nearly identical near the O1 atom of beta-L-fucose in the products-bound complex. Based on these data, we propose and discuss a novel catalytic reaction mechanism of AfcA.

  9. FEASIBILITY OF BURNING COAL IN CATALYTIC COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study, showing that pulverized coal can be burned in a catalytic combustor. Pulverized coal combustion in catalytic beds is markedly different from gaseous fuel combustion. Gas combustion gives uniform bed temperatures and reaction rates over the ent...

  10. Determination of trace amounts of mercury(II) in water samples using a novel kinetic catalytic ligand substitution reaction of hexacyanoruthenate(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Agarwal, Abhinav; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-11-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and rapid kinetic catalytic method has been developed for the determination of Hg(II) ions at micro-level. This method is based on the catalytic effect of Hg(II) ion on the rate of substitution of cyanide in hexacyanoruthenate(II) with nitroso-R-salt (NRS) in aqueous medium and provides good accuracy and precision. The concentration of Hg(II) catalyst varied from 4.0 to 10.0 × 10 -6 M and the progress of reaction was followed spectrophotometrically at 525 nm ( λmax of purple-red complex [Ru(CN) 5NRS] 3-, ɛ = 3.1 × 10 3 M -1 s -1) under the optimized reaction conditions; 8.75 × 10 -5 M [Ru(CN) 64-], 3.50 × 10 -4 M [nitroso-R-salt], pH 7.00 ± 0.02, ionic strength, I = 0.1 M (KCl), temp 45.0 ± 0.1 °C. The linear calibration curves, i.e. calibration equations between the absorbance at fixed times ( t = 15, 20 and 25 min) versus concentration of Hg(II) ions were established under the optimized experimental conditions. The detection limit was found to be 1.0 × 10 -7 M of Hg(II). The effect of various foreign ions on the proposed method has also been studied and discussed. The method has been applied to the determination of mercury(II) in aqueous solutions.

  11. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  12. Effective catalytic media using graphitic nitrogen-doped site in graphene for a non-aqueous Li-O2 battery: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Han; Hwang, Yubin; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2015-03-01

    The cell performance of lithium-oxygen batteries using nitrogen doped graphene as a catalytic cathode has been validated in recent research, but the cathode reaction mechanism of lithium and oxygen still remains unclear. Since the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism by ionic lithium and catalytic surface is predicted to be distinct for different defective sites such as graphitic, pyridinic, and pyrrolic, it is necessary to observe the behavior of ionic lithium and oxygen gas at each defective site in nitrogen doped graphene. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) calculations are adopted to analyze at an atomic scale how effectively each defective site acts as a catalytic cathode. Interestingly, unlike pyridinic or pyrrolic N is known to be the most effective catalytic site for ORR in fuel cells. Among the other defective sites, it is found that the graphitic N site is the most effective catalytic media activating ORR by ionic lithium in lithium-oxygen batteries due to the electron accepting the reaction of Li-O formation by the graphitic N site.

  13. Light hydrocarbons in hydrothermal and magmatic fumaroles: hints of catalytic and thermal reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Martini, Marino; Mangani, Filippo

    1995-02-01

    Volcanic gaseous mixtures emitted from active volcanoes frequently show variable amounts of saturated (alkanes), unsaturated (alkenes) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons. Three major patterns of distributions can be recognized, apparently related to the chemical-physical environment of formation of the gas exhalations: alkane-rich, low-temperature gas emissions from recently active volcanic areas; aromatic-rich hydrothermal manifestations; and alkene-rich, ‘magmatic’ fumaroles on active volcanoes. Thermodynamic data, together with theoretical and practical findings from the petroleum industry, point to two main types of reactions occurring in these volcanic environments: cracking and reforming. Cracking processes, mainly caused by thermal effects, occur when hydrocarbon-bearing hydrothermal fluids enter and mix with a hot and dry, rapidly rising magmatic gas phase. The most probable products are light alkenes with carbon numbers decreasing with increasing reaction temperatures. The presence of aromatic species in hydrothermal fluids can be linked to reforming processes, catalysed by several possible agents, such as smectites and zeolites, generally present in the hydrothermally altered volcanic terranes, and facilitated by long residence times in a hydrothermal envelope.

  14. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  15. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated. PMID:17583959

  16. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  17. A theoretical study on the catalytic effect of nanoparticle confined in carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wu; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the catalytic effect of CuO nanoparticles confined in carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations. Ozone decomposition and hydroxyl radical generation were used as the probe reactions to investigate the catalytic behavior of catalyst. The effects of the confined environment of carbon nanotubes induced more reactants into the channel. Interface interactions between reactants and CuO nanoparticles in the channel and charge transfer accelerated the decomposition of ozone into oxygen molecule and atomic oxygen species. The atomic oxygen species then interacted to water molecule to generate hydroxyl radicals, which were truly identified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique.

  18. Three Component Asymmetric Catalytic Ugi Reaction – Concinnity from Diversity via Substrate Mediated Catalyst Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenjun; Huang, Li; Guan, Yong; Wulff, William D.

    2014-01-01

    The first asymmetric catalyst for the 3-component Ugi reaction was identified as a result of a screen of a large set of different BOROX catalysts. The BOROX catalysts are assembled in-situ from a chiral biaryl ligand, an amine, water, BH3•SMe2 and an alcohol or phenol. The catalyst screen included 13 different ligands, 12 amines and 47 alcohols or phenols. The optimal catalyst (LAP 8-5-47) provides the α-amino amides with excellent asymmetric induction from an aldehyde, 2° amine and an isonitrile. The catalyst is proposed to consist of an ion pair combination of a chiral boroxinate anion and an iminium cation. PMID:24554529

  19. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center. PMID:25370530

  20. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center. PMID:25370530

  1. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  2. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  3. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  4. Induced catalytic activity of fluorided alumina in the reactions of isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, J.; Onyestyak, G.; Hall, W.K.

    1995-12-01

    The reaction chemistry for the conversion of isobutane on pure and fluorided aluminas was compared to continuous flow experiments. Catalysts with 0, 2.6, 4.5, and 6.5% F were pretreated in flowing oxygen either at 500 or 650{degrees}C. Only the products of dehydrogenation and demethanation were obtained on pure alumina; the rate of reaction was about one order of magnitude higher when the catalyst was pretreated at 650{degrees}C than when it was pretreated at 500{degrees}C. Paraffins, including neopentane, were also produced over fluorided aluminas; on catalysts pretreated at 650{degrees}C while dehydrogenation and demethanation decreased, paraffin formation increased with time on stream (TOS). Over the catalysts with 4.5 and 6.5% F the rate of hydride transfer-producing paraffins exceeded that of initiation (H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} formation) by a factor of from 2 to 3. All of the catalysts were more active than silica-alumina for isobutane conversion. IR spectra from pyridine adsorbed on catalysts with 0-4.5% F and pretreated either at 500 or 650{degrees}C showed no evidence of a band of 1540-50 cm{sup -1} assignable to pyridinium ion formed by interaction between pyridine and Bronsted acid sites. On the catalyst with 6.5% F this band appeared when the catalyst was pretreated at either 500 or 650{degrees}C. Isobutane can be dehydrogenated and demethanated over the dual acid-base pair sites of the alumina. The increasing paraffin formation with TOS may result from new and additional Bronsted sites introduced during dehydrogenation. 22 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Liquefaction of coal by depolymerization in an organic solvent has been studied for several years. The liquefied coal extract which results from such a process is far more suitable for conversion into liquid fuel by hydrogenolysis than is the untreated coal. Investigations on the chemical structure and the reactive sites of coal can help to select useful reactions for the production of liquids from coal. Sternberg et al. demonstrated that the reductive alkylation method transforms bituminous coal into an enormously soluble substance, irrespective of the mild reaction conditions. The effectiveness of newly introduced alkyl groups for the disruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sheets in coal macromolecules has been recognized. It has been reported by Ignasiak et al. that a C-alkylabon reaction using sodium or potassium amide in liquid ammonia can be used to introduce alkyl groups at acidic carbon sites. A method has been developed recently in this laboratory for the solubilization of high rank coals. In the previous reports it was shown that n-butyl lithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane produced coal anions which could be alkylated with different alkyl halides. Such alkylated coals were soluble up to 92% in solvents like pyridine. Though the solubilization of coal depended very much on the length of the alkyl group, it also depended very much on the nature of the base used. Strong bases like n-butyl lithium (pKa=42) can cause proton abstraction from aromatic structures, if the more acidic benzylic protons are absent. The utility of this procedure, initially developed and used by Miyake and Stock, has now been tested with the high oxygen containing, low rank Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals.

  6. Study of electronic effects in a catalytic diode: DFT calculations and MEIRAS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshlahra, Prashant

    , and its application for study of CO adsorption on low area Pt thin-film and nanowire catalysts under in-situ and CO oxidation reaction conditions is demonstrated. The effect of external voltage applied to induce charge transfer between metal-support junctions in a multilayer thin-film Pt/TiO2 catalytic diode on adsorbed CO molecules is studied using MEIRAS. The bias voltage causes a reversible shift in the vibrational frequency of CO adsorbed near Pt/TiO 2 interfaces exposed through the cracks in the Pt film. These results provide a direct demonstration of the electronic effects associated with metal-support junctions that have been extensively discussed and debated in the catalysis literature. Nanofabrication techniques are used to prepare regular arrays of uniform and parallel Pt nanowires on TiO2 in order to control the fraction of Pt/TiO2 interfaces while maintaining electrical continuity in the Pt layer. Such nanostructures incorporated in a catalytic diode can provide a better control of electron-transfer effects due to larger fractions of exposed Pt/TiO2 interfaces and potentially lead to tuning of catalytic activity in supported catalysts using bias voltages.

  7. Effect of additions of sodium hydroxide on the catalytic activity of partially deactivated skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in aqueous-organic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, M. V.; Afineevskii, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The effect the concentration of sodium hydroxide has on the catalytic activity of skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in ternary methanol-water-sodium hydroxide solutions with a methanol content of 0.11 mole fractions and different concentrations of sodium hydroxide is studied. The key role of the solvent during changes in the activity of skeletal nickel in the hydrogenation reaction of sodium maleate is assumed, based on data on the redistribution of individual forms of adsorbed hydrogen.

  8. Supramolecular Macrocyclic Pd(II) and Pt(II) Squares and Rectangles with Aryldithiolate Ligands and their Excellent Catalytic Activity in Suzuki C-C Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vivekananda, K V; Dey, S; Maity, D K; Bhuvanesh, N; Jain, V K

    2015-11-01

    Addition of 1,4-benezenedithiol and 4,4'-biphenyldithiol to M(OTf)2 (M = cis-[Pt(PEt3)2](2+) or cis-[Pd(dppe)](2+)) (dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) gave self-assembled tetranuclear complexes [M2{S(C6H4)nS}]2(OTf)4 (n = 1, 2). The same reaction with 1,4-benezenedimethanethiol yielded octanuclear supramolecular coordination complexes (SCC) [M2{SCH2C6H4CH2S}]4(OTf)8. These complexes were characterized by NMR, mass, and UV-vis spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, as well as density functional theory studies and represent the first examples of SCCs constructed by thiolate groups and square-planar metal ions. The rectangular shape of tetranuclear complexes and square shape of octanuclear complex are confirmed by single-crystal structures and computational studies. The palladium complexes showed excellent catalytic activity in Suzuki C-C cross-coupling reactions with high turnover numbers (2 × 10(7)), even with low catalyst loading. PMID:26444245

  9. Study on preparation of NiOOH by a new catalytic electrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanzhi; Pan Junqing Wan Pingyu; Liu Xiaoguang

    2009-04-02

    The present paper reports a new catalytic electrolysis method to prepare NiOOH. KMnO{sub 4} is proposed as a catalyst to play the role of electron-transfer medium in the electrolysis preparation of NiOOH for the first time. Through the self-redox reaction of KMnO{sub 4}, the highly efficient electron-transfer process between the electrolyte and the electrode of the spherical Ni(OH){sub 2} is realized, thus resulting in a high electrolytic efficiency and short electrolysis time. The mechanism of catalytic electrolysis is preliminarily discussed. The experimental results show that the electrode prepared with the NiOOH powders by catalytic electrolysis offers a discharge capacity of 267 mAh g{sup -1} at a current density of 120 mA g{sup -1} and exhibits good cycling performance.

  10. Studying Reaction Intermediates Formed at Graphenic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Depanjan; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-03-01

    We report in-situ production and detection of intermediates at graphenic surfaces, especially during alcohol oxidation. Alcohol oxidation to acid occurs on graphene oxide-coated paper surface, driven by an electrical potential, in a paper spray mass spectrometry experiment. As paper spray ionization is a fast process and the time scale matches with the reaction time scale, we were able to detect the intermediate, acetal. This is the first observation of acetal formed in surface oxidation. The process is not limited to alcohols and the reaction has been extended to aldehydes, amines, phosphenes, sugars, etc., where reaction products were detected instantaneously. By combining surface reactions with ambient ionization and mass spectrometry, we show that new insights into chemical reactions become feasible. We suggest that several other chemical transformations may be studied this way. This work opens up a new pathway for different industrially and energetically important reactions using different metal catalysts and modified substrate.

  11. A comparative DFT study of the catalytic activity of the 3d transition metal sulphides surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Balderas, R.; Oviedo-Roa, R; Martinez-Magadan, J M.; Amador, C.; Dixon, David A. )

    2002-10-10

    The catalytic activity of the first transition metal series sulphides for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reactions exhibits a particular behaviour when analysed as a function of the metal position in the Periodic Table. This work reports a comparative study of the electronic structure of the bulk and of the (0 0 1) metal surface (assumed to be the reactive surface) for the Sc-Zn monosulphides. The systems were modeled using the NiAs prototype crystal structure for the bulk and by applying the supercell model with seven atomic layers for (0 0 1) surfaces. The electronic structure of closed-packed solids code based on the density-functional theory and adopting the muffin-tin approximation to the potential was employed in the calculations of the electronic properties. For the Co and Ni sulphides, the density of states (DOS) variations between the metal atom present in the bulk and the ones exposed at the surface show that at the surface, there exists a higher DOS in the occupied states region just below the Fermi level. This feature might indicate a good performance of these two metal sulphides substrates in the HDS reactions favouring a donation, back-donation mechanism. In contrast, the DOS at the surface of Mn is increased in the unoccupied states region, just above the Fermi level. This suggests the possibility of a strong interaction with charge dontating sulphur adsorbate atoms poisoning the active substrate surface.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination and catalytic activity in epoxidation reaction of two new oxidovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Vida; Grivani, Gholamhossein; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The five coordinated vanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes of VOL1 (1) and VOL2 (2), HL1 = 2-{(E)-[2-bromoethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, HL2 = 2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, have been synthesized and they were characterized by using single-crystal X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis (CHN) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Crystal structure determination of these complexes shows that the Schiff base ligands (L1 and L2) act as bidentate ligands with two phenolato oxygen atoms and two imine nitrogen atoms in the trans geometry. The coordination geometry around the vanadium(IV) is distorted square pyramidal in which vanadium(IV) is coordinated by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms of two independent ligands in the basal plane and by one oxygen atom in the apical position. The catalytic activity of the Schiff base complexes of 1 and 2 in the epoxidation of alkenes were investigated using different reaction parameters such as solvent effect, oxidant, alkene/oxidant ratio and the catalyst amount. The results showed that in the presence of TBHP as oxidant in 1: 4 and 1:3 ratio of the cyclooctene/oxidant ratio, high epoxide yield was obtained for 1 (76%) and 2 (80%) with TON(= mole of substrate/mole of catalyst) of 27 and 28.5, respectively, in epoxidation of cyclooctene.

  13. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim; Dutta, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  14. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ruth; Dutta, Saikat; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR-TEM, and NH3 temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  15. Catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene on an ultrastable-Y zeolite. Nature of initial polymer reactions, pattern of formation of gas and liquid products, and temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Manos, G.; Garforth, A.; Dwyer, J.

    2000-05-01

    The catalytic degradation of high-density polyethylene (hdPE) over ultrastable Y zeolite in a semibatch reactor was studied at different heating rates and reaction temperatures. Catalytic degradation of the polymer occurred at much lower temperatures than pure thermal degradation. When gel permeation chromatography was used to determine the molar mass distribution, it was found that solid state reactions occur only in the presence of a catalyst. These reactions change the polymer structure well before the formation of significant amounts of volatile products. The pattern of formation of gaseous and liquid products was studied and found to follow the temperature increase. After the system reached its final temperature, the reaction rate of formation of volatile products decreased rapidly. The product range was typically between C{sub 3} and C{sub 15}. Isobutane and isopentane were the main gaseous products. The liquid product fraction was alkane-rich, as alkenes rapidly undergo bimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions to give alkanes as secondary products.

  16. Cobalt-manganese-based spinels as multifunctional materials that unify catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in the design and development of affordable and highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts that can resolve the pivotal issues that concern solar fuels, fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here we present the synthesis and application of porous CoMn2 O4 and MnCo2 O4 spinel microspheres as highly efficient multifunctional catalysts that unify the electrochemical OER with oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidation as well as the ORR. The porous materials were prepared by the thermal degradation of the respective carbonate precursors at 400 °C. The as-prepared spinels display excellent performances in electrochemical OER for the cubic MnCo2 O4 phase in comparison to the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 material in an alkaline medium. Moreover, the oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidations were performed and they exhibited a similar trend in activity to that of the electrochemical OER. Remarkably, the situation is reversed in ORR catalysis, that is, the oxygen reduction activity and stability of the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 catalyst outperformed that of cubic MnCo2 O4 and rivals that of benchmark Pt catalysts. The superior catalytic performance and the remarkable stability of the unifying materials are attributed to their unique porous and robust microspherical morphology and the intrinsic structural features of the spinels. Moreover, the facile access to these high-performance materials enables a reliable and cost-effective production on a large scale for industrial applications. PMID:25394186

  17. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of olefin catalytic hydroalumination by organoaluminum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2016-05-01

    The complex reaction mechanism of α-olefin catalytic hydroalumination by alkylalanes is investigated via mathematical modeling that involves plotting the kinetic models for the individual reactions that make up a complex system and a separate study of their principles. Kinetic parameters of olefin catalytic hydroalumination are estimated. Activation energies of the possible steps of the schemes of complex reaction mechanisms are compared and possible reaction pathways are determined.

  19. Structural and Kinetic Evidence That Catalytic Reaction of Human UDP-glucose 6-Dehydrogenase Involves Covalent Thiohemiacetal and Thioester Enzyme Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Sigrid; Chaikuad, Apirat; Klimacek, Mario; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Oppermann, Udo; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid by UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (UGDH) occurs through the four-electron oxidation of the UDP-glucose C6 primary alcohol in two NAD+-dependent steps. The catalytic reaction of UGDH is thought to involve a Cys nucleophile that promotes formation of a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate in the course of the first oxidation step. The thiohemiacetal undergoes further oxidation into a thioester, and hydrolysis of the thioester completes the catalytic cycle. Herein we present crystallographic and kinetic evidence for the human form of UGDH that clarifies participation of covalent catalysis in the enzymatic mechanism. Substitution of the putative catalytic base for water attack on the thioester (Glu161) by an incompetent analog (Gln161) gave a UGDH variant (E161Q) in which the hydrolysis step had become completely rate-limiting so that a thioester enzyme intermediate accumulated at steady state. By crystallizing E161Q in the presence of 5 mm UDP-glucose and 2 mm NAD+, we succeeded in trapping a thiohemiacetal enzyme intermediate and determined its structure at 2.3 Å resolution. Cys276 was covalently modified in the structure, establishing its role as catalytic nucleophile of the reaction. The thiohemiacetal reactive C6 was in a position suitable to become further oxidized by hydride transfer to NAD+. The proposed catalytic mechanism of human UGDH involves Lys220 as general base for UDP-glucose alcohol oxidation and for oxyanion stabilization during formation and breakdown of the thiohemiacetal and thioester enzyme intermediates. Water coordinated to Asp280 deprotonates Cys276 to function as an aldehyde trap and also provides oxyanion stabilization. Glu161 is the Brønsted base catalytically promoting the thioester hydrolysis. PMID:22123821

  20. Resonance Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe for monitoring catalytic events in a Ru-porphyrin mediated amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Paolo; Gallo, Emma; Solan, Gregory A; Hudson, Andrew J

    2016-05-10

    Resonance Raman microspectroscopy has been widely used to study the structure and dynamics of porphyrins and metal complexes containing the porphyrin ligand. Here, we have demonstrated that the same technique can be adapted to examine the mechanism of a homogeneously-catalysed reaction mediated by a transition-metal-porphyrin complex. Previously it has been challenging to study this type of reaction using in situ spectroscopic monitoring due to the low stability of the reaction intermediates and elevated-temperature conditions. We have made a straightforward modification to the sample stage on a microscope for time-lapsed Raman microspectroscopy from reaction mixtures in these media. The allylic amination of unsaturated hydrocarbons by aryl azides, which can be catalysed by a ruthenium-porphyrin complex, has been used as an illustrative example of the methodology. The mechanism of this particular reaction has been studied previously using density-functional theory and kinetic approaches. The Raman measurements support the mechanism proposed in the earlier publications by providing the first experimental verification of a precursor reaction complex between the aryl azide and the ruthenium metal ion, and evidence for the formation of a mono-imido intermediate complex under conditions of high concentration of the reactant olefin. PMID:27070335

  1. Synthesis of magnetically recyclable ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts and their catalytic performance for Knoevenagel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyuan; Jiang, Sai; Ji, Shengfu Ammar, Muhammad; Zhang, Qingmin; Yan, Junlei

    2015-03-15

    Novel magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized by encapsulating magnetic SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles into ZIF-8 through in situ method. The structures of the catalysts were characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD, FT-IR, VSM, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and CO{sub 2}-TPD technology. The catalytic activity and recovery properties of the catalysts for the Knoevenagel reaction of p-chlorobenzaldehyde with malononitrile were evaluated. The results showed that the magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts had the larger surface areas, the suitable superparamagnetism, and good catalytic activity for Knoevenagel reaction. The conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can reach ~98% and the selectivity of the production can reach ~99% over35.8%ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (MZC-5) catalyst under the reaction condition of 25 °C and 4 h. The magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts also had good substrates adaptation. After reaction, the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture by an external magnet. The recovery catalyst can be reused five times and the conversion of p-chlorobenzaldehyde can be kept over 90%. - Graphical abstract: Novel magnetically recyclable ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized by encapsulating magnetic SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles into ZIF-8 and the as-synthesized catalysts exhibited a good catalytic activity for the Knoevenagel reaction. - Highlights: • A series of novel magnetic ZIF-8@SiO{sub 2}@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} catalysts were synthesized. • The catalysts had the larger surface areas and the suitable superparamagnetism. • The catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity for the Knoevenagel reaction. • After reaction the catalyst can be easily separated by an external magnet. • The recovery catalyst can be reused five times and can keep its catalytic activity.

  2. Lagrangian Approach to Study Catalytic Fluidized Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Hossein; Hossein Madi Team; Marcelo Kaufman Rechulski Collaboration; Christian Ludwig Collaboration; Tilman Schildhauer Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Lagrangian approach of fluidized bed reactors is a method, which simulates the movement of catalyst particles (caused by the fluidization) by changing the gas composition around them. Application of such an investigation is in the analysis of the state of catalysts and surface reactions under quasi-operando conditions. The hydrodynamics of catalyst particles within a fluidized bed reactor was studied to improve a Lagrangian approach. A fluidized bed methanation employed in the production of Synthetic Natural Gas from wood was chosen as the case study. The Lagrangian perspective was modified and improved to include different particle circulation patterns, which were investigated through this study. Experiments were designed to evaluate the concepts of the model. The results indicate that the setup is able to perform the designed experiments and a good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results were observed. It has been shown that fluidized bed reactors, as opposed to fixed beds, can be used to avoid the deactivation of the methanation catalyst due to carbon deposits. Carbon deposition on the catalysts tested with the Lagrangian approach was investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis of ex-situ catalyst samples. This investigation was done to identify the effects of particles velocity and their circulation patterns on the amount and type of deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne(EPFL), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI)

  3. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  4. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  5. Cobalt Molybdenum Oxynitrides: Synthesis, Structural, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingfei; Veith, Gabriel M; Diaz, Rosa; Liu, Jue; Stach, Eric; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Khalifah, P.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of CoxMo1 xOyNz compounds supported on carbon black as potential cathode catalysts for ORR. They were prepared by a conventional impregnation method. Their ORR activities in both acid and alkaline electrolytes were evaluated via half-cell measurements. The synthesis temperature and sample composition both strongly impacted their physical and chemical properties. Factors influencing their crystal structures, morphologies and ORR activities will be discussed based on the results of structural and spectroscopic studies.

  6. Intrinsic magnetic characteristics-dependent charge transfer and visible photo-catalytic H2 evolution reaction (HER) properties of a Fe3O4@PPy@Pt catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyan; Kong, Chao; Gao, Wei; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-02-18

    A ternary nano-architectural photocatalyst has been designed to investigate whether the intrinsic magnetic property of photo-catalysts has an effect on the charge transfer and its photo-catalytic H2 evolution reaction (HER) properties under visible light irradiation. The electron transfer and visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution were remarkably enhanced by regulating the electromagnetic interaction between the magnetic catalysts and the photo-generated electrons. PMID:26792246

  7. Quantum chemical study of the catalytic oxidative coupling of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, I.; Senkan, S.

    1997-10-01

    Oxidative coupling of methane reaction pathways on MgO and lithium-modified MgO were theoretically studied using the semiempirical MNDO-PM3 molecular orbital method. The surface of the MgO catalyst was modeled by a Mg{sub 9}O{sub 9} molecular cluster containing structural defects such as edges and corners. Lithium-promoted magnesia was simulated by isomorphic substitution of Mg{sup 2+} by Li{sup +}; the excess negative charge of the cluster was compensated by a proton connected to a neighboring O{sup 2{minus}} site. Heterolytic adsorption of methane was found to be directly related to the coordination number of both the lattice oxygen and the metal sites. Energetically the most favorable site pair was Mg{sub 3c}-O{sub 3c} with a neighboring Li{sub 4c} site present. Various sequential oxygen and methane adsorption pathways were explored resulting in CH{sub 3}OH formation with lower energy barriers for the Li-modified MgO cluster as compared to unmodified MgO.

  8. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine

    PubMed Central

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H2O2] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293–308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands. PMID:20721280

  9. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  10. Reaction mechanism of the reverse water-gas shift reaction using first-row middle transition metal catalysts L'M (M = Fe, Mn, Co): a computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cundari, Thomas R; Wilson, Angela K

    2011-09-19

    The mechanism of the reverse water-gas shift reaction (CO(2) + H(2) → CO + H(2)O) was investigated using the 3d transition metal complexes L'M (M = Fe, Mn, and Co, L' = parent β-diketiminate). The thermodynamics and reaction barriers of the elementary reaction pathways were studied with the B3LYP density functional and two different basis sets: 6-311+G(d) and aug-cc-pVTZ. Plausible reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products were modeled, with different conformers and multiplicities for each identified. Different reaction pathways and side reactions were also considered. Reaction Gibbs free energies and activation energies for all steps were determined for each transition metal. Calculations indicate that the most desirable mechanism involves mostly monometallic complexes. Among the three catalysts modeled, the Mn complex shows the most favorable catalytic properties. Considering the individual reaction barriers, the Fe complex shows the lowest barrier for activation of CO(2). PMID:21838224

  11. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  12. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily. PMID:27370473

  13. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  14. Enhancing catalytic performance of palladium in gold and palladium alloy nanoparticles for organic synthesis reactions through visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong; Jaatinen, Esa; Xiao, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Jia, Jianfeng; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Jian

    2013-04-17

    The intrinsic catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) is significantly enhanced in gold (Au)-Pd alloy nanoparticles (NPs) under visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures. The alloy NPs strongly absorb light and efficiently enhance the conversion of several reactions, including Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling, oxidative addition of benzylamine, selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to corresponding aldehydes and ketones, and phenol oxidation. The Au/Pd molar ratio of the alloy NPs has an important impact on performance of the catalysts since it determines both the electronic heterogeneity and the distribution of Pd sites at the NP surface, with these two factors playing key roles in the catalytic activity. Irradiating with light produces an even more profound enhancement in the catalytic performance of the NPs. For example, the best conversion rate achieved thermally at 30 °C for Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling was 37% at a Au/Pd ratio of 1:1.86, while under light illumination the yield increased to 96% under the same conditions. The catalytic activity of the alloy NPs depends on the intensity and wavelength of incident light. Light absorption due to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of gold nanocrystals plays an important role in enhancing catalyst performance. We believe that the conduction electrons of the NPs gain the light absorbed energy producing energetic electrons at the surface Pd sites, which enhances the sites' intrinsic catalytic ability. These findings provide useful guidelines for designing efficient catalysts composed of alloys of a plasmonic metal and a catalytically active transition metal for various organic syntheses driven by sunlight. PMID:23566035

  15. Probing the correlations between the defects in metal-organic frameworks and their catalytic activity by an epoxide ring-opening reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Klet, Rachel C; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar

    2016-06-14

    Seven Zr/Hf-based MOFs with different degrees of defects were obtained by modulating the synthetic conditions. The number of missing linkers in these MOFs was calculated based on potentiometric acid-base titration. The number of defects was found to correlate quantitatively with the catalytic activity of UiO-type MOFs for an acid-catalyzed epoxide ring-opening reaction. More importantly, we were able to identify a MOF with inherent defective Zr6 nodes, which showed great activity and regio-selectivity for the epoxide ring-opening reaction. PMID:27229848

  16. A QM/MM study of the catalytic mechanism of nicotinamidase.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2014-02-28

    Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) is a member of Zn-dependent amidohydrolases that hydrolyzes nicotinamide (NAM) to nicotinic acid (NA), which is a key step in the salvage pathway of NAD(+) biosynthesis. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of Pnc1 has been investigated by using a combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) approach based on the recently obtained crystal structure of Pnc1. The reaction pathway, the detail of each elementary step, the energetics of the whole catalytic cycle, and the roles of key residues and Zn-binding site are illuminated. Our calculation results indicate that the catalytic water molecule comes from the bulk solvent, which is then deprotonated by residue D8. D8 functions as a proton transfer station between C167 and NAM, while the activated C167 serves as the nucleophile. The residue K122 only plays a role in stabilizing intermediates and transition states. The oxyanion hole formed by the amide backbone nitrogen atoms of A163 and C167 has the function to stabilize the hydroxyl anion of nicotinamide. The Zn-binding site rather than a single Zn(2+) ion acts as a Lewis acid to influence the reaction. Two elementary steps, the activation of C167 in the deamination process and the decomposition of catalytic water in the hydrolysis process, correspond to the large energy barriers of 25.7 and 28.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively, meaning that both of them contribute a lot to the overall reaction barrier. Our results may provide useful information for the design of novel and efficient Pnc1 inhibitors and related biocatalytic applications. PMID:24413890

  17. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11C.

  18. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  19. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new base catalyzed C-alkylation reaction that employs a mixture of n-butyllithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane to produce coal anions that are subsequently treated with n-alkyl halides at 0{degree}C has been developed. Almost quantitative pyridine solubilization was achieved by C-octylation of a Lower Kittanning coal, PSOC 1197. C-Octylation was less successful for the solubilization of bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal, APCSP 3, and subbituminous Wyodak coal, APCSP 2, which gave 35 and 33% soluble material, respectively. Their O-methyl derivatives yielded 43 and 20% soluble material in the same reaction. The observations are in accord with the concept of Ouchi and his associates that higher rank coals, although more aromatic in character, have a lower degree of polymerization than low rank coals. Relatively mild chemical reactions, such as Calkylation, that lead to modest changes in molecular dimensions, can disrupt intermolecular forces and accomplish solubilization.

  20. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  1. High-effective approach from amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst and its catalytic reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Jun; Li, Huiying; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Developing the high-efficient and green synthetic method for chiral amino alcohols is an intriguing target. We have developed the Mg(2+)-doped Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for hydrogenation of L-phenylalanine methyl ester to chiral L-phenylalaninol without racemization. The effect of different L-phenylalanine esters on this title reaction was studied, verifying that Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 is an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of amino acid esters to chiral amino alcohols. DFT calculation was used to study the adsorption of substrate on the catalyst, and showed that the substrate adsorbs on the surface active sites mainly by amino group (-NH2) absorbed on Al2O3, and carbonyl (C=O) and alkoxy (RO-) group oxygen absorbed on the boundary of Cu and Al2O3. This catalytic hydrogenation undergoes the formation of a hemiacetal intermediate and the cleavage of the C-O bond (rate-determining step) by reacting with dissociated H to obtain amino aldehyde and methanol ad-species. The former is further hydrogenated to amino alcohols, and the latter desorbs from the catalyst surface. PMID:27619990

  2. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, G.C.

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  3. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1994-06-15

    Liquids derived from coal contain relatively high amounts of oxygenated organic compounds, mainly in the form of phenols and furans that are deleterious to the stability and quality of these liquids as fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) using Mo/W sulfide catalysts is a promising method to accomplish this removal, but our understanding of the reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during HDO is very limited. Rather than attempting to examine the complexities of real liquids and catalysts we have adopted an approach here using model systems amenable to surface-sensitive techniques that enable us to probe in detail the fundamental processes occurring during HDO at the surfaces of well-defined model catalysts. The results of this work may lead to the development of more efficient, selective and stable catalysts. Above a S/Mo ratio of about 0.5 ML, furan does not adsorb on sulfided Mo surfaces; as the sulfur coverage is lowered increasing amounts of furan can be adsorbed. Temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) reveals that C-H, C-C and C-O bond scission occurs on these surfaces. Auger spectra show characteristic changes in the nature and amount of surface carbon. Comparisons with experiments carried out with CO, H{sub 2} and alkenes show that reaction pathways include -- direct abstraction of CO at low temperatures; cracking and release of hydrogen below its normal desorption temperature; dehydrogenatin of adsorbed hydrocarbon fragments; recombination of C and O atoms and dissolution of carbon into the bulk at high temperatures. Performing the adsorption or thermal reaction in 10{sup {minus}5} torr of hydrogen does not change the mode of reaction significantly.

  4. Elucidating molecular iridium water oxidation catalysts using metal-organic frameworks: a comprehensive structural, catalytic, spectroscopic, and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Liang; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    As a new class of porous, crystalline, molecular materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise as recyclable and reusable single-site solid catalysts. Periodic order and site isolation of the catalytic struts in MOFs facilitate the studies of their activities and reaction mechanisms. Herein we report the construction of two highly stable MOFs (1 and 2) using elongated dicarboxylate bridging ligands derived from Cp*Ir(L)Cl complexes (L = dibenzoate-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine, bpy-dc, or dibenzoate-substituted 2-phenylpyridine, ppy-dc) and Zr(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(carboxylate)(12) cuboctahedral secondary building units (SBUs) and the elucidation of water oxidation pathways of the Cp*Ir(L)Cl catalysts using these MOFs. We carried out detailed kinetic studies of Ce(4+)-driven water oxidation reactions (WORs) catalyzed by the MOFs using UV-vis spectroscopy, phosphorescent oxygen detection, and gas chromatographic analysis. These results confirmed not only water oxidation activity of the MOFs but also indicated oxidative degradation of the Cp* rings during the WOR. The (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl (X is likely a formate or acetate group) complex resulted from the oxidative degradation process was identified as a competent catalyst responsible for the water oxidation activity of 1. Further characterization of the MOFs recovered from WORs using X-ray photoelectron, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis absorption, luminescence, and infrared spectroscopies supported the identity of (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl as an active water oxidation catalyst. Kinetics of MOF-catalyzed WORs were monitored by Ce(4+) consumptions and fitted with a reaction-diffusion model, revealing an intricate relationship between reaction and diffusion rates. Our work underscores the opportunity in using MOFs as well-defined single-site solid catalytic systems to reveal mechanistic details that are difficult to obtain for their homogeneous counterparts. PMID:23136923

  5. Studies on exhaust emissions of catalytic coated spark ignition engine with adulterated gasoline.

    PubMed

    Muralikrishna, M V S; Kishor, K; Venkata Ramana Reddy, Ch

    2006-04-01

    Adulteration of automotive fuels, especially, gasoline with cheaper fuels is widespread throughout south Asia. Some adulterants decrease the performance and life of the engine and increase the emission of harmful pollutants causing environmental and health problems. The present investigation is carried out to study the exhaust emissions from a single cylinder spark ignition (SI) engine with kerosene blended gasoline with different versions of the engine, such as conventional engine and catalytic coated engine with different proportions of the kerosene ranging from 0% to 40% by volume in steps of 10% in the kerosene-gasoline blend. The catalytic coated engine used in the study has copper coating of thickness 400 microns on piston and inner surface of the cylinder head. The pollutants in the exhaust, carbon monoxide (CO) and unburnt hydrocarbons (UBHC) are measured with Netel Chromatograph CO and HC analyzer at peak load operation of the engine. The engine is provided with catalytic converter with sponge iron as a catalyst to control the pollutants from the exhaust of the engine. An air injection is also provided to the catalytic converter to further reduce the pollutants. The pollutants found to increase drastically with adulterated gasoline. Copper-coated engine with catalytic converter significantly reduced pollutants, when compared to conventional engine. PMID:17913184

  6. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  7. Studying photonuclear reactions using the activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Khankin, V. V.; Kurilik, A. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    The experimental setup that is used at the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Moscow State University to study photonuclear reactions using the activation technique is described. The system is based on two modern compact race track microtrons with maximum energy of electrons of up to 55 and 67.7 MeV. A low-background HPGe detector is used to measure the induced gamma activity. The data acquisition and analysis system, used to process the measured spectra, is described. The described system is used to study multiparticle photonuclear reactions and production of nuclei far from the beta stability region.

  8. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  9. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; et al

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  10. Theoretical study of stabilities, electronic, and catalytic performance of supported platinum on modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongwei, Tian; Wei, Feng; Rui, Wang; Huiling, Liu; Xuri, Huang

    2015-11-01

    The geometry, electronic structure, and catalytic properties for CO oxidation of Pt atom supported on pri-graphene (PG), Haeckelite (H), and Stone-Wales-defect-graphene are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In contrast to a Pt atom on PG, defective graphene, especially the Haeckelite, strongly stabilises the Pt atom and makes it more positive and thus the CO poisoning. At the same time the catalytic activities are as high as the pristine one. Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms are favoured as the starting state and are followed by the Eley-Rideal reaction. The results indicate the benefit of Haeckelite as a substrate for the Pt atom and validate the reactivity of catalysts on the atomic scale with low cost and high activity.

  11. Role of associated defects in oxygen ion conduction and surface exchange reaction for epitaxial samaria-doped ceria thin films as catalytic coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Nan; Shi, Yanuo; Schweiger, Sebastian; Strelcov, Evgheni; Foglietti, Vittorio; Orgiani, Pasquale; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jennifer L. M. Rupp; Aruta, Carmela; et al

    2016-05-18

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) thin films are particularly important for energy and electronic applications such as micro-solid oxide fuel cells, electrolysers, sensors and memristors. In this paper we report a comparative study investigating ionic conductivity and surface reactions for well-grown epitaxial SDC films varying the samaria doping concentration. With increasing doping above 20 mol% of samaria, an enhancement in the defect association was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The role of such defect associates on the films` oxygen ion transport and exchange was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). The measurements reveal that the ionic transport has amore » sharp maximum in ionic conductivity and drop in its activation energy down to 0.6 eV for 20 mol% doping. Increasing the doping concentration further up to 40 mol%, raises the activation energy substantially by a factor of two. We ascribe the sluggish transport kinetics to the "bulk" ionic-near ordering in case of the heavily doped epitaxial films. Analysis of the ESM first order reversal curve measurements indicate that these associated defects may have a beneficial role by lowering the activation of the oxygen exchange "surface" reaction for heavily doped 40 mol% of samaria. We reveal in a model experiment through a solid solution series of samaria doped ceria epitaxial films that the occurrence of associate defects in the bulk affects the surface charging state of the films to increase the exchange rates. Lastly, the implication of these findings are the design of coatings with tuned oxygen surface exchange by control of bulk associate clusters for future electro-catalytic applications.« less

  12. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  13. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  14. Nonaqueous catalytic fluorometric trace determination of vanadium based on the pyronine B-hydrogen peroxide reaction and flow injection after cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Paleologos, E K; Koupparis, M A; Karayannis, M I; Veltsistas, P G

    2001-09-15

    The catalytic effect of vanadium on the pyronine B-H2O2 system is examined. Enhancement of the catalytic reaction rate along with the efficiency and selectivity against vanadium is achieved in a formic acid environment in the presence of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Elimination of drastic interference caused by inorganic acids and aqueous matrix along with a 50-fold preconcentration of vanadium are facilitated through cloud point extraction of its neutral complex with 8-quinolinol in an acidic solution. Subsequent flow injection analysis (FIA) with fluorometric detection renders the proposed method ideal for selective and cost-effective determination of as little as 0.020 microng L(-1) vanadium in environmental, biological, and food substrates. The preconcentration step can be applied simultaneously to multiple samples, allowing for massive preparation prior to analysis, compensating, thus, for the time-consuming procedure. PMID:11575789

  15. In situ infrared study of adsorbed species during catalytic oxidation and carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rajesh A.

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be the fuel of the next century. Hydrogen can be produced by either water splitting using the solar or nuclear energy or by catalytic cracking and reforming of the fossil fuels. The water splitting process using solar energy and photovoltaics is a clean way to produce hydrogen, but it suffers from very low efficiency. A promising scheme to produce H 2 from natural gas involves following steps: (i) partial oxidation and reforming of natural gas to syngas, (ii) water-gas shift reaction to convert CO in the syngas to additional H2, (iii) separation of the H2 from CO2, and (iv) CO2 sequestration. The requirements for the above scheme are (i) a highly active coke resistant catalyst for generation of syngas by direct partial oxidation, (ii) a highly active sulfur tolerant catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction, and (iii) a low cost sorbent with high CO2 adsorption capacity for CO2 sequestration. This dissertation will address the mechanisms of partial oxidation, CO2 adsorption, and water-gas shift catalysis using in situ IR spectroscopy coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The results from these studies will lead to a better understanding of the reaction mechanism and design of both the catalyst and sorbent for production of hydrogen with zero emissions. Partial oxidation of methane is studied over Rh/Al2O 3 catalyst to elucidate the reaction mechanism for synthesis gas formation. The product lead-lag relationship observed with in situ IR and MS results revealed that syngas is produced via a two-step reforming mechanism: the first step involving total oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H 2O and the second step involving the reforming of unconverted methane with CO2 and H2O to form syngas. Furthermore, the Rh on the catalyst surface remains predominantly in the partially oxidized state (Rhdelta+ and Rh0). For the water-gas shift reaction, addition of Re to the Ni/CeO2 catalyst enhanced the water gas shift activity by a factor of three. The activity

  16. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-01-22

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces.

  17. Sorption enhanced reaction process for direct production of fuel-cell grade hydrogen by low temperature catalytic steam-methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Michael G.; Caram, Hugo S.; Sircar, Shivaji

    New experimental data are reported to demonstrate that a sorption enhanced reaction (SER) concept can be used to directly produce fuel-cell grade H 2 (<20 ppm CO) by carrying out the catalytic, endothermic, steam-methane reforming (SMR) reaction (CH 4 + 2H 2O ↔ CO 2 + 4H 2) in presence of a CO 2 selective chemisorbent such as K 2CO 3 promoted hydrotalcite at reaction temperatures of 520 and 550 °C, which are substantially lower than the conventional SMR reaction temperatures of 700-800 °C. The H 2 productivity of the sorption enhanced reactor can be large, and the conversion of CH 4 to H 2 can be very high circumventing the thermodynamic limitations of the SMR reaction due to the application of the Le Chetalier's principle in the SER concept. Mathematical simulations of a cyclic two-step SER concept showed that the H 2 productivity of the process (moles of essentially pure H 2 produced per kg of catalyst-chemisorbent admixture in the reactor per cycle) is much higher at a reaction temperature of 590 °C than that at 550 or 520 °C. On the other hand, the conversion of feed CH 4 to high purity H 2 product is relatively high (>99+%) at all three temperatures. The conversion is much higher than that in a conventional catalyst-alone reactor at these temperatures, and it increases only moderately (<1%) as the reaction temperature is increased from 520 to 590 °C. These results are caused by complex interactions of four phenomena. They are (a) favorable thermodynamic equilibrium of the highly endothermic SMR reaction at the higher reaction temperature, (b) faster kinetics of SMR reaction at higher temperatures, (c) favorable removal of CO 2 from the reaction zone at lower temperatures, and (d) higher cyclic working capacity for CO 2 chemisorption at higher temperature.

  18. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich Reaction with Dithiomalonates as Excellent Mannich Donors: Organocatalytic Synthesis of (R)-Sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Bae, Han Yong; Kim, Mun Jong; Sim, Jae Hun; Song, Choong Eui

    2016-08-26

    In this study, dithiomalonates (DTMs) were demonstrated to be exceptionally efficient Mannich donors in terms of reactivity and stereoselectivity in cinchona-based-squaramide-catalyzed enantioselective Mannich reactions of diverse imines or α-amidosulfones as imine surrogates. Owing to the superior reactivity of DTMs as compared to conventional malonates, the catalyst loading could be reduced to 0.1 mol % without the erosion of enantioselectivity (up to 99 % ee). Furthermore, by the use of a DTM, even some highly challenging primary alkyl α-amidosulfones were smoothly converted into the desired adducts with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 97 % ee), whereas the use of a malonate or monothiomalonate resulted in no reaction under identical conditions. The synthetic utility of the chiral Mannich adducts obtained from primary alkyl substrates was highlighted by the organocatalytic, coupling-reagent-free synthesis of the antidiabetic drug (-)-(R)-sitagliptin. PMID:27486059

  19. Spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC) applications in the preparation of hydraulic binders: Pozzolanic properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Rodriguez, Sergio

    At the present work the replacement of Portland cement in pastes and mortars by spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC) is studied. The study has been focused in four physicochemical characterization, hydrated lime/catalyst and cement/catalyst pastes and mortars studies, and environmental impact aspects. The FCC characterization establishes that it is a silicoaluminate, having a mainly amorphous structure, with a great specific surface, and that is necessary its mechanical activation (grinding) to obtain a pozzolanic behaviour material. The reactivity was studied by: thermogravimetry, X ray diffractometry, aqueous media electrical conductivity measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, mechanical strength development evaluation and cementing effectiveness k-factor evaluation. The very high pozzolanic activity of the material has been demonstrated, besides that this reactivity has been superior to others similar products such as the metakaolin. The products formed in the hydration, pozzolanic and hydration catalysis of cement reactions have been studied, comparing the reactivity characteristics with others better known pozzolans. The nature of the reaction products between FCC and hydrated lime is similar to the ones formed by the metakaolin, being fundamentally calcium silicate hydrates and hydrated gehlenite, and their formation allow to obtain microstructures with higher mechanical strength. The possibility of preparation materials containing cement/FCC with improved mechanical strength and drying shrinkage has been demonstrated, compared to homologous materials without ground FCC. The optimal FCC dosage for the lime fixation maximization has been determined, showing a pozzolanic behaviour similar to metakaolin, nevertheless very superior to others studied pozzolans, behaviour that is improved with the aid of certain chemical activators, and with the increasing of the curing temperature. Measurements of electrical

  20. Asymmetric Catalytic Enantio- and Diastereoselective Boron Conjugate Addition Reactions of α-Functionalized α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Substrates.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian-Bo; Lin, Siqi; Qiao, Shuo; Li, Guigen

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic system has been established for the asymmetric boron conjugate addition of B2pin2 onto α-functionalized (involving C, N, O, and Cl) α,β-unsaturated carbonyls under mild, neutral conditions involving Cu[(S)-(R)-ppfa]Cl, AgNTf2, and alcohols. The dual additives of AgNTf2 and alcohols were found to play crucial roles for achieving high catalytic activity and enantio- and diastereoselectivity (up to 98% ee and 70:1 dr). PMID:27434500

  1. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  2. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  3. Auto-combustion synthesis, Mössbauer study and catalytic properties of copper-manganese ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, N.; Petrova, T.; Tsoncheva, T.; Genova, I.; Koleva, K.; Kovacheva, D.; Mitov, I.

    2016-12-01

    Spinel ferrites with nominal composition Cu 0.5Mn 0.5Fe 2 O 4 and different distribution of the ions are obtained by auto-combustion method. Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, Thermogravimetry-Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and catalytic test in the reaction of methanol decomposition is used for characterization of synthesized materials. The spectral results evidence that the phase composition, microstructure of the synthesized materials and the cation distribution depend on the preparation conditions. Varying the pH of the initial solution microstructure, ferrite crystallite size, cation oxidation state and distribution of ions in the in the spinel structure could be controlled. The catalytic behaviour of ferrites in the reaction of methanol decomposition also depends on the pH of the initial solution. Reduction transformations of mixed ferrites accompanied with the formation of Hägg carbide χ-Fe 5 C 2 were observed by the influence of the reaction medium.

  4. Study on the thermal deactivation of motorcycle catalytic converters by laboratory aging tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chi; Chen, Lu-Yen; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    2010-03-01

    Catalytic converters are used to curb exhaust pollution from motorcycles in Taiwan. A number of factors, including the length of time the converter is used for and driving conditions, affect the catalysts' properties during periods of use. The goal of this study is to resolve the thermal deactivation mechanism of motorcycle catalytic converters. Fresh catalysts were treated under different aging conditions by laboratory-scale aging tests to simulate the operation conditions of motorcycle catalytic converters. The aged catalysts were characterized by analytical techniques in order to provide information for investigating deactivation phenomena. The time-dependent data of specific surface areas were subsequently used to construct kinetics of sintering at the specific temperature. According to the analytical results of the catalysts' properties, the increase in aging temperature causes an increase in pore size of the catalysts and a decrease in the specific surface area. The aged catalysts all exhibited lower performances than the fresh ones. The reduction in catalytic activity is consistent with the reduction in the loss of specific surface area. The finding of catalytic properties' dependence on temperature is consistent with the thermally activated theory. In contrast, the effect of the aging time on the specific surface area was only significant during the initial few hours. The high correlation between specific surface areas measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and predicted by the constructed model verifies that the prediction models can predict the sintering rate reasonably under the aging conditions discussed in this study. As compared to automobile catalytic converters, the differences of structures and aging conditions are made less obvious by the deactivation phenomena of motorcycles. PMID:20426275

  5. Comparison of the catalytic activity for the Suzuki–Miyaura reaction of (η5-Cp)Pd(IPr)Cl with (η3-cinnamyl)Pd(IPr)(Cl) and (η3-1-t-Bu-indenyl)Pd(IPr)(Cl)

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Patrick R; Lant, Hannah M C; Peczak, Ian L; Shah, Hemali P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Complexes of the type (η3-allyl)Pd(L)(Cl) and (η3-indenyl)Pd(L)(Cl) are highly active precatalysts for the Suzuki–Miyaura reaction. Even though allyl and indenyl ligands are similar to cyclopentadienyl (Cp) ligands, there have been no detailed comparative studies exploring the activity of precatalysts of the type (η5-Cp)Pd(L)(Cl) for Suzuki–Miyaura reactions. Here, we compare the catalytic activity of (η5-Cp)Pd(IPr)(Cl) (IPr = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-imidazol-2-ylidene, Cp) with two commercially available catalysts (η3-cinnamyl)Pd(IPr)(Cl) (Cin) and (η3-1-t-Bu-indenyl)Pd(IPr)(Cl) (tBu Ind). We show that Cp gives slightly better catalytic activity than Cin, but significantly inferior activity than tBu Ind. This order of activity is rationalized by comparing the rates at which the precatalysts are activated to the monoligated Pd(0) active species along with the tendency of the starting precatalysts to comproportionate with monoligated Pd(0) to form inactive Pd(I) dimers. As part of this work the Cp supported Pd(I) dimer (μ-Cp)(μ-Cl)Pd2(IPr)2 (Cp Dim) was synthesized and crystallographically characterized. It does not readily disproportionate to form monoligated Pd(0) and consequently Cp Dim is a poor catalyst for the Suzuki–Miyaura reaction. PMID:26732227

  6. Study on catalysis effect of TEPB on the curing reaction of HTPB binder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. J.; Tang, J.; Liu, X.; Yan, W.

    2016-07-01

    The catalysis effect of tri (exhoxyphenyl) bismuthine (TEPB) on the curing reaction of HTPB binder system was studied by using DSC method. The curing peak temperatures of the catalyst systems were measured to calculate kinetic parameters by using Kissinger and Crane methods, respectively. Two curing reaction kinetic equations were established. The results show that TEPB has high catalytic activity and can decrease the curing temperature of HTPB binder system, down to 35 °C, in which the optimum volume of TEPB is 0.5% of HTPB binder system.

  7. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Chunhua; Guan, Jingqi

    2014-05-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH{sub 3}-TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction.

  8. A theoretical study on the reaction of ozone with aqueous iodide.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Óscar; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Sanz, Mikel; Pacios, Luis F

    2016-03-21

    Atmospheric iodine chemistry plays a key role in tropospheric ozone catalytic destruction, new particle formation, and as one of the possible sinks of gaseous polar elemental mercury. Moreover, it has been recently proposed that reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could be the major contributor to the chemical loss of atmospheric ozone. However, the mechanism of the reaction between aqueous iodide and ozone is not well known. The aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of such a mechanism. In this paper, an ab initio study of the reaction of aqueous iodide and ozone is presented, evaluating thermodynamic data of the different reactions proposed in previous experimental studies. In addition, the structures, energetics and possible evolution of the key IOOO(-) intermediate are discussed for the first time. PMID:26906609

  9. [NiFe] hydrogenases: structural and spectroscopic studies of the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2009-10-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of dihydrogen. For this simple reaction the molecule has developed a complex catalytic mechanism, during which the enzyme passes through various redox states. The [NiFe] hydrogenase contains several metal centres, including the bimetallic Ni-Fe active site, iron-sulfur clusters and a Mg(2+) ion. The Ni-Fe active site is located in the inner part of the protein molecule, therefore a number of pathways are involved in the catalytic reaction route. These consist of an electron transfer pathway, a proton transfer pathway and a gas-access channel. Over the last 10-15 years we have been investigating the crystal structures of the [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F, which is a sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacterium. So far the crystal structures of the oxidized, H(2)-reduced and carbon monoxide inhibited states have been determined at high resolution and have revealed a rather unique structure of the hetero-bimetallic Ni-Fe active site. Furthermore, intensive spectroscopic studies have been performed on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structure, a water-soluble Ni-Ru complex has been synthesized as a functional model for the [NiFe] hydrogenases. The present review gives an overview of the catalytic reaction mechanism of the [NiFe] hydrogenases. PMID:19759926

  10. Reversible Alkene Insertion into the Pd–N Bond of Pd(II)-Sulfonamidates and Implications for Catalytic Amidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    White, Paul B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2011-01-01

    Alkene insertion into Pd–N bonds is a key step in Pd-catalyzed oxidative amidation of alkenes. A series of well-defined Pd(II)-sulfonamidate complexes have been prepared and shown to react via insertion of a tethered alkene. The Pd–amidate and resulting Pd–alkyl species have been crystallographically characterized. The alkene insertion reaction is found to be reversible, but complete conversion to oxidative amination products is observed in the presence of O2. Electronic-effect studies reveal that alkene insertion into the Pd–N bond is favored kinetically and thermodynamically with electron-rich amidates. PMID:22007610

  11. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  12. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  13. Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-11-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) is a member of a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (OADH) multienzyme complexes involved in several central points of oxidative metabolism, and the E1 subunit is the most important component in the entire PDHc catalytic system, which catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group from a pyruvate to the lipoyl group of E2 subunit lipoly domain. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of the E1 subunit has been systematically studied using density functional theory (DFT). Four possible pathways with different general acid/base catalysts in decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes were explored. Our calculation results indicate that the 4'-amino pyrimidine of ThDP and residue His128 are the most likely proton donors in the decarboxylation and reductive acylation processes, respectively. During the reaction, each C-C and C-S bond formation or cleavage process, except for the liberation of CO2, is always accompanied by a proton transfer between the substrates and proton donors. The liberation of CO2 is calculated to be the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction, with an energy barrier of 13.57 kcal/mol. The decarboxylation process is endothermic by 5.32 kcal/mol, whereas the reductive acylation process is exothermic with a value of 5.74 kcal/mol. The assignment of protonation states of the surrounding residues can greatly influence the reaction. Residues His128 and His271 play roles in positioning the first substrate pyruvate and second substrate lipoyl group, respectively. PMID:24171427

  14. Theoretical study for pyridinium-based ionic liquid 1-ethylpyridinium trifluoroacetate: synthesis mechanism, electronic structure, and catalytic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xueying; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2011-07-28

    By performing density functional theory calculations, we have studied the synthesis mechanism, electronic structure, and catalytic reactivity of a pyridinium-based ionic liquid, 1-ethylpyridinium trifluoroacetate ([epy](+)[CF(3)COO](-)). It is found that the synthesis of the pyridinium salt follows a S(N)2 mechanism. The electronic structural analyses show that multiple H bonds are generally involved in the pyridinium-based ionic liquid, which may play a decisive role for stabilizing the ionic liquid. The cation-anion interaction mainly involves electron transfer between the lone pair of the oxygen atom in the anion and the antibonding orbital of the C*-H bond (C* denotes the carbon atom at the ortho-position of nitrogen atom in the cation). This present work has also given clearly the catalytic mechanism of [epy](+)[CF(3)COO](-) toward to the Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction of acrylonitrile with 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene. Both the cation and anion are shown to play important roles in promoting the D-A reaction. The cation [epy](+), as a Lewis acid, associates the C≡N group by C≡N···H H bond to increase the polarity of the C═C double bond in acrylonitrile, while the anion CF(3)COO(-) links with the methyl group in 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene by C-H···O H bond, which weakens the electron-donating capability of methyl and thereby lowers the energy barrier of the D-A reaction. The present results are expected to provide valuable information for the design and application of pyridinium-based ionic liquids. PMID:21671599

  15. Computational Study of a Model System of Enzyme-Mediated [4+2] Cycloaddition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reac-tion was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation. PMID:25853669

  16. Influence of sp(3)-sp(2) Carbon Nanodomains on Metal/Support Interaction, Catalyst Durability, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Campos-Roldán, Carlos A; Ramos-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Huerta, Rosa G; Vargas García, Jorge R; Balbuena, Perla B; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, platinum nanoparticles were impregnated by two different techniques, namely the carbonyl chemical route and photodeposition, onto systematically surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The different interactions between platinum nanoparticles with sp(2)-sp(3) carbon nanodomains were investigated. The oxidation of an adsorbed monolayer of carbon monoxide, used to probe electronic catalytic modification, suggests a selective nucleation of platinum nanoparticles onto sp(2) carbon nanodomains when photodeposition synthesis is carried out. XPS attests the catalytic center electronic modification obtained by photodeposition. DFT calculations were used to determine the interaction energy of a Pt cluster with sp(2) and sp(3) carbon surfaces as well as with oxidized ones. The interaction energy and electronic structure of the platinum cluster presents dramatic changes as a function of the support surface chemistry, which also modifies its catalytic properties evaluated by the interaction with CO. The interaction energy was calculated to be 8-fold higher on sp(3) and oxidized surfaces in comparison to sp(2) domains. Accelerated Stability Test (AST) was applied only on the electronic-modified materials to evaluate the active phase degradation and their activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The stability of photodeposited materials is correlated with the surface chemical nature of supports indicating that platinum nanoparticles supported onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the highest sp(2) character show the higher stability and activity toward ORR. PMID:27494283

  17. Determination of the pozzolanic activity of fluid catalytic cracking residue. Thermogravimetric analysis studies on FC3R-lime pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, J.; Monzo, J.; Borrachero, M.V.; Velazquez, S.; Bonilla, M

    2003-07-01

    Spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FC3R) from a petrol refinery played a pozzolanic role in portland cement system as revealed by previous experimental data. In the present study, the pozzolanic activity of FC3R was investigated by means thermogravimetry (TG) of cured lime-FC3R pastes. The influence of pozzolan/lime ratio on the pozzolanic activity was investigated. Due to the chemical composition of FC3R is similar to metakaolin (MK), and knowing that MK has a high pozzolanic activity, the latter was used as a material of comparison in this study. The scope of the study is the determination of the pozzolanic activity of FC3R and the evaluation of amount and nature of pozzolanic products. The products obtained from the reaction between FC3R components (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (CH) have been characterized, finding that the main pozzolanic reaction product was similar to hydrated gehlenite (calcium aluminosilicate hydrate) CSH and CAH were also formed in the reaction. FC3R showed higher pozzolanic reactivity than metakaolin, for low-lime content pastes and early curing age. Thermogravimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) became very useful techniques for evaluation of reactivity.

  18. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, A.M.

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  19. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  20. Spectrophotometric evaluation of surface morphology dependent catalytic activity of biosynthesized silver and gold nanoparticles using UV-vis spectra: A comparative kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad; Kamble, Vaishali; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Santra, Chittaranjan

    2016-03-01

    The development of eco-friendly and cost-effective synthetic protocol for the preparation of nanomaterials, especially metal nanoparticles is an emerging area of research in nanotechnology. These metal nanoparticles, especially silver can play a crucial role in various catalytic reactions. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles described here was very stable up to 6 months and can be further exploited as an effective catalyst in the chemical reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. The silver nanoparticles were utilized as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate using Rhodamine 6G as Raman probe molecule. We have also carried out systematic comparative studies on the catalytic efficiency of both silver and gold nanoparticles using UV-vis spectra to monitor the above reaction spectrophotometrically. We find that the reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics and the catalytic activity can be explained by a simple model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for heterogeneous catalysis. We also find that silver nanoparticles are more efficient as a catalyst compare to gold nanoparticles in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, which can be explained by the morphology of the nanoparticles as determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  1. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  2. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni. PMID:25688830

  3. Kinetic study of carbon dioxide reaction with tertiary amines in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, D.; Tondre, C.; Lappai, G.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1981-11-26

    Reaction kinetics of CO/sub 2/ with triethanolamine (TEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) in aqueous solution have been studied by using a stopped-flow technique with pH detection. Rate constants are obtained from the comparison of experimental and theoretical curves giving the optical density as a function of time. At concentrations of CO/sub 2/ well below the saturation limit, the results are consistent with the hydration reactions of the CO/sub 2/ molecules either with neutral water molecules or with hydroxide ions, depending upon the pH, itself governed by the ionization equilibrium of the dissolved amine. Moreover, a specific (catalytic) reaction, first order with respect to both carbon dioxide and amine (rate constant, 2.85 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at 25/sup 0/C), has been shown to contribute significantly to the reaction rate in the case of the first amine (TEA) only.

  4. Pits confined in ultrathin cerium(IV) oxide for studying catalytic centers in carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Qinghua; Gao, Shan; Cheng, Hao; Lei, Fengcai; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Su, Haibin; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Finding ideal material models for studying the role of catalytic active sites remains a great challenge. Here we propose pits confined in an atomically thin sheet as a platform to evaluate carbon monoxide catalytic oxidation at various sites. The artificial three-atomic-layer thin cerium(IV) oxide sheet with approximately 20% pits occupancy possesses abundant pit-surrounding cerium sites having average coordination numbers of 4.6 as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Density-functional calculations disclose that the four- and five-fold coordinated pit-surrounding cerium sites assume their respective role in carbon monoxide adsorption and oxygen activation, which lowers the activation barrier and avoids catalytic poisoning. Moreover, the presence of coordination-unsaturated cerium sites increases the carrier density and facilitates carbon monoxide diffusion along the two-dimensional conducting channels of surface pits. The atomically thin sheet with surface-confined pits exhibits lower apparent activation energy than the bulk material (61.7 versus 122.9 kJ mol-1), leading to reduced conversion temperature and enhanced carbon monoxide catalytic ability.

  5. Exploring reaction pathways for O-GlcNAc transferase catalysis. A string method study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Manju; Kozmon, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Štepán, Jakub; Tvaroška, Igor; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-03-26

    The inverting O-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase (OGT) is an important post-translation enzyme, which catalyzes the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to the hydroxyl group of the Ser/Thr of cytoplasmic, nuclear, and mitochondrial proteins. In the past, three different catalytic bases were proposed for the reaction: His498, α-phosphate, and Asp554. In this study, we used hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics to investigate reaction paths using α-phosphate and Asp554 as the catalytic bases. The string method was used to calculate the free-energy reaction profiles of the tested mechanisms. During the investigations, an additional mechanism was observed. In this mechanism, a proton is transferred to α-phosphate via a water molecule. Our calculations show that the mechanism with α-phosphate acting as the base is favorable. This reaction has a rate-limiting free-energy barrier of 23.5 kcal/mol, whereas reactions utilizing Asp554 and water-assisted α-phosphate have barriers of 41.7 and 40.9 kcal/mol, respectively. Our simulations provide a new insight into the catalysis of OGT and may thus guide rational drug design of transition-state analogue inhibitors with potential therapeutic use. PMID:25731954

  6. A new metallate phase of V2O5 crystalline microstructure achieved in a facile route: synthesis, characterization, and measurement in catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Ji-Xiao; Xing, Na; Ma, Xi-Tong; Feng, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Yong-Heng; Shi, Zhan

    2015-01-15

    Experiencing a series of complicated changes, abundant orange crystals of novel metallic phase of vanadium pentoxide were obtained by a mild chemical method, the formula of which is defined as [V3(μ3-O)2⋅(μ1-OH)⋅O5]⋅H2O. Differ from the synthesis methods of vanadium oxide published, we have adopted a simple solution method that mixed starting materials are refluxing in the system of ethanol-water under a relatively lower temperature. Symmetry of the crystals is Monoclinic, with cell unit dimensions: a=4.9978(10)Å, b=8.4273(17)Å, c=7.8669(16)Å, β=96.44(3)° and space group of P2₁/m. The structure of the complex was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy and single-crystal diffraction analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) was used to detect the purity of the crystals, and crystal morphology was detected by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, in order to extend application of oxidovanadium complexes, bromination catalytic activity about the complex in a single-pot reaction of the conversion of phenol red to bromophenol blue in a mixed solution of H2O-DMF at a constant temperature of 30±0.5 °C with a buffer solution of NaH2PO4Na2HPO4 (pH=5.8) was evaluated firstly, indicating that the complex can be considered as a potential functional model of bromoperoxidase, in the meantime, we have conducted the bromination catalytic reaction to simulate and measure the changes in reaction process indirectly. Besides, catalytic oxidation activity of the complex is also evaluated in the oxidation of cyclohexane (Cy) and cyclopentane with hydrogen peroxide promoted under mild conditions, showing potential catalytic activity of the complex by comparing TON (total turnover number) ratios of CyO/CyOH (CyO is the abbreviation of cyclohexanone and CyOH represents cyclohexanol) in the oxidation results. PMID:25454434

  7. A General Catalytic Enantioselective Transfer Hydrogenation Reaction of β,β-Disubstituted Nitroalkenes Promoted by a Simple Organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Luca; Fochi, Mariafrancesca

    2016-01-01

    Given its synthetic relevance, the catalytic enantioselective reduction of β,β-disubstituted nitroalkenes has received a great deal of attention. Several bio-, metal-, and organo-catalytic methods have been developed, which however are usually applicable to single classes of nitroalkene substrates. In this paper, we present an account of our previous work on this transformation, which implemented with new disclosures and mechanistic insights results in a very general protocol for nitroalkene reductions. The proposed methodology is characterized by (i) a remarkably broad scope encompassing various nitroalkene classes; (ii) Hantzsch esters as convenient (on a preparative scale) hydrogen surrogates; (iii) a simple and commercially available thiourea as catalyst; (iv) user-friendly procedures. Overall, the proposed protocol gives a practical dimension to the catalytic enantioselective reduction of β,β-disubstituted nitroalkenes, offering a useful and general platform for the preparation of nitroalkanes bearing a stereogenic center at the β-position in a highly enantioenriched form. A transition state model derived from control kinetic experiments combined with literature data is proposed and discussed. This model accounts and justifies the observed experimental results. PMID:27483233

  8. Self-assembly growth of alloyed NiPt nanocrystals with holothuria-like shape for oxygen evolution reaction with enhanced catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Tao; Wang, Wenliang; Zhou, Xiaoli; Zhang, Li; Wang, Chunde; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Weilai; Yang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly growth of alloyed NiPt nanocrystals with holothuria-like wire shape has been achieved via a facile and moderate hydrothermal process at 120 °C for 1 h from the reaction of nickel nitrate and chloroplatinic acid in alkaline solution in the presence of ethanediamine and hydrazine hydrate. The holothuria-like alloyed NiPt wires are Ni-rich in composition (Ni23.6Pt) and uniform in diameter with many tiny tips outstretched from the wires surface. The holothuria-like wires are assembled from granular subunits with the assistance of capping molecular of ethanediamine and the wires display an improved oxygen evolution reaction catalytic activity.

  9. Catalytic remediation of 2-propanol on Pt-Mn/γ-Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst during catalytic combustion--experimental study and response surface methodology (RSM) modeling.

    PubMed

    Salari, Dariush; Niaei, Aligholi; Aghazadeh, Faezeh; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Seyednajafi, Fardin

    2012-01-01

    Process and composition variables of catalytic oxidation of 2-propanol on Pt-Mn/γ-Al(2)O(3) bimetallic catalysts were optimized and modeled by response surface methodology (RSM). 31 factorial experiments were designed by setting four factors at five levels: X (1) = amount of manganese loading (wt.% Mn = 1, 3, 5, 7, 9); X (2) = reaction temperature (25, 50, 75, 100, 125°C); X (3) = calcination temperature (200, 300, 400, 500, 600°C) and X (4) = calcination time (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 h). A second-order polynomial model and response surface were developed for 2-propanol conversion. The optimum conditions for 2-propanol complete conversion were 4.8wt.% manganese loading, 4h calcination time with 75°C and 395°C for reaction and calcination temperatures, respectively. A good correlation was found between experimental and predicted responses, confirming the reliability of the model. PMID:22320686

  10. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of vanadium(V) based on its catalytic effect on the reaction of DBM-arsenazo and potassium bromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-zhou; Zhang, Xiao-xia; Huang, Chong

    2008-03-01

    A simple and sensitive kinetic-spectrophotometric method is developed for the determination of trace vanadium(V), based on the catalytic effect of vanadium(V) on the oxidation of DBM-arsenazo by potassium bromate in 0.0138 mol l -1 phosphoric acid medium and at 100 °C in the presence of citric acid as activator. The absorbance is measured at 528 nm with the fixed-time method. The optimization of the operating conditions regarding concentrations of the reagents, temperature and interferences are also investigated. The working curve is linear over the concentration range 0-20 ng ml -1 of vanadium(V) with good precision and accuracy and the detection limit was down to 3.44 ng l -1. The relative standard deviation for a standard solution of 14 ng ml -1 is 0.28% ( n = 11). The apparent activity energies of the catalytic reaction and the non-catalytic reaction are 73.48, 113.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The proposed method proved highly sensitive, selective and relatively rapid for the assay of vanadium at low-level range of 0-20 ng ml -1 without any pre-concentration step. Thw method was applied to the determination of vanadium(V) in steels, rice, flour, cabbage, potato, fish, shrimp and tea samples with satisfactory results. The obtained results for the steel samples were excellent agreement with the standard reference values. The analytical results of the rice, flour, cabbage, potato, fish, shrimp and tea samples were excellent agreement with those of atomic absorption spectrometry. The recovery experiments have been made for the rice, flour, cabbage, potato, fish, shrimp and tea samples except the steels; excellent results were obtained. The relative standard deviations were over the range of 0.18-2.60% and the recoveries were over the range of 98.00-102.4%, respectively. The analytical results obtained were satisfactory.

  11. Complexation, thermal and catalytic studies of N-substituted piperazine, morpholine and thiomorpholine with some metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacan, Mesut; Turkyilmaz, Murat; Karabulut, Ferhat; Altun, Ozlen; Baran, Yakup

    2014-01-01

    Several Cu(II), Pt(II) and Ni(II) complexes of N-substituted, piperazine (NN donor), morpholine (NO donor) and thiomorpholine (NS donor) derivatives were synthesized and their thermal behavior and catalytic activity in epoxidation reaction of cis-diphenylethylene were studied using oxygen sources NaOCl. The coordination compounds of Cu(II), Pt(II) and Ni(II) having general formula [MLCl]Cl, [ML2l]Cl2 or [ML]Cl2 with tetra coordinated geometry around metal ions have been isolated as solid. All the ligands and complexes were identified by spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis, magnetic measurements, electrical conductance and thermal analysis. A square planer structures have been proposed for all complexes. The thermal stability of the complexes discussed in terms of ligands donor atoms, geometry and central metal ions. The complexes have a similar thermal behavior for the selected metal ions. The thermogravimetric analyses suggest high thermal stability for most complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps. The decomposition processes were observed as water elimination, chloride anion removal and degradation of the organic ligands. Catalytic ability of the complexes were examined and found that all the complexes can effectively catalyze the epoxidation of cis-stilbene with NaOCl.

  12. A novel green one-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles using chitosan: catalytic activity and antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesham, Maragoni; Ayodhya, Dasari; Madhusudhan, Alle; Veera Babu, Nagati; Veerabhadram, Guttena

    2014-01-01

    Stable silver nanoparticles were synthesized using chitosan acting as both reducing and stabilizing agent without using any toxic chemicals. This reaction was carried out in an autoclave at a pressure of 15 psi and 120 °C temperature by varying the time. The influence of different parameters such as time, change of concentration of silver nitrate and concentration of chitosan on the formation of silver nanoparticles were studied. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results of catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles were presented. The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles was tested against Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus and was found to be possessing inhibiting property.

  13. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  14. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  15. Operando magnetic resonance: monitoring the evolution of conversion and product distribution during the heterogeneous catalytic ethene oligomerisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Tegan; Renshaw, Matthew P; Lutecki, Michal; McGregor, James; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2013-11-18

    Operando magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy has been used to follow an ethene oligomerisation reaction performed at 110 °C, 28 barg over a 1 wt% Ni/SiO2-Al2O3 catalyst. Spectra acquired over the timecourse of the reaction allow the calculation of conversion and product distribution as a function of time-on-stream. PMID:24088715

  16. Small-Pore Molecular Sieves SAPO-34 with Chabazite Structure: Theoretical Study of Silicon Incorporation and Interrelated Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lewis, James; Liu, Zhongmin

    2011-03-01

    The catalytic conversion of methonal to olefin (MTO) has attracted attention both in industrial and academic fields. Strong evidence shows that small-pore molecular sieves with certain amount silicon incorporated (SAPO) present promising high catalytic activity in MTO conversion. Using DFT, we study the structural and electronic properties of chabazite SAPO-34. Although there are extensively experimental results show that silicon incorporation does not change the overall structure as the original AlPO structure, local structural changes are still created by silicon substitution, which probably accounted for the high catalytic activity. It is noted that the catalytic activity of SAPO-34 presents increasing trend along with the silicon incorporation amount increasing and maintain a flat peak even with more silicon incorporated. Hence, there is an optimal silicon incorporation amount which possibly yields the highest catalytic MTO conversion.

  17. Surface coordination number and surface redox couples on catalyst oxides, a new approach of the interpretation of activity and selectivity III. Interpretation of chemical and catalytic oxidation reactions on some oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Y. P.

    The concepts of surface coordination number n, and of surface redox couples MO [ n] /MO ( n+1) presented previously, are exploited to explain experimental results. Two cases are considered: reactions of chemical gaseous species such as CO, CO 2, H 2, H 2O,N 2O, propene and methanol on the surface of the oxides NiO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3, in the absence of oxygen: activated catalytic reactions of oxygen on reductive species such as CO, H 2,C 2H 6, and CH 3OH. The knowledge of the potential of surface redox couples permits a rationalization of the study of these reactions. The efficiency of the two concepts is obvious in many cases. For example, the origin of an athermal oxidative process occurring for the oxidations of CO or H 2 on TiO 2 is easily understood, as well as those of the poisoning of the catalysts or of the inactivity of a surface saturated by oxygen. In addition, the study of chemical reactions on the oxides confirms and completes the theoretical approach used. Particularly, the existence of the surface states, which are postulated in the case of Cr 2O 3, is corroborated by experimental observations concerning the number of surface states and the value of the chemical potentials. Even though the theory is based upon thermodynamical and structural data, it also leads to a better understanding of kinetic features.

  18. Ab initio study for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin.

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Harrison, Robert J; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are investigated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE pyrolysis through comparison of the reaction barriers with reliable experimental values. We used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. We recomputed selected energy barriers at the B3LYP geometries with the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment and the corresponding CCSD energy barriers. The flat potential energy surface around the saddle points causes numerical inaccuracies. We observe the break down of the harmonic approximation in the calculation of low frequencies.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and photo catalytic studies of the composites by tantalum oxide and zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennakesavulu, K.; Reddy, M. Madhusudhana; Reddy, G. Ramanjaneya; Rabel, A. M.; Brijitta, J.; Vinita, V.; Sasipraba, T.; Sreeramulu, J.

    2015-07-01

    In-situ synthesis of ZnO:Ta2O5 composites in basic medium by using tantalum chloride and zinc chloride as precursors. The prepared composites were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), confocal Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectrophotometer (DRS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, N2-sorption isotherms, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM/EDS). The composite materials were used as photocatalyst in the degradation Rhodamine-B (RhB) dye under visible light irradiation. The catalytic activity and removal percentage of the dye was determined by the spectrophotometric method. This indicates the percentage of degradation was more for the ZnO:Ta2O5 composites. The kinetic parameter obeys pseudo-first order reaction. It may be due to fixed amount the catalysts and concentration of dye solution. The catalytic activity of the recycled ZnO:Ta2O5 catalyst was compared with fresh catalyst.

  20. Asymmetric catalytic transformations in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shaoguang; Tumas, W.; Gross, M.F.; Burk, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Supercritical carbon dioxide can be a useful environmentally benign solvent for a wide range of catalytic reactions. We have been exploring the utility of supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction medium for catalytic asymmetric transformations. We will present results on the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins, ketones, and unsaturated acids by Rh and Ru catalysts containing chiral phosphine ligands using hydrogen or hydrogen transfer agents. We have found that asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation reactions of enamide esters work as well or better in CO{sub 2} than in conventional solvents. We have been able to effect high conversions and ee`s using hydrogen transfer systems such as HCOOH/NEt{sub 3}, We will discuss temperature, pressure and solvent density effects on selectivity and reactivity. Kinetic studies will also be presented in order to understand the enhanced enantioselectivity that we observed in SC CO{sub 2}.

  1. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  2. Ruthenium(II) hydrazone Schiff base complexes: Synthesis, spectral study and catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, R.; Viswanathamurthi, P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    Ruthenium(II) hydrazone Schiff base complexes of the type [RuCl(CO)(B)(L)] (were B = PPh 3, AsPh 3 or Py; L = hydrazone Schiff base ligands) were synthesized from the reactions of hydrazone Schiff base ligand (obtained from isonicotinoylhydrazide and different hydroxy aldehydes) with [RuHCl(CO)(EPh 3) 2(B)] (where E = P or As; B = PPh 3, AsPh 3 or Py) in 1:1 molar ratio. All the new complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C and 31P NMR) data. They have been tentatively assigned an octahedral structure. The synthesized complexes have exhibited catalytic activity for oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone in the presence of N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMO) as co-oxidant. They were also found to catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of aliphatic and aromatic ketones to alcohols in KOH/Isopropanol.

  3. Catalytic behavior of `Pt-atomic chain encapsulated gold nanotube': A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    With an aim to design novel material and explore its catalytic performance towards CO oxidation, Pt atomic chain was introduced inside gold nanotube (Au-NT). Theoretical calculations at the level of first principles formalism was carried out to investigate the atomic and electronic properties of the composite. Geometrically Pt atoms prefer to align in zig-zag fashion. Significant electronic charge transfer from inside Pt atoms to the outer wall Au atoms is observed. Interaction of O2 with Au-NT wall follows by injection of additional electronic charge in the anti-bonding orbital of oxygen molecule leading to activation of the O-O bond. Further interaction of CO molecule with the activated oxygen molecule leads to spontaneous oxidation reaction and formation of CO2.

  4. Activation of Aryl Halides by Nickel(I) Pincer Complexes: Reaction Pathways of Stoichiometric and Catalytic Dehalogenations.

    PubMed

    Rettenmeier, Christoph A; Wenz, Jan; Wadepohl, Hubert; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-08-15

    Homolytic C-X bond cleavage of organohalides by the T-shaped nickel(I) complexes [LigNi(I)] 1 bearing the iso-PyrrMeBox ligand had been found previously to be the crucial activation step in the asymmetric hydrodehalogenation of geminal dihalides. Here, this mechanistic investigation is extended to aryl halides, which allowed a systematic study of the activation process by a combination of experimental data and density functional theory modeling. While the activation of both aryl chlorides and geminal dichlorides appears to proceed via an analogous transition state, the generation of a highly stabile nickel(II)aryl species in the reaction of the aryl chlorides for the former represents a major difference in the reactive behavior. This difference was found to have a crucial impact on the activity of these nickel pincer systems as catalysts in the dehalogenation of aryl chlorides compared to geminal dichlorides and highlights the importance of the regulatory pathways controlling the nickel(I) concentration throughout the catalysis. These results along with the identification and characterization of novel nickel(II)aryl species are presented. PMID:27483018

  5. Treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation: comparative study over CuO/CeO2 and NiO/Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Ersöz, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2012-12-30

    The treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was studied in a bubble reactor. The experiments were performed to investigate the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, reaction time, air flow rate, and pressure on aniline removal. The catalytic effects of the prepared nanostructured catalysts, CuO/CeO(2) (10% wt) and NiO/Al(2)O(3) (10% wt), on the CWAO treatment efficiency were also examined and compared. The prepared catalysts seem to be active having an aniline removal of 45.7% with CuO/CeO(2) and 41.9% with NiO/Al(2)O(3). The amount of N(2) formed was approximately the same for both of the catalysts. PMID:23041516

  6. Catalytic Enantioselective Ring-Opening and Ring-Closing Reactions of 3-Isothiocyanato Oxindoles and N-(2-Picolinoyl)aziridines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqing; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Dan; Wang, Rui

    2015-06-19

    3-Isothiocyanato oxindoles have been successfully applied to an asymmetric formal [3 + 3] cycloaddition reaction with aziridines for the first time. The reaction was efficiently mediated by an in situ generated magnesium catalyst employing (R)-3,3'-fluorous-BINOL as a simple chiral ligand. Serials of polycyclic frameworks could be obtained after a ring-closing step. The enantioenriched ring-opening product was also utilized to modified amino acids, peptides, and bifunctional organocatalyst. PMID:26030403

  7. Construction of Vicinal Tetrasubstituted Stereocenters with a C-F Bond through a Catalytic Enantioselective Detrifluoroacetylative Mannich Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xihong; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhao, Long; Ma, Shixiong; Yang, Dongxu; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2015-12-18

    An efficient asymmetric detrifluoroacetylative Mannich reaction of 2-fluoro-1,3-diketones/hydrates with isatin-derived ketimines catalyzed by a chiral copper(II)-diamine complex has been realized. The reaction afforded a series of 3-substituted 3-amino-2-oxindoles bearing fluorine-containing vicinal tetrasubstituted stereocenters in high yields (up to 99%) with excellent diastereoselectivities (up to >20:1 dr) and enantioselectivities (up to 94% ee). PMID:26574779

  8. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic - oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria

  9. The influence of nano-architectured CeOx supports in RhPd/CeO₂ for the catalytic ethanol steam reforming reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Divins, N. J.; Senanayake, S. D.; Casanovas, A.; Xu, W.; Trovarelli, A.; Llorca, J.

    2015-01-19

    The ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction has been tested over RhPd supported on polycrystalline ceria in comparison to structured supports composed of nanoshaped CeO₂ cubes and CeO₂ rods tailored towards the production of hydrogen. At 650-700 K the hydrogen yield follows the trend RhPd/CeO₂-cubes > RhPd/CeO₂ -rods > RhPd/CeO₂- polycrystalline, whereas at temperatures higher than 800 K the catalytic performance of all samples is similar and close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The improved performance of RhPd/CeO₂-cubes and RhPd/CeO₂ -rods for ESR at low temperature is mainly ascribed to higher water-gas shift activity and a strong interaction between the bimetallic -more » oxide support interaction. STEM analysis shows the existence of RhPd alloyed nanoparticles in all samples, with no apparent relationship between ESR performance and RhPd particle size. X-ray diffraction under operating conditions shows metal reorganization on {100} and {110} ceria crystallographic planes during catalyst activation and ESR, but not on {111} ceria crystallographic planes. The RhPd reconstructing and tuned activation over ceria nanocubes and nanorods is considered the main reason for better catalytic activity with respect to conventional catalysts based on polycrystalline ceria« less

  10. A study of switchgrass pyrolysis: Product variability and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovee, Jonathan Matthew

    Samples of the same cultivar of cave-in-rock switchgrass were harvested from plots in Frankenmuth, Roger City, Cass County, and Grand Valley, Michigan. It was determined that variation exists, between locations, among the pyrolytic compounds which can lead to variability in bio-oil and increased processing costs at bio-refineries to make hydrocarbon fuels. Washed and extractives-free switchgrass samples, which contain a lower alkali and alkaline earth metals content than untreated samples, were shown to produce lower amounts of acids, esters, furans, ketones, phenolics, and saccharides and also larger amounts of aldehydes upon pyrolysis. Although the minerals catalyzed pyrolytic reactions, there was no evidence indicating their effect on reducing the production of anhydrosugars, specifically levoglucosan. To further link minerals present in the biomass to a catalytic pathway, mathematic models were employed to determine the kinetic parameters of the switchgrass. While the calculated activation energies of switchgrass, using the FWO and KAS methods, were 227.7 and 217.8 kJ/mol, correspondingly, it was concluded that the activation energies for the switchgrass hemicellulose and cellulose peaks were 115.5 and 158.2 kJ/mol, respectively, using a modified model-fitting method. The minerals that effect the production of small molecules and levoglucosan also have an observable catalytic effect on switchgrass reaction rate, which may be quantifiable through the use of reaction kinetics so as to determine activation energy.

  11. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes. PMID:11286559

  12. Green synthesis of Pd/CuO nanoparticles by Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and phosphine-free Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad; Rostami-Vartooni, Akbar; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-06-15

    We report the green synthesis of palladium/CuO nanoparticles (Pd/CuO NPs) using Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions. The catalyst was characterized using the powder XRD, TEM, EDS, UV-vis and FT-IR. This method has the advantages of high yields, elimination of surfactant, ligand and homogeneous catalysts, simple methodology and easy work up. The catalyst can be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused several times without any significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25721860

  13. Size-dependent catalytic kinetics and dynamics of Pd nanocubes: a single-particle study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Zhang, Yuwei; Xu, Weilin

    2016-08-10

    Due to the well-known significant effect of the size on the catalytic activity of nanocatalysts, here we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the size-dependent catalytic kinetics and dynamics of individual Pd nanocubes. A series of size-dependent catalytic properties were revealed in both product formation and product desorption processes. It was found that, due to the different adsorption mechanisms of substrate molecules on Pd nanocubes, H2 adsorption is independent of the size of Pd nanocubes, while the large flat resazurin molecules show stronger adsorption on larger sized Pd nanocubes. Apparently, the Pd nanocubes can be divided into three types: when the size of the Pd nanocube is small, substrate binding can prohibit product desorption and product desorption prefers the direct pathway; when the size is in an appropriate range, the product desorption process could be independent of substrate binding and shows no selectivity between two parallel desorption pathways; if the size is large enough, substrate binding can promote product desorption and product desorption prefers the indirect pathway. We also observed the surface-restructuring-induced dynamic heterogeneity of individual Pd nanocubes in both product formation and desorption processes with timescales of about tens to one hundred seconds. The activity fluctuation of individual Pd nanocubes was found to be mainly due to the spontaneous surface-restructuring rather than the catalysis. Furthermore, we estimated the size-dependent activation energies and time scales of spontaneous dynamic surface restructuring, which are fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis. The work presented here reveals new insight into nanocatalysis and exemplifies the advantages of the single-molecule approach in probing the catalytic properties of nanocatalysts. PMID:27465438

  14. Experimental study of an integral catalytic combustor: Heat exchanger for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using catalytic combustion with heat removal for the Stirling engine to reduce exhaust emissions and also improve heat transfer to the working fluid was studied using spaced parallel plates. An internally air-cooled heat exchanger was placed between two noble metal catalytic plates. A preheated fuel-air mixture passed between the plates and reacted on the surface of the catalyzed plates. Heat was removed from the catalytic surface by radiation and convection to the aircooled heat exchangers to control temperature and minimize thermal nitrogen oxide emissions. Test conditions were inlet combustion air temperatures from 850 to 900 K, inlet velocities of about 10 m/s, equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 0.9, and pressures from 1.3x10 to the 5th power to 2.0x10 to the 5th power Pa. Propane fuel was used for all testing. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were measured. Nitrogen oxide emissions ranged from 1.7 to 3.3 g NO2/kg fuel. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and indicate that further investigation of the concept is warranted.

  15. Studies on the catalytic behaviour of a cholinesterase-like abzyme in an AOT microemulsion system.

    PubMed

    Franqueville, Eric; Stamatis, Haralambos; Loutrari, Heleni; Friboulet, Alain; Kolisis, Fragiskos

    2002-08-01

    The hydrolytic activity of a monoclonal catalytic antibody (9A8) (abzyme) with acetylcholinesterase-like activity was investigated in water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions (reverse micelles) based on sodium bis-2-(ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane, using p- and o-nitrophenylacetate (p-and o-NPA) as substrates. The dependence of the abzyme hydrolytic activity on the molar ratio of water to surfactant (w(o)) showed a bell-shaped curve, presenting a maximum at w(o)=11.1. An increase of the AOT concentration at constant w(o), resulted in a decrease of the catalytic activity suggesting a possible inhibition effect of the surfactant. The incorporation of the abzyme into the reverse micelle system caused a blue shift of the fluorescence emission maximum by a magnitude of 7-10 nm depending on the w(o) value. This result indicates that the antibody molecule, or a large part of it, is located in the aqueous microphase of the system. Kinetic studies showed that the hydrolysis of p-and o-NPA in microemulsion system as well as in aqueous solution follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) in w/o microemulsion was significant lower than in aqueous solution. PMID:12067523

  16. Reactions catalyzed by 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylases from Escherichia coli and Gallus gallus: a case for divergent catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Firestine, S M; Poon, S W; Mueller, E J; Stubbe, J; Davisson, V J

    1994-10-01

    A comparative investigation of the substrate requirements for the enzyme 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) carboxylase from E. coli and G. gallus has been conducted using in vivo and in vitro studies. In Escherichia coli, two enzymes PurK and PurE are required for the transformation of AIR to 4-carboxy-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (CAIR). The Gallus gallus PurCE is a bifunctional enzyme containing AIR carboxylase and 4-[(N-succinylamino)carbonyl]-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (SAICAR) synthetase. The E. coli PurE and the C-terminal domain of the G. gallus PurCE protein maintain a significant degree of amino acid sequence identity and also share CAIR as a product of their enzymatic activities. The substrate requirements of AIR carboxylases from E. coli and G. gallus have been compared by a series of in vitro experiments. The carbamic acid, N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (N5-CAIR) is a substrate for the E. coli PurE (Mueller et al., 1994) but not for the G. gallus AIR carboxylase. In contrast, AIR and CO2 are substrates for the G. gallus AIR carboxylase. The recognition properties of the two proteins were also compared using inhibition studies with 4-nitro-5- aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (NAIR). NAIR is a tight-binding inhibitor of the G. gallus AIR carboxylase (K(i) = 0.34 nM) but only a steady-state inhibitor (K(i) = 0.5 microM) of the E. coli PurE. These data suggest significant differences in the transition states for the reactions catalyzed by these two evolutionarily related enzymes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7918411

  17. N-Methylphthalimide-substituted benzimidazolium salts and PEPPSI Pd-NHC complexes: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Akkoç, Senem; Gök, Yetkin; İlhan, İlhan Özer; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel benzimidazolium salts (1-4) and their pyridine enhanced precatalyst preparation stabilization and initiation (PEPPSI) themed palladium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes [PdCl2(NHC)(Py)] (5-8), where NHC = 1-(N-methylphthalimide)-3-alkylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene and Py = 3-chloropyridine, were synthesized and characterized by means of (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} NMR, UV-vis (for 5-8), ESI-FTICR-MS (for 2, 4, 6-8) and FTIR spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were tested in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling (for 1-8) and arylation (for 5-8) reactions. As catalysts, they demonstrated a highly efficient route for the formation of asymmetric biaryl compounds even though they were used in very low loading. For example, all compounds displayed good catalytic activity for the C-C bond formation of 4-tert-butylphenylboronic acid with 4-chlorotoluene. PMID:26877810

  18. Green synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of the Pd/TiO2 nanoparticles for the ligand-free Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    A green synthesis process was developed for production of the Pd/TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) without using toxic, hazardous and dangerous materials. Myrtus communis L. leaf extract serves as a mild, renewable and non-toxic reducing agent. The advantages of this biosynthesis method include use of cheap, clean, nontoxic and environmentally benign precursors and simple procedures without time-consuming polymerization and problems with treatment of a highly viscous polymeric resin. More importantly, the synthesized Pd/TiO2 NPs presented excellent catalytic activity for ligand-free Suzuki-Miyaura coupling which could be easily separated from the reaction mixture and reused many times with no loss of activity. Therefore, these properties indicate demonstrative benefits of the catalyst. The Pd/TiO2 NPs was characterized by FESEM, TEM, FT-IR, UV-vis spectroscopy and EDS. PMID:26674227

  19. N-Methylphthalimide-substituted benzimidazolium salts and PEPPSI Pd–NHC complexes: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity in carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Gök, Yetkin; İlhan, İlhan Özer

    2016-01-01

    Summary A series of novel benzimidazolium salts (1–4) and their pyridine enhanced precatalyst preparation stabilization and initiation (PEPPSI) themed palladium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes [PdCl2(NHC)(Py)] (5–8), where NHC = 1-(N-methylphthalimide)-3-alkylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene and Py = 3-chloropyridine, were synthesized and characterized by means of 1H and 13C{1H} NMR, UV–vis (for 5–8), ESI-FTICR-MS (for 2, 4, 6–8) and FTIR spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were tested in Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling (for 1–8) and arylation (for 5–8) reactions. As catalysts, they demonstrated a highly efficient route for the formation of asymmetric biaryl compounds even though they were used in very low loading. For example, all compounds displayed good catalytic activity for the C–C bond formation of 4-tert-butylphenylboronic acid with 4-chlorotoluene. PMID:26877810

  20. NH3-SCR performance of fresh and hydrothermally aged Fe-ZSM-5 in standard and fast selective catalytic reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Fudong; Xie, Lijuan; Shan, Wenpo; He, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Hydrothermal stability is one of the challenges for the practical application of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 (NH(3)-SCR) for diesel engines. The presence of NO(3) in the exhaust gases can enhance the deNOx activity because of the fast SCR reaction. In this work, a Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst was prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method and was hydrothermally deactivated at 800 °C in the presence of 10% H(2)O. The activity of fresh and hydrothermal aged Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts was investigated in standard SCR (NO(2)/NOx = 0) and in fast SCR with NO(2)/NOx = 0.3 and 0.5. In standard SCR, hydrothermal aging of Fe-ZSM-5 resulted in a significant decrease of low-temperature activity and a slight increase in high-temperature activity. In fast SCR, NOx conversion over aged Fe-ZSM-5 was significantly increased but was still lower than that over fresh catalyst. Additionally, production of N(2)O in fast SCR was much more apparent over aged Fe-ZSM-5 than over fresh catalyst. We propose that, in fast SCR, the rate of key reactions related to NO is slower over aged Fe-ZSM-5 than over fresh catalyst, thus increasing the probabilities of side reactions involving the formation of N(2)O. PMID:23477804

  1. New Insight into the Catalytic Mechanism of Bacterial MraY from Enzyme Kinetics and Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Rodrigues, João P G L M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Zaal, Esther A; Berkers, Celia R; Heger, Michal; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Swiezewska, Ewa; Breukink, Eefjan; Egmond, Maarten R

    2016-07-15

    Phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase (MraY) catalyzes the synthesis of Lipid I, a bacterial peptidoglycan precursor. As such, MraY is essential for bacterial survival and therefore is an ideal target for developing novel antibiotics. However, the understanding of its catalytic mechanism, despite the recently determined crystal structure, remains limited. In the present study, the kinetic properties of Bacillus subtilis MraY (BsMraY) were investigated by fluorescence enhancement using dansylated UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide and heptaprenyl phosphate (C35-P, short-chain homolog of undecaprenyl phosphate, the endogenous substrate of MraY) as second substrate. Varying the concentrations of both of these substrates and fitting the kinetics data to two-substrate models showed that the concomitant binding of both UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide-DNS and C35-P to the enzyme is required before the release of the two products, Lipid I and UMP. We built a model of BsMraY and performed docking studies with the substrate C35-P to further deepen our understanding of how MraY accommodates this lipid substrate. Based on these modeling studies, a novel catalytic role was put forward for a fully conserved histidine residue in MraY (His-289 in BsMraY), which has been experimentally confirmed to be essential for MraY activity. Using the current model of BsMraY, we propose that a small conformational change is necessary to relocate the His-289 residue, such that the translocase reaction can proceed via a nucleophilic attack of the phosphate moiety of C35-P on bound UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. PMID:27226570

  2. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  3. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; Jansen, A P J

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature. PMID:23406093

  4. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  5. Catalytic Asymmetric Reactions of 4‐Substituted Indoles with Nitroethene: A Direct Entry to Ergot Alkaloid Structures

    PubMed Central

    Romanini, Simone; Galletti, Emilio; Caruana, Lorenzo; Mazzanti, Andrea; Himo, Fahmi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A domino Friedel–Crafts/nitro‐Michael reaction between 4‐substituted indoles and nitroethene is presented. The reaction is catalyzed by BINOL‐derived phosphoric acid catalysts, and delivers the corresponding 3,4‐ring‐fused indoles with very good results in terms of yields and diastereo‐ and enantioselectivities. The tricyclic benzo[cd]indole products bear a nitro group at the right position to serve as precursors of ergot alkaloids, as demonstrated by the formal synthesis of 6,7‐secoagroclavine from one of the adducts. DFT calculations suggest that the outcome of the reaction stems from the preferential evolution of a key nitronic acid intermediate through a nucleophilic addition pathway, rather than to the expected “quenching” through protonation. PMID:26486074

  6. Eco-friendly green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using salmalia malabarica: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial, and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali Krishna, I.; Bhagavanth Reddy, G.; Veerabhadram, G.; Madhusudhan, A.

    2016-06-01

    An economically viable and "green" process has been developed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with an average size of 7 nm using non-toxic and renewable salmalia malabarica gum (SMG) as reducing and capping agent without using any chemical reducing agent. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of SMG and silver nitrate and reaction time for the synthesis of AgNPs was studied. The synthesized AgNPs are systematically characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The resultant SMG-capped AgNPs are highly stable and had significant antibacterial action on both Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus). The catalytic action of the SMG-capped AgNPs to initiate the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4 has also been reported. The kinetics of the reaction was found to be of pseudo-first-order with respect to the 4-NP.

  7. Eco-friendly green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using salmalia malabarica: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial, and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali Krishna, I.; Bhagavanth Reddy, G.; Veerabhadram, G.; Madhusudhan, A.

    2015-07-01

    An economically viable and "green" process has been developed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with an average size of 7 nm using non-toxic and renewable salmalia malabarica gum (SMG) as reducing and capping agent without using any chemical reducing agent. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of SMG and silver nitrate and reaction time for the synthesis of AgNPs was studied. The synthesized AgNPs are systematically characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The resultant SMG-capped AgNPs are highly stable and had significant antibacterial action on both Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The catalytic action of the SMG-capped AgNPs to initiate the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4 has also been reported. The kinetics of the reaction was found to be of pseudo-first-order with respect to the 4-NP.

  8. Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and the study on their catalytic activity in NOx reduction and 1-pentanol dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is

    2016-03-01

    Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and their catalytic activity was studied. Activated natural zeolite from Indonesia was utilized for the preparation and catalytic activity test on NOx reduction by NH3 and also 1-pentanol dehydration were examined. Physicochemical characterization of materials was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, scanning electron microscope, solid acidity determination and also gas sorption analysis. The results confirmed that the preparation gives some improvements on physicochemical characters suitable for catalysis mechanism in those reactions. Solid acidity and specific surface area contributed significantly to the activity.

  9. Density functional studies of representative pericyclic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John E.; Sosa, Carlos P.

    1994-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has traditionally been shunned by computational chemists, but has long seen widespread use in the physics community. Recently, however, DFT has been adopted by the ab initio quantum chemistry community and much activity has been devoted to refining the methodology and exploring the range of its applicability. We investigate the use of DFT (both local (LDF) and non-local (NLDF) spin density approximations) to calculate transition and equilibrium structures for three representative pericyclic reactions: the electrocyclic ring opening reaction of cyclobutene, the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift reaction in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene, and the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction between ethylene and butadiene. LDF theory tends to overemphasize the stability of the ringed structures in each of these reactions. For example, LDF predicts a very low (6 kcal mol -1) barrier to reaction for the Deils-Alder reaction. NLDF theory substantially improves the calculated reaction barrier (20 kcal mol -1), but it is still low with respect to experiment.

  10. Ab initio study of the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C; Harrison, Robert J; Hathorn, Bryan C

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the reaction barriers and rate constants for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are calculated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. Thermolysis of PPE occurs by a free radical chain mechanism in which the product selectivity arises from competitive hydrogen abstraction at the benzylic and nonbenzylic methylen sites by chain carrying benzyl and phenoxyl radicals. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE through comparison of the rate constants and the reaction enthalpies with reliable experimental values. In this study, we used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment. Absolute and relative rate constants were calculated using transition state theory. We found that the relative rate constant using the B3LYP functional agrees within a factor of 2.0 with experiment at the experimental temperature of 333 K, indicating that the B3LYP functional will be successful in predicting relative rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions participating in the pyrolysis of PPE.

  11. Cross-hetero-dehydrogenative coupling reaction of phosphites: a catalytic metal-free phosphorylation of amines and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhineshkumar, Jayaraman; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2013-12-01

    Phosphorylation of amines, alcohols, and sulfoximines are accomplished using molecular iodine as a catalyst and H2O2 as the sole oxidant under mild reaction conditions. This method provides an easy route for synthesizing a variety of phosphoramidates, phosphorus triesters and sulfoximine-derived phosphoramidates which are of biological importance. PMID:24219013

  12. Stereoselective Synthesis of Highly Functionalized α-Diazo-β-ketoalkanoates via Catalytic Onepot Mukaiyama-Aldol Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Doyle, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Methyl diazoacetoacetate undergoes zinc triflate catalyzed condensation with a broad selection of aldehydes to produce δ-siloxy-α-diazo-β-ketoalkanoates in good yield, and δ-hydroxy-α-diazo-β-ketoalkanoates are formed with high diastereoselectivity in reactions with α-diazo-β-ketopentanoate promoted by dibutylboron triflate. PMID:20102172

  13. Metal Bromide Controlled Interfacial Aromatization Reaction for Shape-Selective Synthesis of Palladium Nanostructures with Efficient Catalytic Performances.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Soumen; Ray, Chaiti; Roy, Anindita; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-07-11

    Herein, the effect of diverse metal bromides for the shape evolution of palladium nanostructures (Pd NS) has been demonstrated. Aromaticity-driven reduction of bromopalladate(II) is optimized to reproducibly obtain different Pd NS at the water/organic layer interface. In this soft interfacial strategy, a redox potential driven reaction has been performed, forming the thermodynamically more stable (>10(4) -fold) PdBr4 (2-) precursor from PdCl4 (2-) by adding extra metal bromides. In the process, the reductant, Hantzsch dihydropyridine ester (DHPE), is aromatized. Interestingly, alkali metal bromides devoid of coordination propensity exclusively evolve Pd nanowires (Pd NWs), whereas in the case of transition metal bromides the metal ions engage the 'N' donor of DHPE at the interface, making the redox reaction sluggish. Hence, controlled Pd nanoparticles growth is observed, which evolves Pd broccolis (Pd NBRs) and Pd nanorods (Pd NRs) at the interface in the presence of NiBr2 and CuBr2 , respectively, in the aqueous solution. Thus, the effect of diverse metal bromides in the reaction mixture for tailor-made growth of the various Pd NS is reported. Among the as-synthesized materials, the Pd NWs stand to be superior catalysts and their efficiency is almost 6 and 2.5 times higher than commercial 20 % Pd/C in the electrooxidation of ethanol and Cr(VI) reduction reaction by formic acid, respectively. PMID:27294801

  14. Bimolecular Pyrolysis Reactions Studied by Chirped-Pulse Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozument, Kirill; Vasiliou, Angayle K.; Shaver, Rachel G.; Park, G. Barratt; Muenter, John S.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney; Field, Robert W.

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of using Chirped-Pulse Millimeter-Wave (CPmmW) spectroscopy for studies of pyrolysis reactions is demonstrated. The molecules under investigation were mixed with a source of H-atoms (methyl nitrite) and put through a heated silicon carbide micro-reactor (2 cm x 1 mm). More efficient paths of thermal cracking of (i) acetaldehyde and (ii) acetone are demonstrated when using, as a catalyst, the free H-atoms released from methyl nitrite compared to cracking of neat acetaldehyde or acetone. CPmmW spectra of (i) formaldehyde and (ii) acetaldehyde were observed, suggesting that the following bimolecular reactions took place in the micro-reactor: i) CH_3CHO + H → CH_3 + CH_2O ii) CH_3COCH_3 + H → CH_3 + CH_3CHO. The vibrational population distributions (VPDs) of the formaldehyde and acetaldehyde products of the pyrolysis reactions are measured using the broad bandwidth capability of the CPmmW technique. Although we found that the VPDs of the molecules convey little information about the pyrolysis reaction transition state(s), they provide insight to the vibrational collisional cooling mechanisms in different molecules. The relevance of the observed catalytic reactions to biomass decomposition is discussed and other bimolecular pyrolysis reactions are proposed for study by CPmmW spectroscopy. KP thanks the Petroleum Research Fund for support of this work.

  15. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  16. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  17. Composite polymer/oxide hollow fiber contactors: versatile and scalable flow reactors for heterogeneous catalytic reactions in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Eric G; Negretti, Solymar; Chepiga, Kathryn M; Brunelli, Nicholas A; Labreche, Ying; Feng, Yan; Rezaei, Fateme; Lively, Ryan P; Koros, William J; Davies, Huw M L; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-05-26

    Flexible composite polymer/oxide hollow fibers are used as flow reactors for heterogeneously catalyzed reactions in organic synthesis. The fiber synthesis allows for a variety of supported catalysts to be embedded in the walls of the fibers, thus leading to a diverse set of reactions that can be catalyzed in flow. Additionally, the fiber synthesis is scalable (e.g. several reactor beds containing many fibers in a module may be used) and thus they could potentially be used for the large-scale production of organic compounds. Incorporating heterogeneous catalysts in the walls of the fibers presents an alternative to a traditional packed-bed reactor and avoids large pressure drops, which is a crucial challenge when employing microreactors. PMID:25865826

  18. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1986-11-15

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. Progress in the period November 16, 1985 to November 15, 1986 is reviewed in the following areas: (1) Recoil atom reaction studies. (2) Reactions of thermally generated free atoms.

  19. Pincer-Type Complexes for Catalytic (De)Hydrogenation and Transfer (De)Hydrogenation Reactions: Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Svenja; Neumann, Jacob; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-08-24

    Pincer complexes are becoming increasingly important for organometallic chemistry and organic synthesis. Since numerous applications for such catalysts have been developed in recent decades, this Minireview covers progress in their use as catalysts for (de)hydrogenation and transfer (de)hydrogenation reactions during the last four years. Aside from noble-metal-based pincer complexes, the corresponding base metal complexes are also highlighted and their applications summarized. PMID:26179375

  20. Study of Single Catalytic Events at Copper-in-Charcoal: Localization of Click Activity Through Subdiffraction Observation of Single Catalytic Events.

    PubMed

    Decan, Matthew R; Scaiano, Juan C

    2015-10-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy reveals that copper-in-charcoal--a high performance click catalyst- has remarkably few catalytic sites, with 90% of the charcoal particles being inactive, and for the catalytic ones the active sites represent a minute fraction (∼0.003%) of the surface. The intermittent nature of the catalytic events enables subdiffraction resolution and mapping of the catalytic sites. PMID:26722775

  1. Studies of photoredox reactions on nanosize semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Parsapour, F.; Kelley, D.F.

    1997-08-01

    Light induced electron transfer (ET) from nanosize semiconductors of MoS{sub 2} to organic electron acceptors such as 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) and methyl substituted 4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-tetramethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine (tmb) was studied by static and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The kinetics of ET were varied by changing the nanocluster size (the band gap), the electron acceptor, and the polarity of the solvent. MoS{sub 2} is an especially interesting semiconductor material as it is an indirect semiconductor in bulk form, and has a layered covalent bonding arrangement which is highly resistant to photocorrosion. Et occurs following photoexcitation of the direct band gap. Quantum confinement results in the smaller nanoclusters having higher conduction band energies, and therefore larger ET driving forces. The ET reaction energies may be varied by changing the electron acceptor, by varying the size of the MoS{sub 2} nanocluster or by varying the polarity of the solvent. In addition, varying the polarity of the solvent affects the reorganization energy and the barrier to electron transfer. TMB is harder to reduce, and thus has a smaller ET driving force than bpy. The solvent polarity is varied by varying the composition of acetonitrile/benzene mixed solvents.

  2. Rare isotope studies involving catalytic oxidation of CO over platinum-tin oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M., Jr.; Hess, Robert V.; Hoyt, Ronald F.

    1987-01-01

    Results of studies utilizing normal and rare oxygen isotopes in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over a platinum-tin oxide catalyst substrate are presented. Chemisorption of labeled carbon monoxide on the catalyst followed by thermal desorption yielded a carbon dioxide product with an oxygen-18 composition consistent with the formation of a carbonate-like intermediate in the chemisorption process. The efficacy of a method developed for the oxygen-18 labeling of the platinum-tin oxide catalyst surface for use in closed cycle pulsed care isotope carbon dioxide lasers is demonstrated for the equivalent of 10 to the 6th power pulses at 10 pulses per second.

  3. Characteristics of vestibulosensory reactions studied by experimental caloric test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranov, V. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibulo-sensory reactions were studied in 135 workers who were in contact with nitroethers, by the method of an experimental caloric test. The response vestibulo-sensory reactions were recorded by means of an electroencephalograph. The changes in the sensory reaction depended on the duration of the workers' contact with toxic agents. A study of illusion reactions by the labyrinth calorization widens diagnostic possibilities in the examination of functional condition of the vestibular analyser considerably.

  4. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  5. Scaling up of continuous-flow, microwave-assisted, organic reactions by varying the size of Pd-functionalized catalytic monoliths

    PubMed Central

    He, Ping; Fletcher, Paul D I; Kelly, Stephen M; Mansfield, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Summary A product-scalable, catalytically mediated flow system has been developed to perform Suzuki–Miyaura reactions under a microwave heating regime, in which the volumetric throughput of a Pd-supported silica monolith can be used to increase the quantity of the product without changing the optimal operating conditions. Two silica monoliths (both 3 cm long), with comparable pore diameters and surface areas, were fabricated with diameters of 3.2 and 6.4 mm to give volumetric capacities of 0.205 and 0.790 mL, respectively. The two monoliths were functionalized with a loading of 4.5 wt % Pd and then sealed in heat-shrinkable Teflon® tubing to form a monolithic flow reactor. The Pd-supported silica monolith flow reactor was then placed into the microwave cavity and connected to an HPLC pump and a backpressure regulator to minimize the formation of gas bubbles. The flow rate and microwave power were varied to optimize the reactant contact time and temperature, respectively. Under optimal reaction conditions the quantity of product could be increased from 31 mg per hour to 340 mg per hour simply by changing the volumetric capacity of the monolith. PMID:21915220

  6. Properties of zinc oxide films grown on sapphire substrates using high-temperature H{sub 2}O generated by a catalytic reaction on platinum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Kanji Takeuchi, Tomohiko; Nagatomi, Eichi; Satomoto, Souichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Kato, Takahiro; Konya, Takayuki

    2014-03-15

    The authors investigated the characteristics of ZnO films grown on a-plane (11-20) sapphire substrates at 773–873 K using a reaction between dimethylzinc and high-temperature H{sub 2}O generated by a catalytic reaction on Pt nanoparticles. The growth rate was 0.02–0.07 μm min{sup −1}. The largest electron mobility and the smallest residual carrier concentration for the ZnO films were 169 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 1.6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns for the ZnO films exhibited intense (0002) and (0004) peaks associated with ZnO (0001) planes. The minimum full width at half maximum of the ω-rocking curve for ZnO (0002) was less than 0.1°. In a ZnO film with a high electron mobility, no rotational domains were identified using a ZnO (10-10) ϕ scan. From secondary ion mass spectroscopy, a hydrogen concentration of 3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} and a boron concentration of 2–5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} were determined. These were identified as extrinsic donor impurities.

  7. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co2+ ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc.

  8. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co2+ ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc. PMID:27255562

  9. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co(2+) ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc. PMID:27255562

  10. Effects of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of ZnO films grown by catalytic reaction-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Kanji Morioka, Makoto; Kanauchi, Shingo; Ohashi, Yuki; Kato, Takahiro; Tamayama, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-15

    The influence of N{sub 2}O gas addition on the properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) films grown on a-plane (11–20) sapphire (a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates was investigated, using a chemical vapor deposition method based on the reaction between dimethylzinc and high-temperature H{sub 2}O produced by a catalytic H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction on platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. The addition of N{sub 2}O was found to increase the size of the crystalline facets and to improve the crystal orientation along the c-axis. The electron mobility at 290 K was also increased to 234 cm{sup 2}/Vs following the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.2 × 10{sup −3 }Pa. In addition, the minimum full width at half maximum of the most intense photoluminescence peak derived from neutral donor bound excitons at 10 K decreased to 0.6 meV by the addition of N{sub 2}O gas at a pressure of 3.1 × 10{sup −2 }Pa.

  11. Photoemission and reaction study of mass-selected Pt clusters on TiO2(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2008-03-01

    Metal cluster has been speculated to have strong size dependence in catalytic activity. The clusters on surfaces would give further specificity because of the interaction between the clusters and the surface. Catalytic properties of mass-selected metal clusters on well-defined oxide surfaces have been investigated using the new ultra high vacuum cluster deposition apparatus. In this study, we have examined catalytic and electronic properties of platinum clusters used as a composition of automotive exhaust catalysts, and used titanium dioxide as the support. Pt cluster ions were produced by a DC magnetron-sputter cluster ion source [1] with an ion funnel [2], mass-selected by a quadrupole mass filter, and then deposited on TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces. The catalytic oxidation of CO on Ptn/TiO2 (n<10) was investigated using the high-pressure reaction cell with quartz linings, which was connected to the external recirculation loop with a stainless steel bellows pump. The catalytic activity was suggested to be dependent on the size (n) of Ptn clusters. It was expected to be due to the electronic properties of the clusters. The size specificity will be discussed with the results of photoemission spectroscopy. [1] H. Haberland et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 3266 (1992). [2] S.A. Shaffer el al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 11, 1813 (1997).

  12. Kinetic Study of the Heck Reaction: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Christel; Bouzidi, Naoual

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study and calculate the kinetic constant of a Heck reaction: the arylation of but-3-en-2-ol by iodobenzene catalyzed by palladium acetate in presence of triethylamine in DMF. The reaction leads to a mixture of two ketones. Students use GC analysis to quantify reagents and products of reaction. They control the…

  13. Staff Reactions to Challenging Behaviour: An Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video…

  14. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  15. Soot Reaction Properties (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three major soot reaction processes are needed to predict soot properties in flame environments: soot growth, or the formation of soot on soot nuclei and soot particles; soot oxidation, or the reaction of soot with oxidizing species to yield the combustion products of soot oxidation; and soot nucleation, or the formation of soot nuclei from soot precursors having large molecular weights (generally thought to be large and particularly stable PAH molecules in flame environments, called stabilomers). These processes are addressed in the following, considering soot growth, oxidation and nucleation, in turn, by exploiting the soot and flame structure results for premixed and diffusion flames already discussed in Section 2.

  16. Study of the kinetics of catalytic decomposition of hydrazine vapors on palladium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khomenko, A. A.; Apelbaum, L. O.

    1987-01-01

    The decomposition rates of N2H4 on a palladium surface are studied. Experiments were conducted in a circulating unit at atmosphere pressure. The experimental method is described. The laws found for the reaction kinetics are explained by equations.

  17. In situ DRIFTS studies on MnOx nanowires supported by activated semi-coke for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Mi, Liang; Wang, Xidong

    2016-03-01

    To mitigate the threat of NOx on the environment, MnOx nanowires were fabricated on activated semi-coke (MnOx NW/ASC) for the first time. The prepared MnOx NW/ASC was used for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3, which achieved an efficiency of over 90% with a low loading content of 1.64 wt% at 150-210 °C. This high performance could be ascribed to synergistic effect between MnOx and ASC. Specifically, the large specific surface area and reducible property of ASC facilitated the dispersion of MnOx and the formation of Mn3+, respectively. Meanwhile, MnOx nanowires provided more redox sites and lattice oxygen species due to the coexistence of Mn3+ and Mn4+, which accelerated the catalytic cycle. The in situ DRIFTS studies revealed that ASC was conducive to the adsorption of NO and NH3. Most importantly, the existence of Mn3+ favored the formation of amide species and the subsequent reduction reaction. Furthermore, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) route between coordinated NH3 and bidentate nitrate was predominating in the SCR process and responsible for the high catalytic activity at low temperature.

  18. Effect of Sb Segregation on Conductance and Catalytic Activity at Pt/Sb-Doped SnO2 Interface: A Synergetic Computational and Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Colmenares Rausseo, Luis César; Martinez, Umberto; Dahl, Paul Inge; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Vullum, Per Erik; Svenum, Ingeborg-Helene; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-12-23

    Antimony-doped tin dioxide (ATO) is considered a promising support material for Pt-based fuel cell cathodes, displaying enhanced stability over carbon-based supports. In this work, the effect of Sb segregation on the conductance and catalytic activity at Pt/ATO interface was investigated through a combined computational and experimental study. It was found that Sb-dopant atoms prefer to segregate toward the ATO/Pt interface. The deposited Pt catalysts, interestingly, not only promote Sb segregation, but also suppress the occurrence of Sb(3+) species, a charge carrier neutralizer at the interface. The conductivity of ATO was found to increase, to a magnitude close to that of activated carbon, with an increment of Sb concentration before reaching a saturation point around 10%, and then decrease, indicating that Sb enrichment at the ATO surface may not always favor an increment of the electric current. In addition, the calculation results show that the presence of Sb dopants in ATO has little effect on the catalytic activity of deposited three-layer Pt toward the oxygen reduction reaction, although subsequent alloying of Pt and Sb could lower the corresponding catalytic activity. These findings help to support future applications of ATO/Pt-based materials as possible cathodes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications with enhanced durability under practical applications. PMID:26615834

  19. Studies on the catalytic domains of multiple JmjC oxygenases using peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sophie T; Walport, Louise J; Hopkinson, Richard J; Madden, Sarah K; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schofield, Christopher J; Kawamura, Akane

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC-domain-containing 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases catalyze protein hydroxylation and Nε-methyllysine demethylation via hydroxylation. A subgroup of this family, the JmjC lysine demethylases (JmjC KDMs) are involved in histone modifications at multiple sites. There are conflicting reports as to the substrate selectivity of some JmjC oxygenases with respect to KDM activities. In this study, a panel of modified histone H3 peptides was tested for demethylation against 15 human JmjC-domain-containing proteins. The results largely confirmed known Nε-methyllysine substrates. However, the purified KDM4 catalytic domains showed greater substrate promiscuity than previously reported (i.e., KDM4A was observed to catalyze demethylation at H3K27 as well as H3K9/K36). Crystallographic analyses revealed that the Nε-methyllysine of an H3K27me3 peptide binds similarly to Nε-methyllysines of H3K9me3/H3K36me3 with KDM4A. A subgroup of JmjC proteins known to catalyze hydroxylation did not display demethylation activity. Overall, the results reveal that the catalytic domains of the KDM4 enzymes may be less selective than previously identified. They also draw a distinction between the Nε-methyllysine demethylation and hydroxylation activities within the JmjC subfamily. These results will be of use to those working on functional studies of the JmjC enzymes. PMID:25625844

  20. Paramagnetic intermediates in reactions of the components of catalytic systems of the Ziegler type. Reactions of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with diethylaluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasov, Ya.A.; Ismailov, E.G.; Medzhidov, A.A.

    1988-04-01

    The intermediate paramagnetic particles, i.e., radical particles, complexes of Ni(I), and Ni/sub n/(O) aggregates, formed as a result of the reaction of azo and azomethine complexes of Ni(II) with Et/sub 2/AlCl in solvent media (toluene, THF, heptane) have been identified with the aid of ESR. The possibility of the stabilization of reactive intermediate complexes of Ni(I) by organophosphorus ligands (DPPE and TPP) has been demonstrated, and the magnetic-resonance parameters of their adducts have been determined. It has been postulated that the formation of radical particles occurs as a result of the coordination of the nitrogen atoms of the azo or azomethine ligands by the organoaluminum compound followed by splitting of the -N=N or -CH=N bonds.

  1. B-Methylated Amine-Boranes: Substituent Redistribution, Catalytic Dehydrogenation, and Facile Metal-Free Hydrogen Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Naomi E; Schäfer, André; Robertson, Alasdair P M; Leitao, Erin M; Jurca, Titel; Sparkes, Hazel A; Woodall, Christopher H; Haddow, Mairi F; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    Although the dehydrogenation chemistry of amine-boranes substituted at nitrogen has attracted considerable attention, much less is known about the reactivity of their B-substituted analogues. When the B-methylated amine-borane adducts, RR'NH·BH2Me (1a: R = R' = H; 1b: R = Me, R' = H; 1c: R = R' = Me; 1d: R = R' = iPr), were heated to 70 °C in solution (THF or toluene), redistribution reactions were observed involving the apparent scrambling of the methyl and hydrogen substituents on boron to afford a mixture of the species RR'NH·BH3-xMex (x = 0-3). These reactions were postulated to arise via amine-borane dissociation followed by the reversible formation of diborane intermediates and adduct reformation. Dehydrocoupling of 1a-1d with Rh(I), Ir(III), and Ni(0) precatalysts in THF at 20 °C resulted in an array of products, including aminoborane RR'N═BHMe, cyclic diborazane [RR'N-BHMe]2, and borazine [RN-BMe]3 based on analysis by in situ (11)B NMR spectroscopy, with peak assignments further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Significantly, very rapid, metal-free hydrogen transfer between 1a and the monomeric aminoborane, iPr2N═BH2, to yield iPr2NH·BH3 (together with dehydrogenation products derived from 1a) was complete within only 10 min at 20 °C in THF, substantially faster than for the N-substituted analogue MeNH2·BH3. DFT calculations revealed that the hydrogen transfer proceeded via a concerted mechanism through a cyclic six-membered transition state analogous to that previously reported for the reaction of the N-dimethyl species Me2NH·BH3 and iPr2N═BH2. However, as a result of the presence of an electron donating methyl substituent on boron rather than on nitrogen, the process was more thermodynamically favorable and the activation energy barrier was reduced. PMID:26535961

  2. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  3. Ultrathin Coating of Confined Pt Nanocatalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition for Enhanced Catalytic Performance in Hydrogenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meihua; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Huimin; Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Ge, Huibin; Zhang, Jiankang; Qin, Yong

    2016-06-13

    Metal-support interfaces play a prominent role in heterogeneous catalysis. However, tailoring the metal-support interfaces to realize full utilization remains a major challenge. In this work, we propose a graceful strategy to maximize the metal-oxide interfaces by coating confined nanoparticles with an ultrathin oxide layer. This is achieved by sequential deposition of ultrathin Al2 O3 coats, Pt, and a thick Al2 O3 layer on carbon nanocoils templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), followed by removal of the templates. Compared with the Pt catalysts confined in Al2 O3 nanotubes without the ultrathin coats, the ultrathin coated samples have larger Pt-Al2 O3 interfaces. The maximized interfaces significantly improve the activity and the protecting Al2 O3 nanotubes retain the stability for hydrogenation reactions of 4-nitrophenol. We believe that applying ALD ultrathin coats on confined catalysts is a promising way to achieve enhanced performance for other catalysts. PMID:27061428

  4. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  5. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NITRIC OXIDE (NO)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-12-31

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. The authors have investigated the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. The silanation approach failed to stabilize Cu-ZSM-5 activity under hydrothermal condition. Silanation blocked the oxygen migration and inhibited oxygen desorption. Oxygen spillover was found to be an effective approach for promoting NO decomposition activity on Pt-based catalysts. Detailed mechanistic study revealed the oxygen inhibition in NO decomposition and reduction as the most critical issue in developing an effective catalytic approach for controlling NO emission.

  6. [Performance Study of Bromochloracetonitrile Degradation in Drinking Water by Fe/Cu Catalytic Reduction].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Ma, Hai-long; Fu, Yang-ping; Zhao, Shi-du; Li, Dong-bing

    2015-06-01

    The paper used the method of iron copper catalyst reduction to degrade low concentrations of bromochloracetonitrile (BCAN) to lighten the damage to human being, which is a kind of disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced during the chlorination process of drinking water. The removal efficiency of BCAN and its influencing factors were investigated. The mechanism of degradation and kinetics were also explored. The results indicated that iron copper had a greater degradation ability towards BCAN, and the degradation rate of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) was 1.5 times that of the zero-valent iron. The removal of BCAN increased obviously with the increase of Fe/Cu dosage. When the initial concentration was set at 20 microg x L(-1), after a reaction time of 150 min, removal of BCAN was improved from 51.1% to 89.5% with the increase of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) dosage from 5 g x L(-1) to 10 g x L(-1). The temperature also had great impact on BCAN removal and the removal increased with the increase of temperature. However, BCAN removal did not change a lot with the variation of the initial concentration of BCAN when it was at a low level. The BCAN degradation by iron copper catalytic-reduction followed the first-order kinetics model. PMID:26387315

  7. Biochemical and Structural Studies of 6-Carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin Synthase Reveal the Molecular Basis of Catalytic Promiscuity within the Tunnel-fold Superfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Zachary D.; Roberts, Sue A.; McCarty, Reid M.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2014-01-01

    6-Pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) homologs in both mammals and bacteria catalyze distinct reactions using the same 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate substrate. The mammalian enzyme converts 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate to 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin, whereas the bacterial enzyme catalyzes the formation of 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin. To understand the basis for the differential activities we determined the crystal structure of a bacterial PTPS homolog in the presence and absence of various ligands. Comparison to mammalian structures revealed that although the active sites are nearly structurally identical, the bacterial enzyme houses a His/Asp dyad that is absent from the mammalian protein. Steady state and time-resolved kinetic analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the bacterial homolog revealed that these residues are responsible for the catalytic divergence. This study demonstrates how small variations in the active site can lead to the emergence of new functions in existing protein folds. PMID:24990950

  8. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.; Pearson, J.

    2006-11-01

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O(α,p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  9. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  10. Theoretical study of chemical reactions in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yokogawa, D.

    2015-12-31

    Quantum chemical calculations in solution are becoming more and more important in chemistry. Reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) is one of the powerful approaches to perform quantum chemical calculations in solution. In this work, we developed a new generation of RISM-SCF, where a robust fitting method was newly introduced. We applied the new method to tautomerization reaction of cytosine in aqueous phase. Our calculation reproduced experimentally obtained relative stabilities and relative free energies correctly.

  11. Realistic multisite lattice-gas modeling and KMC simulation of catalytic surface reactions: Kinetics and multiscale spatial behavior for CO-oxidation on metal (1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2013-12-01

    A realistic molecular-level description of catalytic reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces can be provided by stochastic multisite lattice-gas (msLG) models. This approach has general applicability, although in this report, we will focus on the example of CO-oxidation on the unreconstructed fcc metal (1 0 0) or M(1 0 0) surfaces of common catalyst metals M = Pd, Rh, Pt and Ir (i.e., avoiding regimes where Pt and Ir reconstruct). These models can capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorbed layers for the individual reactants species, such as CO/M(1 0 0) and O/M(1 0 0), as well as the interaction and reaction between different reactant species in mixed adlayers, such as (CO + O)/M(1 0 0). The msLG models allow population of any of hollow, bridge, and top sites. This enables a more flexible and realistic description of adsorption and adlayer ordering, as well as of reaction configurations and configuration-dependent barriers. Adspecies adsorption and interaction energies, as well as barriers for various processes, constitute key model input. The choice of these energies is guided by experimental observations, as well as by extensive Density Functional Theory analysis. Model behavior is assessed via Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation. We also address the simulation challenges and theoretical ramifications associated with very rapid diffusion and local equilibration of reactant adspecies such as CO. These msLG models are applied to describe adsorption, ordering, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) for individual CO/M(1 0 0) and O/M(1 0 0) reactant adlayers. In addition, they are also applied to predict mixed (CO + O)/M(1 0 0) adlayer structure on the nanoscale, the complete bifurcation diagram for reactive steady-states under continuous flow conditions, temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectra, and titration reactions for the CO-oxidation reaction. Extensive and reasonably successful comparison of model predictions is made with experimental

  12. Realistic multisite lattice-gas modeling and KMC simulation of catalytic surface reactions: Kinetics and multiscale spatial behavior for CO-oxidation on metal (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dajiang; Evans, James W.

    2013-12-01

    A realistic molecular-level description of catalytic reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces can be provided by stochastic multisite lattice-gas (msLG) models. This approach has general applicability, although in this report, we will focus on the example of CO-oxidation on the unreconstructed fcc metal (100) or M(100) surfaces of common catalyst metals M = Pd, Rh, Pt and Ir (i.e., avoiding regimes where Pt and Ir reconstruct). These models can capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorbed layers for the individual reactants species, such as CO/M(100) and O/M(100), as well as the interaction and reaction between different reactant species in mixed adlayers, such as (CO + O)/M(100). The msLG models allow population of any of hollow, bridge, and top sites. This enables a more flexible and realistic description of adsorption and adlayer ordering, as well as of reaction configurations and configuration-dependent barriers. Adspecies adsorption and interaction energies, as well as barriers for various processes, constitute key model input. The choice of these energies is guided by experimental observations, as well as by extensive Density Functional Theory analysis. Model behavior is assessed via Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation. We also address the simulation challenges and theoretical ramifications associated with very rapid diffusion and local equilibration of reactant adspecies such as CO. These msLG models are applied to describe adsorption, ordering, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) for individual CO/M(100) and O/M(100) reactant adlayers. In addition, they are also applied to predict mixed (CO + O)/M(100) adlayer structure on the nanoscale, the complete bifurcation diagram for reactive steady-states under continuous flow conditions, temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectra, and titration reactions for the CO-oxidation reaction. Extensive and reasonably successful comparison of model predictions is made with experimental data. Furthermore

  13. Model studies on the first enzyme-catalyzed Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Kłossowski, Szymon; Wiraszka, Barbara; Berłożecki, Stanisław; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2013-02-01

    Multicomponent reactions are powerful tools for organic chemistry, and among them, the Ugi reaction provides remarkable improvement in many fields of organic chemistry such us combinatorial chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and peptide chemistry. A new, enzyme-catalyzed example of the Ugi three-component reaction is presented. The studies include the selection of an enzyme as well as determination of the scope and limitations of the newly described reaction. The presented method combines the enzyme promiscuity and multicomponent reaction advantages in the first one-pot formation of dipeptide 1. PMID:23343100

  14. Modeling study on the cleavage step of the self-splicing reaction in group I introns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlik, R. F.; Garduno-Juarez, R.; Manchester, J. I.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron is used to further explore the catalytic mechanism of the transphosphorylation reaction of the cleavage step. Based on the coordinates of the catalytic core model proposed by Michel and Westhof (Michel, F., Westhof, E. J. Mol. Biol. 216, 585-610 (1990)), we first converted their ligation step model into a model of the cleavage step by the substitution of several bases and the removal of helix P9. Next, an attempt to place a trigonal bipyramidal transition state model in the active site revealed that this modified model for the cleavage step could not accommodate the transition state due to insufficient space. A lowering of P1 helix relative to surrounding helices provided the additional space required. Simultaneously, it provided a better starting geometry to model the molecular contacts proposed by Pyle et al. (Pyle, A. M., Murphy, F. L., Cech, T. R. Nature 358, 123-128. (1992)), based on mutational studies involving the J8/7 segment. Two hydrated Mg2+ complexes were placed in the active site of the ribozyme model, using the crystal structure of the functionally similar Klenow fragment (Beese, L.S., Steitz, T.A. EMBO J. 10, 25-33 (1991)) as a guide. The presence of two metal ions in the active site of the intron differs from previous models, which incorporate one metal ion in the catalytic site to fulfill the postulated roles of Mg2+ in catalysis. The reaction profile is simulated based on a trigonal bipyramidal transition state, and the role of the hydrated Mg2+ complexes in catalysis is further explored using molecular orbital calculations.

  15. Three-dimensional FeSe2 microflowers assembled by nanosheets: Synthesis, optical properties, and catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiaoying; Jian, Jikang; Cai, Gemei; Wu, Rong; Li, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional FeSe2 microflowers were synthesized for the first time by a facile solvothermal method, using FeCl2·4H2O and selenium powder as raw materials, along with ethanolamine as solvent. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the FeSe2 microflowers consist of nanosheets with a thickness of about 50 - 80 nm. The Raman spectrum shows the characteristic peaks of Se-Se vibration modes. The optical band gap of the sample was determined to be 1.48 eV by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties of the FeSe2 microflowers and their catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction were also assessed. Finally, a possible growth mechanism of the FeSe2 microflowers is proposed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Microfluidic paper-based multiplex colorimetric immunodevice based on the catalytic effect of Pd/Fe₃O₄@C peroxidase mimetics on multiple chromogenic reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Linlin; Ge, Shenguang; Li, Li; Liu, Fang; Yu, Jinghua

    2015-03-01

    In this report, a non-toxic method was proposed for the simple synthesis of palladium nanoparticles (Pd)/Fe3O4@C peroxidase mimetics by virtue of in situ growth of Pd nanoparticles on Fe3O4@C magnetic nanoparticles. And a microfluidic paper-based multiplex colorimetric immunodevice (named α-sheet) was developed by site-selectively immobilizing multiple antigens owing to its intrinsic high-efficiency catalytic activity of peroxidase mimetics to multiple chromogenic reactions. The immunosensor platform was prepared by growing a layer of flower-like gold nanoparticles which could entrap the primary antibodies onto paper sensing zones, and the as-prepared Pd/Fe3O4@C peroxidase mimetics was used to label secondary antibodies. In the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and o-phenylenediamine chromogenic substrates, Pd/Fe3O4@C peroxidase mimetics catalyzed chromogenic reactions and showed different colors with respective intensity. To precisely identify the intensity, a piece of black wax printed chromatographic paper with three observing windows (named β-sheet) was flatted on α-sheet. Under the optimal condition, the proposed multiplex colorimetric immunodevice displayed wide linear ranges from 0.005 to 30 ng mL(-1) with low detection limits of 1.7 pg mL(-1) for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and α-fetoprotein (α-AFP). Meanwhile, the proposed method provided provided a non-toxic, low-cost and promising tool for point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:25682430

  17. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  18. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  19. Study of reaction of sulfur halides with unsaturated compounds. reaction of sulfur monochloride with adamantylideneadamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikov, G.A.; Belogaeva, T.A.; Lerman, B.M.

    1986-09-20

    In a continuation of the study of the reaction of olefin (I) with sulfur halides, the authors investigate its reaction with sulfur monochloride. It is shown that the reaction of (I) with S/sub 2/C1/sub 2/ proceeds readily in CH/sub 2/C1/sub 2/, CHC1/sub 3/, CC1/sub 4/, leading to compounds of the same structure as in the reaction of (I) with SC1/sub 2/. The preferential formation of the epithio compound (II) and chloroepithio compound (III) takes place at near-to-equimolar ratio of the reagents and 100-fold excess of the solvent, while the reaction of chlorine-substituted adamantylideneadamantanes proceeds at an excess of the reagent. In contrast to SC1/sub 2/, sulfur monochloride does not react with (I) in hexane.

  20. Study of an anaphylactoid reaction to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wu-Charng; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2002-01-01

    Generalized itching, urticaria and anaphylactic shock developed in a 9-year-old girl on two separate occasions after she ingested acetaminophen. She was admitted to our hospital for observation during oral challenge. Total eosinophil counts, total serum IgE, IgA, IgG, IgM, C3, and C4, specific IgE antibodies to six common allergens, and skin prick tests to purified acetaminophen and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) were unremarkable. No reaction occurred on open challenge with acetylsalicylic acid and mefenamic acid. However, urticaria and itching sensation occurred 45 min after ingesting 50 mg of purified acetaminophen. Dizziness, shivering, tachycardia and fainting also developed later. These symptoms resolved after treatment with a diphenhydramine injection and intravenous infusion of normal saline. There was a marked increase in the blood histamine level after challenge. In vitro histamine release before oral challenge was also abnormally as high as 50%. In summary, she had an immediate allergic reaction to acetaminophen but was tolerant to acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:12148965