Science.gov

Sample records for catalytic reaction studies

  1. An experimental study of catalytic and non-catalytic reaction in heat recirculating reactors and applications to power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongmin

    An experimental study of the performance of a Swiss roll heat exchanger and reactor was conducted, with emphasis on the extinction limits and comparison of results with and without Pt catalyst. At Re<40, the catalyst was required to sustain reaction; with the catalyst self-sustaining reaction could be obtained at Re less than 1. Both lean and rich extinction limits were extended with the catalyst, though rich limits were extended much further. At low Re, the lean extinction limit was rich of stoichiometric and rich limit had equivalence ratios 80 in some cases. Non-catalytic reaction generally occurred in a flameless mode near the center of the reactor. With or without catalyst, for sufficiently robust conditions, a visible flame would propagate out of the center, but this flame could only be re-centered with catalyst. Gas chromatography indicated that at low Re, CO and non-C3 H8 hydrocarbons did not form. For higher Re, catalytic limits were slightly broader but had much lower limit temperatures. At sufficiently high Re, catalytic and gas-phase limits merged. Experiments with titanium Swiss rolls have demonstrated reducing wall thermal conductivity and thickness leads to lower heat losses and therefore increases operating temperatures and extends flammability limits. By use of Pt catalysts, reaction of propane-air mixtures at temperatures 54°C was sustained. Such low temperatures suggest that polymers may be employed as a reactor material. A polyimide reactor was built and survived prolonged testing at temperatures up to 500°C. Polymer reactors may prove more practical for microscale devices due to their lower thermal conductivity and ease of manufacturing. Since the ultimate goal of current efforts is to develop combustion driven power generation devices at MEMS like scales, a thermally self-sustaining miniature power generation device was developed utilizing a single-chamber solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) placed in a Swiss roll. With the single-chamber design

  2. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-09-07

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-{sigma} bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as {pi}-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  3. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  4. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.; Somorjai, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 [degree]C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  5. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  6. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  7. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  8. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

    2003-05-23

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO {yields} 1/2 N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was also studied by STM on Rh

  9. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  10. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  11. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  12. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  13. Improved catalytic activity of rhodium monolayer modified nickel (110) surface for the methane dehydrogenation reaction: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothra, Pallavi; Pati, Swapan K.

    2014-05-01

    The catalytic activity of pure Ni (110) and single Rh layer deposited Ni (110) surface for the complete dehydrogenation of methane is theoretically investigated by means of gradient-corrected periodic density functional theory. A detailed kinetic study, based on the analysis of the optimal reaction pathway for the transformation of CH4 to C and H through four elementary steps (CH4 --> CH3 + H; CH3 --> CH2 + H; CH2 --> CH + H; CH -->C + H) is presented for pure Ni (110) and Rh/Ni (110) surfaces and compared with pure Rh (110) surface. Through systematic examination of adsorbed geometries and transition states, we show that single layer deposition of Rh on Ni (110) surface has a striking influence on lowering the activation energy barrier of the dehydrogenation reaction. Moreover, it is found that a pure Ni (110) surface has a tendency for carbon deposition on the catalytic surface during the methane dissociation reaction which decreases the stability of the catalyst. However, the deposition of carbon is largely suppressed by the addition of a Rh overlayer on the pure Ni (110) surface. The physical origin of stronger chemisorption of carbon on Ni (110) relative to Rh/Ni (110) has been elucidated by getting insight into the electronic structures and d-band model of the catalytic surfaces. Considering the balance in both the catalytic activity as well as the catalyst stability, we propose that the Rh/Ni (110) surface possesses much improved catalytic property compared to pure Ni (110) and pure Rh (110) surfaces.

  14. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  15. Modeling coal chemistry: One electron catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.; Hunter, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The complexity of the coal structure, in general, and of its organic part, in particular, prevents a rigorous study of coal chemistry. The use of model compounds with less complicated chemical structures to model specific reactions relevant to coal transformation into useful products is necessary and helpful. This is true, however, only if the modeling is properly applied and especially if the results are not excessively extrapolated to all aspects of coal reactivity. The emphasis on all catalytic routes in coal liquefaction has enhanced the interest in the study of the chemistry involved in heterogeneous catalytic reactions relevant to the first stage, solubilization, of coal. One of the important reactions associated with this first stage is the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds linking aromatic rings with aliphatic moieties. In previous publications (1,2,3) we have used a model compound 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (1) in which the bond linking the naphthalene ring to a methylene carbon can be selectively cleaved by specific catalysts (i.e. carbon materials, some iron catalysts) at temperatures at which thermal, free radical-initiated reactions, do not take place. Our data suggest that the above-mentioned catalytic cleavage is initiated by the ion radical of 1, with the unpaired electron localized in the naphthalene ring.

  16. Modeling coal chemistry: One electron catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Smith, C.; Hunter, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    The complexity of the coal structure, in general, and of its organic part, in particular, prevents a rigorous study of coal chemistry. The use of model compounds with less complicated chemical structures to model specific reactions relevant to coal transformation into useful products is necessary and helpful. This is true, however, only if the modeling is properly applied and especially if the results are not excessively extrapolated to all aspects of coal reactivity. The emphasis on all catalytic routes in coal liquefaction has enhanced the interest in the study of the chemistry involved in heterogeneous catalytic reactions relevant to the first stage, solubilization, of coal. One of the important reactions associated with this first stage is the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds linking aromatic rings with aliphatic moieties. In previous publications (1,2,3) we have used a model compound 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (1) in which the bond linking the naphthalene ring to a methylene carbon can be selectively cleaved by specific catalysts (i.e. carbon materials, some iron catalysts) at temperatures at which thermal, free radical-initiated reactions, do not take place. Our data suggest that the above-mentioned catalytic cleavage is initiated by the ion radical of 1, with the unpaired electron localized in the naphthalene ring.

  17. Study of liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin with sodium butyrate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Meng, Qingyi; Ban, Chunlan; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yingyu

    2016-08-01

    The liquid-solid catalytic reaction of epichlorohydrin and sodium butyrate with tetrabutylammonium bromide as a phase transfer catalyst was studied in this paper. The shrinking core model was applied. The analysis of the reaction based on the kinetic model showed a reaction-controlled regime at temperatures varying from 90 to 100°C. The exterior diffusivity was removed between 300 and 400 rpm. The internal diffusivity was removed when the particle size was 2 × 10-4 m. Reaction rate constants were calculated at different temperatures. The correlation was obtained when the proposed kinetic model was applied to all the experimental data for predictive evaluations and the activation energy was 37.01 kJ mol-1.

  18. Catalytic gasification: Isotopic labeling and transient reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, J.M.; Falconer, J.L.; Brown, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reaction was used with labeled isotopes (/sup 13/C and /sup 18/O) to study interactions between carbon black and potassium carbonate in pure He and 10% CO/sub 2//90% He atmospheres. Catalytic gasification precursor complexes were observed. Carbon and oxygen-bearing carbon surface groups interacted with the carbonate above 500 K to form surface complexes. Between 500 K and 950 K, and in the presence of gaseous carbon dioxide, the complexes promoted carbon and oxygen exchange between the gas-phase CO/sub 2/ and the surface. Oxygen exchanged between the surface complexes; but carbon did not exchange between the carbonate and the carbon black. As the temperature rose, the complexes decomposed to produce carbon dioxide, and catalytic gasification then began. Elemental potassium formed, and the active catalyst appears to alternate between potassium metal and a potassium-oxygen-carbon complex.

  19. Ubiquitous ``glassy'' relaxation in catalytic reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Akinori; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-10-01

    Study of reversible catalytic reaction networks is important not only as an issue for chemical thermodynamics but also for protocells. From extensive numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, slow relaxation dynamics to sustain nonequlibrium states are commonly observed. These dynamics show two types of salient behaviors that are reminiscent of glassy behavior: slow relaxation along with the logarithmic time dependence of the correlation function and the emergence of plateaus in the relaxation-time course. The former behavior is explained by the eigenvalue distribution of a Jacobian matrix around the equilibrium state that depends on the distribution of kinetic coefficients of reactions. The latter behavior is associated with kinetic constraints rather than metastable states and is due to the absence of catalysts for chemicals in excess and the negative correlation between two chemical species. Examples are given and generality is discussed with relevance to bottleneck-type dynamics in biochemical reactions as well.

  20. A near-ambient-pressure XPS study on catalytic CO oxidation reaction over a Ru(101¯0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Shimura, Masahiro; Yoshida, Masaaki; Monya, Yuji; Suzuki, Kazuma; Amemiya, Kenta; Mase, Kazuhiko; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the interactions of CO and O2 with Ru(101¯0) single crystal surfaces, and studied the in-situ catalytic oxidation reaction of CO on the surface under near realistic pressure conditions by using a combination of near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential pumping mass spectroscopy. At lower temperatures (T < 190 °C), most of the surface keeps metallic and is covered by both chemisorbed atomic oxygen and CO, and the CO2 formation rate is relatively slow. At higher temperatures, the reaction rate significantly increases and reaches the saturation, where the Ru surface is dominated by a bulk oxide (i.e. RuO2).

  1. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  2. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  3. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  4. Computational Study of Catalytic Reaction of Quercetin 2,4-Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toru; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2015-06-11

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and QM-only study on the oxidative ring-cleaving reaction of quercetin catalyzed by quercetin 2,4-dioxygenase (2,4-QD). 2,4-QD has a mononuclear type 2 copper center and incorporates two oxygen atoms at C2 and C4 positions of the substrate. It has not been clear whether dioxygen reacts with a copper ion or a substrate radical as the first step. We have found that dioxygen is more likely to bind to a Cu(2+) ion, involving the dissociation of the substrate from the copper ion. Then a Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex can be generated. Comparison of geometry and stability between QM-only and QM/MM results strongly indicates that steric effects of the protein environment contribute to maintain the orientation of the substrate dissociated from the copper center. The present QM/MM results also highlight that a prior rearrangement of the Cu(2+)-alkylperoxo complex and a subsequent hydrogen bond switching assisted by the movement of Glu73 can facilitate formation of an endoperoxide intermediate selectively. PMID:25990020

  5. Study of the dynamics of the MoO2-Mo2C system for catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuba Torres, Christian Martin

    On a global scale, the energy demand is largely supplied by the combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels. However, their rapid depletion coupled with environmental and sustainability concerns are the main drivers to seek for alternative energetic strategies. To this end, the sustainable generation of hydrogen from renewable resources such as biodiesel would represent an attractive alternative solution to fossil fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen's lower environmental impact and greater independence from foreign control make it a strong contender for solving this global problem. Among a wide variety of methods for hydrogen production, the catalytic partial oxidation offers numerous advantages for compact and mobile fuel processing systems. For this reaction, the present work explores the versatility of the Mo--O--C catalytic system under different synthesis methods and reforming conditions using methyl oleate as a surrogate biodiesel. MoO2 exhibits good catalytic activity and exhibits high coke-resistance even under reforming conditions where long-chain oxygenated compounds are prone to form coke. Moreover, the lattice oxygen present in MoO2 promotes the Mars-Van Krevelen mechanism. Also, it is introduced a novel beta-Mo2C synthesis by the in-situ formation method that does not utilize external H2 inputs. Herein, the MoO 2/Mo2C system maintains high catalytic activity for partial oxidation while the lattice oxygen serves as a carbon buffer for preventing coke formation. This unique feature allows for longer operation reforming times despite slightly lower catalytic activity compared to the catalysts prepared by the traditional temperature-programmed reaction method. Moreover, it is demonstrated by a pulse reaction technique that during the phase transformation of MoO2 to beta-Mo2C, the formation of Mo metal as an intermediate is not responsible for the sintering of the material wrongly assumed by the temperature-programmed method.

  6. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Evans, Tabitha J.; Cheng, Lei; Nimlos, Mark R.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  7. From Catalytic Reaction Networks to Protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-12-01

    In spite of recent advances, there still remains a large gape between a set of chemical reactions and a biological cell. Here we discuss several theoretical efforts to fill in the gap. The topics cover (i) slow relaxation to equilibrium due to glassy behavior in catalytic reaction networks (ii) consistency between molecule replication and cell growth, as well as energy metabolism (iii) control of a system by minority molecules in mutually catalytic system, which work as a carrier of genetic information, and leading to evolvability (iv) generation of a compartmentalized structure as a cluster of molecules centered around the minority molecule, and division of the cluster accompanied by the replication of minority molecule (v) sequential, logical process over several states from concurrent reaction dynamics, by taking advantage of discreteness in molecule number.

  8. Cage-like copper(II) silsesquioxanes: transmetalation reactions and structural, quantum chemical, and catalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Dronova, Marina S; Yalymov, Alexey I; Lamaty, Frédéric; Bantreil, Xavier; Martinez, Jean; Bizet, Christelle; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Arkhipov, Dmitry E; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shubina, Elena S; Kirillov, Alexander M; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2015-06-01

    The transmetalation of bimetallic copper-sodium silsesquioxane cages, namely, [(PhSiO1.5 )10 (CuO)2 (NaO0.5 )2 ] ("Cooling Tower"; 1), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 ] ("Globule"; 2), and [(PhSiO1.5 )6 (CuO)4 (NaO0.5 )4 (PhSiO1.5 )6 ] ("Sandwich"; 3), resulted in the generation of three types of hexanuclear cylinder-like copper silsesqui- oxanes, [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H9 OH)2 (C2 H5 OH)6 ] (4), [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (C4 H8 O2 )4 (PhCN)2 (MeOH)4 ] (5), and [(PhSiO1.5 )12 (CuO)6 (NaCl)(C4 H8 O2 )12 (H2 O)2 ] (6). The products show a prominent "solvating system-structure" dependency, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Topological analysis of cages 1-6 was also performed. In addition, DFT theory was used to examine the structures of the Cooling Tower and Cylinder compounds, as well as the spin density distributions. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 were applied as catalysts for the direct oxidation of alcohols and amines into the corresponding amides. Compound 6 is an excellent catalyst in the oxidation reactions of benzene and alcohols. PMID:25950426

  9. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years. PMID:26031492

  10. Study of catalytic reaction processes on the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chemiluminescence-based gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Nishiyama, K.; Takechi, S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have investigated a new chemiluminescence (CL)-based gas sensor made of aluminum oxide ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) which emits CL during the catalytic oxidation of combustible vapors in air. The CL intensity is proportional to the concentration in the wide region from 1 to 1000 ppm of ethanol, butanol and acetone in air. However, it has a tendency to saturate in concentrations above 1000 ppm. For the detection of vapors in the environmental atmosphere, improvements of the sensitivity and the linear characteristics of the sensor are necessary. Catalytic reaction processes on the sensor were studied for this purpose.

  11. Embedded-cluster approach to the study of catalytic reactions in zeolite cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, C.; Birkenheuer, U.

    1995-12-31

    This communication compares three different approaches to the study of ammonia protonation in acidic chabazite: the cluster model, the supercell model, and the embedded cluster model. In all cases, the Hartree-Fock approximation has been adopted, and a minimal Slater-type orbital basis set has been used. To calculate the interaction energies of ammonia by means of the periodic model, the CRYSTAL92 program has been used. The same program has been employed to generate the Madelung field in which a molecular cluster may be embedded. It also provides the reference solution necessary for the embedded cluster model calculations, which in turn have been performed with the EMBED93 program. All three techniques lead to similar interaction energies, however, the embedded cluster approach allows for the most natural way of performing the present adsorption study. Only those atoms which are chemically involved in the interaction have to be treated explicitly, while the rest of the system, though chemically inert, is treated as a consistently described background acting on the adsorption complex. The present investigation suggests that cooperative interaction between molecules trapped in the cavities of zeolites is of crucial importance for the protonation of ammonia to occur. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Jason; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Mullins, David R; Suib, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  13. Reaction of Formic Acid over Amorphous Manganese Oxide Catalytic Systems: An In Situ Study

    SciTech Connect

    J Durand; S Senanayake; S Suib; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    The interaction of formic acid with amorphous manganese oxide (AMO) is investigated using in situ photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy techniques. Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and in situ FTIR illustrate two possible modes of formate bound species at the AMO surface. Two peaks in the IR region from 1340-1390 cm{sup -1} are indicative of formate species bound to the surface in a bidentate configuration. However, a 224 cm{sup -1} band gap between v{sub s}OCO and v{sub as}OCO suggests formate is bound in a bridging configuration. Temperature-programmed desorption studies confirm the formate bound species desorbs as carbon dioxide from the surface at multiple binding sites. At temperatures above 700 K, the presence of K{sup +} {hor_ellipsis} OC complex suggests the bound species interacts at vacant sites related to framework oxygen and cation mobility.

  14. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  15. An Analytical Framework for Studying Small-Number Effects in Catalytic Reaction Networks: A Probability Generating Function Approach to Chemical Master Equations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaki; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Cell activities primarily depend on chemical reactions, especially those mediated by enzymes, and this has led to these activities being modeled as catalytic reaction networks. Although deterministic ordinary differential equations of concentrations (rate equations) have been widely used for modeling purposes in the field of systems biology, it has been pointed out that these catalytic reaction networks may behave in a way that is qualitatively different from such deterministic representation when the number of molecules for certain chemical species in the system is small. Apart from this, representing these phenomena by simple binary (on/off) systems that omit the quantities would also not be feasible. As recent experiments have revealed the existence of rare chemical species in cells, the importance of being able to model potential small-number phenomena is being recognized. However, most preceding studies were based on numerical simulations, and theoretical frameworks to analyze these phenomena have not been sufficiently developed. Motivated by the small-number issue, this work aimed to develop an analytical framework for the chemical master equation describing the distributional behavior of catalytic reaction networks. For simplicity, we considered networks consisting of two-body catalytic reactions. We used the probability generating function method to obtain the steady-state solutions of the chemical master equation without specifying the parameters. We obtained the time evolution equations of the first- and second-order moments of concentrations, and the steady-state analytical solution of the chemical master equation under certain conditions. These results led to the rank conservation law, the connecting state to the winner-takes-all state, and analysis of 2-molecules M-species systems. A possible interpretation of the theoretical conclusion for actual biochemical pathways is also discussed. PMID:27047384

  16. The nature of hot electrons generated by exothermic catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-02-01

    We review recent progress in studies of the nature of hot electrons generated in metal nanoparticles and thin films on oxide supports and their role in heterogeneous catalysis. We show that the creation of hot electrons and their transport across the metal-oxide interface is an inherent component of energy dissipation accompanying catalytic and photocatalytic surface reactions. The intensity of hot electron flow is well correlated with turnover rates of corresponding reactions. We also show that controlling the flow of hot electrons crossing the interface can lead to the control of chemical reaction rates. Finally, we discuss perspectives of hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry that promise the capability to drive catalytic reactions with enhanced efficiency and selectivity through electron-mediated, non-thermal processes.

  17. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide: the water gas shift reaction and related processes. Technical progress report, December 1, 1983-November 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed are investigations related to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide. These studies will be concerned with the design of catalysts for the water gas shift reaction and related processes such as the hydroformylation of olefins by homogeneous solution phase systems as well as by selected metal catalysts heterogenized by complexation to functionalized polymers. Also under investigation will be quantitative mechanistic aspects of reactions considered key to probable catalyst cycles. These are principally concerned with the fundamental chemistry of metal carbonyl and metal carbonyl hydride complexes including acid/base properties, reductive elimination, substitution and cluster fragmentation reactions and the nucleophilic activation of metal coordinated carbonyls toward reaction with water or dihydrogen. The goal of these studies is to provide chemical guidelines for the molecular design of new and more efficient catalysts for the utilization of carbonaceous materials such as coal for the production of fuels and other organic chemicals. 70 references.

  18. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  19. The doping effect on the catalytic activity of graphene for oxygen evolution reaction in a lithium-air battery: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaodong; Wang, Beizhou; Zhu, Jinzhen; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-06-14

    A lithium-air battery as an energy storage technology can be used in electric vehicles due to its large energy density. However, its poor rate capability, low power density and large overpotential problems limit its practical usage. In this paper, the first-principles thermodynamic calculations were performed to study the catalytic activity of X-doped graphene (X = B, N, Al, Si, and P) materials as potential cathodes to enhance charge reactions in a lithium-air battery. Among these materials, P-doped graphene exhibits the highest catalytic activity in reducing the charge voltage by 0.25 V, while B-doped graphene has the highest catalytic activity in decreasing the oxygen evolution barrier by 0.12 eV. By combining these two catalytic effects, B,P-codoped graphene was demonstrated to have an enhanced catalytic activity in reducing the O2 evolution barrier by 0.70 eV and the charge voltage by 0.13 V. B-doped graphene interacts with Li2O2 by Li-sited adsorption in which the electron-withdrawing center can enhance charge transfer from Li2O2 to the substrate, facilitating reduction of O2 evolution barrier. In contrast, X-doped graphene (X = N, Al, Si, and P) prefers O-sited adsorption toward Li2O2, forming a X-O2(2-)···Li(+) interface structure between X-O2(2-) and the rich Li(+) layer. The active structure of X-O2(2-) can weaken the surrounding Li-O2 bonds and significantly reduce Li(+) desorption energy at the interface. Our investigation is helpful in developing a novel catalyst to enhance oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in Li-air batteries. PMID:25970821

  20. Periodic perturbation of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2004-09-01

    Periodic forcing of reaction kinetics via, e.g., variation of reactant pressure(s), temperature or flow reversal is one of the useful tools employed in basic and applied studies of heterogeneous catalytic processes. In the case of conventional (stable) kinetics, this strategy is used to clarify the mechanisms of reactions and obtain data on reaction rate constants or to improve the reaction performance, e.g., to increase reaction rate and/or selectivity with respect to desired products. In experiments, that are focused on oscillatory catalytic reactions, periodic perturbations are employed to stabilize period-1 oscillations. This is easily achieved if the external and internal frequencies are equal. In a more general context, periodic perturbation of chemical reactions, that exhibit period-1 oscillations, may result in complex reaction behaviour, including period doubling and irregular kinetics provided that the external and internal frequencies do not coincide. We consider in this review both the relevant data available in the literature and the results of systematic calculations for a few generic models.

  1. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures. PMID:17909495

  2. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    anion of the organic dye perylenediimide is excited by a second photon allowing the one electron reduction of acceptor substituted aryl chlorides. The radical anion of the aryl halide fragments under the loss of a halide ion and the aryl radical undergoes C-H arylation with biologically important pyrrole derivatives or adds to a double bond. Rhodamine 6G as an organic photocatalyst allows an even higher degree of control of the reaction. The dye is photoreduced in the presence of an amine donor under irradiation with green light (e.g., 530 nm), yielding its radical anion, which is a mild reducing reagent. The hypsochromic shift of the absorption of the rhodamine 6G radical anion toward blue region of the visible light spectrum allows its selective excitation using blue light (e.g., 455 nm). The excited radical anion is highly reducing and able to activate even bromoanisole for C-H arylation reactions, although only in moderate yield. Photoredox catalytic C-H arylation reactions are valuable alternatives to metal catalyzed reactions. They have an excellent functional group tolerance, could potentially avoid metal containing catalysts, and use visible light as a traceless reagent for the activation of arylating reagents. PMID:27482835

  3. High-Pressure Catalytic Reactions of C6 Hydrocarbons on PlatinumSingle-Crystals and nanoparticles: A Sum Frequency Generation VibrationalSpectroscopic and Kinetic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bratlie, Kaitlin

    2007-12-19

    Catalytic reactions of cyclohexene, benzene, n-hexane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, and 1-hexene on platinum catalysts were monitored in situ via sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and gas chromatography (GC). SFG is a surface specific vibrational spectroscopic tool capable of monitoring submonolayer coverages under reaction conditions without gas-phase interference. SFG was used to identify the surface intermediates present during catalytic processes on Pt(111) and Pt(100) single-crystals and on cubic and cuboctahedra Pt nanoparticles in the Torr pressure regime and at high temperatures (300K-450K). At low pressures (<10{sup -6} Torr), cyclohexene hydrogenated and dehydrogenates to form cyclohexyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}) and {pi}-allyl C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, respectively, on Pt(100). Increasing pressures to 1.5 Torr form cyclohexyl, {pi}-allyl C{sub 6}H{sub 9}, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene, illustrating the necessity to investigate catalytic reactions at high-pressures. Simultaneously, GC was used to acquire turnover rates that were correlated to reactive intermediates observed spectroscopically. Benzene hydrogenation on Pt(111) and Pt(100) illustrated structure sensitivity via both vibrational spectroscopy and kinetics. Both cyclohexane and cyclohexene were produced on Pt(111), while only cyclohexane was formed on Pt(100). Additionally, {pi}-allyl c-C{sub 6}H{sub 9} was found only on Pt(100), indicating that cyclohexene rapidly dehydrogenates on the (100) surface. The structure insensitive production of cyclohexane was found to exhibit a compensation effect and was analyzed using the selective energy transfer (SET) model. The SET model suggests that the Pt-H system donates energy to the E{sub 2u} mode of free benzene, which leads to catalysis. Linear C{sub 6} (n-hexane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, and 1-hexene) hydrocarbons were also investigated in the presence and absence of excess hydrogen on Pt(100). Based on spectroscopic signatures

  4. Theory and Modeling of Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yu-Hong; Grayson, Matthew N; Holland, Mareike C; Simon, Adam; Houk, K N

    2016-04-19

    Modern density functional theory and powerful contemporary computers have made it possible to explore complex reactions of value in organic synthesis. We describe recent explorations of mechanisms and origins of stereoselectivities with density functional theory calculations. The specific functionals and basis sets that are routinely used in computational studies of stereoselectivities of organic and organometallic reactions in our group are described, followed by our recent studies that uncovered the origins of stereocontrol in reactions catalyzed by (1) vicinal diamines, including cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines, (2) vicinal amidophosphines, and (3) organo-transition-metal complexes. Two common cyclic models account for the stereoselectivity of aldol reactions of metal enolates (Zimmerman-Traxler) or those catalyzed by the organocatalyst proline (Houk-List). Three other models were derived from computational studies described in this Account. Cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines and other vicinal diamines are venerable asymmetric organocatalysts. For α-fluorinations and a variety of aldol reactions, vicinal diamines form enamines at one terminal amine and activate electrophilically with NH(+) or NF(+) at the other. We found that the stereocontrolling transition states are cyclic and that their conformational preferences are responsible for the observed stereoselectivity. In fluorinations, the chair seven-membered cyclic transition states is highly favored, just as the Zimmerman-Traxler chair six-membered aldol transition state controls stereoselectivity. In aldol reactions with vicinal diamine catalysts, the crown transition states are favored, both in the prototype and in an experimental example, shown in the graphic. We found that low-energy conformations of cyclic transition states occur and control stereoselectivities in these reactions. Another class of bifunctional organocatalysts, the vicinal amidophosphines, catalyzes the (3 + 2) annulation

  5. A kinetic and theoretical study of the borate catalysed reactions of hydrogen peroxide: the role of dioxaborirane as the catalytic intermediate for a wide range of substrates.

    PubMed

    Deary, Michael E; Durrant, Marcus C; Davies, D Martin

    2013-01-14

    Our recent work has provided new insights into the equilibria and species that exist in aqueous solution at different pHs for the boric acid - hydrogen peroxide system, and the role of these species in oxidation reactions. Most recently, (M. C. Durrant, D. M. Davies and M. E. Deary, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 7249-7254), we have produced strong theoretical and experimental evidence for the existence of a previously unreported monocyclic three membered peroxide species, dioxaborirane, that is the likely catalytic species in borate mediated electrophilic reactions of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solution. In the present paper, we extend our study of the borate-peroxide system to look at a wide range of substrates that include substituted dimethyl anilines, methyl-p-tolyl sulfoxide, halides, hydrogen sulfide anion, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, and hydrazine. The unusual selectivity-reactivity pattern of borate catalysed reactions compared with hydrogen peroxide and inorganic or organic peracids previously observed for the organic sulfides (D. M. Davies, M. E. Deary, K. Quill and R. A. Smith, Chem.-Eur. J., 2005, 11, 3552-3558) is also seen with substituted dimethyl aniline nucleophiles. This provides evidence that the pattern is not due to any latent electrophilic tendency of the organic sulfides and further supports dioxaborirane being the likely reactive intermediate, thus broadening the applicability of this catalytic system. Moreover, density functional theory calculations on our proposed mechanism involving dioxaborirane are consistent with the experimental results for these substrates. Results obtained at high concentrations of both borate and hydrogen peroxide require the inclusion the diperoxodiborate dianion in the kinetic analysis. A scheme detailing our current understanding of the borate-peroxide system is presented. PMID:23188177

  6. Determination of Catalytic Coefficient for a First-Order Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, E. R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose is used to determine the catalytic coefficient of the hydronium ion, the catalyst in this reaction. (MLH)

  7. Role of substrate positioning in the catalytic reaction of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase-A QM/MM Study.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Anna; Broclawik, Ewa; Siegbahn, Per E M; Lundberg, Marcus; Moran, Graham; Borowski, Tomasz

    2014-10-15

    Ring hydroxylation and coupled rearrangement reactions catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase were studied with the QM/MM method ONIOM(B3LYP:AMBER). For electrophilic attack of the ferryl species on the aromatic ring, five channels were considered: attacks on the three ring atoms closest to the oxo ligand (C1, C2, C6) and insertion of oxygen across two bonds formed by them (C1-C2, C1-C6). For the subsequent migration of the carboxymethyl substituent, two possible directions were tested (C1→C2, C1→C6), and two different mechanisms were sought (stepwise radical, single-step heterolytic). In addition, formation of an epoxide (side)product and benzylic hydroxylation, as catalyzed by the closely related hydroxymandelate synthase, were investigated. From the computed reaction free energy profiles it follows that the most likely mechanism of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase involves electrophilic attack on the C1 carbon of the ring and subsequent single-step heterolytic migration of the substituent. Computed values of the kinetic isotope effect for this step are inverse, consistent with available experimental data. Electronic structure arguments for the preferred mechanism of attack on the ring are also presented. PMID:25157877

  8. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  9. Catalytic bismetallative multicomponent coupling reactions: scope, applications, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reactions have played an indispensable role in organic chemistry for the last several decades. In particular, catalytic multicomponent reactions have attracted a lot of attention due to their efficiency and expediency towards complex molecule synthesis. The presence of bismetallic reagents (e.g. B–B, Si–Si, B–Si, Si–Sn, etc.) in this process renders the products enriched with various functional groups and multiple stereocenters. For this reason, catalytic bismetallative coupling is considered an effective method to generate the functional and stereochemical complexity of simple hydrocarbon substrates. This review highlights key developments of transition-metal catalyzed bismetallative reactions involving multiple π components. Specifically, it will highlight the scope, synthetic applications, and proposed mechanistic pathways of this process. PMID:24736839

  10. Catalytic activity of transition metal-N4 moieties in graphene toward the oxygen reduction reaction: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Walter

    2013-03-01

    The search for non-precious metal cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that replace platinum in proton exchange membrane fuel cells is one of the main challenges toward the use of hydrogen as clean energy for transportation. Most current works on ORR catalysts focuses on N-coordinated iron in a carbon matrix. Although the nature of the active site is still a mystery, different carbon-supported Fe-Nx active sites have been proposed. In this work, The O2 dissociation after the interaction with the metal center of M-N4 moieties in graphene (with M = Mn, Fe, and Co) are addressed by density functional theory calculations. Both, saddle points and minimum energy paths for the ORR in the allowed spin channels have been identified. Our results show that the Mn-N4 center in graphene exhibits the lowest activation barrier in all spin channel, less than 1 eV, suggesting improved ORR activity, while for Fe-N4 and Co-N4 they range between 1.2 and 1.6 eV. Our calculations suggest that the O2 dissociation would proceed through different spin channel which would increase the reaction rate, particularly for Mn-O2 and Fe-O2 moieties. We also investigate energetically favorable routes to incorporate the M-N4 centers in graphene. Work supported by FONDECYT under Grant No. 1090489

  11. Catalytic Friedel-Crafts reaction of aminocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    de Nanteuil, Florian; Loup, Joachim; Waser, Jérôme

    2013-07-19

    A Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts reaction between donor-acceptor aminocyclopropanes and indoles and other electron-rich aromatic compounds is reported. Indole alkylation at the C3 position was generally obtained for a broad range of functional groups and substitution patterns. In the case of C3-substituted indoles, C2 alkylation was observed. The reaction gives a rapid access to gamma amino acid derivatives present in numerous bioactive molecules. PMID:23815365

  12. Catalytic Asymmetric Umpolung Reactions of Imines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongwei; Hu, Lin; Li, Zhe; Deng, Li

    2015-01-01

    Imines, carbon-nitrogen double bonds, are fundamentally important functional groups in organic chemistry. This is largely due to the fact that imines act as electrophiles in C–C bond forming reactions towards carbon nucleophiles, thereby serving one of the most widely used precursors for the formation of amines in both synthetic and biosynthetic settings.1–5 If the carbon atom of the imine could be rendered electron-rich, the imine could react as a nucleophile instead of as an electrophile. Such a reversal in the electronic characteristics of the imine functionality would facilitate the development of new chemical transformations that convert imines into amines via C–C bond forming reactions with carbon electrophiles, thereby creating new opportunities for the efficient synthesis of amines. The development of asymmetric ‘umpolung’ reactions of imines remains an uncharted ground, in spite of the far-reaching impact of such reactions in organic synthesis. Here we report the discovery and development of new chiral phase transfer catalysts that promote the highly efficient asymmetric umpolung reactions of imines and enals. These catalysts mediate the deprotonation of imines and direct the 2-azaallylanions thus formed to react in a highly chemoselective, regioselective, diastereoselective and enantioselective fashion with enals. The reaction tolerates a broad range of imines and enals, and can be carried out in high yield with as little as 0.01 mol % catalyst with a moisture and air-tolerant operational protocol. These umpolung reactions provide a conceptually new and practical approach towards chiral amino compounds. PMID:26201597

  13. New insights in understanding plasma-catalysis reaction pathways: study of the catalytic ozonation of an acetaldehyde saturated Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauce, Sonia; Vega-González, Arlette; Jia, Zixian; Touchard, Sylvain; Hassouni, Khaled; Kanaev, Andrei; Duten, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a preliminary study intended to straighten out the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation mechanisms occurring in a plasma driven catalysis process for acetaldehyde decomposition. For this purpose, the interaction between the surface, the pollutant and one of the main oxidative species generated by non-thermal plasma, namely ozone, was studied. Acetaldehyde catalytic ozonation over a nanostructured Ag/TiO2/SiO2 catalyst is carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, and followed by diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). For this, the catalyst is firstly saturated with acetaldehyde. At the end of the saturation, acetaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, its condensation product, are identified as the major adsorbed species. In a second step, the surface ozonation is carried out and three additional intermediates are identified, namely, acetone, formic acid and acetic acid. Gaseous CO, CO2, methyl formate and methyl acetate are detected at the DRIFTS outlet, evidencing the partial mineralization of the adsorbed species. A global reaction scheme is proposed for explaining the formation of those adsorbed intermediates and gaseous products. This proposed heterogeneous ozone induced chemistry has to be taken into account when associating non-thermal plasma in air to a catalyst. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  14. An FTIR study on the catalytic effect of water molecules on the reaction of CO successive hydrogenation at 3 and 10K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, C.; Krim, L.

    2011-05-01

    The ubiquitous presence of water and the relative high abundance of H2, H and CO molecules in the interstellar medium motivated numerous studies on their potential interaction. The reaction of successive hydrogenation of CO is of large interest in astrochemistry because of its implication in the formation of formaldehyde and methanol in interstellar grains and in comets. The catalytic effect of water on the successive hydrogenation of CO has been investigated by two methods. The first is the hydrogenation of a CO/H2O surface. The second is a co-injection of (CO/H2O) mixtures and H atoms. Both methods have been performed at 3 and 10 K. When the hydrogenation of a CO surface is performed at 3 K, no products are observed. In fact, the presence of solid hydrogen screens the hydrogenation process. However, when performed at 10 K, the experiment shows that water molecules increase the concentration of the H2CO and CH3OH species. At 3 and 10K, [(CO/H2O)+H] co-depositions confirm a subtantial impact on by-products formation. We show that water molecules increase the probability of reactive to encounter H atoms either physically, or chemically, by raising the number of chemical pathways. A coordinated theoretical study of the possible chemical pathways is currently under way.

  15. Fe/N/C composite in Li-O2 battery: studies of catalytic structure and activity toward oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Karan, Naba K; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Li, Shu-You; Liu, Di-Jia

    2012-10-10

    Atomically dispersed Fe/N/C composite was synthesized and its role in controlling the oxygen evolution reaction during Li-O(2) battery charging was studied by use of a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether-based electrolyte. Li-O(2) cells using Fe/N/C as the cathode catalyst showed lower overpotentials than α-MnO(2)/carbon catalyst and carbon-only material. Gases evolved during the charge step contained only oxygen for Fe/N/C cathode catalyst, whereas CO(2) was also detected in the case of α-MnO(2)/C or carbon-only material; this CO(2) was presumably generated from electrolyte decomposition. Our results reiterate the catalytic effect in reducing overpotentials, which not only enhances battery efficiency but also improves its lifespan by reducing or eliminating electrolyte decomposition. The structure of the Fe/N/C catalyst was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Iron was found to be uniformly distributed within the carbon matrix, and on average, Fe was coordinated by 3.3 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.3 low Z elements (C/N/O) at bond distances of ~1.92 and ~2.09 Å, respectively. PMID:22998563

  16. A combined experimental and computational study of the catalytic dehydration of glycerol on microporous zeolites: an investigation of the reaction mechanism and acrolein selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xufeng; Lv, Yanhong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guodong; Xi, Yanyan; Phillips, David L; Liu, Chenguang

    2013-12-14

    The catalytic activity and the acrolein selectivity for liquid phase glycerol dehydration on β zeolites (HNa-β-k) were found to be dependent on the reaction temperature as well as on the amount of acid sites on the zeolites. An increase in the reaction temperature favors the acrolein selectivity. The acrolein selectivity increases with the Na(+)/H(+) ratio and the glycerol conversion decreases with it so that a maximum acrolein yield is obtained when a certain amount of acidic sites are replaced by non-active Na(+) sites. The computational results indicate that 3-hydoxylpropanal (HPA) is an important intermediate that determines the final product selectivity. The relative rates of the different reaction pathways for HAP can be affected by the amount of water molecules involved in its homogeneous reaction. Based on the reaction mechanism proposed, it was hypothesized that smaller pores reduce activity but increase selectivity to acrolein, and results of the H-MFI zeolite were consistent with this hypothesis. Our work provides important insight into the overall landscape of the reaction mechanism and can be used to help design reaction systems that have good acrolein selectivity for the liquid phase glycerol dehydration reactions. PMID:24158544

  17. [Lipases in catalytic reactions of organic chemistry].

    PubMed

    Bezborodov, A M; Zagustina, N A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of enzymatic catalysis in lipase-catalyzed reactions of organic synthesis are discussed in the review. The data on modern methods of protein engineering and enzyme modification allowing a broader range of used substrates are briefly summarized. The application of lipase in the preparation of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals containing no inactive enantiomers and in the synthesis of secondary alcohol enantiomers and optically active amides is demonstrated. The subject of lipase involvement in the C-C bond formation in the Michael reaction is discussed. Data on the enzymatic synthesis of construction materials--polyesters, siloxanes, etc.--are presented. Examples demonstrating the application of lipase enzymatic catalysis in industry are given. PMID:25707112

  18. Controlling Catalytic Selectivity via Adsorbate Orientation on the Surface: From Furfural Deoxygenation to Reactions of Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Pang, Simon H; Medlin, J Will

    2015-04-16

    Specificity to desired reaction products is the key challenge in designing solid catalysts for reactions involving addition or removal of oxygen to/from organic reactants. This challenge is especially acute for reactions involving multifunctional compounds such as biomass-derived aromatic molecules (e.g., furfural) and functional epoxides (e.g., 1-epoxy-3-butene). Recent surface-level studies have shown that there is a relationship between adsorbate surface orientation and reaction selectivity in the hydrogenation pathways of aromatic oxygenates and the ring-opening or ring-closing pathways of epoxides. Control of the orientation of reaction intermediates on catalytic surfaces by modifying the surface or near-surface environment has been shown to be a promising method of affecting catalytic selectivity for reactions of multifunctional molecules. In this Perspective, we review recent model studies aimed at understanding the surface chemistry for these reactions and studies that utilize this insight to rationally design supported catalysts. PMID:26263134

  19. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  20. Catalytic ignition model in a monolithic reactor with in-depth reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, Ta-Ching; Tien, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Two transient models have been developed to study the catalytic ignition in a monolithic catalytic reactor. The special feature in these models is the inclusion of thermal and species structures in the porous catalytic layer. There are many time scales involved in the catalytic ignition problem, and these two models are developed with different time scales. In the full transient model, the equations are non-dimensionalized by the shortest time scale (mass diffusion across the catalytic layer). It is therefore accurate but is computationally costly. In the energy-integral model, only the slowest process (solid heat-up) is taken as nonsteady. It is approximate but computationally efficient. In the computations performed, the catalyst is platinum and the reactants are rich mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. One-step global chemical reaction rates are used for both gas-phase homogeneous reaction and catalytic heterogeneous reaction. The computed results reveal the transient ignition processes in detail, including the structure variation with time in the reactive catalytic layer. An ignition map using reactor length and catalyst loading is constructed. The comparison of computed results between the two transient models verifies the applicability of the energy-integral model when the time is greater than the second largest time scale of the system. It also suggests that a proper combined use of the two models can catch all the transient phenomena while minimizing the computational cost.

  1. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  2. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme–cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes. PMID:26537172

  3. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme-cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes.

  4. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in Monolith Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, this work demonstrates a concept called back-end ignition for lighting-off and pre-heating a catalytic monolith in a power generation system. In this concept, a downstream heat source (e.g. a flame) or resistive heating in the downstream portion of the monolith initiates a localized catalytic reaction which subsequently propagates upstream and heats the entire monolith. The simulations used a transient numerical model of a single catalytic channel which characterizes the behavior of the entire monolith. The model treats both the gas and solid phases and includes detailed homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. An important parameter in the model for back-end ignition is upstream heat conduction along the solid. The simulations used both dry and wet CO chemistry as a model fuel for the proof-of-concept calculations; the presence of water vapor can trigger homogenous reactions, provided that gas-phase temperatures are adequately high and there is sufficient fuel remaining after surface reactions. With sufficiently high inlet equivalence ratio, back-end ignition occurs using the thermophysical properties of both a ceramic and metal monolith (coated with platinum in both cases), with the heat-up times significantly faster for the metal monolith. For lower equivalence ratios, back-end ignition occurs without upstream propagation. Once light-off and propagation occur, the inlet equivalence ratio could be reduced significantly while still maintaining an ignited monolith as demonstrated by calculations using complete monolith heating.

  5. Pre-steady-state kinetic study of the effects of K+ on the partial reactions of the catalytic cycle of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Herscher, C J; Rega, A F; Adamo, H P

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 100 mM K+ on the partial reactions that take place during ATP hydrolysis on the calcium ion-dependent ATPase from plasma membrane (PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase) were studied at 37 degrees C on fragmented intact membranes from pig red cells by means of a rapid chemical quenching technique. At 10 microM [gamma-32P]ATP plus non-limiting concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of formation by 140% to 84 11 s-1 and the steady-state level of phosphoenzyme (EP) by 25% to 3.4 0.17 pmol/mg of protein. If added together with [gamma-32P]ATP at the beginning of phosphorylation, K+ was much less effective than if added earlier, indicating that it did not act on the phosphorylation reaction. Measurements of the E2 --> E1 transition by phosphorylation showed that in medium with Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ increased the k(app) of the transition by 55% to 14 3 s-1 and the apparent concentration of E1 by 45%, suggesting that this may be the cause of the increased rate of phosphorylation observed in enzyme preincubated with K+. The presence of K+ did not change the slow decay of EP without Mg2+ but activated the decay of EP made with Mg2+, increasing its k(app) by 60% to 91 12 s-1. In contrast with observations made during phosphorylation, if added at the beginning of dephosphorylation K+ was fully effective in favouring decomposition of EP made in medium containing no K+. In the presence of either 3mM ATP or 3 mM ATP plus calmodulin, which activate hydrolysis of CaE2P, the effect of K+ on dephosphorylation was conserved. Because the sites for K+ are intracellular and the concentration of K+ in normal red cells is above 100 mM, the effects described here must be taken into account to describe the catalytic cycle of the PM-Ca(2+)-ATPase under physiological conditions. PMID:8615846

  6. Stereodivergent catalytic doubly diastereoselective nitroaldol reactions using heterobimetallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Sohtome, Yoshihiro; Kato, Yuko; Handa, Shinya; Aoyama, Naohiro; Nagawa, Keita; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2008-06-01

    Stereodivergent construction of three contiguous stereocenters in catalytic doubly diastereoselective nitroaldol reactions of alpha-chiral aldehydes with nitroacetaldehyde dimethyl acetal using two types of heterobimetallic catalysts is described. A La-Li-BINOL (LLB) catalyst afforded anti,syn-nitroaldol products in >20:1-14:1 selectivity, and a Pd/La/Schiff base catalyst afforded complimentary syn,syn-nitroaldol products in 10:1-5:1 selectivity. PMID:18465868

  7. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Heinemann, H.; Perry, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes work in progress on three tasks: (1) Catalytic steam gasification of coals and cokes; (2) Oxidative coupling of methane; and (3) Synthesis and characterization of catalysts. Since Task 1 is complete, a final report has been written. This report describes membrane reactors, cyclic methane conversion reactors, theoretical descriptions of reaction-separation schemes, and time-space relationships in cyclic and membrane reactors, all subtasks of Task 2. Initial studies under Task 3 are briefly described.

  8. Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-28

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  9. Catalytic Ignition and Upstream Reaction Propagation in a Platinum Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, P. M.; Dietrich, D. L.; Mellish, B. P.; Miller, F. J.; T'ien, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for catalytic combustion in monolithic reactors at elevated temperatures is the start-up or "light-off" from a cold initial condition. In this work, we demonstrate a concept called "back-end catalytic ignition that potentially can be utilized in the light-off of catalytic monoliths. An external downstream flame or Joule heating raises the temperature of a small portion of the catalyst near the outlet initiating a localized catalytic reaction that propagates upstream heating the entire channel. This work uses a transient numerical model to demonstrate "back-end" ignition within a single channel which can characterize the overall performance of a monolith. The paper presents comparisons to an experiment using a single non-adiabatic channel but the concept can be extended to the adiabatic monolith case. In the model, the time scales associated with solid heat-up are typically several orders of magnitude larger than the gas-phase and chemical kinetic time-scales. Therefore, the model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase with respect to a transient solid. The gas phase is one-dimensional. Appropriate correlations, however, account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The thermally-thin solid includes axial conduction. The gas phase, however, does not include axial conduction due to the high Peclet number flows. The model includes both detailed gas-phase and catalytic surface reactions. The experiment utilizes a pure platinum circular channel oriented horizontally though which a CO/O2 mixture (equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 0.9) flows at 2 m/s.

  10. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells.

  11. Growth states of catalytic reaction networks exhibiting energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yohei; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2011-07-01

    All cells derive nutrition by absorbing some chemical and energy resources from the environment; these resources are used by the cells to reproduce the chemicals within them, which in turn leads to an increase in their volume. In this study we introduce a protocell model exhibiting catalytic reaction dynamics, energy metabolism, and cell growth. Results of extensive simulations of this model show the existence of four phases with regard to the rates of both the influx of resources and cell growth. These phases include an active phase with high influx and high growth rates, an inefficient phase with high influx but low growth rates, a quasistatic phase with low influx and low growth rates, and a death phase with negative growth rate. A mean field model well explains the transition among these phases as bifurcations. The statistical distribution of the active phase is characterized by a power law, and that of the inefficient phase is characterized by a nearly equilibrium distribution. We also discuss the relevance of the results of this study to distinct states in the existing cells. PMID:21867233

  12. Predicting the Catalytic Reactions using Random Phase Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Olsen, T.; Mortensen, J. J.; Jacobsen, K. W.; Thygesen, K. S.; Abild-Pedersen, F.; Norskov, J. K.

    2012-02-01

    Density functional theory has became the workhorse for simulations of catalytic reactions and computational design of novel catalysis. The generally applied semi-local exchange-correlation functionals have successfully predicted catalytic reaction trends over a variety of surfaces. However, in order to achieve quantitative predictions of reaction rates for molecule-surface systems, in particular where there is weak Van der Waals interactions or strong correlation, it is of vital importance to include non-local correlation effects. The use of random phase approximation (RPA) to construct the correlation energy, combined with the exact, self-interaction free exchange energy, offers a non-empirical way for accurately describe the adsorption energies [1] and dispersion forces [2]. We have recently implemented RPA in the GPAW code [3-4], an electronic structure package using projector augmented wave method and real space grids. In this talk I will present our initial results comparing RPA and generalized gradient functionals for the activation energies and reaction energies for transition metal or metal oxide surfaces. [4pt] [1] L. Schimka, et.al, Nature Mat. 9, 741 (2010) [2] T. Olsen, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 156401 (2011) [3] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. B 83, 245122 (2011). [4] J. Yan, et.al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 146803 (2011)

  13. The Influence of Elastic Strain on Catalytic Activity in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Khorshidi, Alireza; Sethuraman, Vijay A; Peterson, Andrew A; Guduru, Pradeep R

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the role of elastic strain in modifying catalytic reaction rates is crucial for catalyst design, but experimentally, this effect is often coupled with a ligand effect. To isolate the strain effect, we have investigated the influence of externally applied elastic strain on the catalytic activity of metal films in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We show that elastic strain tunes the catalytic activity in a controlled and predictable way. Both theory and experiment show strain controls reactivity in a controlled manner consistent with the qualitative predictions of the HER volcano plot and the d-band theory: Ni and Pt's activities were accelerated by compression, while Cu's activity was accelerated by tension. By isolating the elastic strain effect from the ligand effect, this study provides a greater insight into the role of elastic strain in controlling electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27079940

  14. The "Fully Catalytic System" in Mitsunobu Reaction Has Not Been Realized Yet.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Daisuke; Gazvoda, Martin; Košmrlj, Janez; Taniguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-19

    An investigation of the recently reported "fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction" using catalytic amounts of a phosphine reagent and an azo reagent has shown that although benzyl 4-nitrobenzoate is formed under the fully catalytic conditions, the same result is obtained if the hydrazine catalyst is omitted, indicating that this is not a Mitsunobu reaction. In addition, when the reaction between (-)-ethyl lactate and 4-nitrobenzoic acid was carried out using the "fully catalytic" method, the corresponding ester was formed but in very low yield and with predominant retention of configuration. Unfortunately, the system catalytic in phosphine reagent is incompatible with that in the azo reagent. PMID:27481065

  15. Catalytic Transfer Hydogenation Reactions for Undergraduate Practical Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. W.

    1997-04-01

    A brief review of catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) reactions is given. Attention is drawn, particularly, to the utility of ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor in this type of reaction. The reduction of aryl carbonyl compounds to the corresponding methylene derivatives by ammonium formate in the presence of 10% Pd/C at 110°C is compared to their reductive ammonation which occurs at higher temperatures in the absence of the catalyst (the Leuckart reaction). It is suggested that the low cost and simplicity of CTH reactions using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor, together with the high yields obtained in many cases, make them excellent candidates for inclusion in undergraduate practical programmes. Laboratory instructions are given for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline (isolated as benzanilide), benzophenone to diphenylmethanol and fluorenone to fluorene, in all cases using ammonium formate as the hydrogen donor and 10% Pd/C as the catalyst. Thin layer chromatography shows that in each case the product is homogeneous; the yields are essentially quantitative.

  16. [Study on bromate formation of catalytic ozonation process].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Yang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Shao-Xia; Lü, Miao; Cheng, Wen

    2011-08-01

    In a batch reactor, the BrO3(-) formation was investigated in the ozonation and catalytic ozonation of Br(-)-containing Yellow river water, using the different heterogeneous catalysts. The results showed that BrO3(-) minimization was achieved in the catalytic ozonation with NiO, CuO, Fe3O4 and Al2O3 as catalysts and the percent reductions of BrO3(-) were 34.0%, 32.8%, 29.2% and 20.8% respectively. In the reaction R(ct), the ratio of concentration of *OH to O3, decreased with the reaction time, and the range of R(ct) was from 10(-8) to 10(-6). In the ozonation process, one of the main reaction pathways of BrO3(-) formation was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by *OH and then O3, another was the combination oxidation of Br(-) by O3 and then *OH. In the catalytic ozonation with Fe3O4 catalyst, the main pathway was the combination oxidation by *OH and then O3. Moreover, about 60.7% removal for UV254 was obtained after 20 min in the catalytic ozonation reaction. In our study, it was found that the catalytic ozonation process can effectively minimize the formation of BrO3(-) and also oxidize organic compounds. PMID:22619950

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of vanadium nitride and modulation of its catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Taizhong; Mao, Shun; Zhou, Guihua; Wen, Zhenhai; Huang, Xingkang; Ci, Suqin; Chen, Junhong

    2014-07-01

    A creative hydrothermal synthesis method followed by calcination for vanadium nitride (VN) is reported. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) study of the catalyst shows that VN possesses a comparable catalytic performance to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The ORR catalytic activity study of vanadium nitride, vanadium carbonitride, and vanadium carbide reveals that tuning anions offers a promising route for the activity enhancement of the non-precious metal catalysts.A creative hydrothermal synthesis method followed by calcination for vanadium nitride (VN) is reported. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) study of the catalyst shows that VN possesses a comparable catalytic performance to commercial Pt/C catalyst. The ORR catalytic activity study of vanadium nitride, vanadium carbonitride, and vanadium carbide reveals that tuning anions offers a promising route for the activity enhancement of the non-precious metal catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods; SEM characterization of the catalysts; Tafel test of Pt/C catalyst; BET and cyclic performance tests of VN. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02646b

  18. Study of the oxidative half-reaction catalyzed by a non-heme ferrous catalytic center by means of structural and computational methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicero, Giancarlo; Carbonera, Chiara; Valegård, Karin; Hajdu, Janos; Andersson, Inger; Ranghino, Graziella

    Deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) is a mononuclear ferrous enzyme that catalyzes the expansion of the five-membered thiazolidine ring of the penicillin nucleus into the six-membered dihydrothiazine ring of the cephalosporins. In the first half-reaction with dioxygen and 2-oxoglutarate, a reactive iron-oxygen species is produced that can subsequently react with the penicillin substrate to yield the cephalosporin. We describe quantum mechanical calculations of the first part of the reaction based on the high-resolution structures of the active site of DAOCS and its complexes with ligands. These studies are aimed at understanding how the reactive species can be produced and contained in the active site of the enzyme. The results demonstrate the priming of the active site by the co-substrate for oxygen binding and hint to the presence of a stable iron-peroxo intermediate in equilibrium with a more reactive ferryl species and the formation of CO2 as a leaving group by decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate. A conclusion from these studies is that substitution of CO2 by the penicillin substrate triggers the oxidation reaction in a booby-trap-like mechanism.

  19. Graphene-Semiconductor Catalytic Nanodiodes for Quantitative Detection of Hot Electrons Induced by a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Changhwan; Choi, Hongkyw; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Direct detection of hot electrons generated by exothermic surface reactions on nanocatalysts is an effective strategy to obtain insight into electronic excitation during chemical reactions. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel catalytic nanodiode based on a Schottky junction between a single layer of graphene and an n-type TiO2 layer that enables the detection of hot electron flows produced by hydrogen oxidation on Pt nanoparticles. By making a comparative analysis of data obtained from measuring the hot electron current (chemicurrent) and turnover frequency, we demonstrate that graphene's unique electronic structure and extraordinary material properties, including its atomically thin nature and ballistic electron transport, allow improved conductivity at the interface between the catalytic Pt nanoparticles and the support. Thereby, graphene-based nanodiodes offer an effective and facile way to approach the study of chemical energy conversion mechanisms in composite catalysts with carbon-based supports. PMID:26910271

  20. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  1. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest

  2. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  3. Study on the Catalytic Activity of Noble Metal Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Evolution Reactions in Lithium-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Sub; Park, Jin-Bum; Jung, Hun-Gi; Kim, Jooho; Luo, Xiangyi; Lu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Lee, Yun Jung

    2015-07-01

    Among many challenges present in Li-air batteries, one of the main reasons of low efficiency is the high charge overpotential due to the slow oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, we present systematic evaluation of Pt, Pd, and Ru nanoparticles supported on rGO as OER electrocatalysts in Li-air cell cathodes with LiCF3SO3-tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME) salt-electrolyte system. All of the noble metals explored could lower the charge overpotentials, and among them, Ru-rGO hybrids exhibited the most stable cycling performance and the lowest charge overpotentials. Role of Ru nanoparticles in boosting oxidation kinetics of the discharge products were investigated. Apparent behavior of Ru nanoparticles was different from the conventional electrocatalysts that lower activation barrier through electron transfer, because the major contribution of Ru nanoparticles in lowering charge overpotential is to control the nature of the discharge products. Ru nanoparticles facilitated thin film-like or nanoparticulate Li2O2 formation during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which decomposes at lower potentials during charge, although the conventional role as electrocatalysts during OER cannot be ruled out. Pt-and Pd-rGO hybrids showed fluctuating potential profiles during the cycling. Although Pt- and Pd-rGO decomposed the electrolyte after electrochemical cycling, no electrolyte instability was observed with Ru-rGO hybrids. This study provides the possibility of screening selective electrocatalysts for Li-air cells while maintaining electrolyte stability. PMID:26115340

  4. Artificial reaction coordinate "tunneling" in free-energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free-energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free-energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of Bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (approximately 10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free-energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  5. Artificial reaction coordinate “tunneling” in free energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (~10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  6. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles. PMID:26938837

  7. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  8. Catalytic reactor for promoting a chemical reaction on a fluid passing therethrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Pfefferle, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic reactor with an auxiliary heating structure for raising the temperature of a fluid passing therethrough whereby the catalytic reaction is promoted. The invention is a apparatus employing multiple electrical heating elements electrically isolated from one another by insulators that are an integral part of the flow path. The invention provides step heating of a fluid as the fluid passes through the reactor.

  9. State and catalytic activity of iridium compounds in the reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Khomutova, E.G.; Rysev, A.P.; Romanovskaya, L.E.; Malysheva, N.M.

    1995-12-01

    Kinetic methods of determining Ir are insufficiently selective and sensitive as compared to the methods of determining Os and Ru. These characteristics may be improved by increasing the catalytic activity of iridium. All other factors being equal, catalytic activity depends on the state and form of iridium that enters the catalytic process. This is why one of the ways of improving the performance characteristics of a method of determining iridium involves searching for forms of the catalyst with higher catalytic activity. The aim of this work was to study the state and catalytic activity of iridium compounds. The method based on the iridium-catalyzed reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV) was chosen for the investigation. This method is most commonly used for analyzing complex samples. It was found previously that both the catalytic activity and selectivity of iridium determination increase when the reaction is conducted in the medium of perchloric acid or the sample is pretreated with nitric acid.

  10. A computational study of detoxification of lewisite warfare agents by British anti-lewisite: catalytic effects of water and ammonia on reaction mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Chandan; Pakhira, Srimanta; Sen, Kaushik; Das, Abhijit K

    2013-04-25

    trans-2-Chlorovinyldichloroarsine (lewisite, L agent, Lew-I) acts as a blistering agents. British anti-lewisite (BAL, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol) has long been used as an L-agent antidote. The main reaction channels for the detoxification proceed via breaking of As-Cl bonds and formation of As-S bonds, producing stable, nontoxic ring product [(2-methyl-1,3,2-dithiarsolan-4-yl)methanol]. M06-2X/GENECP calculations have been carried out to establish the enhanced rate of detoxification mechanism in the presence of NH3 and H2O catalysts in both gas and solvent phases, which has been modeled by use of the polarized continuum model (PCM). In addition, natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis have been performed to characterize the intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the transition states. Transition-state theory (TST) calculation establishes that the rates of NH3-catalyzed (2.88 × 10(-11) s(-1)) and H2O-catalyzed (2.42 × 10(-11) s(-1)) reactions are reasonably faster than the uncatalyzed detoxification (5.44 × 10(-13) s(-1)). The results obtained by these techniques give new insight into the mechanism of the detoxification process, identification and thermodynamic characterization of the relevant stationary species, the proposal of alternative paths on modeled potential energy surfaces for uncatalyzed reaction, and the rationalization of the mechanistic role played by catalysts and solvents. PMID:23540856

  11. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  12. Catalytic Enantioselective Desymmetrization Reactions to All-Carbon Quaternary Stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing-Ping; Cao, Zhong-Yan; Wang, Yu-Hui; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2016-06-22

    This Review summarizes the advances in the construction of all-carbon quaternary stereocenters via catalytic enantioselective desymmetrization of prochiral and meso-compounds, highlights the power and potential of this strategy in the total synthesis of natural products and biologically active compounds, and outlines the synthetic opportunities still available. PMID:27251100

  13. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  15. Mg(II) -Mediated Catalytic Asymmetric Dearomatization (CADA) Reaction of β-Naphthols with Dialkyl Acetylenedicarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linqing; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Dan; Wang, Pengxin; Wang, Kezhou; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Xianxing; Wang, Rui

    2016-06-13

    A Mg(II) -mediated catalytic asymmetric dearomatization (CADA) reaction of β-naphthols has been developed. The reaction proceeds under ambient temperature and give a series of chiral trisubstituted olefins with good chemoselectivities, Z/E ratios, and excellent enantioselectivities. A fluorinated β-naphthol was designed to generate chiral organofluorine skeletons through the current CADA reaction. Moreover, an interesting tandem cyclization reaction was observed in the following transformation process through an undiscovered intramolecular hydride transfer pathway. PMID:27139904

  16. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  17. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  18. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  19. Revealing structural dynamics in catalytic reactions using ultrafast transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Liu, D.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-03-02

    Progression of a typical heterogeneous catalytic process as a function of a reaction parameter such as temperature can often be segmented, according to Fig. 1. Reactants first bind to active sites to form reaction intermediates with increases in temperature and kinetic energy (Region I). Further temperature increase leads to a full 'light-off' of the catalytic conversion and the reaction is dominated by the intra-particulate diffusion (Region II). The characteristic 'light-off' temperature at the boundary of region I and II often defines the activity of the catalyst. At even higher temperature enters the bulk diffusion region (III), where the catalytic reaction is limited mainly by mass transport between different phases. Significant efforts in practical catalyst design involve improving catalytic activities in the kinetic region (I) and reducing the 'light-off' temperature. Reaction rates at the kinetic region are defined by potential saddle points on top of which a series of 'transitional state' complexes are formed between the active sites and the adsorbed reactants (Fig. 2). Capturing structures of the 'transition state complexes' from the active center's perspective will provide ultimate understanding of catalytic mechanisms and insight into new catalyst design. Experimentally, however, it is a very challenging proposition.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  1. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  2. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  3. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  4. Mass transfer during catalytic reaction in electroosmotically driven flow in a channel microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Vasu, Nadapana; de, Sirshendu

    2011-05-01

    Analytical solution for concentration profile in a microreactor is obtained during heterogeneous catalytic reaction. Reaction occurs in rectangular microchannel with catalyst-coated walls. Flow is induced electroosmotically in the microchannel. A general solution is obtained for first order reaction using a power series solution. Profiles of conversion, cup-mixing concentration of reactant, etc. and variation of Sherwood number is analyzed as function of operating variables. Analytical solution is compared with numerical results.

  5. Sum frequency generation and catalytic reaction studies of the removal of the organic capping agents from Pt nanoparticles by UV-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga, Cesar; Park, Jeong Y.; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Hyun Sook; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-12-10

    We report the structure of the organic capping layers of platinum colloid nanoparticles and their removal by UV-ozone exposure. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS) studies identify the carbon-hydrogen stretching modes on poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and tetradecyl tributylammonium bromide (TTAB)-capped platinum nanoparticles. We found that the UV-ozone treatment technique effectively removes the capping layer on the basis of several analytical measurements including SFGVS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The overall shape of the nanoparticles was preserved after the removal of capping layers, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SFGVS of ethylene hydrogenation on the clean platinum nanoparticles demonstrates the existence of ethylidyne and di-{sigma}-bonded species, indicating the similarity between single-crystal and nanoparticle systems.

  6. A Phosphoenzyme Mimic, Overlapping Catalytic Sites and Reaction Coordinate Motion for Human NAMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, E.; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is highly evolved to capture nicotinamide (NAM) and replenish the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool during ADP-ribosylation and transferase reactions. ATP-phosphorylation of an active-site histidine causes catalytic activation, increasing NAM affinity by 160,000. Crystal structures of NAMPT with catalytic site ligands identify the phosphorylation site, establish its role in catalysis, demonstrate unique overlapping ATP and phosphoribosyltransferase sites, and establish reaction coordinate motion. NAMPT structures with beryllium fluoride indicate a covalent H247-BeF3- as the phosphohistidine mimic. Activation of NAMPT by H247-phosphorylation causes stabilization of the enzyme-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate complex, permitting efficient capture of NAM. Reactant and product structures establish reaction coordinate motion for NAMPT to be migration of the ribosyl anomeric carbon from the pyrophosphate leaving group to the nicotinamide-N1 while the 5-phosphoryl group, the pyrophosphate moiety, and the nicotinamide ring remain fixed in the catalytic site.

  7. Metal Vinylidenes as Catalytic Species in Organic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    McClory, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Organic vinylidene species have found limited use in organic synthesis due to their inaccessibility. In contrast, metal vinylidenes are much more stable, and may be readily accessed through transition metal activation of terminal alkynes. These electrophilic species may be trapped by a number of nucleophiles. Additionally, metal vinylidenes can participate in pericyclic reactions and processes involving migration of a metal ligand to the vinylidene species. This review addresses the reactions and applications of metal vinylidenes in organic synthesis. PMID:18172846

  8. SpaciMS: spatial and temporal operando resolution of reactions within catalytic monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Sa, Jacinto; Fernandes, Daniel; Aiouache, Farid; Goguet, Alexandre; Hardacdre, Christopher; Lundie, David; Naeem, Wasif; Partridge Jr, William P; Stere, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts are widely used as structured catalysts, especially in the abatement of pollutants. Probing what happens inside these monoliths during operation is, therefore, vital for modelling and prediction of the catalyst behavior. SpaciMS is a spatially resolved capillary-inlet mass spectroscopy system allowing for the generation of spatially resolved maps of the reactions within monoliths. In this study SpaciMS results combined with 3D CFD modelling demonstrate that SpaciMS is a highly sensitive and minimally invasive technique that can provide reaction maps as well as catalytic temporal behavior. Herein we illustrate this by examining kinetic oscillations during a CO oxidation reaction over a Pt/Rh on alumina catalyst supported on a cordierite monolith. These oscillations were only observed within the monolith by SpaciMS between 30 and 90% CO conversion. Equivalent experiments performed in a plug-flow reactor using this catalyst in a crushed form over a similar range of reaction conditions did not display any oscillations demonstrating the importance of intra monolith analysis. This work demonstrates that the SpaciMS offers an accurate and comprehensive picture of structured catalysts under operation.

  9. Two-dimensional reaction free energy surfaces of catalytic reaction: effects of protein conformational dynamics on enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Xie, X Sunney; Bagchi, Biman

    2008-01-17

    We introduce a two-dimensional (2D) multisurface reaction free energy description of the catalytic cycle that explicitly connects the recently observed multi-time-scale conformational dynamics as well as dispersed enzymatic kinetics to the classical Michaelis-Menten equation. A slow conformational motion on a collective enzyme coordinate Q facilitates the catalytic reaction along the intrinsic reaction coordinate X, providing a dynamic realization of Pauling's well-known idea of transition-state stabilization. The catalytic cycle is modeled as transitions between multiple displaced harmonic wells in the XQ space representing different states of the cycle, which is constructed according to the free energy driving force of the cycle. Subsequent to substrate association with the enzyme, the enzyme-substrate complex under strain exhibits a nonequilibrium relaxation toward a new conformation that lowers the activation energy of the reaction, as first proposed by Haldane. The chemical reaction in X is thus enslaved to the down hill slow motion on the Q surface. One consequence of the present theory is that, in spite of the existence of dispersive kinetics, the Michaelis-Menten expression of the catalysis rate remains valid under certain conditions, as observed in recent single-molecule experiments. This dynamic theory builds the relationship between the protein conformational dynamics and the enzymatic reaction kinetics and offers a unified description of enzyme fluctuation-assisted catalysis. PMID:18085768

  10. Cyanoalkylation: Alkylnitriles in Catalytic C-C Bond-Forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Alkylnitriles are one of the most ubiquitous nitrogen-containing chemicals and are widely employed in reactions which result in nitrile-group conversion into other functionalities. Nevertheless, their use as carbon pronucleophiles in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions has been hampered by difficulties associated mainly with the catalytic generation of active species, that is, α-cyano carbanions or metalated nitriles. Recent investigations have addressed this challenge and have resulted in different modes of alkylnitrile activation. This review illustrates these findings, which have set the foundation for the development of practical and conceptually new catalytic, direct cyanoalkylation methodologies. PMID:26387483

  11. Structural and spectroscopic study of reactions between chelating zinc-binding groups and mimics of the matrix metalloproteinase and disintegrin metalloprotease catalytic sites: the coordination chemistry of metalloprotease inhibition.

    PubMed

    He, Hongshan; Puerta, David T; Cohen, Seth M; Rodgers, Kenton R

    2005-10-17

    To understand the coordination chemistry of zinc-binding groups (ZBGs) with catalytic zinc centers in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and disintegrin metalloproteases (ADAMs), we have undertaken a model compound study centered around tris(3,5-methylphenypyrazolyl)hydroboratozinc(II) hydroxide and aqua complexes ([Tp(Ph,Me)ZnOH] and [Tp(Ph,Me)Zn(OH2)]+, respectively, wherein (Tp(Ph,Me))- = hydrotris(3,5-methylphenylpyrazolyl)borate) and the products of their reactions with a class of chelating Schiff's base ligands. The results show that the protic ligands, HL (HL = N-propyl-1-(5-methyl-2-imidazolyl)methanimine (5-Me-4-ImHPr), N-propyl-1-(4-imidazolyl)methanimine (4-ImHPr), and N-propyl-1-(2-imidazolyl)methanimine (2-ImHPr)), react with [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnOH] and give products with the general formula [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnL], whereas reactions with neutral aprotic ligands, L' (L' = N-propyl-1-(1-methyl-2-imidazolyl)methanimine (1-Me-2-ImPr) and N-propyl-1-(2-thiazolyl)methanimine (2-TaPr)), yield the corresponding [Tp(Ph,Me)ZnL]+ complexes. Although the phenol group of N-propyl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)methanimine (2-HOPhPr) is protic, this ligand forms a cationic four-coordinate complex containing an intraligand hydrogen bond. The solid-state structures of these complexes were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the results showed that the protic ligands form five-membered chelates of the Zn2+ ion. All ligands displace the aqua ligand in [Tp(Ph,Me)Zn(OH2)]+ to yield complexes having 1H NMR spectra consistent with the formation of five membered chelates. The 1H resonance frequencies of the chelating ligands typically shift upfield upon coordination to the zinc center, due to ring current effects from the pendant phenyl groups of the (Tp(Ph,Me))- ligand. Thus, the 1H NMR spectra provide a convenient and sensitive means of tracking the solution reactions by titration. The resulting series of spectra showed that the stabilities of the chelates in solution depend on the

  12. Facilitating ZnO nanostructure growths by making seeds for self-catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Liang; Yu, Choongho

    2012-03-15

    Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were successfully synthesized on ZnCl{sub 2}-coated Zn foils in oxygen environment by using simple thermal annealing processes. With relatively low reaction temperatures (410 and 700 Degree-Sign C), nanowires whose lengths and diameters are up to {approx}50 {mu}m and 10-100 nm were obtained. We found that ZnO seeds created from ZnCl{sub 2} played an important role in facilitating the ZnO nanowire growth via self-catalytic reactions. Systematic studies by altering critical synthesis factors that determine shape, length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were performed in order to unveil the growth mechanisms. We also compared the nanowires synthesized from Zn foils with tetrapod ZnO nanostructures synthesized from Zn powders at various temperatures. - Graphical abstract: (Left panel) ZnO seeds from ZnCl{sub 2} after thermal annealing at 500 Degree-Sign C for 5 min, (right panel) dense ZnO nanowires grown from Zn foils with ZnCl{sub 2} coating after thermal annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C for 60 min. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnCl{sub 2} facilitated ZnO nanowire growth by creating ZnO seeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanowires were synthesized via self-catalytic reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long and straight single-crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Key parameters in thermal annealing processes were identified.

  13. Reaction network and kinetics for the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V sub 2 O sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Andersson, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The oxidation of three methyl-diphenylmethane isomers and of bibenzyl, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde, which are intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, has been studied to elucidate the reaction network and relative importance of various reactions. Selectivity dependences reveal that the network is composed mainly of three parallel reaction routes: (1) side-chain oxidation with consecutive reactions, (2) oxidative coupling with both parallel and consecutive reactions, and (3) carbon oxide formation. Coupling products are not negligible, with an initial selectivity of 29% (400{degree}C). Anthraquinone is produced mainly from o-methyl-diphenylmethane conditions and catalyst used. Selectivity dependences suggested product lumping and a simplified network. Kinetic analysis of this reaction network indicates that higher temperatures favor route 2 over route 1. The same initial intermediates for route 1 of side-chain oxidation and for route 2 of oxidative coupling are suggested.

  14. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources. PMID:27329206

  15. Phosphinocyclodextrins as confining units for catalytic metal centres. Applications to carbon–carbon bond forming reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Sémeril, David; Oberhauser, Werner; Toupet, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Summary The capacity of two cavity-shaped ligands, HUGPHOS-1 and HUGPHOS-2, to generate exclusively singly phosphorus-ligated complexes, in which the cyclodextrin cavity tightly wraps around the metal centre, was explored with a number of late transition metal cations. Both cyclodextrin-derived ligands were assessed in palladium-catalysed Mizoroki–Heck coupling reactions between aryl bromides and styrene on one hand, and the rhodium-catalysed asymmetric hydroformylation of styrene on the other hand. The inability of both chiral ligands to form standard bis(phosphine) complexes under catalytic conditions was established by high-pressure NMR studies and shown to have a deep impact on the two carbon–carbon bond forming reactions both in terms of activity and selectivity. For example, when used as ligands in the rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation of styrene, they lead to both high isoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In the study dealing with the Mizoroki–Heck reactions, comparative tests were carried out with WIDEPHOS, a diphosphine analogue of HUGPHOS-2. PMID:25383109

  16. Sulfur and Nitrogen Co-Doped Graphene for Metal-Free Catalytic Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoguang; O'Donnell, Kane; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Yuxian; Wang, Shaobin

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen co-doped reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized by a facile method and demonstrated remarkably enhanced activities in metal-free activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for catalytic oxidation of phenol. Based on first-order kinetic model, S-N co-doped rGO (SNG) presents an apparent reaction rate constant of 0.043 ± 0.002 min(-1) , which is 86.6, 22.8, 19.7, and 4.5-fold as high as that over graphene oxide (GO), rGO, S-doped rGO (S-rGO), and N-doped rGO (N-rGO), respectively. A variety of characterization techniques and density functional theory calculations are employed to investigate the synergistic effect of sulfur and nitrogen co-doping. Co-doping of rGO at an optimal sulfur loading can effectively break the inertness of carbon systems, activate the sp(2) -hybridized carbon lattice and facilitate the electron transfer from covalent graphene sheets for PMS activation. Moreover, both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and classical quenching tests are employed to investigate the generation and evolution of reactive radicals on the SNG sample for phenol catalytic oxidation. This study presents a novel metal-free catalyst for green remediation of organic pollutants in water. PMID:25786381

  17. Catalytic reduction of CN−, CO and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions**

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent and added in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-free, organic solvent-based reaction medium to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN−), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) when samarium (II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are supplied as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors not only catalytically reduce CN− or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, but also catalytically reduce CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The observation of C-C coupling from CO2 reveals a unique, Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate; whereas the achievement of catalytic turnover of CN−, CO and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon production from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  18. Robustness and modularity properties of a non-covalent DNA catalytic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu

    2010-01-01

    The biophysics of nucleic acid hybridization and strand displacement have been used for the rational design of a number of nanoscale structures and functions. Recently, molecular amplification methods have been developed in the form of non-covalent DNA catalytic reactions, in which single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules catalyze the release of ssDNA product molecules from multi-stranded complexes. Here, we characterize the robustness and specificity of one such strand displacement-based catalytic reaction. We show that the designed reaction is simultaneously sensitive to sequence mutations in the catalyst and robust to a variety of impurities and molecular noise. These properties facilitate the incorporation of strand displacement-based DNA components in synthetic chemical and biological reaction networks. PMID:20194118

  19. Possibility of a catalytic reaction of H/sub 2/ + Cl/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Kurlyandskaya, I.I.; Rozlovskii, A.I.

    1988-12-01

    It is shown that the amount of conversion of hydrogen in its reaction with chlorine in a mixture passing through a layer of activated carbon at 200/degrees/C corresponds to an effective rate constant that is three orders of magnitude larger than that calculated for the homogeneous reaction in the regime of equilibrium dissociation of chlorine. On the basis of this, the conclusion is drawn that a heterogeneous catalytic process predominates in this case. It is established that with an increase in the temperature up to 300/degrees/, the rate of the homogeneous reaction, having the larger temperature coefficient, becomes commensurate with the heterogeneous rate. In the general case, the ratio of the rates of chlorination for the homogeneous, chain mechanism and for the heterogeneous catalytic reaction mechanism depend on the experimental conditions.

  20. Modular, Catalytic Enantioselective Construction of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters by Sequential Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Potter, Bowman; Edelstein, Emma K; Morken, James P

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling with chiral γ,γ-disubstituted allylboronates in the presence of RuPhos ligand occurs with high regioselectivity and enantiospecificity, furnishing nonracemic compounds with quaternary centers. Mechanistic experiments suggest that the reaction occurs by transmetalation with allyl migration, followed by rapid reductive elimination. PMID:27310927

  1. Utilization of the Recycle Reactor in Determining Kinetics of Gas-Solid Catalytic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paspek, Stephen C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a laboratory scale reactor that determines the kinetics of a gas-solid catalytic reaction. The external recycle reactor construction is detailed with accompanying diagrams. Experimental details, application of the reactor to CO oxidation kinetics, interphase gradients, and intraphase gradients are discussed. (CS)

  2. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reaction of α- and β-Fluorinated Amides.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Lennart; Arteaga, Fernando Arteaga; Yin, Liang; Alagiri, Kaliyamoorthy; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-12-23

    The last two decades have witnessed the emergence of direct enolization protocols providing atom-economical and operationally simple methods to use enolates for stereoselective C-C bond-forming reactions, eliminating the inherent drawback of the preformation of enolates using stoichiometric amounts of reagents. In its infancy, direct enolization relied heavily on the intrinsic acidity of the latent enolates, and the reaction scope was limited to readily enolizable ketones and aldehydes. Recent advances in this field enabled the exploitation of carboxylic acid derivatives for direct enolization, offering expeditious access to synthetically versatile chiral building blocks. Despite the growing demand for enantioenriched fluorine-containing small molecules, α- and β-fluorinated carbonyl compounds have been neglected in direct enolization chemistry because of the competing and dominating defluorination pathway. Herein we present a comprehensive study on direct and highly stereoselective Mannich-type reactions of α- and β-fluorine-functionalized 7-azaindoline amides that rely on a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalytic system to guarantee an efficient enolization while suppressing undesired defluorination. This protocol contributes to provide a series of fluorinated analogs of enantioenriched β-amino acids for medicinal chemistry. PMID:26652911

  3. Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Acetylcholinesterase Determined by Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanzi; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yingkai

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a remarkably efficient serine hydrolase responsible for the termination of impulse signaling at cholinergic synapses. By employing Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with B3LYP/6-31G(d) QM/MM potential and the umbrella sampling method, we have characterized its complete catalytic reaction mechanism for hydrolyzing neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and determined its multi-step free energy reaction profiles for the first time. In both acylation and deacylation reaction stages, the first step involves the nucleophilic attack to the carbonyl carbon with the triad His447 serving as the general base, and leads to a tetrahedral covalent intermediate stabilized by the oxyanion hole. From the intermediate to the product, the orientation of His447 ring needs to be adjusted very slightly, and then the proton transfers from His447 to the product and the break of the scissile bond happen spontaneously. For the three-pronged oxyanion hole, it only makes two hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at either the initial reactant or the final product state, but the third hydrogen bond is formed and stable at all transition and intermediate states during the catalytic process. At the intermediate state of the acylation reaction, a short and low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) is found to be formed between two catalytic triad residues His447 and Glu334, and the spontaneous proton transfer between two residues has been observed. However, it is only about 1 ~ 2 kcal/mol stronger than the normal hydrogen bond. In comparison with previous theoretical investigations of the AChE catalytic mechanism, our current study clearly demonstrates the power and advantages of employing Born-Oppenheimer ab initio QM/MM MD simulations in characterizing enzyme reaction mechanisms. PMID:20550161

  4. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-04-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The reaction of furan on sulfided Mo(110) closely resembles that on the (100) surface, consisting mainly of fragmentation. Some differences in detail are apparent that need further study. After pre-dosing with hydrogen, or in a hydrogen (deuterium) atmosphere (up to 5 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} torr), the reaction pathways for furan change little, though there is evidence for the production of surface formyl radicals. We will attempt to induce HDO activity by using (a) using higher H{sub 2} pressures and (b) performing reactions on a preformed C/S/H{sub x} surface layer. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10-11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on.

  6. Three Dimensional Hybrids of Vertical Graphene-nanosheet Sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles for Enhanced Surface Selectively Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Mentao; Liu, Zhe; Quan, Baogang; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure is perfect for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and also very suitable for surface catalytic reaction, but how to design and fabricate is still a robust task. Here, we show a 3D plasmonic nanohybrid of vertical graphene-nanosheet sandwiched by Ag-nanoparticles on the silicon nanocone array substrate for enhanced surface catalytic reaction. By SERS detection, we find that this hierarchical nanohybrid structure is highly efficient in the enhancement of catalytic reaction, even at a very low concentration of 10−11 M, which is far better than previous reports by four orders of magnitude. A strong electric field enhancement produced in the 3D framework nanohybrids of graphene nanosheet/Ag-nanoparticles is responsible for this great enhancement of catalytic reaction, due to larger electron collective oscillation in the composite system. Especially the oxygen adsorbed on the graphene and Ag nanoparticles can be excited to triplet excited states, and the electrons on the graphene and the nanoparticles can be effectively transferred to the oxygen, which plays very important role in molecular catalytic reactions. Our results demonstrate the contribution of graphene in plasmon-driven catalytic reactions, revealing a co-driven reaction process.This excellent SERS substrate can be used for future plasmon and graphene co-catalytic surface catalytic reactions, graphene-based surface plasmon sensors and so on. PMID:26522142

  7. Revisiting catalytic model reaction p-nitrophenol/NaBH4 using metallic nanoparticles coated on polymeric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maolin; Chen, Guofang

    2013-11-01

    The early reported pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics of the polymer-supported metallic nanocatalysts for the model reaction of p-nitrophenol (p-NP)/NaBH4 were probably oversimplified. Here a detailed study of p-NP reduction by NaBH4 in the presence of the raspberry-like poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-modified polymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate) composite sub-microspheres with tunable gold nanoparticles (PGMA@PAH@AuNPs) was presented. Effects of polyelectrolyte concentration, the ratio of polymer spheres to gold nanoparticles, and the solution pH value for composite synthesis on the induction period, reaction time, average reaction rate and average turnover frequency were systematically investigated. Experimental results in all cases of our study revealed an nth order (n > 1) of the p-NP/NaBH4 catalytic reaction by the prepared polymer composite particles. The apparent order of reaction, n, is dependent on the total surface area of the coated gold nanoparticles on the polymer spheres, which can be closely correlated with the tunable gold nanoparticle surface coverage. The mechanism of the observed catalytic activity enhancement was proposed based on active epoxy groups of the polymer spheres and a large adsorption of p-nitrophenolate anions onto the positively-charged spheres.

  8. Structural effects in the reaction between carbon dioxide and coke doped with various potassium bearing catalytic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.; Debroy, T.

    1986-09-01

    The rate of reaction between carbon dioxide and coke with and without the additions of KCN, KOCN, and K2CO3 was studied using thermogravimetry. Since both potassium and carbon are lost during the reaction, the concentration of potassium in the coke samples was determined as a function of the extent of the reaction by atomic absorption spectrometry. The changes in the specific surface area due to the reaction were studied by the nitrogen adsorption technique. The changes in the pore structure of coke were investigated by mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The distribution of potassium in the coke structure was examined as a function of the reaction time by the energy dispersion X-ray technique. Furthermore, since sulfur is known to influence the rate of the C-CO2 reaction, the sulfur content of the coke samples with or without the addition of catalytic precursors was monitored as a function of the extent of reaction. The influences of the structural parameters and the concentration of potassium on the rate of the coke-CO2 reaction were determined. The rate data were analyzed on the basis of a structural model to examine the contributions of the chemical reaction and the pore diffusion on the overall rate of the coke-CO2 reaction.

  9. Generalized Hydrodynamic Treatment of the Interplay between Restricted Transport and Catalytic Reactions in Nanoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David M.; Wang, Jing; Evans, James W.

    2012-06-01

    Behavior of catalytic reactions in narrow pores is controlled by a delicate interplay between fluctuations in adsorption-desorption at pore openings, restricted diffusion, and reaction. This behavior is captured by a generalized hydrodynamic formulation of appropriate reaction-diffusion equations (RDE). These RDE incorporate an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The RDE elucidate the nonexponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth.

  10. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery. PMID:26436336

  11. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  12. Preparation of palladium containing cubic mesoporous materials and their application towards catalytic hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasanthiran, Vagulejan

    Pd --MCM-48 materials were synthesized by modified Stober synthesis in four hours at room temperature. In this procedure using Pd(0) nanoparticles, Na2[PdCl]4 and Pd(acac)2 were used as Pd precursors and Pd containing cubic MCM-48 mesoporous materials were successfully synthesized with metal loadings 1 to ˜5% wt. These materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Physisorption, and chemisorption studies. Selected Pd-MCM-48 catalysts were employed for hydrogenation and coupling reactions. These materials provide excellent activity for regio- and chemoselective hydrogenation of olefins with a turnover frequency of 4400 mol/h. At the same time, these catalysts are very reactive for the coupling reactions such as Suzuki, Heck, etc. Pd-MCM-48 provides higher activity and selectivity compared with other reported Pd containing siliceous materials. The Pd-MCM-48 catalyst can be reused more than 10 times with minimal loss of cubic phase catalytic activity.

  13. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity. PMID:21428607

  14. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-01-22

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces.

  15. Infrared Laser Generation Of Heterogeneous Catalysts And Laser-Induced Reactions At Catalytic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Cheng, , Sheng-San; Iyer, Pradeep K.; Chiou, Shane-Jaw

    1984-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that continuous wave infrared CO2 laser radiation can be util-ized to rapidly produce active catalysts from inert precursors. The activity and selectiv-ity of Ca0 produced from Ca(OH)2 for the isomerization of 1-butene to cis- and trans-2-but-ene is discussed. Variation of the laser irradiation time produces catalytic activity and selectivity qualitatively similar to that resulting from conventional calcination at different temperatures. Pulsed infrared laser-induced reactions at catalytic surfaces are also discussed with emphasis on the dehydrobromination of 2-bromopropane and ethylene elimination from glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride at BaSO4 , A1PO4, and similar surfaces. Correlations are made of the extent of reaction with various experimental parameters including nature of the catalyst, laser frequency, laser fluence, number of laser pulses, and reagent-catalyst ratio.

  16. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

  17. The Non-innocent Phenalenyl Unit: An Electronic Nest to Modulate the Catalytic Activity in Hydroamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arup; Sen, Tamal K.; Ghorai, Pradip Kr; Mandal, Swadhin K.

    2013-01-01

    The phenalenyl unit has played intriguing role in different fields of research spanning from chemistry, material chemistry to device physics acting as key electronic reservoir which has not only led to the best organic single component conductor but also created the spin memory device of next generation. Now we show the non-innocent behaviour of phenalenyl unit in modulating the catalytic behaviour in a homogeneous organic transformation. The present study establishes that the cationic state of phenalenyl unit can act as an organic Lewis acceptor unit to influence the catalytic outcome of intermolecular hydroamination reaction of carbodiimides. For the present study, we utilized organoaluminum complexes of phenalenyl ligands in which the phenalenyl unit maintains the closed shell electronic state. The DFT calculation reveals that the energy of LUMO of the catalyst is mainly controlled by phenalenyl ligands which in turn determines the outcome of the catalysis. PMID:24084653

  18. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-01-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. The investigators are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. They then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The original plans for this quarter called for continuing study of the interesting reactions of furan on sulfided Mo(100) surfaces presented in the last report. Due to the unfortunate accidental destruction of this sample, the investigators have in fact proceeded on two alternate fronts. First they have improved the sample heating system, the malfunction of which caused the loss of the Mo crystal. Secondly, they have prepared a Mo(110) surface and performed initial experiments to understand the sulfur phases that form on this surface of Mo. These efforts have been worthwhile - they have accomplished on the (110) surface in two months what required almost six months on the (100) surface, and are in a good position to repeat the furan reaction experiments on Mo(110) surfaces. The heating system design is described and results of surface properties are given. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  20. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  1. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-10-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  2. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  3. Continuous-flow stereoselective organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions in a chiral catalytic "homemade" HPLC column.

    PubMed

    Chiroli, Valerio; Benaglia, Maurizio; Cozzi, Franco; Puglisi, Alessandra; Annunziata, Rita; Celentano, Giuseppe

    2013-07-19

    Continuous-flow organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions have been performed with excellent enantioselectivity for the first time in a chiral "homemade" HPLC column, packed with silica on which a MacMillan catalyst has been supported by a straightforward immobilization procedure. The versatility of the system was also proven by running with the same column continuous-flow stereoselective reactions with three different substrates, showing that the catalytic reactor may efficiently work in continuo for more than 150 h; the regeneration of the HPLC column was also demonstrated, allowing to further extend the activity of the reactor to more than 300 operating hours. PMID:23808663

  4. Kinetics and reaction chemistry of catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorinated benzenes on sulfided NiMo/. gamma. Al sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hagh, B.F.

    1989-01-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing has recently emerged as a treatment and recycling process for waste streams containing chlorinated organics. Compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) can be effectively treated using this chemistry. These applications have created a need for rate and mechanism data for these reactions. In this work, the catalytic hydrodechlorination reactions of hexachlorobenzene and all of its partially dechlorinated intermediates over NiMo/{gamma}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydroprocessing catalyst were examined in a differential microflow reactor. The NiMo catalyst was chosen after a screening study revealed that it had high activity and selectivity for dechlorination. Based on chlorobenzene hydrodechlorination data at 275-375C, a kinetic model was proposed where the rates of adsorption and surface reaction were comparable and neither controlled the overall reaction rate. The dechlorination rate data of hexachlorobenzene and other chlorinated benzenes point toward the presence of steps that involve multiple chlorine removal. Not all possible intermediates are formed; all of the observed intermediate dechlorination steps proceed at comparable rates.

  5. Evaluation of the catalytic activity of Pd-Ag alloys on ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Rego, R.; Fernandes, L. S.; Tavares, P. B.

    2011-08-01

    Pd-Ag alloys containing different amounts of Ag (8, 21 and 34 at.%) were prepared in order to evaluate their catalytic activity towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and oxygen reduction (ORR) reactions. A sequential electroless deposition of Ag and Pd on a stainless steel disc, followed by annealing at 650 °C under Ar stream, was used as the alloy electrode deposition process. From half-cell measurements in a 1.0 M NaOH electrolyte at ≅20 °C, it was found that alloying Pd with Ag leads to an increases of the ORR and EOR kinetics, relative to Pd. Among the alloys under study, the 21 at.% Ag content alloy presents the highest catalytic activity for the EOR and the lowest Ag content alloy (8 at.% Ag) shows the highest ORR activity. Moreover, it was found that the selectivity of Pd-Ag alloys towards ORR is sustained when ethanol is present in the electrolyte.

  6. Catalytic properties of intermetallic compounds Ln(NiM)/sub 5/ and their hydrides in hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Konenko, I.R.; Starodubtseva, E.V.; Urazbaeva, K.A.; Fedorovskaya, E.A.; Klabunovskii, E.I.; Slinkin, A.A.; Mordovin, V.P.

    1989-02-01

    The catalytic (hydrogenation of propylene), asymmetric (enantioselective hydrogenation of ethyl acetoacetate), and magnetic properties of intermetallic compounds with the composition Ln(NiM)/sub 5/(IMC), where Ln = La, Sm, Gd; M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, and of their hydrides have been studied. The data obtained indicate that the catalytic activity of the above compounds in both reactions is due to structural peculiarities of IMC and to the affinity of IMC to H/sub 2/. The observed changes in the total and the optical yield of the product of hydrogenation in the presence of IMC hydrides, modified with R,R-(+) tartaric acid, as functions of the nature of d-metals and their combinations, in the initial complex catalyst lead to the assumption that different metal tartrate complexes are formed on the hydride surface which act as centers of enantioselective hydrogenation.

  7. Accelerated Catalytic Fenton Reaction with Traces of Iron: An Fe-Pd-Multicatalysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Anett; Velasco Polo, Miriam; Crincoli, Klara; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    An accelerated catalytic Fenton (ACF) reaction was developed based upon a multicatalysis approach, facilitating efficient contaminant oxidation at trace levels of dissolved iron. Beside the Fe(II)/H2O2 catalyst/oxidant pair for production of OH-radicals, the ACF system contains Pd/H2 as catalyst/reductant pair for fast reduction of Fe(III) back to Fe(II) which accelerates the Fenton cycle and leads to faster contaminant degradation. By this means, the concentration of the dissolved iron catalyst can be reduced to trace levels (1 mg L(-1)) below common discharge limits, thus eliminating the need for iron sludge removal, which is one of the major drawbacks of conventional Fenton processes. ACF provides fast degradation of the model contaminant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, C0 = 0.17 mM) with a half-life of 11 min with 1 mg L(-1) dissolved iron, 500 mg L(-1) H2O2, 5 mg L(-1) Pd (as suspended Pd/Al2O3 catalyst) and 0.1 MPa H2, pH 3. The effects of pH, H2 partial pressure and H2O2 concentration on MTBE degradation rates were studied. Results on kinetic deuterium isotope effect and quenching studies are in conformity with OH-radicals as main oxidant. The heterogeneous Pd/Al2O3 catalyst was reused within six cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27167833

  8. Plant lipases: biocatalyst aqueous environment in relation to optimal catalytic activity in lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Caro, Yanis; Pina, Michel; Turon, Fabrice; Guilbert, Stephane; Mougeot, Estelle; Fetsch, David V; Attwool, Philip; Graille, Jean

    2002-03-20

    Adsorption and desorption isotherms of two commercial enzyme preparations of papain and bromelain were determined with a Dynamic Vapor System. The Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) modeling of the obtained sorption isotherms allowed the definition of different levels of hydration of those samples. Afterward, these enzyme preparations were used as biocatalysts in water and solvent-free esterification and alcoholysis reactions. The evolution of the obtained fatty acid ester level as a function of the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst, i.e., thermodynamic water activity (a(w)) and water content, was studied. The results show an important correlation between the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst and its catalytic activity during the lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions. Thus, the Carica papaya lipase (crude papain preparation) catalytic activity is highly dependent on the biocatalyst hydration state. The optimized synthesis reaction yield is obtained when the a(w) value of the enzyme preparation is stabilized at 0.22, which corresponds to 2% water content. This optimal level of hydration occurs on the linear part of the biocatalyst's sorption isotherm, where the water molecules can form a mono- or multiple layer with the protein network. The synthesis reaction yield decreases when the a(w) of the preparation is higher than 0.22, because the excess water molecules modify the system equilibrium leading to the reverse and competitive reaction, i.e., hydrolysis. These results show also that an optimal storage condition for the highly hydrophilic crude papain preparation is a relative humidity strictly lower than 70% to avoid an irreversible structural transition leading to a useless biocatalyst. Concerning the bromelain preparation, no effect of the hydration level on the catalytic activity during esterification reactions was observed. This biocatalyst has too weak a catalytic activity which makes it difficult to observe any differences. Furthermore, the

  9. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In

  10. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  12. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation with a Methandiide-Based Carbene Complex: An Experimental and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Julia; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2015-11-01

    The transfer hydrogenation (TH) reaction of ketones with catalytic systems based on a methandiide-derived ruthenium carbene complex was investigated and optimised. The complex itself makes use of the noninnocent behaviour of the carbene ligand (M=CR2 →MH-C(H)R2 ), but showed only moderate activity, thus requiring long reaction times to achieve sufficient conversion. DFT studies on the reaction mechanism revealed high reaction barriers for both the dehydrogenation of iPrOH and the hydrogen transfer. A considerable improvement of the catalytic activity could be achieved by employing triphenylphosphine as additive. Mechanistic studies on the role of PPh3 in the catalytic cycle revealed the formation of a cyclometalated complex upon phosphine coordination. This ruthenacycle was revealed to be the active species under the reaction conditions. The use of the isolated complex resulted in high catalytic activities in the TH of aromatic as well as aliphatic ketones. The complex was also found to be active under base-free conditions, suggesting that the cyclometalation is crucial for the enhanced activity. PMID:26403918

  13. Catalytic reduction of CN-, CO, and CO2 by nitrogenase cofactors in lanthanide-driven reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-01-19

    Nitrogenase cofactors can be extracted into an organic solvent to catalyze the reduction of cyanide (CN(-)), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) without using adenosine triphosphate (ATP), when samarium(II) iodide (SmI2) and 2,6-lutidinium triflate (Lut-H) are employed as a reductant and a proton source, respectively. Driven by SmI2, the cofactors catalytically reduce CN(-) or CO to C1-C4 hydrocarbons, and CO2 to CO and C1-C3 hydrocarbons. The C-C coupling from CO2 indicates a unique Fischer-Tropsch-like reaction with an atypical carbonaceous substrate, whereas the catalytic turnover of CN(-), CO, and CO2 by isolated cofactors suggests the possibility to develop nitrogenase-based electrocatalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from these carbon-containing compounds. PMID:25420957

  14. Catalytic mechanism of transition-metal compounds on Mg hydrogen sorption reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Gagik; Klassen, Thomas; Bormann, Rüdiger

    2006-06-01

    The catalytic mechanisms of transition-metal compounds during the hydrogen sorption reaction of magnesium-based hydrides were investigated through relevant experiments. Catalytic activity was found to be influenced by four distinct physico-thermodynamic properties of the transition-metal compound: a high number of structural defects, a low stability of the compound, which however has to be high enough to avoid complete reduction of the transition metal under operating conditions, a high valence state of the transition-metal ion within the compound, and a high affinity of the transition-metal ion to hydrogen. On the basis of these results, further optimization of the selection of catalysts for improving sorption properties of magnesium-based hydrides is possible. In addition, utilization of transition-metal compounds as catalysts for other hydrogen storage materials is considered. PMID:16771356

  15. Catalytic reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol with alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Avetisyan, K.G.; Matnishyan, A.A.

    1987-01-10

    The cyclic ketal 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-bis(3-phenyl-2-propynyloxy)-1,4-dioxane was obtained by the reaction of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1=ol with propargyl alcohol in the presence of the HgO-BF/sub 3/ O(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/ catalytic system. The transformation of 3-phenyl-2-propyn-1-ol and its ethers in methanol and ethanol by the action of the above-mentioned catalytic system leads to 1-phenyl-3-alkoxy-1-propanone, 1-phenyl-1,1,3-trialkoxypropane, and 1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one. The intermediate organomercury compound, which is the product from regioselective addition of mercuric oxide and the saturated alcohol at the triple bond, was isolated. Its protodemercuration led to the above-mentioned linear products. The formation of the cyclic ketal is presumably due to the preferred formation of mercury bis-hydroxypropargylide.

  16. Parallelization of Catalytic Packed-Bed Microchannels with Pressure-Drop Microstructures for Gas-Liquid Multiphase Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Sunao; Ohtaki, Kenichiro; Matsumoto, Sohei; Inoue, Tomoya

    2012-06-01

    High-throughput and stable treatments are required to achieve the practical production of chemicals with microreactors. However, the flow maldistribution to the paralleled microchannels has been a critical problem in achieving the productive use of multichannel microreactors for multiphase flow conditions. In this study, we newly designed and fabricated a glass four-channel catalytic packed-bed microreactor for the scale-up of gas-liquid multiphase chemical reactions. We embedded microstructures generating high pressure losses at the upstream side of each packed bed, and experimentally confirmed the efficacy of the microstructures in decreasing the maldistribution of the gas-liquid flow to the parallel microchannels.

  17. TiO2-sludge carbon enhanced catalytic oxidative reaction in environmental wastewaters applications.

    PubMed

    Athalathil, Sunil; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Stüber, Frank; Bengoa, Christophe; Font, Josep; Fortuny, Agusti; Pintar, Albin; Fabregat, Azael

    2015-12-30

    The enhanced oxidative potential of sludge carbon/TiO2 nano composites (SNCs), applied as heterogeneous catalysts in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), was studied. Fabrification of efficient SNCs using different methods and successful evaluation of their catalytic oxidative activity is reported for the first time. Surface modification processes of hydrothermal deposition, chemical treatment and sol-gel solution resulted in improved catalytic activity and good surface chemistry of the SNCs. The solids obtained after chemical treatment and hydrothermal deposition processes exhibit excellent crystallinity and photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic rate was obtained for the material prepared using hydrothermal deposition technique, compared to other nanocomposites. Further, improved removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous phase by means of catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet air oxidation processes is achieved over the solid synthesized using chemical treatment method. The present results demonstrate that the addition of TiO2 on the surface of sludge carbon (SC) increases catalytic oxidative activity of SNCs. The latter produced from harmful sludge materials can be therefore used as cost-effective and efficient sludge derived catalysts for the removal of hazardous pollutants. PMID:26223014

  18. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes. PMID:24619034

  19. Reactions of hypochlorous acid with biological substrates are activated catalytically by tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Prütz, W A

    1998-09-15

    The activation of reactions of HOCl with a variety of model substrates by tertiary amines was investigated spectroscopically by tandem-mix and stopped-flow techniques. HOCl-induced chlorination of salicylate can be sped up by several orders of magnitude by catalytic amounts of trimethylamine (TMN). The effect is obviously due to the fast generation of reactive quarternary chloramonium ions, TMN+ Cl, which act as chain carrier in a catalytic reaction cycle. Of various catalysts tested, quinine shows the highest activity; this is attributable to the quinuclidine (QN) substituent, a bicyclic tertiary amine, forming a particularly reactive chloro derivative, QN+ Cl, which does not decompose autocatalytically. The rate of catalytic salicylate chlorination as a function of pH (around pH 7) depends not at least on the basicity of the tertiary amine; the rate increases with pH in the cases of TMN and quinuclidine (high basicity), but decreases with pH in the case of MES (low basicity). Tertiary amines also catalyze the interaction between HOCl and alkenes, as shown using sorbate as model. Reaction of HOCl with the nucleotides GMP and CMP is sped up remarkably by catalytic amounts of tertiary amines. In the case of GMP the same product spectrum is produced by HOCl in absence and presence of catalyst, but a change in the product spectra is obtained when AMP and CMP are reacted with HOCl in presence of catalyst. Using poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) as DNA model, it is shown that HOCl primarily induces an absorbance increase at 263 nm, which indicates unfolding of the double strand due to fast chlorination of thymidine; a subsequent secondary absorbance decrease can be explained by slow chlorination of adenosine. Both the primary and secondary processes are activated by catalytic amounts of quinine. No evidence was found for a radical pathway in TMN-mediated oxidation of formate by HOCl. The present results suggest that low concentrations of certain tertiary amines have the potential

  20. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect. PMID:23990024

  1. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation PMID:23213902

  2. Synthesis and the thermal and catalytic dehydrogenation reactions of amine-thioboranes.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alasdair P M; Haddow, Mairi F; Manners, Ian

    2012-08-01

    A series of trimethylamine-thioborane adducts, Me(3)N·BH(2)SR (R = tBu [2a], nBu [2b], iPr [2c], Ph [2d], C(6)F(5) [2e]) have been prepared and characterized. Attempts to access secondary and primary amine adducts of thioboranes via amine-exchange reactions involving these species proved unsuccessful, with the thiolate moiety shown to be vulnerable to displacement by free amine. However, treatment of the arylthioboranes, [BH(2)-SPh](3) (9) and C(6)F(5)SBH(2)·SMe(2) (10) with Me(2)NH and iPr(2)NH successfully yielded the adducts Me(2)NH·BH(2)SR (R = Ph [11a], C(6)F(5) [12a]) and iPr(2)NH·BH(2)SR (R = Ph [11b], C(6)F(5) [12b]) in high yield. These adducts were also shown to be accessible via thermally induced hydrothiolation of the aminoboranes Me(2)N═BH(2), derived from the cyclic dimer [Me(2)N-BH(2)](2) (13), and iPr(2)N═BH(2) (14), respectively. Attempts to prepare the aliphatic thiolate substituted adducts R(2)NH·BH(2)SR' (R = Me, iPr; R' = tBu, nBu, iPr) via this method, however, proved unsuccessful, with the temperatures required to facilitate hydrothiolation also inducing thermal dehydrogenation of the amine-thioborane products to form aminothioboranes, R(2)N═BH(SR'). Thermal and catalytic dehydrogenation of the targeted amine-thioboranes, 11a/11b and 12a/12b were also investigated. Adducts 11b and 12b were cleanly dehydrogenated to yield iPr(2)N═BH(SPh) (22) and iPr(2)N═BH(SC(6)F(5)) (23), respectively, at 100 °C (18 h, toluene), with dehydrogenation also possible at 20 °C (42 h, toluene) with a 2 mol % loading of [Rh(μ-Cl)cod](2) in the case of the former species. Similar studies with adduct 11a evidenced a competitive elimination of H(2) and HSPh upon thermolysis, and other complex reactivity under catalytic conditions, whereas the fluorinated analogue 12a was found to be resistant to dehydrogenation. PMID:22800118

  3. Contributions of Phase, Sulfur Vacancies, and Edges to the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalytic Activity of Porous Molybdenum Disulfide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Xinghong; Xu, Ping; Yuan, Quan; Samad, Leith; Wang, Xianjie; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhihua; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong; Song, Bo; Jin, Song

    2016-06-29

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising nonprecious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that has been extensively studied due to its excellent performance, but the lack of understanding of the factors that impact its catalytic activity hinders further design and enhancement of MoS2-based electrocatalysts. Here, by using novel porous (holey) metallic 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets synthesized by a liquid-ammonia-assisted lithiation route, we systematically investigated the contributions of crystal structure (phase), edges, and sulfur vacancies (S-vacancies) to the catalytic activity toward HER from five representative MoS2 nanosheet samples, including 2H and 1T phase, porous 2H and 1T phase, and sulfur-compensated porous 2H phase. Superior HER catalytic activity was achieved in the porous 1T phase MoS2 nanosheets that have even more edges and S-vacancies than conventional 1T phase MoS2. A comparative study revealed that the phase serves as the key role in determining the HER performance, as 1T phase MoS2 always outperforms the corresponding 2H phase MoS2 samples, and that both edges and S-vacancies also contribute significantly to the catalytic activity in porous MoS2 samples. Then, using combined defect characterization techniques of electron spin resonance spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to quantify the S-vacancies, the contributions of each factor were individually elucidated. This study presents new insights and opens up new avenues for designing electrocatalysts based on MoS2 or other layered materials with enhanced HER performance. PMID:27269185

  4. Asphaltene cracking in catalytic hydrotreating of heavy oils. 2. study of changes in asphaltene structure during catalytic hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Sachio, A.; Chisato, T.; Shinichi, N.; Yoshimi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Characteristics in catalytic conversion of asphaltenes in petroleum heavy residues were studied in the hydrotreating process. A Boscan crude, an Athabasca bitumen, and a Khafji vacuum residue were tested as typical feedstocks. Various analyses were made to obtain the properties of asphaltenes before and after the reaction, e.g., changes of heteroatoms such as sulfur and metals, and decreases of molecular weight. The characteristic changes of asphaltene molecules were also investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and X-ray analyses. The association and coordination of vanadyl in asphaltenes were studied by the temperature dependence on the ESR spectra, and the sizes of the stacked crystallites and the aggregated asphaltene micelles were measured with X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering. In the asphaltene cracking mechanism, it was clarified that the main reactions were the destruction of asphaltene micelles caused by vanadium removal and the depolymerization of asphaltene molecules by removal of heteroatoms such as sulfur.

  5. Convective stability in the presence of a catalytic chemical reaction. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wankat, P. C.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    A linear analysis of hydrodynamic stability has been applied to a problem in which a fluid mixture is contained between two horizontal planes. One species diffuses to the lower plane where it is destroyed by a rapid exothermic or endothermic catalytic reaction. Results show that important coupling takes place between thermal and concentration fields. This coupling gives rise to unusual stabilizing or destabilizing effects, depending upon the value of Lewis number. Several examples are discussed. It is also shown how the results can be applied to other problems involving heat and mass transfer.

  6. Joint catalytic activation of CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in reaction with butadiene under the action of palladium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Kunakova, R.V.; Sidorova, V.V.

    1987-08-20

    In a continuation of the study of catalytic reactions in which small molecules participate they have examined the reaction of butadiene simultaneously with CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/ in the presence of homogeneous Pd-containing catalyst complexes with the object of developing a single-step method for the synthesis of unsaturated higher formamides. The possibility of joint catalytic activation of small molecules (CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/) has been demonstrated in their reaction with butadiene with the participation of palladium complexes, the products being mono- and bis-(2,7-octadienyl)formamides. It has been found that 2-pyrrolidone can take part in a telomerization reaction with butadiene in solutions containing palladium complexes, ammonia and carbon dioxide with the formation of N-2,7-octadienylpyrrolidone.

  7. Computational Approach for Ranking Mutant Enzymes According to Catalytic Reaction Rates

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasiri, Malika; Baker, Gregory A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally efficient approach for ranking mutant enzymes according to the catalytic reaction rates is presented. This procedure requires the generation and equilibration of the mutant structures, followed by the calculation of partial free energy curves using an empirical valence bond potential in conjunction with biased molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella integration. The individual steps are automated and optimized for computational efficiency. This approach is used to rank a series of 15 dihydrofolate reductase mutants according to the hydride transfer reaction rate. The agreement between the calculated and experimental changes in the free energy barrier upon mutation is encouraging. The computational approach predicts the correct direction of the change in free energy barrier for all mutants, and the correlation coefficient between the calculated and experimental data is 0.82. This general approach for ranking protein designs has implications for protein engineering and drug design. PMID:19235997

  8. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LX. Reactions of di-2-furyldimethylgermane under catalytic-hydrogenation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lukevits, E.; Ignatovich, L.M.; Yuskovets, Zh.G.; Golender, L.O.; Shimanskaya, M.V.

    1987-11-20

    In the reaction of di-2-furyldimethylgermane with hydrogen in the presence of the homogeneous metal-complex catalyst RhH(CO)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 3/ the selective hydrogenation of one of the furan rings occurs, but over heterogeneous catalysts (Raney Ni, Rh black, Pd/C) hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis reactions occur. Di-2-furyldimethylgermane is converted into (2-furyl)dimethyl(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-germane by the catalytic transfer of hydrogen from 2-propanol and cyclohexene. On the basis of the kinetic relations and quantum-chemical calculations of the electron structures of the original and partially hydrogenated furylgermanes a stagewise scheme is proposed of the hydrogenation of the furan ring and the further hydrogenolysis of the semihydrogenated germane molecule.

  9. Application of 3-Methyl-2-vinylindoles in Catalytic Asymmetric Povarov Reaction: Diastereo- and Enantioselective Synthesis of Indole-Derived Tetrahydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Ji-Yu; Shi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The first application of 3-methyl-2-vinylindoles in catalytic asymmetric Povarov reactions has been established via the three-component reactions of 3-methyl-2-vinylindoles, aldehydes, and anilines in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, providing easy access to chiral indole-derived tetrahydroquinolines with three contiguous stereogenic centers at high yields (up to 99%) and with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (all >95:5 dr, up to 96% ee). This mode of catalytic asymmetric three-component reaction offers a step-economic and atom-economic strategy for accessing enantioenriched indole-derived tetrahydroquinolines with structural diversity and complexity. PMID:26652222

  10. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed. PMID:25375530

  11. Nanosheet-enhanced asymmetric induction of chiral α-amino acids in catalytic aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Shi, Hui-Min; Wang, Jiu-Zhao; He, Jing

    2012-11-26

    An efficient ligand design strategy towards boosting asymmetric induction was proposed, which simply employed inorganic nanosheets to modify α-amino acids and has been demonstrated to be effective in vanadium-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic alcohols. Here, the strategy was first extended to zinc-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction, a versatile bottom-up route to make complex functional compounds. Zinc, the second-most abundant transition metal in humans, is an environment-friendly catalytic center. The strategy was then further proved valid for organocatalyzed metal-free asymmetric catalysis, that is, α-amino acid catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction. Visible improvement of enantioselectivity was experimentally achieved irrespective of whether the nanosheet-attached α-amino acids were applied as chiral ligands together with catalytic Zn(II) centers or as chiral catalysts alone. The layered double hydroxide nanosheet was clearly found by theoretical calculations to boost ee through both steric and H-bonding effects; this resembles the role of a huge and rigid substituent. PMID:23074138

  12. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: a platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Ming; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ke Xin; Han, Yu

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. PMID:23675958

  13. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-14

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs. PMID:27043428

  14. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  15. Asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions for constructing diverse scaffolds and complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Lu, Hong; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-21

    With the increasing concerns about chemical pollution and sustainability of resources, among the significant challenges facing synthetic chemists are the development and application of elegant and efficient methods that enable the concise synthesis of natural products, drugs, and related compounds in a step-, atom- and redox-economic manner. One of the most effective ways to reach this goal is to implement reaction cascades that allow multiple bond-forming events to occur in a single vessel. This Account documents our progress on the rational design and strategic application of asymmetric catalytic cascade reactions in constructing diverse scaffolds and synthesizing complex chiral molecules. Our research is aimed at developing robust cascade reactions for the systematic synthesis of a range of interesting molecules that contain structural motifs prevalent in natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological probes. The strategies employed to achieve this goal can be classified into three categories: bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis, covalent aminocatalysis/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, and asymmetric organocatalytic relay cascades. By the use of rationally designed substrates with properly reactive sites, chiral oxindole, chroman, tetrahydroquinoline, tetrahydrothiophene, and cyclohexane scaffolds were successfully assembled under bifunctional base/Brønsted acid catalysis from simple and readily available substances such as imines and nitroolefins. We found that some of these reactions are highly efficient since catalyst loadings as low as 1 mol % can promote the multistep sequences affording complex architectures with high stereoselectivities and yields. Furthermore, one of the bifunctional base/Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade reactions for the synthesis of chiral cyclohexanes has been used as a key step in the construction of the tetracyclic core of lycorine-type alkaloids and the formal synthesis of α-lycorane. Guided by the principles of

  16. A combinatorial study on catalytic synergism in supported metal catalysts for fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Yusuke; Shioyama, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    In order to accelerate the catalyst development for the increasing demand on the fuel cell technology, it has been attempted to adopt a combinatorial approach. The catalytic synergism, often observed on the supported metal catalysts for the fuel cell utilization, has been subjected to study. It is proposed herein that not only a comparison of catalysts in one reaction, but also the comparison of interrelated reactions by use of a common catalyst library brings about important information to elucidate the catalytic synergism. Preliminary results of the comparison between the water-gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of MeOH on a given set of catalyst library are presented. An important indicator to predict the serendipitous synergism is expected to be obtained from such information by use of artificial intelligence.

  17. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis. PMID:25393151

  18. Energy-efficient syngas production through catalytic oxy-methane reforming reactions.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Tushar V; Choudhary, Vasant R

    2008-01-01

    The considerable recent interest in the conversion of stranded methane into transportable liquids as well as fuel cell technology has provided a renewed impetus to the development of efficient processes for the generation of syngas. The production of syngas (CO/H2), a very versatile intermediate, can be the most expensive step in the conversion of methane to value-added liquid fuels. The catalytic oxy reforming of methane, which is an energy-efficient process that can produce syngas at extremely high space-time yields, is discussed in this Review. As long-term catalyst performance is crucial for the wide-scale commercialization of this process, catalyst-related studies are abundant. Correspondingly, herein, emphasis is placed on discussing the different issues related to the development of catalysts for oxy reforming. Important aspects of related processes such as catalytic oxy-steam, oxy-CO2, and oxy-steam-CO2 processes will also be discussed. PMID:18188848

  19. The Catalytic Activity of Proline Racemase: a QM/MM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenta, Marco; Calvaresi, Matteo; Altoè, Piero; Spinelli, Domenico; Garavelli, Marco; Bottoni, Andrea

    2007-12-01

    The catalytic activity of an interesting enzyme (involved in the life cycle of the Trypanosoma Cruzi eucariotic parasite) has been elucidated by mean of a QM/MM study. The reaction mechanism of the stereo-inversion of the substrate has been studied by characterizing the associated PES. The nature of the found critical point has been checked by means of numerical frequencies calculations. The role of the various residues in the catalysis has been pointed out.

  20. Spatially orthogonal chemical functionalization of a hierarchical pore network for catalytic cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Bingham, Laura M.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical functionality within porous architectures dictates their performance as heterogeneous catalysts; however, synthetic routes to control the spatial distribution of individual functions within porous solids are limited. Here we report the fabrication of spatially orthogonal bifunctional porous catalysts, through the stepwise template removal and chemical functionalization of an interconnected silica framework. Selective removal of polystyrene nanosphere templates from a lyotropic liquid crystal-templated silica sol-gel matrix, followed by extraction of the liquid crystal template, affords a hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous architecture. Decoupling of the individual template extractions allows independent functionalization of macropore and mesopore networks on the basis of chemical and/or size specificity. Spatial compartmentalization of, and directed molecular transport between, chemical functionalities affords control over the reaction sequence in catalytic cascades; herein illustrated by the Pd/Pt-catalysed oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamic acid. We anticipate that our methodology will prompt further design of multifunctional materials comprising spatially compartmentalized functions.

  1. Solar photo-thermal catalytic reactions to produce high value chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Prengle, Jr, H W; Wentworth, W E

    1992-04-01

    This report presents a summary of the research work accomplished to date on the utilization of solar photo-thermal energy to convert low cost chemical feedstocks into high $-value chemical products. The rationale is that the solar IR-VIS-UV spectrum is unique, supplying endothermic reaction energy as well as VIS-UV for photochemical activation. Chemical market analysis and product price distribution focused attention on speciality chemicals with prices >$1.00/lb, and a synthesis sequence of n-paraffins to aromatics to partial oxidized products. The experimental work has demonstrated that enhanced reaction effects result from VIS-UV irradiation of catalytically active V2O5/SiO2. Experiments of the past year have been on dehydrogenation and dehydrocyclization of n-paraffins to olefins and aromatics with preference for the latter. Recent results using n-hexane produced 95% conversion with 56% benzene; it is speculated that aromatic yield should reach {approximately}70% by further optimization. Pilot- and commercial-scale reactor configurations have been examined; the odds-on-favorite being a shallow fluid-bed of catalyst with incident radiation from the top. Sequencing for maximum cost effectiveness would be day-time endothermic followed by night-time exothermic reactions to produce the products.

  2. Systematic analysis of palladium-graphene nanocomposites and their catalytic applications in Sonogashira reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Hoon; Han, Sang-Wook; Kwon, Ki-Young; Park, Joon B

    2013-08-01

    Graphene has been modified with palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) to develop high performance catalysts for the Sonogashira cross coupling reaction. In this research, graphite oxide (GO) sheets exfoliated from graphite were impregnated with Pd(OAc)2 to prepare Pd(2+)/GO. Thermal treatments of the Pd(2+)/GO in H2 flow at 100°C produced Pd/graphene (Pd/G) nanocomposites. TEM images show that Pd NPs were distributed quite uniformly on the graphene sheet without obvious aggregation, and the mean size of Pd NPs was determined to be less than 2 nm in diameter. Morphological and chemical structures of the GO, Pd(2+)/GO, and Pd/G were investigated using FT-IR, XRD, XPS, and XAFS. The resulting Pd/G showed excellent catalytic efficiency in the Sonogashira reaction and offers significant advantages over inorganic supported catalysts such as simple recovery and recycling. Finally, deactivation process of the Pd/G in recycling was investigated. We believe that the remarkable reactivity of the Pd/G catalyst toward the Sonogashira reaction is attributed to the high degree of the Pd NP dispersion and thus the increased low coordination numbers of smaller Pd NPs. PMID:23673006

  3. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni.

    PubMed

    Iles, Gail N; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials. PMID:25053313

  4. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Iles, Gail N. Reinhart, Guillaume; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F. Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-21

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni{sub 2}Al{sub 3} and NiAl{sub 3} continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  5. Neutron diffraction studies for realtime leaching of catalytic Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iles, Gail N.; Devred, François; Henry, Paul F.; Reinhart, Guillaume; Hansen, Thomas C.

    2014-07-01

    The leaching of Al from intermetallic samples of Nickel Aluminium alloys to form Raney-type nickel catalysts is widely used in the hydrogenation industry, however, little is known of the leaching process itself. In this study, the leaching of Al was measured in realtime, in situ, using the high-flux powder neutron diffractometer, D20, at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Despite the liberation of hydrogen and effervescent nature of the reaction the transformation of the dry powder phases into Raney-type Ni was determined. Samples produced by gas-atomisation were found to leach faster than those produced using the cast and crushed technique. Regardless of processing route of the precursor powder, the formation of spongy-Ni occurs almost immediately, while Ni2Al3 and NiAl3 continue to transform over longer periods of time. Small-angle scattering and broadening of the diffraction peaks is an evidence for the formation of the smaller Ni particles. Understanding the kinetics of the leaching process will allow industry to refine production of catalysts for optimum manufacturing time while knowledge of leaching dynamics of powders produced by different manufacturing techniques will allow further tailoring of catalytic materials.

  6. Mechanistic and Catalytic Studies of β-Nitroalcohol Crosslinking with Polyamine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Yongjun; Rao, Yi; Solomon, Marissa R; Paik, David C; Turro, Nicholas J

    2013-06-15

    β-Nitroalcohols (βNAs) are promising corneoscleral crosslinking agents for the treatment of diseases such as keratoconus and myopia. Although it is believed that formaldehyde is released from the crosslinking reactions of βNAs, the mechanism by which βNAs react with amine-functionalized polymers has yet to be known. In this study, we present the reaction mechanism of the βNA crosslinking. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data provide strong evidence that formaldehyde is released during the reaction. Catalytic studies show that sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and salmon testes DNA accelerate the reaction while hydroxynitrile lyase from Arabidopsis thaliana decelerates the crosslinking reaction. These results suggest that βNAs are potential self-administered crosslinking agents for future clinical use. PMID:24596431

  7. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Raymond C; Hitomi, Kenichi; Arvai, Andrew S; House, Paul G; Kurtz, Andrew J; Dodson, M L; McCullough, Amanda K; Tainer, John A; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2004-11-01

    The Escherichia coli adenine DNA glycosylase, MutY, plays an important role in the maintenance of genomic stability by catalyzing the removal of adenine opposite 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or guanine in duplex DNA. Although the x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MutY revealed a mechanism for catalysis of the glycosyl bond, it appeared that several opportunistically positioned lysine side chains could participate in a secondary beta-elimination reaction. In this investigation, it is established via site-directed mutagenesis and the determination of a 1.35-A structure of MutY in complex with adenine that the abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase activity is alternatively regulated by two lysines, Lys142 and Lys20. Analyses of the crystallographic structure also suggest a role for Glu161 in the apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase chemistry. The beta-elimination reaction is structurally and chemically uncoupled from the initial glycosyl bond scission, indicating that this reaction occurs as a consequence of active site plasticity and slow dissociation of the product complex. MutY with either the K142A or K20A mutation still catalyzes beta and beta-delta elimination reactions, and both mutants can be trapped as covalent enzyme-DNA intermediates by chemical reduction. The trapping was observed to occur both pre- and post-phosphodiester bond scission, establishing that both of these intermediates have significant half-lives. Thus, the final spectrum of DNA products generated reflects the outcome of a delicate balance of closely related equilibrium constants. PMID:15326180

  8. Catalytic Mechanism Investigation of Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1): A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhongjie; Lu, Junyan; Chen, Liang; Shen, Bairong; Li, Donghai; Zheng, Mingyue; Li, Keqin Kathy; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang

    2011-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase which specifically demethylates mono- or dimethylated H3K4 and H3K9 via a redox process. It participates in a broad spectrum of biological processes and is of high importance in cell proliferation, adipogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosome segregation and embryonic development. To date, as a potential drug target for discovering anti-tumor drugs, the medical significance of LSD1 has been greatly appreciated. However, the catalytic mechanism for the rate-limiting reductive half-reaction in demethylation remains controversial. By employing a combined computational approach including molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, the catalytic mechanism of dimethylated H3K4 demethylation by LSD1 was characterized in details. The three-dimensional (3D) model of the complex was composed of LSD1, CoREST, and histone substrate. A 30-ns MD simulation of the model highlights the pivotal role of the conserved Tyr761 and lysine-water-flavin motif in properly orienting flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with respect to substrate. The synergy of the two factors effectively stabilizes the catalytic environment and facilitated the demethylation reaction. On the basis of the reasonable consistence between simulation results and available mutagenesis data, QM/MM strategy was further employed to probe the catalytic mechanism of the reductive half-reaction in demethylation. The characteristics of the demethylation pathway determined by the potential energy surface and charge distribution analysis indicates that this reaction belongs to the direct hydride transfer mechanism. Our study provides insights into the LSD1 mechanism of reductive half-reaction in demethylation and has important implications for the discovery of regulators against LSD1 enzymes. PMID:21984927

  9. On the catalytic effects of UO 2(s) and Pd(s) on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    The possible catalytic effects of UO 2 and Pd (as a model for noble metal particles) on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 have been studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in aqueous solution using an autoclave. The aqueous solutions were pressurized with H 2 or N 2 and the H 2O 2 concentration was measured as a function of time. The experiments clearly showed that Pd catalyzes the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 while UO 2 has no catalytic effect. The rate constant of the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 catalyzed by Pd was found to be close to diffusion controlled and independent of the H 2 pressure in the range 1-40 bar. The impact of the catalytic effect on the reaction between H 2O 2 and H 2 on spent nuclear fuel dissolution is, however, fairly small. Other possible effects of noble metal particles are also discussed, e.g. reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the liquid and solid phase.

  10. Pd@[nBu₄][Br] as a Simple Catalytic System for N-Alkylation Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Cacciuttolo, Bastien; Pascu, Oana; Aymonier, Cyril; Pucheault, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles, simply and briefly generated in commercial and cheap onium salts using supercritical carbon dioxide, have been found to be an effective catalytic system for additive free N-alkylation reaction using alcohols via cascade oxidation/condensation/reduction steps. PMID:27517898

  11. Structural insights into the catalytic reaction trigger and inhibition of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroki; Hoque, Md Mominul; Tsunoda, Masaru; Suzuki, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Kawai, Gota; Kondo, Jiro; Takénaka, Akio

    2016-07-01

    D-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase catalyzes the reversible conversion of acetoacetate and D-3-hydroxybutyrate. These ketone bodies are both energy-storage forms of acetyl-CoA. In order to clarify the structural mechanisms of the catalytic reaction with the cognate substrate D-3-hydroxybutyrate and of the inhibition of the reaction by inhibitors, the enzyme from Alcaligenes faecalis has been analyzed by X-ray crystallography in liganded states with the substrate and with two types of inhibitor: malonate and methylmalonate. In each subunit of the tetrameric enzyme, the substrate is trapped on the nicotinamide plane of the bound NAD(+). An OMIT map definitively shows that the bound ligand is D-3-hydroxybutyrate and not acetoacetate. The two carboxylate O atoms form four hydrogen bonds to four conserved amino-acid residues. The methyl group is accommodated in the nearby hydrophobic pocket so that the formation of a hydrogen bond from the OH group of the substrate to the hydroxy group of Tyr155 at the active centre is facilitated. In this geometry, the H atom attached to the C(3) atom of the substrate in the sp(3) configuration is positioned at a distance of 3.1 Å from the nicotinamide C(4) atom in the direction normal to the plane. In addition, the donor-acceptor relationship of the hydrogen bonds suggests that the Tyr155 OH group is allowed to ionize by the two donations from the Ser142 OH group and the ribose OH group. A comparison of the protein structures with and without ligands indicates that the Gln196 residue of the small movable domain participates in the formation of additional hydrogen bonds. It is likely that this situation can facilitate H-atom movements as the trigger of the catalytic reaction. In the complexes with inhibitors, however, their principal carboxylate groups interact with the enzyme in a similar way, while the interactions of other groups are changed. The crucial determinant for inhibition is that the inhibitors have no active H atom at C

  12. Pyranone natural products as inspirations for catalytic reaction discovery and development.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Benjamin R; Scheidt, Karl A

    2015-04-21

    Natural products continue to provide a wealth of opportunities in the areas of chemical and therapeutic development. These structures are effective measuring sticks for the current state of chemical synthesis as a field and constantly inspire new approaches and strategies. Tetrahydropryans and tetrahydropyran-4-ones are found in numerous bioactive marine natural products and medicinal compounds. Our interest in exploring the therapeutic potential of natural products containing these motifs provided the impetus to explore new methods to access highly functionalized, chiral pyran molecules in the most direct and rapid fashion possible. This goal led to exploration and development of a Lewis acid-mediated Prins reaction between a chiral β-hydroxy-dioxinone and aldehyde to produce a pyran-dioxinone fused product that can be processed in a single pot operation to the desired tetrahydropyran-4-ones in excellent yield and stereoselectivity. Although the Prins reaction is a commonly employed approach toward pyrans, this method uniquely provides a 3-carboxy-trisubstituted pyran and utilizes dioxinones in a manner that was underexplored at the time. The 3-carboxy substituent served as a key synthetic handhold when this method was applied to the synthesis of highly functionalized pyrans within the macrocyclic natural products neopeltolide, okilactiomycin, and exiguolide. When employed in challenging macrocyclizations, this tetrahydropyranone forming reaction proved highly stereoselective and robust. Another major thrust in our lab has been the synthesis of benzopyranone natural products, specifically flavonoids, because this broad and diverse family of compounds possesses an equally broad range of biological and medicinal applications. With the goal of developing a broad platform toward the synthesis of enantioenriched flavonoid analogs and natural products, a biomimetic, asymmetric catalytic approach toward the synthesis of 2-aryl benzopyranones was developed. A

  13. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models: application to catalytic reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Chiara; Filisetti, Alessandro; Graudenzi, Alex; Lecca, Paola

    2013-02-01

    A general numerical methodology for parametric sensitivity analysis is proposed, which allows to determine the parameters exerting the greatest influence on the output of a stochastic computational model, especially when the knowledge about the actual value of a parameter is insufficient. An application of the procedure is performed on a model of protocell, in order to detect the kinetic rates mainly affecting the capability of a catalytic reaction network enclosed in a semi-permeable membrane to retain material from its environment and to generate a variety of molecular species within its boundaries. It is shown that the former capability is scarcely sensitive to variations in the model parameters, whereas a kinetic rate responsible for profound modifications of the latter can be identified and it depends on the specific reaction network. A faster uptaking of limited resources from the environment may have represented a significant advantage from an evolutionary point of view and this result is a first indication in order to decipher which kind of structures are more suitable to achieve a viable evolution. PMID:23246776

  14. Catalytically active polymers obtained by molecular imprinting and their application in chemical reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, O

    2001-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a way of creating polymers bearing artificial receptors. It allows the fabrication of highly selective plastics by polymerizing monomers in the presence of a template. This technique primarily had been developed for the generation of biomimetic materials to be used in chromatographic separation, in extraction approaches and in sensors and assays. Beyond these applications, in the past few years molecular imprinting has become a tool for producing new kinds of catalysts. For catalytic applications, the template must be chosen, so that it is structurally comparable with the transition state (a transition state analogue, TSA) of a reaction, or with the product or substrate. The advantage of using these polymeric catalysts is obvious: the backbone withstands more aggressive conditions than a bio material could ever survive. Results are presented showing the applicability of a molecularly imprinted catalyst in different kinds of chemical reactors. It is demonstrated that the catalysts can be utilized not only in batch but also in continuously driven reactors and that their performance can be improved by means of chemical reaction engineering. PMID:11429307

  15. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites. PMID:27420904

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. PMID:27106147

  17. The effect of external magnetic fields on the catalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Changlai; Li, Ren; Li, Ran; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-04-01

    Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the adsorption system, which is beneficial to the reaction. From the analysis of the partial density states, it could be seen that the 2p orbital of the carbon atom in bromobenzene and the 4d orbital of the Pd atom overlap more closely in the presence of MFs, which is beneficial for the electron transfer from the Pd substrate to the bromobenzene molecule. This study is helpful in understanding the interaction between MFs and catalysts and regulating the process of catalytic reactions via MFs.Pd nanoparticles supported on Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles (marked as Pd@Co3[Co(CN)6]2 nanoparticles) were prepared as catalysts for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction under external magnetic fields (MFs). It is shown that a weak external MF can increase the rate of the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction at room temperature, and with the increase of the strength of external MFs the reaction rate also increased. At 30 °C, the yield was increased by nearly 50% under a 0.5 T external MF after 24 hours compared to that without a MF applied. Theoretical calculations revealed that the adsorption energy changed from -1.07 to -1.12 eV in the presence of MFs, which increased by 5% compared with the absence of MFs, leading to a lower total energy of the

  18. Aluminosilicates as controlled molecular environments for selective photochemical and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation concerns research that involves photochemical, catalytic and spectroscopic studies of clays, pillared clays and zeolites. Incorporation of uranyl ions into hectorite, montmorillonite, bentonite and vermiculite clays was monitored by XRD and luminescence methods. Excitation and emission characteristics were studied in order to understand the behavior of uranyl ions in clays after various thermal treatments. Luminescence lifetime measurements elucidated the number of uranyl sites. Uranyl-exchanged clays were found to absorb light at lower energies (445-455nm) than analogous uranyl-exchanged zeolites (425nm). Each uranyl-exchanged clay was tested as a catalyst for the photoassisted oxidation of isopropyl alcohol. Energy transfer (ET) between uranyl and Eu(III) ions in different zeolite framework systems was examined. The efficiency of ET (eta/sub t/) was found to be affected by the type of framework present. Pillared bentonites were examined in the hydrocracking of decane. A catalytically and spectroscopically active dopant ion, Cr(III), was introduced into the clays in both pillared and unpillared forms depending upon synthetic conditions. EPR and DRS were employed to monitor the environment of Cr(III) for determination of its location - whether in the micropore structure or associated with alumina pillars. Catalytic behavior based upon this variability of location was examined. Incorporation of Cr(III) ions into an alumina pillar was found to increase the stability and activity with respect to an alumina PILC catalyst. The results of these studies suggest that selective, efficient catalysts can be designed around inorganic ions in aluminosilicate supports.

  19. Initial Reaction Mechanism of Platinum Nanoparticle in Methanol-Water System and the Anomalous Catalytic Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangming; Yang, Qingying; Wang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Ye, Qing; Song, Li

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the detailed reaction mechanism in the early stage of noble metal nanoparticles is very critical for controlling the final crystal's size, morphology, and properties. Here, we report a systematic study on the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles in methanol-water system and demonstrate an anomalous catalytic effect of H2O on the reduction of H2PtCl6 to Pt nanoparticles using a combination of UV-vis, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and first-principles calculation methods. The observations reveal the transformation route [PtCl6](2-) → [PtCl5(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl4](2-) → [PtCl3(CH3O)](2-) → [PtCl2](2-) and finally to form Pt nanoparticles in a pure CH3OH solution. With 10 vol % water adding in the CH3OH solution, a new and distinct chemical reduction pathway is found in which the precursors change from [PtCl6](2-) to [PtCl5(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl4](2-) to [PtCl3(CH3O)(H2O)](2-) to [PtCl2](2-) and to Pt nanoparticles. Notably, the supernumerary water molecular can significantly accelerate the rate of chemical reduction and greatly shorten the reaction time. This work not only elucidates the initial reaction mechanism of Pt nanoparticles but also highlights the pronounced influence of H2O on the reaction pathway, which will provide useful insights for understanding the formation mechanism of noble metal nanoparticles and open up a high efficient way to synthesize new functional nanomaterial. PMID:26258551

  20. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:27601199

  1. Ultrafast Dynamics of Plasmon-Exciton Interaction of Ag Nanowire- Graphene Hybrids for Surface Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qianqian; Shi, Ying; Chen, Maodu; Li, Hui; Yang, Xianzhong; Qu, Yingqi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Using the ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy, the femtosecond-resolved plasmon-exciton interaction of graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids is experimentally investigated, in the VIS-NIR region. The plasmonic lifetime of Ag nanowire is about 150 ± 7 femtosecond (fs). For a single layer of graphene, the fast dynamic process at 275 ± 77 fs is due to the excitation of graphene excitons, and the slow process at 1.4 ± 0.3 picosecond (ps) is due to the plasmonic hot electron interaction with phonons of graphene. For the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids, the time scale of the plasmon-induced hot electron transferring to graphene is 534 ± 108 fs, and the metal plasmon enhanced graphene plasmon is about 3.2 ± 0.8 ps in the VIS region. The graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can be used for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. This graphene-mediated surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate significantly increases the probability and efficiency of surface catalytic reactions co-driven by graphene-Ag nanowire hybridization, in comparison with reactions individually driven by monolayer graphene or single Ag nanowire. This implies that the graphene-Ag nanowire hybrids can not only lead to a significant accumulation of high-density hot electrons, but also significantly increase the plasmon-to-electron conversion efficiency, due to strong plasmon-exciton coupling. PMID:27601199

  2. Classical Keggin Intercalated into Layered Double Hydroxides: Facile Preparation and Catalytic Efficiency in Knoevenagel Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yueqing; Fang, Yanjun; Zhang, Yingkui; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-10-12

    The family of polyoxometalate (POM) intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite materials has shown great promise for the design of functional materials with numerous applications. It is known that intercalation of the classical Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) of [PW12 O40 ](3-) (PW12 ) into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is very unlikely to take place by conventional ion exchange methods due to spatial and geometrical restrictions. In this paper, such an intercalated compound of Mg0.73 Al0.22 (OH)2 [PW12 O40 ]0.04 ⋅0.98 H2 O (Mg3 Al-PW12 ) has been successfully obtained by applying a spontaneous flocculation method. The Mg3 Al-PW12 has been fully characterized by using a wide range of methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDX, XPS, FT-IR, NMR, BET). XRD patterns of Mg3 Al-PW12 exhibit no impurity phase usually observed next to the (003) diffraction peak. Subsequent application of the Mg3 Al-PW12 as catalyst in Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various aldehydes and ketones with Z-CH2 -Z' type substrates (ethyl cyanoacetate and malononitrile) at 60 °C in mixed solvents (V2-propanol :Vwater =2:1) demonstrated highly efficient catalytic activity. The synergistic effect between the acidic and basic sites of the Mg3 Al-PW12 composite proved to be crucial for the efficiency of the condensation reactions. Additionally, the Mg3 Al-PW12 -catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate demonstrated the highest turnover number (TON) of 47 980 reported so far for this reaction. PMID:26337902

  3. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  4. In Situ Infrared Study of Catalytic Decomposition of NO

    SciTech Connect

    Cher-Dip Tan; Steven S.C. Chuang

    1997-07-17

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emmissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccesful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  5. Surface characterization and catalytic CO + H 2 reaction on Fe 82.2B 17.8 amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisfaludi, G.; Lázár, K.; Schay, Z.; Guczi, L.; Fetzer, Cs.; Konczos, G.; Lovas, A.

    1985-09-01

    Fe 82.2B 17.8 amorphous ribbon has been used as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch-type reaction of CO+H 2. Specific activity has been found to be at least an order of magnitude higher than that of either the crystallized ribbon of identical composition or the supported iron catalyst. Before and after the catalytic tests the ribbons were characterized by XRD, XPS, UPS and Mössbauer spectroscopy in transmission and in conversion electron modes. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and UPS proved that the surface of the amorphous ribbons is being partially crystallized during 8000 min reaction time at a maximum reaction temperature of 560 K. The superior catalytic activity has been explained by stabilization of the small iron particles and Fe 2O 3 by boron atoms at the surface and by suppressed carbide formation.

  6. First-principles quantum mechanical investigations: Catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111) and at the water/Pd(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wenhua

    Bio-oils have drawn more and more attention from scientists as a promising new clean, cheap energy source. One of the most interesting relevant issues is the effect of catalysts on the catalytic reactions that are used for producing bio-oils. Furfural, as a very important intermediate during these reactions, has attracted significant studies. However, the effect of catalysts, including particularly the liquid/solid interface formed by a metal catalyst and liquid water, in the catalytic reactions involving furfural still remains elusive. In this research, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of catalytic hydrogenation of furfural on the palladium surface and at the liquid/state interface formed by the palladium surface and liquid water. We studied all the possible mechanisms that lead to formation of furfuryl alcohol (FOL), formation of tetrahydrofurfural (THFAL), and formation of tetrahydrofurfurfuryl alcohol (THFOL). We found that liquid water plays a significant role in the hydrogenation reactions. During the reaction in the presence of water and the palladium catalyst, in particular, water directly participates in the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group of furfural and facilitates the formation of FOL by reducing the activation energy. Our calculations show that water provides hydrogen for the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group, and at the same time, a pre-existing hydrogen atom, which is resulted from dissociation of molecular hydrogen (experimentally, molecular hydrogen is always supplied for hydrogenation) on the palladium surface, is bonded to water, making the water molecule intact in structure. In the absence of water, on the other hand, formation of FOL and THFAL on the palladium surface involves almost the same energy barriers, suggesting a comparable selectivity. Overall, as water reduces the activation energy for the formation of FOL

  7. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  8. Preparation of Low Molecular Weight Heparin by Microwave Discharge Electrodeless Lamp/TiO2 Photo-Catalytic Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Jin; Kim, Byung Hoon; Kim, Sun-Jae; Kim, Jung-Sik; Lee, Heon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2015-01-01

    An MDEL/TiO2 photo-catalyst hybrid system was applied, for the first time, for the production of low molecular weight heparin. The molecular weight of produed heparin decreased with increasing microwave intensity and treatment time. The abscission of the chemical bonds between the constituents of heparin by photo-catalytic reaction did not alter the characteristics of heparin. Formation of by-products due to side reaction was not observed. It is suggested that heparin was depolymerized by active oxygen radicals produced during the MDEL/TiO2 photo-chemical reaction. PMID:26328426

  9. Pt monolayer coating on complex network substrate with high catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Ma, Qiang; Zi, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xuejie; Liu, Shengzhong (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    A deposition process has been developed to fabricate a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a large-surface-area three-dimensional (3D) Ni foam substrate using a buffer layer (Ag or Au) strategy. The quartz crystal microbalance, current density analysis, cyclic voltammetry integration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and the deposition can be controlled to a single atomic layer thickness. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a complete-monolayer Pt coating on a 3D bulk substrate with complex fine structures; all prior literature reported on submonolayer or incomplete-monolayer coating. A thin underlayer of Ag or Au is found to be necessary to cover a very reactive Ni substrate to ensure complete-monolayer Pt coverage; otherwise, only an incomplete monolayer is formed. Moreover, the Pt monolayer is found to work as well as a thick Pt film for catalytic reactions. This development may pave a way to fabricating a high-activity Pt catalyst with minimal Pt usage. PMID:26601247

  10. Novel plasma catalytic reaction for structural-controlled growth of graphene and graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    2013-09-01

    An advanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has outstanding advantages for the structural-controlled growth and functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Graphene nanoribbons combine the unique electronic and spin properties of graphene with a transport gap. This makes them an attractive candidate material for the channels of next-generation transistors. However, the reliable site and alignment control of nanoribbons with high on/off current ratios remains a challenge. We have developed a new, simple, scalable method based on novel plasma catalytic reaction for directly fabricating narrow (23 nm) graphene nanoribbon devices with a clear transport gap (58.5 meV) and a high on/off ratio (10000). Indeed, graphene nanoribbons can be grown at any desired position on an insulating substrate without any post-growth treatment, and large-scale, two- and three dimensional integration of graphene nanoribbon devices should be realizable, thereby accelerating the practical evolution of graphene nanoribbon-based electrical applications.

  11. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  12. Differential divalent cation requirements uncouple the assembly and catalytic reactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Hazuda, D J; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A L

    1997-01-01

    Previous in vitro analyses have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase uses either manganese or magnesium to assemble as a stable complex on the donor substrate and to catalyze strand transfer. We now demonstrate that subsequent to assembly, catalysis of both 3' end processing and strand transfer requires a divalent cation cofactor and that the divalent cation requirements for assembly and catalysis can be functionally distinguished based on the ability to utilize calcium and cobalt, respectively. The different divalent cation requirements manifest by these processes are exploited to uncouple assembly and catalysis, thus staging the reaction. Staged 3' end processing and strand transfer assays are then used in conjunction with exonuclease III protection analysis to investigate the effects of integrase inhibitors on each step in the reaction. Analysis of a series of related inhibitors demonstrates that these types of compounds affect assembly and not either catalytic process, therefore reconciling the apparent disparate results obtained for such inhibitors in assays using isolated preintegration complexes. These studies provide evidence for a distinct role of the divalent cation cofactor in assembly and catalysis and have implications for both the identification and characterization of integrase inhibitors. PMID:9261430

  13. Green synthesis of silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots: enhanced photoluminescence and high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minmin; Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance.Metal nanoclusters exhibit unusual optical and catalytic properties due to their unique electronic structures. Here, surfactant-free silver nanoclusters supported on carbon nanodots were synthesized through a facile and green approach with only glucose and AgNO3 as precursors and without any other protecting ligands and reducing agents. The hybrid nanoclusters exhibited enhanced blue fluorescence compared to the carbon nanodots. More importantly, the ``surface-clean'' silver nanoclusters have remarkable electrocatalytic performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the most efficient four-electron transfer process. Moreover, compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pt-free hybrid clusters showed comparable catalytic performance for ORR but much higher tolerance to methanol crossover. Such silver nanoclusters will provide broad applications in fluorescence-related areas and in fuel cells as an efficient Pt-free catalyst with low cost and high catalytic performance. Electronic

  14. Oxidative catalytic evolution of redox- and spin-states of a Fe-phthalocyanine studied by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletsa, Eleni; Solakidou, Maria; Louloudi, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-04-01

    The catalytic-oxidative evolution of the redox/spin states of a Fe-phthalocyanine (Fe-Pc) catalyst was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Under oxidative catalytic conditions, Fe-Pc may evolve via multiple redox/spin conformations. Axial ligation of imidazole, O2 or t-Bu-OOH as oxidant, results in a complex multipath redox/spin landscape that was determined in detail herein. The high-spin conformations of Fe-Pc/imidazole evolve more slowly than the low-spin conformations. Catalytically active vs. inactive conformations were distinguished. A unified physicochemical catalytic reaction mechanism is discussed herein based on the distinct role of the various structural, spin and redox forms.

  15. Chloromethyl chlorosulfate: a new, catalytic method of preparation and reactions with some nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Power, Nicholas P; Bethell, Donald; Proctor, Lee; Latham, Elliot; Dawson, Paul

    2004-05-21

    The reaction of liquid (gamma-) SO3 with CH2Cl2 at room temperature leads to SO3 insertion into the C-Cl bonds, giving the useful chloromethylating agent chloromethyl chlorosulfate (CMCS). The process is very slow but becomes rapid on addition of catalytic quantities of trimethyl borate. The product mixture consists almost entirely of CMCS and the product of further sulfation, methylene bis(chlorosulfate)(MBCS), in a ratio of ca. 2 : 1, but typical yields of CMCS, isolated by distillation, are only 30-35%. The catalysed reaction in the homogeneous liquid phase at -45 degrees C has been followed as a function of time and of reactant concentration by 1H nmr spectroscopy. It is observed that, besides CMCS and MBCS, three additional, transient products (designated A, B and C) are formed. Products A, B and C decompose slowly at -45 degrees C but much more rapidly if the reaction mixture is raised to room temperature, giving additional CMCS and MBCS. From an analysis of the SO3 balance, it is inferred that products A, B and C arise from the reaction of one molecule of CH2Cl2 with respectively two, three and four molecules of SO3; they are suggested to be chloromethyl chloropolysulfates. By measuring initial rates of CMCS formation or total CH2Cl2 consumption, it is shown that the reaction is first order in the catalyst and roughly third order in SO3. A mechanistic scheme is proposed in which SO3 forms equilibrating zwitterionic molecular complexes with CH2Cl2. of 1 : 1, 2 : 1 and higher stoichiometries. The boron-containing catalyst can activate these complexes towards nucleophilic attack at carbon by the negatively charged oxygen of another zwitterion. An analogous mechanism can be written for the conversion of CMCS into MBCS by SO3 in the presence of trimethyl borate. CMCS reacts rapidly with anionic nucleophiles, such as halide or acetate ions (X-), in homogeneous solution of their tetrabutylammonium salts in CD3CN, or in a two-phase system (CDCl3/H2O) using alkali

  16. Enantioselective construction of a 2,2'-bisindolylmethane scaffold via catalytic asymmetric reactions of 2-indolylmethanols with 3-alkylindoles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-Xin; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhu, Qiu-Ning; Shi, Feng

    2015-08-01

    A chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed asymmetric reaction of 2-indolylmethanols with 3-alkylindoles has been established, which constructed a biologically important 2,2'-bisindolylmethane scaffold in high yields and good enantioselectivities (up to 98% yield, 94:6 er). This protocol not only provides an efficient method for constructing a 2,2'-bisindolylmethane framework in an enantioselective form, but also promotes the development of 2-indolylmethanol-involved catalytic asymmetric transformations. PMID:26111901

  17. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction.

  18. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd(2+) ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  19. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction. PMID:27079897

  20. Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Studies of Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. H.

    2004-11-23

    This project investigates the catalytic properties of oxides for the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes and for hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}. Various vanadium oxide based catalysts were investigated to elucidate the relationship between the chemical and structural properties of the catalysts and their selectivity for the formation of alkenes. It was found that vanadium oxide units that are less reducible give higher selectivities. For hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}, it was found that alumina-based catalysts can be effective at higher temperatures than the corresponding zeolite-based catalysts. On some catalysts, such as SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the alumina participates directly in the reaction, making the catalyst bifunctional. These results are useful in research to improve the performance of this stress of catalysts.

  1. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  2. In situ measurement of molecular diffusion during catalytic reaction by pulsed-field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Y.; Kaerger, J.; Hunger, B. ); Feoktistova, N.N.; Zhdanov, S.P. )

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy is applied to study the intracrystalline diffusivity of the reactant and product molecules during the conversion of cyclopropane to propene in Zeolite X. The diffusivities are found to be large enough that any influence of intracrystalline diffusion on the overall reaction in flow reactors may be excluded.

  3. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm(-2) was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. PMID:26133744

  4. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use. PMID:26000867

  5. Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D.; Maier, L.; Deutschmann, O.

    2010-09-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

  6. Enhanced coal liquefaction by low-severity catalytic reactions: Technical progress report for the period March to May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Schobert, H.H.

    1987-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine the potential and limitations of temperature-staged catalytic liquefaction. Experiments have been planned to examine the chemical reactions which occur during the low- and high-severity stages, the effects of coal rank and process conditions, the function of catalyst and influence of solvent donor capability. In our dry, catalytic experiments the key to high conversions is the use of hydrogen at 425/sup 0/C. Pretreatment with nitrogen gave essentially no advantage, and with hydrogen resulted in a slight improvement in oil yield. For the non-catalytic reactions, with a solvent, the result demonstrates the importance of a hydrogen donor (tetralin compared to naphthalene). The use of hydrogen in the pretreatment stage has little influence on the total level of conversion, but gives a somewhat better oil-asphaltene ratio. In fact, regardless of whether a hydrogen donor is present, the best oil/asphaltene ratios were always obtained whenever hydrogen was used in the first stage and nitrogen in the second stage. In order to understand what kinds of bonds are broken during a low-temperature stage in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, five model compounds have been reacted and evaluated in terms of product yield and boiling point distribution. For the reactions conducted at 275/sup 0/C, biphenyl was found to be unreactive, even in the presence of a catalyst; pyrene, diphenyl ketone and phenyl ether are relatively reactive under these conditions. Temperature-staging with MoS/sub 2/ as the catalyst, for most of the model compounds, resulted in more products with boiling points below the starting material, than with any other conditions employed. Observations were made which suggest that minerals can act as catalysts during ''non-catalytic runs''. 12 refs.

  7. Soybean epoxide hydrolase: identification of the catalytic residues and probing of the reaction mechanism with secondary kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Summerer, Stephan; Flenet, Martine; Rogniaux, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schuber, Francis

    2005-02-25

    Soybean epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the oxirane ring opening of 9,10-epoxystearate via a two-step mechanism involving the formation of an alkylenzyme intermediate, which, in contrast to most epoxide hydrolases studied so far, was found to be the rate-limiting step. We have probed residues potentially involved in catalysis by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of His(320), a residue predicted from sequence analysis to belong to the catalytic triad of the enzyme, considerably slowed down the second half-reaction. This kinetic manipulation provoked an accumulation of the reaction intermediate, which could be trapped and characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. As expected, mutation of Asp(126) totally abolished the activity of the enzyme from its crucial function as nucleophile involved in the formation of the alkylenzyme. In line with its role as the partner of His(320) in the "charge relay system," mutation of Asp(285) dramatically reduced the rate of catalysis. However, the mutant D285L still exhibited a very low residual activity, which, by structural analysis and mutagenesis, has been tentatively attributed to Glu(195), another acidic residue of the active site. Our studies have also confirmed the fundamental role of the conserved Tyr(175) and Tyr(255) residues, which are believed to activate the oxirane ring. Finally, we have determined the secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects on the epoxide opening step of 9,10-epoxystearate. The large observed values, i.e. (T)(V/K(m)) approximately 1.30, can be interpreted by the occurrence of a very late transition state in which the epoxide bond is broken before the nucleophilic attack by Asp(126) takes place. PMID:15596432

  8. The role of acidic sites and the catalytic reaction pathways on the Rh/ZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ziyi; Ang, Hanwee; Choong, Catherine; Chen, Luwei; Huang, Lin; Lin, Jianyi

    2009-02-01

    Rh catalysts supported on ZrO(2)-based oxides were studied for ethanol steam reforming (SR) reaction. Pure ZrO(2) as the support resulted in higher H(2) production yield compared to the ZrO(2) oxide decorated with CeO(2), Al(2)O(3), La(2)O(3) or Li(2)O at the reaction temperature of 300 degrees C. Above 450 degrees C, all the catalysts exhibited similar catalytic activity. However, at low reaction temperatures (below 400 degrees C), a significant enhancement in the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability was achieved by replacing the ZrO(2) support prepared by a precipitation method (ZrO(2)-CP) with that prepared by a hydrothermal method (ZrO(2)-HT). A deactivation was observed during the EtOH SR reaction at 300 degrees C on the two catalysts of Rh/ZrO(2)-CP and Rh/ZrO(2)-HT. NH(3)-TPD experiments confirmed that the ZrO(2)-HT support had two types of acidic sites while the ZrO(2)-CP support had only one type of weak acidic sites. DRIFTS studies showed that the absorption of EtOH molecules was strong on the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst and a number of C(2) oxygenates were accumulated on the catalyst surface. Meanwhile, the EtOH absorption on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst was weak and the accumulation of CO, carbonate and CH(x) was observed. It is concluded that the relatively strong Lewis acidic sites in the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst is responsible for the strong absorption of EtOH molecules, and the subsequent C-H breakage step (formation of acetaldehyde or called as dehydrogenation reaction) is a fast reaction on it; on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst, the EtOH adsorption was weak and the C-C breakage was the dominating reaction which led to the accumulation of surface CO, CH(x) and CO(2) species. Therefore, it is believed that, in order to promote the absorption of EtOH molecules and to reduce the formation of metastable carbonaceous species (C(2) oxygenates) during the reaction, the catalyst should be enhanced both with Lewis acidity and with C-C bond breakage function. Also

  9. Catalytic effect of gallium chloride in the diels-alder reaction between maleic anhydride and its derivatives and unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.D.; Konovalov, A.I.; Shakirov, I.M.

    1985-11-10

    The stability of n, v complexes between gallium chloride and unsubstituted and substituted maleic anhydrides was determined in benzene by a thermochemical method; it was shown that the stability of the complexes decreases in the transition from maleic anhydrides with electron-donating substituents to maleic anhydrides with electron-withdrawing substituents. The reactivity of these dienophiles in the uncatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions with unsubstituted and substituted anthracenes in benzene and in the reactions catalyzed by gallium chloride was studied. The reactivity of the dienophiles varies similarly in the reactions with the investigated dienes, and this rules out treatment of steric hindrances as the reason for the reduced reactivity of the substituted dienophiles. A decrease in the catalytic effect was observed for the unreactive diene-dienophile pairs.

  10. Theoretical insights on the catalytic activity and mechanism for oxygen reduction reaction at Fe and P codoped graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Li, Kai; Xie, Guangyou; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Menggai; Tang, Hao; Wu, Zhijian

    2016-05-14

    The non-precious metal graphene catalyst doped with Fe-Px are recently proposed as a promising candidate in substituting Pt for catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Systematic DFT calculations are performed to investigate the catalytic activity and the ORR mechanism on the Fe-Px (x = 1-4) system in acid medium in this work. Our results indicated that the configuration with one Fe and two P atoms codoped at zigzag edge site (Fe-P2-zig-G) is the most stable, in excellent agreement with the experimental observation that the ratio of Fe and P is nearly 1 : 2. The four-electron reduction mechanism for ORR on the Fe-P2-zig-G is via the competing OOH hydrogenation pathways (to form either OH + OH or O + H2O). The rate determining step is the O2 hydrogenation with an energy barrier of 0.43 eV, much smaller that of calculated 0.80 eV for pure Pt. In addition, the highest energy barrier of the studied ORR mechanism is the O2 dissociation with an energy barrier of 0.70 eV, a value also smaller than that of pure Pt. This demonstrated that the zigzag edge site of the Fe-P2 codoped graphene should be active for the ORR. PMID:27094325

  11. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (<5%) in α-MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2. PMID:25284796

  12. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  13. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  14. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

    1994-09-01

    Research continued on the study of catalysts and membrane materials involved in the oxidative coupling of methane and coal gasification processes. Membranes studied and fabricated included Sr-Zr-Y-O, Sr-Zr-Y, and Sr-Ce-Y-O systems.

  15. Oxygen assisted reconstructions of rhodium and platinum nanocrystals and their effects on local catalytic activity of hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroo, C.; Gilis, N.; Lambeets, S. V.; Devred, F.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.

    2014-06-01

    The reconstruction of rhodium and platinum crystals of some tens of nanometres diameter was investigated during the ongoing hydrogenation of oxygen atoms resulting from the dissociation of O2 and NO2 species. Field ion and field emission electron microscopies (FIM and FEM) were used to characterise the apex of tip samples before, during and after the catalytic reactions. On rhodium samples, the exposure of less than 10 Langmuir of O2 is sufficient to induce significant morphological changes. At higher exposures, the presence of subsurface oxygen causes surface reconstructions illustrated with atomic resolution by FIM at 50 K. The same pattern is also visible at 505 K in the presence of H2 and O2 during water production. Upon the decrease of H2 pressure, surface oxidation shows a strong sensitivity to the local surface initiated along the <0 0 1> zone lines. On platinum, the kinetic instabilities of the NO2-H2 reaction are followed by FEM at 390 K starting from a hemispherical tip sample. The instabilities are expressed as surface explosions occurring randomly in time, but synchronised over {0 1 1} facets. These instabilities expand along the <0 0 1> lines over the (0 0 1) pole and exhibit self-sustained kinetic oscillations. The analysis of the tips by FIM after the reaction shows dark regions over the {1 1 3} facets, suggesting the extension of those to the detriment of vicinal ones. A well-controlled field evaporation procedure reveals that these regions appear dark due to the presence of surface oxygen. Structural reconstructions are observed but do not lead to the drastic morphological changes suggested by the FIM and FEM patterns. Nanoparticle dynamics must be accounted in models describing the non-linear features of catalytic reactions and more generally included in the description of catalytic properties of nanosized particles.

  16. Effect of electronic structures on catalytic properties of CuNi alloy and Pd in MeOH-related reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, An-Pang; Kimura, Tomofumi; Suzuki, Yukinori; Kameoka, Satoshi; Shimoda, Masahiko; Ishii, Yasushi

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the catalytic properties of a CuNi solid solution and Pd for methanol-related reactions and associated valence electronic structures. Calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that the CuNi alloy has a similar valence electronic structure to Pd and hence they exhibited similar CO selectivities in steam reforming of methanol and decomposition of methanol. Samples prepared by various processes were found to have similar CO selectivities. We conjecture that alloying of Cu and Ni dramatically alters the valence electronic structures, making it similar to that of Pd so that the alloy exhibits similar catalytic properties to Pd. First-principles slab calculations of surface electronic structures support this conjecture.

  17. Visible to near-infrared plasmon-enhanced catalytic activity of Pd hexagonal nanoplates for the Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. Thuy; Sato, Ryota; Sakamoto, Masanori; Fujiyoshi, Yoshifumi; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-07-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111} and six {100} planes. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates with well-defined and tunable longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have enabled the direct harvesting of visible to near-infrared light for catalytic cross coupling reactions. Upon plasmon excitation, the catalytic Suzuki coupling reactions of iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid accelerate by a plasmonic photocatalytic effect of plasmon induced hot electrons. The turnover frequency (TOF) of the Pd hexagonal nanoplates in a reaction illuminated with a λ = 300-1000 nm Xenon lamp at 176 mW cm-2 was 2.5 and 2.7 times higher than that of non-plasmonic {111}-enclosed Pd nanooctahedra and {100}-enclosed Pd nanocubes, respectively, and 1.7 times higher than the TOF obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature.Photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy is an efficient process in green chemistry because it facilitates room temperature chemical transformations by generating electronically excited states in photocatalysts. We report here on the robust synthesis, detailed structural characterization, and especially photocatalytic properties of plasmonic Pd hexagonal nanoplates for chemical reactions. The Pd hexagonal nanoplates are twin crystals, and composed of the top and bottom faces enclosed by the {111} planes with stacking faults and the side surfaces bound by mixed six {111

  18. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  19. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Maria A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E; Stoppiello, Craig T; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor. PMID:27222094

  20. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-01

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times. PMID:26256345

  1. Chemical reactions at the graphitic step-edge: changes in product distribution of catalytic reactions as a tool to explore the environment within carbon nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Thomas, Alice; Thomas, Bradley E.; Stoppiello, Craig T.; Volkova, Evgeniya; Suyetin, Mikhail; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2016-06-01

    A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction environment inside the molecular catalyst-GNF nanoreactor.A series of explorative cross-coupling reactions have been developed to investigate the local nanoscale environment around catalytically active Pd(ii)complexes encapsulated within hollow graphitised nanofibers (GNF). Two new fullerene-containing and fullerene-free Pd(ii)Salen catalysts have been synthesised, and their activity and selectivity towards different substrates has been explored in nanoreactors. The catalysts not only show a significant increase in activity and stability upon heterogenisation at the graphitic step-edges inside the GNF channel, but also exhibit a change in selectivity affected by the confinement which alters the distribution of isomeric products of the reaction. Furthermore, the observed selectivity changes reveal unprecedented details regarding the location and orientation of the catalyst molecules inside the GNF nanoreactor, inaccessible by any spectroscopic or microscopic techniques, thus shedding light on the precise reaction

  2. [A structure-activity study of a catalytic antiidiotypic antibody to the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E S; Koralevski, F; Titov, M I; Demin, A V; Kozyr', A V; Kolesnikov, A V; Tramontano, A; Paul, S; Thomas, D; Gabibov, A G; Gnuchev, N V; Friboulet, A

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic monoclonal antibody 9A8 (MA 9A8), antiidiotypic to the antibody AE-2 (MA AE2) produced to the active site of acetyl cholinesterase from human erythrocytes, was subjected to a structure-function study. The specific binding of MA 9A8 to MA AE2 (K 2.26 x 10(9) M-1) was shown by the method of surface plasmon resonance, and the functional activity of MA 9A8 was demonstrated. Unlike acetyl cholinesterase, this antibody specifically reacted with the irreversible phosphonate inhibitors of esterases. A peptide map of MA 9A8 was analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The Ser99 residue of its heavy chain was shown to be within the active site of the catalytic antibody. A computer modeling of the MA 9A8 active site suggested the existence of a catalytic dyad formed by Ser99 and His35. A comparison of the tertiary structures of the MA 9A8 and the 17E8 monoclonal antibody, which also exhibited an esterase activity and was produced to the stable analogue of the reaction transition state, indicated a practically complete coincidence of the structures of their presumed active sites. PMID:11962233

  3. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.; Perry, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    During the fourth quarter of FY93, additional studies were undertaken to quantify the effect of adding alkali to coal during charring. Figure 1 shows that the rate of gasification of Ill{number_sign}6 char prepared by charring the coal in the presence of different amounts of NAOH increases with the amount of NAOH used between 0 and 2 wt %. However, most of the improvement occurs with the addition of small amounts of alkali, while doubling the proportion of alkali from 0.9 to 1.7% gives a small additional improvement. In fact it appears that 0.8 to 1% alkali during charring is optimal. This is demonstrated in Figure 2. The chars prepared in the presence of NAOH were water washed and extracted at room temperature until the water was alkali free, dried and then gasified. Figure 2 presents the same data as Figure 1 but additionally shows the gasification rate at 640{degree}C for the water washed chars. The water washed char originally prepared with .85% NAOH had the same gasification rate as before water washing, while the gasification rate of the char originally prepared with 1.7% NAOH dropped to the level of the .85% NAOH containing char after water washing. This may be interpreted as an indication of about 1% alkali being incorporated into the char in a water insoluble form.

  4. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  5. Impairment of the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid polymerase by a unique reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan.

    PubMed Central

    Bratcher, S C; Nitta, K; Kronman, M J

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase loses 55-65% of its catalytic activity on reaction with Nbf-Cl (4-choro-7-nitrobenzofurazan). This partial inactivation was shown to be the result of specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation, since initiation of RNA chains was not altered after treatment with Nbf-Cl. The site of reaction was shown to be a unique thiol on the beta-subunit. This thiol is not accessible to reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). No protection of the enzyme against reaction with Nbf-Cl could be obtained with the inhibitor rifamycin nor with calf thymus DNA, GTP or 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the unique thiol is probably not within the active site. The specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation thus appears to be the result of a local conformational change which leaves chain initiation unimpaired. Changes observed in the tryptophan fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme or reaction with Nbf-Cl are consistent with formation of a Meisenheimer complex of the reagent with a nucleophilic group on the enzyme near the reactive thiol. It is proposed that formation of such a complex and a subsequent conformational change renders this thiol unusually susceptible to reaction with Nbf-Cl. PMID:393251

  6. Alternative substrates reveal catalytic cycle and key binding events in the reaction catalysed by anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Castell, Alina; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Short, Francesca L; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2014-07-01

    AnPRT (anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase), required for the biosynthesis of tryptophan, is essential for the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AnPRT catalyses the Mg2+-dependent transfer of a phosphoribosyl group from PRPP (5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate) to anthranilate to form PRA (5'-phosphoribosyl anthranilate). Mtb-AnPRT was shown to catalyse a sequential reaction and significant substrate inhibition by anthranilate was observed. Antimycobacterial fluoroanthranilates and methyl-substituted analogues were shown to act as alternative substrates for Mtb-AnPRT, producing the corresponding substituted PRA products. Structures of the enzyme complexed with anthranilate analogues reveal two distinct binding sites for anthranilate. One site is located over 8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) from PRPP at the entrance to a tunnel leading to the active site, whereas in the second, inner, site anthranilate is adjacent to PRPP, in a catalytically relevant position. Soaking the analogues for variable periods of time provides evidence for anthranilate located at transient positions during transfer from the outer site to the inner catalytic site. PRPP and Mg2+ binding have been shown to be associated with the rearrangement of two flexible loops, which is required to complete the inner anthranilate-binding site. It is proposed that anthranilate first binds to the outer site, providing an unusual mechanism for substrate capture and efficient transfer to the catalytic site following the binding of PRPP. PMID:24712732

  7. Controllable Assembly of Hierarchical Macroporous-Mesoporous LnFeO₃ and Their Catalytic Performance in the CO + NO Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Shi, Fu-Bo; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-08-11

    A new synthesis strategy to prepare hierarchical macroporous-mesoporous materials employing poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(phenylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) as a single template and an acid adjusting agent was reported. There is a hierarchical structure including macropores with a size of 50-100 nm and mesopores in the macroporous walls with a size of 3-5 nm. The macroporous walls are composed of rare earth orthoferrite nanoparticles with a size of 5-10 nm. These hierarchically porous materials show high catalytic activities for the CO + NO reaction, and NO can be fully converted to N2 at temperatures as low as 350 °C, indicating their potential in the catalytic conversion of automotive exhaust gas and other catalysis-related fields. This synthesis strategy is a facile method for the preparation of hierarchical porous materials and may give us a guideline for the synthesis of functional materials with further catalytic applications. PMID:26196258

  8. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the

  9. Crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic study of the first ligninolytic peroxidase presenting a catalytic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Calviño, Fabiola R; Pogni, Rebecca; Giansanti, Stefania; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, María Jesús; Basosi, Riccardo; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-04-29

    Trametes cervina lignin peroxidase (LiP) is a unique enzyme lacking the catalytic tryptophan strictly conserved in all other LiPs and versatile peroxidases (more than 30 sequences available). Recombinant T. cervina LiP and site-directed variants were investigated by crystallographic, kinetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The crystal structure shows three substrate oxidation site candidates involving His-170, Asp-146, and Tyr-181. Steady-state kinetics for oxidation of veratryl alcohol (the typical LiP substrate) by variants at the above three residues reveals a crucial role of Tyr-181 in LiP activity. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c show that its ability to oxidize large molecules (a requisite property for oxidation of the lignin polymer) originates in Tyr-181. This residue is also involved in the oxidation of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene, a reaction initiated by the one-electron abstraction with formation of substrate cation radical, as described for the well known Phanerochaete chrysosporium LiP. Detailed spectroscopic and kinetic investigations, including low temperature EPR, show that the porphyrin radical in the two-electron activated T. cervina LiP is unstable and rapidly receives one electron from Tyr-181, forming a catalytic protein radical, which is identified as an H-bonded neutral tyrosyl radical. The crystal structure reveals a partially exposed location of Tyr-181, compatible with its catalytic role, and several neighbor residues probably contributing to catalysis: (i) by enabling substrate recognition by aromatic interactions; (ii) by acting as proton acceptor/donor from Tyr-181 or H-bonding the radical form; and (iii) by providing the acidic environment that would facilitate oxidation. This is the first structure-function study of the only ligninolytic peroxidase described to date that has a catalytic tyrosine. PMID:21367853

  10. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.