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Sample records for catenulata sobre zea

  1. A perilipin gene from Clonostachys rosea f. Catenulata HL-1-1 is related to sclerotial parasitism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Li, Shi-Dong; Zhong, Zeng-Ming; Sun, Man-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea f. catenulata is a promising biocontrol agent against many fungal plant pathogens. To identify mycoparasitism-related genes from C. rosea f. catenulata, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1 that parasitizes the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum was constructed. 502 clones were sequenced randomly, and thereby 472 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. Forty-three unigenes were annotated and exhibited similarity to a wide diversity of genes. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that a perilipin-like protein encoding gene, Per3, was up-regulated by 6.6-fold over the control at 96 h under the induction of sclerotia. The full-length sequence of Per3 was obtained via 5' and 3' rapid identification of cDNA ends. Overexpression of Per3 in HL-1-1 significantly enhanced the parasitic ability on sclerotia. The results indicated that Per3 might be involved in the mycoparasitism of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1. This is the first report of a perilipin as a potential biocontrol gene in mycoparasites. The study provides usefu l insights into the interaction between C. rosea f. catenulata and fungal plant pathogens. PMID:25761240

  2. A Perilipin Gene from Clonostachys rosea f. Catenulata HL-1-1 Is Related to Sclerotial Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Li, Shi-Dong; Zhong, Zeng-Ming; Sun, Man-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea f. catenulata is a promising biocontrol agent against many fungal plant pathogens. To identify mycoparasitism-related genes from C. rosea f. catenulata, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1 that parasitizes the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum was constructed. 502 clones were sequenced randomly, and thereby 472 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. Forty-three unigenes were annotated and exhibited similarity to a wide diversity of genes. Quantitative real -time PCR showed that a perilipin-like protein encoding gene, Per3, was up-regulated by 6.6-fold over the control at 96 h under the induction of sclerotia. The full-length sequence of Per3 was obtained via 5' and 3' rapid identification of cDNA ends. Overexpression of Per3 in HL-1-1 significantly enhanced the parasitic ability on sclerotia. The results indicated that Per3 might be involved in the mycoparasitism of C. rosea f. catenulata HL-1-1. This is the first report of a perilipin as a potential biocontrol gene in mycoparasites. The study provides usefu l insights into the interaction between C. rosea f. catenulata and fungal plant pathogens. PMID:25761240

  3. Safety of Pochonia chlamydosporia var catenulata in acute oral and dermal toxicity/pathogenicity evaluations in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    García, Liseth; Bulnes, Carlos; Melchor, Gleiby; Vega, Ernesto; Ileana, Miranda; de Oca, Nivian Montes; Hidalgo, Leopoldo; Marrero, Eva

    2004-10-01

    The nematophagous fungus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulata (Kamyschlco ex Barron & Onions) Zare & W-Gams, was investigated as a potential biocontrol agent in integrated pest management strategy for Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood in vegetable crops in Cuba. An acute oral and dermal toxicity/patogenicity study was performed to determine the safety of this fungus in non-target organisms. In the first study, a 1-dose level of 5 x 10(8) units of the microbial pest control agent/treated rat was used. Mortality or clinical signs were not evident and no adverse effects on body weight, hematology, microbiology and gross or microscopic pathology were observed. Food and water consumption was not significantly different between control and treated groups. In the acute dermal toxicity study, there was neither mortality nor clinical signs of toxicity, and no toxic effects in gross and microscopic pathology were detected. Thus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulate (Vcc-108, IMI SD 187), administered oral and dermally to rats and rabbits respectively, was safe in toxicity/pathogenicity studies. PMID:15487645

  4. Description of Diutina gen. nov., Diutina siamensis, f.a. sp. nov., and reassignment of Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida ranongensis, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae to the genus Diutina.

    PubMed

    Khunnamwong, Pannida; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Lachance, Marc-André

    2015-12-01

    Three strains (DMKU-RE28, DMKU-RE43T and DMKU-RE123) of a novel anamorphic yeast species were isolated from rice leaf tissue collected in Thailand. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the species forms a sister pair with Candida ranongensis CBS 10861T but differs by 24-30 substitutions in the LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 domains and 30-35 substitutions in the ITS region. A phylogenetic analysis based on both the small and the large rRNA gene subunits confirmed this connection and demonstrated the presence of a clade that also includes Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae. The clade is not closely affiliated to any known teleomorphic genus, and forms a well-separated lineage from currently recognized genera of the Saccharomycetales. Hence, the genus Diutina gen. nov. is proposed to accommodate members of the clade, including Diutina siamensis f.a. sp. nov. and the preceding seven Candida species. The type strain is DMKU-RE43T ( = CBS 13388T = BCC 61183T = NBRC 109695T). PMID:26410375

  5. "Zea"-Because It's There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Eric

    1983-03-01

    The Subject is a long standing symbiotic relationship between Zea and the movies. As usual the impossible was required - to attain cinema release quality films with dramatic interpretation - at the same time using Hy-speed macro photographic techniques. The subject was not to be recognizable until the end of the film - some four minutes long. Zea is explosive, it reacts to heat and is extremely difficult to predict when it will explode, which left little time for the focus, stop down and shooting. Using a Hy-cam at 5,000 pictures per second - a 400 ft. roll of 7247 raw stock, left but a brief three seconds for synchronization. To add to the confusion, two co-directors, a cameraman, plus equipment, were jammed into a 2 x 2m space. To achieve reasonable resolution for theatrical showing, 400,000 foot/candles of light were needed. This was achieved. The film was edited and music from Vaughan Williams' "Fantasia" recorded at St. Martins-in-the-Fields, London was added. The result was sent to the Cannes Film Festival, where it was given the Jury Award.

  6. Maize, tropical (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Assem, Shireen K

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the third most important food crop globally after wheat and rice. In sub-Saharan Africa, tropical maize has traditionally been the main staple of the diet; 95 % of the maize grown is consumed directly as human food and as an important source of income for the resource-poor rural population. The biotechnological approach to engineer biotic and abiotic traits implies the availability of an efficient plant transformation method. The production of genetically transformed plants depends both on the ability to integrate foreign genes into target cells and the efficiency with which plants are regenerated. Maize transformation and regeneration through immature embryo culture is the most efficient system to regenerate normal transgenic plants. However, this system is highly genotype dependent. Genotypes adapted to tropic areas are difficult to regenerate. Therefore, transformation methods used with model genotypes adapted to temperate areas are not necessarily efficient with tropical lines. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the method of choice since it has been first achieved in 1996. In this report, we describe a transformation method used successfully with several tropical maize lines. All the steps of transformation and regeneration are described in details. This protocol can be used with a wide variety of tropical lines. However, some modifications may be needed with recalcitrant lines. PMID:25300835

  7. RAPD and Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analyses Reveal Zea nicaraguensis as a Section Luxuriantes Species Close to Zea luxurians

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Lu, Yanli; Zheng, Mingmin; Rong, Tingzhao; Tang, Qilin

    2011-01-01

    Genetic relationship of a newly discovered teosinte from Nicaragua, Zea nicaraguensis with waterlogging tolerance, was determined based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA using 14 accessions from Zea species. RAPD analysis showed that a total of 5,303 fragments were produced by 136 random decamer primers, of which 84.86% bands were polymorphic. RAPD-based UPGMA analysis demonstrated that the genus Zea can be divided into section Luxuriantes including Zea diploperennis, Zea luxurians, Zea perennis and Zea nicaraguensis, and section Zea including Zea mays ssp. mexicana, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, Zea mays ssp. huehuetenangensis and Zea mays ssp. mays. ITS sequence analysis showed the lengths of the entire ITS region of the 14 taxa in Zea varied from 597 to 605 bp. The average GC content was 67.8%. In addition to the insertion/deletions, 78 variable sites were recorded in the total ITS region with 47 in ITS1, 5 in 5.8S, and 26 in ITS2. Sequences of these taxa were analyzed with neighbor-joining (NJ) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods to construct the phylogenetic trees, selecting Tripsacum dactyloides L. as the outgroup. The phylogenetic relationships of Zea species inferred from the ITS sequences are highly concordant with the RAPD evidence that resolved two major subgenus clades. Both RAPD and ITS sequence analyses indicate that Zea nicaraguensis is more closely related to Zea luxurians than the other teosintes and cultivated maize, which should be regarded as a section Luxuriantes species. PMID:21525982

  8. Urinary deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) as biomarkers of DON and ZEA exposure of pigs.

    PubMed

    Thanner, S; Czeglédi, L; Schwartz-Zimmermann, H E; Berthiller, F; Gutzwiller, A

    2016-05-01

    Four diets contaminated with 1.1 to 5.0 mg/kg deoxynivalenol (DON) and 0.4 to 2.4 mg/kg zearalenone (ZEA) were fed to four groups of six growing Large White pigs. Urine samples were collected after 3 to 4 days and again after 6 to 7 days on the diets. On each sampling day, half of the animals were sampled in the morning, after an 8-h fast, and the other half were sampled in the afternoon, after 7 h of ad libitum access to feed. The urinary concentrations of DON, DON-glucuronide, DON-3-sulphate, de-epoxy-DON, as well as of ZEA, ZEA-14-glucuronide, α-zearalenol and α-zearalenol-14-glucuronide, analysed using LC-MS/MS, were used to calculate urinary DON and ZEA equivalent concentrations (DONe and ZEAe). The urinary concentration of DONe (P < 0.001), but not of ZEAe (P = 0.31), was lower in the fasted than that in the fed animals. The urinary DONe/creatinine and ZEAe/creatinine ratios were highly correlated with DON and ZEA intake per kg body weight the day preceding sampling (r = 0.76 and 0.77; P < 0.001). The correlations between DON intake during the 7 h preceding urine sampling in the afternoon and urinary DONe/creatinine ratio (r = 0.88) as well as between mean ZEA intake during 3 days preceding urine sampling and urinary ZEAe/creatinine ratio (r = 0.84) were even higher, reflecting the plasma elimination half-time of several hours for DON and of more than 3 days for ZEA. ZEAe analysed in enzymatically hydrolysed urine using an ELISA kit was highly correlated with the LC-MS/MS data (r = 0.94). The urinary DONe and ZEAe to creatinine ratios, analysed in pooled urine samples of several pigs fed the same diet, can be used to estimate their exposure to DON and ZEA. PMID:26888520

  9. Hophornbeam copperleaf, an example wild host for Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of Helicovepa zea (Boddie)and Heliothis virescens (Fabricies)were commonly found on hophornbeam copperleaf, Acalpha ostryaefolia, in Arkansas and Mississippi. From 2002-2009, more than 25 colonies of H. zea were established from collections made on the wild host plant. One colony of H...

  10. Glucolipids of Zea mays and Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Morohashi, Y; Bandurski, R S

    1976-06-01

    The glucolipids formed upon feeding (U-(14)C)glucose to embryos of Zea mays were partially characterized with respect to: (a) metabolic turnover, (b) acid lability, (c) phosphorus content, (d) chromatographic properties, and (e) hydrolysis products. The chloroform-methanol-soluble assimilated radioactivity was examined specifically for occurrence of a glycosylated prenol phosphate. With the extraction conditions used, no evidence was found for formation of a glucosylated prenol phosphate. Several, as yet unidentified, acid-labile glucolipids undergoing metabolic turnover were observed. Four diglycerides were characterized as hydrolysis products of a fraction that contained (14)C-glucose and phosphorus, and was subject to metabolic turnover. Examination of the 1-butanol-soluble glucolipids from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings also demonstrated anionic glucolipids, evidencing metabolic turnover but none with the properties of glucosylated prenol phosphate. PMID:16659583

  11. Natural history and intragenomic dynamics of the Transib transposon Hztransib in the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hztransib recently identified from Helicoverpa zea represents the first intact and transcriptionally active Transib element. Its open reading frame was detected in H. armigera, from which H. zea evolved, and H. assulta, the common ancestor of H. zea and H. armigera. But its remaining parts were foun...

  12. Gut transcription in Helicoverpa zea is dynamically altered in response to baculovirus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Helicoverpa zea transcriptome was analyzed 24 hours after H. zea larvae fed on artificial diet laced with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV). Significant differential regulation of 1,139 putative genes (P<0.05 T-test with Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate) was detect...

  13. Proteome Profile of the Developing Maize (Zea mays L.) Rachis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the developing maize (Zea mays L.) ear with the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus flavus, which produces the carcinogen aflatoxin, is a serious agricultural problem causing significant economic losses worldwide. The rachis (or cob) is an important structure that fungus uses to spread within...

  14. Helicoverpa zea and Bt Cotton in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), the bollworm or corn earworm, is the most important lepidopteran pest of Bt cotton in the United States. Corn is the preferred host, but the insect feeds on most flowering crops and wild host plants. As a cotton pest, bollworm has been closely linked to the insecticide-res...

  15. Historical divergence and gene flow in the genus Zea.

    PubMed

    Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Tenaillon, Maud; Gaut, Brandon S

    2009-04-01

    Gene flow plays a fundamental role in plant evolutionary history, yet its role in population divergence--and ultimately speciation--remains poorly understood. We investigated gene flow and the modalities of divergence in the domesticated Zea mays ssp. mays and three wild Zea taxa using sequence polymorphism data from 26 nuclear loci. We described diversity across loci and assessed evidence for adaptive and purifying selection at nonsynonymous sites. For each of three divergence events in the history of these taxa, we used approximate Bayesian simulation to estimate population sizes and divergence times and explicitly compare among alternative models of divergence. Our estimates of divergence times are surprisingly consistent with previous data from other markers and suggest rapid diversification of lineages within Zea in the last approximately 150,000 years. We found widespread evidence of historical gene flow, including evidence for divergence in the face of gene flow. We speculate that cultivated maize may serve as a bridge for gene flow among otherwise allopatric wild taxa. PMID:19153259

  16. Historical Divergence and Gene Flow in the Genus Zea

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Tenaillon, Maud; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2009-01-01

    Gene flow plays a fundamental role in plant evolutionary history, yet its role in population divergence—and ultimately speciation—remains poorly understood. We investigated gene flow and the modalities of divergence in the domesticate Zea mays ssp. mays and three wild Zea taxa using sequence polymorphism data from 26 nuclear loci. We described diversity across loci and assessed evidence for adaptive and purifying selection at nonsynonymous sites. For each of three divergence events in the history of these taxa, we used approximate Bayesian simulation to estimate population sizes and divergence times and explicitly compare among alternative models of divergence. Our estimates of divergence times are surprisingly consistent with previous data from other markers and suggest rapid diversification of lineages within Zea in the last ∼150,000 years. We found widespread evidence of historical gene flow, including evidence for divergence in the face of gene flow. We speculate that cultivated maize may serve as a bridge for gene flow among otherwise allopatric wild taxa. PMID:19153259

  17. Induction of glutathione S-Transferase in Helicoverpa zea fed cashew flour.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    H. zea and other insects have evolved strategies to counteract the plant protective proteins and defensive compounds they may encounter during feeding. We sought to take advantage of this phenomenon by identifying proteins upregulated in H. zea in response to the inclusion of cashew nut flour in th...

  18. Long distance migration in Helicoverpa zea: What we know and need to know

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper identifies knowledge and knowledge gaps in the areas of biology and ecology, and migratory flight of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie). The paper focuses on results from studies of H. zea population dynamics and migration in Texas during a period of substantial irrigated corn produc...

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis-toxin resistance management: Stable isotope assessment of alternate host use by Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data have been lacking on the proportion of H. zea larvae that develop on non-cotton host plants that can serve as a refuge from selection pressure for adaptation to Bt-cotton. We found that individual H. zea moths that develop as larvae on cotton and other plants with C3 physiology have a differen...

  20. Biosorption of lead by maize (Zea mays) stalk sponge.

    PubMed

    García-Rosales, G; Colín-Cruz, A

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by a maize (Zea mays) stalk sponge. Equilibrium and kinetic models for Pb(II) sorption were developed by considering the effect of the contact time and concentration at the optimum pH of 6 +/- 0.2. The Freundlich model was found to describe the sorption energetics of Pb(II) by Z. mays stalk sponge, and a maximum Pb(II) loading capacity of 80 mg g(-1) was determined. The kinetic parameters were obtained by fitting data from experiments measuring the effect of contact time on adsorption capacity into pseudo-first and second-order equations. The kinetics of Pb(II) sorption onto Z. mays biosorbent were well defined using linearity coefficients (R(2)) by the pseudo-second-order equation (0.9998). The results obtained showed that Zea may stalk sponge was a useful biomaterial for Pb(II) sorption and that pH has an important effect on metal biosorption capacity. PMID:20615602

  1. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1-7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8-12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC(50), 4.78 μ M). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  2. Genomic affinities revealed by GISH suggests intergenomic restructuring between parental genomes of the paleopolyploid genus Zea.

    PubMed

    González, Graciela Esther; Poggio, Lidia

    2015-10-01

    The present work compares the molecular affinities, revealed by GISH, with the analysis of meiotic pairing in intra- and interspecific hybrids between species of Zea obtained in previous works. The joint analysis of these data provided evidence about the evolutionary relationships among the species from the paleopolyploid genus Zea (maize and teosintes). GISH and meiotic pairing of intraspecific hybrids revealed high genomic affinity between maize (Zea mays subsp. mays) and both Zea mays subsp. parviglumis and Zea mays subsp. mexicana. On the other hand, when Zea mays subsp. huehuetenanguensis DNA was probed on maize chromosomes, a lower affinity was detected, and the pattern of hybridization suggested intergenomical restructuring between the parental genomes of maize. When DNA from Zea luxurians was used as probe, homogeneous hybridization signals were observed through all maize chromosomes. Lower genomic affinity was observed when DNA from Zea diploperennis was probed on maize chromosomes, especially at knob regions. Maize chromosomes hybridized with Zea perennis DNA showed hybridization signals on four chromosome pairs: two chromosome pairs presented hybridization signal in only one chromosomal arm, whereas four chromosome pairs did not show any hybridization. These results are in agreement with previous GISH studies, which have identified the genomic source of the chromosomes involved in the meiotic configurations of Z. perennis × maize hybrids. These findings allow postulating that maize has a parental genome not shared with Z. perennis, and the existence of intergenomic restructuring between the parental genomes of maize. Moreover, the absence of hybridization signals in all maize knobs indicate that these heterochromatic regions were lost during the Z. perennis genome evolution. PMID:26506040

  3. Abscisic acid biosynthesis in isolated embryos of Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, D.A.; Fong, F.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. Texas A M Univ., College Station )

    1989-04-01

    Previous labeling experiments with {sup 18}O{sub 2} have supported the hypothesis that stress-induced abscisic acid (ABA) is synthesized through an indirect pathway involving an oxygenated carotenoid (xanthophyll) as a precursor. To investigate ABA formation under nonstress conditions, an {sup 18}O{sub 2} labeling experiment was conducted with isolated embryos from in vitro grown maize (Zea mays L.) kernels. Of the ABA produced during the incubation in {sup 18}O{sub 2}, three-fourths contained a single {sup 18}O atom located in the carboxyl group. Approximately one-fourth of the ABA synthesized during the experiment contained two {sup 18}O atoms. These results suggest that ABA synthesized in maize embryos under nonstress conditions also proceeds via the indirect pathway, requiring a xanthophyll precursor. It was also found that the newly synthesized ABA was preferentially released into the surrounding medium.

  4. Mutational effects of space flight on Zea mays seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, M.; Qiu, Y.; He, Y.; Bucker, H.; Yang, C. H.

    1994-01-01

    The growth and development of more than 500 Zea mays seeds flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied. Somatic mutations, including white-yellow stripes on leaves, dwarfing, change of leaf sheath color or seedling color were observed in plants developed from these seeds. When the frequency of white-yellow formation was used as the endpoint and compared with data from ground based studies, the dose to which maize seeds might be exposed during the flight was estimated to be equivalent to 635 cGy of gamma rays. Seeds from one particular holder gave a high mutation frequency and a wide mutation spectrum. White-yellow stripes on leaves were also found in some of the inbred progenies from plants displayed somatic mutation. Electron microscopy studies showed that the damage of chloroplast development in the white-yellow stripe on leaves was similar between seeds flown on LDEF and that irradiated by accelerated heavy ions on ground.

  5. Bacterial but not Baculoviral Infections Stimulate Hemolin Expression in Helicoverpa zea and Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lepidopteran larvae are regularly infected by baculoviruses during feeding on infected plants. The differences in sensitivity to these infections can be substantial, even among closely related species. For example, the noctuids Cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa zea) and budworm (Heliothis virescens), whi...

  6. Acetolactate Synthase Activity in Developing Maize (Zea mays L.) Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Muhitch, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) activity was examined in maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm and embryos as a function of kernel development. When assayed using unpurified homogenates, embryo acetolactate synthase activity appeared less sensitive to inhibition by leucine + valine and by the imidazolinone herbicide imazapyr than endosperm acetolactate synthase activity. Evidence is presented to show that pyruvate decarboxylase contributes to apparent acetolactate synthase activity in crude embryo extracts and a modification of the acetolactate synthase assay is proposed to correct for the presence of pyruvate decarboxylase in unpurified plant homogenates. Endosperm acetolactate synthase activity increased rapidly during early kernel development, reaching a maximum of 3 micromoles acetoin per hour per endosperm at 25 days after pollination. In contrast, embryo activity was low in young kernels and steadily increased throughout development to a maximum activity of 0.24 micromole per hour per embryo by 45 days after pollination. The sensitivity of both endosperm and embryo acetolactate synthase activities to feedback inhibition by leucine + valine did not change during kernel development. The results are compared to those found for other enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and discussed with respect to the potential roles of the embryo and endosperm in providing amino acids for storage protein synthesis. PMID:16665871

  7. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  8. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  9. Acclimation improves salt stress tolerance in Zea mays plants.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Camilla; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-08-20

    Plants exposure to low level salinity activates an array of processes leading to an improvement of plant stress tolerance. Although the beneficial effect of acclimation was demonstrated in many herbaceous species, underlying mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. In the present study we have addressed this issue by investigating ionic mechanisms underlying the process of plant acclimation to salinity stress in Zea mays. Effect of acclimation were examined in two parallel sets of experiments: a growth experiment for agronomic assessments, sap analysis, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and confocal laser scanning imaging; and a lab experiment for in vivo ion flux measurements from root tissues. Being exposed to salinity, acclimated plants (1) retain more K(+) but accumulate less Na(+) in roots; (2) have better vacuolar Na(+) sequestration ability in leaves and thus are capable of accumulating larger amounts of Na(+) in the shoot without having any detrimental effect on leaf photochemistry; and (3) rely more on Na(+) for osmotic adjustment in the shoot. At the same time, acclimation affect was not related in increased root Na(+) exclusion ability. It appears that even in a such salt-sensitive species as maize, Na(+) exclusion from uptake is of a much less importance compared with the efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration in the shoot. PMID:27372277

  10. Retroelement genome painting: cytological visualization of retroelement expansions in the genera Zea and Tripsacum.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A

    2006-06-01

    Divergence of abundant genomic elements among the Zea and Tripsacum genera was examined cytologically and a tool kit established for subsequent studies. The LTR regions from the CRM, Huck, Grande, Prem1, Prem2/Ji, Opie, Cinful-1, and Tekay retroelement families were used as FISH probes on mitotic chromosome spreads from a "trispecies" hybrid containing chromosomes from each of three species: Zea mays (2n = 20), Z. diploperennis (2n = 20), and Tripsacum dactyloides (2n = 36). Except for Tekay, which painted both Zea and Tripsacum chromosomes with nearly equal intensity, the retroelement probes hybridized strongly to the Zea chromosomes, allowing them to be distinguished from those of Tripsacum. Huck and Grande hybridized more intensely to maize than to Z. diploperennis chromosomes. Tripsacum genomic clones containing retroelement sequences were isolated that specifically paint Tripsacum chromosomes. The retroelement paints proved effective for distinguishing different genomes in interspecific hybrids and visualizing alien chromatin from T. dactyloides introgressed into maize lines. Other FISH probes (180-bp knob, TR-1, 5S, NOR, Cent4, CentC, rp1, rp3, and alpha-ZeinA) could be simultaneously visualized with the retroelement probes, emphasizing the value of the retroelement probes for cytogenetic studies of Zea and Tripsacum. PMID:16582446

  11. Gut Transcription in Helicoverpa zea is Dynamically Altered in Response to Baculovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noland, Jeffrey E.; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Popham, Holly J. R.; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Vogel, Heiko; Musser, Richard O.

    2013-01-01

    The Helicoverpa zea transcriptome was analyzed 24 h after H. zea larvae fed on artificial diet laced with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV). Significant differential regulation of 1,139 putative genes (p < 0.05 T-test with Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate) was detected in the gut epithelial tissue; where 63% of these genes were down-regulated and 37% of genes were up-regulated compared to the mock-infected control. Genes that play important roles in digestive physiology were noted as being generally down-regulated. Among these were aminopeptidases, trypsin-like serine proteases, lipases, esterases and serine proteases. Genes related to the immune response reacted in a complex nature having peptidoglycan binding and viral antigen recognition proteins and antiviral pathway systems down-regulated, whereas antimicrobial peptides and prophenoloxidase were up-regulated. In general, detoxification genes, specifically cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase were down-regulated as a result of infection. This report offers the first comparative transcriptomic study of H. zea compared to HzSNPV infected H. zea and provides further groundwork that will lead to a larger understanding of transcriptional perturbations associated with viral infection and the host response to the viral insult in what is likely the most heavily infected tissue in the insect. PMID:26462433

  12. Sugar Efflux from Maize (Zea mays L.) Pedicel Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Gregory A.; Knievel, Daniel P.; Shannon, Jack C.

    1985-01-01

    Sugar release from the pedicel tissue of maize (Zea mays L.) kernels was studied by removing the distal portion of the kernel and the lower endosperm, followed by replacement of the endosperm with an agar solute trap. Sugars were unloaded into the apoplast of the pedicel and accumulated in the agar trap while the ear remained attached to the maize plant. The kinetics of 14C-assimilate movement into treated versus intact kernels were comparable. The rate of unloading declined with time, but sugar efflux from the pedicel continued for at least 6 hours and in most experiments the unloading rates approximated those necessary to support normal kernel growth rates. The unloading process was challenged with a variety of buffers, inhibitors, and solutes in order to characterize sugar unloading from this tissue. Unloading was not affected by apoplastic pH or a variety of metabolic inhibitors. Although p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS), a nonpenetrating sulfhydryl group reagent, did not affect sugar unloading, it effectively inhibited extracellular acid invertase. When the pedicel cups were pretreated with PCMBS, at least 60% of sugars unloaded from the pedicel could be identified as sucrose. Unloading was inhibited up to 70% by 10 millimolar CaCl2. Unloading was stimulated by 15 millimolar ethyleneglycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid which partially reversed the inhibitory effects of Ca2+. Based on these results, we suggest that passive efflux of sucrose occurs from the maize pedicel symplast followed by extracellular hydrolysis to hexoses. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16664091

  13. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  14. A linkage map of maize x teosinte zea luxurians and identification of qtls controlling root aerenchyma formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One-hundred and ninety five F2 individuals, derived from a cross between maize inbred line B73 x Zea luxurians, were subjected to a 107 SSR marker based QTL analysis for aerenchyma cell formation that covered 1,331 cM across all ten maize and Zea luxurians chromosomes. Composite interval mapping a...

  15. A cellular study of teosinte Zea mays ssp. parviglumis (Poaceae) caryopsis development showing several processes conserved in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although recent molecular studies elucidate the genetic background leading to changed morphology of maize female inflorescence and the structure of the caryopsis during the domestication of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) from its wild progenitor teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis), the mechanisms under...

  16. Biology, Ecology, and Evolving Management of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Sweet Corn in the United States.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Daniel L; Nault, Brian A; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-08-01

    The corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), is a polyphagous pest found throughout the United States, where it attacks many field and vegetable crops. Although H. zea has long been a traditional pest of sweet corn, its importance to this crop has increased dramatically over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize information critical for current and future management of H. zea in sweet corn production in the United States. First, we discuss the pest status of H. zea and its life history, including migration, infestation and larval development, diapause, overwintering, and abiotic factors that affect its biology. Next we describe monitoring methods, crop protection decision-making processes, chemical control options, and the use of genetic technologies for control of H. zea Alternative H. zea management options including biological control, cultural controls, host plant resistance, and pheromone disruption are also reviewed. The role of climate change and its effects on H. zea and its ecology are discussed, as well as the recent invasion of its relative, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), which is a major pest of corn in other parts of the world. To conclude, we suggest future research opportunities for H. zea and H. armigera management in sweet corn. PMID:27329622

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and expression profiles of mitochondrial-encoded genes in early and late embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial genome of the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, was assembled using paired-end nucleotide sequence reads generated with a next-generation sequencing platform. Assembly resulted in a mitogenome of 15,348 bp with greater than 17,000-fold average coverage. Organization of the H. zea mitogen...

  18. Toxicity of selected tremorgenic mycotoxins and related compounds to Spodoptera frugiperda and Heliothis zea.

    PubMed

    Dowd, P F; Cole, R J; Vesonder, R F

    1988-12-01

    A series of tremorgenic mycotoxins and related compounds were tested for oral toxicity to the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and corn earworm (Heliothis zea) by incorporation of materials into artificial diets and examining mortality and weights after 7 days. Significant mortality to both insect species was caused with dihydroxyaflavinine and roseotoxin B, while significant mortality to H. zea was also caused by penitrem A at 25 ppm. After 7 days, weighs of larvae treated with 25 ppm penitrem A, roseotoxin B, and verruculogen were less than 50% of controls for both insect species. Weights of H. zea larvae treated with 25 ppb of penitrem A were less than 50% those of control larvae. Relative toxicities of the tremorgens and related compounds to insects compared to vertebrates are discussed. PMID:3209479

  19. Occurrence and metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid in Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was identified as a catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in germinating kernels of Zea mays and found to be present in amounts of ca 3.1 nmol/kernel. 7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was shown to be a biosynthetic intermediate between 2-indolinone-3-acetic acid and 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside in both kernels and roots of Zea mays. Further metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-[5-3H]-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside occurred to yield tritiated water plus, as yet, uncharacterized products.

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF THE GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE ISOZYME GSP1 IN MAIZE (ZEA MAYS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher plants contain families of glutamine synthetase (GS) isozymes. In maize (Zea mays L.), GSp1, the predominant GS isozyme of the developing kernel, is abundant in the pedicel and pericarp, but absent from the endosperm and embryo. Determination of GSp1 tissue distribution in vegetative tissue...

  1. Regional Assessment of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Populations on Cotton and Non-Cotton Crop Hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection pressure on bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), by cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvaceae), that produces one or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner proteins is reduced by plantings of non-Bt refuge cotton that produce non-selected individuals. However, ...

  2. Chararacteristics of Thirteen Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers in the Corn Earworm, Helicovepa zea (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn earworm, Helicovepa zea, is an important pest of cotton in the United States. Lack of suitable genetic markers have hindered population genetic studies of this species. Although a number of simple sequence repeat (SSR or microsatellite) markers developed for other species had been evaluated on...

  3. Crimped Cover Crop Legume Residue Effects on Sweet Corn (Zea mays L.) Yield in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crimped legume residue can control weeds and supply N for sweet corn production if biomass is sufficient. Three sweet corn (Zea mays L.) open pollinated variety “Suresweet 2011” plantings (April, 2013; July 2013; February 2014) were conducted on an Oxisol (very fine, kaolinitic, isohyperthermic and...

  4. The homeologous Zea mays gigantea genes: characterization of expression and novel mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two homeologous Zea mays gigantea (gi) genes, gi1 and gi2, arose from the last genome duplication event in the maize lineage. Homologs of these genes in other species are required for correct circadian rhythms and proper regulation of growth and development. Here we characterized the expression ...

  5. Root morphology and gene expression analysis in response to drought stress in maize (Zea mays)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water-deficit stress tolerance is a complex trait, and water deficit results in various physiological and chemical changes in maize (Zea mays L.) and exacerbates preharvest aflatoxin contamination. The objective of this study was to characterize the variations in morphology, physiology and gene expr...

  6. Water deficit stress effects on corn (Zea mays, L.) root: shoot ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted at Akron, CO, USA, on a Weld silt loam in 2004 to quantify the effects of water deficit stress on corn (Zea mays, L.) root and shoot biomass. Corn plants were grown under a range of soil bulk density and water conditions caused by previous tillage, crop rotation, and irrigation...

  7. A new gland associated with the retrocerebral complex of the adult corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the discovery of a putative new gland associated with the retrocerebral complex in the adults of Helicoverpa zea. The gland was not observed in Manduca sexta and few other species of moths. The pair of glands, each 40-60 µm in diameter, is located on either side of the recurrent nerve. Eac...

  8. A re-examination of corn (Zea mays L.) ear volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) is a major insect pest of corn and other agricultural crops. In corn adult moths commonly lay eggs on silk of ripening ears. After hatching, larvae feed on silk and developing kernels. This reduces crop quality and may increase fungal infection and mycotoxin production. Subs...

  9. Microsatellite variation in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) populations in the southern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to analyze Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) populations from various host plants in four different locations in the southern United States. Linear distance between collection sites ranged from approximately 150 to 900 km. Mean number of alleles per locus ...

  10. Adding B-chromosomes of Zea mays L. to the genome of Avena sativa L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B-chromosomes (Bs) are supernumerary dispensable chromosomes described in hundreds of animal and plant species, including maize (Zea mays L.). However, Bs have not been reported to exist in hexaploid oat (Avena sativa L.). In order to transfer maize Bs sexually from maize to oat genomes, we used as ...

  11. Influence of corn (zea mays l.) cultivar development on grain nutrient concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While corn productivity has been increased by the adoption of high-yield hybrids, there are concerns that increased grain potential may be associated with diminished grain nutrient concentration. Ten corn (Zea mays L.) cultivars representing five technological levels (landrace variety, commercial va...

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diapause hormone (DH) in the heliothine moth has shown its activity in termination of pupal diapause, while the orthology in the silkworm is known to induce embryonic diapause. In the current study, we cloned the diapause hormone receptor from the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (HzDHr) and tested ...

  13. Effect of Hexaflumuron on feeding response and reproduction of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hexaflumuron (Consult® 100 EC, Dow AgroSciences) is an insect growth regulator that inhibits chitin synthesis. The efficacy of hexaflumuron mixed with 2.5 M sucrose (ppm) was evaluated in the laboratory against bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) for toxicity, proboscis exten...

  14. Potassium fertilization mitigates the adverse effects of drought on selected Zea mays cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, the role of potassium (K) in mitigating the adverse effects of drought stress (DS) on 2 maize (Zea mays L.) cultivars, ‘Shaandan 9’ (S9; drought-tolerant) and ‘Shaandan 911’ (S911; drought-sensitive), was assessed. K application increased dry matter (DM) across all growth stage...

  15. Development of the cursorial spider, Cheiracanthium inclusum (Araneae: Miturgidae), on eggs of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of the cursorial spider Cheiricanthium inclusum (Hentz) (Araneae: Miturgidae) from emergence to maturity on a diet of eggs of the lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was characterized. C. inclusum developed to adulthood with no mortality while feeding on ...

  16. A maize (Zea mays) line resistant to herbivory constitutively releases (E)-B-caryophyllene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is an important agricultural crop. Various insect pests such as those in the order of Lepidoptera frequently feed on young maize plants and pose a significant threat to plant development and survival. To deal with this problem, maize generates a wide variety of responses to att...

  17. DEVELOPING NITROGEN FERTILIZER RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CORN (ZEA MAYS L.) USING AN ACTIVE SENSOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of uncertainties associated with nitrogen (N) behavior in the environment, producers managing corn (Zea mays L.) production systems often over-apply N fertilizer to reduce the risk that N will limit corn yield. Remote sensing represents a potential opportunity to reduce these uncertainties w...

  18. Larval Helicoverpa zea Transcriptional, Growth and Behavioral Responses to Nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Linus; Vogel, Heiko; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Tuter, Jason; Musser, Richard O.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphagous feeding habits of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), underscore its status as a major agricultural pest with a wide geographic distribution and host plant repertoire. To study the transcriptomic response to toxins in diet, we conducted a microarray analysis of H. zea caterpillars feeding on artificial diet, diet laced with nicotine and Nicotiana tabacum (L.) plants. We supplemented our analysis with growth and aversion bioassays. The transcriptome reflects an abundant expression of proteases, chitin, cytochrome P450 and immune-related genes, many of which are shared between the two experimental treatments. However, the tobacco treatment tended to elicit stronger transcriptional responses than nicotine-laced diet. The salivary factor glucose oxidase, known to suppress nicotine induction in the plant, was upregulated by H. zea in response to tobacco but not to nicotine-laced diet. Reduced caterpillar growth rates accompanied the broad regulation of genes associated with growth, such as juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase. The differential expression of chemosensory proteins, such as odorant binding-protein-2 precursor, as well as the neurotransmitter nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor subunit 9, highlights candidate genes regulating aversive behavior towards nicotine. We suggest that an observed coincidental rise in cannibalistic behavior and regulation of proteases and protease inhibitors in H. zea larvae signify a compensatory response to induced plant defenses. PMID:26462833

  19. Field tests of the role of fumonisins in the Zea mays–Gibberella moniliformis interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zea mays often is colonized with the fungus Gibberella moniliformis, which produces fumonisin toxins. The role of fumonisins in ear colonization was studied by field inoculations of a fumonisin B1 (FB1)-insensitive maize backcross line. The FB1-insensitive maize backcross line was not more resistant...

  20. Modeling the impact of alternative hosts on Helicoverpa zea adaptation to bollgard cotton.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, David I; Head, Graham P; Caprio, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    For highly polyphagous cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., pests such as Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), a substantial portion of the larval population develops on noncotton alternative hosts. These noncotton hosts potentially provide a natural refuge for H. zea, thereby slowing the evolution of resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt)-derived Cry1Ac protein present in Bollgard cotton. Here, we demonstrate how the measured contribution of such alternative hosts can be included in estimating the "effective refuge" present for H. zea and in modeling resistance evolution in this species. A single-gene, two-compartment model was used in which one compartment represented corn, Zea mays L., and cotton that express the Cry1Ac protein or similar proteins, and the other compartment was the effective refuge, made up of a weighted average of non-Bt cotton and noncotton hosts. The effective refuge was estimated for each of six generations of H. zea based upon available data on larval population densities on different hosts and cropping patterns. Model runs were performed for regions centered on three states: Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina. Three sets of fitness cost assumptions for the putative resistance gene were used: none, low, and moderate, with either recessive or additive inheritance for resistance and fitness costs. For Georgia and North Carolina, resistance was predicted to take >30 yr to evolve except in the absence of fitness costs. For Mississippi, results were sensitive to fitness costs: >30 yr with moderate costs, 7-14 yr with low costs, and 6-10 yr without such costs. PMID:17195681

  1. Revisiting macronutrient regulation in the polyphagous herbivore Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): New insights via nutritional geometry.

    PubMed

    Deans, Carrie A; Sword, Gregory A; Behmer, Spencer T

    2015-10-01

    Insect herbivores that ingest protein and carbohydrates in physiologically-optimal proportions and concentrations show superior performance and fitness. The first-ever study of protein-carbohydrate regulation in an insect herbivore was performed using the polyphagous agricultural pest Helicoverpa zea. In that study, experimental final instar caterpillars were presented two diets - one containing protein but no carbohydrates, the other containing carbohydrates but no protein - and allowed to self-select their protein-carbohydrate intake. The results showed that H. zea selected a diet with a protein-to-carbohydrate (p:c) ratio of 4:1. At about this same time, the geometric framework (GF) for the study of nutrition was introduced. The GF is now established as the most rigorous means to study nutrient regulation (in any animal). It has been used to study protein-carbohydrate regulation in several lepidopteran species, which exhibit a range of self-selected p:c ratios between 0.8 and 1.5. Given the economic importance of H. zea, and it is extremely protein-biased p:c ratio of 4:1 relative to those reported for other lepidopterans, we decided to revisit its protein-carbohydrate regulation. Our results, using the experimental approach of the GF, show that H. zea larvae self-select a p:c ratio of 1.6:1. This p:c ratio strongly matches that of its close relative, Heliothis virescens, and is more consistent with self-selected p:c ratios reported for other lepidopterans. Having accurate protein and carbohydrate regulation information for an insect herbivore pest such as H. zea is valuable for two reasons. First, it can be used to better understand feeding patterns in the field, which might lead to enhanced management. Second, it will allow researchers to develop rearing diets that more accurately reflect larval nutritional needs, which has important implications for resistance bioassays and other measures of physiological stress. PMID:26141409

  2. ZEA-TDMA: design and system level implementation of a TDMA protocol for anonymous wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debasmit; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-01

    Wireless sensor network used in military applications may be deployed in hostile environments, where privacy and security is of primary concern. This can lead to the formation of a trust-based sub-network among mutually-trusting nodes. However, designing a TDMA MAC protocol is very challenging in situations where such multiple sub-networks coexist, since TDMA protocols require node identity information for slot assignments. This paper introduces a novel distributed TDMA MAC protocol, ZEA-TDMA (Zero Exposure Anonymous TDMA), for anonymous wireless networks. ZEA-TDMA achieves slot allocation with strict anonymity constraints, i.e. without nodes having to exchange any identity revealing information. By using just the relative time of arrival of packets and a novel technique of wireless collision-detection and resolution for fixed packetsizes, ZEA-TDMA is able to achieve MAC slot-allocation which is described as follows. Initially, a newly joined node listens to its one-hop neighborhood channel usage and creates a slot allocation table based on its own relative time, and finally, selects a slot that is collision free within its one-hop neighborhood. The selected slot can however cause hidden collisions with a two-hop neighbor of the node. These collisions are resolved by a common neighbor of the colliding nodes, which first detects the collision, and then resolve them using an interrupt packet. ZEA-TDMA provides the following features: a) it is a TDMA protocol ideally suited for highly secure or strictly anonymous environments b) it can be used in heterogeneous environments where devices use different packet structures c) it does not require network time-synchronization, and d) it is insensitive to channel errors. We have implemented ZEA-TDMA on the MICA2 hardware platform running TinyOS and evaluated the protocol functionality and performance on a MICA2 test-bed.

  3. Production and characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie).

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Konasale J; Rodrigo-Simón, Ana; Ferré, Juan; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sivasupramaniam, Sakuntala; Moar, William J

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-selected Bacillus thuringiensis-resistant colonies are important tools for elucidating B. thuringiensis resistance mechanisms. However, cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, a target pest of transgenic corn and cotton expressing B. thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt corn and cotton), has proven difficult to select for stable resistance. Two populations of H. zea (AR and MR), resistant to the B. thuringiensis protein found in all commercial Bt cotton varieties (Cry1Ac), were established by selection with Cry1Ac activated toxin (AR) or MVP II (MR). Cry1Ac toxin reflects the form ingested by H. zea when feeding on Bt cotton, whereas MVP II is a Cry1Ac formulation used for resistance selection and monitoring. The resistance ratio (RR) for AR exceeded 100-fold after 11 generations and has been maintained at this level for nine generations. This is the first report of stable Cry1Ac resistance in H. zea. MR crashed after 11 generations, reaching only an RR of 12. AR was only partially cross-resistant to MVP II, suggesting that MVP II does not have the same Cry1Ac selection pressure as Cry1Ac toxin against H. zea and that proteases may be involved with resistance. AR was highly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab toxin but only slightly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab expressing corn leaf powder. AR was not cross-resistant to Cry2Aa2, Cry2Ab2-expressing corn leaf powder, Vip3A, and cypermethrin. Toxin-binding assays showed no significant differences, indicating that resistance was not linked to a reduction in binding. These results aid in understanding why this pest has not evolved B. thuringiensis resistance, and highlight the need to choose carefully the form of B. thuringiensis protein used in experiments. PMID:18024681

  4. Genetic variation and virulence of nucleopolyhedroviruses isolated worldwide from the heliothine pests Helicoverpa armigera, Helicoverpa zea, and Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PCR-based method was used to classify 90 samples of nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV; Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus) obtained worldwide from larvae of Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Helicoverpa armigera. Partial nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of three highly conserved genes...

  5. Optimizing Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) insecticidal efficacy in Minnesota sweet corn: a logistic regression to assess timing parameters.

    PubMed

    Burkness, Eric C; Galvan, Tederson L; Hutchison, W D

    2009-04-01

    Late-season plantings of sweet corn in Minnesota result in an abundant supply of silking corn, Zea mays L., throughout August to early September that is highly attractive to the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). During a 10-yr period, 1997-2006, insecticide efficacy trials were conducted in late-planted sweet corn in Minnesota for management of H. zea. These data were used to develop a logistic regression model to identify the variables and interactions that most influenced efficacy (proportion control) of late-instar H. zea. The pyrethroid lambdacyhalothrin (0.028 kg [AI]/ha) is a commonly used insecticide in sweet corn and was therefore chosen for use in parameter evaluation. Three variables were found to be significant (alpha = 0.05), the percentage of plants silking at the time of the first insecticide application, the interval between the first and second insecticide applications, and the interval between the last insecticide application and harvest. Odds ratio estimates indicated that as the percentage of plants silking at the time of first application increased, control of H. zea increased. As the interval between the first and second insecticide application increased, control of H. zea decreased. Finally, as the interval between the last insecticide application and harvest increased, control of H. zea increased. An additional timing trial was conducted in 2007 by using lambda-cyhalothrin, to evaluate the impact of the percentage of plants silking at the first application. The results indicated no significant differences in efficacy against late-instar H. zea at 0, 50, 90, and 100% of plants silking at the first application (regimes of five or more sprays). The implications of these effects are discussed within the context of current integrated pest management programs for late-planted sweet corn in the upper midwestern United States. PMID:19449649

  6. Inducing gravitropic curvature of primary roots of Zea mays cv Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.; Fondren, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of the mutant 'Ageotropic' cultivar of Zea mays are nonresponsive to gravity. Their root caps secrete little or no mucilage and touch the root only at the extreme apex. A gap separates the cap and root at the periphery of the cap. Applying mucilage from normal roots or substances with a consistency similar to that of mucilage to tips of mutant roots causes these roots to become strongly graviresponsive. Gravicurvature stops when these substances are removed. Caps of some mutants secrete small amounts of mucilage and are graviresponsive. These results indicate that (a) the lack of graviresponsiveness in the mutant results from disrupting the transport pathway between the cap and root, (b) movement of the growth-modifying signal from the cap to the root occurs via an apoplastic pathway, and (c) mucilage is necessary for normal communication between the root cap and root in Zea mays cv Ageotropic.

  7. Influence of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, Piriformospora indica and Glomus mosseae on growth of Zea mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Mansi; Bawskar, Manisha; Rathod, Dnyaneshwar; Nagaonkar, Dipali; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae) and endosymbiont (P. indica) colonized Zea mays were treated with calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNPs) and evaluated for their plant growth promotion efficiency. It was observed that CaPNPs in combination with both G. mosseae and P. indica are more potent plant growth promoter than independent combinations of CaPNPs + G. mosseae, CaPNPs + P. indica or CaPNPs alone. The fluorimetric studies of treated plants revealed that CaPNPs alone and in combination with P. indica can enhance vitality of Zea mays by improving chlorophyll a content and performance index of treated plants. Hence, we conclude that CaPNPs exhibit synergistic growth promotion, root proliferation and vitality improvement properties along with endosymbiotic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which after further field trials can be developed as a cost-effective nanofertilizer with pronounced efficiency.

  8. Influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; McClelen, C. E.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps. The influence of microgravity varied with different stages of cellular differentiation. Overall, microgravity tended to 1) increase relative volumes of hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, 2) decrease the relative volumes of plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and the vacuome, and 3) exert no influence on the relative volume of nuclei in cells comprising the root cap. The reduced allocation of dictyosomal volume in peripheral cells of flight-grown seedlings correlated positively with their secretion of significantly less mucilage than peripheral cells of Earth-grown seedlings. These results indicate that 1) microgravity alters the patterns of cellular differentiation and structures of all cell types comprising the root cap, and 2) the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays is organelle specific.

  9. Movement of endogenous calcium in the elongating zone of graviresponding roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Cameron, I. L.; Smith, N. K.

    1989-01-01

    Endogenous calcium (Ca) accumulates along the lower side of the elongating zone of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent. This accumulation of Ca correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature, and occurs in the cytoplasm, cell walls and mucilage of epidermal cells. Corresponding changes in endogenous Ca do not occur in cortical cells of the elongating zone of intact roots. These results indicate that the calcium asymmetries associated with root gravicurvature occur in the outermost layers of the root.

  10. Abscisic acid is not necessary for gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays L. cv. Tx 5855 treated with fluridone are strongly graviresponsive, but have undetectable levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Primary roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays are also graviresponsive despite having undetectable amounts of ABA. Graviresponsive roots of untreated and wild-type seedlings contain 286 to 317 ng ABA g-1 f. wt, respectively. These results indicate that ABA is not necessary for root gravicurvature.

  11. Conservation and diversity of seed associated endophytes in Zea across boundaries of evolution, ethnography and ecology.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Monje, David; Raizada, Manish N

    2011-01-01

    Endophytes are non-pathogenic microbes living inside plants. We asked whether endophytic species were conserved in the agriculturally important plant genus Zea as it became domesticated from its wild ancestors (teosinte) to modern maize (corn) and moved from Mexico to Canada. Kernels from populations of four different teosintes and 10 different maize varieties were screened for endophytic bacteria by culturing, cloning and DNA fingerprinting using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of 16S rDNA. Principle component analysis of TRFLP data showed that seed endophyte community composition varied in relation to plant host phylogeny. However, there was a core microbiota of endophytes that was conserved in Zea seeds across boundaries of evolution, ethnography and ecology. The majority of seed endophytes in the wild ancestor persist today in domesticated maize, though ancient selection against the hard fruitcase surrounding seeds may have altered the abundance of endophytes. Four TRFLP signals including two predicted to represent Clostridium and Paenibacillus species were conserved across all Zea genotypes, while culturing showed that Enterobacter, Methylobacteria, Pantoea and Pseudomonas species were widespread, with γ-proteobacteria being the prevalent class. Twenty-six different genera were cultured, and these were evaluated for their ability to stimulate plant growth, grow on nitrogen-free media, solubilize phosphate, sequester iron, secrete RNAse, antagonize pathogens, catabolize the precursor of ethylene, produce auxin and acetoin/butanediol. Of these traits, phosphate solubilization and production of acetoin/butanediol were the most commonly observed. An isolate from the giant Mexican landrace Mixteco, with 100% identity to Burkholderia phytofirmans, significantly promoted shoot potato biomass. GFP tagging and maize stem injection confirmed that several seed endophytes could spread systemically through the plant. One seed isolate

  12. Conservation and Diversity of Seed Associated Endophytes in Zea across Boundaries of Evolution, Ethnography and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Johnston-Monje, David; Raizada, Manish N.

    2011-01-01

    Endophytes are non-pathogenic microbes living inside plants. We asked whether endophytic species were conserved in the agriculturally important plant genus Zea as it became domesticated from its wild ancestors (teosinte) to modern maize (corn) and moved from Mexico to Canada. Kernels from populations of four different teosintes and 10 different maize varieties were screened for endophytic bacteria by culturing, cloning and DNA fingerprinting using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of 16S rDNA. Principle component analysis of TRFLP data showed that seed endophyte community composition varied in relation to plant host phylogeny. However, there was a core microbiota of endophytes that was conserved in Zea seeds across boundaries of evolution, ethnography and ecology. The majority of seed endophytes in the wild ancestor persist today in domesticated maize, though ancient selection against the hard fruitcase surrounding seeds may have altered the abundance of endophytes. Four TRFLP signals including two predicted to represent Clostridium and Paenibacillus species were conserved across all Zea genotypes, while culturing showed that Enterobacter, Methylobacteria, Pantoea and Pseudomonas species were widespread, with γ-proteobacteria being the prevalent class. Twenty-six different genera were cultured, and these were evaluated for their ability to stimulate plant growth, grow on nitrogen-free media, solubilize phosphate, sequester iron, secrete RNAse, antagonize pathogens, catabolize the precursor of ethylene, produce auxin and acetoin/butanediol. Of these traits, phosphate solubilization and production of acetoin/butanediol were the most commonly observed. An isolate from the giant Mexican landrace Mixteco, with 100% identity to Burkholderia phytofirmans, significantly promoted shoot potato biomass. GFP tagging and maize stem injection confirmed that several seed endophytes could spread systemically through the plant. One seed isolate

  13. Many maize inbreds lack an endosperm cytosolic phosphoglucomutase. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Stelow, L.I.; Nelson, O.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis of extracts from developing maize (Zea mays L.) endosperms 22 days postpollination reveals only a single zone of phosphoglucomutase activity in the majority of the inbreds tested. The other inbreds had the expected two zones of activity. The activity that is present in all inbreds is the amyloplast isozyme while the absent form is a cytosolic enzyme. The lack of the cytosolic isozyme has no discernible phenotypic consequences.

  14. Inhibition of pig liver and Zea mays L. polyamine oxidase: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Federico, R; Leone, L; Botta, M; Binda, C; Angelini, R; Venturini, G; Ascenzi, P

    2001-01-01

    Polyamine oxidase (PAO) is involved in polyamine metabolism and production of hydrogen peroxide in animal and plants, thus representing a key system in development and programmed cell death. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amiloride, p-aminobenzamidine, clonidine, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl-indole (DAPI), gabexate mesylate, guazatine, and N,N'-bis(2,3-butadienyl)-1,4-butane-diamine (MDL72527) on the catalytic activity of pig liver and Zea mays L. PAO, Lens culinaris L. and Pisum sativum L. and swine kidney copper amine oxidase, bovine trypsin, as well as neuronal constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) was investigated. Moreover, agmatine and N(3) -prenylagmatine (G3) were observed to inhibit pig liver and Zea mays L. PAO, bovine trypsin, and NOS-I action, but were substrates for Lens culinaris L., Pisum sativum L. and swine kidney copper amine oxidase. Guazatine and G3 inhibited selectively Zea mays L. PAO with K(i) values of 7.5 x 10(-9) M and 1.5 x 10(-8) M, respectively (at pH 6.5 and 25.0 degrees C). As a whole, the data reported here represent examples of enzyme cross-inhibition, and appear to be relevant in view of the use of cationic L-arginine-and imidazole-based compounds as drugs. PMID:11342283

  15. Effect of emamectin benzoate on mortality, proboscis extension, gustation and reproduction of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    López, Juan D; Latheef, M A; Hoffmann, W C

    2010-01-01

    Newly emerged corn earworm adults, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) require a carbohydrate source from plant or other exudates and nectars for dispersal and reproduction. Adults actively seek and forage at feeding sites upon eclosion in the habitat of the larval host plant or during dispersal to, or colonization of, a suitable reproductive habitat. This nocturnal behavior of H. zea has potential for exploitation as a pest management strategy for suppression using an adult feeding approach. This approach entails the use of a feeding attractant and stimulant in combination with a toxicant that when ingested by the adult will either reduce fecundity/fertility at sub-lethal dosages or kill the adult. The intent of this study was to assess reproductive inhibition and toxicity of emamectin benzoate on H. zea when ingested by the adults when mixed in ppm active ingredient (wt:vol) with 2.5 M sucrose as a feeding stimulant. Because the mixture has to be ingested to function, the effect of emamectin benzoate was also evaluated at sub-lethal and lethal concentrations on proboscis extension and gustatory response of H. zea in the laboratory. Feral males captured in sex pheromone-baited traps in the field were used for toxicity evaluations because they were readily available and were more representative of the field populations than laboratory-reared adults. Laboratory-reared female moths were used for reproduction effects because it is very difficult to collect newly emerged feral females from the field. Emamectin benzoate was highly toxic to feral H. zea males with LC(50) values (95% CL) being 0.718 (0.532-0.878), 0.525 (0.316-0.751), and 0.182 (0.06-0.294) ppm for 24, 48 and 72 h responses, respectively. Sub-lethal concentrations of emamectin benzoate did not significantly reduce proboscis extension response of feral males and gustatory response of female H. zea. Sublethal concentrations of emamectin benzoate significantly reduced percent larval hatch of

  16. Susceptibilities of Helicoverpa zea and Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations to Cry1Ac insecticidal protein.

    PubMed

    Ali, M I; Luttrell, R G; Young, S Y

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibilities of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.) to Cry1Ac were measured via a diet-incorporated assay with MPV II at the University of Arkansas during 2002-2004. Lethal concentration-mortality (LC50) estimates of five laboratory, seven laboratory-cross, and 10 field populations of H. virescens varied 12-fold. Pooled susceptibilities of H. virescens across all laboratory and field populations varied five-fold. The LC50 estimates for H. virescens were higher than those reported by previous research before the introduction of transgenic crops. However, the ratio of susceptibility of laboratory and field populations was similar, suggesting no change in overall species susceptibility. Individual LC50 estimates of five laboratory, nine laboratory-cross, and 57 field populations of H. zea varied over 130-fold. Pooled susceptibilities across laboratory and field populations varied widely. Among the field populations, colonies from non-Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops were generally more susceptible than those from Bt crops. Across the Bt crops expressing Cry protein, colonies from Bollgard (Monsanto Company) cotton had lower susceptibility to CrylAc than those from Bt corn and those from non-Bt crops. PMID:16573337

  17. Chromium accumulation potential of Zea mays grown under four different fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2014-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) contamination in soil is a growing concern in sustainable agriculture production and food safety. We performed pot experiment with chromium (30 mg/soil) to assess the accumulation potential of Zea mays and study the influence of four fertilizers, viz. Farm Yard Manure (FYM), NPK, Panchakavya (PK) and Vermicompost (VC) with respect to Cr accumulation. The oxidative stress and pigment (chlorophyll) levels were also examined. The results showed increased accumulation of chromium in both shoots and roots of Zea mays under FYM and NPK supply, and reduced with PK and VC. While the protein and pigment contents decreased in Cr treated plants, the fertilizers substantiated the loss to overcome the stress. Similarly, accumulation of Cr increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) indicating the enhanced damage control activity. However, these levels were relatively low in plants supplemented with fertilizers. Our results confirm that the maize can play an effective role in bioremediation of soils polluted with chromium, particularly in supplementation with fertilizers such as farm yard manure and NPK. PMID:25651615

  18. Preventive effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) on experimental diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wipawee, Thukham-mee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Terdthai, Tong-un; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential. PMID:24527449

  19. Analysis of the Genome of the Sexually Transmitted Insect Virus Helicoverpa zea Nudivirus 2

    PubMed Central

    Burand, John P.; Kim, Woojin; Afonso, Claudio L.; Tulman, Edan R.; Kutish, Gerald F.; Lu, Zhiqiang; Rock, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    The sexually transmitted insect virus Helicoverpa zea nudivirus 2 (HzNV-2) was determined to have a circular double-stranded DNA genome of 231,621 bp coding for an estimated 113 open reading frames (ORFs). HzNV-2 is most closely related to the nudiviruses, a sister group of the insect baculoviruses. Several putative ORFs that share homology with the baculovirus core genes were identified in the viral genome. However, HzNV-2 lacks several key genetic features of baculoviruses including the late transcriptional regulation factor, LEF-1 and the palindromic hrs, which serve as origins of replication. The HzNV-2 genome was found to code for three ORFs that had significant sequence homology to cellular genes which are not generally found in viral genomes. These included a presumed juvenile hormone esterase gene, a gene coding for a putative zinc-dependent matrix metalloprotease, and a major facilitator superfamily protein gene; all of which are believed to play a role in the cellular proliferation and the tissue hypertrophy observed in the malformation of reproductive organs observed in HzNV-2 infected corn earworm moths, Helicoverpa zea. PMID:22355451

  20. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  1. The molecular evolution of terminal ear1, a regulatory gene in the genus Zea.

    PubMed Central

    White, S E; Doebley, J F

    1999-01-01

    Nucleotide diversity in the terminal ear1 (te1) gene, a regulatory locus hypothesized to be involved in the morphological evolution of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays), was investigated for evidence of past selection. Nucleotide polymorphism in a 1.4-kb region of te1 was analyzed for a sample of 26 sequences isolated from 12 maize lines, five populations of the maize progenitor, Z. mays ssp. parviglumis, six other Zea populations, and two Tripsacum species. Although nucleotide diversity in te1 in maize is reduced relative to ssp. parviglumis, phylogenetic and statistical analyses of the pattern of polymorphism among these sequences provided no evidence of past selection, indicating that the region of the gene studied was probably not involved in maize evolution. The level of reduction in genetic diversity in te1 in maize relative to its progenitor is comparable to that found in previous reports for isozymes and other neutrally evolving maize genes and is consistent with a genome-wide reduction of genetic diversity resulting from a domestication bottleneck. An estimate of the age (1.2-1.4 million yr) of the maize gene pool based on te1 is roughly consistent with previous estimates based on other neutral genes, but may be biased by the apparently slow synonymous substitution rate at te1. PMID:10545473

  2. Risk assessment for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance on dual-gene versus single-gene corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in EPA regulations have prompted concern in some experts that transgenic corn expressing two lepidopteran-active genes from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (dual-gene) may result in more rapid selection for resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) than corn expressing a s...

  3. Genetic Variation for Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins in Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Eastern North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to evaluate resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner toxins, female bollworm moths, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), were collected from four light trap locations in two eastern North Carolina counties from August-October during 2001 and 2002. Moths were allowed to oviposit, and upon hatch, ...

  4. Promoting Student Inquiry Using "Zea Mays" (Corn) Cultivars for Hypothesis-Driven Experimentation in a Majors Introductory Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Amy C.; Peters, Brenda J.; Bendixen, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    The AAAS Vision and Change report (2011) recommends incorporating student research experiences into the biology curriculum at the undergraduate level. This article describes, in detail, how "Zea mays" (corn) cultivars were used as a model for a hypothesis-driven short-term research project in an introductory biology course at a small…

  5. Prevalence of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on late season volunteer corn in Mississippi: implications on Bt resistance management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southern United States has a long growing period between corn harvest and first winter frost, so volunteer corn which germinates after corn harvest has a growing period sufficient for corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) to feed on these plants. However, lower air temperatures can limit larval...

  6. Quantitative Trait Loci for Maysin Synthesis in Maize (Zea mays L.) Lines Selected for High Silk Maysin Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recurrent selection has been utilized for over a century to increase desired traits in crop plants. One notable trait of interest to plant breeders is insect resistance. Maysin is a naturally occurring C-glycosyl flavone found in maize (Zea mays L.) silk tissue that confers resistance to corn earwor...

  7. Effect of emamectin benzoate on mortality, proboscis extension, gustation and reproduction of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newly emerged bollworm adults, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) require carbohydrate source from plant exudates and nectars for reproduction. Adults actively seek such feeding sites upon eclosion in their natural habitat. We wanted to evaluate this nocturnal behavior of the bollworm for potential use as a p...

  8. Efficacy of insecticides of different chemistries against Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis and conventional cotton.

    PubMed

    Brickle, D S; Turnipseed, S G; Sullivan, M J

    2001-02-01

    Six insecticides of different chemistries were evaluated against the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), in non-B.t. (Deltapine 'DP 5415', Deltapine 'DP 5415RR') and transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (B.t.) (Deltapine 'NuCOTN 33B', Deltapine 'DP 458 B/RR') cotton. In 1998, treatments consisted of three rates each of a pyrethroid (lambda-cyhalothrin), spinosyn (spinosad), carbamate (thiodicarb), pyrrole (chlorfenapyr), oxadiazine (indoxacarb), and avermectin (emamectin benzoate) in a nonirrigated field. In 1999, treatments consisted of three rates each of lambda-cyhalothrin, spinosad, thiodicarb, and indoxacarb in an irrigated and a nonirrigated (dryland) field. The highest rate of each insecticide corresponded to normal grower-use rates. Spinosad and thiodicarb controlled H. zea in non-B.t. cotton, whereas other materials were less effective. Even though H. zea is becoming increasingly resistant to pyrethroid insecticides, lambda-cyhalothrin was highly effective in dryland B. thuringiensis cotton. Spinosad and thiodicarb were equally effective. Data indicated that reduced rates of lambda-cyhalothrin, spinosad, and thiodicarb could be used for control of H. zea in dryland B.t. cotton systems. However, reduced rates of these insecticides in a heavily irrigated B.t. cotton system did not provide adequate control. PMID:11233138

  9. TOXICITY OF METHYL-TERT BYTYL ETHER (MTBE) TO PLANTS (AVENA SATIVA, ZEA MAYS, TRITICUM AESTIVUM, AND LACTUCA SATIVA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the germination of seeds and growth of the plant were studied in some laboratory experiments. Test plants were wild oat (Avena sative), sweet corn (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Seed germination,...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  15. Selection and adaptation to high plant density in the Iowa Stiff Stalk synthetic maize (Zea mays L.) population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant density at which Zea mays L. hybrids achieve maximum grain yield has increased throughout the hybrid era while grain yield on a per plant basis has increased little. Changes in plant traits including grain yield, moisture, test weight, and stalk and root lodging have been well characterize...

  16. Development of neuropeptide analogs capable of traversing the integument: A case study using diapause hormone analogs in Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diapause hormone and its analogs terminate pupal diapause in H. zea when injected, but if such agents are to be used as effective diapause disruptors it will be essential to develop simple techniques for administering active compounds that can exert their effect by penetrating the insect epidermis. ...

  17. The identification and characterization of two dominant R1 haplotype-specific inhibitors of aleurone color in Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the identification and characterization of two novel dominant inhibitors of aleurone color in Zea mays that interact with specific haplotypes of the r1 locus. One inhibitor locus, inr1 (inhibitor of r1 aleurone color1), maps to the long arm of chromosome 10, distal to the TB-10L19 breakpo...

  18. Engineering a Recombinant Baculovirus with a Peptide Hormone Gene and its Effect on the Corn Earworm, Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The helicokinins are peptides identified from Helicoverpa zea that when injected into the larvae were found to cause excessive diuresis and loss of feeding activity. Of the three peptides, helicokinin II (HezK-II) was found to be most potent. A synthetic gene encoding HezK-II was constructed based o...

  19. Detection and Evolution of Resistance to the Pyrethroid Cypermethrin in Bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bollworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) is a key pest of cotton in Texas. Bollworm populations are widely controlled with pyrethroid insecticides in cotton and exposed to pyrethroids in other major crops such as grain sorghum, corn and soybeans. A statewide program that evaluated cypermethrin resist...

  20. Occultifur kilbournensis f.a. sp. nov., a new member of the Cystobasidiales associated with maize (Zea mays) cultivation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a study of microorganisms associated with maize (Zea mays) cultivation, yeasts were isolated from overwintered stalks, cobs and surrounding soil, which were collected from an agricultural field in south-central Illinois, USA. Predominant among isolates were two species of Cryptococcus (Cr. fl...

  1. Insect Eggs Can Enhance Wound Response in Plants: A Study System of Tomato Solanum lycopersicum L. and Helicoverpa zea Boddie

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinwon; Tooker, John F.; Luthe, Dawn S.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Felton, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Insect oviposition on plants frequently precedes herbivory. Accumulating evidence indicates that plants recognize insect oviposition and elicit direct or indirect defenses to reduce the pressure of future herbivory. Most of the oviposition-triggered plant defenses described thus far remove eggs or keep them away from the host plant or their desirable feeding sites. Here, we report induction of antiherbivore defense by insect oviposition which targets newly hatched larvae, not the eggs, in the system of tomato Solanum lycopersicum L., and tomato fruitworm moth Helicoverpa zea Boddie. When tomato plants were oviposited by H. zea moths, pin2, a highly inducible gene encoding protease inhibitor2, which is a representative defense protein against herbivorous arthropods, was expressed at significantly higher level at the oviposition site than surrounding tissues, and expression decreased with distance away from the site of oviposition. Moreover, more eggs resulted in higher pin2 expression in leaves, and both fertilized and unfertilized eggs induced pin2 expression. Notably, when quantified daily following deposition of eggs, pin2 expression at the oviposition site was highest just before the emergence of larvae. Furthermore, H. zea oviposition primed the wound-induced increase of pin2 transcription and a burst of jasmonic acid (JA); tomato plants previously exposed to H. zea oviposition showed significantly stronger induction of pin2 and higher production of JA upon subsequent simulated herbivory than without oviposition. Our results suggest that tomato plants recognize H. zea oviposition as a signal of impending future herbivory and induce defenses to prepare for this herbivory by newly hatched neonate larvae. PMID:22616005

  2. Bt Maize Seed Mixtures for Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Larval Movement, Development, and Survival on Non-transgenic Maize.

    PubMed

    Burkness, Eric C; Cira, T M; Moser, S E; Hutchison, W D

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 and 2013, field trials were conducted near Rosemount, MN, to assess the movement and development of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) larvae on non-Bt refuge corn plants within a seed mixture of non-Bt and Bt corn. The Bt corn hybrid expressed three Bt toxins-Cry1Ab, Cry1F, and Vip3A. As the use of seed mixtures for insect resistance management (IRM) continues to be implemented, it is necessary to further characterize how this IRM approach impacts resistance development in ear-feeding Lepidopteran pests. The potential for Bt pollen movement and cross pollination of the non-Bt ears in a seed mixture may lead to Bt toxin exposure to larvae developing on those refuge ears. Larval movement and development by H. zea, feeding on non-Bt refuge plants adjacent to either transgenic Bt or non-Bt plants, were measured to investigate the potential for unintended Bt exposure. Non-Bt plants were infested with H. zea eggs and subplots were destructively sampled twice per week within each treatment to assess larval development, location, and kernel injury. Results indicate that H. zea larval movement between plants is relatively low, ranging from 2-16% of larvae, and occurs mainly after reaching the second instar. Refuge plants in seed mixtures did not produce equivalent numbers of H. zea larvae, kernel injury, and larval development differed as compared with a pure stand of non-Bt plants. This suggests that there may be costs to larvae developing on refuge plants within seed mixtures and additional studies are warranted to define potential impacts. PMID:26318006

  3. Efficient isolation, purification, and characterization of the Helicoverpa zea VHDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Deryck R; Yousefi, Vandad; Haunerland, Norbert

    2003-12-01

    The study of fat body receptors (e.g., VHDL receptor) in Lepidoptera has been irksome due to the fact that isolation and purification of these proteins are difficult and resulted in extremely low yields. A rapid and efficient method is presented for the purification of Helicoverpa zea VHDL receptor by the use of VHDL-biotin ligand complexed to streptavidin coated magnetic beads. The technique can be easily applied to other ligands and allows for the purification of membrane proteins with higher yields compared to previously used methods involving immunopurification. Although the purified protein can be characterized by Western and non-radioactive ligand blots using enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL), a non-radioactive ligand blot method using VHDL-FITC is presented, which allows for the quick analysis of the receptor directly from the blot under standard UV light. Sufficient receptor protein has been derived for amino acid analysis, receptor-ligand and xenobiotic binding studies. PMID:14965772

  4. Photosynthetic Independence of Light-induced Anthocyanin Formation in Zea Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Stephen O.; Fox, Sue B.; Naylor, Aubrey W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported which support the view that the photosynthetic photosystems are not involved in the high irradiance response (HIR) phenomenon of light-dependent anthocyanin biosynthesis in dark-grown Zea mays L. seedlings. A negative correlation between change in greening rates and change in light-dependent anthocyanin accumulation rates with age was demonstrated. Lack of chlorophyll synthesis in a strain of maize possessing a temperature-sensitive lesion for chlorophyll synthesis could not be correlated with light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Furthermore, seedlings totally lacking photosynthetic capabilities, either due to a genetic lesion or to excision of all photosynthetic tissue, had an enhanced rate of photoinduced anthocyanin formation. This evidence indicates that the HIR results in the initiation of processes that are in competition with chloroplast development for substrate in normal, intact seedlings. PMID:16659449

  5. Root graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Root graviresponsiveness in normal and carotenoid-deficient mutant seedlings of Zea mays was not significantly different. Columella cells in roots of mutant seedlings were characterized by fewer, smaller, and a reduced relative volume of plastids as compared to columella cells of normal seedlings. Plastids in columella cells of mutant seedlings possessed reduced amounts of starch. Although approximately 10 per cent of the columella cells in mutant seedlings lacked starch, their plastids were located at the bottom of the cell. These results suggest that (i) carotenoids are not necessary for root gravitropism, (ii) graviresponsiveness is not necessarily proportional to the size, number, or relative volume of plastids in columella cells, and (iii) sedimentation of plastids in columella cells may not result directly from their increased density due to starch content. Plastids in columella cells of normal and mutant seedlings were associated with bands of microtubule-like structures, suggesting that these structures may be involved in 'positioning' plastids in the cell.

  6. Arabidopsis Thaliana and Zea Mays Data from the Plant Proteome Database (PPDB) at Cornell University

    DOE Data Explorer

    The main objective is to provide a centralized, curated, data deposit for predicted and experimentally determined proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and maize (Zea mays), their annotated functions, as well as their experimental and predicted molecular and biophysical properties. Importantly, information from mass spectrometry-based identifications is available for each identified protein accession; this will allow the database user to determine the significance the experimental identification and also evaluate information of post-translational modification. Multiple search methods are provided so that the user can retrieve information based on gene identification number, functional annotation or various protein properties. Initiated in 2004, PPDB was originally dedicated to plant plastids, but has now expanded to the whole plant proteome. The database includes data generated in Cornell labs, external published data sets, and deposited data from contributors.[Taken from PPDB website at http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu/introduction.aspx

  7. Transport of indoleacetic acid in intact corn coleoptiles. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, K.E.; Briggs, W.R. )

    1990-10-01

    We have characterized the transport of ({sup 3}H)indoleacetic acid (IAA) in intact corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles. We have used a wide range of concentrations of added IAA (28 femtomoles to 100 picomoles taken up over 60 minutes). The shape of the transport curve varies with the concentration of added IAA, although the rate of movement of the observed front of tracer is invariant with concentration. At the lowest concentration of tracer used, the labeled IAA in the transport stream is not detectably metabolized or immobilized, curvature does not develop as a result of tracer application, and normal phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness are not affected. Therefore we believe we are observing the transport of true tracer quantities of labeled auxin at this lowest concentration.

  8. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins induced by auxins in maize embryonic tissues. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.; Aguilar, R.; Mendez, A.P.; de Jimenez, E.S.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of ({sup 32}P) ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of {sup 32}P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on {sup 32}P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent K{sub m} values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins.

  9. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular distribution of Ca in caps of primary roots of Zea mays was examined during the onset and early stages of gravicurvature to determine its possible role in root gravitropism. Staining becomes associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell after five minutes, and persists throughout the onset of gravicurvature. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like channels in their cell walls. Data suggest that Ca is not transported laterally through the columella tissue,but rather that the movement of Ca to the lower side of caps of horizontally-oriented roots is at least partially through and/or on the mucilage of the cap, and via an electrochemical gradient. An important role in root gravitropism is indicated for Ca secretion by peripheral cells.

  10. A gradient of endogenous calcium forms in mucilage of graviresponding roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    Agar blocks that contacted the upper sides of tips of horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays contain significantly less calcium (Ca) than blocks that contacted the lower sides of such roots. This gravity-induced gradient of Ca forms prior to the onset of gravicurvature, and does not form across tips of vertically-oriented roots or roots of agravitropic mutants. These results indicate that (1) Ca can be collected from mucilage of graviresponding roots, (2) gravity induces a downward movement of endogenous Ca in mucilage overlying the root tip, (3) this gravity-induced gradient of Ca does not form across tips of agravitropic roots, and (4) formation of a Ca gradient is not a consequence of gravicurvature. These results are consistent with gravity-induced movement of Ca being a trigger for subsequent redistribution of growth effectors (e.g. auxin) that induce differential growth and gravicurvature.

  11. Response to gravity by Zea mays seedlings. I. Time course of the response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.; Dayanandan, P.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Gravistimulation induces an asymmetric distribution of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the cortex-epidermis of the Zea mays L. cv 'Stowells Evergreen' mesocotyl within 15 minutes, the shortest time tested. IAA was measured by an isotope dilution method as the pentaflurobenzyl ester. The per cent IAA in the lower half of the mescotyl cortex was 56 to 57% at 15, 30, and 90 minutes after stimulus initiation. Curvature is detectable in the mescotyl within 3 minutes after beginning gravitropic stimulation. The rate of curvature of the mesocotyl increases during the first 60 minutes to maximum of about 30 degrees per hour. Thus, the growth asymmetry continues to increase for 45 minutes after hormone asymmetry is established. Free IAA occurs predominantly in the stele of the mesocotyl whereas esterified IAA is mainly in the mesocotyl cortex-epidermis. This compartmentation may permit determining in which tissue the hormone asymmetry arises. Current data suggest the asymmetry originated in the stele.

  12. The influence of gravity on the formation of amyloplasts in columella cells of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; Koon, E. C.; Wang, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Columella (i.e., putative graviperceptive) cells of Zea mays seedlings grown in the microgravity of outer space allocate significantly less volume to putative statoliths (amyloplasts) than do columella cells of Earth-grown seedlings. Amyloplasts of flight-grown seedlings are significantly smaller than those of ground controls, as is the average volume of individual starch grains. Similarly, the relative volume of starch in amyloplasts in columella cells of flight-grown seedlings is significantly less than that of Earth-grown seedlings. Microgravity does not significantly alter the volume of columella cells, the average number of amyloplasts per columella cell, or the number of starch grains per amyloplast. These results are discussed relative to the influence of gravity on cellular and organellar structure.

  13. Collection of gravitropic effectors from mucilage of electrotropically-stimulated roots of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fondren, W. M.; Moore, R.

    1987-01-01

    We placed agar blocks adjacent to tips of electrotropically stimulated primary roots of Zea mays. Blocks placed adjacent to the anode-side of the roots for 3 h induced significant curvature when subsequently placed asymmetrically on tips of vertically-oriented roots. Curvature was always toward the side of the root unto which the agar block was placed. Agar blocks not contacting roots and blocks placed adjacent to the cathode-side of electrotropically stimulated roots did not induce significant curvature when placed asymmetrically on tips of vertically-oriented roots. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry indicated that blocks adjacent to the anode-side of electrotropically-stimulated roots contained significantly more calcium than (1) blocks not contacting roots, and (2) blocks contacting the cathode-side of roots. These results demonstrate the presence of a gradient of endogenous Ca in mucilage of electrotropically-stimulated roots (i.e. roots undergoing gravitropic-like curvature).

  14. The effect of ethylene on root growth of Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. C.; Feldman, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The control of primary root growth in Zea mays cv. Merit by ethylene was examined. At applied concentrations of ethylene equal to or greater than 0.1 microliter L-1, root elongation during 24 h was inhibited. The half-maximal response occurred at 0.6 microliter L-1 and the response saturated at 6 microliters L-1. Inhibition of elongation took place within 20 min. However, after ethylene was removed, elongation recovered to control values within 15 min. Root elongation was also inhibited by green light. The inhibition caused by a 24-h exposure to ethylene was restricted to the elongating region just behind the apex, with inhibition of cortical cell elongation being the primary contributor to the effect. Based on use of 2,5-norbornadiene, a gaseous competitive inhibitor of ethylene, it was concluded that endogenous ethylene normally inhibits root elongation.

  15. The involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the involvement of glucose-6-phosphatase in mucilage secretion by root cap cells, we have cytochemically localized the enzyme in columella and peripheral cells of root caps of Zea mays. Glucose-6-phosphatase is associated with the plasmalemma and cell wall of columella cells. As columella cells differentiate into peripheral cells and begin to produce and secrete mucilage, glucose-6-phosphatase staining intensifies and becomes associated with the mucilage and, to a lesser extent, the cell wall. Cells being sloughed from the cap are characterized by glucose-6-phosphatase staining being associated with the vacuole and plasmalemma. These changes in enzyme localization during cellular differentiation in root caps suggest that glucose-6-phosphatase is involved in the production and/or secretion of mucilage by peripheral cells of Z. mays.

  16. Differentiation of the properties of the branching isozymes from maize (Zea mays)

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, H.P.; Preiss, J. )

    1993-08-01

    The multiple forms of branching enzyme (BE) from developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm were purified by modification of previous procedures such that amylase activity could be eliminated completely from the BE preparation. Three distinct assays for BE activity (phosphorylase a stimulation assay, BE linkage assay, and iodine stain assay) were used to characterize and differentiate that properties of the BE isoforms. This study present s the first evidence that the BE isoforms differ in their action on amylopectin. BEI has the highest activity in branching amylose, but its rate of branching amylopectin was less than 5% of that of branching amylose. Conversely, BEII isoforms had lower rates in branching amylose (about 9--12% of that of BEI) and had higher rates of branching amylopectin (about 6-fold) than BEI. The implication of these findings to the mechanism of amylopectin synthesis in vivo are discussed. 21 refs., 1 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    PubMed

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW. PMID:25736610

  18. Classification, genetic variation, and biological activity of nucleopolyhedrovirus samples from larvae of the heliothine pests heliothis virescens, helicoverpa zea, and helicoverpa armigera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PCR-based method was used to classify 109 isolates of nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV; Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus) collected worldwide from larvae of Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Helicoverpa armigera. Partial nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of three highly conserved ge...

  19. Auxin Transport in Zea mays Coleoptiles II. Influence of Light on the Transport of Indoleacetic Acid-2-C.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, S M; Gordon, S A

    1967-01-01

    The effect of bilateral irradiation with white light (1000 Meter Candle Sec) on the basipetal transport of auxin has been investigated. Illumination of either the intact shoot or the excised coleoptile tip of the Zea seedling, decreased the amount of diffusible auxin obtained from the tip, and decreased Avena curvature response to unilaterally applied indoleacetic acid. Irradiation of the intact Zea seedling did not affect the absorption of (14)C-labeled indoleacetic acid from an agar block subsequently placed on the decapitated coleoptile. However, light caused a significant decrease in the amount of labeled auxin basipetally transported, without affecting materially the velocity of that transport. These and other observations are interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the primary hormonal phenomenon in first-positive phototropism is a light-induced impairment in the basipetal transport of auxin. PMID:16656477

  20. Influence of Dual-Bt Protein Corn on Bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), Survivorship on Bollgard II Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Gore, J.; Catchot, A.; Cook, D.; Musser, F.; Caprio, M.

    2016-01-01

    Similar Cry proteins are expressed in both Bt corn, Zea mays L., and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), commercial production systems. At least one generation of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), completes development on field corn in the Mid-South before dispersing across the landscape into other crop hosts like cotton. A concern is that Bt corn hybrids may result in selection for H. zea populations with a higher probability of causing damage to Bt cotton. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of H. zea offspring from moths that developed on non-Bt and VT Triple Pro (VT3 PRO) field corn to lyophilized Bollgard II cotton tissue expressing Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Offspring of individuals reared on VT3 PRO expressing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab had a significantly higher LC50 two out of the three years this study was conducted. Excess larvae were placed on artificial diet and allowed to pupate to determine if there were any inheritable fitness costs associated with parental development on VT3 PRO corn. Offspring resulting from males collected from VT3 PRO had significantly lower pupal weight and longer pupal duration compared with offspring of individuals collected from non-Bt corn. However, offspring from females collected from VT3 PRO were not different from non-Bt offspring. Paternal influence on offspring in insects is not commonly observed, but illustrates the side effects of development on a transgenic plant expressing less than a high dose, 25 times the concentration needed to kill susceptible larvae. PMID:26809264

  1. Influence of Dual-Bt Protein Corn on Bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), Survivorship on Bollgard II Cotton.

    PubMed

    Von Kanel, M B; Gore, J; Catchot, A; Cook, D; Musser, F; Caprio, M

    2016-04-01

    Similar Cry proteins are expressed in both Bt corn, Zea mays L., and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), commercial production systems. At least one generation of corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), completes development on field corn in the Mid-South before dispersing across the landscape into other crop hosts like cotton. A concern is that Bt corn hybrids may result in selection for H. zea populations with a higher probability of causing damage to Bt cotton. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of H. zea offspring from moths that developed on non-Bt and VT Triple Pro (VT3 PRO) field corn to lyophilized Bollgard II cotton tissue expressing Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Offspring of individuals reared on VT3 PRO expressing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab had a significantly higher LC50 two out of the three years this study was conducted. Excess larvae were placed on artificial diet and allowed to pupate to determine if there were any inheritable fitness costs associated with parental development on VT3 PRO corn. Offspring resulting from males collected from VT3 PRO had significantly lower pupal weight and longer pupal duration compared with offspring of individuals collected from non-Bt corn. However, offspring from females collected from VT3 PRO were not different from non-Bt offspring. Paternal influence on offspring in insects is not commonly observed, but illustrates the side effects of development on a transgenic plant expressing less than a high dose, 25 times the concentration needed to kill susceptible larvae. PMID:26809264

  2. APN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac but not Cry2Ab in Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jizhen; Zhang, Min; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming; Guo, Yuyuan; Ni, Xinzhi; Li, Xianchun

    2016-01-01

    Lepidopteran midgut aminopeptidases N (APNs) are phylogenetically divided into eight clusters, designated as APN1–8. Although APN1 has been implicated as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in several species, its potential role in the mode of action of Cry2Ab has not been functionally determined so far. To test whether APN1 also acts as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in Helicoverpa zea and even for Cry2Ab in this species, we conducted a gain of function analysis by heterologously expressing H. zea APN1 (HzAPN1) in the midgut and fat body cell lines of H. zea and the ovarian cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and a loss of function analysis by RNAi (RNA interference) silencing of the endogenous APN1 in the three cell lines using the HzAPN1 double strand RNA (dsRNA). Heterologous expression of HzAPN1 significantly increased the susceptibility of the three cell lines to Cry1Ac, but had no effects on their susceptibility to Cry2Ab. Knocking down of the endogenous APN1 made the three cell lines resistant to Cry1Ac, but didn’t change cell lines susceptibility to Cry2Ab. The findings from this study demonstrate that HzAPN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac, but not Cry2Ab. PMID:26755166

  3. Managing the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis, and Corn Earworm, Helicoverpa zea, using Bt Corn and Insecticide Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Juliano R.; Costa, Ervandil C.; Guedes, Jerson V. C.; Arbage, Alessandro P.; Neto, Armando B.; Bigolin, Mauricio; Pinto, Felipe F.

    2013-01-01

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), are important pests of corn in Brazil and have not been successfully managed, because of the difficulty of managing them with pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Bt corn MON810, transformed with a gene from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) insecticide seed treatment, and foliar insecticide spray using treatments developed for control of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which is the major pest of corn. The experiments were done under field conditions in early- and late-planted corn in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and in the laboratory. The MON810 corn reduced infestations and damage by D. saccharalis and H. zea. The insecticides used in seed treatments or foliar sprays did not affect D. saccharalis and H. zea infestations or damage levels. The exception was the insecticide seed treatment in non-transformed corn, which reduced early infestations of D. saccharalis. The MON810 corn, therefore, can be used for managing these two pest species, especially D. saccharalis. PMID:24735131

  4. Managing the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis, and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, using Bt corn and insecticide treatments.

    PubMed

    Farias, Juliano R; Costa, Ervandil C; Guedes, Jerson V C; Arbage, Alessandro P; Neto, Armando B; Bigolin, Mauricio; Pinto, Felipe F

    2013-01-01

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), are important pests of corn in Brazil and have not been successfully managed, because of the difficulty of managing them with pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Bt corn MON810, transformed with a gene from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) insecticide seed treatment, and foliar insecticide spray using treatments developed for control of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which is the major pest of corn. The experiments were done under field conditions in early- and late-planted corn in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and in the laboratory. The MON810 corn reduced infestations and damage by D. saccharalis and H. zea. The insecticides used in seed treatments or foliar sprays did not affect D. saccharalis and H. zea infestations or damage levels. The exception was the insecticide seed treatment in non-transformed corn, which reduced early infestations of D. saccharalis. The MON810 corn, therefore, can be used for managing these two pest species, especially D. saccharalis. PMID:24735131

  5. Cross-species amplification and polymorphism of microsatellite loci in Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazilian cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Leite, N A; Corrêa, A S; Alves-Pereira, A; Campos, J B; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2016-01-01

    The Old World bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) was recently discovered in Brazil. This species is closely related to the New World bollworm H. zea (Boddie), and mating between these species has already been reported under laboratory conditions. Here, we tested the cross-species amplification of 20 microsatellite (SSR) loci in field populations of H. armigera and H. zea collected from Brazilian cropping systems. Seven SSR loci were successfully amplified and polymorphic in both species except for the locus HaC14, which was monomorphic for H. zea. All SSR loci were in linkage equilibrium, and deviations from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium were only observed for the locus HarSSR1 in the HaRS-2 population, where null alleles were present. A moderate level of polymorphism was detected in H. armigera and H. zea populations with a mean allele number of 4.14, and 2.24, respectively. Interestingly, most of the populations of the recent invader H. armigera showed higher genetic diversity and inbreeding coefficients than H. zea populations. The genetic identity of each species was recovered using a STRUCTURE analysis, where the populations formed two clusters (K = 2) according to their species. STRUCTURE also suggested the occurrence of potential hybrid offspring between H. armigera and H. zea individuals in natural conditions. These SSR loci will be valuable in characterizing population differentiation, invasion routes, adaptation, reproductive behavior, and intra- and interspecific gene flow in H. armigera and H. zea populations in Brazil, the USA, and other areas where these two pests occur. PMID:27173200

  6. 1-Naphthyl Acetate-Dependent Medium Acidification by Zea mays L. Coleoptile Segments 1

    PubMed Central

    Salguero, Julio; Calatayud, Angeles; Gonzalez-Daros, Francisco; del Valle-Tascon, Secundino

    1991-01-01

    Zea mays L. cv INRA 5a coleoptile segments ecidify the incubation medium on the addition of 1-naphthyl acetate (1-NA). The buffering capacity of the bathing solution increases during 1-NA stimulated medium acidification. The solution bathing the 1-NA treated coleoptile segment was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. A considerable amount of acetic acid was detected in the bathing solution used to measure 1-NA-dependent medium acidification. For the first time, the data demonstrate directly the release of acetic acid from 1-NA. The extent of medium acidification was proportional to 1-NA concentration. Simultaneous measurement of medium acidification and acetate content upon addition of 1-NA showed that both processes were temporally correlated. The stoichiometry of proton equivalents to acetate ion was 0.966. Addition of 50 micromolar N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide had little effect on 1-NA-dependent medium acidification. The results indicate that 1-NA is hydrolyzed in the extracellular space of coleoptile cells. PMID:16668108

  7. Cytogenetics of monosomes in Zea mays. Progress report, May 16, 1980-May 15, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D. F.

    1981-02-01

    Monosomics lack a pairing partner in each meiotic cell, and genes on an entire chromosome are present in the hemizygous condition. We have isolated monosomics for chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 in Zea mays utilizing a recently-discovered system. This is the only series of this type that has been recovered in any diploid organism. The monosomic plants are surprisingly vigorous, good cytological samples can be taken, and crosses can be made. We are isolating all possible monosomic types and characterizing them by studying: (1) the cytology of meiosis, (2) the cytological behavior of univalent chromosomes, (3) the effect of monosomy and trisomy on intergenic and intragenic recombination, (4) the frequency and types of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations arising in monosomics, (5) the effect of aneuploidy on the relative amounts of specific fatty acids in embryos, (6) monosomic mutational mapping, (7) the effect of monosomy on pollen exine morphology with the scanning electron microscope, and (8) the effect of monosomy on DIMBOA levels. We are also developing test systems utilizing maize to detect the environmental or genetic induction of non-disjunction. This study has discovered genetic factors that control the meiotic process, genetic recombination, lipid biosynthesis, and the free amino acid pool.

  8. Cytogenetics of monosomes in Zea mays. Progress report, May 16, 1979-May 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D. F.

    1980-02-01

    Monosomics lack a pairing partner in each meiotic cell, and genes on an entire chromosome are present in the hemizygous condition. Monosomics for chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 in Zea mays have been isolated. This is the only series of this type that has been recovered in any diploid organism. The monosomic plants are vigorous, good cytological samples can be taken, and crosses can be made. All possible monosomic types are being isolated and characterized by studying: (1) the cytology of meiosis; (2) the cytological behavior of univalent chromosomes; (3) the effect of monosomy and trisomy on intergenic and intragenic recombination; (4) the frequency and types of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations arising in monosomics; (5) the effect of aneuploidy on the relative amounts of specific fatty acids in embryos; (6) monosomic mutational mapping; and (7) metabolic profile analysis of monosomics. Systems in maize to detect the environmental and genetic induction of non-disjunction are also being developed. By comparing a monosomic with its disomic siblings, one compares one and two copies of all genes on an entire chromosome. If a gene expressing dosage effects resides on a specific chromosome, a difference will be found between a plant monosomic for that chromosome and its diploid siblings. Genetic factors that control the meiotic process, genetic recombination, lipid biosynthesis, and the free amino acid pool have been discovered.

  9. A seed mixture increases dominance of resistance to Bt cotton in Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Brévault, Thierry; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Widely grown transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can benefit agriculture, but adaptation by pests threatens their continued success. Refuges of host plants that do not make Bt toxins can promote survival of susceptible insects and delay evolution of resistance, particularly if resistance is inherited as a recessive trait. However, data have been lacking to compare the dominance of resistance when Bt and non-Bt seeds are planted in random mixtures versus separate blocks. Here we report results from greenhouse experiments with transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac and the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, showing that the dominance of resistance was significantly higher in a seed mixture relative to a block of Bt cotton. The proportion of larvae on non-Bt cotton plants in the seed mixture was also significantly higher than expected under the null hypothesis of random distribution. In simulations based on observed survival, resistance evolved 2- to 4.5-fold faster in the seed mixture relative to separate blocks of Bt and non-Bt cotton. These findings support previous modelling results indicating that block refuges may be more effective than seed mixtures for delaying resistance in pests with mobile larvae and inherently low susceptibility to the toxins in Bt crops. PMID:25950459

  10. Directly dated starch residues document early formative maize (Zea mays L.) in tropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Zarrillo, Sonia; Pearsall, Deborah M; Raymond, J Scott; Tisdale, Mary Ann; Quon, Dugane J

    2008-04-01

    The study of maize (Zea mays L.) domestication has advanced from questions of its origins to the study-and debate-of its dietary role and the timing of its dispersal from Mexico. Because the investigation of maize's spread is hampered by poor preservation of macrobotanical remains in the Neotropics, research has focused on microbotanical remains whose contexts are often dated by association, leading some to question the dates assigned. Furthermore, some scholars have argued that maize was not introduced to southwestern Ecuador until approximately 4150-3850 calendar years before the present (cal B.P.), that it was used first and foremost as a fermented beverage in ceremonial contexts, and that it was not important in everyday subsistence, challenging previous studies based on maize starch and phytoliths. To further investigate these questions, we analyzed every-day cooking vessels, food-processing implements, and sediments for starch and phytoliths from an archaeological site in southwestern Ecuador constituting a small Early Formative village. Employing a new technique to recover starch granules from charred cooking-pot residues we show that maize was present, cultivated, and consumed here in domestic contexts by at least 5300-4950 cal B.P. Directly dating the residues by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon measurement, our results represent the earliest direct dates for maize in Early Formative Ecuadorian sites and provide further support that, once domesticated approximately 9000 calendar years ago, maize spread rapidly from southwestern Mexico to northwestern South America. PMID:18362336

  11. The Crystal Structures of Zea mays and Arabidopsis 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, Iris M.; Linden, Lars; Freigang, Jörg; Auerbach, Günter; Huber, Robert; Steinbacher, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The transformation of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate to homogentisate, catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), plays an important role in degrading aromatic amino acids. As the reaction product homogentisate serves as aromatic precursor for prenylquinone synthesis in plants, the enzyme is an interesting target for herbicides. In this study we report the first x-ray structures of the plant HPPDs of Zea mays and Arabidopsis in their substrate-free form at 2.0 Å and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Previous biochemical characterizations have demonstrated that eukaryotic enzymes behave as homodimers in contrast to prokaryotic HPPDs, which are homotetramers. Plant and bacterial enzymes share the overall fold but use orthogonal surfaces for oligomerization. In addition, comparison of both structures provides direct evidence that the C-terminal helix gates substrate access to the active site around a nonheme ferrous iron center. In the Z. mays HPPD structure this helix packs into the active site, sequestering it completely from the solvent. In contrast, in the Arabidopsis structure this helix tilted by about 60° into the solvent and leaves the active site fully accessible. By elucidating the structure of plant HPPD enzymes we aim to provide a structural basis for the development of new herbicides. PMID:15084729

  12. Direct observation of local xylem embolisms induced by soil drying in intact Zea mays leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Hwang, Bae Geun; Kim, Yangmin X.; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability of vascular plants to xylem embolism is closely related to their stable long-distance water transport, growth, and survival. Direct measurements of xylem embolism are required to understand what causes embolism and what strategies plants employ against it. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was used to non-destructively investigate both the anatomical structures of xylem vessels and embolism occurrence in the leaves of intact Zea mays (maize) plants. Xylem embolism was induced by water stress at various soil drying periods and soil water contents. X-ray images of dehydrated maize leaves showed that the ratio of gas-filled vessels to all xylem vessels increased with decreased soil water content and reached approximately 30% under severe water stress. Embolism occurred in some but not all vessels. Embolism in maize leaves was not strongly correlated with xylem diameter but was more likely to occur in the peripheral veins. The rate of embolism formation in metaxylem vessels was higher than in protoxylem vessels. This work has demonstrated that xylem embolism remains low in maize leaves under water stress and that there xylem has characteristic spatial traits of vulnerability to embolism. PMID:26946123

  13. Evolution of Resistance by Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Infesting Insecticidal Crops in the Southern United States

    PubMed Central

    Onstad, David; Crain, Philip; Crespo, Andre; Hutchison, William; Buntin, David; Porter, Pat; Catchot, Angus; Cook, Don; Pilcher, Clint; Flexner, Lindsey; Higgins, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We created a deterministic, frequency-based model of the evolution of resistance by corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to insecticidal traits expressed in crops planted in the heterogeneous landscapes of the southern United States. The model accounts for four generations of selection by insecticidal traits each year. We used the model results to investigate the influence of three factors on insect resistance management (IRM): 1) how does adding a third insecticidal trait to both corn and cotton affect durability of the products, 2) how does unstructured corn refuge influence IRM, and 3) how do block refuges (50% compliance) and blended refuges compare with regard to IRM? When Bt cotton expresses the same number of insecticidal traits, Bt corn with three insecticidal traits provides longer durability than Bt corn with two pyramided traits. Blended refuge provides similar durability for corn products compared with the same level of required block refuge when the rate of refuge compliance by farmers is 50%. Results for Mississippi and Texas are similar, but durabilities for corn traits are surprisingly lower in Georgia, where unstructured corn refuge is the highest of the three states, but refuge for Bt cotton is the lowest of the three states. Thus, unstructured corn refuge can be valuable for IRM but its influence is determined by selection for resistance by Bt cotton. PMID:26637533

  14. Quantitative trait loci for mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) identified using a RIL population.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Qinbin; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Song, Guiliang; Fu, Zhiyuan; Ding, Dong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the genetic mechanism of mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.), a population of 194 recombinant inbred lines derived from an elite hybrid Yuyu 22, was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for mercury accumulation at two locations. The results showed that the average Hg concentration in the different tissues of maize followed the order: leaves > bracts > stems > axis > kernels. Twenty-three QTLs for mercury accumulation in five tissues were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10, which explained 6.44% to 26.60% of the phenotype variance. The QTLs included five QTLs for Hg concentration in kernels, three QTLs for Hg concentration in the axis, six QTLs for Hg concentration in stems, four QTLs for Hg concentration in bracts and five QTLs for Hg concentration in leaves. Interestingly, three QTLs, qKHC9a, qKHC9b, and qBHC9 were in linkage with two QTLs for drought tolerance. In addition, qLHC1 was in linkage with two QTLs for arsenic accumulation. The study demonstrated the concentration of Hg in Hg-contaminated paddy soil could be reduced, and maize production maintained simultaneously by selecting and breeding maize Hg pollution-safe cultivars (PSCs). PMID:25210737

  15. Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Maize (Zea mays L.) Carotenoid Epsilon Hydroxylase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yanmin; Wang, Yingdian; Capell, Teresa; Shi, Lianxuan; Ni, Xiuzhen; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2015-01-01

    The assignment of functions to genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is necessary to understand how the pathway is regulated and to obtain the basic information required for metabolic engineering. Few carotenoid ε-hydroxylases have been functionally characterized in plants although this would provide insight into the hydroxylation steps in the pathway. We therefore isolated mRNA from the endosperm of maize (Zea mays L., inbred line B73) and cloned a full-length cDNA encoding CYP97C19, a putative heme-containing carotenoid ε hydroxylase and member of the cytochrome P450 family. The corresponding CYP97C19 genomic locus on chromosome 1 was found to comprise a single-copy gene with nine introns. We expressed CYP97C19 cDNA under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter in the Arabidopsis thaliana lut1 knockout mutant, which lacks a functional CYP97C1 (LUT1) gene. The analysis of carotenoid levels and composition showed that lutein accumulated to high levels in the rosette leaves of the transgenic lines but not in the untransformed lut1 mutants. These results allowed the unambiguous functional annotation of maize CYP97C19 as an enzyme with strong zeinoxanthin ε-ring hydroxylation activity. PMID:26030746

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci for Mercury Accumulation in Maize (Zea mays L.) Identified Using a RIL Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinbin; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Song, Guiliang; Fu, Zhiyuan; Ding, Dong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the genetic mechanism of mercury accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.), a population of 194 recombinant inbred lines derived from an elite hybrid Yuyu 22, was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for mercury accumulation at two locations. The results showed that the average Hg concentration in the different tissues of maize followed the order: leaves > bracts > stems > axis > kernels. Twenty-three QTLs for mercury accumulation in five tissues were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10, which explained 6.44% to 26.60% of the phenotype variance. The QTLs included five QTLs for Hg concentration in kernels, three QTLs for Hg concentration in the axis, six QTLs for Hg concentration in stems, four QTLs for Hg concentration in bracts and five QTLs for Hg concentration in leaves. Interestingly, three QTLs, qKHC9a, qKHC9b, and qBHC9 were in linkage with two QTLs for drought tolerance. In addition, qLHC1 was in linkage with two QTLs for arsenic accumulation. The study demonstrated the concentration of Hg in Hg-contaminated paddy soil could be reduced, and maize production maintained simultaneously by selecting and breeding maize Hg pollution-safe cultivars (PSCs). PMID:25210737

  17. Water transfer in an alfalfa/maize association. [Medicago sativa; Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Corak, S.J.; Blevins, D.G.; Pallardy, S.G.

    1987-07-01

    The authors investigated the possibility of interspecific water transfer in an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) association. An alfalfa plant was grown through two vertically stacked plastic tubes. A 5 centimeter air gap between tubes was bridged by alfalfa roots. Five-week old maize plants with roots confined to the top tube were not watered, while associated alfalfa roots had free access to water in the bottom tube (the -/+ treatment). Additional treatments included: top and bottom tubes watered (+/+), top and bottom tubes droughted (-/-), and top tube droughted after removal of alfalfa root bridges and routine removal of alfalfa tillers (-*). Predawn leaf water potential of maize in the -/+ treatment fell to -1.5 megapascals 13 days after the start of drought; thereafter, predawn and midday potentials were maintained near -1.9 megapascals. Leaf water potentials of maize in the -/- and -* treatments declined steadily; all plants in these treatments were completely desiccated before day 50. High levels of tritium activity were detected in water extracted from both alfalfa and maize leaves after /sup 3/H/sub 2/O was injected into the bottom -/+ tube at day 70 or later. Maize in the -/+ treatment was able to survive an otherwise lethal period of drought by utilizing water lost by alfalfa roots.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Wei, Zhaojun; Nachman, Ronald J.; Park, Yoonseong

    2013-01-01

    The diapause hormone (DH) in the heliothine moth has shown its activity in termination of pupal diapause, while the orthology in the silkworm is known to induce embryonic diapause. In the current study, we cloned the diapause hormone receptor from the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (HzDHr) and tested its ligand specificities in a heterologous reporter system. HzDHr was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, which were co-transfected with the aequorin reporter, and was used to measure the ligand activities. A total of 68 chemicals, including natural DH analogs and structurally similar peptide mimetics, were tested for agonistic and antagonistic activities. Several peptide mimetics with a 2-amino-7-bromofluorene-succinoyl (2Abf-Suc) N-terminal modification showed strong agonistic activities; these mimetics included 2Abf-Suc-F[dA]PRLamide, 2Abf-Suc-F[dR]PRLamide, 2Abf-Suc-FKPRLamide and 2Abf-Suc-FGPRLamide. Antagonistic activity was found in the ecdysis triggering hormone in Drosophila melanogaster (FFLKITKNVPRLamide). Interestingly, HzDHr does not discriminate between DH (WFGPRLamide C-terminal motif) and another closely related endogenous peptide, pyrokinin 1 (FXPRXamide; a C-terminal motif that is separate from WFGPRLamide). We provide large-scale in vitro data that serve as a reference for the development of agonists and antagonists to disrupt the DH signaling pathway. PMID:24257143

  19. Costs of jasmonic acid induced defense in aboveground and belowground parts of corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanjiao; Wang, Jianwu; Luo, Shiming; Fan, Huizhi; Jin, Qiong

    2012-08-01

    Costs of jasmonic acid (JA) induced plant defense have gained increasing attention. In this study, JA was applied continuously to the aboveground (AG) or belowground (BG) parts, or AG plus BG parts of corn (Zea mays L.) to investigate whether JA exposure in one part of the plant would affect defense responses in another part, and whether or not JA induced defense would incur allocation costs. The results indicated that continuous JA application to AG parts systemically affected the quantities of defense chemicals in the roots, and vice versa. Quantities of DIMBOA and total amounts of phenolic compounds in leaves or roots generally increased 2 or 4 wk after the JA treatment to different plant parts. In the first 2 wk after application, the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots was accompanied by a significant decrease of root length, root surface area, and root biomass. Four weeks after the JA application, however, no such costs for the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots were detected. Instead, shoot biomass and root biomass increased. The results suggest that JA as a defense signal can be transferred from AG parts to BG parts of corn, and vice versa. Costs for induced defense elicited by continuous JA application were found in the early 2 wk, while distinct benefits were observed later, i.e., 4 wk after JA treatment. PMID:22744011

  20. Characterization and functional analysis of a B3 domain factor from Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinghui; Yuan, Jincheng; Ma, Halian; Song, Jinhui; Wang, Lingyun; Weng, Qiaoyun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated a full-length cDNA and named ZmBDF from zea mays. ZmBDF encoded a protein of 356 amino acids and phylogenetic analysis showed that it belongs to a closely related subgroup with B3 domain factors in plants. The transcript level of ZmBDF could be induced by ABA, MeJA, salt or drought treatments. To further investigated the function of ZmBDF, ZmBDF over-expression transgenic lines were got by transforming it into Arabidopsis thaliana. ZmBDF over-expression transgenic plants in Arabidopsis could increase drought and salt tolerant in germination assay. Under drought condition, net photosynthetic rates (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), and internal leaf CO2 concentration (Ci) were less affected in transgenic plants compared with wild type. Besides, the chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b (chl a/chl b) ratio decreased in WT plants than the transgenic plants and total carotenoid content show opposite trends. Moreover, transgenic plants could also reduce the stomatal density and changed the stomatal shape. Taken together, our data suggested that ZmBDF could improve stress tolerance to drought and salt in maize. PMID:25953393

  1. Expression profiling of selected glutathione transferase genes in Zea mays (L.) seedlings infested with cereal aphids.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•-) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•- was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•- generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype. PMID:25365518

  2. Expression Profiling of Selected Glutathione Transferase Genes in Zea mays (L.) Seedlings Infested with Cereal Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•−) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•− was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•− generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype. PMID:25365518

  3. Sphingomonas zeae sp. nov., isolated from the stem of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; McInroy, John A; Glaeser, Stefanie P

    2015-08-01

    A yellow-pigmented bacterial isolate (strain JM-791T) obtained from the healthy internal stem tissue of 1-month-old corn (Zea mays, cultivar 'Sweet Belle') grown at the Plant Breeding Unit of the E.V. Smith Research Center in Tallassee (Elmore county), Alabama, USA, was taxonomically characterized. The study employing a polyphasic approach, including 16S RNA gene sequence analysis, physiological characterization, estimation of the ubiquinone and polar lipid patterns, and fatty acid composition, revealed that strain JM-791T shared 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with type strains of Sphingomonas paucimobilis (98.3%), Sphingomonas pseudosanguinis (97.5%) and Sphingomonas yabuuchiae (97.4%), but also showed pronounced differences, both genotypically and phenotypically. On the basis of these results, a novel species of the genus Sphingomonas is described, for which we propose the name Sphingomonas zeae sp. nov. with the type strain JM-791T ( = LMG 28739T = CCM 8596T). PMID:25944808

  4. Differential expression of superoxide dismutase genes in aphid-stressed maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB) in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible) and Ambrozja (relatively resistant) cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid) or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid). Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9). However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4) or 24 h (sod9) post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:24722734

  5. Open Field Study of Some Zea mays Hybrids, Lipid Compounds and Fumonisins Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Giorni, Paola; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Reverberi, Massimo; Scala, Valeria; Ludovici, Matteo; Cirlini, Martina; Galaverna, Gianni; Fanelli, Corrado; Battilani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Lipid molecules are increasingly recognized as signals exchanged by organisms interacting in pathogenic and/or symbiotic ways. Some classes of lipids actively determine the fate of the interactions. Host cuticle/cell wall/membrane components such as sphingolipids and oxylipins may contribute to determining the fate of host-pathogen interactions. In the present field study, we considered the relationship between specific sphingolipids and oxylipins of different hybrids of Zea mays and fumonisin by F. verticillioides, sampling ears at different growth stages from early dough to fully ripe. The amount of total and free fumonisin differed significantly between hybrids and increased significantly with maize ripening. Oxylipins and phytoceramides changed significantly within the hybrids and decreased with kernel maturation, starting from physiological maturity. Although the correlation between fumonisin accumulation and plant lipid profile is certain, the data collected so far cannot define a cause-effect relationship but open up new perspectives. Therefore, the question-"Does fumonisin alter plant lipidome or does plant lipidome modulate fumonisin accumulation?"-is still open. PMID:26378580

  6. In vitro gibberellin A/sub 1/ binding in Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, B.; Rappaport, L.

    1987-12-01

    The first and second leaf sheaths of Zea mays L. cv Golden Jubilee were extracted and the extract centrifuged at 100,000g to yield a supernatant or cytosol fraction. Binding of (/sup 3/H)gibberellin A/sub 1/ (GA/sub 1/) to a soluble macromolecular component present in the cytosol was demonstrated at 4/sup 0/C by Sephadex G-200 chromatography. The binding component was of high molecular weight (HMW) and greater than 500 kilodaltons. The HMW component was shown to be a protein and the /sup 3/H-activity bound to this protein was largely (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 1/ and not a metabolite. Binding was pH sensitive but only a small percentage (20%) appeared to be exchangeable on addition of unlabeled GA/sub 1/. Both biologically active and inactive GAs and non-GAs were able to inhibit GA/sub 1/ binding. (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 1/ binding to an intermediate molecular weight (IMW) fraction (40-100 kilodaltons) was also detected, provided cytosol was first desalted using Sephadex G-200 chromatography. Gel filtration studies suggest that the HMW binding component is an aggregate derived from the IMW fraction. The HMW binding fraction can be separated into two components using anion exchange chromatography.

  7. Similarity of the Cin1 repetitive family of Zea mays to eukaryotic transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, N S; Schwarz-Sommer, Z; Blumberg vel Spalve, J; Gupta, M; Wienand, U; Saedler, H

    It has been suggested that the middle repetitive class of sequences that make up a large proportion of the eukaryotic genome have been amplified and dispersed by DNA transposition. Transposition is a phenomenon first postulated by Barbara McClintock on the basis of her genetic analysis of mutants in Zea mays. Since then, DNA transposition has been studied genetically in various plant systems and is well documented on the molecular level in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This has included the isolation of DNA inserts at various loci in several plants; however, the prevalence of transposition in plants is not established. We report here DNA nucleotide sequence data which show that some members of the Cin1 middle repetitive family of maize have features characteristic of known transposable elements. One cloned Cin1 repeat has a 6-base pair (bp) perfect inverted repeat sequence at its ends. The terminal five base pairs (5' TGTTG . . . CAACA 3') are identical to the termini of Drosophila copia transposable elements. Two other Cin1 alleles are flanked by 5-bp direct repeats. A comparison is made with the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the copia-Ty1-retrovirus families of moveable genetic elements. PMID:6318125

  8. Effects of experimental warming on stomatal traits in leaves of maize (Zea may L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunpu; Xu, Ming; Hou, Ruixing; Shen, Ruichang; Qiu, Shuai; Ouyang, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    We examined the warming effects on the stomatal frequency, stomatal aperture size and shape, and their spatial distribution pattern of maize (Zea may L.) leaves using a light microscope, an electron scanning microscope, and geostatistic techniques. A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate canopy temperature by 2.08°C, on average. We found that experimental warming had little effect on stomatal density, but significantly increased stomatal index due to the reduction in the number of epidermal cells under the warming treatment. Warming also significantly decreased stomatal aperture length and increased stomatal aperture width. As a result, warming significantly increased the average stomatal aperture area and stomatal aperture circumference. In addition, warming dramatically changed the stomatal spatial distribution pattern with a substantial increase in the average nearest neighbor distance between stomata on both adaxial and abaxial surfaces. The spatial distribution pattern of stomata was scale dependent with regular patterns at small scales and random patterns at larger scales on both leaf surfaces. Warming caused the stomatal distribution to become more regular on both leaf surfaces with smaller L(t) values (Ripley's K-function, L(t) is an expectation of zero for any value of t) in the warming plots than the control plots. PMID:24101997

  9. Detection of Cell Wall Chemical Variation in Zea Mays Mutants Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buyck, N.; Thomas, S.

    2001-01-01

    Corn stover is regarded as the prime candidate feedstock material for commercial biomass conversion in the United States. Variations in chemical composition of Zea mays cell walls can affect biomass conversion process yields and economics. Mutant lines were constructed by activating a Mu transposon system. The cell wall chemical composition of 48 mutant families was characterized using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. NIR data were analyzed using a multivariate statistical analysis technique called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA of the NIR data from 349 maize leaf samples reveals 57 individuals as outliers on one or more of six Principal Components (PCs) at the 95% confidence interval. Of these, 19 individuals from 16 families are outliers on either PC3 (9% of the variation) or PC6 (1% of the variation), the two PCs that contain information about cell wall polymers. Those individuals for which altered cell wall chemistry is confirmed with wet chemical analysis will then be subjected to fermentation analysis to determine whether or not biomass conversion process kinetics, yields and/or economics are significantly affected. Those mutants that provide indications for a decrease in process cost will be pursued further to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed changes in cell wall composition and associated changes in process economics. These genes will eventually be incorporated into maize breeding programs directed at the development of a truly dual use crop.

  10. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  11. A seed mixture increases dominance of resistance to Bt cotton in Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    Brévault, Thierry; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Carrière, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Widely grown transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can benefit agriculture, but adaptation by pests threatens their continued success. Refuges of host plants that do not make Bt toxins can promote survival of susceptible insects and delay evolution of resistance, particularly if resistance is inherited as a recessive trait. However, data have been lacking to compare the dominance of resistance when Bt and non-Bt seeds are planted in random mixtures versus separate blocks. Here we report results from greenhouse experiments with transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac and the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, showing that the dominance of resistance was significantly higher in a seed mixture relative to a block of Bt cotton. The proportion of larvae on non-Bt cotton plants in the seed mixture was also significantly higher than expected under the null hypothesis of random distribution. In simulations based on observed survival, resistance evolved 2- to 4.5-fold faster in the seed mixture relative to separate blocks of Bt and non-Bt cotton. These findings support previous modelling results indicating that block refuges may be more effective than seed mixtures for delaying resistance in pests with mobile larvae and inherently low susceptibility to the toxins in Bt crops. PMID:25950459

  12. Estimation of in-canopy ammonia sources and sinks in a fertilized Zea mays field.

    PubMed

    Bash, Jesse O; Walker, John T; Katul, Gabriel G; Jones, Matthew R; Nemitz, Eiko; Robarge, Wayne P

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model was developed to describe in-canopy vertical distribution of ammonia (NH(3)) sources and sinks and vertical fluxes in a fertilized agricultural setting using measured in-canopy mean NH(3) concentration and wind speed profiles. This model was applied to quantify in-canopy air-surface exchange rates and above-canopy NH(3) fluxes in a fertilized corn (Zea mays) field. Modeled air-canopy NH(3) fluxes agreed well with independent above-canopy flux estimates. Based on the model results, the urea fertilized soil surface was a consistent source of NH(3) one month following the fertilizer application, whereas the vegetation canopy was typically a net NH(3) sink with the lower portion of the canopy being a constant sink. The model results suggested that the canopy was a sink for some 70% of the estimated soil NH(3) emissions. A logical conclusion is that parametrization of within-canopy processes in air quality models are necessary to explore the impact of agricultural field level management practices on regional air quality. Moreover, there are agronomic and environmental benefits to timing liquid fertilizer applications as close to canopy closure as possible. Finally, given the large within-canopy mean NH(3) concentration gradients in such agricultural settings, a discussion about the suitability of the proposed model is also presented. PMID:20104891

  13. Rmr6 Maintains Meiotic Inheritance of Paramutant States in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, Jay B.; Kermicle, Jerry L.; Parkinson, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    Paramutation generates heritable changes affecting regulation of specific alleles found at several Zea mays (maize) loci that encode transcriptional regulators of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. Although the direction and extent of paramutation is influenced by poorly understood allelic interactions occurring in diploid sporophytes, two required to maintain repression loci (rmr1 and rmr2), as well as mediator of paramutation1 (mop1), affect this process at the purple plant1 (pl1) locus. Here we show that the rmr6 locus is required for faithful transmission of weakly expressed paramutant states previously established at both pl1 and red1 (r1) loci. Transcriptional repression occurring at both pl1 and booster1 (b1) loci as a result of paramutation also requires Rmr6 action. Reversions to highly expressed, nonparamutant states at both r1 and pl1 occur in plants homozygous for rmr6 mutations. Pedigree analysis of reverted pl1 alleles reveals variable latent susceptibilities to spontaneous paramutation in future generations, suggesting a quantitative nature of Rmr6-based alterations. Genetic tests demonstrate that Rmr6 encodes a common component required for establishing paramutations at diverse maize loci. Our analyses at pl1 and r1 suggest that this establishment requires Rmr6-dependent somatic maintenance of meiotically heritable epigenetic marks. PMID:16020780

  14. Identification of polysaccharide hydrolases involved in autolytic degradation of Zea cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, L.P.; Smith, C.J. )

    1987-08-01

    Cell walls of Zea mays (cv L.G.11) seedlings labeled with {sup 14}C were treated with {alpha}-amylase from Bacillus subtilis to remove starch and mixed linkage glucans. These walls released arabinose, xylose, galactose, and galacturonic acid in addition to glucose when they were allowed to autolyze. Methylation analysis was performed on samples of wall which had been incubated autolytically and the results indicated that degradation of the major polymer of the wall, the glucoarabinoxylan, had occurred. A number of glycanases could be dissociated from the wall by use of 3 M LiCL. The proteins which were released were found to contain a number of exoglycosidase activities in addition to being effective in degrading the polysaccharide substrates, araban, xylan, galactan, laminarin, mannan, and polygalacturonic acid. The effects of these enzymes on the wall during autolysis appear to result from endo-activity in addition to exo-activity. The structural changes that occurred in the cell walls during autolysis were found to be related to the changes previously found to occur in cell walls during auxin induced extension.

  15. Open Field Study of Some Zea mays Hybrids, Lipid Compounds and Fumonisins Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Giorni, Paola; Dall’Asta, Chiara; Reverberi, Massimo; Scala, Valeria; Ludovici, Matteo; Cirlini, Martina; Galaverna, Gianni; Fanelli, Corrado; Battilani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Lipid molecules are increasingly recognized as signals exchanged by organisms interacting in pathogenic and/or symbiotic ways. Some classes of lipids actively determine the fate of the interactions. Host cuticle/cell wall/membrane components such as sphingolipids and oxylipins may contribute to determining the fate of host–pathogen interactions. In the present field study, we considered the relationship between specific sphingolipids and oxylipins of different hybrids of Zea mays and fumonisin by F. verticillioides, sampling ears at different growth stages from early dough to fully ripe. The amount of total and free fumonisin differed significantly between hybrids and increased significantly with maize ripening. Oxylipins and phytoceramides changed significantly within the hybrids and decreased with kernel maturation, starting from physiological maturity. Although the correlation between fumonisin accumulation and plant lipid profile is certain, the data collected so far cannot define a cause-effect relationship but open up new perspectives. Therefore, the question—“Does fumonisin alter plant lipidome or does plant lipidome modulate fumonisin accumulation?”—is still open. PMID:26378580

  16. Comparative effectiveness of metal ions in inducing curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.; Stinemetz, C. L.; Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; Koon, E. C.; Higby, M. A.; Smucker, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    We used five cultivars of Zea mays (Bear Hybrid WF9 * 38MS, B73 * Missouri 17, Yellow Dent, Merit, and Great Lakes Hybrid 422) to reinvestigate the specificity of metal ions for inducing root curvature. Of 17 cations tested, 6 (Al3+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) induced curvature. Roots curved away from Al3+, Ba2+, and Cd2+. Roots curved away from low (0.1 millimolar) concentrations of Cu2+ but toward higher (1-5 millimolar) concentrations. Roots initially curved away from Zn2+ but the direction of the subsequent curvature was unpredictable. In most cases, roots of all cultivars curved towards calcium. However, in some tests there was no response to calcium or even (especially in the cultivars Merit and B73 * Missouri 17) substantial curvature away from calcium. The results indicate that the induction of root curvature is not specific for calcium. The results are discussed relative to the possible role of calmodulin as a mediator of ion-induced root curvature.

  17. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momonoki, Y. S.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol.

  18. Morphometric analysis of epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays was divided into six cell types based on cellular shape and cytoplasmic appearance. These six cell types are: 1) apical protoderm, located at the tip of the root pole and characterized by periclinally flattened cells; 2) cuboidal protoderm, located approximately 230 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells; 3) tabular epidermis, located approximately 450 microns from the root pole and characterized by anticlinally flattened cells; 4) cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 900 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells having numerous small vacuoles; 5) vacuolate cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 1,500 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells containing several large vacuoles; and 6) columnar epidermis, located approximately 2,200 microns from the root pole (i.e., at the beginning of the zone of elongation) and characterized by elongated cells. We also used stereology to quantify the cellular changes associated with epidermal differentiation. The quiescent center and the apical protoderm have significantly different ultrastructures. The relative volume of dictyosomes increases dramatically during the early stages of epidermal differentiation. This increase correlates inversely with the amount of coverage provided by the root cap and mucilage.

  19. Effect of a longitudinally applied voltage upon the growth of Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical parameters that affect young seedling growth were investigated. Voltages ranging from 5 to 40 volts were applied longitudinally along the mesocotyl region of 4-day old Zea mays L. (cv Silver Queen) seedlings for periods of 3 or 4 hours. It was determined that: (a) making the tips of the seedlings electrically positive relative to the base strongly inhibited shoot growth at 5 volts, whereas the reverse polarity had no effect; (b) at higher voltages, making the tip of the seedlings negative caused less growth inhibition than the reverse polarity at each voltage level; (c) the higher the applied voltage the greater the degree of inhibition; and, (d) the more growth inhibition experienced by the plants the poorer, and slower, their recovery. Previous observations of a relationship between the amount of free indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl cortex and the growth rate of the mesocotyl and of gravitropism-induced movement of labeled indole-3-acetic acid from the seed to the shoot lead to the prediction of a voltage-dependent gating of the movement of indole-3-acetic acid from the stele to the cortex. This provided the basis for attempting to alter the growth rate of seedlings by means of an applied voltage.

  20. Depth Profiles in Maize ( Zea mays L.) Seeds Studied by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Zepeda-Bautista, R.

    2015-06-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) has been used to analyze agricultural seeds and can be applied to the study of seed depth profiles of these complex samples composed of different structures. The sample depth profile can be obtained through the photoacoustic (PA) signal, amplitude, and phase at different light modulation frequencies. The PA signal phase is more sensitive to changes of thermal properties in layered samples than the PA signal amplitude. Hence, the PA signal phase can also be used to characterize layers at different depths. Thus, the objective of the present study was to obtain the optical absorption spectra of maize seeds ( Zea mays L.) by means of PAS at different light modulation frequencies (17 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz) and comparing these spectra with the ones obtained from the phase-resolved method in order to separate the optical absorption spectra of seed pericarp and endosperm. The results suggest the possibility of using the phase-resolved method to obtain optical absorption spectra of different seed structures, at different depths, without damaging the seed. Thus, PAS could be a nondestructive method for characterization of agricultural seeds and thus improve quality control in the food industry.

  1. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of calcium (Ca) in caps of vertically- and horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays was monitored to determine its possible role in root graviresponsiveness. A modification of the antimonate precipitation procedure was used to localize Ca in situ. In vertically-oriented roots, the presumed graviperceptive (i.e., columella) cells were characterized by minimal and symmetric staining of the plasmalemma and mitochondria. No precipitate was present in plasmodesmata or cell walls. Within 5 min after horizontal reorientation, staining was associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell. This asymmetric staining persisted throughout the onset of gravicurvature. No staining of lateral cell walls of columella cells was observed at any stage of gravicurvature, suggesting that a lateral flow of Ca through the columella tissue of horizontally-oriented roots does not occur. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like structures in their cell walls. These results are discussed relative to proposed roles of root-cap Ca in root gravicurvature.

  2. Exogenous melatonin improves corn (Zea mays L.) embryo proteome in seeds subjected to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczyk, Izabela; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Szewczyk, Rafał; Posmyk, Małgorzata M

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin (MEL; N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) plays an important role in plant stress defense. Various plant species rich in this indoleamine have shown a higher capacity for stress tolerance. Moreover, it has great potential for plant biostimulation, is biodegradable and non-toxic for the environment. All this indicates that our concept of seed enrichment with exogenous MEL is justified. This work concerns the effects of corn (Zea mays L.) seed pre-sowing treatments supplemented with MEL. Non-treated seeds (nt), and those hydroprimed with water (H) or with MEL solutions 50 and 500 μM (HMel50, HMel500) were compared. Positive effects of seed priming are particularly apparent during germination under suboptimal conditions. The impact of MEL applied by priming on seed protein profiles during imbibition/germination at low temperature has not been investigated to date. In order to identify changes in the corn seed proteome after applying hydropriming techniques, purified protein extracts of chilling stressed seed embryos (14 days, 5°C) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Then proteome maps were graphically and statistically compared and selected protein spots were qualitatively analyzed using mass spectrometry techniques and identified. This study aimed to analyze the priming-induced changes in maize embryo proteome and at identifying priming-associated and MEL-associated proteins in maize seeds subjected to chilling. We attempt to explain how MEL expands plant capacity for stress tolerance. PMID:26945210

  3. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  4. Bronze-2 Gene Expression and Intron Splicing Patterns in Cells and Tissues of Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Nash, J; Walbot, V

    1992-09-01

    A large fraction of the transcripts of the Bronze-2 (Bz2) gene of maize (Zea mays L.) are unspliced in purple husk tissues. The accumulation of unspliced messages could have destructive potential if the intron-bearing mRNAs are translated into aberrant proteins. Our initial studies suggested that both genetic and physiological factors may influence the degree of splicing failure. Nuclear background rather than cis-sequence effects is shown to contribute to the genetic component. The accumulation of unspliced message does not appear to be directly influenced by diurnal effects on transcript abundance, by the expression level of the Bz2 gene, or by thermal stress. We also show that maize cell cultures (Black Mexican Sweet, BMS) can be used to examine the molecular details involved in splicing failure. Much like whole maize plants, the BMS cells excise the Bz2 intron with varying degrees of efficiency. In contrast with heterologous constructs containing plant introns, splicing of the native Bz2 intron can appproach 100% in BMS cells. Splicing of transcripts from a marked, introduced gene can be compared to the endogeneous Bz2 gene facilitating analysis of the impact of sequence changes. PMID:16652984

  5. Composition and thermal stability of anthocyanins from chinese purple corn ( Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Corrales, Margarita; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Xiaosong; Ma, Yue; Tauscher, Bernhard

    2008-11-26

    Chinese purple corn extracts ( Zea mays L., Zhuozhou, Hebei, China) (EZPC) were selected among five Chinese purple corn hybrids due to their higher anthocyanin content, and their thermal stability was evaluated. The total anthocyanin content and total phenolic content of EZPC were 304.5 +/- 16.32 mg of cyanidin-3-glucoside equiv/100 g of dry seeds and 489.8 +/- 24.90 mg of gallic acid equiv/100 g of dry seeds, respectively. Moreover, the individual anthocyanins of EZPC were determined by HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS analysis. Seven main compounds were determined, including cyanidin-3-(malonylglucoside), cyanidin-3-O-glucoside-2-malonylglucoside, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, peonidin-3-O-glucoside, peonidin-3-(malonylglucoside), pelargonidin-3-(6''-malonylglucoside), and peonidin-3-(dimalonylglucoside). The thermal stability of EZPC was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the conversion of EZPC followed an Arrhenius relationship, where the delta enthalpy (H) and activation energy (E(a)) were 97.0 J/g and 204 +/- 2.72 kJ/mol, respectively. Furthermore, the relationships between the degree of conversion of EZPC and time or temperature were reported. This study demonstrated that the evaluated Chinese purple corn hybrids are a natural source of anthocyanins and are stable over a wide range of temperatures and times. PMID:18950186

  6. Effects of growing conditions on purple corncob (Zea mays L.) anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pu; Noriega, Victor; Schwartz, Steven J; Giusti, M Mónica

    2007-10-17

    Purple corn ( Zea mays L.) has been used for centuries as a natural food colorant in South America and, more recently, in Asia and Europe. However, limited information is available on the factors affecting their anthocyanin concentration and profiles. In this study, 18 purple corn samples grown under different conditions in Peru were evaluated for quantitative and qualitative anthocyanin composition as well as total phenolics. High variability was observed on monomeric anthocyanin and phenolic contents with yields ranging from 290 to 1333 mg/100 g dry weight (DW) and from 950 to 3516 mg/100 g DW, respectively, while 30.5-47.1% of the total phenolics were anthocyanins. The major anthocyanins present were cyanidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-maloylglucoside, pelargonidin-3-maloylglucoside, and peonidin-3-maloylglucoside, and 35.6-54.0% of the anthocyanins were acylated. Potassium sources/concentrations on the soil and seedling density did not significantly affect anthocyanin composition. The growing location affected anthocyanin levels and the percentage of anthocyanins to total phenolics ( p < 0.01) and should be taken into account when choosing a material for color production. PMID:17880157

  7. Molecular cloning of the c locus of Zea mays: a locus regulating the anthocyanin pathway.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, J; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1986-05-01

    The c locus of Zea mays, involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, has been cloned by transposon tagging. A clone (# 18En) containing a full size En1 element was initially isolated from the En element-induced mutable allele c-m668655. Sequences of clone # 18En flanking the En1 element were used to clone other c mutants, whose structure was predicted genetically. Clone #23En (isolated from c-m668613) contained a full size En1 element, clone #3Ds (isolated from c-m2) a Ds element and clone # 5 (isolated from c+) had no element on the cloned fragment. From these data we conclude that the clones obtained contain at least part of the c locus. Preliminary data on transcript analysis using a 1-kb DNA fragment from wild-type clone # 5 showed that at least three transcripts are encoded by that part of the locus, indicating that c is a complex locus. PMID:15957214

  8. Patterns of DNA sequence polymorphism along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tenaillon, Maud I.; Sawkins, Mark C.; Long, Anthony D.; Gaut, Rebecca L.; Doebley, John F.; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2001-01-01

    We measured sequence diversity in 21 loci distributed along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.). For each locus, we sequenced a common sample of 25 individuals representing 16 exotic landraces and nine U.S. inbred lines. The data indicated that maize has an average of one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) every 104 bp between two randomly sampled sequences, a level of diversity higher than that of either humans or Drosophila melanogaster. A comparison of genetic diversity between the landrace and inbred samples showed that inbreds retained 77% of the level of diversity of landraces, on average. In addition, Tajima's D values suggest that the frequency distribution of polymorphisms in inbreds was skewed toward fewer rare variants. Tests for selection were applied to all loci, and deviations from neutrality were detected in three loci. Sequence diversity was heterogeneous among loci, but there was no pattern of diversity along the genetic map of chromosome 1. Nonetheless, diversity was correlated (r = 0.65) with sequence-based estimates of the recombination rate. Recombination in our sample was sufficient to break down linkage disequilibrium among SNPs. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium declines within 100–200 bp on average, suggesting that genome-wide surveys for association analyses require SNPs every 100–200 bp. PMID:11470895

  9. Low Water Potential Disrupts Carbohydrate Metabolism in Maize (Zea mays L.) Ovaries.

    PubMed Central

    Zinselmeier, C.; Westgate, M. E.; Schussler, J. R.; Jones, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Water deficit during pollination increases the frequency of kernel abortion in maize (Zea mays L.). Much of the kernel loss is attributable to lack of current photosynthate, but a large number of kernels fail to develop on water-deficient plants even when assimilate supply is increased. We examined the possibility that assimilate utilization by developing ovaries might be impaired at low water potential ([Psi]w). Plants were grown in the greenhouse in 20-L pots containing 22 kg of amended soil. Water was withheld on the first day silks emerged, and plants were hand-pollinated 4 d later when leaf [Psi]w decreased to approximately - 1.8 MPa and silk [Psi]w was approximately -1.0 MPa. Plants were rehydrated 2 d after pollination. The brief water deficit inhibited ovary growth (dry matter accumulation) and decreased kernel number per ear by 60%, compared to controls. Inhibition of ovary growth was associated with a decrease in the level of reducing sugars, depletion of starch, a 75-fold increase in sucrose concentration (dry weight basis), and inhibition of acid invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) activity. These results indicate that water deficits during pollination disrupt carbohydrate metabolism in maize ovaries. They suggest that acid invertase activity is important for establishing and maintaining reproductive sink strength during pollination and early kernel development. PMID:12228365

  10. Response of maize (Zea mays L. saccharata Sturt) to different concentration treatments of deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ragbet Ezgi; Kilic, Semra; Coskun, Yasemin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the deltamethrin pesticide on the biological properties of maize (Zea mays L. saccharata Sturt). Maize seeds were exposed to environmentally relevant dosages (0.01, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 ppm) of deltamethrin. On the 7th day of germination, morphological, anatomical and physiological responses were determined. All seedling growth characters were decreased with increasing deltamethrin levels. The most negative effect on the radicle length of maize was observed by the highest deltamethrin concentration with a 61% decrease (P <0.05). Both stomatal density and stomatal dimension reduction were caused by increasing concentrations of deltamethrin. Moreover, the pigments like chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll and caretonoids decreased with the increase in deltamethrin concentration. Conversely, anthocyanin and proline content increased in parallel with deltamethrin concentration. As a result, all morphological traits and pigments except for proline and anthocyanin were significantly reduced with an increase in pesticide concentration, compared to control (P <0.05). PMID:26453225

  11. Hypoxic stress-induced changes in ribosomes of maize seedling roots. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey-Serres, J.; Freeling, M. )

    1990-11-01

    The hypoxic stress response of Zea mays L. seedling roots involves regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the translational machinery of seedling roots. The levels of monoribosomes and ribosomal subunits increased dramatically within 1 hour of stress. Prolonged hypoxia resulted in continued accumulation of nontranslating ribosomes, as well as increased levels of small polyribosomes. The return of seedlings to normal aerobic conditions resulted in recovery of normal polyribosome levels. Comparison of ribosomal proteins from control and hypoxic roots revealed differences in quantity and electrophoretic mobility. In vivo labeling of roots with ({sup 35}S)methionine revealed variations in newly synthesized ribosomal proteins. In vivo labeling of roots with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate revealed a major reduction in the phosphorylation of a 31 kilodalton ribosomal protein in hypoxic stressed roots. In vitro phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins by endogenous kinases was used to probe for differences in ribosome structure and composition. The patterns of in vitro kinased phosphoproteins of ribosomes from control and hypoxic roots were not identical. Variation in phosphoproteins of polyribosomes from control and hypoxic roots, as well as among polyribosomes from hypoxic roots were observed. These results indicate that modification of the translational machinery occurs in response to hypoxic stress.

  12. Cortical actin filament organization in developing and functioning stomatal complexes of Zea mays and Triticum turgidum.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Galatis, Basil; Quader, Hartmut; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2007-07-01

    Cortical actin filament (AF) organization was studied in detail in developing stomatal complexes of the grasses Zea mays and Triticum turgidum. AF arrays during the whole stomatal complex development are dynamic, partly following the pattern of cortical microtubule (MT) organization. They also exhibit particular patterns of organization, spatially and temporarily restricted. Among AF arrays, the radial ones that underlie young guard cell (GC) periclinal walls, those that line the bulbous GC ends and the AF ring at the junction between subsidiary cells (SCs) and GCs are described here for the first time. Although many similarities in cortical AF organization exist among the stomatal cells of both plants studied, considerable differences have also been observed between them. Our data reveal that the expanding areas of stomatal cell walls are lined by distinct cortical AF aggregations that probably protect the plasmalemma against mechanical stresses. Experimental AF disruption does not seem to affect detectably stomatal cell morphogenesis. Moreover, the structural and experimental data of this study revealed that, in contrast to the elliptical stomata, in the dumbbell-shaped ones the AFs and MTs seem not to be involved in the mechanism of opening and closing of the stomatal pore. PMID:17443701

  13. [Evaluation of a methodology to determine texture characteristics of maize (Zea mays L.) tortilla].

    PubMed

    Arámbula-Villa, Gerónimo; Méndez-Albores, J Abraham; González-Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Arias, Edmundo; Moreno-Martínez, Ernesto

    2004-06-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) tortilla is the primary staple food of the Mexican people, with annual consumption estimated at 12 millions tons. Despite this huge volume of consumption, tortillas are commercially produced with inconsistent quality, mainly in terms of texture characteristics. Different methods to evaluate the texture of maize tortillas have been reported, but the values obtained and their parameters have not yielded reliable results, largely because the methods used do not reflect homogeneous elements for comparison. In addition, evaluation of the reliability of methods for comparing tortilla texture as well as the equipment used has been difficult, as such information perhaps remains largely unpublished. In this study, the reliability of two tortilla sample shapes (rectangle and briquet) and some of the quality parameters (maximum force, total area under curve, area to reach maximum force, elasticity and elongation) from tensile and cut force tested with a texture meter were evaluated. According to the results, the briquet shape of the tortilla samples was better (than the rectangle shape) for determining tensile and elasticity. In regard to cutting force, both the rectangle and the briquet shape presented good repeatability. For tensile and cutting-force curves, the maximum force was the parameter with the highest reliability, 0.95 and 0.99, respectively. The elasticity showed an adequate reliability with the tortilla briquet shape (0.94). The evaluated parameters with the texture meter and the sample shape type briquet, showed a high reliability degree what makes possible the comparison of maize tortilla texture data. PMID:15586691

  14. Differential Expression of Superoxide Dismutase Genes in Aphid-Stressed Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB) in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible) and Ambrozja (relatively resistant) cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid) or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid). Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9). However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4) or 24 h (sod9) post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:24722734

  15. Direct observation of local xylem embolisms induced by soil drying in intact Zea mays leaves.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Hwang, Bae Geun; Kim, Yangmin X; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-04-01

    The vulnerability of vascular plants to xylem embolism is closely related to their stable long-distance water transport, growth, and survival. Direct measurements of xylem embolism are required to understand what causes embolism and what strategies plants employ against it. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was used to non-destructively investigate both the anatomical structures of xylem vessels and embolism occurrence in the leaves of intact Zea mays (maize) plants. Xylem embolism was induced by water stress at various soil drying periods and soil water contents. X-ray images of dehydrated maize leaves showed that the ratio of gas-filled vessels to all xylem vessels increased with decreased soil water content and reached approximately 30% under severe water stress. Embolism occurred in some but not all vessels. Embolism in maize leaves was not strongly correlated with xylem diameter but was more likely to occur in the peripheral veins. The rate of embolism formation in metaxylem vessels was higher than in protoxylem vessels. This work has demonstrated that xylem embolism remains low in maize leaves under water stress and that there xylem has characteristic spatial traits of vulnerability to embolism. PMID:26946123

  16. Morphological and physiological responses of maize (Zea mays) exposed to sand contaminated by phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Joan; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Leglize, Pierre; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Phytoremediation is promising, but depends on clearly understanding contaminants' impact on plant functioning. We therefore focused on the impact of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on cultivated plants and understanding the impact of phenanthrene (PHE) on maize functioning (Zea mays). Cultivation was conducted under controlled conditions on artificially contaminated sand with PHE levels increasing from 50 to 750 mg PHE kg(-1). After four weeks, plants exposed to levels above 50 mg PHE kg(-1) presented decreased biomasses and reduced photosynthetic activity. These modifications were associated with higher biomass allocations to roots and lower ones to stems. The leaf biomass proportion was similar, with thinner blades than controls. PHE-exposed plant showed modified root architecture, with fewer roots of 0.2 and 0.4 mm in diameter. Leaves were potassium-deplete, but calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc-enriched. Their content in nitrogen, iron, sulfur and manganese was unaffected. These responses resembled those of water-stress, although water contents in plant organs were not affected by PHE and water supply was not limited. They also indicated a possible perturbation of both nutritional functioning and photosynthesis. PMID:25496734

  17. Effect of biochar on reclaimed tidal land soil properties and maize (Zea mays L.) response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuck-Soo; Kim, Kwon-Rae; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik; Owens, Gary; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd; Kim, Kye-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Reclaimed tidal land soil (RTLS) often contains high levels of soluble salts and exchangeable Na that can adversely affect plant growth. The current study examined the effect of biochar on the physicochemical properties of RTLS and subsequently the influence on plant growth performance. Rice hull derived biochar (BC) was applied to RTLS at three different rates (1%, 2%, and 5% (w/w)) and maize (Zea mays L.) subsequently cultivated for 6weeks. While maize was cultivated, 0.1% NaCl solution was supplied from the bottom of the pots to simulate the natural RTLS conditions. Biochar induced changes in soil properties were evaluated by the water stable aggregate (WSA) percentage, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), soil organic carbon contents, cation exchange capacity, and exchangeable cations. Plant response was measured by growth rate, nutrient contents, and antioxidant enzyme activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR). Application of rice hull derived biochar increased the soil organic carbon content and the percentage of WSA by 36-69%, while decreasing the ESP. The highest dry weight maize yield was observed from soil which received 5% BC (w/w), which was attributed to increased stability of water-stable aggregates and elevated levels of phosphate in BC incorporated soils. Moreover, increased potassium, sourced from the BC, induced mitigation of Na uptake by maize and consequently, reduced the impact of salt stress as evidenced by overall declines in the antioxidant activities of APX and GR. PMID:26138709

  18. Apoplastic barrier development and water transport in Zea mays seedling roots under salt and osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xu, Guoxin; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The development of apoplastic barriers was studied in Zea mays seedling roots grown in hydroculture solution supplemented with 0-200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Casparian bands in the endodermis of both NaCl- and PEG-treated roots were observed closer to the root tip in comparison with those of control roots, but the cell wall modifications in the endodermis and exodermis induced by salt and osmotic stresses differed. High salinity induced the formation of a multiseriate exodermis, which ranged from several cell layers to the entire cortex tissue but did not noticeably influence cell wall suberization in the endodermis. In contrast, osmotic stress accelerated suberization in both the endodermis and exodermis, but the exodermis induced by osmotic stress was limited to several cell layers in the outer cortex adjacent to the epidermis. The hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp) had decreased significantly after 1 day of PEG treatment, whereas in NaCl-treated roots, Lp decreased to a similar level after 5 days of treatment. Peroxidase activity in the roots increased significantly in response to NaCl and PEG treatments. These data indicate that salt stress and osmotic stress have different effects on the development of apoplastic barriers and water transport in Z. mays seedling roots. PMID:24965373

  19. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings.

    PubMed

    Momonoki, Y S

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol. PMID:11537873

  20. Neonicotinoid-Coated Zea mays Seeds Indirectly Affect Honeybee Performance and Pathogen Susceptibility in Field Trials

    PubMed Central

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Boutin, Sébastien; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Loublier, Yves; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were studied in order to detect and measure potential in vivo effects of neonicotinoid pesticides used in cornfields (Zea mays spp) on honeybee health. Honeybee colonies were randomly split on four different agricultural cornfield areas located near Quebec City, Canada. Two locations contained cornfields treated with a seed-coated systemic neonicotinoid insecticide while the two others were organic cornfields used as control treatments. Hives were extensively monitored for their performance and health traits over a period of two years. Honeybee viruses (brood queen cell virus BQCV, deformed wing virus DWV, and Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV) and the brain specific expression of a biomarker of host physiological stress, the Acetylcholinesterase gene AChE, were investigated using RT-qPCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed to detect pesticide residues in adult bees, honey, pollen, and corn flowers collected from the studied hives in each location. In addition, general hive conditions were assessed by monitoring colony weight and brood development. Neonicotinoids were only identified in corn flowers at low concentrations. However, honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid treated cornfields expressed significantly higher pathogen infection than those located in untreated cornfields. AChE levels showed elevated levels among honeybees that collected corn pollen from treated fields. Positive correlations were recorded between pathogens and the treated locations. Our data suggests that neonicotinoids indirectly weaken honeybee health by inducing physiological stress and increasing pathogen loads. PMID:25993642

  1. Cloning and characterization of a multifunctional promoter from maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Jiang, Haiyang; Xu, QianQian; Li, Xiaoming; Peng, Xiaojian; Yu, Haibing; Xiang, Yan; Cheng, Beijiu

    2015-02-01

    The use of tissue-specific promoters to drive the expression of target genes during certain developmental stages or in specific organs can prevent unnecessary gene expression caused by constitutive promoters. Utilizing heterologous promoters to regulate the expression of genes in transgenic receptors can help prevent gene silencing. Here, we engineered heterologous maize promoters that regulate gene-specific expression in rice plant receptors. We performed a histochemical and quantitative β-glucuronidase (GUS) analysis of the Zea mays legumin1 (ZM-LEGF) gene promoter and detailed detection of stably transformed rice expressing the GUS gene under the control of the promoter of ZM-LEGF (pZM-LEGF) and its truncated promoters throughout development. When the promoter sequence was truncated, the location and intensity of GUS expression changed. The results suggest that the sequence from -140 to +41 is a critical region that confers the expression of the entire promoter. Truncation of pZM-LEG (3'-deleted region of pZM-LEGF) markedly increased the GUS activity, with the core cis-elements located in the -273 to -140 regions, namely pZM-LEG6. Detailed analysis of pZM-LEG6::GUS T2 transformant rice seeds and plant tissues at different developmental stages indicated that this promoter is an ideal vegetative tissue-specific promoter that can serve as a valuable tool for transgenic rice breeding and genetic engineering studies. PMID:25391545

  2. [Systematically induced effects of Tetranychus cinnabarinus infestation on chemical defense in Zea mays inbred lines].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-xi; Yang, Qun-fang; Huang, Yu-bi; Li, Qing

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the systematically induced production of defense-related compounds, including DIMBOA, total phenol, trypsin inhibitors (TI) and chymotrypsin inhibitor (CI), by Tetranychus cinnabarinus infestation in Zea mays. The first leaves of two corn in-bred line seedlings, the mite-tolerant line ' H1014168' and the mite-sensitive line 'H1014591', were sucked by T. cinnabarinus adult female for seven days, and then the contents of DIMBOA, total phenol, TI and CI were measured in the second leaf and in the roots, respectively. Results showed that as compared to the unsucked control, all contents of DIMBOA, total phenol, TI and CI induced by T. cinnabarinus sucking were significantly higher in the second leaf of both inbred lines as well as in the roots of the mite-tolerant 'H1014168'. However, in the roots of 'H1014591', these defense compounds had different trends, where there was a higher induction of TI and a lower level of total phenol than that of the healthy control, while had almost no difference in DIMBOA and CI. These findings suggested that the infestation of T. cinnabarinus could systematically induce accumulation of defense-related compounds, and this effect was stronger in the mite-tolerant inbred line than in the mite-sensitive inbred line. PMID:26785567

  3. Metal Ion Interactions with Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Crassula argentea and Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien T.; Ngam-ek, Apinya; Jenkins, Joane; Grover, Scott D.

    1988-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from the CAM plant Crassula argentea and the C4 plant Zea mays were kinetically analyzed. Fe2+ and Cd2+ were found to be active metal cofactors along with the previously known active metals Mg2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. In studies with the Crassula enzyme, Mg2+ yielded the highest Vmax value but also generated the highest values of Km(metal) and Km(pep). For these five active metals lower Km(metal) values tended to be associated with lower Km(pep) values. PEP saturation curves showed more kinetic cooperativity than the corresponding metal saturation curves. The activating metal ions all have ionic radii in the range of 0.86 to 1.09 Å. Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, and Ni2+ inhibited competitively with respect to Mg2+, whereas Be2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Pd2+ showed mixed-type inhibition. Vmax trends with the five active metals were similar for the C. argentea and Z. mays enzymes except that Cd2+ was less effective with the maize enzyme. Km(metal) values were 10- to 60-fold higher in the enzyme from Z. mays. PMID:16665847

  4. Neonicotinoid-Coated Zea mays Seeds Indirectly Affect Honeybee Performance and Pathogen Susceptibility in Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Boutin, Sébastien; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Loublier, Yves; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were studied in order to detect and measure potential in vivo effects of neonicotinoid pesticides used in cornfields (Zea mays spp) on honeybee health. Honeybee colonies were randomly split on four different agricultural cornfield areas located near Quebec City, Canada. Two locations contained cornfields treated with a seed-coated systemic neonicotinoid insecticide while the two others were organic cornfields used as control treatments. Hives were extensively monitored for their performance and health traits over a period of two years. Honeybee viruses (brood queen cell virus BQCV, deformed wing virus DWV, and Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV) and the brain specific expression of a biomarker of host physiological stress, the Acetylcholinesterase gene AChE, were investigated using RT-qPCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed to detect pesticide residues in adult bees, honey, pollen, and corn flowers collected from the studied hives in each location. In addition, general hive conditions were assessed by monitoring colony weight and brood development. Neonicotinoids were only identified in corn flowers at low concentrations. However, honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid treated cornfields expressed significantly higher pathogen infection than those located in untreated cornfields. AChE levels showed elevated levels among honeybees that collected corn pollen from treated fields. Positive correlations were recorded between pathogens and the treated locations. Our data suggests that neonicotinoids indirectly weaken honeybee health by inducing physiological stress and increasing pathogen loads. PMID:25993642

  5. The Effect of ATP on the Photoconversion of Protochlorophyllide in Isolated Etioplasts of Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Peter; Leech, Rachel M.

    1975-01-01

    The transformation of protochlorophyllide (PChle) into chlorophyllide (Chle) has been studied in isolated etioplasts from Zea mays. ATP (1.5mm) prevented the transformation of photoconvertible PChle 650 to PChle 630 in aged etioplasts. Curve analysis indicated that the ATP effect on photoconvertibility could be entirely accounted for by changes in the proportions of PChle 630 and PChle 650 and examination of the isolated pigments revealed that only unphytylated PChle could be activated for photoconversion by ATP. In etioplasts aged for 5 hours, ATP also stimulated photoconversion of PChle 630 into Chle 670. The process was temperature-sensitive and involved PChle 650 and Chle 680 as intermediates. AMP alone had no effect, but inhibited ATP retardation of PChle loss. ADP had a similar but lesser effect than ATP. The ADP response, but not the ATP response, was considerably enhanced in the presence of an ATP-generating system (phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate kinase). UTP, GTP, and CTP gave 40 to 50% of the ATP response with intact etioplasts. In envelope-free etioplasts, ATP gave the greatest response but the other nucleotides were now 80% as effective as ATP. After primary photoconversion, ATP stimulated resynthesis of PChle 650. It is proposed that ATP both gives the holochrome the ability to bind to the PChle molecule and enables additional association of the pigment-protein complex to form PChle 650. PMID:16659239

  6. Patterns of diversity and recombination along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.).

    PubMed Central

    Tenaillon, Maud I; Sawkins, Mark C; Anderson, Lorinda K; Stack, Stephen M; Doebley, John; Gaut, Brandon S

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between genetic diversity and recombination in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Genetic diversity was measured in three types of markers: single-nucleotide polymorphisms, indels, and microsatellites. All three were examined in a sample of previously published DNA sequences from 21 loci on maize chromosome 1. Small indels (1-5 bp) were numerous and far more common than large indels. Furthermore, large indels (>100 bp) were infrequent in the population sample, suggesting they are slightly deleterious. The 21 loci also contained 47 microsatellites, of which 33 were polymorphic. Diversity in SNPs, indels, and microsatellites was compared to two measures of recombination: C (=4Nc) estimated from DNA sequence data and R based on a quantitative recombination nodule map of maize synaptonemal complex 1. SNP diversity was correlated with C (r = 0.65; P = 0.007) but not with R (r = -0.10; P = 0.69). Given the lack of correlation between R and SNP diversity, the correlation between SNP diversity and C may be driven by demography. In contrast to SNP diversity, microsatellite diversity was correlated with R (r = 0.45; P = 0.004) but not C (r = -0.025; P = 0.55). The correlation could arise if recombination is mutagenic for microsatellites, or it may be consistent with background selection that is apparent only in this class of rapidly evolving markers. PMID:12454083

  7. Effects of Light and Temperature on the Association between Zea mays and Spirillum lipoferum.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S L; Okon, Y; Burris, R H

    1977-10-01

    Zea mays was grown on a low N nutrient solution under 16 conditions of light and temperature in a crossed-gradient room in an attempt to determine whether or not variation in climatic conditions influences N(2) fixation by the association between maize and Spirillum lipoferum. Temperatures were 28, 32, 36, and 40 C and 10 C lower at night; light intensities were 500, 1,250, 2,400, and 3,000 ft-c. Plants harvested after 94 days showed no significant benefit from association with S. lipoferum either in dry weight production or in total N content; variations in temperature and light had only a small influence on N(2) fixation under the conditions tested. Measurements of total N, together with designated assumptions, indicated that less than the equivalent of 0.5 kilogram of N was fixed/hectare during the entire growing period by the maize-S. lipoferum association. Rates of C(2)H(2) reduction by replicate root samples generally were low and variable and did not correlate with the measurements of total N. PMID:16660131

  8. Kinetics of sup 15 NH sub 4 sup + assimilation in Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Magalhaes, J.R.; Ju, G.C.; Rich, P.J.; Rhodes, D. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN )

    1990-10-01

    Comparative studies of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} assimilation were undertaken with a GDH1-null mutant of Zea mays and a related (but not strictly isogenic) GDH1-positive wild type from which this mutant was derived. The kinetics of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} assimilation into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen were monitored in both roots and shoots of 2-week-old seedlings supplied with 5 millimolar 99% ({sup 15}NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} via the aerated root medium in hydroponic culture over a 24-h period. The GDH1-null mutant, with a 10- to 15-fold lower total root GDH activity in comparison to the wild type, was found to exhibit a 40 to 50% lower rate of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} assimilation into total reduced nitrogen. The lower rates of {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} assimilation in the mutant was associated with lower rates of labeling of several free amino acids (including glutamate, glutamine-amino N, aspartate, asparagine-amino N, and alanine) in both roots and shoots of the mutant in comparison to the wild type. Qualitatively, these labeling kinetics appear consistent with a reduced flux of {sup 15}N via glutamate in the GDH1-null mutant. However, the responses of the two genotypes to the potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, methionine sulfoximine, and differences in morphology of the two genotypes (particularly a lower shoot:root ratio in the GDH1-null mutant) urge caution in concluding that GDH1 is solely responsible for these differences in ammonia assimilation rate.

  9. Phenotypic impacts of PBAN RNA interference in an ant, Solenopsis invicta, and a moth, Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K; Coy, Monique; Scharf, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    Insect neuropeptide hormones represent more than 90% of all insect hormones. The PBAN/pyrokinin family is a major group of insect neuropeptides, and they are expected to be found from all insect groups. These species-specific neuropeptides have been shown to have a variety of functions from embryo to adult. PBAN is well understood in moth species relative to sex pheromone biosynthesis, but other potential functions are yet to be determined. Recently, we focused on defining the PBAN gene and peptides in fire ants in preparation for an investigation of their function(s). RNA interference (RNAi) technology is a convenient tool to investigate unknown physiological functions in insects, and it is now an emerging method for development of novel biologically-based control agents as alternatives to insecticides. This could be a paradigm shift that will avoid many problems associated with conventional chemical insecticides. In this study, we selected the PBAN gene and its neuropeptide products as an RNAi target from two insect groups; a social insect, the fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) and a non-social insect, the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea). Both insects are economically important pests. We report negative impacts after PBAN dsRNA treatment to suppress PBAN gene transcription during developmental and adult stages of both species, e.g. increased adult and larval mortality, delayed pupal development and decreased sex pheromone production in the moth. This is an important first step in determining the multiple functions of the PBAN gene in these two insects. This work illustrates the variety of phenotypic effects observed after RNAi silencing of the PBAN gene and suggests the possibility of novel biologically-based insect pest control methods. PMID:22705256

  10. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. PMID:26208645

  11. Role of juvenile hormone esterase and epoxide hydrolase in reproduction of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sayed M S; Anspaugh, Douglas D; Michael Roe, R

    2006-07-01

    The role of juvenile hormone (JH) esterase (JHE) and epoxide hydrolase (EH) in reproduction of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, was investigated. Peak emergence of male and female bollworm adults occurred early in the scotophase. Female adults were added to males in a 1:2 ratio, respectively, at the beginning of the first photophase after emergence (d0). The highest oviposition rates for mated females were noted on d 2-4. The in vitro JH III esterase and JH III EH activity was measured in whole body homogenates of virgin and mated females from d0 to d8 post-emergence. Maximal JHE activity for virgin females occurred on d2 (1.09+/-0.14(+/-1 SEM) nmol of JH III degraded/min/mg protein), which was approximately twice that of mated females on the same day. The same results were observed for EH where the activity peaked on d2 at 0.053+/-0.003 as compared to 0.033+/-0.003 nmol of JH III degraded/min/mg protein, respectively. By d4, both JHE and JH EH activities declined significantly in virgin and mated females and were the same through d7. The developmental changes and effects of mating on JH degradation were similar when measured per insect. The highest levels of JHE and JH EH activity/min/mg protein in d2 virgin and mated females was found in ovaries followed by the carcass and then haemolymph; no EH activity was found in haemolymph as expected. For ovary, the JHE and JH EH activity was highest in virgin compared to mated females. The role of both enzymes in the regulation of reproduction is discussed. PMID:16678198

  12. Regulation of assimilatory sulfate reduction by cadmium in Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.; Schmutz, D.; Brunold, C. )

    1988-12-01

    Plants cultivated with Cd can produce large amounts of phytochelatins. Since these compounds contain much cysteine, these plants should have an increased rate of assimilatory sulfate reduction, the biosynthetic pathway leading to cysteine. To test this prediction, the effect of Cd on growth, sulfate assimilation in vivo and extractable activity of two enzymes of sulfate reduction, ATP-sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4) and adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase were measured in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. For comparison, nitrate reductase activity was determined. In 9-day-old cultures, the increase in fresh and dry weight was significantly inhibited by 50 micromolar and more Cd in the roots and by 100 and 200 micromolar in the shoots. Seedlings cultivated with 50 micromolar Cd for 5 days incorporated more label from {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} into higher molecular weight compounds than did controls, indicating that the predicted increase in the rate of assimilatory sulfate reduction took place. Consistent with this finding, an increased level of the extractable activity of both ATP-sulfurylase and adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase was measured in the roots of these plants at 50 micromolar Cd and at higher concentrations. This effect was reversible after removal of Cd from the nutrient solution. In the leaves, a significant positive effect of Cd was detected at 5 micromolar for ATP-sulfurylase and at 5 and 20 micromolar for adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase. At higher Cd concentrations, both enzyme activities were at levels below the control. Nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) activity decreased at 50 micromolar or more Cd in the roots and was similarly affected at ATP-sulfurylase activity in the primary leaves.

  13. Yield response of dual-toxin Bt cotton to Helicoverpa zea infestations.

    PubMed

    Gore, J; Adamczyk, J J; Catchot, A; Jackson, R

    2008-10-01

    Field cage experiments were conducted to determine the impact of bollworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), on yields of Bollgard II and Widestrike cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. One-day-old bollworm larvae were infested in white flowers of Bollgard II and in white flowers and terminals of Widestrike cotton. The infestation levels included 0, 50, and 100% of white flowers for each type of cotton. Terminal infestations included one or two larvae per terminal on Widestrike cotton. Larvae were placed in flowers of Bollgard II cotton each day for 1 to 4 wk during the first 4 wk of flowering during 2003, 2004, and 2005 seasons and in the flowers or terminals of Widestrike cotton each day for 1 to 3 wk. Averaged across years and durations of infestation, yields of Bollgard II cotton were significantly reduced compared with noninfested Bollgard II cotton when 100% of white flowers were infested. For Widestrike cotton, there was a reduction in yield when 100% of white flowers were infested in 2005, but not in 2006. There was a significant relationship for cumulative numbers of white flowers infested on seedcotton yield of Bollgard II during one of the 3 yr of the experiment. The regression equation during that year had a slope of -0.77. No significant relationships were observed for cumulative numbers of white flowers infested on yields of Widestrike cotton. Results of the current experiment suggest bollworms will rarely cause yield losses of Bollgard II and Widestrike cotton. Future research will need to focus on developing specific thresholds for bollworms on Bollgard II and Widestrike cotton. PMID:18950041

  14. Diverse gene-silencing mechanisms with distinct requirements for RNA polymerase subunits in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Amy E; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes--mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1--suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  15. Phytohormone levels in germinating seeds of Zea mays L. exposed to selenium and aflatoxines.

    PubMed

    Ağar, Güleray; Türker, Musa; Battal, Peyami; Emre, Erez M

    2006-07-01

    Seeds of Zea mays L. were exposed to aflatoxine B1 (AFB1), aflatoxine G1 (AFG1) and selenium (Se) alone and in combination and allowed to germinate. Phytohormone levels of GA-like substances (GAs), trans-Zeatin (t-Z) and Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) were determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) when the roots of the germinating seeds reach 1.5-3.0 cm in length. The levels of endogenous hormones decreased in seeds treated with AFB1 and AFG1 compared to control; however an increase was noted in seeds exposed to AFG1 and Se together. AFB1 and Se treatment caused reduced hormone levels in most of the treatments. When plants were exposed to Se alone, the highest levels of GAs, t-Z and IAA were observed in the application of 800 ppm Se. The highest levels of GAs, t-Z and IAA were observed when seeds were treated with 0.2 ppm AFG1 + 8 ppm Se, 0.2 ppm AFG1 + 8 ppm Se and 0.2 ppm AFG1 + 0.08 ppm Se, respectively, whereas the lowest levels of the hormones were observed in 0.2 ppm AFB1 + 8 ppm Se, 0.2 ppm AFB1 + 0.08 ppm Se and 0.1 ppm AFB1, respectively. In conclusion, the levels of phytohormones were reduced by the treatment of AFB1 and AFG1 alone. However Se removed the negative effect of AFB1 on phytohormones, but not AFB1. PMID:16636889

  16. Concurrent Measurements of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Exchange during Lightflecks in Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Krall, J. P.; Pearcy, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    Leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) were enclosed in a temperature-controlled cuvette under 35 Pa (350 [mu]bars) CO2 and 0.2 kPa (0.2%)O2 and exposed to short periods (1-30 s) of illumination (light-flecks). The rate and total amount of CO2 assimilated and O2 evolved were measured. The O2 evolution rate was taken as an indicator of the rate of photosynthetic noncyclic electron transport (NCET). In this C4 species, the response of electron transport during the lightflecks qualitatively mimicked that of C3 species previously tested, whereas the response of CO2 assimilation differed. Under short-duration lightflecks at high photon flux density (PFD), the mean rate of O2 evolution was greater than the steady-state rate of O2 evolution under the same PFD due to a burst of O2 evolution at the beginning of the lightfleck. This O2 burst was taken as indicating a high level of NCET involved in the buildup of assimilatory charge via ATP, NADPH, and reduced or phosphorylated metabolites. However, as lightfleck duration decreased, the amount of CO2 assimilated per unit time of the lightfleck (the mean rate of CO2 assimilation) decreased. There was also a burst of CO2 from the leaf at the beginning of low-PFD lightflecks that further reduced the assimilation during these lightflecks. The results are discussed in terms of the buildup of assimilatory charge through the synthesis of high-energy metabolites specific to C4 metabolism. It is speculated that the inefficiency of carbon uptake during brief light transients in the C4 species, relative to C3 species, is due to the futile synthesis of C4 cycle intermediates. PMID:12231981

  17. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  18. Calcium ion dependency of ethylene production in segments of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Ca2+ on ethylene production in 2-cm long apical segments from primary roots of corn (Zea mays L., B73 x Missouri 17) seedlings. The seedlings were raised under different conditions of Ca2+ availability. Low-Ca and high-Ca seedlings were raised by soaking the grains and watering the seedlings with distilled water or 10 mM CaCl2, respectively. Segments from high-Ca roots produced more than twice as much ethylene as segments from low-Ca roots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA; 1 micromole) enhanced ethylene production in segments from both low-Ca and high-Ca roots but auxin-induced promotion of ethylene production was consistently higher in segments from high-Ca roots. Addition of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to root segments from low-Ca seedlings doubled total ethylene production and the rate of production remained fairly constant during a 24 h period of monitoring. In segments from high-Ca seedlings ACC also increased total ethylene production but most of the ethylene was produced within the first 6 h. The data suggest that Ca2+ enhances the conversion of ACC to ethylene. The terminal 2 mm of the root tip were found to be especially important to ethylene biosynthesis by apical segments and, experiments using 45Ca2+ as tracer indicated that the apical 2 mm of the root is the region of strongest Ca2+ accumulation. Other cations such as Mn2+, Mg2+, and K+ could largely substitute for Ca2+. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to recent evidence for gravity-induced Ca2+ redistribution and its relationship to the establishment of asymmetric growth during gravitropic curvature.

  19. Correlations between gravitropic curvature and auxin movement across gravistimulated roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.; Hertel, R.

    1990-01-01

    We compared the kinetics of auxin redistribution across the caps of primary roots of 2-day-old maize (Zea mays, cv Merit) seedlings with the time course of gravitropic curvature. [3H] indoleacetic acid was applied to one side of the cap in an agar donor and radioactivity moving across the cap was collected in an agar receiver applied to the opposite side. Upon gravistimulation the roots first curved upward slightly, then returned to the horizontal and began curving downward, reaching a final angle of about 67 degrees. Movement of label across the caps of gravistimulated roots was asymmetric with preferential downward movement (ratio downward/upward = ca. 1.6, radioactivity collected during the 90 min following beginning of gravistimulation). There was a close correlation between the development of asymmetric auxin movement across the root cap and the rate of curvature, with both values increasing to a maximum and then declining as the roots approached the final angle of curvature. In roots preadapted to gravity (alternate brief stimulation on opposite flanks over a period of 1 hour) the initial phase of upward curvature was eliminated and downward bending began earlier than for controls. The correlation between asymmetric auxin movement and the kinetics of curvature also held in comparisons between control and preadapted roots. Both downward auxin transport asymmetry and downward curvature occurred earlier in preadapted roots than in controls. These findings are consistent with suggestions that the root cap is not only the site of perception but also the location of the initial redistribution of effectors that ultimately leads to curvature.

  20. Maize (Zea mays L.) performance in organically amended mine site soils.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, Oluwatosin Gbemisola; Olayinka, Akinyemi; Awotoye, Olusegun Olufemi

    2016-10-01

    Organic amendments play an important role in the eco-friendly remediation of degraded mine site soils. This study investigated the quality (essential nutrients and heavy metal content) of maize grown on organically amended soils from three active mines in Nigeria. Soil samples were collected randomly at 0-15 cm depth, air-dried and sieved. Five kg of soil were amended with poultry manure and sawdust (poultry manure only, sawdust only, poultry manure-sawdust mixtures in 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1 ratios) at 10 g kg(-1). Maize (Zea mays L.) seeds were planted and watered for two consecutive periods of 8 weeks, with the control and treatment experiments set up in the screenhouse in quadruples. Harvested tissues were weighed, dried, ground and digested. Chemical properties were determined using standard methods while atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine total metal concentrations (Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu). ANOVA was used to test for significant differences among treatment groups in the various parameters. Application of poultry manure-sawdust mixtures significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced tissue dry matter yield, as well as N, P, K, and Na contents while Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb were immobilized to approximately 50-100%. Treatment with sawdust alone reduced tissue nutrient content resulting in depressed plant yield while poultry manure only though enhanced crop yield, contained higher heavy metal contents. Soil amendments comprised of poultry manure-sawdust mixtures can be effective remediation strategy for mine site soils, as these organic materials help replenish soil nutrients, immobilize heavy metals, and enhance food productivity. PMID:27415409

  1. Proliferation of maize (Zea mays L.) roots in response to localized supply of nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granato, T. C.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) plants with two primary nodal root axes were grown for 8 d in flowing nutrient culture with each axis independently supplied with NO3-. Dry matter accumulation by roots was similar whether 1.0 mol m-3 NO3- was supplied to one or both axes. When NO3- was supplied to only one axis, however, accumulation of dry matter within the root system was significantly greater in the axis supplied with NO3-. The increased dry matter accumulation by the +N-treated axis was attributable entirely to increased density and growth of lateral branches and not to a difference in growth of the primary axis. Proliferation of lateral branches for the +N axis was associated with the capacity for in situ reduction and utilization of a portion of the absorbed NO3-, especially in the apical region where lateral primordia are initiated. Although reduced nitrogen was translocated to the -N axis, concentrations in the -N axis remained significantly lower than in the +N axis. The concentration of reduced nitrogen, as well as in vitro NO3- reductase activity, was greater in apical than in more basal regions of the +N axis. The enhanced proliferation of lateral branches in the +N axis was accompanied by an increase in total respiration rate of the axis. Part of the increased respiration was attributable to increased mass of roots. The specific respiration rate (micromoles CO2 evolved per hour per gram root dry weight) was also greater for the +N than for the -N axis. If respiration rate is taken as representative of sink demand, stimulation of initiation and growth of laterals by in situ utilization of a localized exogenous supply of NO3- establishes an increased sink demand through enhanced metabolic activity and the increased partitioning of assimilates to the +N axis responds to the difference in sink demand between +N and -N axes.

  2. Transport and metabolism of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-galactoside in seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komoszynski, M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside labeled with 3H in the indole and 14C in the galactose moieties was applied to kernels of 5 day old germinating seedlings of Zea mays. Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside was not transported into either the shoot or root tissue as the intact molecule but was instead hydrolyzed to yield [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [3H]indole-3-acetic acid which were then transported to the shoot with little radioactivity going to the root. With certain assumption concerning the equilibration of applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[U-14C]galactose with the endogenous pool, it may be concluded that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside in the endosperm supplies about 2 picomoles per plant per hour of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and 1 picomole per plant per hour of indole-3-acetic acid to the shoot and thus is comparable to indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol as a source of indole-acetic acid for the shoot. Quantitative estimates of the amount of galactose in the kernels suggest that [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose is hydrolyzed after the compound leaves the endosperm but before it reaches the shoot. In addition, [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose supplies appreciable amounts of 14C to the shoot and both 14C and 3H to an uncharacterized insoluble fraction of the endosperm.

  3. Optical Reflectance and Fluorescence for Detecting Nitrogen Needs in Zea mays L.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMurtrey, J. E.; Middleton, E. M.; Corp. L. A.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Butcher, L. M.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) status in field grown corn (Zea mays L.) was assessed using spectral techniques. Passive reflectance remote sensing and, both passive and active fluorescence sensing methods were investigated. Reflectance and fluorescence methods are reported to detect changes in the primary plant pigments (chlorophylls a and b; carotenoids) in higher plant species. As a general rule, foliar chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) usually exist in approx.3:l ratio. In plants under stress, Chl b content is affected before Chl a reductions occur. For reflectance, a version of the chlorophyll absorption in reflectance index (CARI) method was tested with narrow bands from the Airborne Imaging Spectroradiometer for Applications (ASIA). CARI minimizes the effects of soil background on the signal from green canopies. A modified CARI (MCARI) was used to track total Chl a levels in the red dip of the spectrum from the corn canopy. A second MCARI was used to track the auxiliary plant pigments (Chl b and the carotenoids) in the yellow/orange/red edge part of the reflectance spectrum. The difference between these two MCARI indices detected variations in N levels across the field plot canopies using ASIA data. At the leaf level, ratios of fluorescence emissions in the blue, green, red and far-red wavelengths sensed responses that were associated with the plant pigments, and were indicative of energy transfer in the photosynthetic process. N stressed corn stands could be distinguish from those with optimally applied N with fluorescence emission spectra obtained from individual corn leaves. Both reflectance and fluorescence methods are sensitive in detecting corn N needs and may be especially powerful in monitoring crop conditions if both types of information can be combined.

  4. Nonomuraea zeae sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Jia, Feiyu; Liu, Chongxi; Li, Jiansong; Guo, Siyu; Zhou, Shuyu; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated strain NEAU-ND5T, was isolated from the rhizosphere of corn (Zea mays L.) collected in Heilongjiang Province, north-east China, and characterized using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain NEAU-ND5T was a member of the genus Nonomuraea, with highest sequence similarities to Nonomuraea jabiensis A4036T (98.29 %), Nonomuraea rosea GW12687T (98.25 %), Nonomuraea candida HMC10T (98.22 %), Nonomuraea rhizophila YIM 67092T (98.04 %) and Nonomuraea kuesteri NRRL B-24325T (98.04 %). Similarities to other type strains of the genus Nonomuraea were lower than 98 %. Morphological and chemotaxonomic properties of strain NEAU-ND5T were also consistent with the description of the genus Nonomuraea. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the whole-cell sugars were glucose, ribose and madurose. The phospholipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, hydroxy-phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, hydroxy-phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H4), MK-9(H2) and MK-9(H0). The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C16:0 and 10-methyl C17:0. A combination of DNA-DNA hybridization results and some phenotypic characteristics demonstrated that strain NEAU-ND5T was clearly distinguished from its closely related Nonomuraea species. Consequently, it is concluded that strain NEAU-ND5T represents a novel species of the genus Nonomuraea, for which the name Nonomuraea zeae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-ND5T (=CGMCC 4.7280T=DSM 100528T). PMID:26971302

  5. Net irrigation requirements for maize (Zea mays L.) in Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias Ramirez, Asdrubal Jesus; Moreno Pizani, Maria Alejandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is one of the largest consumers of fresh water. In situations where water resources are limited, the irrigation for crops has led to water use conflicts because of human, hydroelectric and industrial demands. Thus, achieving precise information about water availability and water needs of crops becomes safety factors to guarantee sustainable development of irrigated crops in the future. In Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area located within Barinas and Portuguesa states in Venezuela, there has been a significant increase in intensive farming with maize (Zea mays L.) which made essential to determine the availability of irrigation water to meet the crop requirement and improve the management based on planning designs. Due to the lack of irrigation requirements data for the study area, a methodology was developed to estimate the net irrigation requirements (NIR). Therefore, the available information of this region related to climate, soil and irrigation was used to estimate NIR for maize through CROPWAT 8.0 model. There were established different crop-climate-soil combinations that allowed estimating NIR. It was found that NIR did not exceed the value of 125 mm/month in all of the combinations. Based on these results, a NIR spatial distribution map was obtained through the use of ArcView 3.2 ®. The results showed that the highest NIR were located in the northeast sector of the study area which was associated to the influence of the Weather Station named San Hipolito. Additionally, the estimated availability of groundwater was found to be higher than the surface water, and both combined exceeded the demands of the study area. The model CROPWAT 8.0 provided necessary information for irrigation planning in large scale. A NIR map developed through the proposed methodology represents a useful tool to integrate water balance factors.

  6. Soluble and bound phenolic compounds in different Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Montilla, Elyana; Hillebrand, Silke; Antezana, Amalia; Winterhalter, Peter

    2011-07-13

    In nine Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) varieties the content of phenolic compounds as well as the anthocyanin composition has been determined. The phenotypes under investigation included four red and five blue varieties (Kulli, Ayzuma, Paru, Tuimuru, Oke, Huaca Songo, Colorado, Huillcaparu, and Checchi). In purple corn, phenolic compounds were highly concentrated in cell walls. Thus, simultaneous determination of soluble and bound-form phenolics is essential for analysis, extraction, and quantification. The present study reports the determination of soluble and insoluble-bound fraction of phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) in Bolivian purple corn varieties. Enzymatic, thermal, and alkaline hydrolyses were used to obtain the cell wall-linked phenolic compounds. Ferulic acid values ranged from 132.9 to 298.4 mg/100 g, and p-coumaric acid contents varied between 251.8 and 607.5 mg/100 g dry weight (DW), respectively, and were identified as the main nonanthocyanin phenolics. The total content of phenolic compounds ranged from 311.0 to 817.6 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW, and the percentage contribution of bound to total phenolics varied from 62.1 to 86.6%. The total monomeric anthocyanin content ranged from 1.9 to 71.7 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 g DW. Anthocyanin profiles are almost the same among the different samples. Differences are observed only in the relative percentage of each anthocyanin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside and its malonated derivative were detected as major anthocyanins. Several dimalonylated monoglucosides of cyanidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin were present as minor constituents. PMID:21639140

  7. Effect of selenite and selenate on plant uptake of cadmium by maize (zea mays)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, K.; Mishra, S.; Srivastava, S.

    1996-03-01

    Selenium has been reported to confer tolerance to toxicity of heavy metals including cadmium, a highly toxic and non essential heavy metal, which enters the food chain via plant uptake from soils. Selenium reduces availability of cadmium to plants along with other aspects of its toxicokinetics. When plants are supplied with selenite, selenium concentrations in the xylem exudate are lower than selenate. Most of the selenate was transported as selenate and unidentified organic Se compounds. In contrast, Se distribution among various Se fractions within plants does not depend significantly on whether selenite or selenate was used. Selenium has a strong tendency to form complexes with heavy metals like Cd, Hg, Ag and Tl. It has been suggested that the protective effects of selenium are due to the formation of non toxic Se-metal complexes, although the mechanism by which this protective effect is exerted remains unclear. Studies on the effect of selenium (selenite) and cadmium additions to the soil on their concentrations in lettuce and wheat has indicated the role of selenite in reduction of cadmium uptake. The cletoxifying effect of sodium selenite on cadmium ion in the freshwater fish Potyacuthus cupanus has been reported. The discovery that an element like selenium counteracts the toxicity, chemical carcinogenesis and reduces the plant uptake of other toxic metals, highlights the possibility of existence of a Se-metal interaction mechanism in soil plant systems. The uptake and translocation of root-absorbed chromium supplied through irrigation in the trivalent and hexavalant states in various parts of the onion plant (Allium cepa) grown in soil and sand culture has been recently reported by us. In continuation of that, this preliminary report describes the effect of selenite and selenate pretreatment on the uptake of cadmium in the maize plant (Zea mays).

  8. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  9. Global gene expression analysis of the shoot apical meristem of maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Smith, Marianne B; Emrich, Scott J; Borsuk, Lisa A; Zhou, Ruilian; Chen, Tianle; Zhang, Xiaolan; Timmermans, Marja C P; Beck, Jon; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J; Schnable, Patrick S

    2007-01-01

    All above-ground plant organs are derived from shoot apical meristems (SAMs). Global analyses of gene expression were conducted on maize (Zea mays L.) SAMs to identify genes preferentially expressed in the SAM. The SAMs were collected from 14-day-old B73 seedlings via laser capture microdissection (LCM). The RNA samples extracted from LCM-collected SAMs and from seedlings were hybridized to microarrays spotted with 37 660 maize cDNAs. Approximately 30% (10 816) of these cDNAs were prepared as part of this study from manually dissected B73 maize apices. Over 5000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (about 13% of the total) were differentially expressed (P<0.0001) between SAMs and seedlings. Of these, 2783 and 2248 ESTs were up- and down-regulated in the SAM, respectively. The expression in the SAM of several of the differentially expressed ESTs was validated via quantitative RT-PCR and/or in situ hybridization. The up-regulated ESTs included many regulatory genes including transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors and components of the gene-silencing machinery, as well as about 900 genes with unknown functions. Surprisingly, transcripts that hybridized to 62 retrotransposon-related cDNAs were also substantially up-regulated in the SAM. Complementary DNAs derived from the LCM-collected SAMs were sequenced to identify additional genes that are expressed in the SAM. This generated around 550 000 ESTs (454-SAM ESTs) from two genotypes. Consistent with the microarray results, approximately 14% of the 454-SAM ESTs from B73 were retrotransposon-related. Possible roles of genes that are preferentially expressed in the SAM are discussed. PMID:17764504

  10. Paenibacillus zeae sp. nov., isolated from maize (Zea mays L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhai, Lei; Wang, Ronghuan; Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chuanyong; Cao, Yu; Cao, Yanhua; Xu, Tianjun; Ge, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jiuran; Cheng, Chi

    2015-12-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive bacterial strains, designated 6R2T, 6R18, 3T2 and 3T10, isolated from seeds of hybrid maize (Zea mays L., Jingke 968) were investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells were aerobic, motile, spore-forming and rod-shaped. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates may represent a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, the four closest neighbours being Paenibacillus lautus NRRL NRS-666T (97.1 % similarity), Paenibacillus glucanolyticus DSM 5162T (97.0 %), Paenibacillus lactis MB 1871T (97.0 %) and Paenibacillus chibensis JCM 9905T (96.8 %). The DNA G+C content of strain 6R2T was 51.8 mol%. Its polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The predominant respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Strains 6R2T, 6R18, 3T2 and 3T10 were clearly distinguished from the above type strains using phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization, and a range of physiological and biochemical characteristics. It is evident from the genotypic and phenotypic data that strains 6R2T, 6R18, 3T2 and 3T10 represent a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus zeae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 6R2T ( = KCTC 33674T = CICC 23860T). PMID:26373452

  11. Cohnella rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere environment of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; McInroy, John A; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, non-endospore forming organism, isolated as a seed endophyte (colonizing the internal healthy tissue of plant seed) of sweet corn (Zea mays), strain CSE-5610T, was studied for its taxonomic allocation. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, strain CSE-5610T was grouped into the genus Cohnella, most closely related to Cohnella ginsengisoli GR21-5T (98.1%) and 'Cohnella plantaginis' YN-83 (97.5%). The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to other members of the genus Cohnella was <96.6%. DNA-DNA hybridization of strain CSE-5610T with C. ginsengisoli DSM 18997T and 'C. plantaginis' DSM 25424 was 58% (reciprocal 24%) and 30% (reciprocal 27%), respectively. The fatty acid profile from whole cell hydrolysates supported the allocation of the strain to the genus Cohnella; iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids were found as major compounds. meso-Diaminopimelic acid was identified as the cell-wall diamino acid. The quinone system consisted predominantly of menaquinone MK-7. The polar lipid profile was composed of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two aminophospholipids, a phospholipid and minor amounts of two polar lipids. In the polyamine pattern, spermidine was the major polyamine. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 60 mol%. In addition, the results of physiological and biochemical tests also allowed phenotypic differentiation of strain CSE-5610T from the two closely related strains. Hence, CSE-5610T represents a novel species of the genus Cohnella, for which we propose the name Cohnella rhizosphaerae sp. nov., with CSE-5610T (=LMG 28080T=CIP 110695T) as the type strain. PMID:24556632

  12. Fungal-fungal associations affect the assembly of endophyte communities in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Pan, Jean J; May, Georgiana

    2009-10-01

    Many factors can affect the assembly of communities, ranging from species pools to habitat effects to interspecific interactions. In microbial communities, the predominant focus has been on the well-touted ability of microbes to disperse and the environment acting as a selective filter to determine which species are present. In this study, we investigated the role of biotic interactions (e.g., competition, facilitation) in fungal endophyte community assembly by examining endophyte species co-occurrences within communities using null models. We used recombinant inbred lines (genotypes) of maize (Zea mays) to examine community assembly at multiple habitat levels, at the individual plant and host genotype levels. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches were used to assess endophyte communities. Communities were analyzed using the complete fungal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) dataset or only the dominant (most abundant) OTUs in order to ascertain whether species co-occurrences were different for dominant members compared to when all members were included. In the culture-dependent approach, we found that for both datasets, OTUs co-occurred on maize genotypes more frequently than expected under the null model of random species co-occurrences. In the culture-independent approach, we found that OTUs negatively co-occurred at the individual plant level but were not significantly different from random at the genotype level for either the dominant or complete datasets. Our results showed that interspecific interactions can affect endophyte community assembly, but the effects can be complex and depend on host habitat level. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine endophyte community assembly in the same host species at multiple habitat levels. Understanding the processes and mechanisms that shape microbial communities will provide important insights into microbial community structure and the maintenance of microbial biodiversity. PMID:19517158

  13. Molecular identification and expression analysis of a diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qirui; Piermarini, Peter M; Nachman, Ronald J; Denlinger, David L

    2014-03-01

    Diapause hormone (DH) is an insect neuropeptide that is highly effective in terminating the overwintering pupal diapause in members of the Helicoverpa/Heliothis complex of agricultural pests, thus DH and related compounds have promise as tools for pest management. To augment our development of effective DH analogs and antagonists that could be used as diapause disruptors this study focuses on the cloning and identification of the DH receptor (DHR) in the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea. The full-length dhr cDNA contains 2153 nucleotides encoding 511 amino acids. Our results suggest there are at least two splicing variants of Hezea-DHR. Hydrophobicity analysis and sequence alignment indicate that Hezea-DHR has 7 transmembrane regions and a highly conserved C-terminal region that is also present in related receptors. Hezea-DHR has 95%, 82% and 79% identity to a partial DHR sequence from Heliothis virescens, a full-length DHR in Orgyia thyellina, and DHR-1 in Bombyx mori, but only 45-49% identity to pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Expression of dhr mRNA remained low in whole body extracts throughout diapause and in young nondiapausing pupae, but was distinctly elevated as development ensued in pharate adults 7 days after pupation. The highest expression of dhr mRNA we noted was in the ovary. A DHR fusion protein with enhanced-green fluorescent protein was successfully expressed heterologously in X. laevis oocytes, as verified by fluorescent imaging and Western blots, but an electrophysiological assay failed to detect receptor-ligand binding activity, which suggests that an essential cofactor and/or accessory protein is required for functional activity of the DHR. PMID:24345336

  14. Expression and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins in stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Robert B; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Cohen, David; Chevalier, Adrien S; Uehlein, Norbert; Hachez, Charles; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Le Thiec, Didier; Chaumont, François

    2014-10-01

    Stomata, the microscopic pores on the surface of the aerial parts of plants, are bordered by two specialized cells, known as guard cells, which control the stomatal aperture according to endogenous and environmental signals. Like most movements occurring in plants, the opening and closing of stomata are based on hydraulic forces. During opening, the activation of plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters results in solute accumulation in the guard cells. To re-establish the perturbed osmotic equilibrium, water follows the solutes into the cells, leading to their swelling. Numerous studies have contributed to the understanding of the mechanism and regulation of stomatal movements. However, despite the importance of transmembrane water flow during this process, only a few studies have provided evidence for the involvement of water channels, called aquaporins. Here, we microdissected Zea mays stomatal complexes and showed that members of the aquaporin plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are expressed in these complexes and that their mRNA expression generally follows a diurnal pattern. The substrate specificity of two of the expressed ZmPIPs, ZmPIP1;5 and ZmPIP1;6, was investigated by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and yeast cells. Our data show that both isoforms facilitate transmembrane water diffusion in the presence of the ZmPIP2;1 isoform. In addition, both display CO2 permeability comparable to that of the CO2 diffusion facilitator NtAQP1. These data indicate that ZmPIPs may have various physiological roles in stomatal complexes. PMID:25082269

  15. Usefulness of Multiparental Populations of Maize (Zea mays L.) for Genome-Based Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Lehermeier, Christina; Krämer, Nicole; Bauer, Eva; Bauland, Cyril; Camisan, Christian; Campo, Laura; Flament, Pascal; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Menz, Monica; Meyer, Nina; Moreau, Laurence; Moreno-González, Jesús; Ouzunova, Milena; Pausch, Hubert; Ranc, Nicolas; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Schönleben, Manfred; Walter, Hildrun; Charcosset, Alain; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of marker-assisted prediction of phenotypes has been studied intensively for different types of plant breeding populations. However, one remaining question is how to incorporate and counterbalance information from biparental and multiparental populations into model training for genome-wide prediction. To address this question, we evaluated testcross performance of 1652 doubled-haploid maize (Zea mays L.) lines that were genotyped with 56,110 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phenotyped for five agronomic traits in four to six European environments. The lines are arranged in two diverse half-sib panels representing two major European heterotic germplasm pools. The data set contains 10 related biparental dent families and 11 related biparental flint families generated from crosses of maize lines important for European maize breeding. With this new data set we analyzed genome-based best linear unbiased prediction in different validation schemes and compositions of estimation and test sets. Further, we theoretically and empirically investigated marker linkage phases across multiparental populations. In general, predictive abilities similar to or higher than those within biparental families could be achieved by combining several half-sib families in the estimation set. For the majority of families, 375 half-sib lines in the estimation set were sufficient to reach the same predictive performance of biomass yield as an estimation set of 50 full-sib lines. In contrast, prediction across heterotic pools was not possible for most cases. Our findings are important for experimental design in genome-based prediction as they provide guidelines for the genetic structure and required sample size of data sets used for model training. PMID:25236445

  16. Evaluating Corn (Zea Mays L.) N Variability Via Remote Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J.; Wersinger, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Transformations and losses of nitrogen (N) throughout the growing season can be costly. Methods in place to improve N management and facilitate split N applications during the growing season can be time consuming and logistically difficult. Remote sensing (RS) may be a method to rapidly assess temporal changes in crop N status and promote more efficient N management. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of three different RS platforms to predict N variability in corn (Zea mays L.) leaves during vegetative and early reproductive growth stages. Plots (15 x 15m) were established in the Coastal Plain (CP) and Appalachian Plateau (AP) physiographic regions each spring from 2000 to 2002 in a completely randomized design. Treatments consisted of four N rates (0, 56, 112, and 168 kg N/ha) applied as ammonium nitrate (NH4N03) replicated four time. Spectral measurements were acquired via spectroradiometer (lambda = 350 - 1050 nm), Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) (lambda = 400 - 12,500 nm), and the IKONOS satellite (lambda = 450 - 900 nm). Spectroradiometer data were collected on a biweekly basis from V4 through R1. Due to the nature of - satellite and aircraft acquisitions, these data were acquired per availability. Chlorophyll meter (SPAD) and tissue N were collected as ancillary data along with each RS acquisition. Results showed vegetation indices derived from hand-held spectroradiometer measurements as early as V6-V8 were linearly related to yield and tissue N content. ATLAS data was correlated with tissue N at the AP site during the V6 stage (r2 = 0.66), but no significant relationships were observed at the CP site. No significant relationships were observed between plant N and IKONOS imagery. Using a combination of the greenness vegetation index (GNDVI) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), RS data acquired via ATLAS and the spectroradiometer could be used to evaluate tissue N variability and estimate corn yield variability

  17. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response. PMID:26416125

  18. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  19. The effect and fate of water-soluble carbon nanodots in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Dou, Runzhi; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Chuanbin; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the toxicity of water-soluble carbon nanodots (C-dots) to maize (Zea mays L.) and their uptake and transport in plants were investigated. After exposed in sand matrix amended with 0-2000 mg/L C-dots for 4 weeks, we found that the phytotoxicity of C-dots was concentration-dependent. C-dots at 250 and 500 mg/L showed no toxicity to maize. However, 1000 and 2000 mg/L C-dots significantly reduced the fresh weight of root by 57% and 68%, and decreased the shoot fresh weight by 38% and 72%, respectively. Moreover, in maize roots, the exposure of C-dots at 2000 mg/L significantly increased the H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation (6.5 and 1.65 times higher, respectively), as well as, the antioxidant enzymes activities, up to 2, 1.5, 1.9 and 1.9 times higher for catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, respectively. On the other hand, C-dots were observed in detached root-cap cells, cortex and vascular bundle of roots and mesophyll cells of leaves through fluorescence microscopy analysis, suggesting that C-dots were absorbed and translocated systemically in maize. Remarkably, a certain amount of C-dots were excreted out from leaf blade. To our knowledge, this is the first study combined phenotypic observation with physiologic responses and bioaccumulation and translocation analysis of C-dots to investigate their effect and fate in maize. PMID:26694806

  20. Chelant-assisted phytoextraction and accumulation of Zn by Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Gheju, M; Stelescu, I

    2013-10-15

    Zea mays plants were exposed to soils with concentrations of Zn ranging from 64 to 1800 mg kg(-1) dw, and the efficiency of three selected chelating agents (trisodium citrate (CI), disodium oxalate (OX) and disodium dihydrogen ethylene-diamine-tetraacetate (EDTA)) in enhancing metal phytoextraction was compared. Zn concentration in plant tissues increased in conjunction with the metal concentration of the soil. EDTA was found to be the most efficient chelating amendment, increasing concentrations of Zn in shoots from 88 mg kg(-1) dw, at 64 mg kg(-1) dw soil, to 8026 mg kg(-1) dw at 1800 mg kg(-1) dw soil. The overall orders of BCFs and TFs which resulted from this study are: EDTA > H2O > OX > CI, and EDTANa2 > OX > CI > H2O, respectively. The more effective uptake of Zn by plants for the control treatment (distilled water only) than for CI and OX was attributed to the neutral or slightly alkaline pH of the two chelant irrigation solutions. Instead, EDTA had a favorable effect on Zn uptake from soil due to its additive chelating and acidifying properties. Among the three chelants, only EDTA significantly increased the Zn phytoextraction potential of Z. mays, while CI and OX induced a low metal uptake from soil by plants. Although Z. mays has a lower Zn accumulation capacity than the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens, it could be considered as a potential phytoremediator of soils with elevated Zn concentrations, especially when metal pollution extends to depths greater than 20 cm. PMID:23845956

  1. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omaththage P; Allen, Kerry C; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S; Luttrell, Randall G

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  2. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Omaththage P.; Allen, Kerry C.; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S.; Luttrell, Randall G.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  3. Association of Cry1Ac Toxin Resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) with Increased Alkaline Phosphatase Levels in the Midgut Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Caccia, Silvia; Moar, William J.; Chandrashekhar, Jayadevi; Oppert, Cris; Anilkumar, Konasale J.; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin was characterized in a population of Helicoverpa zea larvae previously shown not to have an alteration in toxin binding as the primary resistance mechanism to this toxin. Cry1Ac-selected larvae (AR1) were resistant to protoxins and toxins of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and the corresponding modified proteins lacking helix α-1 (Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod). When comparing brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from susceptible (LC) and AR1 larval midguts, there were only negligible differences in overall Cry1Ac toxin binding, though AR1 had 18% reversible binding, in contrast to LC, in which all binding was irreversible. However, no differences were detected in Cry1Ac-induced pore formation activity in BBMVs from both strains. Enzymatic activities of two putative Cry1Ac receptors (aminopeptidase N [APN] and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) were significantly reduced (2-fold and 3-fold, respectively) in BBMVs from AR1 compared to LC larvae. These reductions corresponded to reduced protein levels in midgut luminal contents only in the case of ALP, with an almost 10-fold increase in specific ALP activity in midgut fluids from AR1 compared to LC larvae. Partially purified H. zea ALP bound Cry1Ac toxin in ligand blots and competed with Cry1Ac toxin for BBMV binding. Based on these results, we suggest the existence of at least one mechanism of resistance to Cry1A toxins in H. zea involving binding of Cry1Ac toxin to an ALP receptor in the larval midgut lumen of resistant larvae. PMID:22685140

  4. Association of Cry1Ac toxin resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) with increased alkaline phosphatase levels in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Moar, William J; Chandrashekhar, Jayadevi; Oppert, Cris; Anilkumar, Konasale J; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Ferré, Juan

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin was characterized in a population of Helicoverpa zea larvae previously shown not to have an alteration in toxin binding as the primary resistance mechanism to this toxin. Cry1Ac-selected larvae (AR1) were resistant to protoxins and toxins of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and the corresponding modified proteins lacking helix α-1 (Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod). When comparing brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from susceptible (LC) and AR1 larval midguts, there were only negligible differences in overall Cry1Ac toxin binding, though AR1 had 18% reversible binding, in contrast to LC, in which all binding was irreversible. However, no differences were detected in Cry1Ac-induced pore formation activity in BBMVs from both strains. Enzymatic activities of two putative Cry1Ac receptors (aminopeptidase N [APN] and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) were significantly reduced (2-fold and 3-fold, respectively) in BBMVs from AR1 compared to LC larvae. These reductions corresponded to reduced protein levels in midgut luminal contents only in the case of ALP, with an almost 10-fold increase in specific ALP activity in midgut fluids from AR1 compared to LC larvae. Partially purified H. zea ALP bound Cry1Ac toxin in ligand blots and competed with Cry1Ac toxin for BBMV binding. Based on these results, we suggest the existence of at least one mechanism of resistance to Cry1A toxins in H. zea involving binding of Cry1Ac toxin to an ALP receptor in the larval midgut lumen of resistant larvae. PMID:22685140

  5. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  6. Carbon-14 Distribution in Carbohydrates of Immature Zea mays. Kernels Following 14CO2 Treatment of Intact Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Jack C.

    1968-01-01

    Shortly after Zea mays L. plants were exposed to 14CO2, most of the radioactivity in the kernel occurred in the free monosaccharides, glucose and fructose. Later the proportion of 14C in sucrose increased and that in the monosaccharides declined. These data have been interpreted as showing that the translocated sugar is hydrolyzed prior to or during its movement into the storage cells of the endosperm. This hydrolysis appears to occur in the “pedicel region” of the kernel. After entry into the endosperm tissue, sucrose was rapidly resynthesized from the monosaccharides prior to its utilization in starch synthesis. PMID:16656904

  7. Inhibition of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Growth by Transgenic Corn Expressing Bt Toxins and Development of Resistance to Cry1Ab.

    PubMed

    Reisig, Dominic D; Reay-Jones, Francis P F

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic corn, Zea mays L., that expresses the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry1Ab is only moderately toxic to Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and has been planted commercially since 1996. Growth and development of H. zea was monitored to determine potential changes in susceptibility to this toxin over time. Small plots of corn hybrids expressing Cry1F, Cry1F × Cry1Ab, Cry1Ab × Cry3Bb1, Cry1A.105 × Cry2Ab2 × Cry3Bb1, Cry1A.105 × Cry2Ab2, and Vip3Aa20 × Cry1Ab × mCry3A were planted in both 2012 and 2013 inNorth and South Carolina with paired non-Bt hybrids from the same genetic background. H. zea larvae were sampled on three time periods from ears and the following factors were measured: kernel area injured (cm(2)) by H. zea larvae, larval number per ear, larval weight, larval length, and larval head width. Pupae were sampled on a single time period and the following factors recorded: number per ear, weight, time to eclosion, and the number that eclosed. There was no reduction in larval weight, number of insect entering the pupal stadium, pupal weight, time to eclosion, and number of pupae able to successfully eclose to adulthood in the hybrid expressing Cry1Ab compared with a non-Bt paired hybrid. As Cry1Ab affected these in 1996, H. zea may be developing resistance to Cry1Ab in corn, although these results are not comprehensive, given the limited sampling period, size, and geography. We also found that the negative impacts on larval growth and development were greater in corn hybrids with pyramided traits compared with single traits. PMID:26314074

  8. VHDL, a larval storage protein from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, is a member of the vitellogenin gene family.

    PubMed

    Sum, Herbert; Haunerland, Norbert H

    2007-10-01

    The hemolymph of last instar larvae of the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea contains a blue very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) that is selectively taken up into fat body prior to pupation. Its amino-terminal sequence was determined by Edman degradation, and used to design a degenerate primer for PCR amplification. With 5' and 3' RACE techniques, the entire cDNA coding for VHDL was amplified and sequenced. Conceptual translation reveals a 173 kDa protein that contains a 15 amino acid signal sequence immediately before the experimentally determined N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein contains a typical lipoprotein N-terminal domain, and shows high sequence similarity to vitellogenins from Lepidoptera and other insect species. VHDL mRNA was not detectable in adult H. zea, and antibodies raised against VHDL did not react with adult hemolymph or yolk proteins. Therefore VHDL, although a member of the vitellogenin gene family, seems to be distinct from the vitellogenin expressed in adult females. PMID:17785196

  9. ZmSOC1, a MADS-box transcription factor from Zea mays, promotes flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suzhou; Luo, Yanzhong; Zhang, Zhanlu; Xu, Miaoyun; Wang, Weibu; Zhao, Yangmin; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Zea mays is an economically important crop, but its molecular mechanism of flowering remains largely uncharacterized. The gene, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), integrates multiple flowering signals to regulate floral transition in Arabidopsis. In this study, ZmSOC1 was isolated from Zea mays. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the ZmSOC1 protein contained a highly conserved MADS domain and a typical SOC1 motif. ZmSOC1 protein was localized in the nucleus in protoplasts and showed no transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells. ZmSOC1 was highly expressed in maize reproductive organs, including filaments, ear and endosperm, but expression was very low in embryos; on the other hand, the abiotic stresses could repress ZmSOC1 expression. Overexpression of ZmSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis through increasing the expression of AtLFY and AtAP1. Overall, these results suggest that ZmSOC1 is a flowering promoter in Arabidopsis. PMID:25372944

  10. A morphometric analysis of the redistribution of organelles in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to determine what structural changes in graviperceptive cells are associated with onset of root gravicurvature, the redistribution of organelles in columella cells of horizontally-oriented, graviresponding roots of Zea mays has been quantified. Root gravicurvature began by 15 min after reorientation, and did not involve significant changes in the (i) volume of individual columella cells or amyloplasts, (ii) relative volume of any cellular organelle, (iii) number of amyloplasts per columella cell, or (iv) surface area of cellular location of endoplasmic reticulum. Sedimentation of amyloplasts began within 1 to 2 min after reorientation, and was characterized by an intensely staining area of cytoplasm adjacent to the sedimenting amyloplasts. By 5 min after reorientation, amyloplasts were located in the lower distal corner of columella cells, and, by 15 min after reorientation, overlaid the entire length of the lower cell wall. No consistent contact between amyloplasts and any cellular structure was detected at any stage of gravicurvature. Centrally-located nuclei initially migrated upward in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots, after which they moved to the proximal ends of the cells by 15 min after reorientation. No significant pattern of redistribution of vacuoles, mitochondria, dictyosomes, or hyaloplasm was detected that correlated with the onset of gravicurvature. These results indicate that amyloplasts and nuclei are the only organelles whose movements correlate positively with the onset of gravicurvature by primary roots of this cultivar of Zea mays.

  11. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  12. ZmSOC1, an MADS-Box Transcription Factor from Zea mays, Promotes Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Suzhou; Luo, Yanzhong; Zhang, Zhanlu; Xu, Miaoyun; Wang, Weibu; Zhao, Yangmin; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Zea mays is an economically important crop, but its molecular mechanism of flowering remains largely uncharacterized. The gene, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), integrates multiple flowering signals to regulate floral transition in Arabidopsis. In this study, ZmSOC1 was isolated from Zea mays. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the ZmSOC1 protein contained a highly conserved MADS domain and a typical SOC1 motif. ZmSOC1 protein was localized in the nucleus in protoplasts and showed no transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells. ZmSOC1 was highly expressed in maize reproductive organs, including filaments, ear and endosperm, but expression was very low in embryos; on the other hand, the abiotic stresses could repress ZmSOC1 expression. Overexpression of ZmSOC1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis through increasing the expression of AtLFY and AtAP1. Overall, these results suggest that ZmSOC1 is a flowering promoter in Arabidopsis. PMID:25372944

  13. Presence of Zea luxurians (Durieu and Ascherson) Bird in Southern Brazil: Implications for the Conservation of Wild Relatives of Maize

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Records of the occurrence of wild relatives of maize in South American lowlands are unprecedented, especially in sympatric coexistence with landraces. This fact is relevant, because regions of occurrence of wild relatives of cultivated plants should be a priority for conservation, even if they do not correspond to the center of origin of the species. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the wild relatives of maize in the Far West of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Therefore, phenotypic characterization was performed for five populations, based on 22 morphological traits deemed as fundamental for classifying the species of the genus Zea, and validated through the characterization of chromosomal knobs of two populations. The occurrence and distribution of teosinte populations were described through semi-structured interviews applied to a sample of 305 farmers. A total of 136 teosinte populations were identified; 75% of them occur spontaneously, 17% are cultivated populations, and 8% occur both ways, for the same farm. Populations that were characterized morphologically had trapezoidal fruits mostly, upright tassel branch (4–18), non-prominent main branch and glabrous glumes, with two protruding outer ribs and 8 inner ribs, on average. Cytogenetic analysis identified 10 pairs of homologous chromosomes (2n = 20) with 26 knobs, located in the terminal region of all chromosomes. The similarity of these results with the information reported in the literature indicates that the five populations of wild relatives of maize in this region of Santa Catarina belong to the botanical species Zea luxurians. PMID:26488577

  14. Intraear Compensation of Field Corn, Zea mays, from Simulated and Naturally Occurring Injury by Ear-Feeding Larvae.

    PubMed

    Steckel, S; Stewart, S D

    2015-06-01

    Ear-feeding larvae, such as corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea Boddie (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), can be important insect pests of field corn, Zea mays L., by feeding on kernels. Recently introduced, stacked Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) traits provide improved protection from ear-feeding larvae. Thus, our objective was to evaluate how injury to kernels in the ear tip might affect yield when this injury was inflicted at the blister and milk stages. In 2010, simulated corn earworm injury reduced total kernel weight (i.e., yield) at both the blister and milk stage. In 2011, injury to ear tips at the milk stage affected total kernel weight. No differences in total kernel weight were found in 2013, regardless of when or how much injury was inflicted. Our data suggested that kernels within the same ear could compensate for injury to ear tips by increasing in size, but this increase was not always statistically significant or sufficient to overcome high levels of kernel injury. For naturally occurring injury observed on multiple corn hybrids during 2011 and 2012, our analyses showed either no or a minimal relationship between number of kernels injured by ear-feeding larvae and the total number of kernels per ear, total kernel weight, or the size of individual kernels. The results indicate that intraear compensation for kernel injury to ear tips can occur under at least some conditions. PMID:26470235

  15. A comparison of canopy evapotranspiration between perennial rhizomatous grasses and Zea mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, G.; Bernacchi, C.; Dohleman, F.

    2008-12-01

    Perennial rhizomatous C4 grasses are currently considered one of the most promising vegetation types to accommodate a cellulosic feedstock based liquid fuel economy. The current focus on using these vegetation types as a source of renewable fuel has sparked numerous concerns associated with environmental impacts. Of particular interest is the impact that altering the composition of vegetation at the landscape scale would have on local and regional hydrological cycles. We hypothesize that evapotranspiration, ET, will be higher for perennial grasses relative to maize as a result higher leaf area, higher above-ground biomass and prolonged growing seasons. To test this hypothesis, a technique in which ET is estimated as the residual in the energy balance equation from measurements of net radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes was employed. Measurements were made during the 2007 growing season for three replicate plots of the perennial rhizomatous grasses Miscanthus giganteus and Panicum virgatum, as well as for Zea mays planted at the University of Illinois South Farms. When averaged across the entire growing season, ET for M. giganteus was double relative to Z. mays, and 130% of P. virgatum ET. When compared over the periods in which all three species experienced mature and closed canopies (from day of year 200 to 250), M. giganteus still showed higher rates of ET compared with Z. mays, however, the increase was only ~15%. We conclude that ET associated with perennial alternative energy crops are higher relative to annual row crop; with most ET disparity, particularly for P. virgatum, being driven by phenology, quicker canopy closure and a prolonged growing season. Physiological rates of ET were highest for M. giganteus, followed by Z. mays, followed P. virgatum. Differences in phenology were more important than those of physiology for ET overshadowing effects from increased biomass associated with M. giganteus and/or a physiological difference between these

  16. Effects of fertilizer application to sweet corn (Zea mays.) grown on sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Ferenc; Jakab, Samuel; Losak, Tomas; Slezak, Katalin

    2009-11-01

    In our experiment we tried to find out what kind of eventual changes in the environment and in plant chemical composition occurred in response to different fertilizer treatments applied to sweet corn (Zea mays convar. saccharata) grown on sandy soil with low humus content. The ploughed layer contained <1% CaCO3 and around 1% humus. The soil was very well supplied with P, well supplied with K, Mg, Mn and Cu, and weakly supplied with N and Ca. The treatments were planned in accordance with the recommendations, with a planned unhusked ear yield of 16 tons per hectare, of the new environmental friendly advisory system recently elaborated for field vegetable crops in Hungary. The treatments applied included: G1 (blank control)(N0P0K0), G2(N222.5P22.2K143), G3(N445 P22.5 K143), G4(N222.5 P22.5K143), G5(N222.5P22.5 K286), G6(N222.5 P22.5 K143) + Mg(1.52). According to our findings, of the composition parameters of the grains of the treatments with no fertilizer application, the invert and reducing sugar contents (4.42%, respectively 2.59% relative to fresh weight(-1)) in grains were the highest among the treatments. The same conclusion was drawn on the K 120.2, Mg 13.3, Fe 0.24, Cu 0.66 mg 100 g(-1) grain dry weight levels among minerals. In the case of the basic treatment (G2) recommended by the advisory system we obtained favourable results for the measured parameters, including yields. Invert and reducing sugar contents were (3.26% respectively 1.97% relative to fresh weight(-1)), and mineral contents K 101.9; Mg 11.8; Fe 0.21; Cu 0.56 mg 100 g(-1) dry weight. In the grains, no translocation of toxic elements was observed in response to the direct or indirect effect of the treatments. PMID:20329385

  17. Lipid Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residue as a Fertilizer Substitute for Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Trivedi, Khanjan; Pancha, Imran; Kubavat, Denish; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Arup

    2015-01-01

    High volumes of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) are expected to be produced upon commencement of biodiesel production on a large scale, thus necessitating its value addition for sustainable development. LMBRs of Chlorella variabilis and Lyngbya majuscula were employed to substitute the nitrogen content of recommended rate of fertilizer (RRF) for Zea mays L. The pot experiment comprised of 10 treatments, i.e., T1 (No fertilizer); T2 (RRF-120 N: 60 P2O5: 40 K2O kg ha(-1)); T3 to T6-100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of the Chlorella sp., respectively; T7 to T10-100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of Lyngbya sp., respectively. It was found that all LMBR substitution treatments were at par to RRF with respect to grain yield production. T10 gave the highest grain yield (65.16 g plant(-1)), which was closely followed by that (63.48 g plant(-1)) under T5. T10 also recorded the highest phosphorus and potassium contents in grains. T4 was markedly superior over control in terms of dry matter accumulation (DMA) as well as carbohydrate content, which was ascribed to higher pigment content and photosynthetic activity in leaves. Even though considerably lower DMA was obtained in Lyngbya treatments, which might have been due to the presence of some toxic factors, no reduction in grain yield was apparent. The length of the tassel was significantly higher in either of the LMBRs at any substitution rates over RRF, except T6 and T7. The ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased with decreasing dose of Chlorella LMBR, while all the Lyngbya LMBR treatments recorded lower activity, which were at par with each other. Among the Chlorella treatments, only T5 recorded significantly higher values of glutathione reductase activity over RRF, while the rest were at par. There were significant increases in carbohydrate and crude fat, respectively, only in T4 and T3 over RRF, while no change was observed in crude protein due to LMBR treatments. Apparently, there was no

  18. Purification and Partial Characterization of Maize (Zea mays L.) β-Glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Asim

    1992-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) β-glucosidase (β-d-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.21) was extracted from the coleoptiles of 5- to 6-day-old maize seedlings with 50 millimolar sodium acetate, pH 5.0. The pH of the extract was adjusted to 4.6, and most of the contaminating proteins were cryoprecipitated at 0°C for 24 hours. The pH 4.6 supernatant from cryoprecipitation was further fractionated by chromatography on an Accell CM column using a 4.8 to 6.8 pH gradient of 50 millimolar sodium acetate, which yielded the enzyme in two homogeneous, chromatographically different fractions. Purified enzyme was characterized with respect to subunit molecular weight, isoelectric point, amino acid composition, NH2-terminal amino acid sequence, pH and temperature optima, thermostability, and activity and stability in the presence of selected reducing agents, metal ions, and alkylating agents. The purified enzyme has an estimated subunit molecular mass of 60 kilodaltons, isoelectric point at pH 5.2, and pH and temperature optima at 5.8 and 50°C, respectively. The amino acid composition data indicate that the enzyme is rich in Glx and Asx, the sum of which approaches 25%. The sequence of the first 20 amino acids in the N-terminal region was H2N-Ser-Ala-Arg-Val-Gly-Ser-Gln-Asn-Gly-Val-Gln-Met-Leu-Ser-Pro-(Ser?) -Glu-Ile-Pro-Gln, and it shows no significant similarity to other proteins with known sequence. The enzyme is extremely stable at 0 to 4°C up to 1 year but loses activity completely at and above 55°C in 10 minutes. Likewise, the enzyme is stable in the presence of or after treatment with 500 millimolar 2-mercaptoethanol, and it is totally inactivated at 2000 millimolar 2-mercaptoethanol. Such metal ions as Hg2+ and Ag+ reversibly inhibit the enzyme at micromolar concentrations, and inhibition could be completely overcome by adding 2-mercaptoethanol at molar excess of the inhibitory metal ion. The alkylating agents iodoacetic acid and iodoacetamide irreversibly inactivate the

  19. Emergence and patterning of the five cell types of the Zea mays anther locule

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Timothy; Walbot, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    One fundamental difference between plants and animals is the existence of a germ-line in animals and its absence in plants. In flowering plants the sexual organs (stamens and carpels) are composed almost entirely of somatic cells, a small subset of which switch to meiosis, however, the mechanism of meiotic cell fate acquisition is a long-standing botanical mystery. In the maize (Zea mays) anther microsporangium the somatic tissues consist of four concentric cell layers which surround and support reproductive cells as they progress through meiosis and pollen maturation. Male sterility, defined as the absence of viable pollen, is a common phenotype in flowering plants, and many male sterile mutants have defects in somatic and reproductive cell fate acquisition. However, without a robust model of anther cell fate acquisition based on careful observation of wild type anther ontogeny, interpretation of cell fate mutants is limited. To address this, the pattern of cell proliferation, expansion, and differentiation was tracked in three dimensions over thirty days of wild type (W23) anther development, using anthers stained with propidium iodide (PI) and/or 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) (S-phase label) and imaged by confocal microscopy. The pervading lineage model of anther development claims that new cell layers are generated by coordinated, oriented cell divisions in transient precursor cell types. In reconstructing anther cell division patterns, however, we can only confirm this for the origin of the middle layer (ml) and tapetum, while young anther development appears more complex. We find that each anther cell type undergoes a burst of cell division after specification with a characteristic pattern of both cell expansion and division. Comparisons between two inbreds lines and between ab- and adaxial anther florets indicated near identity: anther development is highly canalized and synchronized. Three classical models of plant organ development are tested and ruled

  20. Potentially toxic elements in foodcrops: Triticum aestivum L., Zea mays L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Fontana, Silvia; Squizzato, Stefania; Minello, Fabiola; Fornasier, Flavio; Wahsha, Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Soil is the basis of the ecosystems and of our system of food production. Crops can uptake heavy metals and potentially toxic elements from the soil and store them in the roots or translocate them to the aerial parts. Excessive content of these elements in edible parts can produce toxic effects and, through the food chain and food consumption, result in a potential hazard for human health. In this study soils and plants (spring wheat, Triticum aestivum L. and maize, Zea mays L.) from a tannery district in North-East Italy were analyzed to determine pedological characters, soil microbial indicators and the content of some major and micro-nutrients and potentially toxic elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, S, Zn, V). The soils of the area are moderately polluted; Cr is the most important inorganic contaminant, followed by Ni, Cu and V. Factor analysis evidenced that the contaminants are in part anthropogenic and in part geogenic. Major anthropogenic origin was detected for Cr, Ni (from industrial activities), Zn, Cu, Cd (from agriculture practices). Biological Absorption Coefficient (BAC) from soil to plant roots and Translocation factor (TF) within the plant were calculated; major nutrients (K, P, S) and some micronutrients (Cu, Zn, Mg, Mn) are easily absorbed and translocated, whilst other nutrients (Ca, Fe) and potentially toxic elements or micronutrients (Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, V) are not accumulated in the seeds of the two considered species. However, the two edible species proved differently able to absorb and translocate elements, and this suggests to consider separately every species as potential PHEs transporter to the food chain and to humans. Cr concentrations in seeds and other aerial parts (stem and leaves) of the examined plants are higher than the values found for the same species and for other cereals grown on unpolluted soils. Comparing the Cr levels in edible parts with recommended dietary intake, besides other possible Cr sources

  1. The characterization of ligand-specific maize (Zea mays) profilin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, D R; Drøbak, B K; Collings, D A; Staiger, C J

    2001-01-01

    Profilins are low-molecular-mass (12-15 kDa) cytosolic proteins that are major regulators of actin assembly in all eukaryotic cells. In general, profilins from evolutionarily diverse organisms share the ability to bind to G-actin, poly-(L-proline) (PLP) and proline-rich proteins, and polyphosphoinositides. However, the functional importance of each of these interactions remains unclear and might differ between organisms. We investigated the importance of profilin's interaction with its various ligands in plant cells by characterizing four maize (Zea mays) profilin 5 (ZmPRO5) mutants that had single amino acid substitutions in the presumed sites of ligand interaction. Comparisons in vitro with wild-type ZmPRO5 showed that these mutations altered ligand association specifically. ZmPRO5-Y6F had a 3-fold increased affinity for PLP, ZmPRO5-Y6Q had a 5-fold decreased affinity for PLP, ZmPRO5-D8A had a 2-fold increased affinity for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and ZmPRO5-K86A had a 35-fold decreased affinity for G-actin. When the profilins were microinjected into Tradescantia stamen hair cells, ZmPRO5-Y6F increased the rate of nuclear displacement in stamen hairs, whereas ZmPRO5-K86A decreased the rate. Mutants with a decreased affinity for PLP (ZmPRO5-Y6Q) or an enhanced affinity for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) (ZmPRO5-D8A) were not significantly different from wild-type ZmPRO5 in affecting nuclear position. These results indicate that plant profilin's association with G-actin is extremely important and further substantiate the simple model that profilin acts primarily as a G-actin-sequestering protein in plant cells. Furthermore, interaction with proline-rich binding partners might also contribute to regulating profilin's effect on actin assembly in plant cells. PMID:11485551

  2. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry of Seabird Guano Fertilization: Results from Growth Chamber Studies with Maize (Zea Mays)

    PubMed Central

    Szpak, Paul; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Millaire, Jean-François; White, Christine D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stable isotope analysis is being utilized with increasing regularity to examine a wide range of issues (diet, habitat use, migration) in ecology, geology, archaeology, and related disciplines. A crucial component to these studies is a thorough understanding of the range and causes of baseline isotopic variation, which is relatively poorly understood for nitrogen (δ15N). Animal excrement is known to impact plant δ15N values, but the effects of seabird guano have not been systematically studied from an agricultural or horticultural standpoint. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper presents isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and vital data for maize (Zea mays) fertilized with Peruvian seabird guano under controlled conditions. The level of 15N enrichment in fertilized plants is very large, with δ15N values ranging between 25.5 and 44.7‰ depending on the tissue and amount of fertilizer applied; comparatively, control plant δ15N values ranged between −0.3 and 5.7‰. Intraplant and temporal variability in δ15N values were large, particularly for the guano-fertilized plants, which can be attributed to changes in the availability of guano-derived N over time, and the reliance of stored vs. absorbed N. Plant δ13C values were not significantly impacted by guano fertilization. High concentrations of seabird guano inhibited maize germination and maize growth. Moreover, high levels of seabird guano greatly impacted the N metabolism of the plants, resulting in significantly higher tissue N content, particularly in the stalk. Conclusions/Significance The results presented in this study demonstrate the very large impact of seabird guano on maize δ15N values. The use of seabird guano as a fertilizer can thus be traced using stable isotope analysis in food chemistry applications (certification of organic inputs). Furthermore, the fertilization of maize with seabird guano creates an isotopic signature very similar to a high-trophic level marine resource, which must

  3. Bacterial Communities in the Rhizosphere of Amilaceous Maize (Zea mays L.) as Assessed by Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Correa-Galeote, David; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Fernández-González, Antonio J; Fernández-López, Manuel; Arone, Gregorio J

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the staple diet of the native peasants in the Quechua region of the Peruvian Andes who continue growing it in small plots called chacras following ancestral traditions. The abundance and structure of bacterial communities associated with the roots of amilaceous maize has not been studied in Andean chacras. Accordingly, the main objective of this study was to describe the rhizospheric bacterial diversity of amilaceous maize grown either in the presence or the absence of bur clover cultivated in soils from the Quechua maize belt. Three 16S rRNA gene libraries, one corresponding to sequences of bacteria from bulk soil of a chacra maintained under fallow conditions, the second from the rhizosphere of maize-cultivated soils, and the third prepared from rhizospheric soil of maize cultivated in intercropping with bur clover were examined using pyrosequencing tags spanning the V4 and V5 hypervariable regions of the gene. A total of 26031 sequences were found that grouped into 5955 distinct operational taxonomic units which distributed in 309 genera. The numbers of OTUs in the libraries from the maize-cultivated soils were significantly higher than those found in the libraries from bulk soil. One hundred ninety seven genera were found in the bulk soil library and 234 and 203 were in those from the maize and maize/bur clover-cultivated soils. Sixteen out of the 309 genera had a relative abundance higher than 0.5% and the were (in decreasing order of abundance) Gp4, Gp6, Flavobacterium, Subdivision3 genera incertae sedis of the Verrucomicrobia phylum, Gemmatimonas, Dechloromonas, Ohtaekwangia, Rhodoferax, Gaiella, Opitutus, Gp7, Spartobacteria genera incertae sedis, Terrimonas, Gp5, Steroidobacter and Parcubacteria genera incertae sedis. Genera Gp4 and Gp6 of the Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Rhodoferax were the most abundant in bulk soil, whereas Flavobacterium, Dechloromonas and Ohtaekwangia were the main genera in the rhizosphere of maize

  4. Nucleotide Metabolism in Salt-Stressed Zea mays L. Root Tips

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd A.; Nieman, Richard H.; Clark, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Corn plants (Zea mays L. cv Pioneer 3906) were grown in a glass house on control and saline nutrient solutions, in winter and summer. There were two saline treatments, both with osmotic potential = −0.4 megapascal but with different Ca2+/Na+ ratios: 0.03 and 0.73. Root tips and shoot meristems (culm tissue) of 26 day-old plants were analyzed for nucleotides to ascertain if there were correlations between nucleotide pool size and the reduced growth on saline cultures. Several other cell components also were determined. Plants grown in winter were only half as large as those grown in summer mainly because of the lower light intensity and lower temperature. But the relative yield reduction on salt treatment compared to the control was similar in winter and summer. The two different salt treatments caused similar yield reductions. Neither salt treatment affected nucleotide pools in culm tissue, with the possible exception of UDPG in winter. In the case of root tips, salt treatment had little or no effect on nucleotide pool sizes in winter when many already seemed near a critical minimum, but in summer it reduced several pools including ATP, total adenine nucleotide, UTP, total uridine nucleotide, and UDP-glucose. The reductions were greatest on the salt treatment with low Ca2+/Na+. There was no simple correlation between the effects of salt stress on growth and on nucleotide pool size. The nucleotide pools of culm tissue indicated that in some respects this tissue was effectively insulated from the salt stress. Roots that were in direct contact with the saline solution indicated significant reductions in nucleotide pools only in the summer whereas growth was reduced both summer and winter. It is possible that the nucleotide concentrations of root cells in winter were already near a critical minimum so that nucleotide synthesis and growth were tightly linked. Significant reductions in nucleotide pools that would be expected to affect growth were more evident in summer

  5. Bacterial Communities in the Rhizosphere of Amilaceous Maize (Zea mays L.) as Assessed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Galeote, David; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Fernández-González, Antonio J.; Fernández-López, Manuel; Arone, Gregorio J.

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the staple diet of the native peasants in the Quechua region of the Peruvian Andes who continue growing it in small plots called chacras following ancestral traditions. The abundance and structure of bacterial communities associated with the roots of amilaceous maize has not been studied in Andean chacras. Accordingly, the main objective of this study was to describe the rhizospheric bacterial diversity of amilaceous maize grown either in the presence or the absence of bur clover cultivated in soils from the Quechua maize belt. Three 16S rRNA gene libraries, one corresponding to sequences of bacteria from bulk soil of a chacra maintained under fallow conditions, the second from the rhizosphere of maize-cultivated soils, and the third prepared from rhizospheric soil of maize cultivated in intercropping with bur clover were examined using pyrosequencing tags spanning the V4 and V5 hypervariable regions of the gene. A total of 26031 sequences were found that grouped into 5955 distinct operational taxonomic units which distributed in 309 genera. The numbers of OTUs in the libraries from the maize-cultivated soils were significantly higher than those found in the libraries from bulk soil. One hundred ninety seven genera were found in the bulk soil library and 234 and 203 were in those from the maize and maize/bur clover-cultivated soils. Sixteen out of the 309 genera had a relative abundance higher than 0.5% and the were (in decreasing order of abundance) Gp4, Gp6, Flavobacterium, Subdivision3 genera incertae sedis of the Verrucomicrobia phylum, Gemmatimonas, Dechloromonas, Ohtaekwangia, Rhodoferax, Gaiella, Opitutus, Gp7, Spartobacteria genera incertae sedis, Terrimonas, Gp5, Steroidobacter and Parcubacteria genera incertae sedis. Genera Gp4 and Gp6 of the Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonas and Rhodoferax were the most abundant in bulk soil, whereas Flavobacterium, Dechloromonas and Ohtaekwangia were the main genera in the rhizosphere of maize

  6. Lipid Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residue as a Fertilizer Substitute for Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Trivedi, Khanjan; Pancha, Imran; Kubavat, Denish; Mishra, Sandhya; Ghosh, Arup

    2016-01-01

    High volumes of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) are expected to be produced upon commencement of biodiesel production on a large scale, thus necessitating its value addition for sustainable development. LMBRs of Chlorella variabilis and Lyngbya majuscula were employed to substitute the nitrogen content of recommended rate of fertilizer (RRF) for Zea mays L. The pot experiment comprised of 10 treatments, i.e., T1 (No fertilizer); T2 (RRF-120 N: 60 P2O5: 40 K2O kg ha−1); T3 to T6—100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of the Chlorella sp., respectively; T7 to T10—100, 75, 50, and 25% N through LMBR of Lyngbya sp., respectively. It was found that all LMBR substitution treatments were at par to RRF with respect to grain yield production. T10 gave the highest grain yield (65.16 g plant−1), which was closely followed by that (63.48 g plant−1) under T5. T10 also recorded the highest phosphorus and potassium contents in grains. T4 was markedly superior over control in terms of dry matter accumulation (DMA) as well as carbohydrate content, which was ascribed to higher pigment content and photosynthetic activity in leaves. Even though considerably lower DMA was obtained in Lyngbya treatments, which might have been due to the presence of some toxic factors, no reduction in grain yield was apparent. The length of the tassel was significantly higher in either of the LMBRs at any substitution rates over RRF, except T6 and T7. The ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased with decreasing dose of Chlorella LMBR, while all the Lyngbya LMBR treatments recorded lower activity, which were at par with each other. Among the Chlorella treatments, only T5 recorded significantly higher values of glutathione reductase activity over RRF, while the rest were at par. There were significant increases in carbohydrate and crude fat, respectively, only in T4 and T3 over RRF, while no change was observed in crude protein due to LMBR treatments. Apparently, there was no

  7. A Histidine-Rich Extensin from Zea mays Is an Arabinogalactan Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Kieliszewski, Marcia J.; Kamyab, Abdolreza; Leykam, Joseph F.; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Earlier we isolated a threonine-rich extensin from maize (Zea mays). Here, we report that maize cell suspension cultures yield a new extensin rich in histidine (HHRGP) that also has characteristics of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). Thus, chymotryptic peptide maps of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF)-deglycosylated HHRGP showed repetitive motifs related to both extensins and AGPs as follows. HHRGP contains Ala-Hyp3 and Ala-Hyp4 repeats that may be related to the classical dicot Ser-Hyp4 extensin motif by the single T → G (Ser → Ala) base change. Furthermore, HHRGP also contains the repetitive motif Ala-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-His-Phe-Pro-Ser-Hyp-Hyp related to the Ser-Hyp4-Ser-Hyp-Ser-Hyp4 motif of P3-type dicot extensin. However, HHRGP also has AGP characteristics, notably an elevated alanine content, near sequence identity with the known Lolium AGP peptide Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Ala-Pro-Ala-Pro, the putative presence of glucuronoarabinogalactan, and precipitation by Yariv antigen, but β-elimination of arabinogalactan indicates its O-linkage to serine rather than the characteristic O-hydroxyproline link of other AGPs. Although HHRGP might be a “chimera” of two different proteins, i.e. an extensin and an AGP, this is unlikely because one can account for the apparent chimera by the codon relationships of the five common hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein amino acid residues, Ser, Pro, Thr, Ala (TCx, CCx, ACx, GCx) and histidine (CAT or CAC), which facilitate interconversion of major motifs by single point mutations. Thus, we propose that the extensin family of wall proteins consists of a highly diversified phylogenetic series ranging from basic minimally glycosylated repetitive pro-rich proteins to the highly glycosylated acidic AGPs. To relate this diversity of form and function at the molecular level, we identified putative functional domains hypothetically involved in properties such as reptation, recognition, adhesion, intermolecular cross-linkage, and self-assembly. Not

  8. Temporal and spatial distribution of Helicoverpa zea and Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: noctuidae) moths in pheromone traps across agricultural landscapes in Arkansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone trap captures of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and Heliothis virescens (F.) from 2002-2005 were used to examine the distribution of these species across a multiple crop environment in southeast Arkansas. The greatest number of H. virescens moths was collected during 2003, but densities were lo...

  9. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Host Use by Helicoverpa zea as Measured by Analyses of Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios and Gossypol Residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns with resistance evolution in tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.) and bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to transgenic insecticidal crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis proteins led to the adoption of the high dose/refuge strategy for managing cotton insect resistance in the Unit...

  10. Responses of Maize (Zea mays L.) near isogenic lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to three viruses in the Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three independent genes controlling resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; family Potyviridae; genus Tritimovirus) were previously identified on chromosomes six (Wsm1), three (Wsm2) and ten (Wsm3) in the resistant maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line Pa405. Near isogenic lines (NIL) carrying eac...