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1

Denali Fault: Black Rapids Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

View eastward along Black Rapids Glacier. The Denali fault follows the trace of the glacier. These very large rockslides went a mile across the glacier on the right side. Investigations of the headwall of the middle landslide indicate a volume at least as large as that which fell, has dropped a mete...

2

Cathedral Spires in Fog  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

In this image, Cathedral Spires can be seen shrouded in fog from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. From left to right, the peaks are known as Lower Cathedral Rock, Middle Cathedral Rock, and Higher Cathedral Rock. They are composed of granite and are part of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Like th...

3

The Cathedral as Text.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Characterizes the medieval cathedral as an architectural encyclopedia, expressing the humanistic concerns, beliefs, and aspirations of the period in which it was built. Explains the theological, political, and social significance of the cathedral's architectural characteristics from the floor plan to the spires. Discusses the process and problems…

Calkins, Robert G.

1995-01-01

4

St. Paul's Cathedral  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perhaps one of the finest neo-Classical cathedrals in the world, the current St. Paul's cathedral is an example of the outstanding architecture of Christopher Wren, and a testimony to his dogged persistence and passion for his life's work. In keeping with the attention to detail that is indicative of Mr. Wren's work, the St. Paul's Web site has detailed information on visiting the cathedral, the various musical performances that it hosts, and an interactive timeline detailing the history of St. Paul's that extends back to the year 604. Along with this information, the site also tells visitors about upcoming events at the cathedral, along with an extensive online gift shop that offers a diverse set of St. Paul's related material for purchase.

5

Cathedrals in the Desert  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Museum of Photography at the University of California-Riverside, (last mentioned in the May 30, 2000 Scout Report for Social Sciences) is a site worth visiting again and again; there is always something new to look at in a variety of areas: photography history, California lifestyle and culture, fine art photography, and photo journalism. Jean Ruiter's exhibition, Cathedrals in the Desert, is a show based on "borrowing classic images to offer ironic commentary on the present."

Ruiter, Jean.

6

Earthquake Resistant Cathedral in Chile  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A cathedral in the central square of Chillán, Chile replaces the ancient cathedral that collapsed during the strong earthquake of 1939. This modern structure was constructed with earthquake resistance as the primary consideration. The only damage caused by the M 8.8 earthquake on Feb. 27, 2010 was b...

7

An earthquake mechanism based on rapid sealing of faults  

USGS Publications Warehouse

RECENT seismological, heat flow and stress measurements in active fault zones such as the San Andreas have led to the suggestion1,2 that such zones can be relatively weak. One explanation for this may be the presence of overpressured fluids along the fault3-5, which would reduce the shear stress required for sliding by partially 'floating' the rock. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for overpressurizing fault fluids3,4,6,7, we recall that 'pressure seals' are known to form in both sedimentary8 and igneous9 rocks by the redistribution of materials in solution; the formation of such a seal along the boundaries of a fault will prevent the communication of fluids between the porous, deforming fault zone and the surrounding country rock. Compaction of fault gouge, under hydrostatic loading and/or during shear, elevates pore pressure in the sealed fault and allows sliding at low shear stress. We report the results of laboratory sliding experiments on granite, which demonstrate that the sliding resistance of faults can be significantly decreased by sealing and compaction. The weakening that results from shear-induced compaction can be rapid, and may provide an instability mechanism for earthquakes.

Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

1992-01-01

8

Half Dome from Cathedral Spires  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

In this image, Half Dome may be seen from the base of Cathedral Spires. Half Dome is a granite dome, rising about 4,737 ft (1,444 m) above the surrounding valley. It is part of the Sierra Nevada batholith and is one of Yosemite National Park's most famous features....

9

Microseismicity and creeping faults: Hints from modeling the Hayward fault, California (USA) [rapid communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creeping segments of strike-slip faults are often characterized by high rates of microseismicity on or near the fault. This microseismicity releases only a small fraction of the slip occurring on the fault and the majority of the accumulating elastic strain is released either through aseismic creep or in rare large events. Distinguishing between creeping or non-creeping patches on faults and

R. Malservisi; K. P. Furlong; C. R. Gans

2005-01-01

10

Potentially active faults in the rapidly eroding landscape adjacent to the Alpine Fault, central Southern Alps, New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Potentially active faults are exposed in the steep glaciated topography of the central Southern Alps, New Zealand, immediately adjacent to the Alpine Fault plate boundary. Four major faults exposed along the flanks of three of the highest mountain ranges strike 10-23 km (potentially 40 km) NNE oblique to the Alpine Fault, dipping 57° ± 12° NW in the opposite direction. Youngest discernable motions were reverse dip-slip, accommodating both margin-perpendicular shortening and dextral margin-parallel components of plate motion. Kinematic analysis yields a compression axis (295/10° ± 9° trend or plunge) equivalent to the contemporary shortening determined from seismological and geodetic studies, suggesting the faults may be active, although definitive evidence for recent movement or single event displacements is lacking. There are 106 other potentially active faults mapped in central Southern Alps with strike lengths 4-73 km. Earthquake parameters were assigned from fault trace lengths and historical earthquake statistics, indicating potential for MW 5.5-7.4 earthquakes at recurrence intervals of 1000-10,000 years. Such long recurrence intervals are consistent with the faults having little surface expression, with rapid erosion of these seismically agitated mountains erasing any evidence of surface rupture during periods between earthquakes. The central Southern Alps faults exemplify the difficulty in fully deciphering long-term (e.g., Holocene or Quaternary) records of seismicity in tectonically active regions with rapidly evolving landscapes. Although there may be little evidence of surface ruptures remaining in the landscape, the faults are still an important potential source of earthquakes and seismic hazard.

Cox, Simon C.; Stirling, Mark W.; Herman, Frederic; Gerstenberger, Matthew; Ristau, John

2012-04-01

11

Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north elevations, perspective view from the northeast - Grace Cathedral, George William Gibbs Memorial Hall, 1051 Taylor Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

12

Noto Cathedral: soil and foundation investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

On 13th March 1996 the dome of the St. Nicolò Cathedral of Noto fell due to a post-seismic structural collapse. In order to study the soil–structure interaction a comprehensive laboratory and in situ investigation has been carried out to obtain a soil profile. In this paper the dynamic characterisation results and normalised laws are proposed to consider shear modulus decay

A. Cavallaro; M. R. Massimino; M. Maugeri

2003-01-01

13

Cathedral-II: A Silicon Compiler for Digital Signal Processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article describes the status of work at IMEC on the Cathedral-II silicon compiler. The compiler was developed to synthesize synchronous multiprocessor system chips for digital signal processing. It is a continuation of work on the Cathedral-I operational silicon compiler for bit-serial digital filters. Cathedral-II is based on a ¿meet in the middle¿ design method that encourages a total separation

H. De Man; J. Rabaey; L. Claesen

1986-01-01

14

Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of damage was a surprise. The satellite or airborne imagery was not available in the first days after these earthquakes, and hand-crafted analysis added more time after data delivery, so source assessment products were not useful for the initial rescue operations, but they were useful for guiding field mapping and early recovery planning. Future rapid assessment of earthquakes could be speeded by automated analysis and more prompt data accessibility to provide products in time to benefit rescue operations.

Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

2010-12-01

15

Real-time inversion of GPS data for finite fault modeling and rapid hazard assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Responses to recent great earthquakes and ensuing tsunamis in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, with the resulting loss of life and damage to infrastructure demonstrate that our ability to ascertain the full extent of slip of catastrophic earthquakes and their tsunamigenic potential in the first minutes after the initiation of rupture is problematic. Regional GPS networks such as those in western North America and Japan are complementary to seismic networks by being able to directly measure displacements close to the source during large earthquakes in real time. We report on rapid modeling of two large earthquakes, the 2003 Mw 8.3 Tokachi-oki earthquake 100 km offshore Hokkaido Island using 356 GEONET stations and the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in northern Baja California using 95 CRTN stations in southern California about 75 km northwest of the epicenter. Working in a simulated real-time mode, we invert for finite fault slip in a homogeneous elastic half-space using Green's functions obtained from Okada's formulation. We compare two approaches: the first starts with a catalog of pre-defined faults, while the second uses a rapid centroid moment tensor solution to provide an initial estimate of the ruptured fault plane. In either case, we are able to characterize both earthquakes in less than two minutes, reducing the time necessary to obtain finite fault slip and moment magnitude for medium and greater earthquakes compared to traditional methods by an order of magnitude.

Crowell, Brendan W.; Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

2012-05-01

16

Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls  

E-print Network

Building Cathedrals and Breaking down Reinforced Concrete Walls Michel Brou´e Institut Henri distinction between great mathematicians Concrete walls breakers Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Concrete walls breakers Cathedrals builders Michel Brou´e (Institut Henri Poincar´e) John Thompson

Broué, Michel - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

17

STS-107 Memorial Service at the National Cathedral  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

View of the Recessional at a special memorial ceremony honoring the Space Shuttle Columbia crew at the Washington National Cathedral. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

2003-01-01

18

DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ALONG MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WAY FROM 14TH STREET - St. Francis de Sales Church, 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

19

Late Completion of Cologne and St-Vitus Cathedral   

E-print Network

Abstract Completions of Cathedrals were, in some cases (e.g. Sagrada Familia in Barcelona) still are large scale and unique projects which were carried out across Europe at the end of the 19th and even during the course ...

Tomas, Brichta

2014-11-26

20

GPR survey to confirm the location of ancient structures under the Valencian Cathedral (Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey performed inside the Cathedral of Valencia, Spain. It is part of historical studies performed in the Cathedral in order to add information to old maps and documents in the Cathedral Archives and also to analyze the extent and importance of potentially destructive moisture areas that were appearing on the floor. The construction

Vega Pérez Gracia; José Antonio Canas; Lluis G Pujades; Jaume Clapés; Oriol Caselles; Francesc Garc??a; Raul Osorio

2000-01-01

21

A teleseismic study of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and implications for rapid strong-motion estimation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Slip histories for the 2002 M7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake are derived rapidly from global teleseismic waveform data. In phases, three models improve matching waveform data and recovery of rupture details. In the first model (Phase I), analogous to an automated solution, a simple fault plane is fixed based on the preliminary Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor mechanism and the epicenter provided by the Preliminary Determination of Epicenters. This model is then updated (Phase II) by implementing a more realistic fault geometry inferred from Digital Elevation Model topography and further (Phase III) by using the calibrated P-wave and SH-wave arrival times derived from modeling of the nearby 2002 M6.7 Nenana Mountain earthquake. These models are used to predict the peak ground velocity and the shaking intensity field in the fault vicinity. The procedure to estimate local strong motion could be automated and used for global real-time earthquake shaking and damage assessment. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Ji, C.; Helmberger, D.V.; Wald, D.J.

2004-01-01

22

Rapid Creeping on the Historic Earthquake Fault in the Chihshang Area: Active Tectonics at the Plate-Suture Between Eurasia and Philippine Sea in Eastern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chihshang fault is an active segment of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the plate suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates. A big earthquake of Mw 7.0 resulted from rupturing of the Chihshang fault in 1951. From that on, no big earthquake greater than M 6 occurred in this area. Instead, the Chihshang fault reveals a creeping behavior at least during the past 15 observation years. Data from geodetic trilateration network (1986-1988) indicate a horizontal shortening of 22 mm/yr concentrated on the Chihshang fault zone. Leveling of 1987-1988 across the Longitudinal Valley shows a abrupt uplift of 2 cm/yr on the eastern side of the Chihshang fault. GPS measurements of 1992-1999 show a steady horizontal shortening of 30 mm/yr across the Longitudinal Valley in the Chihshang area. Outcrop observation reveals that the surface breaks of the active Chihshang fault are characterized by one or multiple thrust-type ruptures within a narrow zone of 30-100 m wide. Annual outcrop measurements since 1990 show a nearly steady displacement of about 2-3 cm/yr, however, with a seasonal variation from the later biannual measurements since 1996. Combining the above geodetic and geologic data, we can obtain the geometry and kinematics of the Chihshang fault _ the Chihshang fault strikes N20E, dips 45-55 to the east, and moves as a reverse fault with 1/3 component of left-lateral strike slip. This reconstruction is in a good agreement with that deduced from the seismic study. Recently, five creepmeters were installed with data on a daily basis across the Chihshang fault in 1998. Three years data on creepmeters indicate that the surface ruptures of the Chihshang fault not only continuously moved in more or less steady rate of about 2 cm/yr but also show a clear seasonal variation. The fault moved in a high rate during the wet season and almost stopped to move during the dry season. Study on seismicity in the area shows also a more frequent seismcity during the wet season. It appears that the active Chihshang fault, the major plate suture boundary fault, can divide into (1) a creep zone in the upper 10-15 km, (2) a seismogenic zone (brittle-ductile transition zone) at about 15-25 km deep, and (3) ductile deformation zone below 25-30 km deep. We propose that the rapid creeping and high seismic activity during the wet season are due to decoupling on the Chihshang fault surface, when water goes into the fault zone acts as a lubricant.

Lee, J.; Chu, H.; Angelier, J.; Hu, J.; Rau, R.

2001-12-01

23

Rapid slip along the central Altyn Tagh Fault: Morphochronologic evidence from Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh  

Microsoft Academic Search

To better constrain the ongoing rates of deformation in northern Tibet, the ages of fluvial and glacial geomorphic markers left-laterally displaced by the Altyn Tagh Fault have been determined by radiocarbon and 10Be-26Al cosmic ray exposure dating. Two sites were investigated: Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh, both near Tura (?37.6°N, 86.6°E). The sites are geomorphologically distinct with Cherchen He dominated

A.-S. Mériaux; F. J. Ryerson; P. Tapponnier; J. Van der Woerd; R. C. Finkel; Xiwei Xu; Zhiqin Xu; M. W. Caffee

2004-01-01

24

Rapid slip along the central Altyn Tagh Fault: Morphochronologic evidence from Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh  

Microsoft Academic Search

To better constrain the ongoing rates of deformation in northern Tibet, the ages of fluvial and glacial geomorphic markers left-laterally displaced by the Altyn Tagh Fault have been determined by radiocarbon and 10Be-26Al cosmic ray exposure dating. Two sites were investigated: Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh, both near Tura (~37.6°N, 86.6°E). The sites are geomorphologically distinct with Cherchen He dominated

A.-S. Mériaux; F. J. Ryerson; P. Tapponnier; J. Van der Woerd; R. C. Finkel; Xiwei Xu; Zhiqin Xu; M. W. Caffee

2004-01-01

25

"Friends" of Anglican Cathedrals: Norms and Values. Befriending, Friending or Misnomer?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Loyal supporters of Anglican cathedrals first subscribed to "Friends" associations in the late 1920s. Yet, in 1937, a journalist in "The Times" portrayed cathedrals as a "queer thing to be a friend of." Drawing on theories of friendship from a range of disciplines, and surveys of what has been proclaimed in the public…

Muskett, Judith A.

2013-01-01

26

Rapid strain accumulation on the Ashkabad fault (Turkmenistan) from atmosphere-corrected InSAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have measured interseismic deformation across the Ashkabad strike-slip fault using 13 Envisat interferograms covering a total effective timespan of ˜30 years. Atmospheric contributions to phase delay are significant and variable due to the close proximity of the Caspian Sea. In order to retrieve the pattern of strain accumulation, we show it is necessary to use data from Envisat's Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument, as well as numerical weather model outputs from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), to correct interferograms for differences in water vapor and atmospheric pressure, respectively. This has enabled us to robustly estimate the slip rate and locking depth for the Ashkabad fault using a simple elastic dislocation model. Our data are consistent with a slip rate of 5-12 mm/yr below a locking depth of 5.5-17 km for the Ashkabad fault, and synthetic tests support the magnitude of the uncertainties on these estimates. Our estimate of slip rate is 1.25-6 times higher than some previous geodetic estimates, with implications for both seismic hazard and regional tectonics, in particular supporting fast relative motion between the South Caspian Block and Eurasia. This result reinforces the importance of correcting for atmospheric contributions to interferometric phase for small strain measurements. We also attempt to validate a recent method for atmospheric correction based on ECMWF ERA-Interim model outputs alone and find that this technique does not work satisfactorily for this region when compared to the independent MERIS estimates.

Walters, R. J.; Elliott, J. R.; Li, Z.; Parsons, B.

2013-07-01

27

Rapid slip along the central Altyn Tagh Fault: Morphochronologic evidence from Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To better constrain the ongoing rates of deformation in northern Tibet, the ages of fluvial and glacial geomorphic markers left-laterally displaced by the Altyn Tagh Fault have been determined by radiocarbon and 10Be-26Al cosmic ray exposure dating. Two sites were investigated: Cherchen He and Sulamu Tagh, both near Tura (˜37.6°N, 86.6°E). The sites are geomorphologically distinct with Cherchen He dominated by fluvial processes and the Sulamu Tagh by glacial action. Nine offsets ranging from 166 to 3660 m with ages between 6 and 113 ka yield an average slip rate of 26.9 ± 6.9 mm/yr. Landscape evolution appears to have been modulated by climate change and is temporally consistent with the ?18O record from the Guliya ice cap in the West Kunlun; the features of interest were all formed by glacial and fluvial processes subsequent to marine isotope stage 5e, with the youngest features having formed during the early Holocene Optimum. This "near-field," morphochronological slip rate is averaged over many earthquake cycles and is hence little affected by interseismic strain. It is kinematically consistent with other, somewhat lower, geomorphic slip rate measurements to the east. The average rate, and lower bounds obtained from alternate interpretational models, 18.4 mm/yr, cannot be reconciled with the most rece geodetic measurements (˜7 mm/yr), suggesting that interseismic strain and interactions with adjacent faults may lead to disparate geologic and geodetic rate estimates. This late Pleistocene-Holocene, morphochronologic rate would imply that, at this longitude, the Altyn Tagh Fault, on the north edge of Tibet, might absorb almost as much of India's convergence relative to Siberia as the Himalayan Main Frontal Thrust does on the southern edge of the plateau.

MéRiaux, A.-S.; Ryerson, F. J.; Tapponnier, P.; van der Woerd, J.; Finkel, R. C.; Xu, Xiwei; Xu, Zhiqin; Caffee, M. W.

2004-06-01

28

Rapid fault model estimation based on RTK-GPS and its application to near-field tsunami forecasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) generated a huge tsunami that inflicted enormous damage on the Pacific side of Tohoku region. Three minutes after the earthquake, the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a tsunami warning based on the seismic data. The estimated maximum tsunami heights (up to 6 m), however, were clearly smaller than the observed one (more than 10 m) because of underestimation of the earthquake magnitude. The magnitude can be derived within a short period following the earthquake, which can saturate for such great earthquakes. This example clearly shows necessity of accurate tsunami early warning system and importance of the rapid determination of reliable earthquake sizes. Blewitt et al. [GRL, 2006] already pointed out that a true earthquake size and its tsunamigenic potential could be determined using GPS data. The permanent displacement directly tells us the true earthquake size information. It is the great advantage of the GPS compared with the seismometer even though the signal-to-noise ratio is lower than it. Based on these backgrounds, we newly developed an algorithm to detect/estimate static ground displacement due to earthquake faulting from real time kinematic GPS (RTK-GPS) time series for quasi real-time determination of seismic fault model. We use the method using comparison between short-term and long-term average, which is generally used for automatic detection of seismic waves. Before its practical application, we assessed the noise property of the RTK-GPS time series with various conditions such as baseline lengths, GPS satellites ephemerides, etc., with analysis software "RTKLIB 2.4.0" [http://www.rtklib.com] to show that the ultra-rapid ephemerides distributed by the international GNSS Service result in enough precision for the crustal deformation monitoring with long baselines up to 1,000 km. We applied the algorithm to the GPS data obtained in the Tohoku Earthquake to assess its ability of event detection and performance of fault model estimation. The maximum baseline length is about 900 km. Detection and calculation of the coseismic displacements finished at all sites within about 4.5 min from origin time. Estimation of parameters of a rectangular fault with a uniform slip was also carried out every 20 sec to give the final earthquake magnitude reaching Mw 8.7, which is close to actual one (9.0). Once the fault model is estimated, tsunami waveforms can be synthesized within 1 min by using pre-computed tsunami Green's functions for initial displacement of elementary sea-surface sources [Tsushima et al., Ocean Science Meeting, 2010]. The calculated waveforms show good agreement with the observed tsunami both in arrival times and wave heights at coastal tide gauge stations in near field. In the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami height calculation based on seismic fault model was capable within 6 min from the origin time. These tsunami predictions can be provided 20 min before the actual tsunami attack in this case. The time in advance can save people in the coastal area by providing enough time for evacuation.

Kobayashi, T.; Ohta, Y.; Miura, S.; Tsushima, H.; Hino, R.; Takasu, T.; Fujimoto, H.

2011-12-01

29

Rapid, decimeter-resolution fault zone topography mapped with Structure from Motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent advances in the generation of high-resolution topography have revolutionized our ability to detect subtle geomorphic features related to ground-rupturing earthquakes. Currently, the most popular topographic mapping methods are airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Though powerful, these laser scanning methods have some inherent drawbacks: airborne LiDAR is expensive and can be logistically complicated, while TLS is time consuming even for small field sites and suffers from patchy coverage due to its restricted field-of-view. An alternative mapping technique, called Structure from Motion (SfM), builds upon traditional photogrammetry to reproduce the topography and texture of a scene from photographs taken at varying viewpoints. The improved availability of cheap, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as camera platforms further expedites data collection by covering large areas efficiently with optimal camera angles. Here, we introduce a simple and affordable UAV- or balloon-based SfM mapping system which can produce dense point clouds and sub-decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) registered to geospatial coordinates using either the photograph's GPS tags or a few ground control points across the scene. The system is ideally suited for studying ruptures of prehistoric, historic, and modern earthquakes in areas of sparse or low-lying vegetation. We use two sites from southern California faults to illustrate. The first is the ~0.1 km2 Washington Street site, located on the Banning strand of the San Andreas fault near Thousand Palms. A high-resolution DEM with ~700 point/m2 was produced from 230 photos collected on a balloon platform flying at 50 m above the ground. The second site is the Galway Lake Road site, which spans a ~1 km strip of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake on the Emerson Fault. The 100 point/m2 DEM was produced from 267 photos taken with a balloon platform at a height of 60 m above the ground. We compare our SfM results to existing airborne LiDAR or TLS datasets. Each SfM survey required less than 2 hours for setup and data collection, an allotment much lower than that required for TLS data collection, given the size of the sites. Processing time is somewhat slower, but depends on the quality of the DEM desired and is almost fully automated. The SfM point cloud densities we present are comparable to TLS but exceed the density of most airborne LiDAR and the orthophotos (texture maps) from the SfM are valuable complements to the DEMs. The SfM topography illuminates features along the faults that can be used to measure offsets from past ruptures, offering the potential to enhance regional seismic hazard analyses.

Johnson, K. L.; Nissen, E.; Saripalli, S.; Arrowsmith, R.; McGarey, P.; Scharer, K. M.; Williams, P. L.

2013-12-01

30

RAPID  

Cancer.gov

Rapid Access to Preventive Intervention Development (RAPID) Program About RAPID Description and Objectives of the Program Oversight RAPID Is Not... Frequently Asked Questions Application Information Format of Applications Address for Applications

31

Clastic dikes of Heart Mountain fault breccia, northwestern Wyoming, and their significance  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Structural features in northwestern Wyoming indicate that the Heart Mountain fault movement was an extremely rapid, cataclysmic event that created a large volume of carbonate fault breccia derived entirely from the lower part of the upper plate. After fault movement had ceased, much of the carbonate fault breccia, here called calcibreccia, lay loose on the resulting surface of tectonic denudation. Before this unconsolidated calcibreccia could be removed by erosion, it was buried beneath a cover of Tertiary volcanic rocks: the Wapiti Formation, composed of volcanic breccia, poorly sorted volcanic breccia mudflows, and lava flows, and clearly shown in many places by inter lensing and intermixing of the calcibreccia with basal volcanic rocks. As the weight of volcanic overburden increased, the unstable water-saturated calcibreccia became mobile and semifluid and was injected upward as dikes into the overlying volcanic rocks and to a lesser extent into rocks of the upper plate. In some places the lowermost part of the volcanic overburden appears to have flowed with the calcibreccia to form dike like bodies of mixed volcanic rock and calcibreccia. One calcibreccia dike even contains carbonized wood, presumably incorporated into unconsolidated calcibreccia on the surface of tectonic denudation and covered by volcanic rocks before moving upward with the dike. Angular xenoliths of Precambrian rocks, enclosed in another calcibreccia dike and in an adjoining dikelike mass of volcanic rock as well, are believed to have been torn from the walls of a vent and incorporated into the basal part of the Wapiti Formation overlying the clastic carbonate rock on the fault surface. Subsequently, some of these xenoliths were incorporated into the calcibreccia during the process of dike intrusion. Throughout the Heart Mountain fault area, the basal part of the upper-plate blocks or masses are brecciated, irrespective of the size of the blocks, more intensely at the base and in places extending upward for several tens of meters. North of Republic Mountain a small 25-m-high upper-plate mass, brecciated to some degree throughout, apparently moved some distance along the Heart Mountain fault as brecciated rock. Calcibreccia dikes intrude upward from the underlying 2 m of fault breccia into the lower part of the mass and also from its top into the overlying volcanic rocks; an earthquake-related mechanism most likely accounts for the observed features of this deformed body. Calcibreccia dikes are more common within the bedding-plane phase of the Heart Mountain fault but also occur in its transgressive and former land-surface phases. Evidence that the Wapiti Formation almost immediately buried loose, unconsolidated fault breccia that was the source of the dike rock strongly suggests a rapid volcanic deposition over the area in which clastic dikes occur, which is at least 75 km long. Clastic dikes were injected into both the upper-plate and the volcanic rocks at about the same time, after movement on the Heart Mouuntain fault had ceased, and therefore do not indicate a fluid-flotation mechanism for the Heart Mountain fault. The difference between contacts of the clastic dikes with both indurated and unconsolidated country rock is useful in field mapping at localities where it is difficult to distinguish between volcanic rocks of the Cathedral Cliffs and Lamar River Formations, and the Wapiti Formation. Thus, calcibreccia dikes in the Cathedral Cliffs and Lamar River Formations show a sharp contact because the country rock solidified prior to fault movement, whereas calcibreccia dikes in the Wapiti Formation in many instances show a transitional or semifluid contact because the country rock was still unconsolidated or semifluid at the time of dike injection.

Pierce, W.G.

1979-01-01

32

The role of dyking and fault control in the rapid onset of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile.  

PubMed

Rhyolite is the most viscous of liquid magmas, so it was surprising that on 2?May 2008 at Chaitén Volcano, located in Chile's southern Andean volcanic zone, rhyolitic magma migrated from more than 5?km depth in less than 4?hours (ref.?1) and erupted explosively with only two days of detected precursory seismic activity. The last major rhyolite eruption before that at Chaitén was the largest volcanic eruption in the twentieth century, at Novarupta volcano, Alaska, in 1912. Because of the historically rare and explosive nature of rhyolite eruptions and because of the surprisingly short warning before the eruption of the Chaitén volcano, any information about the workings of the magmatic system at Chaitén, and rhyolitic systems in general, is important from both the scientific and hazard perspectives. Here we present surface deformation data related to the Chaitén eruption based on radar interferometry observations from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) DAICHI (ALOS) satellite. The data on this explosive rhyolite eruption indicate that the rapid ascent of rhyolite occurred through dyking and that melt segregation and magma storage were controlled by existing faults. PMID:22012396

Wicks, Charles; de la Llera, Juan Carlos; Lara, Luis E; Lowenstern, Jacob

2011-10-20

33

In situ investigations of vault paintings in the Antwerp cathedral.  

PubMed

X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy have been used to examine 15th century mediaeval and 16th century renaissance vault paintings in the Our Lady's Cathedral (Antwerp, Belgium) in view of their restoration. The use of mobile instruments made it possible to work totally non-destructively. This complementary approach yields information on the elemental (XRF) and on the molecular composition (Raman) of the pigments. For the 15th century vault painting the pigments lead-tin yellow (Pb(2)SnO(4)), lead white (2PbCO(3)xPb(OH)(2)), vermilion (HgS), massicot (PbO) and azurite (2CuCO(3).Cu(OH)(2)) could be identified. The pigments used for the 16th century vault painting could be identified as red lead (Pb(3)O(4)), hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), lead white (2PbCO(3)xPb(OH)(2)) and azurite (2CuCO(3)xCu(OH)(2)). For both paintings the presence of the strong Raman scatterer calcite (CaCO(3)) resulted in a difficult identification of the pigments by Raman spectroscopy. The presence of gypsum (CaSO(4)x2H(2)O) on the mediaeval vault painting probably indicates that degradation took place. PMID:20036616

Deneckere, Annelien; Schudel, Walter; Van Bos, Marina; Wouters, Helena; Bergmans, Anna; Vandenabeele, Peter; Moens, Luc

2010-02-01

34

Remote structural monitoring of the Cathedral of Como using an optical fiber Bragg sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a prototype system being developed for on-line structural monitoring of the cathedral of Como, Italy. Monitoring is based on relative displacement and temperature measurements employing optical fibre Bragg grating transducers. System features include an edge-filter demodulation scheme with wavelength multiplexing, palmtop-based control with customised software, automated data acquisition and analysis and GSM-based data transmission via email. The system also offers the option to be solar powered, allowing it to be located in areas with limited access, such as on the cathedral roof. Initial results obtained over an eight-month demonstration period are also presented. The intention is to develop this prototype into a complete system for on-line structural monitoring of the Cathedral, offering real decision support to those responsible for its maintenance.

Whelan, Maurice P.; Albrecht, Daniel; Capsoni, Antonio

2002-07-01

35

Evidence for rapid displacement on Himalayan normal faults and the importance of tectonic denudation in the evolution of mountain ranges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

East-striking, low-angle normal faults of the South Tibetan detachment system have played an important role in exposing the high-grade metamorphic core of the Himalayan orogen. In the Mount Everest region of southern Tibet, granites both pre- and postdate an important fault of the system, the Qomolangma detachment. New U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data for these rocks constrain the age of brittle faulting to between 16.67 ± 0.04 and 16.37 ± 0.40 Ma, significantly expanding the known age range for extension in the central Himalaya (widely regarded as ca. 20 22 Ma). More importantly, they indicate an average displacement rate of ?47 mm/yr and a consequent tectonic unroofing rate of ?8.2 mm/yr. Such unroofing is faster than all but the highest estimates of combined physical and chemical erosion rates in mountainous regions, suggesting that large-displacement normal faulting can be an extremely efficient agent of mass redistribution in orogenic systems.

Hodges, Kip; Bowring, Samuel; Davidek, Kathleen; Hawkins, David; Krol, Michael

1998-06-01

36

The Grammar School at the Cathedral of the Canary Islands (1563-1851)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From 1563 until the death of the last teacher in 1851, there was a prebendary in the Cathedral of the Canary Islands in charge of the education of children. In fact, it could be said that this prebendary was the only continuous secondary school teacher there was in the Canary Islands until the beginning of the nineteenth century when the High…

Vera-Cazorla, Maria Jesus

2013-01-01

37

HOLOCENE CLIMATIC CHANGE AND LANDSCAPE RESPONSE AT CATHEDRAL PROVINCIAL PARK, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental sensitivity to temperature change was established by comparing pollen, plant macrofossils, macroscopic charcoal, and sediment yield data from Lake of the Woods, Cathedral Provincial Park in the Cascade Mountains of southern British Columbia, Canada, to an independent record of midge-inferred paleo- temperature. Steppe vegetation with some spruce and fir occurred initially, developing into pine forests in the warm early

Markus L. HEINRICHS; Martin G. EVANS; Richard J. HEBDA; Ian R. WALKER; Samantha L. PALMER

38

The Misfiring of German Cultural Leadership in the Twelfth Century: The Evidence from the Cathedral Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the causes and effects of the shift between 1050 and 1125 of people leaving Germany to receive advanced training for high ecclesiastical office, on the subsequent decline in German cathedral schools, and on the delayed entry of Germany into the community of nations that sported universities. (CMK)

Pixton, Paul B.

1998-01-01

39

The effect of air pollution on the stone decay of the Cologne Cathedral  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Different building stones of the Cologne Cathedral show a large variation of weathering phenomena. The Drachenfels trachyte, which was the construction material for the medieval part of the cathedral, shows significant surface deterioration, back-weathering coexisting with flaking, crumbling or the massive formation of gypsum crusts. Wolff (1992) first mentioned the negative interferences between the Schlaitdorfer sandstone and the Londorfer basalt lava or the Drachenfels trachyte and the Krensheimer muschelkalk. Crust formation on limestone, sandstone, and volcanic rock from the Cologne Cathedral as well as from the Xanten and Altenberg Cathedral are investigated. These three buildings are located in different areas and exposed to varying industrial, urban, and rural environmental situations. The material investigated range from dark grey to black framboidal crusts. This 3 to 10 mm thick cauliflower-like form of gypsum crust incorporates particles from the pollution fluxes. It covers the stone surface and mainly occurs at sites protected from wind and direct rain. Secondly, thin laminar black crusts trace the stone surface and may cover complete sections of the building's structure not necessarily preferring protected sites. This kind of crust seems to have very strong bonds between the thin black crust and the stone surface. Major and trace element distribution show an enrichment of sulfur, indicating the presence of gypsum, lead and other typical pollutants (arsenic, antimony, bismuth, tin etc.), which generally can be linked to traffic and industry. This indicates that even though the SO2 emission has decreased due to i.e. stronger regulations of waste incineration plants and the ban of leaded petrol, the pollutants are still present in the crusts on the building stones. From systematic SEM observations it becomes evident that the total amount of pollution is less pronounced in the Altenberg and Xanten Cathedrals as compared with the Cologne Cathedral. The formation of gypsum occurs at lower amounts in Altenberg, which correlates well with the measured SO2 content. On the other hand, the increasing H2O content in the trachyte and the crusts correlates well with an increasing phyllosilicate formation. Through the combination of different analytical techniques it was possible to clearly distinguish samples from the industrial or rural environment. If the data is compared to actual pollutant emissions, the analyzed samples imply present but also past pollution fluxes. Thus, the soiled zones of the built environment can function as environmental indicators.

Graue, B.; Siegesmund, S.; Licha, T.; Simon, K.; Oyhantcabal, P.; Middendorf, B.

2012-04-01

40

A Speculation on an Affinity between Ruskin's Seven Lamps of Architecture and Monet's Cathedrals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses John Ruskin’s architectural aesthetics and his view of the Gothic style as expressed in his Seven Lamps of Architecture. Discovers similarities between Ruskin’s ideas and the ideas and methods of Claude Monet, evident in his series of paintings of Rouen Cathedral, 1892-1895. Describes how Ruskin’s theories grew out of and advanced beyond the aesthetics of the Gothic revival movement,

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

1983-01-01

41

Exeter Cathedral Keystones and Carvings: A Catalogue Raisonne of the Sculptures & Their Polychromy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Exeter Cathedral Keystones and Carvings functions as "an illustrated introduction to, and explanatory catalogue of all the figurative sculpture that is part of the original interior fabric of the medieval building." The material on the site, which is primarily geared toward art historians and medievalists, was compiled by Avril Kay Henry, former professor of English Medieval Culture at University of Exeter, and the late Anna Carson Hulbert, a well known conservator. The site does not provide a tour through the cathedral so much as it offers photos and explanations of the individual sculptural pieces: "medieval bosses, corbels, labelstops, figurative capitals (and a few other interior carvings) which are an integral part of the medieval interior construction of Exeter Cathedral, Devon, England." Users can browse or search the contents, and a nice introduction and bibliography are both useful supplements. From the homepage, users can access a page that explains navigation and layout of the site, entitled The Resource: Coverage and Use. This one is well worth a stop for medievalists.

Henry, Avril.

42

J. Sulem, P. Lazar, I. Vardoulakis (2007): Thermo-Poro-Mechanical Properties of Clayey Gouge and Application to Rapid Fault Shearing, Int. J. Numer. Anal. Meth. Geomech., 2007; 31:523540.  

E-print Network

and Application to Rapid Fault Shearing, Int. J. Numer. Anal. Meth. Geomech., 2007; 31:523­540. 1 Thermo and temperature increase leading to pore fluid vaporization. Published in: Int. J. Numer. Anal. Meth. Geomech. Anal. Meth. Geomech., 2007; 31:523­540. 2 Introduction The interest of the interactions between

Boyer, Edmond

43

Fault Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations provides elementary examples of fault motion intended for simple demonstrations. Examples include dip-slip faults (normal and reverse), strike-slip faults, and oblique-slip faults.

44

Integration of constrained electrical and seismic tomographies to study the landslide affecting the cathedral of Agrigento  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cathedral of Saint Gerland, located on the top of the hill of Agrigento, is an important historical church, which dates back to the Arab-Norman period (XI century). Unfortunately throughout its history the Cathedral and the adjacent famous Archaeological Park of the ‘Valley of the Temples’ have been affected by landslides. In this area the interleaving of calcarenites, silt, sand and clay is complicated by the presence of dislocated rock blocks and cavities and by a system of fractures partly filled with clay or water. Integrated geophysical surveys were carried out on the north side of the hill, on which the Cathedral of Agrigento is founded, to define lithological structures involved in the failure process. Because of the landslide, the cathedral has been affected by fractures, which resulted in the overall instability of the structure. Along each of four footpaths a combination of 2D electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT) and 2D seismic refraction tomographies (SRT) was performed. Moreover, along two of these footpaths microtremor (HVSR) and surface wave soundings (MASW) were carried out to reconstruct 2D sections of shear waves velocity. Furthermore a 3D electrical resistivity tomography was carried out in a limited area characterized by gentle slopes. After a preliminary phase, in which the data were processed independently, a subsequent inversion of seismic and electrical data was constrained with stratigraphic information obtained from geognostic continuous core boreholes located along the geophysical lines. This process allowed us to significantly increase the robustness of the geophysical models. The acquired data were interpolated to construct 3D geophysical models of the electrical resistivity and of the P-wave velocity. The interpolation algorithm took into account the average direction and immersion of geological strata. Results led to a better understanding of the complexity of the subsoil in the investigated area. The use of integrated geophysical techniques allowed us to understand the sliding processes that affect the slope delimiting the possible rock volume affected by the sliding. These results should be useful to define the works to consolidate the landslides affecting the slope on which the Cathedral is founded and the hill inside the Archaeological Park.

Capizzi, P.; Martorana, R.

2014-08-01

45

Testing of a rapid fault detection model for quality control: Borophosphosilicate glass thin films monitored by infrared absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Infrared absorption spectra of 108 borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) thin films produced in a multiple-wafer low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) reactor were collected to enable the development and testing of a rapid and inexpensive method for determining if films are within the desired specifications. Classification of samples into good and bad product categories was made by applying principal component analysis to the spectra. Mahalanobis distances were used as the classification metric. The highest overall percentage of correct classification of samples based upon their spectra with two-step classification was 95{percent}. The misclassified samples were, however, within the error of the reference methods that were used in making the original classification against which the infrared (IR) classification methods were tested. The classification errors are thus just as likely to be a result of misclassification by the reference method rather than errors by the IR classification. Although reference measurements were used in this article for the original classification of the samples, these expensive and time-consuming reference methods can be eliminated simply by building classification models on samples determined to produce a product within the correct device specifications. The IR classification methods presented here hold great promise as a tool for rapid quality control of BPSG deposition. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

Zhang, S.; Franke, J.E.; Niemczyk, T.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Haaland, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0342 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0342 (United States); Cox, J.N.; Banerjee, I. [Intel Corporation, 3065 Bowers Avenue, Santa Clara, California 95052 (United States)] [Intel Corporation, 3065 Bowers Avenue, Santa Clara, California 95052 (United States)

1997-07-01

46

Polyphase exhumation in the western Qinling Mountains, China: Rapid Early Cretaceous cooling along a lithospheric-scale tear fault and pulsed Cenozoic uplift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The western sector of the Qinling-Dabie orogenic belt plays a key role in both Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous "Yanshanian" intracontinental tectonics and Cenozoic lateral escape triggered by India-Asia collision. The Taibai granite in the northern Qinling Mountains is located at the westernmost tip of a Yanshanian granite belt. It consists of multiple intrusions, constrained by new Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous U-Pb zircon ages (156 ± 3 Ma and 124 ± 1 Ma). Applying various geochronometers (40Ar/39Ar on hornblende, biotite and K-feldspar, apatite fission-track, apatite [U-Th-Sm]/He) along a vertical profile of the Taibai Mountain refines the cooling and exhumation history. The new age constraints record the prolonged pre-Cenozoic intracontinental deformation as well as the cooling history mostly related to India-Asia collision. We detected rapid cooling for the Taibai granite from ca. 800 to 100 °C during Early Cretaceous (ca. 123 to 100 Ma) followed by a period of slow cooling from ca. 100 Ma to ca. 25 Ma, and pulsed exhumation of the low-relief Cretaceous peneplain during Cenozoic times. We interpret the Early Cretaceous rapid cooling and exhumation as a result from activity along the southern sinistral lithospheric scale tear fault of the recently postulated intracontinental subduction of the Archean/Palaeoproterozoic North China Block beneath the Alashan Block. A Late Oligocene to Early Miocene cooling phase might be triggered either by the lateral motion during India-Asia collision and/or the Pacific subduction zone. Late Miocene intensified cooling is ascribed to uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

Heberer, Bianca; Anzenbacher, Thomas; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Dong, Yunpeng; Dunkl, István

2014-03-01

47

Faulted Barn  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This barn is faulted through the middle; the moletrack is seen in the foreground with the viewer standing on the fault. From the air one can see metal roof panels of the barn that rotated as the barn was faulted....

48

Fault Separation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use gestures to explore the relationship between fault slip direction and fault separation by varying the geometry of faulted layers, slip direction, and the perspective from which these are viewed.

Carol Ormand

49

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SOLID EARTH, VOL. 118, 117, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50236, 2013 Rapid strain accumulation on the Ashkabad fault (Turkmenistan)  

E-print Network

May 2013. [1] We have measured interseismic deformation across the Ashkabad strike-slip fault using 13-lateral Ashkabad strike-slip fault is located along the northeastern edge of the Kopeh Dagh moun- tains on the Iran be found in the online version of this article. 1 COMET+, Department of Earth Sciences, University

50

Crowning the Cathedral of Florence: Brunelleschi Builds His Dome. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit focuses on a dramatic moment in the Renaissance from about 1420 when Filippo Brunelleschi single handedly created, defined, and engineered a new architecture by building the great dome of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. The dome became the symbol of Florence's grandeur during the Renaissance, and a model for great…

Symcox, Linda

51

Arvicoline rodent fauna from the Room 2 Excavation in Cathedral Cave, White Pine County, Nevada, and its biochronologic significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test-pit excavations from 1989 in Room 2 of Cathedral Cave yielded a diverse faunal assemblage, but age estimates derived from radioisotopic dates and biochronological assessment were widely disparate. New excavations were undertaken in 2003 to increase faunal samples and clarify chronological resolution. Arvicoline rodents recovered from the 2003 excavation include Allophaiomys pliocaenicus, Microtus meadensis, M. paroperarius, Microtus sp., Mictomys meltoni

Christopher N. Jass; Christopher J. Bell

2011-01-01

52

Photogrammetric and LIDAR Documentation of the Royal Chapel Cathedral-Mosque of Cordoba, Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, cultural heritage documentation projects use a variety of spatial data acquisition techniques such as conventional surveying, photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning. This paper deals with a full documentation project based on all those techniques in the Royal Chapel located in the Cathedral-Mosque of Cordoba in Spain, declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO. At present, the Royal Chapel is under study for a detailed diagnostic analysis in order to evaluate the actual state of the chapel, pathologies, construction phases, previous restoration works, material analysis, etc. So in order to assist the evaluation, a documentation project with photogrammetric and laser scanner techniques (TLS) has been carried out. With this purpose, accurate cartographic and 3D products, by means of the integration of both image and laser based techniques, were needed to register all data collected during the diagnostic analysis.

Cardenal, J.; Perez-Garcia, J. L.; Mata, E.; Hernandez, M. A.; Mozas, A.; Delgado, J.; Lopez-Arenas, A.; Meroño, J. E.

2012-07-01

53

Fault Management Frameworks in Wireless Sensor Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapidly gaining ground of the Internet of things, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) will be bound to permeate more and more applications. However, due to the nature of these applications such as harsh environment, resource-limited wireless sensor networks are usually fault- prone. Therefore, it is essential to provide effective fault management techniques and robust fault management frameworks for WSNs.

Hu Huangshui; Qin Guihe

2011-01-01

54

Fault finder  

DOEpatents

A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

Bunch, Richard H. (1614 NW. 106th St., Vancouver, WA 98665)

1986-01-01

55

Acoustic conditioning of the metropolitan cathedral of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the acoustic study of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, initially background noise and reverberation time were measured. A digital model was built using acoustic simulation software AcustaCadd, applying the values of the measured reverberation time. Then reverberation time, speech intelligibility, and geometric acoustics were analyzed. As a result the Project of Acoustic Conditioning was developed to correct the high reverberation time, by increasing absorption with the installation of 65000 m of panels of glass wool (100 mm, 60 kg/m). Advantage was taken of existing details in the plaster to embed the panels in the walls. Also the volume of the choir and of the lateral balcony to the altar was reduced and the interior of this was covered with the same glass wool. Special care was taken to minimize alterations to the architectural characteristics of the place, because it is a construction of historical importance. The measured values of background noise were also analyzed and appropriate acoustic isolation considered. The final measure of the reverberation time showed an average reduction of 5 seconds and better speech intelligibility, long demanded by the users. [Work supported by FAIR/FUNDATEC, BR; IUCC-US, SP.

Simoes, Flavio M.; Nabinger, Luciano B.; Ramalho, Aline I.

2002-11-01

56

Monitoring of the Heat and Moisture Transport through Walls of St. Martin Cathedral Tower in Bratislava  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historic monuments are subject to degradation due to exposition to surrounding meteorological conditions and groundwater. Construction of buildings consists of the plaster and material components that have porous structure. Processes like heat transport, moisture diffusion, moisturizing and drying; freezing and thawing can be found in such structures depending on environmental conditions. Monitoring of the temperature - moisture regime gives a picture on the processes running in the structure. Long term monitoring of the tower of St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava have been performed under window sill of the belfry in exterior in south orientation. Principle of the hot-ball method is used for monitoring of the temperature and thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the porous system depends on the pore content. Moisture sensors are constructed from the parent material in a form of cylinder. Sensors are calibrated for dry and water saturated stage prior installation in the walls. Monitoring has been carried out in plaster and in the masonry in a distance about 10 cm from the wall surface, where sensors are installed. Information on temperature, moisture and thermal conductivity can be gained from measured signal. Use of two sensors allows estimation on heat and moisture transport through the wall. Monitoring has been performed in the period from April 2013 up to July 2013. Monitored data are correlated to the meteorological data. Details of various effects will be discussed.

Kubi?ár, ?udovít; Hudec, Ján; Fidríková, Danica; Štofanik, Vladimír; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam

2014-05-01

57

Spectrometric investigation of the weathering process affecting historical glasses of León Cathedral, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric pollution plays important roles in the weathering of the historical buildings and glass windows. Samples of white powdered weathering products, recovered during restoration of the stained-glass windows of León Cathedral in Spain, were characterised using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive-X ray spectrometry (ED-XRS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectrometry. The presence of sulphates, and to a lesser extent carbonates, in the white powdered product is clear indication of the participation of atmospheric acidifying gases, particularly SOx, in the weathering process. It is interesting to note that there was no indication of the participation of NOx gases. There was, however, evidence that the putty and mortar used to seal/join the glasses were major sources of the weathering products. In this way, this study suggests sealants more resistant to oxidation, such as silicone- and zirconia-based materials, should be considered for repairing glass windows in historic buildings to avoid exacerbating degradation.

Castro, M. A.; Pereira, F. J.; Aller, A. J.; Littlejohn, D.

2014-12-01

58

An in situ corrosion study of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains in the Amiens Cathedral  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The corrosion behaviour of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains exposed to indoor atmospheric corrosion for hundred of years in the Notre Dame Cathedral of Amiens (France) has been evaluated by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), a well-established electrochemical technique extensively used for testing anticorrosive properties of metal coatings. The measurements have been performed in situ with a portable EIS instrument designed to work as a standalone device, in six different areas of the wrought iron bar chains characterized by different aesthetical appearance. Moreover, a properly designed electrochemical cell has been employed to carry out the impedance measurements without affecting the artefacts surfaces. The wrought iron bar chains, as evidenced by ?-Raman and microscopic analyses, are covered by corrosion products constituted by iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, such as goethite, lepidocrocite, maghemite, akaganeite, organized in complex layered structures. In situ EIS allows one to investigate the phenomena involved at the electrochemical interfaces among the various corrosion products and to assess and predict their corrosion behaviour. From the analysis of the experimental findings of this monitoring campaign, EIS measurements can be proposed to restorers/conservators as a reliable indicator of dangerous situations on which they must act for the preservation of the iron artefacts.

Grassini, S.; Angelini, E.; Parvis, M.; Bouchar, M.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.

2013-12-01

59

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

Welch, K.M.

1981-01-01

60

Fault diagnosis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to examine pilot mental models of the aircraft subsystems and their use in diagnosis tasks. Future research plans include piloted simulation evaluation of the diagnosis decision aiding concepts and crew interface issues. Information is given in viewgraph form.

Abbott, Kathy

1990-01-01

61

Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

2013-07-01

62

Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California  

SciTech Connect

Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

Boles, James [Professor

2013-05-24

63

Presented by Fault-Tolerance Challenges  

E-print Network

Presented by Fault-Tolerance Challenges and Solutions Al Geist Computer Science Research Group Geist_FT_SC10 Rapid growth in scale drives fault tolerance need Challenges · Fundamental assumptions as scale increases #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Geist_FT_SC10 Hardware

64

Fault terminations and barriers to fault growth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field observations of strike slip faults in jointed granitic rocks of the central Sierra Nevada, California, combined with a mechanical analysis of fault interaction, provide insight into how fault terminations vary with scale. We document here a strike-slip fault system 2-3 km long. Clustered about the west end of the fault system are several dozen faults that parallel the three main fault zones in the system. We interpret this cluster of small faults as a barrier that inhibited growth of fault zones in the fault system. A two-dimensional mechanical analysis shows that a cluster of small faults flanking the tip of a large fault zone will tend to diffuse the stress concentration near the fault zone tip—an analogous effect in engineering is known as crack-tip shielding. Near-tip stress concentrations promote fault growth, and processes that decrease these stress concentrations inhibit fault growth. As faults lengthen and grow, they interact with features at greater distances and over a broader area, so the potential for tip shielding effects will increase as fault length increases. This effect can account for why the mechanisms and character of fault terminations would tend to vary as a function of scale.

d'Alessio, Matthew A.; Martel, Stephen J.

2004-10-01

65

Norumbega Fault System of the Northern Appalachians  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yes, Virginia, the eastern United States can finally claim to have a strike-slip fault of its own on a scale to rival the west coast's San Andreas fault: the Norumbega fault system, which stretches nearly 450 km from central New Brunswick, south to Casco Bay in southern Maine, and perhaps even farther into southern Connecticut. The Norumbega fault was active for 100 Ma, five times longer than the San Andreas. Its displacement is reckoned by one author to be as much as 1768 km (!), five times more than the San Andreas, and it has been exhumed locally to mid-crustal depths. This collection of 12 full-length, standalone papers and preface provides a single venue for a rapidly growing body of interdisciplinary research about a remarkable—though inactive—fault that may prove to be the longest, most long-lived fault with the greatest displacement of any in North America.

Sylvester, Arthur Gibbs

66

CMOS Bridging Fault Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors compare the performance of two test generation techniques, stuck fault testing and current testing, when applied to CMOS bridging faults. Accurate simulation of such faults mandated the development of several new design automation tools, including an analog-digital fault simulator. The results of this simulation are analyzed. It is shown that stuck fault test generation, while inherently incapable of

Thomas M. Storey; Wojciech Maly

1990-01-01

67

Normal Fault Visualization  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module demonstrates the motion on an active normal fault. Faulting offsets three horizontal strata. At the end of the faulting event, surface topography has been generated. The upper rock layer is eroded by clicking on the 'begin erosion' button. The operator can manipulate the faulting motion, stopping and reversing motion on the fault at any point along the transit of faulting. The action of erosion is also interactive. One possible activity is an investigation of the control of different faulting styles on regional landscape form. This visual lends itself to an investigation of fault motion, and a comparison of types of faults. The interactive normal faulting visual could be compared to other interactive visuals depicting thrust faults, reverse faults, and strike slip faults (interactive animations of these fault types can be found by clicking on 'Media Types' at top red bar, then 'Animations', then 'Faults'). By comparing the interactive images of different types of faulting with maps of terrains dominated by different faulting styles, students are aided in conceptualizing how certain faulting styles produce distinctive landforms on the earth's surface (e.g., ridge and valley topography [thrust faulting dominant] versus basin-and-range topography [normal faulting dominant]). Jimm Myers, geology professor at the University of Wyoming, originated the concept of The Magma Foundry, a website dedicated to improving Earth science education across the grade levels. The Magma Foundry designs and creates modular, stand-alone media components that can be utilized in a variety of pedagogical functions in courses and labs.

Jimm Myers

68

Optimal fault location  

E-print Network

after the accurate fault condition and location are detected. This thesis has been focusing on automated fault location procedure. Different fault location algorithms, classified according to the spatial placement of physical measurements on single ended...

Knezev, Maja

2008-10-10

69

Optimal fault location  

E-print Network

after the accurate fault condition and location are detected. This thesis has been focusing on automated fault location procedure. Different fault location algorithms, classified according to the spatial placement of physical measurements on single ended...

Knezev, Maja

2009-05-15

70

Fault Separation Gestures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students explore the relationship between fault slip direction and fault separation by varying the geometry of faulted layers, slip direction, and the perspective from which these are viewed. They work in teams to explore these complex geometric relationships via gestures.

Carol Ormand

71

Optimal stochastic fault detection filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Properties of the optimal stochastic fault detection filter for fault detection and identification are determined. The objective of the filter is to monitor certain faults called target faults and block other faults which are called nuisance faults. This filter is derived by keeping the ratio of the transmission from nuisance fault to the transmission from target fault small. It is

Robert H. Chen; Jason L. Speyer

1999-01-01

72

Finding Fault with Faults: A Case Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe our effort in extending this work beyond the initial software contruction. Our area of focus is determining the rate of fault injection over a sequence of successive builds, first observing that software faults may be seen to fall into two distinct classes some faults are incorporated during the initial coding effort, while others are added in successive software builds.

Munson, John C.; Nikora, Allen P.

1997-01-01

73

Quantitative fault seal prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault seal can arise from reservoir\\/nonreservoir juxtaposition or by development of fault rock having high entry pressure. The methodology for evaluating these possibilities uses detailed seismic mapping and well analysis. A first-order seal analysis involves identifying reservoir juxtaposition areas over the fault surface by using the mapped horizons and a refined reservoir stratigraphy defined by isochores at the fault surface.

G. Yielding; B. Freeman; D. T. Needham

1997-01-01

74

Transition Fault Simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delay fault testing is becoming more important as VLSI chips become more complex. Components that are fragments of functions, such as those in gate-array designs, need a general model of a delay fault and a feasible method of generating test patterns and simulating the fault. The authors present such a model, called a transition fault, which when used with parallel-pattern,

John Waicukauski; Eric Lindbloom; Barry Rosen; Vijay Iyengar

1987-01-01

75

Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

1990-01-01

76

Fault zone fabric and fault weakness.  

PubMed

Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals, high fluid pressures within the fault core and dynamic processes such as normal stress reduction, acoustic fluidization or extreme weakening at high slip velocity. Dynamic weakening mechanisms can explain some observations; however, creep and aseismic slip are thought to occur on weak faults, and quasi-static weakening mechanisms are required to initiate frictional slip on mis-oriented faults, at high angles to the tectonic stress field. Moreover, the maintenance of high fluid pressures requires specialized conditions and weak mineral phases are not present in sufficient abundance to satisfy weak fault models, so weak faults remain largely unexplained. Here we provide laboratory evidence for a brittle, frictional weakening mechanism based on common fault zone fabrics. We report on the frictional strength of intact fault rocks sheared in their in situ geometry. Samples with well-developed foliation are extremely weak compared to their powdered equivalents. Micro- and nano-structural studies show that frictional sliding occurs along very fine-grained foliations composed of phyllosilicates (talc and smectite). When the same rocks are powdered, frictional strength is high, consistent with cataclastic processes. Our data show that fault weakness can occur in cases where weak mineral phases constitute only a small percentage of the total fault rock and that low friction results from slip on a network of weak phyllosilicate-rich surfaces that define the rock fabric. The widespread documentation of foliated fault rocks along mature faults in different tectonic settings and from many different protoliths suggests that this mechanism could be a viable explanation for fault weakening in the brittle crust. PMID:20016599

Collettini, Cristiano; Niemeijer, André; Viti, Cecilia; Marone, Chris

2009-12-17

77

Optimal stochastic fault detection filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fault detection and identification algorithm, called optimal stochastic fault detection filter, is determined. The objective of the filter is to detect a single fault, called the target fault, and block other faults, called the nuisance faults, in the presence of the process and sensor noises. The filter is derived by maximizing the transmission from the target fault to the

Robert H. Chen; D. Lewis Mingori; Jason L. Speyer

2003-01-01

78

Monitoring of the temperature - moisture regime of critical parts in the tower of the St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Historic monuments are subject to degradation due to exposition to surrounding meteorological conditions and groundwater. Degradation is most often manifested by deterioration of plaster, walls structure and building elements like stones. A significant attention measures are undertaken to prevent degradation of the cultural heritage throughout the world. Our contribution is to monitor the objects for recognition of the critical state when it is necessary to make adjustments to avoid destruction. Buildings consisting from the listed elements belong to porous materials. Moisture diffusion, condensation, etc. attack structure stability of the buildings. Then the moisture diffusion and effects like drying, freezing / thawing belong to the control mechanisms of the degradation. In addition to laboratory experiments concerning the mentioned effects, we simultaneously studied processes by monitoring of the cultural monuments. During monitoring we have identified diffusion of moisture associated with cycle day / night and cycle moisture /drying caused by meteorological precipitation. Long term monitoring is performed in the tower of St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava under the window sill of the belfry in exterior at three orientations, the north, south and the west. Monitoring is carried out in plaster and in masonry about 10 cm from the wall surface. The thermal conductivity sensors are used for monitoring that operate on the principle of the hot ball method. Then thermal conductivity of porous material is a function of pore content. The sensor has shape of a ball in diameter up to 2 mm in which a heat source as well as a thermometer is integrated into one component. A small heat output is delivered into the surrounding material. The temperature response of the sensor gives information on the thermal conductivity. For use in the preservation of cultural heritage a number of measuring devices have been developed for automatic registration of temperature and moisture in masonry and plaster of monuments.

Kubicar, L.; Fidríková, D.; Štofanik, V.; Vretenár, V.

2012-04-01

79

Off-fault damage and acoustic emission distributions during the evolution of structurally complex faults over series of stick-slip events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in fault structure, for example, surface roughness and deformation zone width, influence the location and dynamics of large earthquakes as well as the distribution of small seismic events. In nature, changes in fault roughness and seismicity characteristics can rarely be studied simultaneously, so that little is known about their interaction and evolution. Here, we investigate the connection between fault structure and near-fault distributions of seismic events over series of stick-slip cycles in the laboratory. We conducted a set of experiments on rough faults that developed from incipient fracture surfaces. We monitored stress and seismic activity which occurred in the form of acoustic emissions (AEs). We determined AE density distributions as a function of fault normal distance based on high-accuracy hypocentre locations during subsequent interslip periods. The characteristics of these distributions were closely connected to different structural units of the faults, that is, the fault core, off-fault and background damage zone. The core deformation zone was characterized by consistently high seismic activity, whereas the off-fault damage zone displayed a power-law decay of seismic activity with increasing distance from the fault core. The exponents of the power-law-distributed off-fault activity increased with successive stick-slip events so that later interslip periods showed a more rapid spatial decay of seismic activity from the fault. The increase in exponents was strongest during the first one to three interslip periods and reached approximately constant values thereafter. The relatively rapid spatial decay of AE events during later interslip periods is likely an expression of decreasing fault zone complexity and roughness. Our results indicate a close relationship between fault structure, stress and seismic off-fault activity. A more extensive mapping of seismic off-fault activity-decay has the potential to significantly advance the understanding of fault zone properties including variations in fault roughness and stress.

Goebel, T. H. W.; Becker, T. W.; Sammis, C. G.; Dresen, G.; Schorlemmer, D.

2014-06-01

80

Study on Fault Diagnosis Strategy of Radio Fuze Microsystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radio fuze will be out of order easily because of small size and high integration. In order to improve the testability, an effective method to achieve rapid detection and fault isolation is to determine reasonable test-sets and a best diagnosis strategy. Based on the functional block diagram, a fault message matrix among every module of inner radio fuze is

Xiaopeng Yan; Li Ping; Ruili Jia; Yongqiang Wang

2009-01-01

81

Generation of Fault Trees from Simulated Incipient Fault Case Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault tree analysis is widely used in industry in fault diagnosis. The diagnosis of incipient or 'soft' faults is considerably more dif ficult than of 'hard' faults, which is the situation considered normally. A detailed fault tree model reflecting signal variations over wide range is required for diagnosing such soft faults. This paper describes the investigation of a machine learning

Michael G. Madden; Paul J. Nolan

1994-01-01

82

Fault Tolerant Strategies for BLDC Motor Drives under Switch Faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the fault tolerant system for BLDC motors has been proposed to maintain the control performance under switching device faults of inverter. The proposed fault tolerant system provides compensation for open-circuit faults and short-circuit faults in power converter. The fault identification is quickly achieved by simple algorithm using the characteristic of BLDC motor drives. The drive system after

Byoung-Gun Park; Tae-Sung Kim; Ji-Su Ryu; Dong-Seok Hyun

2006-01-01

83

Every Place Has Its Faults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site covers the four main types of faults (not including growth faults): the normal fault, reverse fault, transcurrent (strike-slip) fault, and thrust fault. Animations show the type of movement for each different type of fault. There is a section on the initial stage of a landform, containing a diagram of a graben and horst system. Also included are photographs of fault scarps along Hebgen Lake, Montana.

84

Fault Mapping in Haiti  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS geologist Carol Prentice surveying features that have been displaced by young movements on the Enriquillo fault in southwest Haiti.  The January 2010 Haiti earthquake was associated with the Enriquillo fault....

85

Active Faulting in Idaho  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces students to faulting from the Quaternary Period and the Holocene Epoch in the State of Idaho. They will examine a map showing the distribution of these faults and answer questions concerning groundwater circulation and earthquake potential, and determine which geologic province has the most neotectonically active faults (15,000 years or younger).

86

Fault-tolerant estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fault-tolerant estimator is obtained from fusing the concept of fault detection with estimation. Two possible architectures are evaluated. At the center of the fault-tolerant estimation procedure is a bank of filters computing local state estimates, a residual screening scheme to isolate corrupted estimates and a method of blending untainted ones into a global minimum variance estimate, free of the

Laurence H. Mutuel; Jason L. Speyer

2000-01-01

87

Fault Tree Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, a state-of-the-art review of fault tree analysis is presented. Different forms of fault trees, including\\u000a static, dynamic, and non-coherent fault trees, their applications and analyses will be discussed. Some advanced topics such\\u000a as importance analysis, dependent failures, disjoint events, and multistate systems will also be presented.

Liudong Xing; Suprasad V. Amari

88

Mechanics of discontinuous faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault traces consist of numerous discrete segments, commonly arranged as echelon arrays. In some cases, discontinuities influence the distribution of slip and seismicity along faults. To analyze fault segments, we derive a two-dimensional solution for any number of nonintersecting cracks arbitrarily located in a homogeneous elastic material. The solution includes the elastic interaction between cracks. Crack surfaces are assumed to

P. Segall; D. D. Pollard

1980-01-01

89

Faults of Southern California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive map displays faults for five regions in Southern California. Clicking on a region links to an enlarged relief map of the area, with local faults highlighted in colors. Users can click on individual faults to access pages with more detailed information, such as type, length, nearest communities, and a written description. In all of the maps, the segment of the San Andreas fault that is visible is highlighted in red, and scales for distances and elevations are provided. There is also a link to an alphabetical listing of faults by name.

90

Diagnosing CMOS bridging faults with stuck-at fault dictionaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that the traditional approach to diagnosing stuck-at faults with fault dictionaries generated for stuck-at faults is not appropriate for diagnosing CMOS bridging faults. A novel technique for using stuck-at-fault dictionaries to diagnose bridging faults is described. Teradyne's LASAR was used to simulate bridging and stuck-at faults in a number of combinational circuits, including parity trees, multiplexers, and

Steven D. Millman; Edward J. McCluskey; John M. Acken

1990-01-01

91

Earthquake fault superhighways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the observation that the rare earthquakes which propagated for significant distances at supershear speeds occurred on very long straight segments of faults, we examine every known major active strike-slip fault system on land worldwide and identify those with long (> 100 km) straight portions capable not only of sustained supershear rupture speeds but having the potential to reach compressional wave speeds over significant distances, and call them "fault superhighways". The criteria used for identifying these are discussed. These superhighways include portions of the 1000 km long Red River fault in China and Vietnam passing through Hanoi, the 1050 km long San Andreas fault in California passing close to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Francisco, the 1100 km long Chaman fault system in Pakistan north of Karachi, the 700 km long Sagaing fault connecting the first and second cities of Burma, Rangoon and Mandalay, the 1600 km Great Sumatra fault, and the 1000 km Dead Sea fault. Of the 11 faults so classified, nine are in Asia and two in North America, with seven located near areas of very dense populations. Based on the current population distribution within 50 km of each fault superhighway, we find that more than 60 million people today have increased seismic hazards due to them.

Robinson, D. P.; Das, S.; Searle, M. P.

2010-10-01

92

Recent fault movement and palaeoseismicity in western Scotland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field study at two locations in western Scotland is described and gives evidence for fault movement and seismic activity during the late- and post-glacial epochs. The evidence comprises levelling survey of raised marine shorelines, remote sensing study of lineaments, radiocarbon dating of Quaternary sediment, and detailed field examination of faults and fault-gouge material. Vertical fault displacements of up to 3 m are observed on a c.10,500 year old raised marine shoreline on the Isle of Mull, and repeated predominantly lateral, movement is observed on a prominent 14 km-long fault lineament active since ice retreat and as recently as c.2000 yrs B.P. The fault movements are located close to the edge of the area formerly covered by the Loch Lomond Readvance ice cap (11,000-10,000 yrs B.P.). They are considered to have been caused by rapid rates of isostatic rebound soon after deglaciation.

Ringrose, P. S.

1989-07-01

93

Creeping Faults and Seismicity: Lessons From The Hayward Fault, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

While faults remain mostly locked between large strain releasing events, they can dissipate some of the accumulating elastic strain through creep. One such fault that releases a significant fraction of accumulating strain by creep is the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The seismic risk associated with creeping faults such as the Hayward fault will depend

R. Malservisi; K. P. Furlong; C. Gans

2002-01-01

94

Isolability of faults in sensor fault diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major concern with fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods is their robustness with respect to noise and modeling uncertainties. With this in mind, several approaches have been proposed to minimize the vulnerability of FDI methods to these uncertainties. But, apart from the algorithm used, there is a theoretical limit on the minimum effect of noise on detectability and isolability. This limit has been quantified in this paper for the problem of sensor fault diagnosis based on direct redundancies. In this study, first a geometric approach to sensor fault detection is proposed. The sensor fault is isolated based on the direction of residuals found from a residual generator. This residual generator can be constructed from an input-output or a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based model. The simplicity of this technique, compared to the existing methods of sensor fault diagnosis, allows for more rational formulation of the isolability concepts in linear systems. Using this residual generator and the assumption of Gaussian noise, the effect of noise on isolability is studied, and the minimum magnitude of isolable fault in each sensor is found based on the distribution of noise in the measurement system. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to clarify this approach.

Sharifi, Reza; Langari, Reza

2011-10-01

95

Fault detection and diagnosis of photovoltaic systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rapid growth of the solar industry over the past several years has expanded the significance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. One of the primary aims of research in building-integrated PV systems is to improve the performance of the system's efficiency, availability, and reliability. Although much work has been done on technological design to increase a photovoltaic module's efficiency, there is little research so far on fault diagnosis for PV systems. Faults in a PV system, if not detected, may not only reduce power generation, but also threaten the availability and reliability, effectively the "security" of the whole system. In this paper, first a circuit-based simulation baseline model of a PV system with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is developed using MATLAB software. MATLAB is one of the most popular tools for integrating computation, visualization and programming in an easy-to-use modeling environment. Second, data collection of a PV system at variable surface temperatures and insolation levels under normal operation is acquired. The developed simulation model of PV system is then calibrated and improved by comparing modeled I-V and P-V characteristics with measured I--V and P--V characteristics to make sure the simulated curves are close to those measured values from the experiments. Finally, based on the circuit-based simulation model, a PV model of various types of faults will be developed by changing conditions or inputs in the MATLAB model, and the I--V and P--V characteristic curves, and the time-dependent voltage and current characteristics of the fault modalities will be characterized for each type of fault. These will be developed as benchmark I-V or P-V, or prototype transient curves. If a fault occurs in a PV system, polling and comparing actual measured I--V and P--V characteristic curves with both normal operational curves and these baseline fault curves will aid in fault diagnosis.

Wu, Xing

96

Frictional constraints on crustal faulting  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We consider how variations in fault frictional properties affect the phenomenology of earthquake faulting. In particular, we propose that lateral variations in fault friction produce the marked heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes. We model these variations using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening behavior into two fields: the strong seismic field is very velocity weakening and the weak seismic field is slightly velocity weakening. Similarly, we differentiate velocity-strengthening behavior into two fields: the compliant field is slightly velocity strengthening and the viscous field is very velocity strengthening. The strong seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two "intermediate" fields, weak seismic and compliant, have frictional velocity dependences that are close to velocity neutral: these fields modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the weak seismic and compliant regions slip aseismically, while the strong seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak seismic areas exhibit most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks but can also creep seismically. This "mixed" frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution of the critical slip distance. The model also provides a mechanism for rupture arrest: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into unloaded complaint or weak seismic areas, producing broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur on both the weak seismic and compliant areas around a fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the seismicity and the coseismic slip for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes. The interevent seismicity and aftershocks appear to occur on fault areas outside the regions of significant slip: these regions are interpreted as either weak seismic or compliant, depending on whether or not they manifest interevent seismicity.

Boatwright, J.; Cocco, M.

1996-01-01

97

Ustinov College Durham Cathedral  

E-print Network

wouldn't change it for anything. Durham University is where you can balance your study and your life if you intend to live in private accommodation. Weather wise, we're a typical northern town ­ average. This is important for students walking around the town but also for those accessing public transport. Regular buses

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

98

A CATHEDRAL OF DETECTORS  

E-print Network

the pattern. THE ART IN YOUR ENGINE A vortex of flame swirls inside a combustion chamber. Researchers, the particle-physics lab near Geneva. Over the course of this year it has slowly been filled up with all manner on a butterfly's wing. The insect was engineered so that its cells expressed a green fluorescent dye when

Monteiro, Antónia

99

How Faults Shape the Earth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

1992-01-01

100

It's Not Your Fault  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson students will learn about tectonic plate movement. They will discover that we can measure the relative motions of the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate along the San Andreas Fault. Students will be able to compare and contrast movements on either side of the San Andreas Fault, calculate the amount of movement of a tectonic plate over a period of time, and describe the processes involved in the occurrence of earthquakes along the fault.

101

The San Andreas Fault  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication discusses the San Andreas Fault in California; specifically what has caused the fault, where it is located, surface features that characterize it, and movement that has occurred. General earthquake information includes an explanation of what earthquakes are, and earthquake magnitude versus intensity. Earthquakes that have occurred along the fault are covered, as well as where the next large one may occur and what can be done about large earthquakes in general.

Sandra Schulz

102

Its Not My Fault  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students become familiar with strike-slip faults, normal faults, reverse faults and visualize these geological structures using cardboard or a plank of wood, a stack of books, protractor, and a spring scale. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Shaky Quake. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

2012-08-03

103

Fault simulation and test generation for small delay faults  

E-print Network

Delay faults are an increasingly important test challenge. Traditional delay fault models are incomplete in that they model only a subset of delay defect behaviors. To solve this problem, a more realistic delay fault model has been developed which...

Qiu, Wangqi

2007-04-25

104

Structurally controlled fluid flow and diagenesis along the Moab fault, SE Utah: Organic-inorganic interactions and their effects on fault cementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hydraulic properties of faults in clastic sedimentary sequences are traditionally considered a function of stratigraphic juxtaposition and fault rock composition. Diagenetic effects, in particular organic-inorganic interactions, and their spatial association with the fault architecture, are only rudimentarily explored. Here, we mapped the type and extent of diagenetic alteration along the Moab fault to assess the interrelationships among fault architecture, fault hydraulic properties, and fault rock diagenesis. The Moab fault, a normal fault with up to 1 km of throw and a small strike-slip component, is segmented along strike by branch points and relays. Fault branch points are associated with extensive carbonate cementation of faulted eolian Jurassic sandstone. Within the fault damage zone the abundance of concretions and veins and the diameter of concretions decrease with distance from the fault. Carbonate is spatially associated with bleaching of the reddish hematite-cemented sandstones. Pore and fracture-filling dead oil in bleached and carbonate cemented zones is indicative of bleaching due to reducing aqueous fluids in association with hydrocarbon migration along the fault. Fault-related cementation was potentially controlled by two processes: (1) rapid upward fluid flow along the fault and (2) microbially mediated degradation of hydrocarbons in contact with meteoric water. Evidence for rapid fluid flow is provided by clastic dikes associated with the fault. A drop in CO2 partial pressure during rapidly upward flowing fluid flow would favor carbonate precipitation. Evidence for carbonate precipitation due to hydrocarbon degradation is inferred through the close association of residual oil and calcite or malachite. Release of CO2 by the microbial degradation of oil in the presence of organic acids can increase alkalinity resulting in carbonate precipitation. The involvement of organic acids in fault cementation is suggested by feldspar dissolution and by trends in the stable isotopic composition of carbonate. The stable isotopic trends are interpreted to result from mixing of inorganic carbon derived from upward migrating brine with isotopically light organic carbon that formed by microbially mediated aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons in contact with meteoric water. Carbonate cementation associated with oil degradation is consistent with the discontinuous globular distribution of cement along fractures in the fault damage zone. Once formed, this cement will impede fluid flow along initially preferred structurally controlled fault conduits. Yet, the discontinuous distribution of cement makes this process ineffective in forming a continuous hydraulic seal for flow across the fault.

Eichhubl, P.; Davatzes, N. C.; Aydin, A.

2002-12-01

105

The influence of indoor microclimate on thermal comfort and conservation of artworks: the case study of the cathedral of Matera (South Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Matera Cathedral was built in Apulian-Romanesque style in the thirteenth century on the highest spur of the "Civita" that divides "Sassi" district in two parts. The constructive material is the calcareous stone of the Vaglia, extracted from quarries in the area of Matera. The interior is Baroque and presents several artworks, including: mortars covered with a golden patina, a wooden ceiling, painted canvas and painting frescoes, three minor altars and a major altar of precious white marble, a nativity scene made of local painted limestone. The research had to evaluate the indoor microclimate during and after the restoration works, that also concern the installation of floor heating system to heat the indoor environments. Specifically, we have analyzed the thermal comfort and the effect that the artwork and construction materials inside the Cathedral of Matera have undergone. This evaluation was carried out in two different phases: in the first one we have investigated the state of the art (history of the site, constructive typology and artworks); in the second one we have done a systematic diagnosis and an instrumental one. The analysis were carried out in a qualitative and quantitative way and have allowed us to test indoor microclimatic parameters (air temperature, relative humidity and indoor air velocity), surface temperatures of the envelope and also Fanger's comfort indices (PMV and PPD) according to the UNI EN ISO 7730. The thermal mapping of the wall surface and of the artworks, carried out through thermal imaging camera, and the instrumental measurement campaigns were made both before restoration and after installation of the heating system; in addition measurements were taken with system on and off. The analysis thus made possible to verify that the thermo-hygrometric parameters found, as a result of the recovery operations, meet the limits indicated by the regulations and international studies. In this way, we can affirm that the indoor environment of the Cathedral of Matera is suitable both from the point of view of indoor comfort (both during the summer and the winter season) and of microclimatic parameters that are in the intervals prescribed by the regulations on the conservation of artworks of art (Ministerial Decree of 10/05/2001 dictated by the Ministry for heritage and cultural activities). Moreover the energy performance of the building-plant system was evaluated according to the Italian Norm UNI TS 11300. In particular the summer comfort is guaranteed by the huge thermal inertia of the structure that reduces the internal temperature fluctuation. Instead, the winter comfort is guaranteed by the floor heating system, which through the use of evolving fluid at low temperatures, also ensures higher efficiency and significant energy savings, as well as the protection and conservation of the artistic heritage present in the Cathedral.

Cardinale, Tiziana; Rospi, Gianluca; Cardinale, Nicola; Paterino, Lucia; Persia, Ivan

2014-05-01

106

Fault Creep on the Hayward Fault, CA: Implications for Fault Properties and Patterns of Moment Release  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seismic risk associated with creeping faults such as the Hayward fault (San Francisco Bay Area, CA) will depend on the rate of moment accumulation (slip deficit) on the fault plane, on the specific geometry of locked and free portions of the fault, and on the interactions between the fault zone and the surrounding lithosphere. Using a visco-elastic finite-element model,

R. Malservisi; K. P. Furlong; C. Gans

2001-01-01

107

Fault detection and fault tolerance in robotics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robots are used in inaccessible or hazardous environments in order to alleviate some of the time, cost and risk involved in preparing men to endure these conditions. In order to perform their expected tasks, the robots are often quite complex, thus increasing their potential for failures. If men must be sent into these environments to repair each component failure in the robot, the advantages of using the robot are quickly lost. Fault tolerant robots are needed which can effectively cope with failures and continue their tasks until repairs can be realistically scheduled. Before fault tolerant capabilities can be created, methods of detecting and pinpointing failures must be perfected. This paper develops a basic fault tree analysis of a robot in order to obtain a better understanding of where failures can occur and how they contribute to other failures in the robot. The resulting failure flow chart can also be used to analyze the resiliency of the robot in the presence of specific faults. By simulating robot failures and fault detection schemes, the problems involved in detecting failures for robots are explored in more depth.

Visinsky, Monica; Walker, Ian D.; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

1992-01-01

108

Fault weakening and earthquake instability by powder lubrication  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Earthquake instability has long been attributed to fault weakening during accelerated slip1, and a central question of earthquake physics is identifying the mechanisms that control this weakening2. Even with much experimental effort2-12, the weakening mechanisms have remained enigmatic. Here we present evidence for dynamic weakening of experimental faults that are sheared at velocities approaching earthquake slip rates. The experimental faults, which were made of room-dry, solid granite blocks, quickly wore to form a fine-grain rock powder known as gouge. At modest slip velocities of 10-60mms-1, this newly formed gouge organized itself into a thin deforming layer that reduced the fault's strength by a factor of 2-3. After slip, the gouge rapidly 'aged' and the fault regained its strength in a matter of hours to days. Therefore, only newly formed gouge can weaken the experimental faults. Dynamic gouge formation is expected to be a common and effective mechanism of earthquake instability in the brittle crust as (1) gouge always forms during fault slip5,10,12-20; (2) fault-gouge behaves similarly to industrial powder lubricants21; (3) dynamic gouge formation explains various significant earthquake properties; and (4) gouge lubricant can form for a wide range of fault configurations, compositions and temperatures15. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

Reches, Z.; Lockner, D.A.

2010-01-01

109

RAPID Contacts  

Cancer.gov

Rapid Access to Preventive Intervention Development (RAPID) Program Contacts Program Contact RAPID ProgramAttn: Izet M. Kapetanovic, PhD, Program Director Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group Division of Cancer Prevention, NCI Executive Plaza

110

Prehistoric Earthquakes Along The Sanchiao Fault, Taipei Basin, Northern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although numerous large earthquakes in Taiwan have produced surface rupture during the last century, little is known about fault slip rates and recurrence intervals of fault displacement in metropolitan Taipei city. Previous studies along the Sanchiao Fault, a major normal fault that flanks the western boundary of the Taipei Basin, suggest that the fault has a long-term slip rate of ~2.3mm/yr for the past 400,000 years. The Sanchiao Fault cuts the Quaternary Sunshan Formation and contains evidence for the age of subsidence of Taipei Basin. Strata from eight boreholes were examined in order to document the late-Pleistocene-Holocene record of earthquakes along the fault. Grain size analysis, total carbon content, lithology, texture, sedimentary structures, paleosols and fossil abundance were used to correlate subsidence stratigraphic units. Woody material and detrital charcoal from the boreholes were processed to provide radiocarbon dates. Borehole SCF05 and SCF06, drilled at the northern section of the fault, show two stages of hanging wall thickening. The amount of net offset between SCF05 and SCF06 abruptly changes from 5 to 8m, implying rapid subsidence of about 3 meters at about 9.3~9.4 kyr B.P. Similarly, net offset between SCF05 and SCF06 abruptly changes about 2 m occurs at about 11.1 kyr B.P., suggesting rapid subsidence. Borehole SCF01 and SCF02, located at the central section of the Sanchiao Fault, also display similar thickening and rapid subsidence. The net offset between SCF01 and SCF02 abruptly changes from 8 to 12m, suggesting rapid subsidence of about 4 m at about 8.4~8.6 kyr B.P. Earlier subsidence at about 8.9~9.1 kyr B.P. records similar displacement. Borehole SCF14, SCF15, SCF16 and SCF17, located at the southern section of the fault and do not show substantial Holocene offset. According to our subsurface stratigraphic correlations, we suggest that the Sanchiao Fault generated episodic earthquakes during the past 10,000 years. The amount of vertical offset for each event ranges from 2 to 4.8m. If we assume that 3.5m offset represents the average surface displacement, simple scaling relationships between surface displacement to moment magnitude yields a Mw 7.1 earthquake. Damage from large magnitude earthquakes along the Sanchiao Fault would be substantially different from that produced in the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. A large magnitude earthquake on the Sanchiao fault would rupture eastward, directing energy into the densely populated basin.

Huang, S.; Rubin, C. M.; Chen, Y.; Liu, H.; Su, T.; Lai, T.; Chiu, C.

2003-12-01

111

Fault table generation using Graphics Processing Units  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we explore the implementation of fault table generation on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). A fault table is essential for fault diagnosis and fault detection in VLSI testing and debug. Generating a fault table requires extensive fault simulation, with no fault dropping, and is extremely expensive from a computational standpoint. Fault simulation is inherently parallelizable, and the

Kanupriya Gulati; Sunil P Khatri

2009-01-01

112

Testing for Design Faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing theories of testing focus on verification. Their strategy is to cover a specification or a program text to a certain degree in order to raise the confidence in the correctness of a system under test. We take a dierent approach in the sense that we present a theory of fault-based testing. Fault-based testing uses test data designed to demonstrate

Bernhard K. Aichernig; Jifeng He

2005-01-01

113

SFT: scalable fault tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency---requiring

Fabrizio Petrini; Jarek Nieplocha; Vinod Tipparaju

2006-01-01

114

Denali Fault: Susitna Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Helicopters and satellite phones were integral to the geologic field response. Here, Peter Haeussler is calling a seismologist to pass along the discovery of the Susitna Glacier thrust fault. View is to the north up the Susitna Glacier. The Denali fault trace lies in the background where the two lan...

115

Denali Fault: Gillette Pass  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

View northward of mountain near Gillette Pass showing sackung features. Here the mountaintop moved downward like a keystone, producing an uphill-facing scarp. The main Denali fault trace is on the far side of the mountain and a small splay fault is out of view below the photo....

116

Denali Fault: Gillette Pass  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

View north of Denali fault trace at Gillette Pass. this view shows that the surface rupture reoccupies the previous fault scarp. Also the right-lateral offset of these stream gullies has developed since deglaciation in the last 10,000 years or so....

117

Denali Fault: Alaska Pipeline  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

View south along the Trans Alaska Pipeline in the zone where it was engineered for the Denali fault. The fault trace passes beneath the pipeline between the 2nd and 3rd slider supports at the far end of the zone. A large arc in the pipe can be seen in the pipe on the right, due to shortening of the ...

118

Puente Hills Fault Visualization  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Puente Hills Fault posses a disaster threat for Los Angeles region. Earthquake simulations on this fault estimate damages over $250 billion. Visualizations created by SDSC using the data computed from earthquake simulations helps one to fathom the propagation of siesmic waves and the areas affected.

119

Practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new replication algorithm that is able to tolerate Byzantine faults. We believe that Byzantine- fault-tolerant algorithms will be increasingly important in the future because malicious attacks and software errors are increasingly common and can cause faulty nodes to exhibit arbitrary behavior. Whereas previous algorithms assumed a synchronous system or were too slow to be used in

Miguel Castro; Barbara Liskov

1999-01-01

120

Fault rocks lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab is intended to give students some hands on experience looking at fault rocks with a suite of cataclasites and mylonites I have collected. The focus is on identifying key textural features in both hand sample and thin section and understanding how deformation within a fault zone varies with depth.

John Singleton

121

Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heat flow paradox provides evidence that a dynamic weakening mechanism may be important in understanding fault friction and rupture. We present here a specific model for dynamic velocity weakening that uses the mechanics of well-studied industrial bearings to explain fault zone processes. An elevated fluid pressure is generated in a thin film of viscous fluid that is sheared between

Emily E. Brodsky; Hiroo Kanamori

2001-01-01

122

Folds and Faults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will learn how rock layers are folded and faulted and how to represent these structures in maps and cross sections. They will use playdough to represent layers of rock and make cuts in varying orientations to represent faults and other structures.

123

Solar system fault detection  

DOEpatents

A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

1984-05-14

124

Solar system fault detection  

DOEpatents

A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO); Pruett, Jr., James C. (Lakewood, CO)

1986-01-01

125

Characterization of leaky faults  

SciTech Connect

Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

Shan, Chao

1990-05-01

126

Immunity-Based Aircraft Fault Detection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the study reported in this paper, we have developed and applied an Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for aircraft fault detection, as an extension to a previous work on intelligent flight control (IFC). Though the prior studies had established the benefits of IFC, one area of weakness that needed to be strengthened was the control dead band induced by commanding a failed surface. Since the IFC approach uses fault accommodation with no detection, the dead band, although it reduces over time due to learning, is present and causes degradation in handling qualities. If the failure can be identified, this dead band can be further A ed to ensure rapid fault accommodation and better handling qualities. The paper describes the application of an immunity-based approach that can detect a broad spectrum of known and unforeseen failures. The approach incorporates the knowledge of the normal operational behavior of the aircraft from sensory data, and probabilistically generates a set of pattern detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults) in the behavior pattern indicating unsafe in-flight operation. We developed a tool called MILD (Multi-level Immune Learning Detection) based on a real-valued negative selection algorithm that can generate a small number of specialized detectors (as signatures of known failure conditions) and a larger set of generalized detectors for unknown (or possible) fault conditions. Once the fault is detected and identified, an adaptive control system would use this detection information to stabilize the aircraft by utilizing available resources (control surfaces). We experimented with data sets collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions using a piloted motion-base simulation facility. The reported results are from a collection of test cases that reflect the performance of the proposed immunity-based fault detection algorithm.

Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

2004-01-01

127

West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011 Japan tsunami,. Comparing to a long rupture, the Tohoku-type rupture may cause more serious impact at the adjacent coastline, independent of where it would occur in the Cascadia subduction zone. These findings imply that the Cascadia tsunami hazard may be greater than originally thought.

Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

2013-12-01

128

Active faults in the Kashmir Valley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The risk of earthquake is ever increasing in mountains along with rapid growth of population and urbanization. Over half a million people died in the last decade due to earthquakes. The devastations of Sumatra and Thai coasts in 2004, of Kashmir and New Orleans in 2005, of SW Java in 2006, of Sumatra again in 2007, W Sichuan and Myanmar in 2008, of Haiti in 2010, Japan, New Zealand and Turkey in 2011, brought enormous damage. The primary step in this regard could be to establish an earthquake risk model. The Kashmir valley is a NW-SE trending oval-shaped inter-mountain basin. A number of low magnitude earthquakes have recently been reported from the border and few inside the Kashmir valley. A number of active reverse faults were identified in this valley using remote sensing images and active geomorphic features. NE dipping reverse faults uplifted the young alluvial fan at the SW side. An active tectonic environment has been created by these reverse faults; sediment filled streams at NE, and uplifted quaternary deposits at SW. These resulted in an overall tilting of the entire Kashmir valley towards NE. Dating of displaced deposits is required to estimate the total convergence along these faults. Broadly, these faults are because of the convergence of Indian plate beneath the Eurasian plate.

Shah, A.

2012-04-01

129

3D seismic analysis of the structure and evolution of a salt-influenced normal fault zone: A test of competing fault growth models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we determine the structure and evolution of a normal fault system by applying qualitative and quantitative fault analysis techniques to a 3D seismic reflection dataset from the Suez Rift, Egypt. Our analysis indicates that the October Fault Zone is composed of two fault systems that are locally decoupled across a salt-bearing interval of Late Miocene (Messinian) age. The sub-salt system offsets pre-rift crystalline basement, and was active during the Late Oligocene-early Middle Miocene. It is composed of four, planar, NW-SE-striking segments that are hard- linked by N-S-striking segments, and up to 2 km of displacement occurs at top basement, suggesting that this fault system nucleated at or, more likely, below this structural level. The supra-salt system was active during the Pliocene-Holocene, and is composed of four, NW-SE-striking, listric fault segments, which are soft-linked by unbreached relay zones. Segments in the supra-salt fault system nucleated within Pliocene strata and have maximum throws of up to 482 m. Locally, the segments of the supra-salt fault system breach the Messinian salt to hard-link downwards with the underlying, sub-salt fault system, thus forming the upper part of a fault zone composed of: (i) a single, amalgamated fault system below the salt and (ii) a fault system composed of multiple soft-linked segments above the salt. Analysis of throw-distance (T-x) and throw-depth (T-z) plots for the supra-salt fault system, isopach maps of the associated growth strata and backstripping of intervening relay zones indicates that these faults rapidly established their lengths during the early stages of their slip history. The fault tips were then effectively ‘pinned’ and the faults accumulated displacement via predominantly downward propagation. We interpret that the October Fault Zone had the following evolutionary trend; (i) growth of the sub-salt fault system during the Oligocene-to-early Middle Miocene; (ii) cessation of activity on the sub-salt fault system during the Middle Miocene-to-?Early Pliocene; (iii) stretching of the sub- and supra-salt intervals during Pliocene regional extension, which resulted in mild reactivation of the sub-salt fault system and nucleation of the segmented supra-salt fault system, which at this time was geometrically decoupled from the sub-salt fault system; and (iv) Pliocene-to-Holocene growth of the supra-salt fault system by downwards vertical tip line propagation, which resulted in downward breaching of the salt and dip-linkage with the sub-salt fault system. The structure of the October Fault Zone and the rapid establishment of supra-salt fault lengths are compatible with the predictions of the coherent fault model, although we note that individual segments in the supra-salt array grew in accordance with the isolated fault model. Our study thereby indicates that both coherent and isolated fault models may be applicable to the growth of kilometre-scale, basin-bounding faults. Furthermore, we highlight the role that fault reactivation and dip-linkage in mechanically layered sequences can play in controlling the three-dimensional geometry of normal faults.

Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Rotevatn, Atle

2013-09-01

130

Thyristor controlled ground fault current limiting system for ungrounded power distribution systems  

SciTech Connect

A thyristor controlled ground fault current limiting system (TGCL) was proposed to prevent one-line ground fault current rises due to increased capacitance to ground. Basic components of the TGCL are a main ground fault current limiter, which rapidly adjusts a compensating reactor level for the capacitance to ground, and the TGCL`s controller. Control is ensured by an in-phase control method for zero-phase sequence voltage and current. The method determines the direction of ground faults and the compensating reactor level. The fast control which can be realized shows the TGCL is a valuable protecting system for high ground fault current distribution systems.

Sugimoto, S.; Neo, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan). Electric Power Research and Development Center] [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan). Electric Power Research and Development Center; Arita, H.; Kida, J.; Matsui, Y.; Yamagiwa, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-04-01

131

WFSD fault monitoring using active seismic source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wenchuan Fault Scientific Drilling(WFSD)is a rapid response drilling project to the great Wenchuan earthquake. It focuses on the fault structure, earthquake physical mechanism, fluid and in-situ stress, energy budget and so on. Temporal variation of stress and physical property in the fault zone is important information for understanding earthquake physics, especially when the fault is still under the post-seismic recovery or stress modification. Seismic velocity is a good indicator of the medium mechanics, stress state within the fault zone. After the great Wenchuan Ms 8.0 earthquake, May 12, 2008, we built up a fault dynamic monitoring system using active seismic source cross the WFSD fault. It consists of a 10 ton accurately controlled eccentric mass source and eight receivers to continuously monitor the seismic velocity cross the fault zone. Combining the aftershock data, we try to monitor the fault recovery and some aftershock physical process. The observatory is located at the middle of the Longmenshan range-front fault, Mianzhu, Sichuan Province. The No.3 hole of WFSD is on the survey line near the No.4 receiver. The source and receiver site were carefully treated. All instruments were well installed to ensure the system's repeatability. Seismic velocity across the fault zone was monitored with continuous observation. The recording system consists of Guralp-40T short period seismometer and RefTek-130B recorder which was continuously GPS timed up to 20us. The active source ran since June 20, 2009. It was operated routinely at night and working continuously from 21:00 to 02:00 of the next day. So far, we have gotten almost one year recording. The seismic velocity variation may be caused by changes of the fault zone medium mechanical property, fault stress, fluid, and earth tide, barometric pressure and rainfall. Deconvolution, stacking and cross-correlation analysis were used for the velocity analysis. Results show that the relationship between seismic velocity change and the aftershock events is very complicated. An earthquake of Ms 5.6 happened at 02:03 in the morning of June 30th 2009, which was very close to the observatory site. A 5 ~ 9ms of time delay, corresponding to 0.3% of relative direct S wave velocity decrease, was observed. These variations of the velocity are much more than the possible variations caused by barometric pressure, solid earth tide and instrument factors. We speculate that the velocity variations are caused by the co-seismic effects of the aftershock. Experiment shows that the accurately controlled eccentric mass source is suitable for the fault monitoring. Large numbers of stacking (a few days recording) was done in order to increase the S/N, consequently the time resolution is not high enough to analyze the refined aftershock physical process. Some new measurements(continuous GPS, corss-hole ultrasonic) are planed to be introduced. The observation data will be analyzed in details and combined with WFSD core and downhole measurements, so as to get the stress variation and fracture deformation information for WFSD fault dynamic analysis.

Yang, W.; Ge, H.; Wang, B.; Yuan, S.; Song, L.

2010-12-01

132

A CMOS fault extractor for inductive fault analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inductive fault analysis (IFA) method is presented and a description is given of the CMOS fault extraction program FXT. The IFA philosophy is to consider the causes of faults (manufacturing defects) and then simulate these causes to find the faults that are likely to occur in a circuit. FXT automates IFA for a CMOS technology by generating a list

F. Joel Ferguson; John Paul Shen

1988-01-01

133

ZAMBEZI: a parallel pattern parallel fault sequential circuit fault simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sequential circuit fault simulators use the multiple bits in a computer data word to accelerate simulation. We introduce, and implement, a new sequential circuit fault simulator, a parallel pattern parallel fault simulator, ZAMBEZI, which simultaneously simulates multiple faults with multiple vectors in one data word. ZAMBEZI is developed by enhancing the control flow, of existing parallel pattern algorithms. For a

Minesh B. Amin; Bapiraju Vinnakota

1996-01-01

134

Transient fault modeling and fault injection simulation  

E-print Network

An accurate transient fault model is presented in this thesis. A 7-term exponential current upset model is derived from the results of a device-level, 3-dimensional, single-event-upset simulation. A curve-fitting algorithm is used to extract...

Yuan, Xuejun

1996-01-01

135

System fault diagnostics using fault tree analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last 50 years advances in technology have led to an increase in the complexity and sophistication of systems. More complex systems can be harder to maintain and the root cause of a fault more difficult to isolate. Down-time resulting from a system failure can be dangerous or expensive depending on the type of system. In aircraft systems the

E. E. Hurdle; L. M. Bartlett; J. D. Andrews

2008-01-01

136

Characterization of Fault Zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

- There are currently three major competing views on the essential geometrical, mechanical, and mathematical nature of faults. The standard view is that faults are (possibly segmented and heterogeneous) Euclidean zones in a continuum solid. The continuum-Euclidean view is supported by seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic imaging studies; by successful modeling of observed seismic radiation, geodetic data, and changes in seismicity patterns; by detailed field studies of earthquake rupture zones and exhumed faults; and by recent high resolution hypocenter distributions along several faults. The second view focuses on granular aspects of fault structures and deformation fields. The granular view is supported by observations of rock particles in fault zone gouge; by studies of block rotations and the mosaic structure of the lithosphere (which includes the overall geometry of plate tectonics); by concentration of deformation signals along block boundaries; by correlation of seismicity patterns on scales several times larger than those compatible with a continuum framework; and by strongly heterogeneous wave propagation effects on the earth's surface. The third view is that faults are fractal objects with rough surfaces and branching geometry. The fractal view is supported by some statistical analysis of regional hypocenter locations; by long-range correlation of various measurements in geophysical boreholes; by the fact that observed power-law statistics of earthquakes are compatible with an underlying scale-invariant geometrical structure; by geometrical analysis of fault traces at the earth's surface; and by measurements of joint and fault surfaces topography.There are several overlaps between expected phenomenology in continuum-Euclidean, granular, and fractal frameworks of crustal deformation. As examples, highly heterogeneous seismic wavefields can be generated by granular media, by fractal structures, and by ground motion amplification around and scattering from an ensemble of Euclidean fault zones. A hierarchical granular structure may have fractal geometry. Power-law statistics of earthquakes can be generated by slip on one or more heterogeneous planar faults, by a fractal collection of faults, and by deformation of granular material. Each of the three frameworks can produce complex spatio-temporal patterns of earthquakes and faults. At present the existing data cannot distinguish unequivocally between the three different views on the nature of fault zones or determine their scale of relevance. However, in each observational category, the highest resolution results associated with mature large-displacement faults are compatible with the standard continuum-Euclidean framework. This can be explained by a positive feedback mechanism associated with strain weakening rheology and localization, which attracts the long-term evolution of faults toward progressive regularization and Euclidean geometry. A negative feedback mechanism associated with strain hardening during initial deformation phases and around persisting geometrical irregularities and conjugate sets of faults generates new fractures and granularity at different scales. We conclude that long-term deformation in the crust, including many aspects of the observed spatio-temporal complexity of earthquakes and faults, may be explained to first order within the continuum-Euclidean framework.

Ben-Zion, Y.; Sammis, C. G.

137

Fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley, California - Field survey and fault model test -  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to develop hydrologic characterization technology of fault zones, it is desirable to clarify the relationship between the geologic structure and hydrologic properties of fault zones. To this end, we are performing surface-based geologic and trench investigations, geophysical surveys and borehole-based hydrologic investigations along the Wildcat fault in Berkeley,California to investigate the effect of fault zone structure on regional hydrology. The present paper outlines the fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley on the basis of results from trench excavation surveys. The approximately 20 - 25 km long Wildcat fault is located within the Berkeley Hills and extends northwest-southeast from Richmond to Oakland, subparallel to the Hayward fault. The Wildcat fault, which is a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip fault, steps right in a releasing bend at the Berkeley Hills region. A total of five trenches have been excavated across the fault to investigate the deformation structure of the fault zone in the bedrock. Along the Wildcat fault, multiple fault surfaces are branched, bent, paralleled, forming a complicated shear zone. The shear zone is ~ 300 m in width, and the fault surfaces may be classified under the following two groups: 1) Fault surfaces offsetting middle Miocene Claremont Chert on the east against late Miocene Orinda formation and/or San Pablo Group on the west. These NNW-SSE trending fault surfaces dip 50 - 60° to the southwest. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 1 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 60 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault gouge and foliated cataclasite show normal right-slip shear sense. 2) Fault surfaces forming a positive flower structure in Claremont Chert. These NW-SE trending fault surfaces are sub-vertical or steeply dipping. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 3 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 200 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault gouge and foliated cataclasite show reverse right-slip shear sense. We are performing sandbox experiments to investigate the three-dimensional kinematic evolution of fault systems caused by oblique-slip motion. The geometry of the Wildcat fault in the Berkeley Hills region shows a strong resemblance to our sandbox experimental model. Based on these geological and experimental data, we inferred that the complicated fault systems were dominantly developed within the fault step and the tectonic regime switched from transpression to transtension during the middle to late Miocene along the Wildcat fault.

Ueta, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Karasaki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Hamada, T.; Sasaki, T.; Ito, H.; Tsukuda, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, J.; Moriya, T.

2010-12-01

138

Fault detection and isolation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

Bernath, Greg

1994-01-01

139

Fault diagnosis of analog circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, various fault location techniques in analog networks are described and compared. The emphasis is on the more recent developments in the subject. Four main approaches for fault location are addressed, examined, and illustrated using simple network examples. In particular, we consider the fault dictionary approach, the parameter identification approach, the fault verification approach, and the approximation approach.

J. W. Bandler; A. E. Salama

1985-01-01

140

Effects of fault propagation on superficial soils/gravel aquifer properties: The Chihshang Fault in Eastern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mature bedrock fault zone generally consists of a fault core, a damage zone, and a surrounding host rock with different permeabilities, which mainly depend on the fracture density. However, near the surface, when an active thrust fault propagates from bedrocks into an unconsolidated surface cover, it results in a diffused fault zone, which may influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties around the fault zone. It is thus of great concern to understand to which extent surface soil/gravel hydraulic properties modifications by continuously active faulting can impact geotechnical projects in countries under active tectonic context, such as Taiwan, where active faults often are blinded beneath thick soil/gravel covers. By contrast, it is also interesting to decipher those fault-induced permeability modifications to estimate potential activity precursors to large earthquakes. Here, we combined a variety of measurements and analyses on the Chihshang fault, located at the plate suture between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates, which converge at a rapid rate of 8 cm/yr in Taiwan. At the Chinyuan site, the Chihshang fault is propagating from depth to emerge through thick alluvial deposits. We characterized the fault geometry and slip behavior at the shallow level by measuring and analyzing horizontal, vertical displacements, and groundwater table across the surface fault zone. The yielded fault dip of 45o in the shallow alluvium is consistent with the observations from surface ruptures and subsurface core logging. The 7-year-long groundwater table record shows that the piezometric level in the hanging wall is about 8 meter higher than that in the footwall in the summer; and about 10 meter higher in the winter. Repeated slug tests have been monthly conducted since 2007 to provide the average permeability within the fault zone and the presumably low-deformed zone outside of the diffused fault zone. Based on in-situ measurements at four wells across the fault zone, a 2-D modeling of pore pressure distribution around the fault zone is conducted using the finite-difference method (FLAC3D). The results showed that the permeability within the fault zone is 10-10 cm2 and outside of the fault zone is 10-8 cm2. The low permeable zone is estimated to be about 4-5 meters thick, and its location matches with the main fault structures mapped from geological and geodetic results. This low permeability fault zone acts as a hydraulic boundary, which explains the difference in the piezometric levels observed within the soil aquifer across the fault zone. This study provides a good natural analogue to permeability changes induced by clay smearing during soft sediments faulting. It also shows the significant impact of active thrust faults on soft sediments aquifer drainage.

Mu, C.; Lee, J.; guglielmi, Y.

2013-12-01

141

A “mesh” of crossing faults: Fault networks of southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed geologic mapping of active fault systems in the western Salton Trough and northern Peninsular Ranges of southern California make it possible to expand the inventory of mapped and known faults by compiling and updating existing geologic maps, and analyzing high resolution imagery, LIDAR, InSAR, relocated hypocenters and other geophysical datasets. A fault map is being compiled on Google Earth and will ultimately discriminate between a range of different fault expressions: from well-mapped faults to subtle lineaments and geomorphic anomalies. The fault map shows deformation patterns in both crystalline and basinal deposits and reveals a complex fault mesh with many curious and unexpected relationships. Key findings are: 1) Many fault systems have mutually interpenetrating geometries, are grossly coeval, and allow faults to cross one another. A typical relationship reveals a dextral fault zone that appears to be continuous at the regional scale. In detail, however, there are no continuous NW-striking dextral fault traces and instead the master dextral fault is offset in a left-lateral sense by numerous crossing faults. Left-lateral faults also show small offsets where they interact with right lateral faults. Both fault sets show evidence of Quaternary activity. Examples occur along the Clark, Coyote Creek, Earthquake Valley and Torres Martinez fault zones. 2) Fault zones cross in other ways. There are locations where active faults continue across or beneath significant structural barriers. Major fault zones like the Clark fault of the San Jacinto fault system appears to end at NE-striking sinistral fault zones (like the Extra and Pumpkin faults) that clearly cross from the SW to the NE side of the projection of the dextral traces. Despite these blocking structures, there is good evidence for continuation of the dextral faults on the opposite sides of the crossing fault array. In some instances there is clear evidence (in deep microseismic alignments of hypocenters) that the master dextral faults zones pass beneath shallower crossing fault arrays above them and this mechanism may transfer strain through the blocking zones. 3) The curvature of strands of the Coyote Creek fault and the Elsinore fault are similar along their SE 60 km. The scale, locations and concavity of bends are so similar that their shape appears to be coordinated. The matching contractional and extensional bends suggests that originally straighter dextral fault zones may be deforming in response of coeval sinistral deformation between, beneath, and around them. 4) Deformation is strongly domainal with one style or geometry of structure dominating in one area then another in an adjacent area. Boundaries may be abrupt. 5) There are drastic lateral changes in the width of damage zones adjacent to master faults. Outlines of the deformation related to some dextral fault zones resemble a snake that has ingested a squirming cat or soccer ball. 6) A mesh of interconnected faults seems to transfer slip back and forth between structures. 7) Scarps are not necessarily more abundant on the long master faults than on connector or crossing faults. Much remains to be learned upon completion the fault map.

Janecke, S. U.

2009-12-01

142

Practical Byzantine Fault Tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our growing reliance on online services accessible on the Internet demands highly-available systemsthat provide correct service without interruptions. Byzantine faults such as software bugs, operatormistakes, and malicious attacks are the major cause of service interruptions. This thesis describesa new replication algorithm, BFT, that can be used to build highly-available systems that tolerateByzantine faults. It shows, for the first time, how

Miguel Castro

2001-01-01

143

Fault reactivation control on normal fault growth: an experimental study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field studies frequently emphasize how fault reactivation is involved in the deformation of the upper crust. However, this phenomenon is generally neglected (except in inversion models) in analogue and numerical models performed to study fault network growth. Using sand/silicon analogue models, we show how pre-existing discontinuities can control the geometry and evolution of a younger fault network. The models show that the reactivation of pre-existing discontinuities and their orientation control: (i) the evolution of the main fault orientation distribution through time, (ii) the geometry of relay fault zones, (iii) the geometry of small scale faulting, and (iv) the geometry and location of fault-controlled basins and depocenters. These results are in good agreement with natural fault networks observed in both the Gulf of Suez and Lake Tanganyika. They demonstrate that heterogeneities such as pre-existing faults should be included in models designed to understand the behavior and the tectonic evolution of sedimentary basins.

Bellahsen, Nicolas; Daniel, Jean Marc

2005-04-01

144

About RAPID  

Cancer.gov

The Rapid Access to Preventive Intervention Development (RAPID) Program makes the contract resources from NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention available to academic and academically-affiliated investigators for preclinical and early clinical drug development.

145

Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Insurance loss modeling for earthquakes utilizes available maps of active faulting produced by geoscientists. All such maps are subject to uncertainty, arising from lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history. Field work to undertake geological fault investigations drains human and monetary resources, and this inevitably limits the resolution of fault parameters. Some areas are more accessible than others; some may be of greater social or economic importance than others; some areas may be investigated more rapidly or diligently than others; or funding restrictions may have curtailed the extent of the fault mapping program. In contrast with the aleatory uncertainty associated with the inherent variability in the dynamics of earthquake fault rupture, uncertainty associated with lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history is epistemic. The extent of this epistemic uncertainty may vary substantially from one regional or national fault map to another. However aware the local cartographer may be, this uncertainty is generally not conveyed in detail to the international map user. For example, an area may be left blank for a variety of reasons, ranging from lack of sufficient investigation of a fault to lack of convincing evidence of activity. Epistemic uncertainty in fault parameters is of concern in any probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard, not least in insurance earthquake risk applications. A logic-tree framework is appropriate for incorporating epistemic uncertainty. Some insurance contracts cover specific high-value properties or transport infrastructure, and therefore are extremely sensitive to the geometry of active faulting. Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) to the capital markets may also be considered. In order for such insurance or ART contracts to be properly priced, uncertainty should be taken into account. Accordingly, an estimate is needed for the likelihood of surface rupture capable of causing severe damage. Especially where a high deductible is in force, this requires estimation of the epistemic uncertainty on fault geometry and activity. Transport infrastructure insurance is of practical interest in seismic countries. On the North Anatolian Fault in Turkey, there is uncertainty over an unbroken segment between the eastern end of the Dazce Fault and Bolu. This may have ruptured during the 1944 earthquake. Existing hazard maps may simply use a question mark to flag uncertainty. However, a far more informative type of hazard map might express spatial variations in the confidence level associated with a fault map. Through such visual guidance, an insurance risk analyst would be better placed to price earthquake cover, allowing for epistemic uncertainty.

Woo, G.

2005-12-01

146

Veinlet fault gouge and crushing-origin pseudotachylyte developed along the active Shimotsuburai fault, central Japan and its implication for seismotectoncs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Veinlet cataclastic rocks such as fault gouge and crushing-origin pseudotachylyte occurred as both simple veins and complicated networks within fault zones are generated by rapid comminution and injection during seismic faulting and are therefore considered to record fossil earthquakes. Accordingly the study of such veinlet rocks can provide evidence of seismic faulting within seismogenic fault zones. In this study, we report a typical veinlet cataclstic rock involving crushing-origin pseudotachylyte and fault gouge veins developed in granitic rocks along the Shimotsubrai Fault of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line and discuss the formation mechanisms. The Shimotsubrai Fault is a main active thrust fault of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL), central Japan, extending for ~12 km with a strand of NNW-SSE, which is bounded by the Upper Pleistocene sediments in the east and the grantic cataclasite in the west. The trenching surveys reveal that the most recent seismic faulting event occurred in the period between 1550±70 and 2350±60 yr. B.P. with a displacement of 1-1.2m along the main fault plane (Toda et al., 2000). Veinlet fault gouge and pseudotachylyte are widely developed along the fault plane and within the fault- fracture zone of less than 10 m in width. Both the fault gouge and pseudotachylyte veins observed along the fault plane show a simple and linear geometric feature, generally ranging from a few millimeters to 5 centimeters in thickness. In contrast, the fault gouge and pseudotachylyte veins developed within fault- fracture zone are generally distributed in the fractures as complex networks, generally ranging from sub- millimeter to 1 centimeter with a maximum width of 3 cm. Locally, some network veins are cut and offset by newly-formed injection veins. This finding shows that the injection vein-forming events occurred repeatedly in the same fault zone. The fault gouge veins are bluish gray to dark bluish gray in color and the pseuotachylyte veins generally show a dark and aphanitic appearance with a sharp contact with the country rocks. Microstructurally, both the fault gouge and pseudotachylyte veins are composed of fine-grained clasts derived from the country grantic rocks. All the clasts show an angular outline. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses show that both the fault gouge and injection pseudotachylyte vein are characterized by crystalline materials similar to those of the country rocks involving cataclasite. The crystalline peaks indicate that these veins are mainly composed of quartz and feldspar as those of the country granitic rocks. The analytical results show that the main rock-forming minerals of vainlets fault gouge and pseudotachylyte are the same as that of the country cataclasites derived from the grantic rocks. Based on the meso-micro structural features and powder X-ray diffraction analytical results, we conclude that i) the pseudotachylyte veins observed in this study are generated by crushing rather than melting, ii) the complex networks of fault gouge and pseudotachylyte veins developed within the fault-fracture zone repeatedly formed by rapid injection and fluidization of fine-grained clasts derived from the host grantic rocks during seismic faulting events along the active Shimotsubrai Fault of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line. Our results show that the veinlet cataclasitic rocks are a kind of "earthquake fossil" formed within seismogenic fault zone.

Shin, J.; Lin, A.; Kano, K.

2008-12-01

147

Dynamic pulverization by rapid decompression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years several studies have identified so-called ';pulverized rocks' on various crustal-scale faults, a type of intensely damaged fault rock which has undergone minimal shear strain, and the occurrence of which has been linked to damage induced by transient stress perturbations during earthquake rupture. Several dynamic mechanisms have been proposed for the generation of pulverized rocks, such as compressive loading by high-frequency stress pulses due to the radiation of seismic waves and/or explosive dilation in tension in rocks containing pressurized pore fluids due to instantaneous reductions in fault-normal stress. Here, we demonstrate an explosive pulverization mechanism by imparting rapid drops in gas confining pressure for gas-saturated (effectively unconfined) rock samples. Using a specially designed pressure vessel allowing near-instantaneous decompression of rock samples via a large-diameter blow-out diaphragm, we show that low-permeability granitic rocks can pulverize by pore fluid-driven volumetric expansion (i.e. hydrofracture) where the confining pressure drops faster than the pore pressure of the rock. Microstructural observations show pervasive pulverization with minor shear in granitic samples, and significantly less damage in limestone and sandstones which have higher initial permeabilities. Permeability measurements on granitic samples following rapid decompression show increases of nearly 4 orders of magnitude in permeability, to values as high as 10-15 m2, and reductions in ultrasonic P-wave velocities of up to 60 %, compared to the starting samples. We propose that for ruptures that generate dynamic reductions in local stress, absolute tension is not necessarily required for pervasive damage or pulverization; rather, providing that the permeability of the fault rocks is low enough, a rapid drop in confining pressure below the pore fluid pressure by at least the tensile strength of the rock may cause pulverization. This may explain field observations suggesting that pulverized rocks surround faults cutting low-permeability crystalline rock. Pulverization by rapid decompression in seismogenic faults is likely controlled by complex interplays between rock permeability and tensile strength, pore fluid pressure and the magnitude and duration of the transient stress reduction.

Mitchell, T. M.; Billi, A.; Miller, S. A.; Goldsby, D. L.; Scholz, C. H.; Gran, J. K.; Simons, J.

2013-12-01

148

Sliding along Coulombic shear faults in ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New experiments have been performed on the resistance to inelastic deformation through frictional sliding along naturally-formed Coulombic shear faults in ice Ih. Coulombic faults mark terminal failure of virgin material when loaded rapidly under a moderate degree of confinement. The experiments were performed on S2 fresh-water ice at -10degreesC, proportionally loaded biaxially across the columns along a variety of all-compressive paths. Two kinds of behavior were observed. At higher sliding velocities (8 x 10(-2) and 8 x 10(-1) mm s(-1)) sliding was noisy and the process exhibited velocity weakening. At a lower sliding velocity (8 x 10(-4) mm s(-1)) sliding was quiet and fault healing occurred. The two kinds of sliding are indicative of brittle-like (at higher speeds) and ductile-like (at lower speeds) behavior, and are explained in terms of fracture and creep. Within the brittle regime, a power law describes the relationship between the shear strength of the fault and the normal stress across it at the onset of sliding, while Coulomb's law describes the relationship once sliding has progressed by about 2 mm.

Fortt, A.; Schulson, E. M.; Russell, E.

2003-01-01

149

Fault-tolerant, Universal Adiabatic Quantum Computation  

E-print Network

Quantum computation has revolutionary potential for speeding computational tasks such as factoring and simulating quantum systems, but the task of constructing a quantum computer is daunting. Adiabatic quantum computation and other ``hands-off" approaches relieve the need for rapid, precise pulsing to control the system, inspiring at least one high-profile effort to realize a hands-off quantum computing device. But is hands-off incompatible with fault-tolerant? Concerted effort and many innovative ideas have not resolved this question but have instead deepened it, linking it to fundamental problems in quantum complexity theory. Here we present a hands-off approach that is provably (a) capable of scalable universal quantum computation in a non-degenerate ground state and (b) fault-tolerant against an analogue of the usual local stochastic fault model. A satisfying physical and numerical argument indicates that (c) it is also fault-tolerant against thermal excitation below a threshold temperature independent of the computation size.

Ari Mizel

2014-03-30

150

Medieval glass from the Cathedral in Paderborn: a comparative study using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled laser ablation mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have investigated four stained glass samples recovered from an archaeological excavation at the Cathedral in Paderborn (Germany) between 1978 and 1980. On two of the samples there are parts of paintings. Concentrations of major elements were determined using two independent techniques: LA-ICP-MS (a UV laser ablation microsampler combined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and synchrotron radiation X-ray excited X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). The SR-XRF data were quantified by using the program package PyMCA developed by the software group of the ESRF in Grenoble. Significant differences were found between the concentrations determined by the two techniques that can be explained by concentration gradients near the surface of the glasses caused, for example, by corrosion/leaching processes and the different surface sensitivities of the applied techniques. For several of the elements that were detected in the glass and in the colour pigments used for the paintings X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded in order to determine the chemical speciation of the elements of interest. As was expected, most elements in the glass were found as oxides in their most stable form. Two notable exceptions were observed: titanium was not found as rutile—the most stable form of TiO2—but in the form of anatase, and lead was not found in one defined chemical state but as a complex mixture of oxide, sulphate, and other compounds.

Hormes, J.; Roy, A.; Bovenkamp, G.-L.; Simon, K.; Kim, C.-Y.; Börste, N.; Gai, S.

2013-04-01

151

Novel methodology for the extraction and identification of natural dyestuffs in historical textiles by HPLC-UV-Vis-ESI MS. Case study: chasubles from the Wawel Cathedral collection.  

PubMed

High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with spectrophotometric and electrospray mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-UV-Vis-ESI MS) was used for characterization of natural dyes present in historical art works. The gradient program was developed for identification of 29 colorants of various polarities. Dual detection system (UV-Vis and ESI MS) allowed differentiation of all compounds, even if they were not completely separated. This enabled examination of more color compounds over a substantially shorter time in comparison with previously recommended methods. Moreover, for extraction of colorants from historical textiles a two-step sequential procedure was proposed, excluding evaporation used in earlier procedures. The developed method was successfully applied to identification of indigotin, carminic, kermesic, flavokermesic, dcII, dcIV, dcVII, and ellagic acids as well as luteolin, apigenin, and genistein in red, violet, and green fibers taken from three selected historical chasubles which belong to the collection of the Wawel Cathedral treasury (Cracow, Poland). Italian textiles from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, of which chasubles were made, were dyed with a limited number of dyestuffs, consistently used for all batches of fabrics. The obtained results also allowed confirmation of the structure of the so-called "dcII" component of cochineal as a C-glucose derivative of flavokermesic acid. PMID:21188578

Lech, Katarzyna; Jarosz, Maciej

2011-03-01

152

Long-Term Monitoring of Fresco Paintings in the Cathedral of Valencia (Spain) Through Humidity and Temperature Sensors in Various Locations for Preventive Conservation  

PubMed Central

We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999). PMID:22164100

Zarzo, Manuel; Fernández-Navajas, Angel; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

2011-01-01

153

Subsurface fault geometry inferred from topographic relief and footwall geologic information: An example from the Ikoma fault zone, southwest Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To improve seismic hazard assessment caused by inland earthquakes, it is necessary to clarify subsurface fault geometry and fault slip sense. Although seismic reflection profiles are commonly used to image subsurface fault geometry and associated deformation, there are numerous technical and conditional limitations that often prevent us seeing deeper extension of the fault. To perform the best estimate of the subsurface fault at seismogenic depth, we use all the geomorphic and geologic information to better constrain numerical fault models. Here we choose the Ikoma fault zone, east of the Osaka plain, southwest Japan, as a case study to infer subsurface fault geometry with a great deal of shallow geologic information. The Ikoma fault zone composes a part of NS-trending topographic relief of basins and ranges in Osaka-Kyoto region where significant EW contraction has been continuously occurring in the late Quaternary (Huzita, 1962). To model the east Osaka basin and the Ikoma Mountains, both of which corresponds to footwall and hanging wall of the Ikoma fault, we employ dislocation model in an elastic half space of Okada (1992). We first calculate surface displacement with a simple rectangular fault, and then compare with the present topographic profile across the fault. We find our best estimate of the fault width, dip, and top depth to maximize the cross correlation and/or to minimize the root mean square of the residual between the model and the topographic profile by grid search technique. Since we apply the dislocation model to the topographic profile across an active fault, we introduce information of the confirmed fault position at the Earth's surface into our model when calculated displacement pattern and topographic cross section are compared. Our result shows that a 14-km-wide shallow dipping thrust fault better explains the topographic relief across the Ikoma fault. However, such fault models cannot reproduce the basin-forming deformation on the footwall. Numerous geologic data of pre-Tertiary bedrock, Pleistocene to Holocene marine and non-marine sediments beneath the Osaka plane (e.g., Horikawa et al., 2003) provide several well-constrained chronological key units which allow us to incorporate the information into our models. In the case of bedrock deformation, our best estimate is a combination of fault width 19km, dip 50°, and top depth 2 km. To explain the thick Quaternary sedimentary units up to ~1,500 m on the footwall, fault dip must be deeper than 50°. None of the traditional geologic fold models (e.g., fault-propagation fold), most of which take detachment into account, can explain such significant basin subsidence. However, one could criticize limitations of the elastic half space model for the long-term geologic processes of tens of thousand years to a few million years. We thus intend to perform further experiments considering viscoelastic relaxation of lower crust, topographic change in upheaval side due to rapid surface erosion, newly-formed dislocation (fault) beyond elaselastic limit.

Tani, E.; Toda, S.

2013-12-01

154

Late Quaternary activity of the Feldbiss Fault Zone, Roer Valley Rift System, the Netherlands, based on displaced fluvial terrace fragments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Meuse River crosses the Feldbiss Fault Zone, one of the main border fault zones of the Roer Valley Graben in the southern part of the Netherlands. Uplift of the area south of the Feldbiss Fault Zone forced the Meuse River to incise and, as a result, a flight of terraces was formed. Faults of the Feldbiss Fault Zone have displaced the Middle and Late Pleistocene terrace deposits. In this study, an extensive geomorphological survey was carried out to locate the faults of the Feldbiss Fault Zone and to determine the displacement history of terrace deposits. The Feldbiss Fault Zone is characterized by an average displacement rate of 0.041-0.047 mm a -1 during the Late Pleistocene. Individual faults show an average displacement rate ranging between 0.010 and 0.034 mm a -1. The spatial variation in displacement rates along the individual faults reveals a system of overstepping faults. These normal faults developed by reactivation of Paleozoic strike-slip faults. As fault displacements at the bases of the younger terrace deposits are apparently similar to the tops of the adjacent older terrace, the age of these horizons is the same within thousands of years. This implies that the model of terrace development by rapid fluvial incision followed by slow aggradation does apply for this area.

Houtgast, R. F.; Van Balen, R. T.; Bouwer, L. M.; Brand, G. B. M.; Brijker, J. M.

2002-08-01

155

Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

2011-01-01

156

Development of a bridge fault extractor tool  

E-print Network

complete list of realistic two-node bridging faults. The DEFAM (Defect to Fault Mapper) fault extractor tool [23] was one of the first hierarchical fault extractors. The DEFAM tool consists of three main parts: 1) Hierarchy Identification 11 2...

Bhat, Nandan D.

2005-02-17

157

Stresses and Faulting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module is designed for students in an introductory structural geology course. While key concepts are described here, it is assumed that the students will have access to a good textbook to augment the information presented here. Learning goals: (1) Understand the role of gravity and rock properties in producing stresses in the shallow Earth. (2) Graphically represent stress states using Mohr diagrams. (3) Determine failure criteria from the results of laboratory experiments. (4) Explore the interaction of gravity-induced and tectonic stresses on fault formation. (5) Apply models of fault formation to predict fault behavior in two natural settings: San Onofre Beach in southern California and Canyonland National Park in Utah. The module is implemented entirely using Microsoft Excel. This program was selected due to its widespread availability and relative ease-of-use. It is assumed that students are familiar with using equations and graphing tools in Excel.

Linda Reinen

158

Transition-fault test generation  

E-print Network

. One way to detect these timing defects is to apply test patterns to the integrated circuit that are generated using the transition-fault model. Unfortunately, industry's current transition-fault test generation schemes produce test sets that are too...

Cobb, Bradley Douglas

2013-02-22

159

Fault-Scarp Degradation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this exercise, students investigate the evolution of Earth's surface over time, as governed by the balance between constructional (tectonic) processes and destructional (erosional) processes. Introductory materials explain the processes of degradation, including the concepts of weathering-limited versus transport-limited slopes, and diffusion modeling. Using the process of diffusion modeling, students will determine how a slope changes through four 100-year time steps, calculate gradient angles for a fault scarp, and compare parameters calculated for two fault scarps, attempting to determine the age of the scarp created by the older, unknown earthquake. Example problems, study questions, and a bibliography are provided.

Nicholas Pinter

160

Computer hardware fault administration  

DOEpatents

Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Megerian, Mark G. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2010-09-14

161

Fault tolerant linear actuator  

DOEpatents

In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

Tesar, Delbert

2004-09-14

162

Fault Rate Acceleration and Low Angle Normal Faulting: The Hunter Mountain Fault, California.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Panamint Valley, Hunter Mountain, Saline Range (PHS) faults are, together with the Death Valley and Owens Valley faults, one of the three major fault zones within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ). The ECSZ is the most active fault system bounding the Basin and Range to the southwest with approximately 10 mm/yr of cumulative slip along strike-slip and trans-tensional segments. Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a geodetic technique that allows measurement of ground motion at a mm/yr accuracy over large areas with a high measurement sampling. We processed a large number of data to investigate ground motion in the PHS fault system to shed light on the interseismic strain accumulation and its relation to the fault geometry. Results indicate high strain rate over the Hunter Mountain fault, possibly showing slip rate acceleration of the fault since inception time. The locking depth of the fault inferred from elastic modeling of interseismic strain accumulation is on the order of a few kilometers, significantly shallower than for neighboring faults. The shallow locking depth inferred for the Hunter Mountain fault corresponds to the extension at depth of two suggested bounding low angle normal faults. This finding reinforced recent field study findings about possible activity of the low angle normal fault system.

Gourmelen, N.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.; Manzo, M.; Casu, F.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

2008-05-01

163

Analyzing Fault/Fracture Patterns  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During a lab period, students go out in the field to an area that contains at least 2 fault/fracture sets. Students measure orientations of faults and make observations about the relationship between different fault sets. After the field trip, the students compile their field data, plot it on a stereonet and write-up a brief report. In this report students will use their field observations and stereonet patterns to determine whether faults are related or unrelated to each other.

Jamie Levine

164

Examine animations of fault motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed for high school students, this Earth science resource provides animations of each of four different fault types: normal, reverse, thrust, and strike-slip faults. Each animation has its own set of movie control buttons, and arrows in each animation indicate the direction of force that causes that particular kind of fault. The introductory paragraph defines the terms fault plane, handing wall, and footwall--features that are labeled at the end of the appropriate animations. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

2003-01-01

165

Fault reconstruction from sensor and actuator failures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many fault detection filters have been developed to detect and identify sensor and actuator faults by using analytical redundancy. In this paper, an approach for reconstructing sensor and actuator faults from the residual generated by the fault detection filter is proposed. The transfer matrix from the faults to the residual is derived in terms of the eigenvalues of the fault

Robert H. Chen; Jason L. Speyer

2001-01-01

166

Optimal stochastic multiple-fault detection filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A class of robust fault detection filters is generalized from detecting single fault to multiple faults. This generalization is called the optimal stochastic multiple-fault detection filter since in the formulation, the unknown fault amplitudes are modeled as white noise. The residual space of the filter is divided into several subspaces and each subspace is sensitive to only one fault (target

Robert H. Chen; Jason L. Speyer

1999-01-01

167

Depth Dependence of the Fault Strength in the Creeping Section of the Atotsugawa Fault, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Atotsugawa fault is located along a highly deformed region in central Japan with 60km long, striking to N60°E and dipping to 90° ± 10°. From the laser distance measurement survey, a creeping section (1.5mm/y) was found in the northeastern part [Geogr. Surv. Inst., 1997]. In this section, a low seismicity area down to a depth of 7km was found above the seismically active region down to 15 km [Ito and Wada, 1999]. In order to investigate the depth dependent feature of the fault strength, we conducted tri-axial friction tests of the Atotsugawa fault gouge under the conditions of 1, 3, 5 and 7km depth. The NIED drilled a borehole in the fault zone down to a depth of 350m in this creeping section [Omura et al., 2004] and obtained core samples consisting of fault gouge, fault breccia and fractured host rocks (granitic rocks and hornblende gneiss). The samples are taken in the gouge zone (8.5mm in thickness) located at a depth of 342 m. The samples were disaggregated in distilled water and passed through a 100?m diameter sieve for the friction tests. From the XRD analysis, the gouge sample consists of quartz, feldspar, smectite, kaolinite and micas. The average grain size in the sample was approximately 16.9?m measured by a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. The friction tests were run using a gas-medium tri-axial apparatus at the AIST, Japan [Masuda et al., 2002]. For each run, 0.5g gouge powder was put between 30° sawcut of an alumina ceramic cylinder (20mm in diameter) and sheared at a constant axial slip rate of 0.1?m/s. Each test was done with pore fluid of distilled water at the temperature-pressure conditions of 1-7 km depths assuming a hydrostatic pore-pressure gradient of 10MPa/km, a lithostatic confining pressure gradient of 26MPa/km and a geothermal gradient of 30°C/km. In all experiments, the friction increases rapidly to an axial displacement of about 0.1mm, and then it gradually increases or becomes steady state. We found a strong depth dependence of friction; it increases from 0.25 - 0.3 at 1km to 0.5 at 7km. We need additional experiments to obtain a physical explanation on this depth dependence. However this result gives us useful information for the creeping motion observed at the Atotsugawa fault. If the creeping motion terminates at a depth around 7km corresponding to the lower boundary of the seismic gap, the frictional strength deeper than 7km should be equal to or more than the shear stress applied to the fault from the tectonic stress field. As far as a linear dependence of stress along the depth is assumed, the ratio of shear stress to effective normal stress (normal stress - hydrostatic pore pressure) on the fault should be constant. At shallow part where the friction is smaller than 0.5, the fault cannot sustain the applied shear stress and it is forced to slip. Slip along the fault results in a decrease in the applied shear stress. We modeled the creeping motion along the fault to balance the applied stress and the depth dependent fault strength obtained by the experiments. The obtained model is that at a depth of 0-2km the fault creeps at a rate of 1.5mm/y and it decreases down to 0.75mm/y at a depth of 6-8km.

Mizoguchi, K.; Fukuyama, E.; Kitamura, K.; Takahashi, M.; Masuda, K.

2005-12-01

168

New high impedance fault detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The high impedance fault detection in power system is one of the hard works and if the fault does not clear then the power system may get into damage. In this paper a new method for high impedance fault detection is proposed. The proposed method is based on the chaotic and doffing function. The paper will propose the appropriate formula

A. Siadatan; H. Kazemi Karegar; V. Najmi

2010-01-01

169

A decentralized fault detection filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce the decentralized fault detection filter which is the structure that results from merging decentralized estimation theory with a game theoretic fault detection filter. A decentralized approach may be the ideal way to health monitor large-scale systems for faults, since it decomposes the problem down into (potentially smaller) “local” problems and then blends the “local” results into a “global”

W. H. Chung; Jason L. Speyer

1998-01-01

170

Tolerating transient faults in MARS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concepts of transient fault handling in the MARS architecture are discussed. After an overview of the MARS architecture, the mechanisms for the detection of transient faults are discussed in detail. In addition to extensive checks in the hardware and in the operating system, time-redundant execution of application tasks is proposed for the detection of transient faults. The time difference

H. Kopetz; H. Kantz; G. Grunsteidl; P. Puschner; J. Reisinger

1990-01-01

171

Diagnosable Systems for Intermittent Faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diagnosable systems composed of interconnected units which are capable of testing each other have been studied primarily from the point of view of permanent faults. Along such lines, designs have been proposed, and necessary and sufficient conditions for the diagnosis of such faults have been established. In this paper, we study the intermittent fault diagnosis capabilities of such systems. Necessary

Sivanarayana Mallela; Gerald M. Masson

1978-01-01

172

Fault-Related Rocks From The Thrust Fault Zone in Miaoli Area, West Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taiwan is located in the orogenic belt, which the fault-related earthquakes were very common and severe in last few myrs. However, there are no any fault-related rocks have been reported until now. This research is the first article to report an unambiguous occurrence of pseudotachylyte and cataclasite in Taiwan. The fault-related rocks, including the pseudotachylyte and cataclasite have been found in the drilled core, about 600 meters in depth below the surface in the western foothill sedimentary sequences of Miaoli area, Taiwan. The pseudotachylytes are thin, submillimeter to centimeter in thickness and distribute intercalated in thick fault zone. They dominantly occur as injection veins, which contact sharply with host rocks, the sandstones and siltstones, and normal or cut with the major shearing zone. Petrogaphically, the pseudotachylytes consist of a black or dark brown, fine-grained to glassy aphanitic matrix with microlites, rounded or embayed clasts and numerous rock and mineral fragments. The presence of pseudotachylytes indicates that the fault zone has suffered the rapid seismic displacements. The cataclastic rocks include non-foliated clast-supported to matrix-supported cataclasites and foliated clastic-supported cataclasites. The former form either thin dark films underlining isolated shear plane or accumulating as thick lens or pods. The later have large varieties in structures, such as thin dark films displaying S-C fabrics silimar to those of mylonites, injected veins and well-polished slickensided surface. Under the microscope, the muscovite fragments show the structures of brittle-plastic shearing processes, such as fish, cleavage-steps, bending and folding. Those characteristics of cataclasites infer that the cataclasites may form under either the slow seismic movement or aseismic creep. From the occurrence, location and regional geology, this fault zone with abundant fault-related rocks may be correlated to the Shenchoshan thrust fault, which is a seismic fault moved in 1935. The coeval formation of pseudotachylyte and foliated cataclasite infers that the seismic displacement and aseismic creep occurred in the same shear zone.

Song, S.; Chen, H.; Li, L.; Liu, C.; Kuo, L.

2001-12-01

173

Constructing arbitrary Steane code single logical qubit fault-tolerant gates  

E-print Network

We present a simple method for constructing optimal fault-tolerant approximations of arbitrary unitary gates using an arbitrary discrete universal gate set. The method presented is numerical and scales exponentially with the number of gates used in the approximation. However, for the specific case of arbitrary single-qubit gates and the fault-tolerant gates permitted by the concatenated 7-qubit Steane code, we find gate sequences sufficiently long and accurate to permit the fault-tolerant factoring of numbers thousands of bits long. A general scaling law of how rapidly these fault-tolerant approximations converge to arbitrary single-qubit gates is also determined.

Austin G. Fowler

2010-12-20

174

Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

Nason, R.

1979-01-01

175

Row fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

2010-02-23

176

Row fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

2012-02-07

177

Row fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

2008-10-14

178

Implications of Fault Constitutive Properties for Earthquake Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulation for fault slip characterizes an exceptional variety of materials over a wide range of sliding conditions. This formulation provides a unified representation of diverse sliding phenomena including slip weakening over a characteristic sliding distance Dc, apparent fracture energy at a rupture front, time-dependent healing after rapid slip, and various other transient and slip rate

James H. Dieterich; Brian Kilgore

1996-01-01

179

Diagnosis of Interconnect Faults in Cluster-Based FPGA Architectures  

E-print Network

Diagnosis of Interconnect Faults in Cluster-Based FPGA Architectures Ian Harris and Russell Tessier. Cluster-based FPGA architectures, in which several logic blocks are grouped together into a coarse-grained logic block, are rapidly becoming the architecture of choice for major FPGA manufacturers. The high

Harris, Ian G.

180

Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

Padilla, Peter A.

1991-03-01

181

An analysis of the black crusts from the Seville Cathedral: a challenge to deepen the understanding of the relationships among microstructure, microchemical features and pollution sources.  

PubMed

The Cathedral of Seville is one of the most important buildings in the whole of southern Spain. It suffers, like most of the historical buildings located in urban environments, from several degradation phenomena related to the high pollution level. Undoubtedly, the formation of black crusts plays a crucial role in the decay of the stone materials belonging to the church. Their formation occurs mainly on carbonate building materials, whose interaction with a sulfur oxide-enriched atmosphere leads to the transformation of calcium carbonate (calcite) into calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) which, together with embedded carbonaceous particles, forms the black crusts on the stone surface. To better understand the composition and the formation dynamics of this degradation product and to identify the pollutant sources and evaluate their impact on the stone material, an analytical study was carried out on the black crust samples collected from different areas of the building. For a complete characterization of the black crusts, several techniques were used, including laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, micro infrared spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy. This battery of tests provided information about the nature and distribution of the mineralogical phases and the elements within the crusts and the crust-substrate interface, contributing to the identification of the major pollution sources responsible for the deterioration of the monument over time. In addition, the results revealed a relation among the height of sampling, the surface exposure and the concentration of heavy metals. Finally, information has been provided about the origin of the concentration gradients of some metals. PMID:25260161

Ruffolo, Silvestro A; Comite, Valeria; La Russa, Mauro F; Belfiore, Cristina M; Barca, Donatella; Bonazza, Alessandra; Crisci, Gino M; Pezzino, Antonino; Sabbioni, Cristina

2015-01-01

182

Fault diagnosis of analog circuits  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, various fault location techniques in analog networks are described and compared. The emphasis is on the more recent developments in the subject. Four main approaches for fault location are addressed, examined, and illustrated using simple network examples. In particular, we consider the fault dictionary approach, the parameter identification approach, the fault verification approach, and the approximation approach. Theory and algorithms that are associated with these approaches are reviewed and problems of their practical application are identified. Associated with the fault dictionary approach we consider fault dictionary construction techniques, methods of optimum measurement selection, different fault isolation criteria, and efficient fault simulation techniques. Parameter identification techniques that either utilize linear or nonlinear systems of equations to identify all network elements are examined very thoroughly. Under fault verification techniques we discuss node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. For the approximation approach we consider probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods. The artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are also considered. The main features of the techniques considered are summarized in a comparative table. An extensive, but not exhaustive, bibliography is provided.

Bandler, J.W.; Salama, A.E.

1985-08-01

183

Fault-slip directions in central and southern Greece measured from striated and corrugated fault planes: Comparison with focal mechanism and geodetic data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fault-slip directions recorded by outcropping striated and corrugated fault planes in central and southern Greece have been measured for comparison with extension directions derived from focal mechanism and Global Positioning System (GPS) data for the last ˜100 years to test how far back in time velocity fields and deformation dynamics derived from the latter data sets can be extrapolated. The fault-slip data have been collected from the basin-bounding faults to Plio-Pleistocene to recent extensional basins and include data from arrays of footwall faults formed during the early stages of fault growth. We show that the orientation of the inferred stress field varies along faults and earthquake ruptures, so we use only slip-directions from the centers of faults, where dip-slip motion occurs, to constrain regionally significant extension directions. The fault-slip directions for the Peloponnese and Gulfs of Evia and Corinth are statistically different at the 99% confidence level but statistically the same as those implied by earthquake focal mechanisms for each region at the 99% confidence level; they are also qualitatively similar to the principal strain axes derived from GPS studies. Extension directions derived from fault-slip data are 043-047° for the southern Peloponnese, 353° for the Gulf of Corinth, and 015-014° for the Gulf of Evia. Extension on active normal faults in the two latter areas appears to grade into strike-slip along the North Anatolian Fault through a gradual change in fault-slip directions and fault strikes. To reconcile the above with 5° Myr-1 clockwise rotations suggested for the area, we suggest that the faults considered formed during a single phase of extension. The deformation and formation of the normal fault systems examined must have been sufficiently rapid and recent for rotations about vertical axes to have been unable to disperse the fault-slip directions from the extension directions implied by focal mechanisms and GPS data. Thus, in central and southern Greece the velocity fields derived from focal mechanism and GPS data may help explain the dynamics of the deformation over longer time periods than the ˜100 years over which they were measured; this may include the entire deformation history of the fault systems considered, a time period that may exceed 1-2 Myr.

Roberts, Gerald P.; Ganas, Athanassios

2000-10-01

184

3-D kinematics analysis of surface ruptures on an active creeping fault at Chihshang, Eastern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chihshang fault is one of the most active segments of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the plate suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates. A destructive earthquake of M 7.1 with substantial surface scarps resulted from rupturing of the Chihshang fault in 1951. From that on, no big earthquake greater than M 5.5 occurred in this area. Instead, the Chihshang fault reveals a creeping behavior at a rapid rate of about 20 mm/yr at least during the past 20 years. The surface breaks of the creeping Chihshang fault can be observed at the several places. A typical feature is reverse-fault-like fractures on the retaining wall. We deployed small geodetic networks across the fault zone at five sites. Each network comprises of 5 to 15 benchmarks. Trilateration measurements including angles and distances as well as leveling among the benchmarks have been carried out on an annual basis or twice a year since 1998. Compared to previous other measurements which have shown the first order creep rate for the entire fault zone, the present geodetic data provides the detailed information of the surface movements across the fault zone which usually composed of more than one fault strands and folds structures. According to our data from the local geodetic networks, we are able to reconstruct the 3-D kinematics of surface deformation across the Chihshang fault zone. Multiple fault strands are common along the Chihshang fault. Oblique shortening occurred at all sites and was characterized by a combination of thrusts, backthrust and surface warps. Strike-slip motion can also be distinguished on some fault strands. It is worth to note that the cultural feature, such as concrete basement of strong resistance, sometimes acted as deflection of surface ruptures. It should be taken into consideration for mitigation against seismic hazards.

Lee, J.; Angelier, J.; Chen, H.; Chu, H.; Hu, J.

2003-12-01

185

The San Andreas Fault 'Supersite' (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An expanded and permanent Supersite has been proposed to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for the San Andreas Fault system, based upon the successful initial Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Geohazard Supersite for the Los Angeles region from 2009-2013. As justification for the comprehensive San Andreas Supersite, consider the earthquake history of California, in particular the devastating M 7.8 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which occurred along the San Andreas Fault, as did an earthquake of similar magnitude in 1857 in southern California. Los Angeles was only a small town then, but now the risk exposure has increased for both of California's megacities. Between the San Francisco and Los Angeles urban areas lies a section of the San Andreas Fault known to creep continually, so it has relatively less earthquake hazard. It used to be thought of as capable of stopping earthquakes entering it from either direction. Transitional behavior at either end of the creeping section is known to display a full range of seismic to aseismic slip events and accompanying seismicity and strain transient events. Because the occurrence of creep events is well documented by instrumental networks such as CISN and PBO, the San Andreas Supersite can be expected to be especially effective. A good baseline level of geodetic data regarding past events and strain accumulation and release exists. Many prior publications regarding the occurrence of geophysical phenomena along the San Andreas Fault system mean that in order to make novel contributions, state-of-the-art science will be required within this Supersite region. In more recent years, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck adjacent to the San Andreas Fault and caused the most damage along the western side of the San Francisco Bay Area. More recently, the concern has focused on the potential for future events along the Hayward Fault along the eastern side of San Francisco Bay. In Southern California, earthquakes struck in 1992 (Landers), 1994 (Northridge) and 1999 (Hector Mine) as well as the 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah (EM-C) earthquake (just south of the US-Mexico border). Of these four notable events, all produced extensive surface faulting except for the 1994 Northridge event, which was close to the Los Angeles urban area on a buried thrust fault. Northridge caused by far the most destruction, topping $20B (US) and resulting in 57 fatalities due to its location under an urban area. The Landers, Hector Mine and EM-C events occurred in desert areas away from major urban centers, and each proved to be a new and unique test-bed for making rapid progress in earthquake science and creative use of geodetic imagery. InSAR studies were linked to GPS deformation and mapping of surface ruptures and seismicity in a series of important papers about these earthquakes. The hazard in California remains extremely high, with tens of millions of people living in close proximity to the San Andreas Fault system as it runs past both San Francisco and Los Angeles. Dense in-situ networks of seismic and geodetic instruments are continually used for research and earthquake monitoring, as well as development of an earthquake early warning capability. Principles of peer review from funding agencies and open data availability will be observed for all data. For all of these reasons, the San Andreas Fault system is highly appropriate for consideration as a world-class permanent Supersite in the GEO framework.

Hudnut, K. W.

2013-12-01

186

Internal structure, fault rocks, and inferences regarding deformation, fluid flow, and mineralization in the seismogenic Stillwater normal fault, Dixie Valley, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Outcrop mapping and fault-rock characterization of the Stillwater normal fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada are used to document and interpret ancient hydrothermal fluid flow and its possible relationship to seismic deformation. The fault zone is composed of distinct structural and hydrogeological components. Previous work on the fault rocks is extended to the map scale where a distinctive fault core shows a spectrum of different fault-related breccias. These include predominantly clast-supported breccias with angular clasts that are cut by zones containing breccias with rounded clasts that are also clast supported. These are further cut by breccias that are predominantly matrix supported with angular and rounded clasts. The fault-core breccias are surrounded by a heterogeneously fractured damage zone. Breccias are bounded between major, silicified slip surfaces, forming large pod-like structures, systematically oriented with long axes parallel to slip. Matrix-supported breccias have multiply brecciated, angular and rounded clasts revealing episodic deformation and fluid flow. These breccias have a quartz-rich matrix with microcrystalline anhedral, equant, and pervasively conformable mosaic texture. The breccia pods are interpreted to have formed by decompression boiling and rapid precipitation of hydrothermal fluids whose flow was induced by coseismic, hybrid dilatant-shear deformation and hydraulic connection to a geothermal reservoir. The addition of hydrothermal silica cement localized in the core at the map scale causes fault-zone widening, local sealing, and mechanical heterogeneities that impact the evolution of the fault zone throughout the seismic cycle. ?? 2010.

Caine, J.S.; Bruhn, R.L.; Forster, C.B.

2010-01-01

187

Earthquakes and Fault Lines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this activity is for students to find the locations of the fault lines in Utah and understand that fault lines are often earthquake zones. They will learn how often earthquakes are expected to occur, when Utah is due for another one, and where the next one is expected to occur. This meets the Utah Core Standard for fifth grade science: Standard 2: Students will understand that volcanoes, earthquakes, uplift, weathering, and erosion reshape Earth's surface. Objective 1,c: Explain the relationship between time and specific geological changes. Objective 2: Explain how volcanoes, earthquakes, and uplift affect Earth's surface. Situation You are from Montana, and your dad just got a new job in Northern Utah. Your family will have to move there. Your parents have heard that Utah has the potential for major earthquakes, and don?t know where to build your new house. They ...

Miss Bennington

2010-04-26

188

Managing Fault Management Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

McDougal, John M.

2010-01-01

189

Randomness fault detection system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method and apparatus are provided for detecting a fault on a power line carrying a line parameter such as a load current. The apparatus monitors and analyzes the load current to obtain an energy value. The energy value is compared to a threshold value stored in a buffer. If the energy value is greater than the threshold value a counter is incremented. If the energy value is greater than a high value threshold or less than a low value threshold then a second counter is incremented. If the difference between two subsequent energy values is greater than a constant then a third counter is incremented. A fault signal is issued if the counter is greater than a counter limit value and either the second counter is greater than a second limit value or the third counter is greater than a third limit value.

Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

1996-01-01

190

This paper compares two fault injection techniques: scan chain implemented fault injection (SCIFI), i.e. fault  

E-print Network

Abstract This paper compares two fault injection techniques: scan chain implemented fault injection (SCIFI), i.e. fault injection in a physical system using built in test logic, and fault injection in a VHDL software simulation model of a system. The fault injections were used to evaluate the error

Karlsson, Johan

191

Fault tree analysis is widely used in industry for fault diagnosis. The diagnosis of incipient or `soft' faults is  

E-print Network

Fault tree analysis is widely used in industry for fault diagnosis. The diagnosis of incipient results based on a neural network approach. INTRODUCTION Fault tree analysis (FTA) and fault tree used in systems safety analysis for over 30 years. During this time the fault tree method has been used

Madden, Michael

192

Normal fault growth, displacement localisation and the evolution of normal fault populations: the Hammam Faraun fault block, Suez rift, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fault segment linkage, migration of the locus of fault activity, and displacement localisation were important processes controlling the late Oligocene-Recent evolution of the normal fault population of the Hammam Faraun fault block, Suez rift. Initial fault activity was distributed across the fault block on fault segments that had attained their final length within 1-2 My of rifting. These initial segments then either grew by increasing displacement and linked to form longer segmented fault zones or died, during a rift initiation phase that lasted 6-8 My. Following this rift initiation phase, displacement became localised onto >25-km-long border fault zones bounding the fault block and many of the early high-displacement intra-block fault zones died. Following displacement localisation onto the major faults bounding the fault block, the locus of maximum displacement continued to migrate, with post-Middle Miocene displacement focused on the western margin of the fault block. This migration of fault activity between major crustal-scale normal faults can be viewed in terms of strain localisation at the rift scale. The results from this study question conventional fault growth models based on final displacement distributions, and highlight the sequential nature of faulting on major normal faults bounding domino-style tilted fault blocks.

Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Young, Mike J.; Sharp, Ian R.; Moustafa, Adel R.; Leppard, Christopher W.

2003-06-01

193

A comparison of damage zone decay around small and large faults  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increase in fracture density around faults is a useful proxy for assessing the stress field when the damaged formed. However, the damage surrounding large faults will inevitably be a function of the superposition of several main fault strands, in addition to farther-flung secondary faults, that form over many episodes of slip. To investigate the decay of fracture density away from a single fault with presumably few episodes of slip, we measure damage around small faults that are isolated or have few discrete strands. We compare the fracture decay from our small fault profiles with profiles compiled from the literature, as well as fracture profiles we collected along a section of the San Andreas Fault. We are measuring linear fracture density at Four Mile Beach along several faults with displacements ranging from less than one meter to a few meters. Most of the faults experienced normal displacement and are hosted within the thinly-bedded Santa Cruz mudstone. On the opposite end of the displacement spectrum, we are collecting fracture data at Logan Quarry, a granodiorite quarry located on the western side of the San Andreas Fault in Aromas, CA. Because of the size of the field site, we developed a new fracture counting technique using ground-based LiDAR. We use an RMS roughness parameter to define the existence of a fracture and count the number of fractures along a linear transect, creating a dataset comparable to the Four Mile Beach dataset. Preliminary results imply that damage decay around faults is well described using a power law. However, the rapidity of the decay may be a function of fault displacement. For small faults that are relatively isolated, the slope of the power law curve is approximately negative one. As fault displacement increases, the slope of the decay decreases. We suggest that this change is due to the superposition of decay profiles at secondary faults, which can form in increasing numbers and at increasing distances as the fault matures. In addition to looking at the decay of fracture density away from the fault, we also look at the width of the damage zone. Again, we compare our datasets with published studies and find that damage zone width grows approximately linearly with displacement at small offsets, but grows more slowly at offsets larger than 10-100m. This suggests that most new strands form early in the displacement history of the fault.

Savage, H. M.; Brodsky, E. E.; Johns, M.

2008-12-01

194

Fault tolerant control laws  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

1986-01-01

195

Faults and Faulting Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004  

E-print Network

#12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 39/14/2010 Faults, fault zones and shear zones #12;© EarthStructure (2nd on a footwall flat, and segment DE is a hanging-wall flat on a footwall flat. #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 109/14/2010 Fault Rocks: Gouge and Cataclasite #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 259/14/2010 Mylonites/Shear Zones #12

196

Overview of the Southern San Andreas Fault Model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This appendix summarizes the data and methodology used to generate the source model for the southern San Andreas fault. It is organized into three sections, 1) a section by section review of the geological data in the format of past Working Groups, 2) an overview of the rupture model, and 3) a manuscript by Biasi and Weldon (in review Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America) that describes the correlation methodology that was used to help develop the ?geologic insight? model. The goal of the Biasi and Weldon methodology is to quantify the insight that went into developing all A faults; as such it is in concept consistent with all other A faults but applied in a more quantitative way. The most rapidly slipping fault and the only known source of M~8 earthquakes in southern California is the San Andreas fault. As such it plays a special role in the seismic hazard of California, and has received special attention in the current Working Group. The underlying philosophy of the current Working Group is to model the recurrence behavior of large, rapidly slipping faults like the San Andreas from observed data on the size, distribution and timing of past earthquakes with as few assumptions about underlying recurrence behavior as possible. In addition, we wish to carry the uncertainties in the data and the range of reasonable extrapolations from the data to the final model. To accomplish this for the Southern San Andreas fault we have developed an objective method to combine all of the observations of size, timing, and distribution of past earthquakes into a comprehensive set of earthquake scenarios that each represent a possible history of earthquakes for the past ~1400 years. The scenarios are then ranked according to their overall consistency with the data and then the frequencies of all of the ruptures permitted by the current Working Group?s segmentation model are calculated. We also present 30-yr conditional probabilities by segment and compare to previous results. A distinctive aspect of the current model is that the probability is higher at both ends of the fault and that the ends have a much greater fraction of smaller events. There is a significant difference in the likelihood of large (M 7.7-8.0) earthquakes along the fault from north to south, with large 1857-like events common on the northern half of the southern San Andreas fault but relatively few M 7.7-8.0 expected on the southern half.

Weldon, Ray J., II; Biasi, Glenn P.; Wills, Chris J.; Dawson, Timothy E.

2008-01-01

197

Software Evolution and the Fault Process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In developing a software system, we would like to estimate the way in which the fault content changes during its development, as well determine the locations having the highest concentration of faults. In the phases prior to test, however, there may be very little direct information regarding the number and location of faults. This lack of direct information requires developing a fault surrogate from which the number of faults and their location can be estimated. We develop a fault surrogate based on changes in the fault index, a synthetic measure which has been successfully used as a fault surrogate in previous work. We show that changes in the fault index can be used to estimate the rates at which faults are inserted into a system between successive revisions. We can then continuously monitor the total number of faults inserted into a system, the residual fault content, and identify those portions of a system requiring the application of additional fault detection and removal resources.

Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

1999-01-01

198

A survey of an introduction to fault diagnosis algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report surveys the field of diagnosis and introduces some of the key algorithms and heuristics currently in use. Fault diagnosis is an important and a rapidly growing discipline. This is important in the design of self-repairable computers because the present diagnosis resolution of its fault-tolerant computer is limited to a functional unit or processor. Better resolution is necessary before failed units can become partially reuseable. The approach that holds the greatest promise is that of resident microdiagnostics; however, that presupposes a microprogrammable architecture for the computer being self-diagnosed. The presentation is tutorial and contains examples. An extensive bibliography of some 220 entries is included.

Mathur, F. P.

1972-01-01

199

On-line fault diagnosis of distribution substations using hybrid cause-effect network and fuzzy rule-based method  

Microsoft Academic Search

A correct and rapid inference is required for practical use of an online fault diagnosis in power substations. This paper proposes a novel approach for on-line fault section estimations and fault types identification using the hybrid cause-effect network\\/fuzzy rule-based method in distribution substations. A cause-effect network, which is well suited to parallel processing, represents the functions of protective relays and

Wen-Hui Chen; Chih-Wen Liu; Men-Shen Tsai

2000-01-01

200

Rapid Response  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Rapid Response, a "knowledge resource specializing in policy advice for developing countries," is a new service from the World Bank. Mainly a fee-based service, the Rapid Response service also contains several valuable free resources. The service concentrates on several areas of expertise including investment climates; private participation in a variety of complex sectors such as telecommunications, water, and energy; and output-based aid. By far, the most useful tool offered on this site is Knowledge Resources, the database of papers, reports, case studies and related Websites. The database is searchable by keyword or by topic or resource type.

201

Fault management for data systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

1993-01-01

202

Polynomially Complete Fault Detection Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We look at several variations of the single fault detection problem for combinational logic circuits and show that deciding whether single faults are detectable by input-output (I\\/O) experiments is polynomially complete, i.e., there is a polynomial time algorithm to decide if these single faults are detectable if and only if there is a polynomial time algorithm for problems such as

Oscar H. Ibarra; Sartaj Sahni

1975-01-01

203

Handling Software Faults with Redundancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software engineering methods can increase the dependability of software systems, and yet some faults escape even the most\\u000a rigorous and methodical development process. Therefore, to guarantee high levels of reliability in the presence of faults,\\u000a software systems must be designed to reduce the impact of the failures caused by such faults, for example by deploying techniques\\u000a to detect and compensate

Antonio Carzaniga; Alessandra Gorla; Mauro Pezzè

2008-01-01

204

Aerial photographic interpretation of lineaments and faults in late Cenozoic deposits in the eastern parts of the Saline Valley 1:100, 000 quadrangle, Nevada and California, and the Darwin Hills 1:100, 000 quadrangle, California  

SciTech Connect

Faults and fault-related lineaments in Quaternary and late Tertiary deposits in the southern part of the Walker Lane are potentially active and form patterns that are anomalous compared to those in most other areas of the Great Basin. Two maps at a scale of 1:100,000 summarize information about lineaments and faults in the area around and southwest of the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system based on extensive aerial-photo interpretation, limited field interpretation, limited field investigations, and published geologic maps. There are three major fault zones and two principal faults in the Saline Valley and Darwin Hills 1:100,000 quadrangles. (1) The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system and (2) the Hunter Mountain fault zone are northwest-trending right-lateral strike-slip fault zones. (3) The Panamint Valley fault zone and associated Towne Pass and Emigrant faults are north-trending normal faults. The intersection of the Hunter Mountain and Panamint Valley fault zones is marked by a large complex of faults and lineaments on the floor of Panamint Valley. Additional major faults include (4) the north-northwest-trending Ash Hill fault on the west side of Panamint Valley, and (5) the north-trending range-front Tin Mountain fault on the west side of the northern Cottonwood Mountains. The most active faults at present include those along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, the Tin Mountain fault, the northwest and southeast ends of the Hunter Mountain fault zone, the Ash Hill fault, and the fault bounding the west side of the Panamint Range south of Hall Canyon. Several large Quaternary landslides on the west sides of the Cottonwood Mountains and the Panamint Range apparently reflect slope instability due chiefly to rapid uplift of these ranges. 16 refs.

Reheis, M.C.

1991-09-01

205

Maximum Magnitude in Relation to Mapped Fault Length and Fault Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earthquake hazard zones are highlighted using known fault locations and an estimate of the fault's maximum magnitude earthquake. Magnitude limits are commonly determined from fault geometry, which is dependent on fault length. Over the past 30 years it has become apparent that fault length is often poorly constrained and that a single event can rupture across several individual fault segments.

N. Black; D. Jackson; T. Rockwell

2004-01-01

206

Fault-tolerant Sensor Network based on Fault Evaluation Matrix and Compensation for Intermittent Observation  

E-print Network

Fault-tolerant Sensor Network based on Fault Evaluation Matrix and Compensation for Intermittent Observation Kazuya Kosugi, Shinichiro Tokumoto and Toru Namerikawa Abstract-- This paper deals with a fault for constructing a fault tolerant system. Specifically, we propose a fault-evaluation matrix for the fault

207

Fault Location Orion is the distribution company for the Canterbury region. In 2007, a Ground Fault  

E-print Network

Fault Location Orion is the distribution company for the Canterbury region. In 2007, a Ground Fault faults. This system operates by reducing the fault currents present during a fault, extinguishing and preventing arcing from occurring. Although this is greatly beneficial to the system, the reduction in fault

Hickman, Mark

208

DIAGNOSIS USING FAULT TREES INDUCED FROM SIMULATED INCIPIENT FAULT CASE DATA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault tree analysis is widely used in industry for fault diagnosis. The diagnosis of incipient or 'soft' faults is considerably more difficult than that of 'hard' faults, which is the case considered normally. A detailed fault tree model reflecting signal variations over a wide range is required in the case of soft faults. This paper presents comprehensive results describing the

P J Nolan; M G Madden; P Muldoon

1994-01-01

209

Normal fault corrugation: implications for growth and seismicity of active normal faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large normal faults are corrugated. Corrugations appear to form from overlapping or en échelon fault arrays by two breakthrough mechanisms: lateral propagation of curved fault-tips and linkage by connecting faults. Both mechanisms include localized fault-parallel extension and eventual abandonment of relay ramps. These breakthrough mechanisms produce distinctive hanging wall and footwall geometries indicative of fault system evolution. From such geometries,

David A Ferrill; John A Stamatakos; Darrell Sims

1999-01-01

210

Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (?1 - ?3) and ?3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with ?1' increasing at constant ?3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing ?3' under constant ?1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to ?1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

2010-12-01

211

Stacking Faults in Cotton Fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stacking faults in different variety of cotton fibers have been quantified using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data. Exponential functions for the column length distribution have been used for the determination of microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %), stacking faults (?d) and twin faults (?) have been determined by profile analysis using Fourier method of Warren. We examined different variety of raw cotton fibers using WAXS techniques. In all these cases we note that, the stacking faults are quite significant in determining the property of cotton fibers.

Divakara, S.; Niranjana, A. R.; Siddaraju, G. N.; Somashekar, R.

2011-07-01

212

Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling program (WFSD): Overview and Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) project has been initiated in response to the devastating 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan province, China. The earthquake occurred in the transition zone between the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin within the Longmenshan, producing 270 and 80 km-long co-seismic surface ruptures along the Yingxiu-Beichuan and Anxian-Guanxian faults, respectively,. To better understand the mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics of the faults that ruptured during the Wenchuan earthquake, the two main strands are currently being drilled under the auspices of the WFSD program, which is the most rapid response project to study large earthquakes and their aftershocks(the first borehole, WFSD-1, started to be drilled just 178 days after the earthquake). Five boreholes ranging from 550 to 3400 m-depth will ultimately be drilled along the Yingxiu-Beichuan and Anxian-Guanxian faults, targeting locations of maximum co-seismic slip. WFSD-1 and 2, with depths of 1201.15 and 2283.56 m respectively, are located on the hanging wall of the southern Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone in Bajiaomiao village, where the largest vertical displacement was about 6 m. WFSD-3P and 3 were drilled on the hanging wall of the Anxian-Guanxian fault in Qingquan village, Mianzhu city, with depths of 551.65 and 1502.18 m, respectively (the maximum vertical displacement was about 4 m). WFSD-4 started to be drilled on August 6th 2012 and will reach a depth of about 3400 m. It is located along the northern part of the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone in the Nanba area, where the observed vertical displacement was about 1.5 m, and the dextral displacement was ~2 m. Four drilling holes (WFSD-1, 2, 3P and 3) have been completed, the results show that the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault zone is about 105 m wide and is a high-angle (~70 degree) thrust zone at >1.6 km depth. The PSZ of the earthquake is tilted to cut through the whole fault zone, the Anxian-Guanxian fault zone is a low-angle (~38 degree) thrust zone, about 50 m wide at ~1.3 km depth, and is asymmetric and mainly restricted in the hanging wall of the fault. The Longmenshan is a multiple thrust sheets structure, determined from the WFSD-2 structural profiles, which show that the three massifs of the Neoproterozoic Pengguan granitic and volcanic complex were on top of the Late Triassic sediments. This shows that the Pengguan complex in the Longmenshan Range is not produced by channel flow from middle-low crust.

Li, H.; Xu, Z.; Si, J.; Song, S.; Sun, Z.; Chevalier, M.

2012-12-01

213

Mechanisms and rates of strength recovery in laboratory fault zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The life cycle of a typical fault zone consists of repeated catastrophic seismic events during which much of the slip is accommodated interspersed with creep during the inter-seismic cycle. Fault strength is regenerated during this period as a result of several time-dependent, fluid assisted deformation mechanisms that are favored by high stresses along active fault zones. The strengthening is thought to be a function of the sum total of the rates of recovery due to these multiple creep processes as well as the rate of tectonic loading. Mechanisms and rates of strength recovery in laboratory fault zones were investigated in this research with the aid of several experimental designs. It was observed that wet faults recover strength in a time-dependent manner after slip due to operative creep processes. Subsequent loading results in unstable failure of a cohesive gouge zone with large associated stress drops. The failure process is similar to that observed for intact rocks. Dry laboratory faults in contrast do not recover strength and slip along them is always stable with no observable drop in stress. Strengthening in laboratory faults proceeds in a manner that is a logarithmic function of time. The recovery is attributable to fluid mediated mechanisms such as pressure solution, crack sealing and Ostwald ripening that collectively cause a reduction in porosity and enhance lithification of an unconsolidated gouge. Rates for the individual deformation mechanisms investigated in separate experimental setups were also observed to be a non-linear function of time. Pressure solution and Ostwald ripening are especially enhanced due to the significant volume fraction of fine particles within the gouge created due to cataclasis during slip. The results of this investigation may be applied to explain observations of rapid strengthening along large, active crustal fault zones such as parts of the San Andreas Fault system in California and the Nojima fault in Japan. Presence of fault seals in clean hydrocarbon reservoirs with minor clay content as in several North Sea fields may also be a manifestation of similar deformation processes.

Muhuri, Sankar Kumar

2001-07-01

214

Dynamics of earthquake faults  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an overview of ongoing studies of the rich dynamical behavior of the uniform, deterministic Burridge-Knopoff model of an earthquake fault, discussing the model's behavior in the context of current seismology. The topics considered include: (1) basic properties of the model, such as the distinction between small and large events and the magnitude vs frequency distribution; (2) dynamics of individual events, including dynamical selection of rupture propagation speeds; (3) generalizations of the model to more realistic, higher-dimensional models; and (4) studies of predictability, in which artificial catalogs generated by the model are used to test and determine the limitations of pattern recognition algorithms used in seismology.

Carlson, J.M. (Department of Physics and Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)); Langer, J.S. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)); Shaw, B.E. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States) Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964 (United States))

1994-04-01

215

Fault current limiter  

DOEpatents

A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

Darmann, Francis Anthony

2013-10-08

216

Perspective View, Garlock Fault  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 35.25 deg. North lat., 118.05 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking southwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

2000-01-01

217

Central Asia Active Fault Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.

Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

2014-05-01

218

The precipitation of silica gels along seismogenic faults due to sudden fluid pressure drops: an example from the Zuccale low angle normal fault, Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on experimental and some field-based studies several authors have proposed that silica gel (hydrated amorphous silica) layers are generated by frictional slip along seismogenic faults. The precise mechanism(s) of formation have remained somewhat enigmatic, but most studies invoke a mixture of frictional and chemical processes simultaneous with seismogenic slip. In this presentation we describe a new occurrence of ultrafine grained silica fault rocks that are hosted along a number of detachment faults developed within the Zuccale low angle normal fault on the island of Elba, Italy. Based on the geological and microstructural observations, including very detailed EBSD measurements, we propose an alternative mechanism of formation in which the gels precipitate rapidly from supersaturated pore fluids formed due to sudden drops in fluid pressure along faults during or immediately following episodes of seismogenic slip. This mechanism may have widespread application to other examples of fault-hosted silica gels. Furthermore, given the field appearance of these layers (see figure) and the recognition of ultrafine quartz crystallites in thin section, it is possible that similar examples in other natural fault zones may have been mistakenly identified as pseudotachylytes. The implications for fault weakening will also be discussed.

Holdsworth, R. E.; Smith, S.; Lloyd, G. E.

2012-04-01

219

Surface Creep on California Faults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides data from a number of creepmeters in California. A creepmeter is an instrument that monitors the slow surface displacement of an active fault. Its function is not to measure fault slip during earthquakes, but to record the slow aseismic slip between earthquakes.

Roger Bilham

220

Soft Computing and Fault Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soft computing is a partnership between A.I. techniques that are tolerant of imprecision, uncertainty and partial truth, with the aim of obtaining a robust solution for complex systems. Telecommunication systems are built with extensive redundancy and complexity to ensure robustness and quality of service. To facilitate this requires complex fault identification and management systems. Fault identification and management is generally

R. Sterritt

2000-01-01

221

SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5?s; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

2006-04-15

222

Colorado Regional Faults  

SciTech Connect

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01

223

Fluid transport by solitary waves along growing faults. A field example from the South Eugene Island Basin, Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Red Fault system is one of the main growth faults found in the South Eugene Island Basin, a salt withdrawal minibasin located offshore Louisiana, in the Gulf of Mexico. This fault system corresponds to a lateral boundary between fluid overpressured compartments. In addition, there is a set of observations indicating that the Red Fault system exhibits rapid episodic migration of fluids. This fault represents an example of preferential pathway for the upward episodic migration of overpressured hydrocarbons from deep, heavily pressured, compartments on time scales of years. The migrations of fluids into active growing faults could take the form of propagating surges (solitary waves) that propagate upward along the fault planes in a wave-like manner at km/yr. Solitary waves represent a very efficient mechanism for the upward transport of fluids along growth faults in sedimentary basins generating its own permeability. In addition, this mechanism is compatible with the fact that the fault plane is observed to sustain a static pore fluid pressure difference between its two sides. The propagation of solitary waves in active growth faults appears as a fundamental mechanism to understand the nature of upward fast migration of fluids along active growth faults in compartimentalized sedimentary basins.

Revil, A.; Cathles, L. M.

2002-09-01

224

Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (?_1 - ?_3) and ?_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with ?1' increasing at constant ?_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing ?_3' under constant ?_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to ?_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (?_1' = ?_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing ?_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing ?_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (?_2 and ?_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in excess of ?_3 and consequently reach reduced effective stress conditions that allow the reactivation of highly unfavourably orientated faults. We demonstrate that the rate of P_f increase imposed on the fault plane has a significant effect on reshear conditions, which has potentially important implications for faulting in the seismogenic zone.

Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

2011-12-01

225

Segmentation of the Sumatran fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Segmentation of the Sumatran fault is discerned using an analytical approach in which a k-means algorithm partitions earthquakes into clusters of seismicity along the fault. Clusters are tessellated into segment zones from which segment lengths and maximum credible magnitude are estimated. Decreasing the depth of seismicity sampled from 70 to 60 to 50 km reduces interaction with deeper seismicity, and results from the k-means algorithm initially suggest that the fault has K = 14, 16, and 16 clusters, respectively. After inspection, it becomes clear that the optimum number of clusters is 16. The 16 cluster model developed into zones generates segment lengths ranging from 22 to 196 km and maximum earthquake potentials in the range of Mw 6.5-7.8. The Sumatran fault is dominated by eight great central segments distributed approximately symmetrically about Lake Maninjau. These central fault segments dominate the hazard, which is less in the far north because segments are shorter.

Burton, Paul W.; Hall, Thomas R.

2014-06-01

226

Moment accumulation rate on faults in California inferred from viscoelastic earthquake cycle models (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calculations of moment accumulation rates on active faults require knowledge of long-term fault slip rates and the area of the fault that is locked interseismically. These parameters are routinely estimated from geodetic data using elastic block models with back slip on dislocations in an elastic half-space. Yet, the elastic models are inconsistent with studies that infer postseismic viscous flow in the lower crust and mantle occurring for decades following large earthquakes. Viscous flow in the lower crust and mantle generates rapid, localized deformation early in the earthquake cycle and slower, more diffuse deformation later in the cycle. Elastic models which neglect this time-dependent flow process may lead to biased estimates of fault slip rates and locking distribution. To address this issue we have developed a three-dimensional earthquake cycle model consisting of fault-bounded blocks in an elastic crust overlying a viscoelastic lower crust and uppermost mantle. It is a kinematic model in which long-term motions of fault-bounded blocks is imposed. Interseismic locking of faults and associated deformation is modeled with steady back-slip on faults and imposed periodic earthquakes. Creep on unlocked portions of the faults occurs at constant stress and therefore the instantaneous creep rate is proportional to the instantaneous stressing rate on the fault. We compare geologic slip rate estimates in southern California with model estimates using GPS data and show that elastic block models underpredict slip rates on several faults that are late in the earthquake cycle and overpredict slip rates on faults that are early in the earthquake cycle. The viscoelastic cycle model, constrained by earthquake timing from the geologic record, predicts fault slip rates that are entirely consistent with geologic estimates for all major faults in southern California. For northern California, fault slip rate estimates using geodetic data appear not to be strongly dependent on model assumptions and are generally consistent with geologic estimates; therefore we focus on estimates of the distribution of interseismic locking of faults. We constrain the locking distribution using nearly a century of triangulation measurements of strain following the M7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake, contemporary GPS velocities, geologic slip rate and earthquake timing data, and the viscoelastic earthquake cycle model with spatially variable distributions of locking and stress-driven creep. We find considerable lateral variations in locking depths in the San Francisco Bay area. Compared with our models of spatially variable locking distribution, models that assume a typical 15 km uniform locking depth overpredict the moment accumulation rate by a factor of 2-3 on the Peninsular San Andreas, Calaveras, Rodgers Creek, and Green Valley faults.

Johnson, K. M.

2009-12-01

227

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-print Network

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01

228

ARGES: an Expert System for Fault Diagnosis Within Space-Based ECLS Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ARGES (Atmospheric Revitalization Group Expert System) is a demonstration prototype expert system for fault management for the Solid Amine, Water Desorbed (SAWD) CO2 removal assembly, associated with the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System. ARGES monitors and reduces data in real time from either the SAWD controller or a simulation of the SAWD assembly. It can detect gradual degradations or predict failures. This allows graceful shutdown and scheduled maintenance, which reduces crew maintenance overhead. Status and fault information is presented in a user interface that simulates what would be seen by a crewperson. The user interface employs animated color graphics and an object oriented approach to provide detailed status information, fault identification, and explanation of reasoning in a rapidly assimulated manner. In addition, ARGES recommends possible courses of action for predicted and actual faults. ARGES is seen as a forerunner of AI-based fault management systems for manned space systems.

Pachura, David W.; Suleiman, Salem A.; Mendler, Andrew P.

1988-01-01

229

Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

2012-01-01

230

Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation for Local Leakage Faults  

E-print Network

We provide a rigorous analysis of fault-tolerant quantum computation in the presence of local leakage faults. We show that one can systematically deal with leakage by using appropriate leakage-reduction units such as quantum teleportation. The leakage noise is described by a Hamiltonian and the noise is treated coherently, similar to general non-Markovian noise analyzed in Refs. quant-ph/0402104 and quant-ph/0504218. We describe ways to limit the use of leakage-reduction units while keeping the quantum circuits fault-tolerant and we also discuss how leakage reduction by teleportation is naturally achieved in measurement-based computation.

Panos Aliferis; Barbara M. Terhal

2006-05-26

231

Faulted Sedimentary Rocks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

2004-01-01

232

Arc fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

1999-01-01

233

Arc fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

Jha, K.N.

1999-05-18

234

The evolution of intraplate fault systems in central Turkey: Structural evidence and Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr age constraints for the Savcili Fault Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Savcili Fault Zone represents one of the most prominent regional-scale intraplate fault systems in central Turkey, recording the collisional events following the closure of Neo-Tethys in the eastern Mediterranean region. It consists of anastomosing reverse/thrust faults with WNW-ESE direction that placed rocks of the Central Anatolian Crystalline Complex on Paleogene sedimentary units. Structural measurements and kinematic indicators show that faults within the Savcili Fault Zone (SFZ) have top to the NE and NW sense of brittle deformation. Stable isotope (?18O and ? D) and trace element data indicate that fault gouge illites precipitated from deep basinal brines. These fluids were mobilized during phases of compressional deformation and migrated upward along thrust faults toward shallow brittle deformation zones. Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar geochronology of fault gouges in two cataclastic zones demonstrates age variability for two different dating techniques (Rb-Sr: 40.9 ± 1.5 Ma and 22.9 ± 1.3 Ma; Ar-Ar: 46.45 ± 0.25 Ma and 29.8 ± 0.13 Ma). We argue that Rb-Sr dating provides ages more closely reflecting the timing of fault movements because of potential contamination of illite by excess 40Ar. Accordingly, the SFZ was active during at least two phases; the middle Eocene and late Oligocene to early Miocene, which is consistent with the relative age constraints suggested by field relationships. Geochronology combined with structural field evidence indicates a rapid change in stress regime from extension to contraction at ~40 Ma that continued until at least ~23 Ma. Direct dating of brittle faulting provides a prolific approach for determining the absolute timing of tectonic events in areas that have largely relied on indirect information.

Isik, Veysel; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Caglayan, Ayse; Seyitoglu, Gurol

2014-10-01

235

Exploring Fault-Tolerant Network-on-Chip Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advent of deep sub-micron technology has exacerbated reliability issues in on-chip interconnects. In particular, single event upsets, such as soft errors, and hard faults are rapidly becoming a force to be reckoned with. This spiraling trend highlights the importance of detailed analysis of these reliability hazards and the incorporation of comprehensive protection measures into all Network-on-Chip (NoC) designs. In

Chrysostomos Nicopoulos; Jongman Kim; Narayanan Vijaykrishnan; Chita R. Das

2006-01-01

236

Fault Injection Campaign for a Fault Tolerant Duplex Framework  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault tolerance is an efficient approach adopted to avoid or reduce the damage of a system failure. In this work we present the results of a fault injection campaign we conducted on the Duplex Framework (DF). The DF is a software developed by the UCLA group [1, 2] that uses a fault tolerant approach and allows to run two replicas of the same process on two different nodes of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer cluster. A third process running on a different node, constantly monitors the results computed by the two replicas, and eventually restarts the two replica processes if an inconsistency in their computation is detected. This approach is very cost efficient and can be adopted to control processes on spacecrafts where the fault rate produced by cosmic rays is not very high.

Sacco, Gian Franco; Ferraro, Robert D.; von llmen, Paul; Rennels, Dave A.

2007-01-01

237

The Effects of Fault Counting Methods on Fault Model Quality  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, we describe three other fault-counting techniques and compare the models resulting from the application of two of those methods to the models obtained from the application of our proposed definition.

Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

2004-01-01

238

Fault-Tolerant Quantum Walks  

E-print Network

Quantum walks are expected to serve important modelling and algorithmic applications in many areas of science and mathematics. Although quantum walks have been successfully implemented physically in recent times, no major efforts have been made to combat the error associated with these physical implementations in a fault-tolerant manner. In this paper, we propose a systematic method to implement fault-tolerant quantum walks in discrete time on arbitrarily complex graphs, using quantum states encoded with the Steane code and a set of universal fault tolerant matrix operations.

S. D. Freedman; Y. H. Tong; J. B. Wang

2014-08-06

239

An Algebra of Fault Tolerance  

E-print Network

Every system of any significant size is created by composition from smaller sub-systems or components. It is thus fruitful to analyze the fault-tolerance of a system as a function of its composition. In this paper, two basic types of system composition are described, and an algebra to describe fault tolerance of composed systems is derived. The set of systems forms monoids under the two composition operators, and a semiring when both are concerned. A partial ordering relation between systems is used to compare their fault-tolerance behaviors.

Shrisha Rao

2009-07-20

240

Granular packings and fault zones  

PubMed

The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local "rotating bearings" are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The "seismic activity" distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault. PMID:11017335

Astrom; Herrmann; Timonen

2000-01-24

241

Data parallel sequential circuit fault simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sequential circuit fault simulation is a compute-intensive problem. Parallel simulation is one method to reduce fault simulation time. In this paper, we discuss a novel technique to partition the fault set for the fault parallel simulation of sequential circuits on multiple processors. When applied statically, the technique can scale well for up to thirty two processors on an ethernet. The

Minesh B. Amin; Bapiraju Vinnakota

1996-01-01

242

Seismic Fault Rheology and Earthquake Dynamics  

E-print Network

5 Seismic Fault Rheology and Earthquake Dynamics JAMES R. RICE1 and MASSIMO COCCO2 1Department Workshop on The Dynamics of Fault Zones, spe- cifically on the subtopic "Rheology of Fault Rocks and Their Surroundings," we addressed critical research issues for understanding the seismic response of fault zones

243

Inductive Fault Analysis of MOS Integrated Circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inductive Fault Analysis (IFA) is a systematic Procedure to predict all the faults that are likely to occur in MOS integrated circuit or subcircuit The three major steps of the IFA procedure are: (1) generation of Physical defects using statistical data from the fabrication process; (2) extraction of circuit-level faults caused by these defects; and (3) classification of faults types

John Shen; W. Maly; F. J. Ferguson

1985-01-01

244

Normal faults geometry and morphometry on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this report, we show how normal faults scarps geometry and degradation history can be accessed using high resolution imagery and topography. We show how the initial geometry of the faults can be inferred from faulted craters and we demonstrate how a comparative morphometric analysis of faults scarps can be used to study erosion rates through time on Mars.

Vaz, D. A.; Spagnuolo, M. G.; Silvestro, S.

2014-04-01

245

Fault-Trajectory Approach for Fault Diagnosis on Analog Circuits Carlos Eduardo Savioli,  

E-print Network

Fault-Trajectory Approach for Fault Diagnosis on Analog Circuits Carlos Eduardo Savioli, Claudio C Mesquita@coe.ufrj.br Abstract This issue discusses the fault-trajectory approach suitability for fault on this concept for ATPG for diagnosing faults on analog networks. Such method relies on evolutionary techniques

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

Fault Tolerant Control with Additive Compensation for Faults in an Automotive Damper  

E-print Network

Fault Tolerant Control with Additive Compensation for Faults in an Automotive Damper Juan C. Tud: sebastien.varrier@gipsa-lab.fr Abstract--A novel Fault-Tolerant Controller is proposed for an automotive mechanism used to accommodate actuator faults. The compensation mechanism is based on a robust fault

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

An Approach to Fault Modeling and Fault Seeding Using the Program Dependence Graph1  

E-print Network

An Approach to Fault Modeling and Fault Seeding Using the Program Dependence Graph1 Mary Jean harrold@cis.ohio-state.edu ofut@isse.gmu.edu kanu@eng.sun.com Abstract We present a fault-classification scheme and a fault-seeding method that are based on the manifes- tation of faults in the program

Harrold, Mary Jean

248

A Fault Prediction Approach for Process Plants using Fault Tree Analysis in Sensor Malfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a fault prediction approach for process plants using fault tree analysis is presented in the presence of no or false information of certain sensor. The fault propagation model is constructed by causal relationships from fault tree analysis (FTA). Knowledge about system failure, which is obtained from the fault propagation model, is represented as abnormality patterns in process

Zongxiao Yang; Xiaobo Yuan; Zhiqiang Feng; Kazuhiko Suzuki; Akira Inoue

2006-01-01

249

Suppression of strike-slip fault zones by preexisting crustal heterogeneities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although transform (strike-slip on land) faults are a defining feature of plate tectonics, plate boundary models show several regions where shearing is the primary regional deformation mechanism that completely lack or have underdeveloped strike-slip fault systems with respect to their slip rate. Regions that exhibit rapid toroidal (shearing) flow as indicated by GPS velocities, focal mechanisms, and/or neotectonic models but lack pervasive strike-slip faulting tend to possess common features that predate shearing, such as: (1) extensive fracturing perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the shear plane (e.g., South Iceland Seismic Zone and Walker Lane, CA), and/or (2) regional cover of flood basalts or andesites containing columnar joints (e.g., Brothers Fault Zone, Oregon). We present a new plane-stress finite-strain analog model created to investigate the evolution of primary deformation zones in pure strike-slip fault systems where crustal heterogeneities emulating (1) and (2) exist prior to shear initiation. Experimental results indicate that, in comparison to systems with originally pristine surfaces, strike-slip fault systems containing preexisting structures develop more distributed geometries and that more than twice as much net offset is required for throughgoing strike-slip faulting to occur. These results provide new insight for kinematic interpretations of structural data from fault systems on Earth, Venus and other terrestrial bodies where crustal heterogeneities such as shear-plane perpendicular fractures and/or basaltic or andesitic flood basalts are present prior to shear initiation. Direct and independent confirmation of fault zone suppression could be provided through detailed geologic analyses of underdeveloped fault zones on Earth that exemplify the fault zone development observed in these experiments (e.g., Walker Lane, CA-NV).

Curren, I. S.; Bird, P.

2013-12-01

250

Complexity of the deep San Andreas Fault zone defined by cascading tremor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weak seismic vibrations--tectonic tremor--can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

Shelly, David R.

2015-02-01

251

Tutorial: Advanced fault tree applications using HARP  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reliability analysis of fault tolerant computer systems for critical applications is complicated by several factors. These modeling difficulties are discussed and dynamic fault tree modeling techniques for handling them are described and demonstrated. Several advanced fault tolerant computer systems are described, and fault tree models for their analysis are presented. HARP (Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor) is a software package developed at Duke University and NASA Langley Research Center that is capable of solving the fault tree models presented.

Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Boyd, Mark A.

1993-01-01

252

Recognition of Active Faults and Stress Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Around the plate-boundary region, the directions of maximum and minimum stress related to the plate motion is one of the key for the recognition of active faults. For example, it is typical idea that there are many N-S trading reverse faults, NE-SW and NW-SE trending strike slip faults and less normal faults (only near volcanoes) in Japan, where the compressional stress with E-W direction is dominant caused by the motion of the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mj 9.0), however, many earthquakes with the mechanism of the normal fault type occurred in the coastal region of the northern-east Japan. On 11th April 2011, the Fukushima Hamadori Earthquake (Mj 7.0) occurred accompanying surface faults along two faults, the Idosawa fault and the Yunotake fault, that recognized as active faults by the Research Group for Active Fault of Japan (1980, 1991). It impacted on active fault study by the reason of not only the appearance of two traces of significant surface faults with maximum displacement up to 2.1 m, but also the reactivation of the normal faults under the E-W compressional stress field. When we identify the active faults, it is one of the key whether the direction of slip on the fault consists with the stress field in that area or not. And there is a technique to recognized whether the fault is active or not by using the data of the direction of stress in the field and the geometry of the fault plane. Though it is useful for the fault in the rock without overlain Quaternary deposits, we should care that the active faults may react caused by the temporal stress condition after the generation of large earthquakes.

Azuma, T.

2012-12-01

253

Developing Fault Models for Space Mission Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A viewgraph presentation on the development of fault models for space mission software is shown. The topics include: 1) Goal: Improve Understanding of Technology Fault Generation Process; 2) Required Measurement; 3) Measuring Structural Evolution; 4) Module Attributes; 5) Principal Components of Raw Metrics; 6) The Measurement Process; 7) View of Structural Evolution at the System and Module Level; 8) Identifying and Counting Faults; 9) Fault Enumeration; 10) Modeling Fault Content; 11) Modeling Results; 12) Current and Future Work; and 13) Discussion and Conclusions.

Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

2003-01-01

254

Fault diagnosis for the heat exchanger of the aircraft environmental control system based on the strong tracking filter.  

PubMed

The aircraft environmental control system (ECS) is a critical aircraft system, which provides the appropriate environmental conditions to ensure the safe transport of air passengers and equipment. The functionality and reliability of ECS have received increasing attention in recent years. The heat exchanger is a particularly significant component of the ECS, because its failure decreases the system's efficiency, which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger is necessary to prevent risks. However, two problems hinder the implementation of the heat exchanger fault diagnosis in practice. First, the actual measured parameter of the heat exchanger cannot effectively reflect the fault occurrence, whereas the heat exchanger faults are usually depicted by utilizing the corresponding fault-related state parameters that cannot be measured directly. Second, both the traditional Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the EKF-based Double Model Filter have certain disadvantages, such as sensitivity to modeling errors and difficulties in selection of initialization values. To solve the aforementioned problems, this paper presents a fault-related parameter adaptive estimation method based on strong tracking filter (STF) and Modified Bayes classification algorithm for fault detection and failure mode classification of the heat exchanger, respectively. Heat exchanger fault simulation is conducted to generate fault data, through which the proposed methods are validated. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods are capable of providing accurate, stable, and rapid fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger. PMID:25823010

Ma, Jian; Lu, Chen; Liu, Hongmei

2015-01-01

255

Fault Diagnosis for the Heat Exchanger of the Aircraft Environmental Control System Based on the Strong Tracking Filter  

PubMed Central

The aircraft environmental control system (ECS) is a critical aircraft system, which provides the appropriate environmental conditions to ensure the safe transport of air passengers and equipment. The functionality and reliability of ECS have received increasing attention in recent years. The heat exchanger is a particularly significant component of the ECS, because its failure decreases the system’s efficiency, which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger is necessary to prevent risks. However, two problems hinder the implementation of the heat exchanger fault diagnosis in practice. First, the actual measured parameter of the heat exchanger cannot effectively reflect the fault occurrence, whereas the heat exchanger faults are usually depicted by utilizing the corresponding fault-related state parameters that cannot be measured directly. Second, both the traditional Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the EKF-based Double Model Filter have certain disadvantages, such as sensitivity to modeling errors and difficulties in selection of initialization values. To solve the aforementioned problems, this paper presents a fault-related parameter adaptive estimation method based on strong tracking filter (STF) and Modified Bayes classification algorithm for fault detection and failure mode classification of the heat exchanger, respectively. Heat exchanger fault simulation is conducted to generate fault data, through which the proposed methods are validated. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods are capable of providing accurate, stable, and rapid fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger. PMID:25823010

Ma, Jian; Lu, Chen; Liu, Hongmei

2015-01-01

256

The fault-tree compiler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fault Tree Compiler Program is a new reliability tool used to predict the top event probability for a fault tree. Five different gate types are allowed in the fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N gates. The high level input language is easy to understand and use when describing the system tree. In addition, the use of the hierarchical fault tree capability can simplify the tree description and decrease program execution time. The current solution technique provides an answer precise (within the limits of double precision floating point arithmetic) to the five digits in the answer. The user may vary one failure rate or failure probability over a range of values and plot the results for sensitivity analyses. The solution technique is implemented in FORTRAN; the remaining program code is implemented in Pascal. The program is written to run on a Digital Corporation VAX with the VMS operation system.

Martensen, Anna L.; Butler, Ricky W.

1987-01-01

257

Slip Rates on young faults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use measured ages and offset of quaternary surfaces to determine vertical slip rates of a young fault. Students then must determine if vertical slip rates have varied significantly through time.

Audrey Huerta

258

Fault Trace: Marin County, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph shows the trace of a fault (in trench phase) as it passes beneath a barn. The trace developed during the April 18, 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. The location is the Skinner Ranch, near Olema, Marin County, California.

259

Fault-tolerant TCP mechanisms  

E-print Network

: Computer Science FAULT-TOLERANT TCP MECHANISMS A Thesis by SURESH KUMAR SATAPATI Submitted to Texas A%M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Riccardo Bet... tati (Chair of Committee) Nitin H. Vaidya (Member) A. L. Narasimha Reddy (Member) Wei Zhao (Head of Department) August 2000 Major Subject: Computer Science ABSTRACT Fault-Tolerant TCP Mechanisms. (August 2000) Suresh Kumar Satapati, B. E...

Satapati, Suresh Kumar

2000-01-01

260

Types of Faults in California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This educational movie made using SCEC-VDO shows the differences between strike-slip faults and thrust faults in southern California.The Southern California Earthquake Center's Virtual Display of Objects SCEC-VDO is 3D visualization software that allows users to display study and make movies of earthquakes as they occur globally. SCEC-VDO was developed by interns of SCEC Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology UseIT under the supervision of Sue Perry and Tom Jordan.

Interns of SCEC Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology UseIT under the supervision of Sue Perry and Tom Jordan.

261

Fault Diagnosis utilizing Structural Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

When designing model-based fault-diagnosis systems, the use of consistency relations (also called e.g. parity relations) is a common choice. Dierent subsets are sensi- tive to dierent subsets of faults, and thereby isolation can be achieved. This paper presents an algorithm for nding a small set of submodels that can be used to derive con- sistency relations with highest possible diagnosis

Mattias Krysander; Mattias Nyberg

262

Fault Tree Analysis: A Bibliography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault tree analysis is a top-down approach to the identification of process hazards. It is as one of the best methods for systematically identifying an graphically displaying the many ways some things can go wrong. This bibliography references 266 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts. fault tree analysis, risk an probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms. An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

2000-01-01

263

Fault-tolerant rotary actuator  

DOEpatents

A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

Tesar, Delbert

2006-10-17

264

Hardware Fault Simulator for Microprocessors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breadboarded circuit is faster and more thorough than software simulator. Elementary fault simulator for AND gate uses three gates and shaft register to simulate stuck-at-one or stuck-at-zero conditions at inputs and output. Experimental results showed hardware fault simulator for microprocessor gave faster results than software simulator, by two orders of magnitude, with one test being applied every 4 microseconds.

Hess, L. M.; Timoc, C. C.

1983-01-01

265

Passive fault current limiting device  

DOEpatents

A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

1999-01-01

266

Passive fault current limiting device  

DOEpatents

A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

1999-04-06

267

Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

2000-01-01

268

Seismic slip propagation along a fault in the Shimanto accretionary prism detected by vitrinite reflectance studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitative assessment of heat generation along faults during fault movement is of primary importance in understanding the dynamics of earthquakes. Last several years localized heat anomaly in a fault zone due to rapid seismic sliding has been detected by various analyses of fault zone materials, such as ferromagnetic resonance signal (Fukuchi et al., 2005), trace elements and isotopes (e.g., Ishikawa et al., 2008) and mineralogical change of clay (e.g., Hirono et al., 2008) and vitrinite reflectance (O'Hara, 2004). Here we report a heat anomaly found in a fault zone in the Shimanto accretionary complex by vitrinite reflectance measurements. Mature faults in nature mostly experience multiple seismic events, resulting in integrated heat anomaly. Thus, in addition to vitrinite reflectance measurements across natural faults, we performed high-velocity friction experiments on a mixture of quartz and vitrinite grains to evaluate how multiple rapid-slip events affect vitrinite reflectance in a fault zone. A localized heat anomaly is found in one of fault zones which are developed within a mélange unit in the Cretaceous Shimanto belt, SW Japan. A principle slip zone with thickness of ~5 mm forms within cataclastic damage zone with thickness of ~3 m. The slip zone is mainly composed of well-foliated clay minerals. Host rocks are characterized by a block-in-matrix texture: aligned sandstone and chert blocks embedded in mudstone matrix. We measured vitrinite reflectance across the fault zone by the same method as reported in Sakaguchi et al., (2011). The measurement reveals that the principle slip zone underwent localized temperature of more than 220°C, while background temperature of both damage zone and host rocks is ~170°C. Since fault motion along most active faults occurs seismological, that inevitably generates frictional heat, the localized heat anomaly is possibly caused by the rapid seismic slip. In order to evaluate the change in vitrinite reflectance by coseismic sliding, we conducted friction experiments on a mixture of 90 wt% quartz and 10 wt% vitrinite at slip rates of 1.3 mm/s and 1.3 m/s, normal stress of 1.0 MPa and displacement of 15 m under anoxic, nitrogen atmosphere. A series of slide-hold-slide tests are also performed to reproduce multiple seismic-slip events. Our preliminary observation of recovered specimens indicated that significant heat anomaly, especially at shear localized zone in the simulated gouge zone, can be detected by vitrinite reflectance measurement. Detailed results will be reported in our presentation.

Kitamura, M.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Hirose, T.

2011-12-01

269

Matching pursuit of an adaptive impulse dictionary for bearing fault diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sparse decomposition based on matching pursuit is an adaptive sparse expression of the signals. An adaptive matching pursuit algorithm that uses an impulse dictionary is introduced in this article for rolling bearing vibration signal processing and fault diagnosis. First, a new dictionary model is established according to the characteristics and mechanism of rolling bearing faults. The new model incorporates the rotational speed of the bearing, the dimensions of the bearing and the bearing fault status, among other parameters. The model can simulate the impulse experienced by the bearing at different bearing fault levels. A simulation experiment suggests that a new impulse dictionary used in a matching pursuit algorithm combined with a genetic algorithm has a more accurate effect on bearing fault diagnosis than using a traditional impulse dictionary. However, those two methods have some weak points, namely, poor stability, rapidity and controllability. Each key parameter in the dictionary model and its influence on the analysis results are systematically studied, and the impulse location is determined as the primary model parameter. The adaptive impulse dictionary is established by changing characteristic parameters progressively. The dictionary built by this method has a lower redundancy and a higher relevance between each dictionary atom and the analyzed vibration signal. The matching pursuit algorithm of an adaptive impulse dictionary is adopted to analyze the simulated signals. The results indicate that the characteristic fault components could be accurately extracted from the noisy simulation fault signals by this algorithm, and the result exhibited a higher efficiency in addition to an improved stability, rapidity and controllability when compared with a matching pursuit approach that was based on a genetic algorithm. We experimentally analyze the early-stage fault signals and composite fault signals of the bearing. The results further demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the matching pursuit algorithm that uses the adaptive impulse dictionary. Finally, this algorithm is applied to the analysis of engineering data, and good results are achieved.

Cui, Lingli; Wang, Jing; Lee, Seungchul

2014-05-01

270

Critical fault patterns determination in fault-tolerant computer systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The method proposed tries to enumerate all the critical fault-patterns (successive occurrences of failures) without analyzing every single possible fault. The conditions for the system to be operating in a given mode can be expressed in terms of the static states. Thus, one can find all the system states that correspond to a given critical mode of operation. The next step consists in analyzing the fault-detection mechanisms, the diagnosis algorithm and the process of switch control. From them, one can find all the possible system configurations that can result from a failure occurrence. Thus, one can list all the characteristics, with respect to detection, diagnosis, and switch control, that failures must have to constitute critical fault-patterns. Such an enumeration of the critical fault-patterns can be directly used to evaluate the overall system tolerance to failures. Present research is focused on how to efficiently make use of these system-level characteristics to enumerate all the failures that verify these characteristics.

Mccluskey, E. J.; Losq, J.

1978-01-01

271

Strength of SAFOD Fault Gouge Under Hydrothermal Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low strength of the San Andreas fault has often been attributed to the presence of weak gouge or elevated pore fluid pressure within the fault zone. To test these explanations frictional sliding experiments were conducted on clay-rich SAFOD fault gouge taken from a spot core at 3067 m measured depth (2561 vertical depth) from the main hole, and possibly corresponding to the southwest strand of the SAF. Gouge composition was approximately 65% illite and mixed layer phases, 20% quartz, 15% feldspar and trace chlorite. Water saturated samples were tested at pressures and temperatures corresponding to a depth range of 0-15 km. In most experiments stable sliding behavior was observed with an overall trend for the frictional strength to increase steadily with temperature from 0.4 at 100°C up to 0.73 at 440°C. Interestingly, negative velocity dependence (implying possible unstable slip behavior) was observed for tests run between 266-283°C, corresponding to depths of 9 to 9.5 km. If the experimental data represent lower bounds for strength of clay-rich SAF gouge materials, then the friction coefficient is too large to explain, by itself, the low heat flow and near-fault-normal compression reported for the SAF. In this case, high pore fluid pressure or dynamic weakening mechanisms need to be considered as well. We calculate the pore pressure excess for a fault zone with near fault normal compression, implied by geophysical observations, and with a friction coefficient provided by the experimental data. Our analysis for a transpressional stress regime is modified from a conceptual model introduced by Rice (1992) to allow for a depth-dependent variation of ? for the country rock and fault zone. Since the frictional strength of the SAFOD gouge is lower than what is predicted from Byerlee's law at depths <9.5 km, the pore pressure excess required is slightly less than that predicted using the original Rice (1992) model but is still one to three times the overburden stress. Our synthesis of high temperature laboratory data and stress analysis can be applied to other weak minerals. In particular, serpentinite which has been observed in SAFOD cuttings associated with the SAF main trace has led to speculation that serpentine may explain the low strength of the fault. However, laboratory tests of this material (reported separately) show that it too has relatively high shear strength. Furthermore, preliminary measurements of pore fluid pressure in the SAFOD hole indicate near-hydrostatic pressure at 3 to 3.5 km depth. It is still possible that pore pressure increases rapidly below the depth of the SAFOD hole where higher temperature leads to more rapid hydrothermal reactions (i.e., more rapid fault sealing and porosity loss). Additional understanding of the mechanics of the SAF should come in 2007 with retrieval of multilateral cores from the active fault zone and further measurement of in-situ stresses.

Tembe, S.; Lockner, D. A.; Wong, T.

2006-12-01

272

Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (?1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

2014-06-01

273

Fault Management Guiding Principles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

2011-01-01

274

Growth of faults in crystalline rock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growth of faults depends on the coupled interplay of the distribution of slip, fault geometry, the stress field in the host rock, and deformation of the host rock, which commonly is manifest in secondary fracturing. The distribution of slip along a fault depends highly on its structure, the stress perturbation associated with its interaction with nearby faults, and its strength distribution; mechanical analyses indicate that the first two factors are more influential than the third. Slip distribution data typically are discrete, but commonly are described, either explicitly or implicitly, using continuous interpolation schemes. Where the third derivative of a continuous slip profile is discontinuous, the compatibility conditions of strain are violated, and fracturing and perturbations to fault geometry should occur. Discontinuous third derivatives accompany not only piecewise linear functions, but also functions as seemingly benign as cubic splines. The stress distribution and fracture distribution along a fault depends strongly on how the fault grows. Evidence to date indicates that a fault that nucleates along a pre-existing, nearly planar joint or a dike typically develops secondary fractures only near its tipline when the slip is small relative to the fault length. In contrast, stress concentrations and fractures are predicted where a discontinuous or non-planar fault exhibits steps and bends; field observations bear this prediction out. Secondary fracturing influences how faults grow by creating damage zones and by linking originally discontinuous elements into a single fault zone. Field observations of both strike-slip faults and dip-slip faults show that linked segments usually will not be coplanar; elastic stress analyses indicate that this is an inherent tendency of how three-dimensional faults grow. Advances in the data we collect and in the rigor and sophistication of our analyses seem essential to substantially advance our ability to successfully predict earthquakes, fluid flow and mineralization along faults, and fault sealing. Particularly promising avenues of research include: (a) collecting high-resolution slip distribution data over fault surfaces (rather than just the maximum slip); (b) refining the locations of microseismic events; (c) conducting large-scale controlled experiments on in-situ faults; (d) characterizing the spatial distribution of fractures along faults (e.g., by back-mining); (e) performing dynamic experiments to evaluate the formation and strength of fault gouge and pseudotachylyte; (f) characterizing the shape of fault surfaces at different scales using laser scanning and differential geometry; and (g) modeling faults mechanically as part of an interacting system rather than as isolated structures.

Martel, S. J.

2009-04-01

275

Dislocation model for aseismic fault slip in the transverse ranges of Southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geodetic data at a plate boundary can reveal the pattern of subsurface displacements that accompany plate motion. These displacements are modelled as the sum of rigid block motion and the elastic effects of frictional interaction between blocks. The frictional interactions are represented by uniform dislocation on each of several rectangular fault patches. The block velocities and fault parameters are then estimated from geodetic data. Bayesian inversion procedure employs prior estimates based on geological and seismological data. The method is applied to the Transverse Ranges, using prior geological and seismological data and geodetic data from the USGS trilateration networks. Geodetic data imply a displacement rate of about 20 mm/yr across the San Andreas Fault, while the geologic estimates exceed 30 mm/yr. The prior model and the final estimates both imply about 10 mm/yr crustal shortening normal to the trend of the San Andreas Fault. Aseismic fault motion is a major contributor to plate motion. The geodetic data can help to identify faults that are suffering rapid stress accumulation; in the Transverse Ranges those faults are the San Andreas and the Santa Susana.

Cheng, A.; Jackson, D. D.; Matsuura, M.

276

Dislocation model for aseismic fault slip in the transverse ranges of Southern California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Geodetic data at a plate boundary can reveal the pattern of subsurface displacements that accompany plate motion. These displacements are modelled as the sum of rigid block motion and the elastic effects of frictional interaction between blocks. The frictional interactions are represented by uniform dislocation on each of several rectangular fault patches. The block velocities and fault parameters are then estimated from geodetic data. Bayesian inversion procedure employs prior estimates based on geological and seismological data. The method is applied to the Transverse Ranges, using prior geological and seismological data and geodetic data from the USGS trilateration networks. Geodetic data imply a displacement rate of about 20 mm/yr across the San Andreas Fault, while the geologic estimates exceed 30 mm/yr. The prior model and the final estimates both imply about 10 mm/yr crustal shortening normal to the trend of the San Andreas Fault. Aseismic fault motion is a major contributor to plate motion. The geodetic data can help to identify faults that are suffering rapid stress accumulation; in the Transverse Ranges those faults are the San Andreas and the Santa Susana.

Cheng, A.; Jackson, D. D.; Matsuura, M.

1985-01-01

277

Fault testing quantum switching circuits  

E-print Network

Test pattern generation is an electronic design automation tool that attempts to find an input (or test) sequence that, when applied to a digital circuit, enables one to distinguish between the correct circuit behavior and the faulty behavior caused by particular faults. The effectiveness of this classical method is measured by the fault coverage achieved for the fault model and the number of generated vectors, which should be directly proportional to test application time. This work address the quantum process validation problem by considering the quantum mechanical adaptation of test pattern generation methods used to test classical circuits. We found that quantum mechanics allows one to execute multiple test vectors concurrently, making each gate realized in the process act on a complete set of characteristic states in space/time complexity that breaks classical testability lower bounds.

Jacob Biamonte; Marek Perkowski

2010-01-19

278

Transient Faults in Computer Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

Masson, Gerald M.

1993-01-01

279

Faulting in porous carbonate grainstones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the recent past, a new faulting mechanism has been documented within porous carbonate grainstones. This mechanism is due to strain localization into narrow tabular bands characterized by both volumetric and shear strain; for this reason, these features are named compactive shear bands. In the field, compactive shear bands are easily recognizable because they are lightly coloured with respect to the parent rock, and/or show a positive relief because of their increased resistance to weathering. Both characteristics, light colours and positive relief, are a consequence of the compaction processes that characterize these bands, which are the simplest structure element that form within porous carbonate grainstones. With ongoing deformation, the single compactive shear bands, which solve only a few mm of displacement, may evolve into zone of compactive shear bands and, finally, into well-developed faults characterized by slip surfaces and fault rocks. Field analysis conducted in key areas of Italy allow us to documented different modalities of interaction and linkage among the compactive shear bands: (i) a simple divergence of two different compactive shear bands from an original one, (ii) extensional and contractional jogs formed by two continuous, interacting compactive shear bands, and (iii) eye structures formed by collinear interacting compactive shear bands, which have been already described for deformation bands in sandstones. The last two types of interaction may localize the formation of compaction bands, which are characterized by pronounced component of compaction and negligible components of shearing, and/or pressure solution seams. All the aforementioned types of interaction and linkage could happen at any deformation stage, single bands, zone of bands or well developed faults. The transition from one deformation process to another, which is likely to be controlled by the changes in the material properties, is recorded by different ratios and distributions of the fault dimensional attributes. The results of field analysis are consistent with length (L), displacement (D) and thickness (T) of single compactive shear bands clustering around given values, peculiar to the individual lithologies, and does not point out to any scale relationship among these parameters. On the contrary, in zones of shear bands and well-developed faults the D values are maximum in the central portion of individual elements. Differently from what characterize the well-developed faults, in which the slip increments are solved along the main slip surfaces, within zones of compactive shear bands the displacement varies according to the number of individual single bands, so that an increased displacement is related to an higher number of bands. As a consequence, the T-D plot concerning zones of compactive shear bands and well-developed faults show two different populations, which suggest that well-developed faults are much efficient to resolve displacement, with respect the zone of shear bands, because they include sharp slip surfaces. The petrographical and petrophysical properties of the tectonic features described above, which have been assessed by mean of detailed laboratory analyses, are consistent with the single compactive shear bands and zones of shear bands behaving as seals for underground fluid flow with respect to the host rock. These features, strongly present within the fault damage zones of well-developed faults, may compartmentalize the fluid flow in faulted carbonate reservoirs.

Tondi, Emanuele; Agosta, Fabrizio

2010-05-01

280

InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be solved by adding the displacement offset in each interferogram as a model parameter and solving the system of equations with the minimum norm condition. This way, the unknown offsets can be automatically determined. By applying this method to the ALOS/PALSAR data acquired over the Alpine Fault, I obtained the mean velocity map showing the right-lateral relative motion of the blocks north and south of the fault and the strain concentration (large velocity gradient) around the fault. The velocity gradient around the fault has along-fault variation, probably reflecting the variation in the fault locking depth. When one aims to detect fault creeps, i.e., displacement discontinuity in space, one can additionally introduce additional parameters to describe the phase ramps in the interferograms and solve the system of equations again with the minimum norm condition. Then, the displacement discontinuity appears more clearly in the result at the cost of suppressing long-wavelength displacements. By applying this method to the ALOS/PALSAR data acquired over the Philippine Fault in Leyte Island, I obtained the mean velocity map showing fault creep at least in the northern and central parts of Leyte at a rate of around 10 mm/year.

Fukushima, Y.

2013-12-01

281

The Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone: A component of upper plate extension of the subduction transform edge propagator fault linking Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, Eastern Mediterranean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs, that mark the convergent boundary of the African and Aegean-Anatolian plates, are offset along a subduction transform edge propagator ('STEP') fault running NE-SW along the Pliny and Strabo Trenches. The continuation of the fault to the northeast through the Rhodes Basin and into SW Anatolia is assessed. Seismic reflection profiles show that the structural architecture of the northern sector of the Rhodes Basin includes a large crustal-scale fold-thrust belt which is overprinted by numerous faults with small extensional stratigraphic separations. A protracted episode of convergence in the Miocene resulted in the development of a prominent NE-SW-striking and NW-verging fold-thrust belt in the Rhodes Basin. The absence of evaporites in the Rhodes Basin and several seaward prograded vertically stacked Quaternary delta successions resting at 2500-3500 m water depth collectively suggest that the Rhodes Basin must have remained above the depositional base of marine evaporite environment during the Messinian and that the region must have subsided very rapidly during the Pliocene-Quaternary. During the Pliocene-Quaternary, a NE-SW-trending belt developed across the Rhodes Basin: while the structural framework of this belt was characterised by reactivated thrusts in the central portion of the basin, a prominent zone of NE-SW-striking and NW- and SE-dipping faults with extensional separations developed in the northern portion of the basin. Two seismic profiles running parallel to the present-day coastline provide the much needed linkage between the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone onland and the reactivated thrusts in central Rhodes Basin, and show that the Pliocene-Quaternary zone of high-angle faults with extensional separations clearly link with the similarly trending and dipping strike-slip faults onland in the E?en Valley, thus providing the continuity between the Pliny-Strabo Trenches in the southwest and the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone in the northeast. Mapping of many faults in parts of the Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone shows evidence for sinistral strike-slip but total displacement across the fault zone is at maximum a few tens of kilometres. The STEP fault thus appears to have diminishing displacement associated with it as it propagates upwards into the upper plate from its originating tear in the subducting plate.

Hall, J.; Aksu, A. E.; Elitez, I.; Yalt?rak, C.; Çifçi, G.

2014-11-01

282

Faulting at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California: A low-angle normal fault cut by high-angle faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

New geophysical and fault kinematic studies indicate that late Cenozoic basin development in the Mormon Point area of Death Valley, California, was accommodated by fault rotations. Three of six fault segments recognized at Mormon Point are now inactive and have been rotated to low dips during extension. The remaining three segments are now active and moderately to steeply dipping. From

Charles Keener; Laura Serpa; Terry L. Pavlis

1993-01-01

283

Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

1996-01-01

284

Underground distribution cable incipient fault diagnosis system  

E-print Network

This dissertation presents a methodology for an efficient, non-destructive, and online incipient fault diagnosis system (IFDS) to detect underground cable incipient faults before they become catastrophic. The system provides vital information...

Jaafari Mousavi, Mir Rasoul

2007-04-25

285

Sensor Fault Detection and Isolation System  

E-print Network

The purpose of this research is to develop a Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) system which is capable to diagnosis multiple sensor faults in nonlinear cases. In order to lead this study closer to real world applications in oil industries...

Yang, Cheng-Ken

2014-08-01

286

Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems  

E-print Network

Fault location in distribution systems is a critical component of outage management and service restoration, which directly impacts feeder reliability and quality of the electricity supply. Improving fault location methods supports the Department...

Lotfifard, Saeed

2012-10-19

287

Quantum Error Correction and Fault-Tolerance  

E-print Network

I give an overview of the basic concepts behind quantum error correction and quantum fault tolerance. This includes the quantum error correction conditions, stabilizer codes, CSS codes, transversal gates, fault-tolerant error correction, and the threshold theorem.

Daniel Gottesman

2005-07-18

288

Update: San Andreas Fault experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Satellite laser ranging techniques are used to monitor the broad motion of the tectonic plates comprising the San Andreas Fault System. The San Andreas Fault Experiment, (SAFE), has progressed through the upgrades made to laser system hardware and an improvement in the modeling capabilities of the spaceborne laser targets. Of special note is the launch of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite, LAGEOS spacecraft, NASA's only completely dedicated laser satellite in 1976. The results of plate motion projected into this 896 km measured line over the past eleven years are summarized and intercompared.

Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

1984-01-01

289

Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from drilling through the Nojima and 1  

E-print Network

Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from active faults with the aim of 11 learning about the geology of the fault all 18 their objectives, have still contributed to a better geological

Boyer, Edmond

290

Stress and fault parameters affecting fault slip magnitude and activation time during a glacial cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growing and melting of continental ice sheets during a glacial cycle is accompanied by stress changes and reactivation of faults. To better understand the relationship between stress changes, fault activation time, fault parameters, and fault slip magnitude, a new physics-based two-dimensional numerical model is used. In this study, tectonic background stress magnitudes and fault parameters are tested as well as the angle of the fault and the fault locations relative to the ice sheet. Our results show that fault slip magnitude for all faults is mainly affected by the coefficient of friction within the crust and along the fault and also by the depth of the fault tip and angle of the fault. Within a compressional stress regime, we find that steeply dipping faults (˜75°) can be activated after glacial unloading, and fault activity continues thereafter. Furthermore, our results indicate that low-angle faults (dipping at 30°) may slip up to 63m, equivalent to an earthquake with a minimum moment magnitude of 7.0. Finally, our results imply that the crust beneath formerly glaciated regions was close to a critically stressed state, in order to enable activation of faults by small changes in stress during a glacial cycle.

Steffen, Rebekka; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Eaton, David W.

2014-07-01

291

Multi-Sensor Fault Recovery in the Presence of Known and Unknown Fault Types  

E-print Network

Multi-Sensor Fault Recovery in the Presence of Known and Unknown Fault Types Steven Reece in the presence of modelled and unmodelled faults. The al- gorithm comprises two stages. The first stage attempts to re- move modelled faults from each individual sensor estimate. The second stage de

Roberts, Stephen

292

Efficient Fault Tolerance: an Approach to Deal with Transient Faults in Multiprocessor Architectures  

E-print Network

Efficient Fault Tolerance: an Approach to Deal with Transient Faults in Multiprocessor be integrated with a fault treatment approach aiming at op- timising resource utilisation. In this paper we propose a diagnosis approach that, accounting for transient faults, tries to remove units very cautiously

Firenze, Università degli Studi di

293

Fault diagnosis system based on Dynamic Fault Tree Analysis of power transformer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Firstly, this research paper introduced the process of transformer fault diagnosis and the theory of DFTA and then we attempt to apply DFTA to the field of transformer faults diagnosis. By establishing the fault tree of transformer, a practical, easily-extended, interactive and self-learning enabled fault diagnosis system based on DFTA for transformer is designed and developed. With the implementation and

Jiang Guo; Kefei Zhang; Lei Shi; Kaikai Gu; Weimin Bai; Bing Zeng; Yajin Liu

2012-01-01

294

Curved Fault Dynamic Rupture Study: Wasatch Fault Salt Lake City Segment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Faults are not planar; the curvature of the fault provides us useful information on the earthquake mechanics and faulting (Scholz, 1990). Fault geometry has a profound impact on both static aspect (stress distribution in the fault zone) and dynamic aspect (facilitation and impedance of the fault rupture process) of some fundamental earthquake problems. In most earthquake simulations, planar/piece-wise planar faults are used for numerical simplicity. For real earthquake scenarios, especially ground motion prediction, the eligibility of using simplified planar fault geometry needs to be validated, otherwise the simplification might bias the final conclusion. We analyze the rupture process and ground motion statistics in earthquake simulations for Wasatch Fault -Salt Lake City segment- with different fault configurations. We use a finite element method (Ma & Liu, 2006) to simulate the dynamics of a propagating rupture. We consider various initial stress distribution schemes on the fault (uniform, depth-dependent, random). We want to understand 1) how does the fault geometry itself influence the physical rupture process? and 2) what effect does the curvature have on redistributing the initial stresses on the fault? We will monitor the Coulomb stress change near the fault (Liu et al, 2010). This may provide some indication of the interaction between discontinuous fault segments and dynamic triggering as well as the distribution of aftershocks/foreshocks in relation to the fault geometry.

Liu, Q.; Archuleta, R. J.; Smith, R. B.

2011-12-01

295

Fault Behavior and Characteristic Earthquakes: Examples From the Wasatch and San Andreas Fault Zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paleoseismological data for the Wasatch and San Andreas fault zones have led to the formulation of the characteristic earthquake model, which postulates that individual faults and fault segments tend to generate essentially same size or characteristic earthquakes having a relatively narrow range of magnitudes near the maximum. Analysis of scarp-derived colluvium in trench exposures across the Wasatch fault provides estimates

David P. Schwartz; Kevin J. Coppersmith

1984-01-01

296

Neural network based fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for BLDC motor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fault diagnostics and fault tolerant control system for controller of brushless direct current motor is designed. The neural network state observer is trained by real nonlinear control system. From the residual difference between outputs of actual system and neural network observer, the fault of control system is detected and determined. The simulation results and study on fault diagnostics are

Zheng Li

2009-01-01

297

Microseismicity and creeping faults: Hints from modeling the Hayward fault, California (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creeping segments of strike-slip faults are often characterized by high rates of microseismicity on or near the fault. This microseismicity releases only a small fraction of the slip occurring on the fault and the majority of the accumulating elastic strain is released either through aseismic creep or in rare large events. Distinguishing between creeping or non-creeping patches on faults and

R. Malservisi; K. P. Furlong; C. R. Gans

2005-01-01

298

Fault seal analysis: Methodology and case studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault seal can arise from reservoir\\/non-reservoir juxtaposition or by development of fault rock of high entry-pressure. The methodology for evaluating these possibilities uses detailed seismic mapping and well analysis. A [open quote]first-order[close quote] seal analysis involves identifying reservoir juxtaposition areas over the fault surface, using the mapped horizons and a refined reservoir stratigraphy defined by isochores at the fault surface.

M. E. Badley; B. Freeman; D. T. Needham

1996-01-01

299

Low Angle Normal Fault, Fossil or Active?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Panamint Valley - Hunter Mountain - Saline Range (PHS) faults are, together with the Death Valley and Owens Valley faults, one of the three major fault zones within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ). The ECSZ is the most active fault system bounding the Basin and Range to the southwest with approximately 10 mm/yr of cumulative slip along strike-slip and trans-tensional segments. Previous work has identified the Panamint Valley and Saline Range faults as low angle normal faults and the Hunter Mountain as a transfer fault (Wesnousky and Jones, 1994). A debate exists whether this system is active at present time. Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a geodetic technique that allows measurement of ground motion at a mm/yr accuracy over large areas with a high measurement sampling. We processed a large number of data to investigate ground motion in the PHS fault system to shed light on the interseismic strain accumulation and its relation to the fault geometry. Preliminary results indicate high strain rate over the Hunter Mountain fault. The locking depth of the fault inferred from elastic modeling of interseismic strain accumulation is on the order of 4km, significantly shallower than for neighboring faults. In contrast, the long wavelength strain field across the Panamint and Saline faults indicates possibly deeper locking depths and/or shallower dip. The shallow locking depth of 4km inferred for the Hunter Mountain fault corresponds with the extension at depth of the two bounding low angle normal faults below Hunter Mountain, suggesting a control by the low angle normal fault system.

Gourmelen, N.; Falk, A.; Manzo, M.; Francesco, C.; Lanari, R.; Johnson, K.

2007-12-01

300

The arc-fault circuit protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

In electrical power systems bolted short-circuits are rare and the fault usually involves arcing and burning; mostly the limit value of minimum short-circuit depends on arcing-fault. In AC low voltage systems, the paper examines the arcing-fault branch circuits as weak points. Different protection measures are available against the arc-faults. A first measure that can guarantee a probabilistic protection is allowed

G. Parise; L. Martirano; U. Grasselli; L. Benetti

2001-01-01

301

Fault Models for Quantum Mechanical Switching Networks  

E-print Network

The difference between faults and errors is that, unlike faults, errors can be corrected using control codes. In classical test and verification one develops a test set separating a correct circuit from a circuit containing any considered fault. Classical faults are modelled at the logical level by fault models that act on classical states. The stuck fault model, thought of as a lead connected to a power rail or to a ground, is most typically considered. A classical test set complete for the stuck fault model propagates both binary basis states, 0 and 1, through all nodes in a network and is known to detect many physical faults. A classical test set complete for the stuck fault model allows all circuit nodes to be completely tested and verifies the function of many gates. It is natural to ask if one may adapt any of the known classical methods to test quantum circuits. Of course, classical fault models do not capture all the logical failures found in quantum circuits. The first obstacle faced when using methods from classical test is developing a set of realistic quantum-logical fault models. Developing fault models to abstract the test problem away from the device level motivated our study. Several results are established. First, we describe typical modes of failure present in the physical design of quantum circuits. From this we develop fault models for quantum binary circuits that enable testing at the logical level. The application of these fault models is shown by adapting the classical test set generation technique known as constructing a fault table to generate quantum test sets. A test set developed using this method is shown to detect each of the considered faults.

Jacob Biamonte; Jeff S. Allen; Marek A. Perkowski

2010-01-19

302

Facies composition and scaling relationships of extensional faults in carbonates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault seal evaluations in carbonates are challenged by limited input data. Our analysis of 100 extensional faults in shallow-buried layered carbonate rocks aims to improve forecasting of fault core characteristics in these rocks. We have analyzed the spatial distribution of fault core elements described using a Fault Facies classification scheme; a method specifically developed for 3D fault description and quantification,

Eivind Bastesen; Alvar Braathen

2010-01-01

303

Rapid prototyping of rapid prototyping machines  

E-print Network

Rapid prototyping tools empower individuals to create almost anything. Unfortunately, these tools are still far too expensive for personal ownership. The do-it-yourself community has responded with a slew of home-made rapid ...

Moyer, Ilan Ellison

2008-01-01

304

High impedance fault detection on distribution systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detection of high impedance faults on electrical distribution systems has been one of the most persistent and difficult problems facing the electric utility industry. Recent advances in digital technology have enabled practical solutions for the detection of a high percentage of these previously undetectable faults. This paper reviews several mechanical and electrical methods of detecting high impedance faults. The

C. G. Wester

1998-01-01

305

Network Reliability and Fault Tolerance Muriel Medard  

E-print Network

; for transient faults, a combination of error-correcting codes and data retransmission usually provides adequate problems must be considered in the design of a fault-tolerant system. A system must be capable of detectingNetwork Reliability and Fault Tolerance Muriel M´edard medard@mit.edu Laboratory for Information

Médard, Muriel

306

Relyzer: Application Resiliency Analyzer for Transient Faults  

E-print Network

that these undetected faults can result in silent data corruptions or SDCs. The SDC rates demonstrated by the state that Relyzer is capable of pruning about 99.9979% of hardware faults for the workloads that we studied. Some Terms--Silent Data Corruption, Transient Faults, Dy- namic Program Analysis, Architecture I

Adve, Sarita

307

Fault tolerant software modules for SIFT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of software fault tolerance is investigated for critical modules of the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) operating system to support the computational and reliability requirements of advanced fly by wire transport aircraft. Fault tolerant designs generated for the error reported and global executive are examined. A description of the alternate routines, implementation requirements, and software validation are included.

Hecht, M.; Hecht, H.

1982-01-01

308

FAULT PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF COMPACT DISK PLAYERS  

E-print Network

FAULT PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF COMPACT DISK PLAYERS Peter Fogh Odgaard Mladen Victor Wickerhauser playing certain discs with surface faults like scratches and fingerprints. The problem is to be found in an other publications of the first author. This scheme is based on an assumption that the surface faults do

Wickerhauser, M. Victor

309

The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen1  

E-print Network

The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen1 and Petr Kuznetsov2 1 Max Planck Institute challenges in distributed com- puting is ensuring that services are correct and available despite faults. Recently it has been argued that fault detection can be factored out from computation, and that a generic

Pennsylvania, University of

310

The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen  

E-print Network

The Fault Detection Problem Andreas Haeberlen Petr Kuznetsov Abstract One of the most important challenges in distributed computing is ensuring that services are correct and available despite faults. Recently it has been argued that fault detection can be factored out from computation, and that a generic

Pennsylvania, University of

311

High temperature superconducting fault current limiter  

DOEpatents

A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

1997-01-01

312

High temperature superconducting fault current limiter  

DOEpatents

A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

Hull, J.R.

1997-02-04

313

Fault detection via parameter robust estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We derive and analyze a fault detection filter which is robust to model uncertainty. To do this, we recast the fault detection problem as a disturbance attenuation problem and then incorporate parameter variations as an additional disturbance. The corresponding solution is a parameter robust game theoretic fault detection filter. A second look at our results, however, shows that the parameter

Walter H. Chung; Jason L. Speyer

1997-01-01

314

Lake Tahoe Faults, Shaded Relief Map  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Shaded relief map of western part of the Lake Tahoe basin, California. Faults lines are dashed where approximately located, dotted where concealed, bar and ball on downthrown side. Heavier line weight shows principal range-front fault strands of the Tahoe-Sierra frontal fault zone (TSFFZ). Opaque wh...

315

Salton Sea Satellite Image Showing Fault Slip  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Landsat satellite image (LE70390372003084EDC00) showing location of surface slip triggered along faults in the greater Salton Trough area. Red bars show the generalized location of 2010 surface slip along faults in the central Salton Trough and many additional faults in the southwestern section of t...

316

5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2010-01-01

317

20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

2011-04-01

318

5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2011-01-01

319

40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

2012-07-01

320

Active faulting and tectonics in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a study of the active tectonics of China based on an interpretation of Landsat (satellite) imagery and supplemented with seismic data. Several important fault systems can be identified, and most are located in regions of high historical seismicity. We deduce the type and sense of faulting from adjacent features seen on these photos, from fault plane solutions of

Paul Tapponnier; Peter Molnar

1977-01-01

321

22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2013-04-01

322

20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

2013-04-01

323

40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

2014-07-01

324

40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

2013-07-01

325

5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

2014-01-01

326

22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2011-04-01

327

5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2012-01-01

328

22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2014-04-01

329

40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

2010-07-01

330

40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral...located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

2011-07-01

331

20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

2014-04-01

332

Field Trip to the Hayward Fault Zone  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide provides directions to locations in Hayward, California where visitors can see evidence of creep along the Hayward Fault. There is also information about the earthquake hazards associated with fault zones, earthquake prediction, and landforms associated with offset along a fault. The guide is available in downloadable, printable format (PDF) in two resolutions

333

5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

2010-01-01

334

5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

2012-01-01

335

5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

2011-01-01

336

22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2012-04-01

337

5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2014-01-01

338

5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402 Administrative...for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of...

2013-01-01

339

20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

2010-04-01

340

22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2010-04-01

341

5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302 Administrative...Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of...

2013-01-01

342

20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees...RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment...that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If...

2012-04-01

343

A fault tolerance approach to computer viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensions of program flow monitors and n-version programming can be combined to provide a solution to the detection and containment of computer viruses. The consequence is that a computer can tolerate both deliberate faults and random physical faults by one common mechanism. Specifically, the technique detects control flow errors due to physical faults as well as the presence of viruses

Mark K. Joseph; Algirdas AviZienis

1988-01-01

344

Ground Fault--A Health Hazard  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

Jacobs, Clinton O.

1977-01-01

345

Delineating a shallow fault zone and dipping bed rock strata using multichannal analysis of surface waves with a land streamer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) seismic method was used to delineate a fault zone and gently dipping sedimentary bedrock at a site overlain by several meters of regolith. Seismic data were collected rapidly and inexpensively using a towed 30-channel land streamer and a rubberband-accelerated weight-drop seismic source. Data processed using the MASW method imaged the subsurface to a depth of about 20 m and allowed detection of the overburden, gross bedding features, and fault zone. The fault zone was characterized by a lower shear-wave velocity (Vs) than the competent bedrock, consistent with a large-scale fault, secondary fractures, and in-situ weathering. The MASW 2D Vs section was further interpreted to identify dipping beds consistent with local geologic mapping. Mapping of shallow-fault zones and dipping sedimentary rock substantially extends the applications of the MASW method. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Lacombe, P.; Johnson, C.D.; Lane, J.W., Jr.

2006-01-01

346

Fault tolerant high-performance PACS network design and implementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the Wake Forest University/Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) are implementing a second generation PACS. The first generation PACS provided helpful information about the functional and temporal requirements of the system. It highlighted the importance of image retrieval speed, system availability, RIS/HIS integration, the ability to rapidly view images on any PACS workstation, network bandwidth, equipment redundancy, and the ability for the system to evolve using standards-based components. This paper deals with the network design and implementation of the PACS. The physical layout of the hospital areas served by the PACS, the choice of network equipment and installation issues encountered are addressed. Efforts to optimize fault tolerance are discussed. The PACS network is a gigabit, mixed-media network based on LAN emulation over ATM (LANE) with a rapid migration from LANE to Multiple Protocols Over ATM (MPOA) planned. Two fault-tolerant backbone ATM switches serve to distribute network accesses with two load-balancing 622 megabit per second (Mbps) OC-12 interconnections. The switch was sized to be upgradable to provide a 2.54 Gbps OC-48 interconnection with an OC-12 interconnection as a load-balancing backup. Modalities connect with legacy network interface cards to a switched-ethernet device. This device has two 155 Mbps OC-3 load-balancing uplinks to each of the backbone ATM switches of the PACS. This provides a fault-tolerant logical connection to the modality servers which pass verified DICOM images to the PACS servers and proper PACS diagnostic workstations. Where fiber pulls were prohibitively expensive, edge ATM switches were installed with an OC-12 uplink to a backbone ATM switches. The PACS and data base servers are fault-tolerant, hot-swappable Sun Enterprise Servers with an OC-12 connection to a backbone ATM switch and a fast-ethernet connection to a back-up network. The workstations come with 10/100 BASET autosense cards. A redundant switched-ethernet network will be installed to provide yet another degree of network fault-tolerance. The switched-ethernet devices are connected to each of the backbone ATM switches with two-load-balancing OC-3 connections to provide fault-tolerant connectivity in the event of a primary network failure.

Chimiak, William J.; Boehme, Johannes M.

1998-07-01

347

A Fault Prediction Model with Limited Fault Data to Improve Test Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software fault prediction models are used to identify the fault-prone software modules and produce reliable software. Performance\\u000a of a software fault prediction model is correlated with available software metrics and fault data. In some occasions, there\\u000a may be few software modules having fault data and therefore, prediction models using only labeled data can not provide accurate\\u000a results. Semi-supervised learning approaches

Cagatay Catal; Banu Diri

2008-01-01

348

Extraction and Simulation of Realistic CMOS Faults Using Inductive Fault Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

FXT is a software tool which implements inductive fault analysis for CMOS circuits. It extracts a comprehensive list of circuit-level faults for any given CMOS circuit and ranks them according to their relative likelihood of occurrence. Five commercial CMOS circuits are analyzed using FXT. Of the extracted faults, approximately 50% can be modeled by single-line stuck-at 0\\/1 fault model. Faults

John Paul Shen; F. Joel Ferguson

1988-01-01

349

Abstract--Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equiva-  

E-print Network

1 Abstract--Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equiva- lence/dominance relationships among faults. Exact glo- bal fault collapsing can be easily applied fault collapsing method for library modules that uses both binary deci- sion diagrams and fault

Al-Asaad, Hussain

350

Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

2009-01-01

351

Cell boundary fault detection system  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

2011-04-19

352

Implementing fault-tolerant sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

Marzullo, Keith

1989-01-01

353

Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south-central Kyrgyzstan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Central Asia's Tien Shan, deformation is distributed across the wide orogen, a characteristic of intracontinental mountain building. Active faults are commonly found within intramontane basins that separate its constituent ranges. In order to explore the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south-central Kyrgyzstan. A series of five balanced cross-sections reveals a transition in patterns of faulting from faults confined to basin margins to faults focused within the basin center. The 20-km-wide eastern Naryn Basin displays deformation attributed to low-angle splays of the northern, basin-bounding fault. In the 40-km-wide western Naryn Basin, the pattern of deformation linked to the northern range remains, but is accompanied by steeper faults that dip both south and north without being directly linked to the basin-bounding fault. We compare these cross-sections to synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements of surface deformation. Profiles of InSAR-derived surface deformation rates across the Naryn Basin reveal that in the west, deformation is distributed across the broad basin interior, whereas in the east, rapid uplift is concentrated at the margin of the narrower basin. From the geodetic and structural data, we infer that in the western Naryn Basin, deformation has migrated away from the northern basin margin and into the interior. Deformation of the eastern basin interior, however, remains linked to the basin-bounding fault. A simple mechanical model demonstrates that basin width may control basin deformation whereby basin-interior faulting in the narrow, eastern Naryn Basin is inhibited by the overburden of adjacent ranges.

Goode, Joseph K.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Bookhagen, Bodo

2011-12-01

354

An evaluation of a real-time fault diagnosis expert system for aircraft applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several aspects of the aircraft domain make inflight diagnosis difficult. Many stem from the fact that the aircraft is in operation during and after the occurrence of a fault. These aspects include failure propagation, operator compensation, and lack of complete information. Still other aspects include responding rapidly to a failure, recognizing multiple failures, and predicting the effect of the failure

Paul C. Schutte; Kathy H. Abbott; Michael T. Palmer; Wendell R. Ricks

1987-01-01

355

Predeployment validation of fault-tolerant systems through software-implemented fault insertion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault injection-based automated testing (FIAT) environment, which can be used to experimentally characterize and evaluate distributed realtime systems under fault-free and faulted conditions is described. A survey is presented of validation methodologies. The need for fault insertion based on validation methodologies is demonstrated. The origins and models of faults, and motivation for the FIAT concept are reviewed. FIAT employs a validation methodology which builds confidence in the system through first providing a baseline of fault-free performance data and then characterizing the behavior of the system with faults present. Fault insertion is accomplished through software and allows faults or the manifestation of faults to be inserted by either seeding faults into memory or triggering error detection mechanisms. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of fault-tolerant strategies and architectures, can monitor system activity, and can automatically orchestrate experiments involving insertion of faults. There is a common system interface which allows ease of use to decrease experiment development and run time. Fault models chosen for experiments on FIAT have generated system responses which parallel those observed in real systems under faulty conditions. These capabilities are shown by two example experiments each using a different fault-tolerance strategy.

Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

1989-01-01

356

Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

2005-01-01

357

Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

2005-01-01

358

Geologic map + fault mechanics problem set  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This exercise requires students to answer some questions about stress and fault mechanics that relate to geologic maps. In part A) students must draw a cross section and Mohr circles and make some calculations to explain the slip history and mechanics of two generations of normal faults. In part B) students interpret the faulting history and fault mechanics of the Yerington District, Nevada, based on a classic geologic map and cross section by John Proffett. keywords: geologic map, cross section, normal faults, Mohr circle, Coulomb failure, Andersonian theory, frictional sliding, Byerlee's law

John Singleton

359

Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

1997-01-01

360

Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

Pattipati, Krishna R.

1997-01-01

361

Mapping tasks into fault tolerant manipulators  

SciTech Connect

The application of robots in critical missions in hazardous environments requires the development of reliable or fault tolerant manipulators. In this paper, we define fault tolerance as the ability to continue the performance of a task after immobilization of a joint due to failure. Initially, no joint limits are considered, in which case we prove the existence of fault tolerant manipulators and develop an analysis tool to determine the fault tolerant work space. We also derive design templates for spatial fault tolerant manipulators. When joint limits are introduced, analytic solutions become infeasible but instead a numerical design procedure can be used, as is illustrated through an example.

Paredis, C.J.J.; Khosla, P.K.; Kanade, T. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-12-31

362

Rapid shallow breathing  

MedlinePLUS

Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

363

Model-Based Fault Tolerant Control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Model Based Fault Tolerant Control (MBFTC) task was conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program. The goal of MBFTC is to develop and demonstrate real-time strategies to diagnose and accommodate anomalous aircraft engine events such as sensor faults, actuator faults, or turbine gas-path component damage that can lead to in-flight shutdowns, aborted take offs, asymmetric thrust/loss of thrust control, or engine surge/stall events. A suite of model-based fault detection algorithms were developed and evaluated. Based on the performance and maturity of the developed algorithms two approaches were selected for further analysis: (i) multiple-hypothesis testing, and (ii) neural networks; both used residuals from an Extended Kalman Filter to detect the occurrence of the selected faults. A simple fusion algorithm was implemented to combine the results from each algorithm to obtain an overall estimate of the identified fault type and magnitude. The identification of the fault type and magnitude enabled the use of an online fault accommodation strategy to correct for the adverse impact of these faults on engine operability thereby enabling continued engine operation in the presence of these faults. The performance of the fault detection and accommodation algorithm was extensively tested in a simulation environment.

Kumar, Aditya; Viassolo, Daniel

2008-01-01

364

Fault diagnosis for magnetic bearing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A full fault diagnosis for active magnetic bearing (AMB) and rotor systems to monitor the closed-loop operation and analyze fault patterns on-line in case any malfunction occurs is proposed in this paper. Most traditional approaches for fault diagnosis are based on actuator or sensor diagnosis individually and can solely detect a single fault at a time. This research combines two diagnosis methodologies by using both state estimators and parameter estimators to detect, identify and analyze actuators and sensors faults in AMB/rotor systems. The proposed fault diagnosis algorithm not only enhances the diagnosis accuracy, but also illustrates the capability to detect multiple sensors faults which occur concurrently. The efficacy of the presented algorithm has been verified by computer simulations and intensive experiments. The test rig for experiments is equipped with AMB, interface module (dSPACE DS1104), data acquisition unit MATLAB/Simulink simulation environment. At last, the fault patterns, such as bias, multiplicative loop gain variation and noise addition, can be identified by the algorithm presented in this work. In other words, the proposed diagnosis algorithm is able to detect faults at the first moment, find which sensors or actuators under failure and identify which fault pattern the found faults belong to.

Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; King, Yueh-Hsun; Lee, Rong-Mao

2009-05-01

365

Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

2005-01-01

366

Multiple sensor fault diagnosis for dynamic processes.  

PubMed

Modern industrial plants are usually large scaled and contain a great amount of sensors. Sensor fault diagnosis is crucial and necessary to process safety and optimal operation. This paper proposes a systematic approach to detect, isolate and identify multiple sensor faults for multivariate dynamic systems. The current work first defines deviation vectors for sensor observations, and further defines and derives the basic sensor fault matrix (BSFM), consisting of the normalized basic fault vectors, by several different methods. By projecting a process deviation vector to the space spanned by BSFM, this research uses a vector with the resulted weights on each direction for multiple sensor fault diagnosis. This study also proposes a novel monitoring index and derives corresponding sensor fault detectability. The study also utilizes that vector to isolate and identify multiple sensor faults, and discusses the isolatability and identifiability. Simulation examples and comparison with two conventional PCA-based contribution plots are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:20542268

Li, Cheng-Chih; Jeng, Jyh-Cheng

2010-10-01

367

Alp Transit: Crossing Faults 44 and 49  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the crossing of faults 44 and 49 when constructing the 57 km Gotthard base tunnel of the Alp Transit project. Fault 44 is a permeable fault that triggered significant surface deformations 1,400 m above the tunnel when it was reached by the advancing excavation. The fault runs parallel to the downstream face of the Nalps arch dam. Significant deformations were measured at the dam crown. Fault 49 is sub-vertical and permeable, and runs parallel at the upstream face of the dam. It was necessary to assess the risk when crossing fault 49, as a limit was put on the acceptable dam deformation for structural safety. The simulation model, forecasts and action decided when crossing over the faults are presented, with a brief description of the tunnel, the dam, and the monitoring system.

El Tani, M.; Bremen, R.

2014-05-01

368

Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

1997-01-01

369

Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of field data has led different investigators to conclude that the San Andreas Fault (SAF) has either anomalously low frictional sliding strength (?? 0.6). Arguments for the apparent weakness of the SAF generally hinge on conceptual models involving intrinsically weak gouge or elevated pore pressure within the fault zone. Some models assert that weak gouge and/or high pore pressure exist under static conditions while others consider strength loss or fluid pressure increase due to rapid coseismic fault slip. The present paper is composed of three parts. First, we develop generalized equations, based on and consistent with the Rice (1992) fault zone model to relate stress orientation and magnitude to depth-dependent coefficient of friction and pore pressure. Second, we present temperature-and pressure-dependent friction measurements from wet illite-rich fault gouge extracted from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) phase 1 core samples and from weak minerals associated with the San Andreas Fault. Third, we reevaluate the state of stress on the San Andreas Fault in light of new constraints imposed by SAFOD borehole data. Pure talc (?????0.1) had the lowest strength considered and was sufficiently weak to satisfy weak fault heat flow and stress orientation constraints with hydrostatic pore pressure. Other fault gouges showed a systematic increase in strength with increasing temperature and pressure. In this case, heat flow and stress orientation constraints would require elevated pore pressure and, in some cases, fault zone pore pressure in excess of vertical stress. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

Tembe, S.; Lockner, D.; Wong, T.-F.

2009-01-01

370

Longest fault-free paths in hypercubes with vertex faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypercube is one of the most versatile and efficient interconnection networks (networks for short) so far discovered for parallel computation. Let f denote the number of faulty vertices in an n-cube. This study demonstrates that when f?n?2, the n-cube contains a fault-free path with length at least 2n?2f?1 (or 2n?2f?2) between two arbitrary vertices of odd (or even) distance.

Jung-sheng Fu

2006-01-01

371

Geometric analysis of faulted rollovers: Contrasting styles of extensional growth folding in the Gulf of Mexico and Offshore Trinidad  

SciTech Connect

Rapid sedimentation rates combined with the presences of seaward-dipping detachment levels in both the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and the Columbus Basin (Offshore Trinidad) have facilitated the development of large extensional growth faults and their associated hanging-wall rollover folds. While detachment in the GOM is often associated with salt and/or overpresurred shale, shale is believed to be responsible for detachment and translation of large structural blocks within the Columbus Basin. Although, gravity-driven extension seems to be the primary mechanism driving structural development in both regions, the detailed structural geometries and deformational mechanisms present seem to be quite different. In the Columbus Basin, extensional rollovers are generally dominated by the presence of pervasive synthetic faults. Restoration of these structures suggests that these synthetic faults are accomodating the bulk hanging-wall deformation as the hanging-wall slides basinwards above an underlying listric fault surface. This synthetic simple shear deformation is not typically observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often observed in Gulf of Mexico rollovers. In contrast, although synthetic faults are present, often spatially associated with the master growth fault, antithetic or mixed antithetic/synthetic faulting dominates the crest of the structures. An antithetic simple shear deformation is borne out by simple geometric modeling and restoration. The synthetic faulting seem in Trinidadian rollovers to be influenced by the presence of important vertical pressure seals (major unconformities) that may act as internal detachment levels within the larger folds. Synthetic faults are often observed to sole or die downwards into these intervals. Generally, lateral closure of rollover anticlines in the GOM is controlled by the underlying scoop-like shape of the major listric growth faults.

Bentham, P.A. (Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01

372

Mantle convection with plates and mobile, faulted plate margins.  

PubMed

A finite-element formulation of faults has been incorporated into time-dependent models of mantle convection with realistic rheology, continents, and phase changes. Realistic tectonic plates naturally form with self-consistent coupling between plate and mantle dynamics. After the initiation of subduction, trenches rapidly roll back with subducted slabs temporarily laid out along the base of the transition zone. After the slabs have penetrated into the lower mantle, the velocity of trench migration decreases markedly. The inhibition of slab penetration into the lower mantle by the 670-kilometer phase change is greatly reduced in these models as compared to models without tectonic plates. PMID:17813909

Zhong, S; Gurnis, M

1995-02-10

373

Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (?) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ?1 ?m powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 ?m clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub-micron particles of unstable materials are unlikely to survive in the crust over geologic time, so a direct comparison of fresh experimental wear material and ancient fault rock needs to account for the alteration and crystallization of primary materials. The surface of the Corona fault is coated by a translucent shiny layer consisting of ~100 nm interlocking groundmass of dislocation-free quartz, 10 nm ellipsoidal particles, and interstitial patches of amorphous silica. We interpret this layer as the equivalent of the experimentally produced amorphous material after crystallizing to more stable forms over geological time.

Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

2013-12-01

374

Detrital zircon provenance evidence for large-scale extrusion along the Altyn Tagh fault  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The question of whether or not the Altyn Tagh fault is a large-scale extrusion boundary is critical for understanding the role of lateral extrusion in accommodating the Indo-Asian convergence and in building the Tibetan Plateau. Oligocene conglomerate clasts in the eastern Xorkol basin are low-grade slate, phyllite, sandstone, dacite and carbonate, and associated paleocurrent indicators evince sediment derivation from the opposing side of the Altyn Tagh fault. Matching these clasts with similar basement rocks in the North Qilian and Tuolainanshan terranes requires post-Oligocene left-lateral offset of 380 ?? 60 km on the eastern segment of the Altyn Tagh fault, suggesting large-scale extrusion along the fault in the Cenozoic (Yue, Y.J., Ritts, B.D., Graham, S.A., 2001b. Initiation and long-term slip history of the Altyn Tagh fault. International Geological Review 43, 1087-1094.). In order to further define this piercing point, the detrital zircon pattern of Oligocene sandstone from the Xorkol basin and the zircon ages of basement on the southern side of the fault were established by ion microprobe dating. Characterized by strong peaks between 850 and 950 Ma and the absence of Paleozoic and Mesozoic ages, the detrital zircon age pattern of the Oligocene sandstone matches the age distribution of zircon-bearing rocks of the Tuolainanshan terrane. This match requires 360 ?? 40 km of post-Oligocene left-lateral displacement on the eastern segment of the Altyn Tagh fault, supporting as well as refining the previously reported lithology-based cross-fault match. At least one of the following three extrusion scenarios must have existed to accommodate this large offset: (1) northeastward extrusion along the Altyn Tagh-Alxa-East Mongolia fault, (2) eastward extrusion along the Altyn Tagh-North Qilian-Haiyuan fault, and (3) northeastward extrusion of northern Tibet as a Himalaya-scale thrust sheet along the North Qilian-Haiyuan fault. We prefer the first scenario inasmuch as rapidly growing evidence for Cenozoic strike-slip activity on the Alxa-East Mongolia fault and mid-Miocene exhumation of northern Tibet supports it. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Yue, Y.; Graham, S.A.; Ritts, B.D.; Wooden, J.L.

2005-01-01

375

Quantifying the effects of an active blind fault on a shallow aquifer properties and drainage, case study of the Chihshang Aquifer in the eastern Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Chihshang Fault aquifer is nested in the Longitudinal Valley active Fault (LVF) situated along a plate suture between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate in eastern Taiwan. The LVF is undergoing rapid creep and co-seismic rupturing. Surface creeping on the fault were simultaneously measured utilizing creepmeters in surface as creeping rate of 2 cm/yr. Combining surface fracture investigation and geodetic results, we show that three branches of the Chihshang Fault developed at shallow depth with average dip angles of 35°. In order to better understand the effects of variations of pore-fluid pressure in the aquifer significantly influence the near-surface behavior of the fault by this blind fault system, 9 observation wells were drilled at depths of 30 to 100 m through the zone of the aquifer affected by fault deformations. Pore pressure variations in hydraulic observation wells induced by artificial single well disturbance (slug test) and pumping/injection experiments were monitored, together with the surface electrical resistivity measurement. It is possible to identify an aquifer zone of specific hydraulic properties that corresponds to the zone deformed by the active fault. Repeated hydraulic tests revealed that the two different phenomenon: the permeability of the footwall had the same trend with the variations of annual groundwater level; the permeability of the fault zone increased following the fault creep movement in 2008.

Mu, Chung-Hsiang; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frederic; Angelier, Jacques; Lee, Jian-Cheng; Dong, Jia-Jyun

2010-05-01

376

A Log-Scaling Fault Tolerant Agreement Algorithm for a Fault Tolerant MPI  

SciTech Connect

The lack of fault tolerance is becoming a limiting factor for application scalability in HPC systems. The MPI does not provide standardized fault tolerance interfaces and semantics. The MPI Forum's Fault Tolerance Working Group is proposing a collective fault tolerant agreement algorithm for the next MPI standard. Such algorithms play a central role in many fault tolerant applications. This paper combines a log-scaling two-phase commit agreement algorithm with a reduction operation to provide the necessary functionality for the new collective without any additional messages. Error handling mechanisms are described that preserve the fault tolerance properties while maintaining overall scalability.

Hursey, Joshua J [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Graham, Richard L [ORNL

2011-01-01

377

Sensor and Sensorless Fault Tolerant Control for Induction Motors Using a Wavelet Index  

PubMed Central

Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) systems are crucial in industry to ensure safe and reliable operation, especially of motor drives. This paper proposes the use of multiple controllers for a FTC system of an induction motor drive, selected based on a switching mechanism. The system switches between sensor vector control, sensorless vector control, closed-loop voltage by frequency (V/f) control and open loop V/f control. Vector control offers high performance, while V/f is a simple, low cost strategy with high speed and satisfactory performance. The faults dealt with are speed sensor failures, stator winding open circuits, shorts and minimum voltage faults. In the event of compound faults, a protection unit halts motor operation. The faults are detected using a wavelet index. For the sensorless vector control, a novel Boosted Model Reference Adaptive System (BMRAS) to estimate the motor speed is presented, which reduces tuning time. Both simulation results and experimental results with an induction motor drive show the scheme to be a fast and effective one for fault detection, while the control methods transition smoothly and ensure the effectiveness of the FTC system. The system is also shown to be flexible, reverting rapidly back to the dominant controller if the motor returns to a healthy state. PMID:22666016

Gaeid, Khalaf Salloum; Ping, Hew Wooi; Khalid, Mustafa; Masaoud, Ammar

2012-01-01

378

Application of padmounted fault interrupters to single-phase URD systems  

SciTech Connect

Underground distribution has proven itself to be a highly effective means of eliminating the temporary faults that plague overhead distribution, however, the permanent faults that do occur are often cable or splice failures which are unpredictable, difficult to locate and require a lot of time and expense to repair. One of the ways that the designer seeks to minimize the impact of such events on service reliability is by incorporating an overcurrent protection scheme which removes the faulted section from the rest of the system and contingency scheme which allows isolation of the faulted section and restoration of service in the shortest possible time with a minimal number of switching operations. As a result there has been a continuing interest in the development of devices, equipment, and methods which help to realize the ideals of rapid service restoration and isolation of faults to the smallest segment of the system. Overcurrent protection of the single-phase URD system has, traditionally, been the province of fused cutouts and fused padmounted sectionalizing terminals and switchgear. Recently however, padmounted vacuum fault interrupters, that utilize electronic controls for tripping, have become available from several manufacturers and are beginning to make inroads into this portion of the distribution system. This paper will discuss the characteristics and potential applications of a new product offered by Cooper Power Systems, the Shrubline VFI, which was designed specifically for use in single phase residential underground distribution.

Israel, W.F. [Cooper Power Systems, South Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1995-12-31

379

Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and experiments. With the proposed optimal waveform, torque production is greatly improved under the same Root Mean Square (RMS) current constraint. Additionally, position sensorless operation methods under phase faults are investigated to account for the combination of physical position sensor and phase winding faults. A comprehensive solution for position sensorless operation under single and multiple phases fault are proposed and validated through experiments. Continuous position sensorless operation with seamless transition between various numbers of phase fault is achieved.

Wang, Wei

380

Perspective View, San Andreas Fault  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.70 deg. North lat., 118.57 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

2000-01-01

381

Anisotropic Permeability of a Strike Slip Fault  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pump tests were performed in isolated sections of two inclined ~200m long boreholes that are ~130 meters apart from each other (WF-4 and WF-5 in Figure 1). The boreholes penetrate the Wildcat Fault, a semi-vertical strike slip fault, which is a member of the Hayward Fault system situated in the Berkeley Hills. The geology encountered in the boreholes was predominantly the Claremont Fm., extensively fractured and alternating sequences of chert, shale and sandstone. The drawdowns in four isolated sections in a vertical borehole (WF-1) drilled adjacent to the fault at distances of ~45m and ~95m from each of the inclined borehole was analyzed. The permeability of the fault plane was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the protolith and anisotropic with approximately 10 fold higher permeability in near horizontal direction, which is somewhat expected for a strike slip fault (Figure 2). Build-up analysis suggests that the fault is asymmetric with higher permeability along the east side of the fault plane and lower along the west side.igure 1. Pumping test configuration with two inclined boreholes (WF-4 and WF-5) intersecting the Wildcat Fault. The vertical borehole WF-1 is situated very close to the fault. igure 2. Dimensionless directional drawdowns observed in four isolated sections in WF-1 in response to the pumping in WF-4 and WF-5 at a dimensionless time of 16. Also shown is the best fit permeability ellipse.

Karasaki, K.; Goto, J.; Kiho, K.

2012-12-01

382

Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic

Carol S. Prentice; Christopher J. Crosby; Caroline S. Whitehill; J. Ramón Arrowsmith; Kevin P. Furlong; David A. Phillips

2009-01-01

383

Fault-ignorant quantum search  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the problem of quantum searching on a noisy quantum computer. Taking a fault-ignorant approach, we analyze quantum algorithms that solve the task for various different noise strengths, which are possibly unknown beforehand. We prove lower bounds on the runtime of such algorithms and thereby find that the quadratic speedup is necessarily lost (in our noise models). However, for low but constant noise levels the algorithms we provide (based on Grover's algorithm) still outperform the best noiseless classical search algorithm.

Vrana, Péter; Reeb, David; Reitzner, Daniel; Wolf, Michael M.

2014-07-01

384

Fault-ignorant Quantum Search  

E-print Network

We investigate the problem of quantum searching on a noisy quantum computer. Taking a 'fault-ignorant' approach, we analyze quantum algorithms that solve the task for various different noise strengths, which are possibly unknown beforehand. We prove lower bounds on the runtime of such algorithms and thereby find that the quadratic speedup is necessarily lost (in our noise models). However, for low but constant noise levels the algorithms we provide (based on Grover's algorithm) still outperform the best noiseless classical search algorithm.

Peter Vrana; David Reeb; Daniel Reitzner; Michael M. Wolf

2014-07-25

385

Fault-Tolerant FFT Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two concurrent error detection (CED) schemes are proposed for N-point fast Fourier transform (FFT) networks that consists of log\\/sub 2\\/N stages with N\\/2 two-point butterfly modules for each stage. The method assumes that failures are confined to a single complex multiplier or adder or to one input or output set of lines. Such a fault model covers a broad class

Jing-yang Jou; Jacob A. Abraham

1988-01-01

386

DEM simulation of growth normal fault slip  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Slip of the fault can cause deformation of shallower soil layers and lead to the destruction of infrastructures. Shanchiao fault on the west side of the Taipei basin is categorized. The activities of Shanchiao fault will cause the quaternary sediments underneath the Taipei basin to become deformed. This will cause damage to structures, traffic construction, and utility lines within the area. It is determined from data of geological drilling and dating, Shanchiao fault has growth fault. In experiment, a sand box model was built with non-cohesive sand soil to simulate the existence of growth fault in Shanchiao Fault and forecast the effect on scope of shear band development and ground differential deformation. The results of the experiment showed that when a normal fault containing growth fault, at the offset of base rock the shear band will develop upward along with the weak side of shear band of the original topped soil layer, and this shear band will develop to surface much faster than that of single top layer. The offset ratio (basement slip / lower top soil thickness) required is only about 1/3 of that of single cover soil layer. In this research, it is tried to conduct numerical simulation of sand box experiment with a Discrete Element Method program, PFC2D, to simulate the upper covering sand layer shear band development pace and scope of normal growth fault slip. Results of simulation indicated, it is very close to the outcome of sand box experiment. It can be extended to application in water pipeline project design around fault zone in the future. Keywords: Taipei Basin, Shanchiao fault, growth fault, PFC2D

Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang; Nien, Wie-Tung; Chan, Pei-Chen

2014-05-01

387

Is the fault core-damage zone model representative of seismogenic faults? Pre-existing anisotropies and fault zone complexity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismogenic fault zones are often described in terms of a "fault core" surrounded by an intensely fractured "damage zone". This useful framework has found broad application in many fault zone studies (hydraulic potential, etc.). However, we found it difficult to apply this model in the case of several seismogenic faults zones hosted in the continental crust of the Italian Southern Alps. As an example, we present quantitative field data (e.g. roughness analysis, fracture density profiles) derived from various digital mapping methods (LiDAR, RTK-GPS, high resolution photogrammetry) to illustrate two case studies of seismogenic strike-slip faults: 1) The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ) hosted in granitoids and exhumed from 8-10 km depth, and, 2) The Borcola Pass Fault Zone (BPFZ) hosted in dolostones and exhumed from 1.5-2 km depth. Ancient seismicity is corroborated by the occurrence of pseudotachylytes (GLFZ) and fluidized cataclasites (BPFZ). Both of the studied fault zones accommodated < 2 km of displacement. Despite the large differences in exhumation depth and host rock lithology, both fault zones: 1) are up to several hundreds of meters thick; 2) consist of tens to hundreds of sub-parallel fault strands, connected by a network of minor faults and fractures; 3) most significantly, lack a well-defined fault core that accommodated a majority of fault displacement. Instead, displacement was distributed amongst the networks of minor faults and fractures. The above similarities can be explained by the fact that both fault zones developed in rock volumes containing strong pre-existing anisotropies: magmatic cooling joints sets spaced 2-5 m apart for the GLFZ, regional joint sets spaced < 1 m apart for the BPFZ. During initial development of both fault zones, the pre-existing anisotropies were diffusely reactivated over wide volumes. This was associated in both cases with extensive fluid flow, and sealing/hardening of the pre-existing anisotropies by syn-deformation mineral precipitation. Pre-existing anisotropies are a common occurrence in the continental crust (e.g. joints, bedding surfaces, old fault zones, cleavage surfaces): fault zones developing in such areas will be highly segmented and discontinuous, particularly during the early stages of fault evolution (first few kilometers of displacement?). We speculate that the absence of a leading fault may result in long duration earthquake sequences with several main shocks, especially if accompanied by fluid migration. This is the case for the L'Aquila 2008-2009 seismic sequence (mainshock Mw 6.3) occurring within a fault zone with ~1.5 km total displacement cutting limestones and dolostones (Chiaraluce et al. 2011). High-resolution aftershock locations suggest the re-activation of both optimally and non-optimally oriented small fault segments over a total fault zone width of ~1 km. The magnitude of aftershocks is consistent with activation of fault strands tens to hundreds of meters in length for a period of several months following the mainshocks.

Di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.; Fondriest, M.; Bistacchi, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Mitchell, T. M.; Mittempergher, S.; Griffith, W. A.

2012-12-01

388

Could lithospheric instability cause the San Andreas Fault to creep ?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern Sierra Nevada mountains range rapidly uplifted at ? 3.5 Ma simultaneously with a pulse of basaltic volcanism. Xenoliths recovered from volcanics indicate that the range lost a dense crustal root after the Miocene. The vertical motions and removal of the root have been linked to a fast seismic velocity anomaly that extends ? 200 km into the mantle but is offset to the west of the range. With visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical numerical models, we have tested the influence of crustal strength on the kinematics of removal and on the amount of associated uplift. We find that delamination of the dense root is the most likely mechanism for gravitational instability to occur. In this class of models, the Great Valley deforms by elastic flexure in response to the load exerted by the delaminated root. We therefore explore the influence of the strength of the Great Valley on the wavelength of the flexure and complement 2D models by flexural 3D models. The study shows that for a Te=10 km, the flexural anomaly resulting from the drip pull outlines the limit between the area where the Quaternary sediments are found on-lapping or off-lapping the western flank of the Sierra. On the Western edge of the Sierra Nevada micro plate, the flexural anomaly crosses the San Andreas Fault. Where uplift is predicted Miocene strata are eroding, and where subsidence is predicted Quaternary sediments are at the surface. These geological limits also coincide with the limit of the creeping segment of the Fault. Geological evidence (especially fold kinematics) suggests that the extreme weakness of the San Andreas Fault in that area started during the Pliocene (~3 Ma). This timing also coincides with the rapid uplift of the Sierra Nevada. Simple coincidences or real mechanical link between these two anomalous behaviors? We will present and discuss how flexure could promote lithostatic fluid pressure in the depth range of 7 to 15 km along the creeping segment of the fault, and therefore influence the seismic behavior of the fault and, compare the prediction of this model with various sets of observations.

Le Pourhiet, L.; Saleeby, J.

2013-12-01

389

Generation and propagation of stick-slip waves over a fault with rate-independent friction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquakes generated at faults are either produced by rapid (sometimes supersonic) propagation of shear cracks/ruptures along the fault or originated in the stick-slip sliding over the fault. In some cases, supersonic (faster than the shear wave velocity) propagation of earthquake-generating shear ruptures or sliding is observed. This gave rise to the concept of supersonic shear crack propagation, much researched in the literature. Here we consider another mechanisms of supersonic sliding propagation. We concentrate on the stick-slip sliding as the earthquake mechanism. It is conventionally assumed that the mechanism of stick-slip lies in intermittent change between static and kinetic friction and the rate dependence of the friction coefficient. However the accumulation of elastic energy in the sliding plates on both sides of the fault can produce oscillations in the velocity of sliding even if the friction coefficient is constant. These oscillations resemble stick-slip movement, but they manifest themselves in terms of sliding velocity rather than displacement. Furthermore, over long faults the sliding exhibits wave-like propagation. We developed a model that shows that the zones of non-zero sliding velocities propagate along the fault with the velocity of p-wave. The mechanism of such fast movement is in the fact that sliding of every element of the rock at the fault surface creates normal (tensile/compressive) stresses in the neighbouring elements (normal stresses on the planes normal to the fault surface). The strains associated with these stresses are controlled by the Young's modulus rather than shear modulus resulting in the p-wave velocity of propagation of the sliding zone. This results in the observed supersonic (with respect to the s-waves) propagation of the apparent shear rupture. Keywords: Stick-slip, Rate-independent friction, Supersonic propagation.

Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

2014-05-01

390

Inferred relation of Miocene Bealville Fanglomerate to Edison Fault, Caliente Canyon area, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Bealville Fanglomerate is a very coarse, local, eastern torrential facies of the middle Tertiary marine sedimentary sequence of southern San Joaquin basin. This fanglomerate is exposed in lower Caliente Canyon east of Bakersfield. It is composed of unsorted boulder-size detritus of granitic rocks now exposed in the highlands on the east and south. The fanglomerate intertongues northwestward into the overlying Miocene fluvial Bena Gravel and probably partly into the underlying Oligocene-Miocene fluvial Walker Formation. In its eastern exposure, the Bealville Fanglomerate laps onto granitic basement. The Bealville Fanglomerate, as thick as 7000 ft (2200 m), dips southward into the north-dipping Edison fault. Pre-Tertiary granitic basement was elevated on the Edison fault to the south when the fault was contemporaneously active during the Miocene. Both the fanglomerate terrane north of the fault and the adjacent granitic basement terrane south of it are now eroded to low relief, so the fault is not expressed physiographically and is inactive. In contrast, the active White Wolf fault to the southeast is expressed by the northwest-facing escarpment slope of Bear Mountain. The Bealville Fanglomerate was deposited during the early and middle Miocene as coarse alluvial detritus on the western base of the rising Sierra Nevada uplift of granitic terrane. This southward-dipping fanglomerate is coarser and thicker than other formations deposited on the eastern margin of the San Joaquin basin. These conditions indicate that the fanglomerate was deposited rapidly on a southward-tilting block against a block of granitic basement being elevated on the Edison fault to the south, and it was derived from the adjacent granitic terrane to the east and from that elevated on the Edison fault to the south.

Dibblee, T.W. Jr.; Warne, A.H.

1986-04-01

391

Identifiability of Additive Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A class of fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type actuator and sensor faults is explored in detail from the point of view of fault identifiability. The methods use state augmentation along with banks of Kalman-Bucy filters for fault detection, fault pattern determination, and fault value estimation. A complete characterization of conditions for identifiability of bias-type actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is presented. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have unknown biases. The fault identifiability conditions are demonstrated via numerical examples. The analytical and numerical results indicate that caution must be exercised to ensure fault identifiability for different fault patterns when using such methods.

Joshi, Suresh; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Upchurch, Jason M.

2014-01-01

392

Networking of Near Fault Observatories in Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Networking of six European near-fault observatories (NFO) was established In the FP7 infrastructure project NERA (Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation). This networking has included sharing of expertise and know-how among the observatories, distribution of analysis tools and access to data. The focus of the NFOs is on research into the active processes of their respective fault zones through acquisition and analysis of multidisciplinary data. These studies include the role of fluids in fault initiation, site effects, derived processes such as earthquake generated tsunamis and landslides, mapping the internal structure of fault systems and development of automatic early warning systems. The six fault zones are in different tectonic regimes: The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) in Iceland, the Marmara Sea in Turkey and the Corinth Rift in Greece are at plate boundaries, with strike-slip faulting characterizing the SISZ and the Marmara Sea, while normal faulting dominates in the Corinth Rift. The Alto Tiberina and Irpinia faults, dominated by low- and medium-angle normal faulting, respectively are in the Apennine mountain range in Italy and the Valais Region, characterized by both strike-slip and normal faulting is located in the Swiss Alps. The fault structures range from well-developed long faults, such as in the Marmara Sea, to more complex networks of smaller, book-shelf faults such as in the SISZ. Earthquake hazard in the fault zones ranges from significant to substantial. The Marmara Sea and Corinth rift are under ocean causing additional tsunami hazard and steep slopes and sediment-filled valleys in the Valais give rise to hazards from landslides and liquefaction. Induced seismicity has repeatedly occurred in connection with geothermal drilling and water injection in the SISZ and active volcanoes flanking the SISZ also give rise to volcanic hazard due to volcano-tectonic interaction. Organization among the NERA NFO's has led to their gaining working-group status in EPOS as the WG on Near Fault Observatories, representing multidisciplinary research of faults and fault zones.

Vogfjörd, Kristín; Bernard, Pascal; Chiraluce, Lauro; Fäh, Donat; Festa, Gaetano; Zulficar, Can

2014-05-01

393

Surface faulting along the Superstition Hills fault zone and nearby faults associated with the earthquakes of 24 November 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The M6.2 Elmore Desert Ranch earthquake of 24 November 1987 was associated spatially and probably temporally with left-lateral surface rupture on many northeast-trending faults in and near the Superstition Hills in western Imperial Valley. Three curving discontinuous principal zones of rupture among these breaks extended northeastward from near the Superstition Hills fault zone as far as 9km; the maximum observed surface slip, 12.5cm, was on the northern of the three, the Elmore Ranch fault, at a point near the epicenter. Twelve hours after the Elmore Ranch earthquake, the M6.6 Superstition Hills earthquake occurred near the northwest end of the right-lateral Superstition Hills fault zone. We measured displacements over 339 days at as many as 296 sites along the Superstition Hills fault zone, and repeated measurements at 49 sites provided sufficient data to fit with a simple power law. The overall distributions of right-lateral displacement at 1 day and the estimated final slip are nearly symmetrical about the midpoint of the surface rupture. The average estimated final right-lateral slip for the Superstition Hills fault zone is ~54cm. The average left-lateral slip for the conjugate faults trending northeastward is ~23cm. The southernmost ruptured member of the Superstition Hills fault zone, newly named the Wienert fault, extends the known length of the zone by about 4km. -from Authors

Sharp, R.V.

1989-01-01

394

Stable sliding preceding stick-slip on fault surfaces in granite at high pressure  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distance of stable sliding before sudden slip on fault surfaces in granite decreases rapidly as the confining pressure is increased. At a pressure of 6 kb the amount of stable creep is very small or absent. Two orders of magnitude change in strain rate has no effect on the distance of stable sliding. Our results suggest that in the earth, fault creep should predominate in the shallow crust but in the deep crustal layer most of the stresses are probably relieved by sudden earthquake type of motion. Below the crust high temperature would promote stable-slip so in this region creep would once more predominate. ?? 1975 Birkha??user Verlag.

Byerlee, J.D.; Summers, R.

1975-01-01

395

Self-stabilizing byzantine-fault-tolerant clock synchronization system and method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Systems and methods for rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing clock synchronization are provided. The systems and methods are based on a protocol comprising a state machine and a set of monitors that execute once every local oscillator tick. The protocol is independent of specific application specific requirements. The faults are assumed to be arbitrary and/or malicious. All timing measures of variables are based on the node's local clock and thus no central clock or externally generated pulse is used. Instances of the protocol are shown to tolerate bursts of transient failures and deterministically converge with a linear convergence time with respect to the synchronization period as predicted.

Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

2012-01-01

396

Syntactic Fault Patterns in OO Programs Roger T. Alexander  

E-print Network

Syntactic Fault Patterns in OO Programs Roger T. Alexander Colorado State University Dept faults are widely studied, there are many aspects of faults that we still do not understand, par is to cause failures and thereby detect faults, a full understanding of the char- acteristics of faults

Offutt, Jeff

397

COMPLETE FAULT ANALYSIS FOR LONG TRANSMISSION LINE USING  

E-print Network

COMPLETE FAULT ANALYSIS FOR LONG TRANSMISSION LINE USING SYNCHRONIZED SAMPLING Nan Zhang Mladen 77843-3128, U.S.A. Abstract: A complete fault analysis scheme for long transmission line represented for normal situation and external faults, and is close to fault current during the internal faults

398

Fault tree analysis on handwashing for hygiene management  

Microsoft Academic Search

FTA (fault tree analysis) of the handwashing process was performed to investigate the causes for faults in hygiene management. The causes were deductively identified as the events causing every possible hazard by constructing a fault tree. The fault tree was constructed in a hierarchical structure with a single top event (occurrence of faults in hand washing), seven intermediate events, and

Aeri Park; Seung Ju Lee

2009-01-01

399

Actuator fault tolerant control in experimental networked embedded mini Drone  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with freezing fault reconfiguration in a small four-rotor helicopter (drone). This fault may be because of network faults such as packet loss or long delay in one actuator. In case of the fault occurrence in one actuator (motor) different strategies were proposed to compensate the fault effects on drone. These approaches are based on the minimisation of

Hossein Hashemi Nejad; Dominique Sauter; Samir Aberkane; Suzanne Lesecq

2009-01-01

400

Performance Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. In this paper, an FTC analysis framework is provided to calculate the upper bound of an induced-L(sub 2) norm of an FTC system with existence of false identification and detection time delay. The upper bound is written as a function of a fault detection time and exponential decay rates and has been used to determine which FTC law produces less performance degradation (tracking error) due to false identification. The analysis framework is applied for an FTC system of a HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle. Index Terms fault tolerant control system, linear parameter varying system, HiMAT vehicle.

Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine

2005-01-01

401

Rotating parallel faults: book shelf mechanism  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical analysis of book shelf operations induced by simple shearing shows that, under certain conditions, this operation requires less driving shear stress than an accommodation of the imposed shear by shear-parallel faulting. The operation of cross faults between neighboring Riedel faults in a wrench zone is a typical example. Large-scale rotation of parallel normal faults in domino style (tilted block tectonics) is primarily associated with the extension of ductile substrata. It may be inferred from mechanical arguments and sandbox experiments how the process, and in particular the dip direction of the faults, is controlled by the way the substratal extension progresses, by the direction of a substratal squeeze flow, by the presence of a surface slope, and by the configuration of the rock boundaries that confine the set of faults in the direction of extension.

Mandl, G.

1984-04-01

402

Perspective View, San Andreas Fault  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, DC.

Size: Varies in a perspective view Location: 34.78 deg. North lat., 118.75 deg. West lon. Orientation: Looking Northwest Original Data Resolution: SRTM and Landsat: 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: February 16, 2000

2000-01-01

403

Implications of fault constitutive properties for earthquake prediction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The rate- and state-dependent constitutive formulation for fault slip characterizes an exceptional variety of materials over a wide range of sliding conditions. This formulation provides a unified representation of diverse sliding phenomena including slip weakening over a characteristic sliding distance D(c), apparent fracture energy at a rupture front, time- dependent healing after rapid slip, and various other transient and slip rate effects. Laboratory observations and theoretical models both indicate that earthquake nucleation is accompanied by long intervals of accelerating slip. Strains from the nucleation process on buried faults generally could not be detected if laboratory values of D, apply to faults in nature. However, scaling of D(c) is presently an open question and the possibility exists that measurable premonitory creep may precede some earthquakes. Earthquake activity is modeled as a sequence of earthquake nucleation events. In this model, earthquake clustering arises from sensitivity of nucleation times to the stress changes induced by prior earthquakes. The model gives the characteristic Omori aftershock decay law and assigns physical interpretation to aftershock parameters. The seismicity formulation predicts large changes of earthquake probabilities result from stress changes. Two mechanisms for foreshocks are proposed that describe observed frequency of occurrence of foreshock-mainshock pairs by time and magnitude. With the first mechanism, foreshocks represent a manifestation of earthquake clustering in which the stress change at the time of the foreshock increases the probability of earthquakes at all magnitudes including the eventual mainshock. With the second model, accelerating fault slip on the mainshock nucleation zone triggers foreshocks.

Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.

1996-01-01

404

Fault prophet : a fault injection tool for large scale computer systems  

E-print Network

In this thesis, I designed and implemented a fault injection tool, to study the impact of soft errors for large scale systems. Fault injection is used as a mechanism to simulate soft errors, measure the output variability ...

Tchwella, Tal

2014-01-01

405

Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults  

E-print Network

With increasing operating speed and shrinking technology, timing defects in integrated circuits are becoming increasingly important. The well established stuck-at-fault model is not sufficient because it is a static fault model and does not account...

Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

2001-01-01

406

Vibration-based fault detection of sharp bearing faults in helicopters  

E-print Network

Vibration-based fault detection of sharp bearing faults in helicopters Victor Girondin , Herve the context of helicopter imposes a limited sampling frequency regarding the observed phenomena, many noisy their efficiency. Keywords: vibration, helicopter, health monitoring, frequency estimation, bearing, HUMS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

Modeling Fault Coverage of Random Test Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new probabilistic fault coverage model that is accurate, simple, predictive, and easily integrated with the normal design o w of built-in self-test circuits. The parameters of the model are determined by tting the fault simulation data obtained on an initial segment of the random test. A cost-based analysis nds the point at which to stop fault simulation,

Hailong Cui; Sharad C. Seth; Shashank K. Mehta

2003-01-01

408

Evidence for a strong San Andreas fault  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress measurements in deep boreholes have universally shown that stresses in the Earth's crust are in equilibrium with favorably oriented faults with friction coefficients in the range 0.6-0.7 and with nearly hydrostatic pore-pressure gradients. Because of the lack of any fault-adjacent heat-flow anomaly as predicted by a conductive model of frictional heating, the San Andreas fault has long been thought

Christopher H. Scholz

2000-01-01

409

Diagnosing process faults using neural network models  

SciTech Connect

In order to be of use for realistic problems, a fault diagnosis method should have the following three features. First, it should apply to nonlinear processes. Second, it should not rely on extensive amounts of data regarding previous faults. Lastly, it should detect faults promptly. The authors present such a scheme for static (i.e., non-dynamic) systems. It involves using a neural network to create an associative memory whose fixed points represent the normal behavior of the system.

Buescher, K.L.; Jones, R.D.; Messina, M.J.

1993-11-01

410

Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

1988-01-01

411

Theory of fault-tolerant quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to use quantum error-correcting codes to improve the performance of a quantum computer, it is necessary to be able to perform operations fault-tolerantly on encoded states. I present a theory of fault-tolerant operations on stabilizer codes based on symmetries of the code stabilizer. This allows a straightforward determination of which operations can be performed fault-tolerantly on a given

Daniel Gottesman

1998-01-01

412

Approximate active fault detection and control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with approximate active fault detection and control for nonlinear discrete-time stochastic systems over an infinite time horizon. Multiple model framework is used to represent fault-free and finitely many faulty models. An imperfect state information problem is reformulated using a hyper-state and dynamic programming is applied to solve the problem numerically. The proposed active fault detector and controller is illustrated in a numerical example of an air handling unit.

Škach, Jan; Pun?ochá?, Ivo; Šimandl, Miroslav

2014-12-01

413

Developing fault models for space mission software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the past several years, we have focused on developing fault models for space mission software. In general, these models use measurable attributes of a software system and its development process to estimate the number of faults inserted into the system during its development; their outputs can be used to better estimate the resources to be allocated to fault identification and removal for all system components.

Nikora, A. P.; Munson, J. C.

2003-01-01

414

New mapping and structural constraints on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault system, southeast Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dextral Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault lies along the western margin of Canada and southeastern Alaska, a transform plate boundary accommodating motion between the North American and Pacific Plates. The Fairweather Fault is the northern extension of the Queen Charlotte Fault and has numerous and complex splays, including the Chichagof-Baranof Fault, the Peril Strait Fault, the Chatham Strait Fault, and the Icy Point-Lituya Bay Fault. Except for a few small areas, these fault systems have not been mapped in detail. We present updated geometries and fault maps of the entirety of the strike-slip system using seismic reflection and bathymetric data, including a 2004 seismic reflection survey (EW0408), 2005 United Nations Commission on Law of the Sea multibeam bathymetry, and legacy data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Geophysical Data Center. This work is highly relevant for earthquake hazard research and mitigation in southeast Alaska. Several large (> Mw 7.0) earthquakes have occurred along this margin in the last century, impacting communities of southeastern Alaska and western Canada. Two large, recent events include 1) a Mw 7.7 earthquake that took place on 28 October 2012 near the Haida Gwaii Islands offshore of western Canada, and 2) a Mw 7.5 event which occurred on 05 January 2013, 330 km to the northwest and offshore of Craig, Alaska. Interestingly, the Haida Gwaii earthquake ruptured as a thrust event and the Craig earthquake ruptured with a near-vertical dextral strike-slip mechanism. Since a change in Pacific Plate motion around 4 million years ago, the southern Queen Charlotte Fault system has been obliquely converging at a rate of 20 mm/year, with the boundary accommodating about 80 km of perpendicular motion over that time. This convergence explains the Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake, but leaves questions about the along-strike fault structure. Two opposing end-member theories suggest convergence is accommodated by either: 1) Pacific Plate underthrusting beneath North America; or 2) crustal shortening via smaller, localized thrust faults. The underthrusting model assumes oblique slip along fault planes that transition to a lesser dip with increasing depth, whereas the local-thrust model requires strain partitioning via a series of thrust faults proximal to and inland from the main strike-slip trace. We provide insight into this system with improved surficial fault geometries that illuminate Queen Charlotte Fault structure in the context of the two recent earthquakes. We present these data in conjunction with preliminary aftershock locations and focal mechanisms for the 05 January 2013 Craig earthquake (obtained from a joint University of Texas-USGS OBS rapid-response survey), which offer new information about the seemingly changing along-strike dip and planar structure of the southern Queen Charlotte Fault. Additionally, we can now better constrain the Queen Charlotte's northern structure in relation with the Chatham Strait and Fairweather transforms.

Levoir, M. A.; Roland, E. C.; Gulick, S. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

2013-12-01

415

Shallow Faulting in Morelia, Mexico, Based on Seismic Tomography and Geodetically Detected Land Subsidence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsidence has been a common occurrence in several cities in central Mexico for the past three decades. This process causes substantial damage to the urban infrastructure and housing in several cities and it is a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land-use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. Since the early 1980's the city of Morelia in Central Mexico has experienced subsidence associated with groundwater extraction in excess of natural recharge from rainfall. Previous works have focused on the detection and temporal evolution of the subsidence spatial distribution. The most recent InSAR analysis confirms the permanence of previously detected rapidly subsiding areas such as the Rio Grande Meander area and also defines 2 subsidence patches previously undetected in the newly developed suburban sectors west of Morelia at the Fraccionamiento Del Bosque along, south of Hwy. 15 and another patch located north of Morelia along Gabino Castañeda del Rio Ave. Because subsidence-induced, shallow faulting develops at high horizontal strain localization, newly developed a subsidence areas are particularly prone to faulting and fissuring. Shallow faulting increases groundwater vulnerability because it disrupts discharge hydraulic infrastructure and creates a direct path for transport of surface pollutants into the underlying aquifer. Other sectors in Morelia that have been experiencing subsidence for longer time have already developed well defined faults such as La Colina, Central Camionera, Torremolinos and La Paloma faults. Local construction codes in the vicinity of these faults define a very narrow swath along which housing construction is not allowed. In order to better characterize these fault systems and provide better criteria for future municipal construction codes we have surveyed the La Colina and Torremolinos fault systems in the western sector of Morelia using seismic tomographic techniques. Our results indicate that La Colina Fault include secondary faults at depths up to 4-8m below the surface and located up to 24m away from the main fault trace. The Torremolinos fault system includes secondary faults, which are present up to 8m deep and 12-18m away from the main fault trace. Even though the InSAR analysis provides an unsurpassed synoptic view, a higher temporal resolution observation of fault movement has been pursued using the MOIT continuously operating GPS station, which is located within 100 m from the La Colina main fault trace. GPS data is also particularly useful to decompose horizontal and vertical motion in the absence of both ascending and descending SAR data acquisitions. Observations since July 2009 show a total general displacement trend of -39mm/yr and a total horizontal differential motion of 41.8 mm/yr and -4.7mm/yr in its latitudinal and Longitudinal components respectively in respect to the motion observed at the MOGA GPS station located 5.0 km to the SSE within an area which is not affected by subsidence. In addition to the overall trend, high amplitude excursions at the MOIT station with individual residual amplitudes up to 20mm, 25mm, and 60mm in its latitudinal, longitudinal and vertical components respectively vertical are observed. The correlation of fault motion excursions in relationship to the rainfall records will be analyzed.

Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Vergara-Huerta, F.; Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

2013-12-01

416

On Identifiability of Bias-Type Actuator-Sensor Faults in Multiple-Model-Based Fault Detection and Identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper explores a class of multiple-model-based fault detection and identification (FDI) methods for bias-type faults in actuators and sensors. These methods employ banks of Kalman-Bucy filters to detect the faults, determine the fault pattern, and estimate the fault values, wherein each Kalman-Bucy filter is tuned to a different failure pattern. Necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for identifiability of actuator faults, sensor faults, and simultaneous actuator and sensor faults. It is shown that FDI of simultaneous actuator and sensor faults is not possible using these methods when all sensors have biases.

Joshi, Suresh M.

2012-01-01

417

An algorithm for faulted phase and feeder selection under high impedance fault conditions  

E-print Network

substation. One-line diagram of a distribution system with two feeders. Typical high impedance fault, showing little or no change in phase voltage due to the fault. . Phase voltage and high frequency current component during a staged high impedance... be a valuable aid in the location oi' the high impedance fault by repair crews, since the area of search would be greatly reduced. Two primary methods have been used in the past to make directional deter- minations on faulted power systems, both...

Benner, Carl Lee

1988-01-01

418

Analysis of Unsymmetrical Faults in High Voltage Power Systems With Superconducting Fault Current Limiters  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of unsymmetrical faults for a 110 kV sub-grid coupling with a superconducting fault current limiter is conducted in this contribution. For the design of the super-conducting fault current limiters it is essential to identify the highest possible voltage during the limitation process. As reference the symmetric three phase fault which generally leads to the highest short-circuit currents is

Mark Stemmle; Claus Neumann; Frank Merschel; Ulrich Schwing; Karl-Heinz Weck; Mathias Noe; Frank Breuer; Steffen Elschner

2007-01-01

419

Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault  

E-print Network

. Financial support for the study was provided by the USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, under grant numbers 0 1 HQGR0029 and 01HQGR0056. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page l. INTRODUCTION . . 1. 1. Structure and Evolution of Major Fault Zones. 1... photographs of cataclastic fault rocks . . 79 28 Optical photomicrographs of hematite fault gouge . . 81 29 Backscattered scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of hematite fault gouge 82 30 Grid map of the intersection of the phyllonite zone...

Neal, Leslie Ann

2002-01-01

420

The morphology of strike-slip faults - Examples from the San Andreas Fault, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dilatational strains associated with vertical faults embedded in a horizontal plate are examined in the framework of fault kinematics and simple displacement boundary conditions. Using boundary element methods, a sequence of examples of dilatational strain fields associated with commonly occurring strike-slip fault zone features (bends, offsets, finite rupture lengths, and nonuniform slip distributions) is derived. The combinations of these strain fields are then used to examine the Parkfield region of the San Andreas fault system in central California.

Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey

1989-01-01

421

Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of back-to-back, or comparison, testing for regression test or porting is examined. The efficiency and the cost of the strategy is compared with manual and table-driven single version testing. Some of the key parameters that influence the efficiency and the cost of the approach are the failure identification effort during single version program testing, the extent of implemented changes, the nature of the regression test data (e.g., random), and the nature of the inter-version failure correlation and fault-masking. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed, together with some suggestions concerning its practical use.

Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

1990-01-01

422

Faults Discovery By Using Mined Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault discovery in the complex systems consist of model based reasoning, fault tree analysis, rule based inference methods, and other approaches. Model based reasoning builds models for the systems either by mathematic formulations or by experiment model. Fault Tree Analysis shows the possible causes of a system malfunction by enumerating the suspect components and their respective failure modes that may have induced the problem. The rule based inference build the model based on the expert knowledge. Those models and methods have one thing in common; they have presumed some prior-conditions. Complex systems often use fault trees to analyze the faults. Fault diagnosis, when error occurs, is performed by engineers and analysts performing extensive examination of all data gathered during the mission. International Space Station (ISS) control center operates on the data feedback from the system and decisions are made based on threshold values by using fault trees. Since those decision-making tasks are safety critical and must be done promptly, the engineers who manually analyze the data are facing time challenge. To automate this process, this paper present an approach that uses decision trees to discover fault from data in real-time and capture the contents of fault trees as the initial state of the trees.

Lee, Charles

2005-01-01

423

1, 135149, 2006 Earthquake fault rock  

E-print Network

Discussion EGU Abstract A pseudotachylyte bounded by a carbonate-matrix implosion breccia was found promoted melting during fault movement. Coexistence of fluid implosion breccia and pseudotachylyte has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Sequential Test Strategies for Multiple Fault Isolation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing near optimal test sequencing algorithms for diagnosing multiple faults in redundant (fault-tolerant) systems. The computational complexity of solving the optimal multiple-fault isolation problem is super-exponential, that is, it is much more difficult than the single-fault isolation problem, which, by itself, is NP-hard. By employing concepts from information theory and Lagrangian relaxation, we present several static and dynamic (on-line or interactive) test sequencing algorithms for the multiple fault isolation problem that provide a trade-off between the degree of suboptimality and computational complexity. Furthermore, we present novel diagnostic strategies that generate a static diagnostic directed graph (digraph), instead of a static diagnostic tree, for multiple fault diagnosis. Using this approach, the storage complexity of the overall diagnostic strategy reduces substantially. Computational results based on real-world systems indicate that the size of a static multiple fault strategy is strictly related to the structure of the system, and that the use of an on-line multiple fault strategy can diagnose faults in systems with as many as 10,000 failure sources.

Shakeri, M.; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Raghavan, V.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Kell, T.

1997-01-01

425

Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

2012-01-01

426

Proactive Fault-Recovery in Distributed Systems  

E-print Network

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA framework for proactive (rather than the classical reactive) fault-recov- ery that reduces the latencies

Narasimhan, Priya

427

Use of Fault Dropping for Multiple Fault Analysis Youns KARKOURI, El Mostapha ABOULHAMID, Eduard CERNY and Alain VERREAULT  

E-print Network

- 1 - Use of Fault Dropping for Multiple Fault Analysis Younès KARKOURI, El Mostapha ABOULHAMID Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. "A" Montréal, (Québec), H3C-3J7, Canada. ABSTRACT A new approach to fault analysis is presented. We consider multiple stuck-at-0/1 faults at the gate level. First, a fault

Aboulhamid, El Mostapha

428

Toward Reducing Fault Fix Time: Understanding Developer Behavior for the Design of Automated Fault Detection Tools, the Full Report  

E-print Network

Toward Reducing Fault Fix Time: Understanding Developer Behavior for the Design of Automated Fault}@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract The longer a fault remains in the code from the time it was injected, the more time it will take to fix the fault. Increasingly, automated fault detection (AFD) tools are providing developers

Young, R. Michael

429

Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equivalence/dominance  

E-print Network

1 Abstract Fault collapsing is the process of reducing the number of faults by using redundance and equivalence/dominance relationships among faults. Exact fault collapsing can be easily applied locally such as execution time and/or memory. In this paper, we present EGFC, an exact global fault collapsing tool

Al-Asaad, Hussain

430

Transform fault earthquakes in the North Atlantic: Source mechanisms and depth of faulting  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The centroid depths and source mechanisms of 12 large earthquakes on transform faults of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge were determined from an inversion of long-period body waveforms. The earthquakes occurred on the Gibbs, Oceanographer, Hayes, Kane, 15 deg 20 min, and Vema transforms. The depth extent of faulting during each earthquake was estimated from the centroid depth and the fault width. The source mechanisms for all events in this study display the strike slip motion expected for transform fault earthquakes; slip vector azimuths agree to 2 to 3 deg of the local strike of the zone of active faulting. The only anomalies in mechanism were for two earthquakes near the western end of the Vema transform which occurred on significantly nonvertical fault planes. Secondary faulting, occurring either precursory to or near the end of the main episode of strike-slip rupture, was observed for 5 of the 12 earthquakes. For three events the secondary faulting was characterized by reverse motion on fault planes striking oblique to the trend of the transform. In all three cases, the site of secondary reverse faulting is near a compression jog in the current trace of the active transform fault zone. No evidence was found to support the conclusions of Engeln, Wiens, and Stein that oceanic transform faults in general are either hotter than expected from current thermal models or weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

1987-01-01

431

Fault Detection of Broken Rotor Bars in Induction Motor using a Global Fault Index  

E-print Network

Modulation Index, Global Fault Index. 1 Introduction Induction motors, especially the asynchronous motorsFault Detection of Broken Rotor Bars in Induction Motor using a Global Fault Index G. Didier , E. Ternisien , O. Caspary , and H. Razik Abstract Induction motors play a very important part in the safe

Boyer, Edmond

432

Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault  

E-print Network

Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 faults is governed by the same process. Based on our own field work combined with data from

Savage, Heather M.

433

Permeability of fault-related rocks, and implications for hydraulic structure of fault zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The permeability structure of a fault zone in granitic rocks has been investigated by laboratory testing of intact core samples from the unfaulted protolith and the two principal fault zone components; the fault core and the damaged zone. The results of two test series performed on rocks obtained from outcrop are reported. First, tests performed at low confining pressure on

J. Goddard; C. Forster

1997-01-01

434

Fuzzy Set Theory and Fault Tree Analysis based Method Suitable for Fault Diagnosis of Power Transformer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fault detection and analysis for power transformer are the key measures to improve the security of power systems and the reliability of power supply. Due to the complicity of the power transformer structure and the variations in operating conditions, the occurrence of a fault inside power transformer is uncertain and random. Until now, the fault statistics of power transformer

Tong Wu; Guangyu Tu; Z. Q. Bo; A. Klimek

2007-01-01

435

Supervision, fault-detection and fault-diagnosis methods — An introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The operation of technical processes requires increasingly advanced supervision and fault diagnosis to improve reliability, safety and economy. This paper gives an introduction to the field of fault detection and diagnosis. It begins with a consideration of a knowledge-based procedure that is based on analytical and heuristic information. Then different methods of fault detection are considered, which extract features from

R. Isermann

1997-01-01

436

Using the Work of Fault Generation in the Laboratory to Predict Fault Evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fault systems may evolve to minimize the total work on the system. The work budget of fault systems includes frictional heating, internal work, tectonic work (external to the system), work against gravity, and seismic work. More enigmatic than these is the work required to propagate faults. While this term may be smaller than other terms in the work budget, observations of long-lived faults suggest that Wprop is not negligible. Measurements of external work from sandbox experiments show a drop in work associated with detachment growth, ramp (fore/backthrusts) growth, and the reactivation of older faults. The new forethrusts develop when the total work savings of having the fault exceeds the cost of the new fault. The drop in work with new fault formation can thus be used to estimate the cost of fault growth in the sandbox. We measure Wprop of 0.15 J/m2. Numerical simulations of fault growth episodes within our experiments are calibrated to the measured Wprop. By knowing the required work to grow faults, we can implement the principal of work minimization to predict fault growth in the tabletop sandbox experiments and larger accretionary systems.

Herbert, J. W.; Cooke, M. L.

2012-12-01

437

Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing, and Reconfiguration  

E-print Network

Towards Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip: Defects, Fault Modeling, Testing microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. Defects are related to logical fault models that can be viewed not only of microfluidics, referred to as "digital microfluidics", relies on the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

438

Research paper Dating deep? Luminescence studies of fault gouge from the San Andreas Fault  

E-print Network

Research paper Dating deep? Luminescence studies of fault gouge from the San Andreas Fault zone 2 Resetting IRSL TL Dating a b s t r a c t This study aims to assess whether luminescence emission from fault in lower energy trapping sites. In this work luminescence experiments are being conducted on minerals from

439

Seismic images and fault relations of the Santa Monica thrust fault, West Los Angeles, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In May 1997, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Southern California (USC) acquired high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction images on the grounds of the Wadsworth Veterans Administration Hospital (WVAH) in the city of Los Angeles (Fig. 1a,b). The objective of the seismic survey was to better understand the near-surface geometry and faulting characteristics of the Santa Monica fault zone. In this report, we present seismic images, an interpretation of those images, and a comparison of our results with results from studies by Dolan and Pratt (1997), Pratt et al. (1998) and Gibbs et al. (2000). The Santa Monica fault is one of the several northeast-southwest-trending, north-dipping, reverse faults that extend through the Los Angeles metropolitan area (Fig. 1a). Through much of area, the Santa Monica fault trends subparallel to the Hollywood fault, but the two faults apparently join into a single fault zone to the southwest and to the northeast (Dolan et al., 1995). The Santa Monica and Hollywood faults may be part of a larger fault system that extends from the Pacific Ocean to the Transverse Ranges. Crook et al. (1983) refer to this fault system as the Malibu Coast-Santa Monica-Raymond-Cucamonga fault system. They suggest that these faults have not formed a contiguous zone since the Pleistocene and conclude that each of the faults should be treated as a separate fault with respect to seismic hazards. However, Dolan et al. (1995) suggest that the Hollywood and Santa Monica faults are capable of generating Mw 6.8 and Mw 7.0 earthquakes, respectively. Thus, regardless of whether the overall fault system is connected and capable of rupturing in one event, individually, each of the faults present a sizable earthquake hazard to the Los Angeles metropolitan area. If, however, these faults are connected, and they were to rupture along a continuous fault rupture, the resulting hazard would be even greater. Although the Santa Monica fault represents a hazard to millions of people, its lateral extent and rupture history are not well known, due largely to limited knowledge of the fault location, geometry, and relationship to other faults. The Santa Monica fault has been obscured at the surface by alluvium and urbanization. For example, Dolan et al. (1995) could find only one 200-m-long stretch of the Santa Monica fault that was not covered by either streets or buildings. Of the 19-km length onshore section of the Santa Monica fault, its apparent location has been delineated largely on the basis of geomorphic features and oil-well drilling. Seismic imaging efforts, in combination with other investigative methods, may be the best approach in locating and understanding the Santa Monica fault in the Los Angeles region. This investigation and another recent seismic imaging investigation (Pratt et al., 1998) were undertaken to resolve the near-surface location, fault geometry, and faulting relations associated with the Santa Monica fault.

Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Okaya, D.

2001-01-01

440

A Fault-tolerant RISC Microprocessor for Spacecraft Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on a fault-tolerant RISC microprocessor for spacecraft applications are presented. Topics covered include: reduced instruction set computer; fault tolerant registers; fault tolerant ALU; and double rail CMOS logic.

Timoc, Constantin; Benz, Harry

1990-01-01

441

Intermittent/transient fault phenomena in digital systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the intermittent/transient (IT) fault study is presented. An interval survivability evaluation of digital systems for IT faults is discussed along with a method for detecting and diagnosing IT faults in digital systems.

Masson, G. M.

1977-01-01

442

Earthquake behavior and structure of oceanic transform faults  

E-print Network

Oceanic transform faults that accommodate strain at mid-ocean ridge offsets represent a unique environment for studying fault mechanics. Here, I use seismic observations and models to explore how fault structure affects ...

Roland, Emily Carlson

2012-01-01

443

Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

Schoess, Jeffrey N.

1999-05-01

444

Lightning faults on distribution lines  

SciTech Connect

Until now, power engineers have been unable to quantify electrical system outages and damage caused by lightning. Determining the number of lightning strikes to overhead lines is a necessary first step in evaluating design options for lightning protection systems. Under contract to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the authors have developed low-cost instru