Science.gov

Sample records for catheter ablation predicts

  1. Distal end of the atrioventricular nodal artery predicts the risk of atrioventricular block during slow pathway catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J; Huang, S; Lai, L; Lin, L; Chen, J; Tseng, Y; Lien, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To search for a reliable anatomical landmark within Koch's triangle to predict the risk of atrioventricular (AV) block during radiofrequency slow pathway catheter ablation of AV nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—To test the hypothesis that the distal end of the AV nodal artery represents the anatomical location of the AV node, and thus could be a useful landmark for predicting the risk of AV block, 128 consecutive patients with AVNRT receiving slow pathway catheter ablation were prospectively studied in two phases. In phase I (77 patients), angiographic demonstration of the AV nodal artery and its ending was performed at the end of the ablation procedure, whereas in the subsequent phase II study (51 patients), the angiography was performed immediately before catheter ablation to assess the value of identifying this new landmark in reducing the risk of AV block. Multiple electrophysiologic and anatomical parameters were analysed. The former included the atrial activation sequence between the His bundle recording site (HBE) and the coronary sinus orifice or the catheter ablation site, either during AVNRT or during sinus rhythm. The latter included the spatial distances between the distal end of the AV nodal artery and the HBE and the final catheter ablation site, and the distance between the HBE and the tricuspid border at the coronary sinus orifice floor.
RESULTS—In phase I, nine of the 77 patients had complications of transient (seven patients) or permanent (two patients) complete AV block during stepwise, anatomy guided slow pathway catheter ablation. These nine patients had a wider distance between the HBE and the distal end of the AV nodal artery, and a closer approximation of the catheter ablation site to the distal end of the AV nodal artery, which independently predicted the risk of AV block. In contrast, none of the available electrophysiologic parameters were shown to be reliable. When the distance between

  2. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  3. Incidence and Factors Predicting Skin Burns at the Site of Indifferent Electrode during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Hussain; Finta, Bohuslav; Rind, Jubran

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has become a mainstay for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Skin burns at the site of an indifferent electrode patch have been a rare, serious, and likely an underreported complication of RFA. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin burns in cardiac RFA procedures performed at one institution. Also, we wanted to determine the factors predicting skin burns after cardiac RFA procedures at the indifferent electrode skin pad site. Methods. A retrospective case control study was performed to compare the characteristics in patients who developed skin burns in a 2-year period. Results. Incidence of significant skin burns after RFA was 0.28% (6/2167). Four of the six patients were female and all were Caucasians. Four controls for every case were age and sex matched. Burn patients had significantly higher BMI, procedure time, and postprocedure pain, relative to control subjects (p < 0.05, one-tailed testing). No one in either group had evidence of dispersive pad malattachment. Conclusions. Our results indicate that burn patients had higher BMI and longer procedure times compared to control subjects. These findings warrant further larger studies on this topic. PMID:27213077

  4. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost. PMID:10159774

  5. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  6. Left Atrial Anatomy Relevant to Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Cabrera, José Angel; Saremi, Farhood

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of interventional procedures for the treatment of arrhythmias in humans, especially the use of catheter ablation techniques, has renewed interest in cardiac anatomy. Although the substrates of atrial fibrillation (AF), its initiation and maintenance, remain to be fully elucidated, catheter ablation in the left atrium (LA) has become a common therapeutic option for patients with this arrhythmia. Using ablation catheters, various isolation lines and focal targets are created, the majority of which are based on gross anatomical, electroanatomical, and myoarchitectual patterns of the left atrial wall. Our aim was therefore to review the gross morphological and architectural features of the LA and their relations to extracardiac structures. The latter have also become relevant because extracardiac complications of AF ablation can occur, due to injuries to the phrenic and vagal plexus nerves, adjacent coronary arteries, or the esophageal wall causing devastating consequences. PMID:25057427

  7. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  8. Left atrial reservoir function predicts atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation: a two-dimensional speckle strain study

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Mahek; Caracciolo, Giuseppe; Khan, Uzma; Mori, Naoyo; Saha, Samir K.; Srivathsan, Komandoor; Altemose, Gregory; Scott, Luis; Sengupta, Partho

    2011-01-01

    Background Predictors of atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after catheter ablation (CA) are not fully defined. We hypothesized that 2D left atrial (LA) regional strain maps would help identify abnormal atrial substrate that increases susceptibility to AF recurrence post-CA. Methods and Results Sixty-three patients (63±10 years, 60% male) underwent CA for symptomatic paroxysmal (75%) or persistent (25%) AF. Baseline LA mechanical function determined using speckle tracking echocardiography was compared between those with AF recurrence (AFR) and no recurrence post-CA. Bi-dimensional global and regional maps of LA wall velocity, strain, and strain rate (SR) were obtained during end ejection and early diastole. After 18±12 months of follow-up, 34 patients were free of AFR post-CA. There were no differences in clinical characteristics, LA and LV volumes, and Doppler estimates of LV diastolic function and filling pressures at baseline between patients with recurrent AF and those that maintained sinus rhythm. However, the LA emptying fraction (55±17% vs. 64±14%, p=0.04), global and regional systolic and diastolic strains, SR, and velocities were reduced in patients with recurrent AF. There was marked attenuation of peak LA lateral wall longitudinal strain (LS; 11±7% vs. 20±14%, p=0.007) and SR (0.9±0.4 vs. 1.3±0.6 s−1, p=0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed lateral wall LS (odds ratio=1.15, 95% CI=1.02–1.28, p=0.01) as an independent predictor of AFR. Conclusions Regional LA lateral wall LS is a pre-procedural determinant of AFR in patients undergoing CA, independent of LA enlargement. Characterization of atrial myocardial tissue properties by speckle tracking echo may aid the appropriate selection of adjunctive strategies and prognostication of patients undergoing CA. PMID:21424845

  9. [Catheter ablation of atrial flutter and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for atrial flutter based on studies demonstrating the role of the cavotricuspid isthmus. With a high rate of success and minimal complications, catheter ablation is the therapy of choice for patients with the common type of atrial flutter. Left atrial flutter, non-cavotricuspid isthmus dependent, and those associated with heart disease have a worst outcome with catheter ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has also emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a transseptal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this is the only curative method for these patients. PMID:12966653

  10. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Radiofrequency catheter ablation for redo procedures after cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Kettering, Klaus; Gramley, Felix

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of two different strategies using radiofrequency catheter ablation for redo procedures after cryoablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Thirty patients (paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: 22 patients, persistent atrial fibrillation: 8 patients) had to undergo a redo procedure after initially successful circumferential pulmonary vein (PV) isolation with the cryoballoon technique (Arctic Front Balloon, CryoCath Technologies/Medtronic). The redo ablation procedures were performed using a segmental approach or a circumferential ablation strategy (CARTO; Biosense Webster) depending on the intra-procedural findings. After discharge, patients were scheduled for repeated visits at the arrhythmia clinic. A 7-day Holter monitoring was performed at 3, 12 and 24 mo after the ablation procedure. RESULTS: During the redo procedure, a mean number of 2.9 re-conducting pulmonary veins (SD ± 1.0 PVs) were detected (using a circular mapping catheter). In 20 patients, a segmental approach was sufficient to eliminate the residual pulmonary vein conduction because there were only a few recovered pulmonary vein fibres. In the remaining 10 patients, a circumferential ablation strategy was used because of a complete recovery of the PV-LA conduction. All recovered pulmonary veins could be isolated successfully again. At 2-year follow-up, 73.3% of all patients were free from an arrhythmia recurrence (22/30). There were no major complications. CONCLUSION: In patients with an initial circumferential pulmonary vein isolation using the cryoballoon technique, a repeat ablation procedure can be performed safely and effectively using radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:24009817

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Benito, F.; Sánchez, C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the indications, results and complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation in small infants with supraventricular tachycardia due to an accessory atrioventricular pathway. METHODS: Five infants less than 9 months old underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways. Ablation was done for medically refractory tachyarrhythmia associated with aborted sudden death in two patients, left ventricular dysfunction in one, failure of antiarrhythmic drugs in one, and planned cardiac surgery in one. All five patients underwent a single successful procedure. Three left free wall pathways were ablated by transseptal approach, a right posteroseptal pathway was ablated from the inferior vena cava, and a left posteroseptal pathway was approached from the inferior vena cava into the coronary sinus. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter with a 3 mm tip was used. RESULTS: A sudden increment in impedance indicative of coagulum formation was observed in two procedures. One patient developed a transient ischaemic complication after ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway by transseptal approach. This patient had mild pericardial effusion after the procedure. Moderate pericardial effusion was also noted in another patient. After a mean follow up of 18.4 months all patients are symptom free without treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be performed successfully in infants. Temperature monitoring in 5F ablation catheters would be desirable to prevent the development of coagulum. Echocardiography must be performed after the ablation procedure to investigate pericardial effusion. Images PMID:9326990

  12. Catheter selection for ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus for treatment of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Antoine; Jamon, Yann; Romeyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Thévenin, Jérôme; Messier, Marc; Isaaz, Karl

    2006-11-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) represents the first line therapy of the cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) with a high efficacy and low secondary effects. RFA of CTI-dependent AFL can be performed by using various types of ablation catheters. Recent evaluations comparing externally cooled tip RFA (ecRFA) catheters and large-tip (8 mm) catheters have revealed that these catheters have a higher efficacy for CTI-AFL ablation compared to 4-mm catheters. The reliability of RFA catheters for AFL is variable and an optimal catheter selection may enhance the RFA effectiveness. The main goal of this article is to review the elements that improve the management of CTI RFA. Preliminary examinations of histopathologic and anatomical elements that may interfere with conventional CTI RFA are presented. Experimental studies concerning the electrobiology of large-tip and cooled-tip catheters are compared. The different catheter designs between cooled-tip and 8-mm-tip catheters are examined (size of the deflectable curve, rotation stability, and size of the distal nonsteerable catheter part) because of their critical role in CTI RFA results. A thorough review of clinical trials of each catheter is presented, and comparison of both catheters in this clinical setting is analyzed. In addition, the role of CTI morphology on AFL RF duration is underlined such as the value of right atrial angiography as an adjunct tool for CTI RFA catheter selection. Based on randomized studies, 8-mm-tip catheters seem to be more effective for ablation in case of straight angiographic isthmus morphology. On the other hand, ecRFA catheters appear to be more effective in cases of complex CTI anatomy or difficult CTI RFA. To reduce X-ray exposition and RFA application time, few studies report that CTI angiographic evaluation before RFA allows a catheter selection based on both CTI morphology and length. Moreover, preliminary data of randomized studies showed that an

  13. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  14. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  15. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  16. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  17. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  18. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  19. Successful Management of Atrio-Esophageal Fistula after Cardiac Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hun Bo; Kim, Chilsung; Kim, Hong-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    An increase in cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation for treating refractory atrial fibrillation has resulted in an increased prevalence of complications. Among numerous complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation, atrio-esophageal fistula, although rare, is known to have fatal results. We report a case of successful management of an atrio-esophageal fistula as a complication of cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:23614102

  20. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A.; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  1. Irrigated tip catheters for radiofrequency ablation in ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Müssigbrodt, Andreas; Grothoff, Matthias; Dinov, Borislav; Kosiuk, Jedrzej; Richter, Sergio; Sommer, Philipp; Breithardt, Ole A; Rolf, Sascha; Bollmann, Andreas; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy. PMID:25705659

  2. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  3. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, Frederic; Jais, Pierre; Stephenson, Kent; O'Neill, Mark D; Hocini, Meleze; Clementy, Jacques; Stevenson, William G; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI) has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC), and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon) or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser); the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months. Conclusion Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI. PMID:17235367

  4. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  5. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  6. Technique of pulmonary vein isolation by catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wittkampf, F.H.M.; Derksen, R.; Wever, E.F.D.; Simmers, T.A.; Boersma, L.V.A.; Vonken, E.P.A.; Velthuis, B.K.; Sreeram, N.; Rensing, B.J.; Cramer, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In selected patients with atrial fibrillation, the fibrillation episodes may be initiated by single or short bursts of ectopy often originating from one or more pulmonary veins (PVs). Therefore, electrical isolation of these veins by catheter ablation is currently being explored as a treatment modality for patients with paroxysmal and even more permanent types of atrial fibrillation. At present, two different techniques are used: 1) selective ablation of electrical connections between left atrium and myocardial sleeves inside the PVs; and 2) contiguous encircling lesions around and outside the PV ostia. With both techniques, moderate to high success rates have been reported with a limited follow-up duration. Both types of procedure are very complex and require a highly skilful team. With the variable anatomy of the PVs, non-invasively acquired angiographic images may serve as a roadmap for catheter manipulation. Modern three-dimensional catheter navigation techniques can be applied to facilitate accurate catheter positioning with limited fluoroscopic exposure. Experimental and clinical research is needed to define patient selection criteria. ImagesFigure 2Figures 3 and 4Figure 5 PMID:25696100

  7. Optimization of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: insights gained from clinically-derived computer models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R; Hansen, Brian J; Csepe, Thomas A; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K; Fedorov, Vadim V

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  8. Optimization of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Insights Gained from Clinically-Derived Computer Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jichao; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Hansen, Brian J.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Wang, Yufeng; Stiles, Martin K.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, and its treatment is an increasing economic burden on the health care system. Despite recent intense clinical, experimental and basic research activity, the treatment of AF with current antiarrhythmic drugs and catheter/surgical therapies remains limited. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is widely used to treat patients with AF. Current clinical ablation strategies are largely based on atrial anatomy and/or substrate detected using different approaches, and they vary from one clinical center to another. The nature of clinical ablation leads to ambiguity regarding the optimal patient personalization of the therapy partly due to the fact that each empirical configuration of ablation lines made in a patient is irreversible during one ablation procedure. To investigate optimized ablation lesion line sets, in silico experimentation is an ideal solution. 3D computer models give us a unique advantage to plan and assess the effectiveness of different ablation strategies before and during RFCA. Reliability of in silico assessment is ensured by inclusion of accurate 3D atrial geometry, realistic fiber orientation, accurate fibrosis distribution and cellular kinetics; however, most of this detailed information in the current computer models is extrapolated from animal models and not from the human heart. The predictive power of computer models will increase as they are validated with human experimental and clinical data. To make the most from a computer model, one needs to develop 3D computer models based on the same functionally and structurally mapped intact human atria with high spatial resolution. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize recent developments in clinically-derived computer models and the clinical insights they provide for catheter ablation. PMID:25984605

  9. Catheter ablation in competitive athletes: indication.

    PubMed

    Furlanello, F; Bertoldi, A; Inama, G; Fernando, F

    1995-12-01

    Some supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (SVT), particularly if paroxysmal and/or related to Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), may in some cases endanger an athlete's professional career due to hemodynamic consequences during athletic activity, which in some instances may be life-threatening. One must also take into account that in Italy the law makes antiarrhythmic drug treatment (AAD) incompatible with sport eligibility. For these reasons, the utilization of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in athletes has different indications as opposed to the normal population, since the primary goal is "the eligibility of the athlete." In our study, we discuss the criteria for indication of RFA in athletes with SVT on the basis of the data obtained from our population of athletes, studied over a 20-year period, from 1974 to the 31st of December 1993. These athletes were evaluated for arrhythmic events, utilizing a standardized cardioarrhythmological protocol: 1,325 athletes (1,125 men, 200 women, mean age 20.7 years). One subgroup included 380 athletes with WPW (28.7%), 22 athletes with aborted sudden death (1.6%), 6 of whom had WPW, 13 athletes with sudden death (0.98%), and 2 of whom had WPW. Another subgroup was formed by 116 top level elite professional athletes (TLA) (mean age 22.9 years), of which 10 of 116 (8.6%) had WPW and 12 of 116 (10.3%) had paroxysmal SVT. The most important indications for RFA in athletes are represented by: WPW asymptomatic at risk, symptomatic during athletic activity, and/or requiring AAD treatment: paroxysmal junctional reentrant tachycardia: when this condition is disabling and related to exercise and therefore compromising an athlete's performance and sports career. Paroxysmal junctional reentrant tachycardia is easily reproduced via transesophageal atrial pacing (TAP) during exercise (bicycle ergometer), common in athletes but normally the recurrences are concentrated only during the period in which the athlete is engaged in sport. Rare

  10. Clinical Significance of Additional Ablation of Atrial Premature Beats after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Soo; Yang, Pil-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Junbeum; Park, Jin-Kyu; Uhm, Jae Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The clinical significance of post-procedural atrial premature beats immediately after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has not been clearly determined. We hypothesized that the provocation of immediate recurrence of atrial premature beats (IRAPB) and additional ablation improves the clinical outcome of AF ablation. Materials and Methods We enrolled 200 patients with AF (76.5% males; 57.4±11.1 years old; 64.3% paroxysmal AF) who underwent catheter ablation. Post-procedure IRAPB was defined as frequent atrial premature beats (≥6/min) under isoproterenol infusion (5 µg/min), monitored for 10 min after internal cardioversion, and we ablated mappable IRAPBs. Post-procedural IRAPB provocations were conducted in 100 patients. We compared the patients who showed IRAPB with those who did not. We also compared the IRAPB provocation group with 100 age-, sex-, and AF-type-matched patients who completed ablation without provocation (No-Test group). Results 1) Among the post-procedural IRAPB provocation group, 33% showed IRAPB and required additional ablation with a longer procedure time (p=0.001) than those without IRAPB, without increasing the complication rate. 2) During 18.0±6.6 months of follow-up, the patients who showed IRAPB had a worse clinical recurrence rate than those who did not (27.3% vs. 9.0%; p=0.016), in spite of additional IRAPB ablation. 3) However, the clinical recurrence rate was significantly lower in the IRAPB provocation group (15.0%) than in the No-Test group (28.0%; p=0.025) without lengthening of the procedure time or raising complication rate. Conclusion The presence of post-procedural IRAPB was associated with a higher recurrence rate after AF ablation. However, IRAPB provocation and additional ablation might facilitate a better clinical outcome. A further prospective randomized study is warranted. PMID:26632385

  11. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  12. Influence of catheter orientation on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Sagerer-Gerhardt, Michaela; Weber, Helmut P

    2016-09-01

    Lesion sizes and quality are crucial for successful catheter ablation procedures. We sought to test the influence of catheter orientation towards the endocardial surface on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter. Continuous wave 1064-nm laser catheter applications at 15 W (4.5 W/mm²)/30 s, (135 J/mm²), irrigation flow 30 mL/min, were aimed at the left ventricular endocardial surface of bovine myocardium. The catheter was kept in vertical, in slanting (67.5°, 45°, 22.5°), and in flat positions; in flat position, also 60 s of radiation times were applied (n = 10, each). Lesions were evaluated morphometrically. Maximum depth of lesion was achieved with the catheter in a vertical orientation. Catheter inclination of <22.5 showed a highly significant decrease of lesion depth from 5.6 ± 1.1 to 3.7 ± 0.5 mm (p = 0.0001). In a flat catheter position, laser radiation of 30 s achieved the smallest lesions. However, after 60 s of radiation, the flat lesions were similar in depth (p = 087) and were larger in width (p = 0.0004) and in volumes (p = 0.0025) as compared to the lesions achieved with the catheter in vertical position after 30 s of radiation. Steam-pop with intramural cavitation or tissue vaporization with crater formation did not occur. Longer radiation times can achieve larger lesions regardless of catheter orientation. Catheter orientation is not a major determinant for laser ablation lesion size and quality, and a steerable support may not be needed when using the open-irrigated electrode-laser mapping and ablation (ELMA) catheter RytmoLas. PMID:27286865

  13. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  14. MediGuide-impact on catheter ablation techniques and workflow.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2014-09-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous intervention in modern medical science, specifically cardiovascular medicine fluoroscopy has remained the gold standard for navigation inside the cardiac structures. As the complexity of the procedures continue to increase with advances in interventional electrophysiology, the procedural times and fluoroscopy times have proportionately increased and the risks of radiation exposure both to the patients as well as the operator continue to rise. 3D electroanatomic mapping systems have to some extent complemented fluoroscopic imaging in improving catheter navigation and forming a solid platform for exploring the electroanatomic details of the target substrate. The 3D mapping systems are still limited as they continue to be static representations of a dynamic heart without being completely integrated with fluoroscopy. The field needed a technological solution that could add a dynamic positioning system that can be successfully incorporated into fluoroscopic imaging as well as electroanatomic imaging modalities. MediGuide is one such innovative technology that exploits the geo-positioning system principles. It employs a transmitter mounted on the X-ray panel that emits an electromagnetic field within which sensor-equipped diagnostic and ablation catheters are tracked within prerecorded fluoroscopic images. MediGuide is also integrated with NavX mapping system and helps in developing better 3D images by field scaling-a process that reduces field distortions that occur from impedance mapping alone. In this review, we discuss about the principle of MediGuide technology, the catheter ablation techniques, and the workflow in the EP lab for different procedures. PMID:24928484

  15. Catheter ablation of atrioventricular accessory pathways by radiofrequency current.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Hu, D; Ding, Y

    1993-12-15

    Tachycardias mediated by atrioventricular accessory pathways, which are refractory to antiarrhythmic drug therapy have been treated both by surgery and by catheter ablation with high energy direct current shock. These procedures have variable success rates and substantial associated morbidity and mortality. Radiofrequency ablation, a newer, low-energy technique is potentially safer and more effective. Of 110 patients with 117 accessory pathways, 101 were located on the left side and 16 on the right. Accessory pathway conduction was abolished permanently in 101 (91.8%) patients. VA conduction dissociation and VA decremental conduction were found in 88 and 13 successful patients, respectively. Four (3.9%) patients with decremental VA conduction suffered arrhythmia recurrence after a mean of 8 months follow-up. Complications developed in two patients including right femoral vein thrombosis and left ventricular insufficiency. There were no deaths from the procedure. We conclude that radiofrequency current ablation is a safe and effective interventional modality for patients with symptomatic tachycardias mediated by atrioventricular accessory pathways. PMID:8112920

  16. Catheter Ablation of Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peichl, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Recently, catheter ablation (CA) has become a therapeutic option to target focal triggers of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the setting of electrical storm (ES). This strategy was first described in subjects without organic heart disease (i.e. idiopathic VF) and subsequently in other conditions, especially in patients with ischaemic heart disease. In the majority of cases, the triggering focus originates in the ventricular Purkinje system. In patients with Brugada syndrome, besides ablation of focal trigger in the right ventricular outflow tract, modification of a substrate in this region has been described to prevent recurrences of VF. In conclusion, CA appears to be a reasonable strategy for intractable cases of ES due to focally triggered polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and VF. Therefore, early transport of the patient into the experience centre for CA should be considered since the procedure could be in some cases life-saving. Therefore, the awareness of this entity and link to the nearest expert centre are important.

  17. Cost analysis of periprocedural imaging in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Pokorney, Sean D; Hammill, Bradley G; Qualls, Laura G; Steinberg, Benjamin A; Curtis, Lesley H; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-07-15

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score<2 (p<0.001). In conclusion, periprocedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  18. Catheter Ablation Related Mitral Valve Injury: The Importance of Early Recognition and Rescue Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Hu, Tiffany; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Vaidya, Vaibhav R.; Cha, Yong-Mei; Valverde, Arturo M.; Friedman, Paul A.; Suri, Rakesh M.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of catheter ablations involve the mitral annular region and valve apparatus, increasing the risk of catheter interaction with the mitral valve (MV) complex. We review our experience with catheter ablation-related MV injury resulting in severe mitral regurgitation (MR) to delineate mechanisms of injury and outcomes. Methods We searched the Mayo Clinic mitral valve surgical database over a 19-year period (1993–2012) and the electrophysiologic procedures database over a 23-year period (1990–2013) and identified 9 patients with catheter ablation related MV injury requiring clinical intervention. Results Indications for ablation included atrial fibrillation (AF) [n=4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [n =3], and left-sided accessory pathways [n=2]. In all 4 AF patients, a circular mapping catheter entrapped in the MV apparatus was responsible for severe mitral regurgitation. In all 3 VT patients, radiofrequency energy delivery led to direct injury to the MV apparatus. In the 2 patients with accessory pathways, both mechanisms were involved (1 per patient). Six patients required surgical intervention (5 MV repair, 1 catheter removal). One patient developed severe functional MR upon successful endovascular catheter disentanglement that improved spontaneously. Two VT patients with persistent severe post-ablation MR were managed non-surgically, one of whom died 3 months post-procedure. Conclusion Circular mapping catheter entrapment and ablation at the mitral annulus are the most common etiologies of MV injury during catheter ablation. Close surveillance of the MV is needed during such procedures and early surgical repair is important for successful salvage if significant injury occurs. PMID:24758402

  19. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections.

    PubMed

    Haase, C; Schäfer, D; Dössel, O; Grass, M

    2014-11-21

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm. PMID:25350552

  20. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  1. Geographic Variation in the Use of Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Melissa A.; Walkey, Allan J.; Wallace, Erin R.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Curtis, Lesley H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is used increasingly in older patients, yet the risks and benefits are not completely understood. With such uncertainty, local medical opinion may influence catheter ablation use. Methods In a 100% sample of Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, we investigated variation in use by hospital referral region (HRR) for 20,176 catheter ablation procedures. Results Across 274 HRRs, median age was 71.2 years (interquartile range, 70.5-71.8), a median of 98% of patients were white, and a median of 39% of patients were women. The median age-standardized prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 77.1 (69.4-84.2) per 1000 beneficiaries; the median rate of catheter ablation was 3.5 (2.4-4.9) per 1000 beneficiaries. We found no significant associations between the rate of catheter ablation and prevalence of atrial fibrillation (P = 0.99), end-of-life Medicare expenditures per capita (P = 0.09), or concentration of cardiologists (P = 0.45), but a slight association with Medicare expenditures per capita (linear regression estimate, 0.016; 95% CI, 0.001-0.031; P = 0.04). Examined HRR characteristics explained only 2% of the variation in HRR-level rates of catheter ablation (model R2 = 0.016). Conclusion The rate of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in older patients was low, varied substantially by region, and was not associated with the prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the availability of cardiologists, or end-of-life resource use, and was only slightly associated with overall Medicare expenditures per capita. PMID:26027614

  2. Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia: Lessons learned from past clinical trials and implications for future clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pokorney, Sean D; Friedman, Daniel J; Calkins, Hugh; Callans, David J; Daoud, Emile G; Della-Bella, Paolo; Jackson, Kevin P; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Saba, Samir; Sapp, John; Stevenson, William G; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2016-08-01

    Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) has evolved in recent years, especially in patients with ischemic heart disease. Data from prospective studies show that VT catheter ablation reduces the risk of recurrent VT; however, there is a paucity of data on the effect of VT catheter ablation on mortality and patient-centered outcomes such as quality of life. Performing randomized clinical trials of VT catheter ablation can be fraught with challenges, and, as a result, several prior trials of VT catheter ablation had to be stopped prematurely. The main challenges are inability to blind the patient to therapy to obtain a traditional control group, high crossover rates between the 2 arms of the study, patient refusal to participate in trials in which they have an equal chance of receiving a "pill" vs an invasive procedure, heterogeneity of mapping and ablation techniques as well as catheters and equipment, rapid evolution of technology that may make findings of any long trial less relevant to clinical practice, lack of consensus on what constitutes acute procedural and long-term success, and presentation of patients to electrophysiologists late in the course of their disease. In this article, a panel of experts on VT catheter ablation and/or clinical trials of VT catheter ablation review challenges faced in conducting prior trials of VT catheter ablation and offer potential solutions for those challenges. It is hoped that the proposed solutions will enhance the feasibility of randomized clinical trials of VT catheter ablation. PMID:27050910

  3. The Feasibility and Efficacy of a Large-Sized Lasso Catheter Combined With 3 Dimensional Mapping System for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Won; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Min-Seok; Choi, Yun Seok; Lee, Man-Young; Rho, Tai-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives We aimed to investigate whether a large-sized Lasso catheter could increase the success rate of immediate complete pulmonary vein (PV) antral isolation and improve the outcome of catheter ablation in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Subjects and Methods This study included 107 consecutive patients (67 males, mean age: 57.8±9.7 years) who underwent PV mapping and ablation due to symptomatic drug-refractory AF. The first 43 patients underwent isolation of both ipsilateral PVs using the Carto-Merge 3 dimensional mapping system (group 1). The other 64 patients underwent isolation of both ipsilateral PVs using the same technique with a large-sized (a diameter of 30 to 35 mm) Lasso cathe-ter (group 2). When ipsilateral PVs did not show any potential after the initial circumferential ablation, we defined this as 'immediate complete antral isolation (ICAI)'. We compared the AF recurrence rate of both groups. Results There was no significant difference of the clinical characteristics between group 1 and group 2. All the patients were followed-up for 1 year. The ICAI rate of group 1 and group 2 was significantly different (21% vs. 78%, p<0.001), and the AF recurrence rates of group 1 and group 2 were also different (34.9% vs. 18.8%, p=0.042). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the use of a large-sized Lasso catheter was a significant predictive factor for preventing recurrence (odds ratio: 0.489, 95% confidence interval: 0.136-0.927). Conclusion It is likely that a large-sized Lasso catheter plays an important role in achieving ICAI and in lowering the rate of AF recurrence. PMID:21949528

  4. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  5. Three-dimensional electroanatomic mapping systems in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Li-Wei; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common tachyarrhythmia, with a prevalence of 5% in people over the age of 65. Catheter ablation of AF has emerged as an important management choice for drug-refractory symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF. Three-dimensional (3D) electroanatomic mapping systems were introduced into catheter ablation of AF more than a decade ago. The 3D tool has the benefit of reducing the radiation exposure time, as well as voltage and fractionation mapping in order to identify the critical substrate during the ablation, prevent the formation of gaps, guide the ablation of post-ablation atrial tachycardia or flutter, and integrate images to improve the safety and long-term success rate. The 3D systems successfully enable safe and tailored radiofrequency ablation of AF in individual patients. (Circ J 2010; 74: 18 - 23). PMID:19920357

  6. [Catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation: what will change in daily practice?].

    PubMed

    van der Voort, Pepijn H

    2013-01-01

    A recent publication compared catheter ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs as initial therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. No difference was seen in the primary endpoint of the cumulative AF burden over two years. The burden of AF was documented objectively by a series of 7-day continuous ECG recordings; a method that will evolve as a gold standard for measuring the AF burden. The major shortcoming of the study was an obsolete ablation endpoint, lacking verification of pulmonary vein isolation. Other drawbacks were the fact that ablations were not exclusively carried out in high-volume centres and a high cross-over rate in the drug group. Also, although the primary endpoint was not significantly different, several secondary outcomes obviously favoured ablation. Outcomes in both the ablation and drug groups were relatively good, and this study will not change the current practice for the majority of paroxysmal AF patients, although catheter ablation could be performed as the initial therapy. PMID:23548191

  7. The role of catheter ablation in the management of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ang, Richard; Earley, Mark J

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is driven by spontaneous electrical activation emerging from the pulmonary veins. Catheter ablation using either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy electrically isolates these veins from the left atrium, both reducing the burden of atrial fibrillation episodes and improving the patient's symptoms. Catheter ablation is superior to antiarryhthmic drugs when patients are carefully selected. Underlying medical problems - including obesity, hypertension and obstructive sleep apnoea - should be optimally treated before considering ablation. Although this treatment has the potential to cure patients of their symptoms, they should be aware of the important associated procedural complications. PMID:27251918

  8. Current and future modalities of catheter ablation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Haines, D E

    1992-01-01

    Catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment for a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. By destroying the critical zone of conductive tissue responsible for impulse generation or propagation, the arrhythmias may be cured. A variety of modalities of catheter ablation have been tested in the past decade. Initially, high energy direct current shocks delivered through a conventional electrode catheter were used. Now, use of radiofrequency energy as a power supply has resulted in higher efficacy and much improved safety of this technique. New approaches including low energy direct current shock ablation, microwave hyperthermic ablation, and laser photocoagulation are being tested, and may result in further refinement of nonsurgical curative therapy of arrhythmias. PMID:10147817

  9. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  10. Cost Analysis of Periprocedural Imaging in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Pokorney, Sean D.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Qualls, Laura G.; Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score <2 (p <0.001). In conclusion, peri-procedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  12. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients with Post-Infarction Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with post-infarction cardiomyopathy (CMP) is caused by reentry through slowly conducting tissue with in areas of myocardial scar. The use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has helped to decrease the risk of arrhythmic death in patients with post-infarction CMP, but the symptomatic and psychological burden of ICD shocks remains significant. Experience with catheter ablation has progressed substantially in the past 20 years, and is now routinely used to treat patients with post-infarction CMP who experience VT or receive ICD therapy. Depending on the hemodynamic tolerance of VT, a variety of mapping techniques may be used to identify sites for catheter ablation, including activation and entrainment mapping for mappable VTs, or substrate mapping for unmappable VTs. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of VT in post-infarction CMP patients, and the contemporary practice of catheter ablation. PMID:25089131

  13. Gender, Race, and Health Insurance Status in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nileshkumar; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Thakkar, Badal; Coffey, James O; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Patel, Achint; Ainani, Nitesh; Nalluri, Nikhil; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Kowalski, Marcin; Hendel, Robert; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Noseworthy, Peter A; Asirvatham, Samuel; Lo, Kaming; Myerburg, Robert J; Mitrani, Raul D

    2016-04-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has emerged as a popular procedure. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there exist differences or disparities in ablation utilization across gender, socioeconomic class, insurance, or race. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000 to 2012), we identified adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of AF by ICD 9 code 427.31 who had catheter ablation (ICD 9 code-37.34). We stratified patients by race, insurance status, age, gender, and hospital characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate mixed-effect model was created to identify the independent predictors of AF ablation. Among an estimated total of 3,508,122 patients (extrapolated from 20% Nationwide Inpatient Sample) hospitalized with a diagnosis of AF in the United States from the year 2000 to 2012, 102,469 patients (2.9%) underwent catheter ablations. The number of ablations was increased by 940%, from 1,439 in 2000 to 15,090 in 2012. There were significant differences according to gender, race, and health insurance status, which persisted even after adjustment for other risk factors. Female gender (0.83 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.87; p <0.001]), black (0.49 [95% CI 0.44 to 0.55; p <0.001]), and Hispanic race (0.64 [95% CI 0.56 to 0.72; p <0.001]) were associated with lower likelihoods of undergoing an AF ablation. Medicare (0.93, 0.88 to 0.98, <0.001) or Medicaid (0.67, 0.59 to 0.76, <0.001) coverage and uninsured patients (0.55, 0.49 to 0.62, <0.001) also had lower rates of AF ablation compared to patients with private insurance. In conclusion we found differences in utilization of catheter ablation for AF based on gender, race, and insurance status that persisted over time. PMID:26899494

  14. Prevention of immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation with low-dose landiolol after radiofrequency catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Daisuke; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Kutsuzawa, Daisuke; Kumagai, Yu; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is commonly observed within 3 d after the procedure. The mechanism and pharmacological management of immediate AF recurrence remain unclear. Methods A total of 50 consecutive patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized to receive either low-dose landiolol (landiolol group) or a placebo (placebo group). In the landiolol group, intravenous landiolol (0.5 μg kg−1 min−1) was administered for 3 d after AF ablation. Results No serious adverse event associated with RF catheter ablation or landiolol administration was observed. The prevalence of immediate AF recurrence (≤3 d after RF catheter ablation) was significantly lower in the landiolol group than in the placebo group (16% vs. 48%, p=0.015). Although the postprocedural change in heart rate was significantly lower in the landiolol group compared to that in the placebo group, the changes in blood pressure and body temperature were not different between the two groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that landiolol treatment was the only independent predictor of immediate AF recurrence after ablation (odds ratio: 0.180; 95% confidence interval: 0.044–0.729; p=0.016). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of low-dose landiolol after AF ablation may be effective and safe for preventing immediate AF recurrence within 3 d after AF ablation. PMID:26550083

  15. Adjusted Left Atrial Emptying Fraction as a Predictor of Procedural Outcome after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Won; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Jin Won; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-01-01

    Structural remodeling of the left atrium is a risk factor for recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation; however, data are sparse regarding the role of functional left atrial remodeling in predicting procedural outcomes. We evaluated whether left atrial transport function could be used to predict recurrent atrial fibrillation. From July 2008 through August 2010, we enrolled 202 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal=120, persistent=82). Left atrial volumes (LAVs) were measured by means of multislice computed tomography at every 10% of the R-R interval, and measurements were adjusted for body surface area to yield the LAV index (LAVI) at baseline. The left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF) was calculated according to LAV differences. During the mean follow-up period of 10 ± 4 months after a single ablation procedure, atrial fibrillation recurred in 59 patients (paroxysmal=19, persistent=40). Multivariate analysis revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation, early mitral inflow velocity, LAVImax, LAVImin, LAEF, LAVImax/LAEF, and LAVImin/LAEF were all independent predictors of atrial fibrillation, but the best predictor was LAVImin/LAEF (β=1.329, P=0.001). The cutoff value was 1.61 (mL/m2)/%, and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.6% and 62.2%, respectively (area under the curve=0.761). Our study shows that adjusted left atrial emptying fraction with use of multislice computed tomography might be a useful, noninvasive method to select patients for ablation. PMID:26175632

  16. Respiratory motion influence on catheter contact force during radio frequency ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation is a common treatment option for atrial fibrillation. A common treatment strategy is pulmonary vein isolation. In this case, individual ablation points need to be placed around the ostia of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium to generate transmural lesions and thereby block electric signals. To achieve a durable transmural lesion, the tip of the catheter has to be stable with a sufficient tissue contact during radio-frequency ablation. Besides the steerable interface operated by the physician, the movement of the catheter is also influenced by the heart and breathing motion - particularly during ablation. In this paper we investigate the influence of breathing motion on different areas of the endocardium during radio frequency ablation. To this end, we analyze the frequency spectrum of the continuous catheter contact force to identify areas with increased breathing motion using a classification method. This approach has been applied to clinical patient data acquired during three pulmonary vein isolation procedures. Initial findings show that motion due to respiration is more pronounced at the roof and around the right pulmonary veins.

  17. Catheter Ablation as First-Line Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation: Ready for Prime-Time?

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Aldo G; Morillo, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    Current guidelines include atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation as part of the management strategy in patients that have failed at least one oral antiarrhythmic drug treatment course. However, growing evidence derived from both randomized and non-randomized studies demonstrate lower rates of AF recurrence and AF burden in patients with paroxysmal AF that are naïve to antiarrhythmic drug treatment. Furthermore, progression from paroxysmal AF to persistent AF appears to be delayed by early catheter ablation of AF. The current review addresses the question of the best timing for ablation in patients with paroxysmal AF and provides the rationale for offering AF ablation as first-line therapy based on the most updated evidence available. PMID:27300744

  18. Advances in catheter ablation: atrial fibrillation ablation in patients with mitral mechanical prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Bai, Rong; Horton, Rodney; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Price, Justin; Natale, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in patients with mitral valve replacement (MVR). Treatment of AF in these subjects is challenging, as the arrhythmia is often refractory to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is usually avoided or delayed in patients with MVR due to the higher perceived risks and difficulty of left atrial catheter manipulation in the presence of a mechanical valve. Over the last few years, several investigators have reported the feasibility and safety of RFCA of AF in patients with MVR. Five case-control studies have evaluated the feasibility and safety of RFCA of AF or perimitral flutter (PMFL) in patients with MVR. Overall, a total of 178 patients with MVR have been included (21 undergoing ablation of only PMFL), and have been compared with a matched control group of 285 patients. Total procedural duration (weighted mean difference [WMD] = +24.5 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] +10.2 min to +38.8 min, P = 0.001), and fluoroscopy time (WMD = +13.5 min, 95% CI +3.7 min to +23.4 min, P = 0.007) were longer in the MVR group. After a mean follow-up of 11.5 ± 8.6 months, 64 (36%) patients in the MVR group experienced recurrence of AF/PMFL, as compared to 73 (26%) patients in the control group, accounting for a trend toward an increased rate of recurrences in patients with MVR (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66, 95% CI 0.99 to 2.78, P = 0.053). Periprocedural complications occurred in 10 (5.6%) patients in the MVR group, and in 8 (2.8%) patients in the control group (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 0.56 to 7.15, P = 0.28). In conclusion, a quantitative analysis of the available evidence supports a trend toward a worse arrhythmia-free survival and a higher absolute rate of periprocedural complications in patients with MVR undergoing RFCA of AF or PMFL, as compared to a matched control group without mitral valve disease. These data would encourage the adoption of RFCA of AF in MVR patients mostly by more experienced Institutions. PMID:23003204

  19. Reversal of pulmonary vein remodeling after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Hui; Li, Hung-Kei; Couri, Daniel M; Araoz, Philip A; Lee, Ying-Hsiang; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Packer, Douglas L; Cha, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary veins (PV) and the atria undergo electrical and structural remodeling in atrial fibrillation (AF). This study aimed to determine PV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling after catheter ablation for AF assessed by chest computed tomography (CT). Methods PV electrophysiologic studies and catheter ablation were performed in 63 patients (68% male; mean ± SD age: 56 ± 10 years) with symptomatic AF (49% paroxysmal, 51% persistent). Chest CT was performed before and 3 months after catheter ablation. Results At baseline, patients with persistent AF had a greater LA volume (91 ± 29 cm3 vs. 66 ± 27 cm3; P = 0.003) and mean PV ostial area (241 ± 43 mm2 vs. 212 ± 47 mm2; P = 0.03) than patients with paroxysmal AF. There was no significant correlation between the effective refractory period and the area of the left superior PV ostium. At 3 months of follow-up after ablation, 48 patients (76%) were AF free on or off antiarrhythmic drugs. There was a significant reduction in LA volume (77 ± 31 cm3 to 70 ± 28 cm3; P < 0.001) and mean PV ostial area (224 ± 48 mm2 to 182 ± 43 mm2; P < 0.001). Patients with persistent AF had more reduction in LA volume (11.8 ± 12.8 cm3 vs. 4.0 ± 11.2 cm3; P = 0.04) and PV ostial area (62 mm2 vs. 34 mm2; P = 0.04) than those who have paroxysmal AF. The reduction of the averaged PV ostial area was significantly correlated with the reduction of LA volume (r = 0.38, P = 0.03). Conclusions Catheter ablation of AF improves structural remodeling of PV ostia and left atrium. This finding is more apparent in patients with persistent AF treated by catheter ablation. PMID:27168743

  20. Demographic Differences in Catheter Ablation After Hospital Presentation With Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Bhave, Prashant D; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Okin, Peter M; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is increasingly used for rhythm control in symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing this procedure are unclear. Methods and Results We used data on all admissions at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York to identify patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011. Our primary outcome was readmission for catheter ablation of AF, identified using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Cox regression models were used to assess relationships between demographic characteristics and catheter ablation, adjusting for Elixhauser comorbidities. We identified 397 612 eligible patients. Of these, 16 717 (4.20%, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.43) underwent ablation. These patients were significantly younger, more often male, more often white, and more often privately insured, with higher household incomes and lower rates of medical comorbidity. In Cox regression models, the likelihood of ablation was lower in women than men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.86) despite higher rates of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.24). Compared to whites, the likelihood of ablation was lower in Hispanics (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.64) and blacks (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.73), even though blacks had only a slightly lower likelihood of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.99) and a higher likelihood of all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 1.39). Essentially the same pattern existed in Hispanics. Conclusions We found differences in use of catheter ablation for symptomatic AF according to sex and race despite adjustment for available data on demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities. PMID:26396201

  1. Catheter ablation of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with congenital absence of inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Inama, G; Vergara, G; Gramegna, L; Rillo, M; Fuochi, C; Furlanello, F

    1998-09-01

    In the present report we describe a patient (a 36-year-old woman with 15 year history of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias) with congenital absence of inferior vena cava (IVC) revealed during radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation procedure for right postero-septal Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). For the absence of IVC, the ablation procedure was more difficult, because we had to perform the ablation with the catheters (the ablator catheter and the coronary sinus catheter) introduced both through the superior vena cava. The application of RF energy (35 Watt for 60 seconds) at successful site abolished accessory pathway conduction. The following day was performed the venous angiography, showing the absence of the IVC and a venous return via paravertebral venous plexus to the azygous vein and superior vena cava into the right atrium. Computer tomography confirmed the absence of the IVC with azygous continuation. The drainage via the azygous system modified the radiological image on chest roentgenogram of the right mediastinal silhouette. During cardiogenesis fusion of the IVC and organisation of the heart occur between the 33rd to 40th embryonic days. It is therefore possible that some unknown teratogenic mechanism at this critical period might have caused, in the patient, both the developmental arrest of IVC and failure of regression of atrio-ventricular anatomical and electrical continuity in the right postero-septal region. PMID:9870026

  2. Impact of computed tomography image and contact force technology on catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Marai, Ibrahim; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Blich, Miry; Lessick, Jonathan; Abadi, Sobhi; Boulos, Monther

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of using computed tomography (CT) and contact force (CF) technology on recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmia after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: This non-randomized study included 2 groups of patients. All patients had symptomatic recurrent paroxysmal or persistent AF and were treated with at least 1 anti arrhythmic medication or intolerant to medication. The first group included 33 patients who underwent circumferential pulmonary veins isolation (PVI) for AF during 2012 and 2013 guided by CT image integration (Cartomerge, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) of left atrium and pulmonary veins into an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system (CT group) using standard irrigated radiofrequency catheter (ThermoCool, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States) or irrigated catheter with integrated CF sensor (Smart Touch, Carto, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, United States). The second group included immediately preceding 32 patients who had circumferential PVI by standard irrigated catheter (ThermoCool) using only EAM (Carto) system (EAM group). Linear lesions were performed according to the discretion of operator. RESULTS: Sex, age, and persistent AF were not different between groups. PVI was achieved in all patients in both groups. Linear ablations including cavo-tricuspid isthmus and or roof line ablation were not different between groups. Free of atrial tachyarrhythmia during follow-up of 24 mo was significantly higher among CT group compared to EAM group (81% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.027). When 11 patients from CT group who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter were excluded, the difference between CT group and EAM became non significant (73% vs 55%; respectively; P = 0.16). Sub analysis of CT group showed that patients who had ablation using Smart Touch catheter tend to be more free of atrial tachyarrhythmia compared to patients who had ablation using standard irrigated catheter during

  3. Experimental Studies with a 9 French Forward-Looking Intracardiac Imaging and Ablation Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Thomenius, Kai; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Chen, Peter; Shung, K. Kirk; Cannata, Jonathan; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Oralkan, Omer; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Sahn, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop a high resolution, near field optimized 14 MHz 24-element broad bandwidth forward-looking array for integration on a steerable 9 French (Fr) electrophysiology (EP) catheter. Methods Several generations of prototype imaging catheters with bi-directional steering, termed the Micro-Linear (ML), have been built and tested as an integrated catheter design with EP sensing electrodes near the tip. The wide bandwidth ultrasound array is mounted on the very tip, equipped with an aperture of only 1.2 mm by 1.58 mm. The array pulse echo performance has been fully simulated and its construction offers shielding from ablation noise. Both ex-vivo and in-vivo imaging with a porcine animal model were performed. Results The array pulse-echo performance is concordant with KLM simulation. Three generations of prototype devices were tested in four acute pig studies in the right atrium and ventricle for a) image quality, b) anatomic identification, c) visualization of other catheter devices, and d) for a mechanism for stabilization when imaging ablation. The ML catheter is capable of both low artifact ablation imaging on a standard clinical imaging system and high frame rate myocardial wall strain rate imaging for detecting changes in cardiac mechanics associated with ablation. Conclusions The imaging resolution performance of this very small array device, together with its penetration beyond 2cm, is excellent considering its very small array aperture. The forward looking intracardiac catheter has been adapted to work easily on an existing commercial imaging platform with very minor software modifications. PMID:19168770

  4. Outcomes of Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in the Setting of Structural Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Betensky, B P; Marchlinski, F E

    2016-07-01

    Sustained ventricular tachycardias are common in the setting of structural heart disease, either due to prior myocardial infarction or a variety of non-ischemic etiologies, including idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Over the past two decades, percutaneous catheter ablation has evolved dramatically and has become an effective tool for the control of ventricular arrhythmias. Single and multicenter observational studies as well as several prospective randomized trials have begun to investigate long-term outcomes after catheter ablation procedures. These studies encompass a wide range of mapping and ablation techniques, including conventional activation mapping/entrainment criteria, substrate modification guided by pacemapping, late potential and abnormal electrogram ablation, scar de-channeling, and core isolation. While large-scale, multicenter prospective randomized clinical trials are somewhat limited, the published data demonstrate favorable outcomes with respect to a reduction in overall ventricular tachycardia (VT) burden, reduction of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks, and discontinuation of anti-arrhythmic medications across varying disease subtypes and convincingly support the use of catheter ablation as the standard of care for many patients with VT in the setting of structural heart disease. PMID:27234813

  5. Radiofrequency catheter ablation for dyssynchrony-induced dilated cardiomyopathy in an infant.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Elena N; Carter, Kerri A; Kanter, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between accessory pathway-mediated ventricular preexcitation and left ventricular dyssynchrony-induced dysfunction has been described in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in the absence of sustained supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Supraventricular tachycardia in infants is usually successfully suppressed with antiarrhythmic medications, but catheter ablation has ultimately been required as definitive treatment in medically resistant cases. Catheter ablation has not been described in young infants for dyssynchrony-related dilated cardiomyopathy in the absence of SVT. We describe a case of an infant with WPW who did not have sustained supraventricular tachycardia, but who developed rapid progression of ventricular dysfunction after birth. Preexcitation could not be medically suppressed but was successfully ablated. This was followed by complete resolution of ventricular dysfunction within 2 months. PMID:23902593

  6. An Approach to Catheter Ablation of Cavotricuspid Isthmus Dependent Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Mark D; Jais, Pierre; Jönsson, Anders; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Sanders, Prashanthan; Rostock, Thomas; Rotter, Martin; Clémenty, Jacques; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the mechanisms of macro re-entrant atrial tachycardia comes from study of cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) dependent atrial flutter. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis can be made from simple analysis of the surface ECG. Endocardial mapping during tachycardia allows confirmation of the macro re-entrant circuit within the right atrium while, at the same time, permitting curative catheter ablation targeting the critical isthmus of tissue located between the tricuspid annulus and the inferior vena cava. The procedure is short, safe and by demonstration of an electrophysiological endpoint - bidirectional conduction block across the CTI - is associated with an excellent outcome following ablation. It is now fair to say that catheter ablation should be considered as a first line therapy for patients with documented CTI-dependent atrial flutter. PMID:16943901

  7. Radiofrequency ablation with a vibrating catheter: A new method for electrode cooling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kaihong; Yamashita, Tetsui; Shingyochi, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    A new electrode cooling system using a vibrating catheter is described for conditions of low blood flow when saline irrigation cannot be used. Vibrations of the catheter are hypothesized to disturb blood flow around the electrode, leading to increased convective cooling of the electrode. The aim of this study is to confirm the cooling effect of vibration and investigate the associated mechanisms. As methods, an in vitro system with polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel (PVA-H) as ablated tissue and saline flow in an open channel was used to measure changes in electrode and tissue temperatures under vibration of 0-63Hz and flow velocity of 0-0.1m/s. Flow around the catheter was observed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Results show that under conditions of no flow, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing vibration frequency, and in the absence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing flow velocity. In the presence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased under conditions of low flow velocity, but not under those of high flow velocity. PIV analyses showed disturbed flow around the vibrating catheter, and flow velocity around the catheter increased with higher-frequency vibrations. In conclusion, catheter vibration facilitated electrode cooling by increasing flow around the catheter, and cooling was proportional to vibration frequency. PMID:27013053

  8. The effects of fat layer on temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Fei; Nan, Qun; Guo, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of fat layer on the temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation in the conditions of different ablation time; 3D finite element models (fat layer and no fat layer) were built, and temperature distribution was obtained based on coupled electromagnetic-thermal analysis at 2.45 GHz and 30 W of microwave power. Results shown: in the endocardial ablation, the existence of the fat layer did not affect the shape of the 50 °C contour before 30 s. The increase speed of depth became quite slowly in the model with fat layer after 30 s. When ablation depth needed fixed, there are no significant effect on effectively ablation depth whether fat layer over or not. However, the existence of fat layer makes the temperature lower in the myocardium, and maximum temperature point closer to the myocardium surface. What is more, in the model with fat layer, effective ablation reach lower maximum temperature and the shallower depth of 50 °C contour. But there are larger ablation axial length and transverse width. In this case, doctor should ensure safety of normal cardiac tissue around the target tissue. In the epicardial ablation, the existence of fat layer seriously affects result of the microwave ablation. The epicardial ablation needs more heating time to create lesion. But epicardial ablation can be better controlled in the shape of effective ablation area because of the slowly increase of target variables after the appearing of 50 °C contour. Doctor can choose endocardial or epicardial ablation in different case of clinic requirement. PMID:26296248

  9. Robust tracking of a virtual electrode on a coronary sinus catheter for atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; Strobel, Norbert; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    Catheter tracking in X-ray fluoroscopic images has become more important in interventional applications for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures. It provides real-time guidance for the physicians and can be used as reference for motion compensation applications. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to track a virtual electrode (VE), which is a non-existing electrode on the coronary sinus (CS) catheter at a more proximal location than any real electrodes. Successful tracking of the VE can provide more accurate motion information than tracking of real electrodes. To achieve VE tracking, we first model the CS catheter as a set of electrodes which are detected by our previously published learning-based approach.1 The tracked electrodes are then used to generate the hypotheses for tracking the VE. Model-based hypotheses are fused and evaluated by a Bayesian framework. Evaluation has been conducted on a database of clinical AF ablation data including challenging scenarios such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), occlusion and nonrigid deformation. Our approach obtains 0.54mm median error and 90% of evaluated data have errors less than 1.67mm. The speed of our tracking algorithm reaches 6 frames-per-second on most data. Our study on motion compensation shows that using the VE as reference provides a good point to detect non-physiological catheter motion during the AF ablation procedures.2

  10. Catheter ablation for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients supported by continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Garan, Arthur R; Iyer, Vivek; Whang, William; Mody, Kanika P; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Colombo, Paolo C; Te-Frey, Rosie; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Garan, Hasan; Jorde, Ulrich P; Uriel, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are common after implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and in a subset of patients may be refractory to medication. Morbidity from VA in this population includes right ventricular failure (RVF). We sought to evaluate the efficacy of catheter ablation for VA in patients with LVAD. A retrospective analysis of patients supported by continuous-flow LVAD referred for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) between 2008 and the present was performed. Seven patients were referred for VT ablation an average of 236 ± 292 days after LVAD implantation. Three patients (42.9%) developed RVF in the setting of intractable arrhythmias. A transfemoral approach was used for six patients (85.7%) and an epicardial for one patient (14.3%). The clinical VT was inducible and successfully ablated in six patients (85.7%). The location of these arrhythmias was apical in three cases (42.9%). A total of 13 VTs were ablated in seven patients. Although the majority had reduction in VA frequency, recurrent VAs were observed in six patients (85.7%). One patient (14.3%) experienced a bleeding complication after the procedure. For patients with a high VA burden after LVAD implantation, VT ablation is safe and feasible, but VA frequently recurs. PMID:24614361

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Catheter Ablation for Rhythm Control of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Blackhouse, Gord; Assasi, Nazila; Xie, Feng; Gaebel, Kathryn; Campbell, Kaitryn; Healey, Jeff S.; O'Reilly, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for rhythm control compared to antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who have previously failed on an AAD. Methods. An economic model was developed to compare (1) catheter ablation and (2) AAD (amiodarone 200 mg/day). At the end of the initial 12 month phase of the model, patients are classified as being in normal sinus rhythm or with AF, based on data from a meta-analysis. In the 5-year Markov phase of the model, patients are at risk of ischemic stroke each 3-month model cycle. Results. The model estimated that, compared to the AAD strategy, ablation had $8,539 higher costs, 0.033 fewer strokes, and 0.144 more QALYS over the 5-year time horizon. The incremental cost per QALY of ablation compared to AAD was estimated to be $59,194. The probability of ablation being cost-effective for willingness to pay thresholds of $50,000 and $100,000 was estimated to be 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Conclusion. Based on current evidence, pulmonary vein ablation for treatment of AF is cost-effective if decision makers willingness to pay for a QALY is $59,194 or higher. PMID:24089640

  12. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging. PMID:12910859

  13. Comparison between retrograde and transeptal approach in radiofrequency catheter ablation of left accessory pathways.

    PubMed

    Hashem, S; Choudhury, A K; Paul, G K; Rahman, M Z

    2015-01-01

    To study a series of patients submitted to radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) of left accessory pathways (AP) using the transeptal approach (TSA) as compared to the conventional retrograde arterial approach (RAA). Sixty consecutive patients (44 male; mean age of 35.60±11.63 years) with 60 left APs (39 overt and 21 concealed) underwent catheter ablation using the TS method (30 patients) and the RAA method (30 patients) in an alternate fashion. The analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The transeptal puncture was successfully performed in 29 patients (96%). This access allowed primary success in the ablation in all the patients without any complication. When we compared this approach with the RAA there was no difference as regards the primary success (p=0.103), fluoroscopy time (p=0.565) and total time (p=0.1917). Three patients in the RAA group presented a vascular complication. The TSA allowed shorter ablation times (p=0.006) and smaller number of radiofrequency applications (p=0.042) as compared to the conventional RAA. The patients who had unsuccessful ablation in the first session in each approach underwent with the opposite technique (cross-over), with a final ablation success rate of 100%.The TS and RA approaches showed similar efficacy and safety for the ablation of left accessory pathways. The TSA allowed shorter ablation times and smaller number of radiofrequency applications. When the techniques were used in a complementary fashion, they increased the final efficacy of the ablation. PMID:25725674

  14. Catheter Ablation of Pediatric Focal Atrial Tachycardia: Ten-Year Experience Using Modern Mapping Systems.

    PubMed

    Dieks, Jana-K; Müller, Matthias J; Schneider, Heike E; Krause, Ulrich; Steinmetz, Michael; Paul, Thomas; Kriebel, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Experience of catheter ablation of pediatric focal atrial tachycardia (FAT) is still limited. There are data which were gathered prior to the introduction of modern 3D mapping and navigation systems into the clinical routine. Accordingly, procedures were associated with significant fluoroscopy and low success rates. The aim of this study was to present clinical and electrophysiological details of catheter ablation of pediatric FAT using modern mapping systems. Since March 2003, 17 consecutive patients <20 years underwent electrophysiological study (EPS) for FAT using the NavX(®) system (n = 7), the non-contact mapping system (n = 6) or the LocaLisa(®) system (n = 4), respectively. Radiofrequency was the primary energy source; cryoablation was performed in selected patients with a focus close to the AV node. In 16 patients, a total number of 19 atrial foci (right-sided n = 13, left-sided n = 6) could be targeted. In the remaining patient, FAT was not present/inducible during EPS. On an intention-to-treat basis, acute success was achieved in 14/16 patients (87.5 %) with a median number of 11 (1-31) energy applications. Ablation was unsuccessful in two patients due to an epicardial location of a right atrial focus (n = 1) and a focus close to the His bundle (n = 1), respectively. Median procedure time was 210 (84-332) min, and median fluoroscopy time was 13.1 (4.5-22.5) min. In pediatric patients with FAT, 3D mapping and catheter ablation provided improved clinical quality of care. Catheter ablation may be considered early in the course of treatment of this tachyarrhythmia in symptomatic patients. PMID:26538211

  15. Capturing Pain in the Cortex during General Anesthesia: Near Infrared Spectroscopy Measures in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Steele, Sarah C.; Alexander, Mark E.; Boas, David A.; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2016-01-01

    The predictability of pain makes surgery an ideal model for the study of pain and the development of strategies for analgesia and reduction of perioperative pain. As functional near-infrared spectroscopy reproduces the known functional magnetic resonance imaging activations in response to a painful stimulus, we evaluated the feasibility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy to measure cortical responses to noxious stimulation during general anesthesia. A multichannel continuous wave near-infrared imager was used to measure somatosensory and frontal cortical activation in patients undergoing catheter ablation of arrhythmias under general anesthesia. Anesthetic technique was standardized and intraoperative NIRS signals recorded continuously with markers placed in the data set for the timing and duration of each cardiac ablation event. Frontal cortical signals only were suitable for analysis in five of eight patients studied (mean age 14 ± 1 years, weight 66.7 ± 17.6 kg, 2 males). Thirty ablative lesions were recorded for the five patients. Radiofrequency or cryoablation was temporally associated with a hemodynamic response function in the frontal cortex characterized by a significant decrease in oxyhemoglobin concentration (paired t-test, p<0.05) with the nadir occurring in the period 4 to 6 seconds after application of the ablative lesion. Cortical signals produced by catheter ablation of arrhythmias in patients under general anesthesia mirrored those seen with noxious stimulation in awake, healthy volunteers, during sedation for colonoscopy, and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging activations in response to pain. This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy as an objective measure of cortical activation under general anesthesia. PMID:27415436

  16. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of Type 1 atrial flutter using a large-tip electrode catheter and high-power radiofrequency energy generator.

    PubMed

    Feld, Gregory K

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of efficacy of 8 mm electrode-tipped or saline-irrigated-tip catheters for ablation of atrial flutter (AFL). These catheters have a theoretical advantage as they produce a large ablation lesion. However, large-tip ablation catheters have a larger surface area and require a higher power radiofrequency (RF) generator with up to 100 W capacity to produce adequate ablation temperatures (50-60 degrees C). The potential advantages of a large-tip ablation catheter and high-power RF generator include the need for fewer energy applications, shorter procedure and fluoroscopy times, and greater efficacy. Therefore, the safety and efficacy of AFL ablation using 8 or 10 mm electrode catheters and a 100-W RF generator was studied using the Boston Scientific, Inc., EPT-1000 XP cardiac ablation system. There were 169 patients, aged 61 +/- 12 years involved. Acute end points were bidirectional isthmus block and no inducible AFL. Following ablation, patients were seen at 1, 3 and 6 months, with event monitoring performed weekly and for any symptoms. Three quality of life surveys were completed during follow-up. Acute success was achieved in 158 patients (93%), with 12 +/- 11 RF energy applications. The efficacy of 8 and 10 mm electrodes did not differ significantly. The number of RF energy applications (10 +/- 8 vs. 14 +/- 8) and ablation time (0.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.6 h) were less with 10 mm compared with 8 mm electrodes (p < 0.01). Of 158 patients with acute success, 42 were not evaluated at 6 months due to study exclusions. Of the 116 patients evaluated at 6 months, 112 (97%) had no AFL recurrence. Of those without AFL recurrence at 6 months, 95 and 93% were free of symptoms at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Ablation of AFL improved quality of life scores (p < 0.05) and reduced anti-arrhythmic and rate control drug use (p < 0.05). Complications occurred in six out of 169 patients (3.6%) but there were no deaths. It was concluded

  17. Catheter ablation of the accessory pathways of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and its variants.

    PubMed

    Plumb, V J

    1995-01-01

    The basis of arrhythmias in the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and its variants is the presence of accessory atrioventricular connections. Those variants include the concealed form of the WPW syndrome, the permanent form of junctional reciprocating tachycardia, and Mahaim preexcitation. In all forms of symptomatic WPW syndrome, catheter ablation of the accessory atrioventricular connections using radiofrequency current has become the treatment of choice. This review traces the development of this therapy, outlines the basics of the technique, summarizes the results reported in the largest series, indicate remaining areas of controversy, and discusses the indications and limitations of radiofrequency ablation therapy. PMID:7871178

  18. Reduction of Fluoroscopy Time and Radiation Dosage During Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice for atrial fibrillation (AF) that does not respond to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. During the procedure, fluoroscopy imaging is still considered essential to visualise catheters in real-time. However, radiation is often ignored by physicians since it is invisible and the long-term risks are underestimated. In this respect, it must be emphasised that radiation exposure has various potentially harmful effects, such as acute skin injury, malignancies and genetic disease, both to patients and physicians. For this reason, every electrophysiologist should be aware of the problem and should learn how to decrease radiation exposure by both changing the setting of the system and using complementary imaging technologies. In this review, we aim to discuss the basics of X-ray exposure and suggest practical instructions for how to reduce radiation dosage during AF ablation procedures. PMID:27617094

  19. Combined Therapeutic and Monitoring Ultrasonic Catheter for Cardiac Ablation Therapies.

    PubMed

    Carias, Mathew; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a combined therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasonic catheter for cardiac ablation therapies. Ultrasound can be used to determine when diseased cardiac tissues have become fully coagulated through a method known as local harmonic motion imaging (LHMI). LHMI is an imaging modality for treatment monitoring that uses acoustic radiation force, displacement tracking and the different mechanical properties of viable and ablated tissues. In this study, we developed catheters that are capable of LHMI measurements. Experiments were conducted in phantoms, ex vivo cardiac samples and the in vivo beating hearts of healthy porcine subjects. In vivo experiments revealed that four of four epicardial sonications revealed a decrease in measured displacements from LHMI experiments and that when lower power was used, no lesions formed and there was no corresponding decrease in measured displacement amplitudes. In addition, two of three endocardial lesions were confirmed and corresponded to a decrease in the measured displacement amplitude. PMID:26431798

  20. Fiber-optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive OCT for radio-frequency ablation monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yves T; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    An all-fiber optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is demonstrated. A novel multiplexing method was used to illuminate the sample, splitting the light from a 58.5kHz Fourier-domain mode-locked laser such that two different polarization states, alternated in time, are generated by two semiconductor optical amplifiers. A 2.3mm forward-view cone-scanning catheter probe was designed, fabricated, and used to acquire sample scattering intensity and phase retardation images. The system was first verified with a quarter-wave plate and then by obtaining intensity and phase retardation images of high-birefringence plastic, human skin in vivo, and untreated and thermally ablated porcine myocardium ex vivo. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid radio-frequency ablation therapy for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:25166075

  1. Fiber-optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive OCT for radio-frequency ablation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yves T; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2014-09-01

    An all-fiber optic catheter-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is demonstrated. A novel multiplexing method was used to illuminate the sample, splitting the light from a 58.5 kHz Fourier-domain mode-locked laser such that two different polarization states, alternated in time, are generated by two semiconductor optical amplifiers. A 2.3 mm forward-view cone-scanning catheter probe was designed, fabricated, and used to acquire sample scattering intensity and phase retardation images. The system was first verified with a quarter-wave plate and then by obtaining intensity and phase retardation images of high-birefringence plastic, human skin in vivo, and untreated and thermally ablated porcine myocardium ex vivo. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid radio-frequency ablation therapy for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:25166075

  2. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  3. Catheter-Based Ultrasound Applicators for Selective Prostate Ablation With MR-Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Ross, Anthony B.; Nau, Will H.; Butts, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Sommer, Graham

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop catheter-based ultrasound devices and techniques specifically for treating prostate cancer in conjunction with MRI thermal imaging to monitor and control treatment progression. Directional transurethral applicators have been designed with arrays of sectored tubular (90° active acoustic sector) or narrow planar transducer segments integrated with a flexible delivery catheter with a cooling balloon. Interstitial applicators (2.4 mm catheter diameter, 1.5 mm OD tubular transducers) with 180° active acoustic sectors have been developed specifically for transperineal implantation to treat the posterior portion of the prostate. Both heating strategies were evaluated via in vivo experiments within canine prostate. Both transurethral and interstitial treatment strategies demonstrated significant potential for selective thermal ablation of localized regions of the prostate, particularly when MRI thermal imaging is used to guide and assess treatment.

  4. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, R K; Klein, G J; Yee, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the experience with radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in terms of the duration of fluoroscopy exposure to the patient and the operator and the effect of accessory-pathway location and operator experience on the success rate. DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospital. PATIENTS: Two hundred consecutive patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation between September 1990 and June 1992. INTERVENTIONS: Electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Success rate, duration of fluoroscopy, complications and long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Of the 224 accessory pathways in the 200 patients 135 were left free wall, 47 posteroseptal, 32 right free wall and 10 anteroseptal. The overall success rate increased from 53% in the first 3 months of the study period to 96% in the last 3 months. The success rate depended on the location of the accessory pathway. The duration of fluoroscopic exposure decreased from 50 (standard deviation [SD] 21) minutes in the first 3 months to 40 (SD 15) minutes in the last 3 months (p < 0.05). Complications occurred in 3.5% of the patients; they included hemopericardium, cerebral embolism, perforation of the right atrial wall, air embolism in a coronary artery and hematoma at the arterial perforation site. None of the complications resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS: With experience, radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways can have an overall success rate of more than 95% and a complication rate of less than 4%. Such rates make this procedure suitable for first-line therapy for patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8087753

  5. Catheter Ablation of Recurrent Ventricular Fibrillation: A Literature Review and Case Examples.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kim H; Sy, Raymond W

    2016-08-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) electrical storm is a serious and life-threatening event, and is often triggered by premature ventricular complexes (PVCs). Catheter ablation of these PVC triggers have been described in a variety of clinical situations, including post-myocardial infarction (MI), patients with structurally normal heart, as well as in patients with Brugada Syndrome and Long QT Syndrome. We provide a literature review on this topic, using case examples for illustration. PMID:27038767

  6. Cardiac ablation catheter guidance by means of a single equivalent moving dipole inverse algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kichang; Lv, Wener; Ter-Ovanesyan, Evgeny; Barley, Maya E.; Voysey, Graham E.; Galea, Anna; Hirschman, Gordon; LeRoy, Kristen; Marini, Robert P.; Barrett, Conor; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Cohen, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a novel system for guiding radio-frequency catheter ablation therapy of ventricular tachycardia. This guidance system employs an Inverse Solution Guidance Algorithm (ISGA) utilizing a single equivalent moving dipole (SEMD) localization method. The method and system were evaluated in both a saline-tank phantom model and in-vivo animal (swine) experiments. A catheter with two platinum electrodes spaced 3 mm apart was used as the dipole source in the phantom study. A 40 Hz sinusoidal signal was applied to the electrode pair. In the animal study, four to eight electrodes were sutured onto the right ventricle. These electrodes were connected to a stimulus generator delivering one millisecond duration pacing pulses. Signals were recorded from 64 electrodes, located either on the inner surface of the saline-tank or the body surface of the pig, and then processed by the ISGA to localize the physical or bioelectrical SEMD. In the phantom studies, the guidance algorithm was used to advance a catheter tip to the location of the source dipole. The distance from the final position of the catheter tip to the position of the target dipole was 2.22 ± 0.78 mm in real space and 1.38± 0.78 mm in image space (computational space). The ISGA successfully tracked the locations of electrodes sutured on the ventricular myocardium and the movement of an endocardial catheter placed in the animal’s right ventricle. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a SEMD inverse algorithm to guide a cardiac ablation catheter. PMID:23448231

  7. [Long-term results of low-speed irrigated radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial flutter].

    PubMed

    Ardashev, V N; Ardashev, A V; Novichkov, S A; Konev, A V; Voloshko, S V; Shavarov, A A

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied long-term results of low-speed (10 ml/min) irrigated radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) of the lower isthmus (LI) in patients with typical atrial flutter (AF). This treatment was based upon combined use of local and indirect criteria of the block of isthmus conduction. The influence of RFA LI on quality of life (QL), echocardiographic parameters and cardiac rhythm variability (CRV) was studied. Low-speed irrigated RFA LI, based upon combined use of local and indirect criteria for verification of complete bidirectional blockade in this area, is an effective and safe method of treatment of patients with different variants of clinical course of typical AF which makes it possible to significantly improve QL characteristics and central hemodynamic parameters, and normalize CVR parameters as well. Self-organization of chaos, which realizes according to RR interval time rows, in patients with typical AF after RFA LI may be considered an additional criterion of the effectiveness of this operative intervention and a prognostic sign that predicts maintenance of sinus rhythm in this category of patients. PMID:17601035

  8. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  9. New-onset ventricular arrhythmias post radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingmin; Lu, Yanlai; Yao, Yan; Zheng, Lihui; Chen, Gang; Ding, Ligang; Hou, Bingbo; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2016-09-01

    As a new complication, new-onset ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) post atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation have not been well defined. This prospective study aimed to describe the details of new-onset VAs post AF ablation in a large study cohort.One thousand fifty-three consecutive patients who underwent the first radiofrequency catheter ablation for AF were enrolled. All patients had no evidence of pre-ablation VAs. New-onset VAs were defined as new-onset ventricular tachycardia (VT) or premature ventricular contractions (PVC) ≥1000/24 h within 1 month post ablation.There were 46 patients (4.4%) who had 62 different new-onset VAs, among whom 42 were PVC alone, and 4 were PVC coexisting with nonsustained VT. Multivariate analysis showed that increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation were independently associated with new-onset VAs (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0-3.5; P = 0.043). The median number of PVC was 3161 (1001-27,407) times/24 h. Outflow tract VAs were recorded in 35 (76.1%) patients. No significant differences were found in origin of VAs (P = 0.187). VAs disappeared without any treatment in 6 patients (13.0%). No VAs-related adverse cardiac event occurred.The study revealed a noticeable prevalence but relatively benign prognosis of new-onset VAs post AF ablation. Increased serum leukocyte counts ≥50% post ablation appeared to be associated with new-onset VAs, implying that inflammatory response caused by ablation might be the mechanism. PMID:27603357

  10. Materials for Multifunctional Balloon Catheters With Capabilities in Cardiac Electrophysiological Mapping and Ablation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lu, Nanshu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Yun-Soung; Lee, Stephen P.; Xu, Lizhi; Wu, Jian; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Song, Jizhou; Liu, Zhuangjian; Viventi, Jonathan; de Graff, Bassel; Elolampi, Brian; Mansour, Moussa; Slepian, Marvin J.; Hwang, Sukwon; Moss, Joshua D.; Won, Sang-Min; Huang, Younggang; Litt, Brian; Rogers, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of advanced surgical tools for minimally invasive procedures represents an activity of central importance to improvements in human health. A key materials challenge is in the realization of bio-compatible interfaces between the classes of semiconductor and sensor technologies that might be most useful in this context and the soft, curvilinear surfaces of the body. This paper describes a solution based on biocompatible materials and devices that integrate directly with the thin elastic membranes of otherwise conventional balloon catheters, to provide multimodal functionality suitable for clinical use. We present sensors for measuring temperature, flow, tactile, optical and electrophysiological data, together with radio frequency (RF) electrodes for controlled, local ablation of tissue. These components connect together in arrayed layouts designed to decouple their operation from large strain deformations associated with deployment and repeated inflation/deflation. Use of such ‘instrumented’ balloon catheter devices in live animal models and in vitro tests illustrates their operation in cardiac ablation therapy. These concepts have the potential for application in surgical systems of the future, not only those based on catheters but also on other platforms, such as surgical gloves. PMID:21378969

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of Mahaim tachycardia by targeting Mahaim potentials at the tricuspid annulus.

    PubMed Central

    Heald, S. C.; Davies, D. W.; Ward, D. E.; Garratt, C. J.; Rowland, E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Reentrant tachycardias associated with Mahaim pathways are rare but potentially troublesome. Various electrophysiological substrates have been postulated and catheter ablation at several sites has been described. OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy and feasibility of targeting discrete Mahaim potentials recorded on the tricuspid annulus for the delivery of radiofrequency energy in the treatment of Mahaim tachycardia. PATIENTS--21 patients out of a consecutive series of 579 patients referred to one of three tertiary centres for catheter ablation of accessory pathways causing tachycardia. All had symptoms and presented with tachycardia of left bundle branch block configuration or had this induced at electrophysiological study. In all cases, the tachycardia was antidromic with anterograde conduction over a Mahaim pathway. RESULTS--6 patients had additional tachycardia substrates (4 had accessory atrioventricular connections and 2 had dual atrioventricular nodal pathways and atrioventricular nodal reentry). After ablation of the additional pathways, Mahaim potentials were identified in 16 (76%) associated with early activation of the distal right bundle branch and radiofrequency energy at this site on the tricuspid annulus abolished Mahaim conduction in all 16 cases. In 2 patients there was early ventricular activation at the annulus without a Mahaim potential but radiofrequency energy abolished pre-excitation. In the remaining patients no potential could be found (1 patient), no tachycardia could be induced after ablation of an additional pathway (1 patient), or no Mahaim conduction was evident during the study (1 patient). During follow up (1-29 months (median 9 months)) all but 1 patient remained symptom free without medication. CONCLUSIONS--Additional accessory pathways seem to be common in patients with Mahaim tachycardias. The identification of Mahaim potentials at the tricuspid annulus confirms that most of these pathways are in the right free wall and

  12. The mechanism of lesion formation by focused ultrasound ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Y. D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure.

  13. THE MECHANISM OF LESION FORMATION BY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION CATHETER FOR TREATMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    PubMed Central

    Sinelnikov, Y.D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O.A.

    2009-01-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish rigorous dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure. PMID:20161431

  14. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  15. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System -The First Feasibility Study in Pigs-

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Yuhi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Koji; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Hanawa, Kenichiro; Shindo, Tomohiko; Kondo, Masateru; Nakano, Makoto; Wakayama, Yuji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) using Joule heat has two fundamental weaknesses: the limited depth of treatment and the risk of thrombus formation. In contrast, focused shock wave (SW) therapy could damage tissues at arbitrary depths without heat generation. Thus, we aimed to develop a SW catheter ablation (SWCA) system that could compensate for the weaknesses of RFCA therapy. Methods and Results We developed a SWCA system where the SW generated by a Q-switched Holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser beam was reflected by a reflector attached to 14-Fr catheter tip and then was converged onto the focus. We examined the feasibility of our system on pigs in vivo. When applied using the epicardial approach, the SWCA caused persistent spheroidal lesions with mild superficial injury than the RFCA. The lesions were created to a depth based on the focal length (2.0 mm) [2.36 ± 0.45 (SD) mm immediately after procedure, n = 16]. When applied to the atrioventricular (AV) node using the endocardial approach, the SWCA caused junctional escape rhythms in 2 pigs and AV block in 12 pigs (complete AV block in 9) in acute phase (n = 14). Nine of the 14 pigs survived with pacemakers for the long-term study, and the AV block persisted for 12.6 ± 3.9 (SD) days in all surviving pigs. Histological examination showed AV nodal cell body atrophy in the acute phase and fibrotic lesions in the chronic phase. Importantly, no acute or chronic fatal complications were noted. Conclusions Our novel SWCA system could be a promising modality as a non-thermal ablation method to compensate for the weaknesses of RFCA therapy. However, further research and development will be necessary as the current prototype still exhibited the presence of micro-thrombus formation in the animal studies. PMID:25633373

  16. Reduction of radiation exposure in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Lesson learned

    PubMed Central

    De Ponti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, the concern for the radiation injury hazard to the patients and the professional staff has increased in the medical community. Since there is no magnitude of radiation exposure that is known to be completely safe, the use of ionizing radiation during medical diagnostic or interventional procedures should be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA principle). Nevertheless, in cardiovascular medicine, radiation exposure for coronary percutaneous interventions or catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias may be high: for ablation of a complex arrhythmia, such as atrial fibrillation, the mean dose can be > 15 mSv and in some cases > 50 mSv. In interventional electrophysiology, although fluoroscopy has been widely used since the beginning to navigate catheters in the heart and the vessels and to monitor their position, the procedure is not based on fluoroscopic imaging. Therefore, non-fluoroscopic three-dimensional systems can be used to navigate electrophysiology catheters in the heart with no or minimal use of fluoroscopy. Although zero-fluoroscopy procedures are feasible in limited series, there may be difficulties in using no fluoroscopy on a routine basis. Currently, a significant reduction in radiation exposure towards near zero-fluoroscopy procedures seems a simpler task to achieve, especially in ablation of complex arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The data reported in the literature suggest the following three considerations. First, the use of the non-fluoroscopic systems is associated with a consistent reduction in radiation exposure in multiple centers: the more sophisticated and reliable this technology is, the higher the reduction in radiation exposure. Second, the use of these systems does not automatically lead to reduction of radiation exposure, but an optimized workflow should be developed and adopted for a safe non-fluoroscopic navigation of catheters. Third, at any level of expertise, there is a specific learning curve for

  17. Reduction of radiation exposure in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: Lesson learned.

    PubMed

    De Ponti, Roberto

    2015-08-26

    Over the last decades, the concern for the radiation injury hazard to the patients and the professional staff has increased in the medical community. Since there is no magnitude of radiation exposure that is known to be completely safe, the use of ionizing radiation during medical diagnostic or interventional procedures should be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA principle). Nevertheless, in cardiovascular medicine, radiation exposure for coronary percutaneous interventions or catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias may be high: for ablation of a complex arrhythmia, such as atrial fibrillation, the mean dose can be > 15 mSv and in some cases > 50 mSv. In interventional electrophysiology, although fluoroscopy has been widely used since the beginning to navigate catheters in the heart and the vessels and to monitor their position, the procedure is not based on fluoroscopic imaging. Therefore, non-fluoroscopic three-dimensional systems can be used to navigate electrophysiology catheters in the heart with no or minimal use of fluoroscopy. Although zero-fluoroscopy procedures are feasible in limited series, there may be difficulties in using no fluoroscopy on a routine basis. Currently, a significant reduction in radiation exposure towards near zero-fluoroscopy procedures seems a simpler task to achieve, especially in ablation of complex arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. The data reported in the literature suggest the following three considerations. First, the use of the non-fluoroscopic systems is associated with a consistent reduction in radiation exposure in multiple centers: the more sophisticated and reliable this technology is, the higher the reduction in radiation exposure. Second, the use of these systems does not automatically lead to reduction of radiation exposure, but an optimized workflow should be developed and adopted for a safe non-fluoroscopic navigation of catheters. Third, at any level of expertise, there is a specific learning curve for

  18. Isolated Disruption of the Right Coronary Artery Following a Steam Pop during Cavotricuspid Linear Ablation with a Contact Force Catheter.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Michele; Frommhold, Markus; Back, Dieter; Mierzwa, Marco; Lauer, Bernard; Geller, J Christoph

    2016-07-01

    A 70-year-old woman with persistent atrial fibrillation underwent pulmonary vein isolation and linear ablation with a contact sensor catheter. During cavotricuspid isthmus ablation, a steam pop resulted in cardiac tamponade, and the patient developed severe hypotension despite successful pericardial puncture and minimal residual pericardial effusion. Right coronary artery angiography revealed extravasal contrast medium accumulation posterior of the Crux Cordis. Emergent cardiac surgery confirmed isolated disruption of the artery in the absence of additional heart perforation. Although contact sensor catheters may reduce complications, steam pops can still occur and result in dramatic complications. PMID:27378561

  19. Electrophysiology testing and catheter ablation are helpful when evaluating asymptomatic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern: the pro perspective.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Important advances in the natural history and diagnosis of, and therapy for, asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome have been made in the last decade by our group. These data have necessitated revisiting current practice guidelines to decide on the optimal management of the asymptomatic WPW population. There has also been an emphasis on identifying initially asymptomatic individuals who are at risk by nationwide screening programs using the electrocardiogram for prophylactic catheter ablation to prevent the lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death, particularly in young asymptomatic people, because only a subgroup of them is at high risk, requiring early catheter ablation. PMID:26304515

  20. A finite-element model of a microwave catheter for cardiac ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaouk, Z.; Khebir, A.; Savard, P.

    1996-10-01

    To investigate the delivery of microwave energy by a catheter located inside the heart for the purpose of ablating small abnormal regions producing cardiac arrhythmias, a numerical model was developed. This model is based on the finite element method and can solve both the electromagnetic field and the temperature distribution resulting from the radiated power for axisymmetrical geometries. The antenna, which is fed by a coaxial cable with a 2.4 mm diameter, is constituted by a monopole which is terminated by a metallic cylindrical cap. The heart model can be either homogeneous or constituted of coaxial cylindrical shells with different electrical and thermal conductivities representing the intracavitary blood masses, the heart, and the torso. Experimental measurements obtained in an homogeneous tissue equivalent medium, such as the reflection coefficient of the antenna at different frequencies and for different monopole lengths, the radial and axial steady-state temperature profiles, and the time course of the temperature rise, were all in close agreement with the values computed with the model. Accurate modeling is a useful prerequisite for the design of antennas, and these results confirm the validity of the catheter-heart model for the investigation and the development of microwave catheters.

  1. Clinical utility of the Covidien Closure Fast™ Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Simon A; Braithwaite, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    The Closure Fast™ Endovenous Radiofrequency Ablation Catheter is the latest version of a minimally invasive system for the treatment of patients with superficial venous disease. The Closure Fast™ catheter heats the vein wall to 120°C, causing denaturation of the collagen of the vein wall and contraction of the vessel such that no blood can flow through it. Nearly one million systems have been sold since the product was launched. Many, if not all, patients can be treated under local anesthesia with the Closure Fast™ catheter. Duplex ultrasound reports occlusion rates for the treated vein of 94%–98% at 1 year and 85%–93% at 3 years. The system produces average postoperative pain scores of less than 2 out of 10 on a visual analog score. In the first postoperative week, 76% of patients do not require analgesia. Some 45% of patients return to normal activity on the first postoperative day. Serious complications appear to be rare following the Closure Fast™ procedure. Transient paresthesia occurs in 0.2% of cases, thrombophlebitis in 1%–10%, and thromboembolic events in up to 1.4%, mainly heat-induced thrombosis. Closure Fast™ adds significant costs to treating superficial venous disease but studies have shown it to be cost-effective when used in an office setting. PMID:24940086

  2. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Risks Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Heart Surgery How the Heart Works Sudden Cardiac ... medical procedure used to treat some types of arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah). An arrhythmia is a ...

  3. Zero-fluoroscopy catheter ablation of severe drug-resistant arrhythmia guided by Ensite NavX system during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangzhi; Sun, Ge; Xu, Renfan; Chen, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Bai, Yang; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Chunxia; Wang, Dao Wen; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac arrhythmias can occur during pregnancy. Owing to radiation exposure and other uncertain risks for the mother and fetus, catheter ablation has rarely been performed and is often delayed until the postpartum period. We reported 2 pregnant women who were experiencing severe arrhythmias and were successfully ablated without fluoroscopic guidance. We also carried out a literature review of cases of pregnant women who underwent zero-fluoroscopy ablation. Methods and Results: One woman had drug-resistant and poorly tolerated frequent premature ventricular contraction (PVC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). The other one had persistent and hardly terminated supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) via a right accessory pathway. The 2 patients were successfully underwent zero-fluoroscopy ablation guided by Ensite NavX system. The procedure time was 42 and 71 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: Catheter ablation of SVT or PVC/VT in pregnant patients can be safely and effectively performed with a completely zero-fluoroscopy approach guided by the Ensite NavX system. In the case of a drug refractory, life-threatening arrhythmia during pregnancy, catheter ablation may be considered. PMID:27512864

  4. Retrieval of a detached transseptal sheath tip from a right pulmonary artery branch following catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Schricker, Amir A; Feld, Gregory K; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-11-15

    Transseptal introducer sheaths are being used with increasing frequency for left-sided arrhythmia ablations and structural heart disease interventions. Sheath tip detachment and embolization is an uncommon but known complication, and several sheaths have been recalled due to such complications. We report a unique case of a fractured transseptal sheath tip that embolized to a branch of the right pulmonary artery in a patient who had undergone ablation of a left-sided atypical atrial flutter. During final removal of one of the two long 8.5-French SL1 transseptal sheaths used routinely as part of the ablation, the radiopaque tip of the sheath fractured and first embolized to the right atrium and subsequently to a secondary right pulmonary artery branch. Using techniques derived from percutaneous interventional approaches, including a multipurpose catheter, coronary guidewire, and monorail angioplasty balloon, the sheath tip was successfully wired through its inner lumen, trapped from the inside with the balloon, and removed from the body via a large femoral vein sheath, without complications. The approach detailed in this case may guide future cases and circumvent urgent surgical intervention. PMID:25913843

  5. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  6. Preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Lamb, Hildo J; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-02-01

    To present and validate a highly automated MRI analysis workflow for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation procedures. A cohort of 15 post-infarction patients underwent MRI prior to VT ablation. The MRI study included a black-blood turbo spin echo sequence for visualizing the aortic root and ostium of the left main (LM) coronary artery, and a 3D late gadolinium enhanced sequence for visualizing the LV anatomy and myocardial scar substrate. Semi-automated segmentation of the LV, aortic root and ostium of LM was performed, followed by fully automated segmentation of myocardial scar. All segmented structures were aligned using an automated image registration algorithm to remove inter-scan displacement. MRI was integrated at the beginning of the procedure after mapping a single LM point. The integration performance was compared to that of the traditional iterative closest point (ICP) method. The proposed method required a single LM mapping point only, compared to 255 ± 43 points with the ICP method. The single-point method achieved a mean point-to-surface distance of 4.9 ± 1.5 mm on the LV surface and 5.1 ± 1.7 mm on the aorta surface (ICP: 3.7 ± 0.8 and 9.2 ± 7.2 mm, P < 0.05). The Cohen's kappa coefficient between the MRI-defined and EAM-defined scar was 0.36 ± 0.16 for the presented method, significantly higher than that of ICP method (0.23 ± 0.21, P = 0.03), indicating more accurate scar substrate localization during integration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of preprocedural MRI integration into the VT ablation procedure, with highly automated image analysis workflow and minimal mapping effort. PMID:25341408

  7. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  8. [Radiofrequency catheter ablation of two accessory pathways in patients with WPW Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kalarus, Z; Kowalski, O; Prokopczuk, J; Chodór, P; Sredniawa, B; Pasyk, S

    1998-12-01

    In 10-30% patients with WPW syndrome more than one accessory pathway in electrophysiology study is observed. These patients make a group of higher atrial fibrillation and coming next ventricle fibrillation risk. We present the 39 years old patient with symptomatic WPW syndrome, without preexcitation signs in ECG at rest. In medical history--palpitations was observed from childhood with one episode of atrial fibrillation with high ventricle response required cardioversion. Electrophysiology study: without preexcitation signs at rest, two ortodromic AV reentrant tachycardias were induced--200 and 166/min. Two accessory pathways were diagnosed, left lateral and left midseptal. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of both accessory pathways was made during tachycardia, first lateral, next septal. In six month follow-up the patient was asymptomatic. PMID:10405568

  9. Contact force-guided catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Z.; Luo, X.; Wu, B.; Shi, H.; Jin, B.; Wen, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Contact force (CF) sensing technology allows real-time monitoring during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the effect of CF sensing technology on procedural parameters and clinical outcomes still needs clarification. Because of the inconsistent results thus far in this area, we performed a meta-analysis to determine whether CF sensing technology can improve procedural parameters and clinical outcomes for the treatment of AF. Studies examining the benefits of CF sensing technology were identified in English-language articles by searching the MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases (inception to May 2015). Ten randomized, controlled trials involving 1834 patients (1263 males, 571 females) were included in the meta-analysis (681 in the CF group, 1153 in the control group). Overall, the ablation time was significantly decreased by 7.34 min (95%CI=-12.21 to -2.46; P=0.003, Z test) in the CF group compared with the control group. CF sensing technology was associated with significantly improved freedom from AF after 12 months (OR=1.55, 95%CI=1.20 to 1.99; P=0.0007) and complications were significantly lower in the CF group than in the control group (OR=0.50, 95%CI=0.29 to 0.87; P=0.01). However, fluoroscopy time analysis showed no significantly decreased trend associated with CF-guided catheter ablation (weighted mean difference: -2.59; 95%CI=-9.06 to 3.88; P=0.43). The present meta-analysis shows improvement in ablation time and freedom from AF after 12 months in AF patients treated with CF-guided catheter ablation. However, CF-guided catheter ablation does not decrease fluoroscopy time. PMID:26840711

  10. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Doctor, J R; Solanki, S L; Patil, V P; Divatia, J V

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  11. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  12. Korean Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Network: Genetic Variants for AF Do Not Predict Ablation Success

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eue-Keun; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Ji-Young; Nam, Chung Mo; Hwang, Min Ki; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Ko, Young-Guk; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Lubitz, Steven A; Ellinor, Patrick T; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomewide association studies have identified several loci associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) and have been reportedly associated with response to catheter ablation for AF in patients of European ancestry; however, associations between top susceptibility loci and AF recurrence after ablation have not been examined in Asian populations. We examined whether the top single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (PITX2), 16q22 (ZFHX3), and 1q21 (KCNN3) were associated with AF in a Korean population and whether these SNPs were associated with clinical outcomes after catheter ablation for AF. Methods and Results We determined the association between 4 SNPs and AF in 1068 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation (74.6% male, aged 57.5±10.9 years, 67.9% paroxysmal AF) and 1068 age- and sex-matched controls. The SNPs at the PITX2 and ZFHX3 loci, but not the KCNN3 locus, were significantly associated with AF (PITX2/rs6843082_G: odds ratio 3.41, 95% CI 2.55 to 4.55, P=1.32×10−16; PITX2/rs2200733_T: odds ratio 2.05, 95% CI 1.66 to 2.53, P=2.20×10−11; ZFHX3/rs2106261_A: odds ratio 2.33, 95% CI 1.87 to 2.91, P=3.75×10−14; KCNN3/rs13376333_T: odds ratio 1.74, 95% CI 0.93 to 3.25, P=0.085). Among those patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, none of the top AF-associated SNPs were associated with long-term clinical recurrence of AF after catheter ablation. Conclusions SNPs at the PITX2 and ZFHX3 loci were strongly associated with AF in Korean patients. In contrast to prior reports, none of the 4 top AF-susceptibility SNPs predicted clinical recurrence after catheter ablation. PMID:26272656

  13. Pulmonary vein stenosis complicating radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Edriss, Hawa; Denega, Tatiana; Test, Victor; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become a widely used intervention in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is one of the most serious complications associated with this procedure; the degree of stenosis ranges from mild (<50%) to complete venous occlusion. The natural history of PVS and the risk of progression of existing PVS are uncertain. Symptomatic and/or severe PVS is a serious medical problem and can be easily misdiagnosed since it is an uncommon and relatively new medical problem, often has low clinical suspicion among clinicians, and has a non-specific presentation that mimics other more common respiratory or cardiac diseases. The estimated incidence varies in literature reports from 0% to 42% of ablation procedures, depending on technical aspects of the procedure and operator skill. Most patients with significant PVS remain asymptomatic or have few symptoms. Symptomatic patients usually present with dyspnea, chest pain, or hemoptysis and are usually treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Little is known about the long term effect of PV stenosis/occlusion on the pulmonary circulation and the development of pulmonary hypertension. Evolving technology may reduce the frequency of this complication, but long term studies are needed to understand the effect of therapeutic atrial injury and adverse outcomes. This review summarizes the current literature and outlines an approach to the evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:27492534

  14. Contact force mapping during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: procedural data and one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Huemer, Martin; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is the state-of-the-art treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein reconnection is one of the main mechanisms of AF recurrence after ablation. Catheter-tissue contact is essential for effective ablation lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of catheter contact monitoring during PVI on AF recurrence rate. Material and methods One hundred and forty-three patients who underwent PVI were analysed. In 31 patients, PVI was performed by monitoring the catheter-tissue contact with a contact force (CF) sensing catheter. One hundred and twelve patients in whom conventional PVI was performed without CF information served as the control group. Procedural data and recurrence rate within 12-month follow-up were compared. Results A significant reduction in procedure duration was seen in the CF mapping group (128.4 ±29 min vs. 157.7 ±30.8 min, p = 0.001). Complete pulmonary vein isolation was achieved in 100% of the patients. Rate of AF recurrence within 12 months after ablation was significantly lower in the contact force group (16.1%) when compared to the standard ablation group (36.6%) (p = 0.031). Conclusions Pulmonary vein isolation with the use of contact force information results in a shorter procedure duration and a lower rate of AF recurrence after 12 months compared to conventional PVI without this information. Catheter-tissue contact monitoring may have a beneficial effect on mid-term and long-term results of PVI procedures. PMID:24904659

  15. Catheter ablation of recurrent polymorphic tachycardia: Use of sodium channel blockade to organize the tachycardia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Daljeet Kaur; Nair, Sandeep G.; Shelke, Abhijeet; Yalagudri, Sachin; Narasimhan, Calambur

    2015-01-01

    A 55 year old male presented with recurrent implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT). He had undergone prior catheter ablation for VT three years ago. During the prior attempt he underwent voltage guided substrate ablation. With programmed ventricular extrastimulation (PVES), PMVT was repeatedly induced requiring DC shock. Intravenous procainamide was administered and PVES was repeated which induced sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (MMVT). This VT had pseudo delta waves with maximum deflection index of 0.68, suggestive of epicardial origin. Activation mapping was performed epicardially. Presystolic potentials were recorded in mid anterolateral wall of left ventricular epicardial region. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation at this site terminated the VT. Post ablation there was no inducible tachycardia and patient is free of arrhythmias during 2 years of follow-up.

  16. Early recurrence of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation with left atrial fibrosis identified at cardiac magnetic resonance by late gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Antonio; Casavecchia, Graziapia; Gravina, Matteo; Ieva, Riccardo; Santoro, Francesco; Grimaldi, Massimo; Pellegrino, Pier Luigi; Macarini, Luca; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2016-08-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), extensive atrial tissue fibrosis identified by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with early recurrence of AF after catheter ablation. We present a case of a patient with extensive atrial fibrosis and AF recurrence.The study of late gadolinium enhancement with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with AF could be a valuable noninvasive tool for the selection of patients suitable for successful catheter ablation. PMID:26826170

  17. Electrophysiology testing and catheter ablation are helpful when evaluating asymptomatic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern: the con perspective.

    PubMed

    Skanes, Allan C; Obeyesekere, Manoj; Klein, George J

    2015-09-01

    The association between asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and sudden cardiac death (SCD) has been well documented. The inherent properties of the accessory pathway determine the risk of SCD in WPW, and catheter ablation essentially eliminates this risk. An approach to WPW syndrome is needed that incorporates the patient's individualized considerations into the decision making. Patients must understand that there is a trade-off of a small immediate risk of an invasive approach for elimination of a small lifetime risk of the natural history of asymptomatic WPW. Clinicians can minimize the invasive risk by only performing ablation for patients with at-risk pathways. PMID:26304516

  18. Incidence and predictive factors of atrial fibrillation after ablation of typical atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Valérie; Fauchier, Laurent; Pierre, Bertrand; Grimard, Caroline; Babuty, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    Although cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency catheter ablation is considered curative therapy for typical atrial flutter, many patients develop an atrial fibrillation after ablation. The purpose of our study was to determine the incidence and the predictive factors of post-ablation atrial fibrillation. One hundred and forty eight consecutive patients underwent cavotricuspid isthmus ablation for the treatment of typical atrial flutter between January 2004 and December 2005 in our electrophysiological department. Complete cavotricuspid isthmus block was successfully obtained in 96.6% of the patients. At the end of the electrophysiological study a sustained atrial fibrillation was inducible in 20 patients (13.5%). During an average follow-up of 21.3 +/- 8.2 months, atrial fibrillation occurred in 27% of the patients. Univariate analysis identified four parameters correlated with post-ablation atrial fibrillation among the 21 parameters tested: the young age of the patients, a prior history of atrial fibrillation, an inducible atrial fibrillation, and a paroxysmal atrial flutter. Only inducible atrial fibrillation and paroxysmal atrial flutter were independent factors linked to atrial fibrillation after ablation. In our study the incidence of atrial fibrillation after cavotricuspid isthmus radiofrequency catheter ablation is 152 per 1,000 patient-years, i.e. 25 times higher than the incidence of atrial fibrillation in the general population of the same age. Twenty five percent of the patients who had neither prior history of atrial fibrillation nor structural heart disease suffered from atrial fibrillation during a mean follow-up of 21.3 +/- 8.2 months. All these results suggest that atrial flutter and fibrillation could be manifestations of a more general electrophysiologic disease. They emphasize the need for all these patients to benefit from regular, long-term cardiological follow-up after cavotricuspid isthmus ablation because of the high incidence of atrial

  19. Catheter-based radiofrequency renal-nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M; Steichen, O; Frank, M; Bobrie, G; Plouin, P-F; Sapoval, M

    2012-03-01

    This review aims to describe the role and the results of catheter-based renal nerve ablation for the treatment of resistant hypertension. Despite the availability of multiple classes of orally active antihypertensive treatments, resistant hypertension remains an important public health issue in 2012 due to its prevalence and association with target-organ damage and poor prognosis. The failure of purely pharmacological approaches to treat resistant hypertension has stimulated interest in invasive device-based treatments based on old concepts. In the absence of orally active antihypertensive agents, patients with severe and complicated hypertension were widely treated by surgical denervation of the kidney until the 1960s, but this approach was associated with a high incidence of severe adverse events and a high mortality rate. A new catheter system using radiofrequency energy has been developed, allowing an endovascular approach to renal denervation and providing patients with resistant hypertension with a new therapeutic option that is less invasive than surgery and can be performed rapidly under local anaesthesia. To date, this technique has been evaluated only in open-label trials including small numbers of highly selected resistant hypertensive patients with suitable renal artery anatomy. The available evidence suggests a favourable blood pressure-lowering effect in the short term (6 months) and a low incidence of immediate local and endovascular complications. This follow-up period is, however, too short for the detection of rare or late-onset adverse events. For the time being, the benefit/risk ratio of this technique remains to be evaluated, precluding its uncontrolled and widespread use in routine practice. PMID:22237510

  20. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in chronic heart failure: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Anselmino, Matteo; Matta, Mario; Castagno, Davide; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AFCA) is a widely recommended treatment for symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) patients refractory to pharmacological treatment. Catheter ablation of AF is becoming a therapeutic option also among patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), on top of optimal medical treatment, being this arrhythmia related to a higher risk of death and/or symptom's worsening. In fact, in this setting, clinical evidences are continuously increasing. The present systematic review pools all published experiences concerning AFCA among CHF patients, or patients with structural cardiomyopathies, in order to summarize procedural safety and efficacy in this specific population. Moreover, the effects of AFCA on functional class and quality of life and the different procedural protocols available are discussed. The present work, therefore, attempts to provide an evidence-based clinical perspective to optimize clinical indication and tailor procedural characteristics and endpoints to patients affected by CHF referred for AFCA. PMID:26857188

  1. Catheter ablation in combination with left atrial appendage closure for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Swaans, Martin J; Alipour, Arash; Rensing, Benno J W M; Post, Martijn C; Boersma, Lucas V A

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. The rapid, irregular, and disordered electrical activity in the atria gives rise to palpitations, fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain and dizziness with or without syncope. Patients with AF have a five-fold higher risk of stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin is commonly used for stroke prevention in patients with AF and has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke by 64%. Warfarin therapy has several major disadvantages, however, including bleeding, non-tolerance, interactions with other medications and foods, non-compliance and a narrow therapeutic range. These issues, together with poor appreciation of the risk-benefit ratio, unawareness of guidelines, or absence of an OAC monitoring outpatient clinic may explain why only 30-60% of patients with AF are prescribed this drug. The problems associated with warfarin, combined with the limited efficacy and/or serious side effects associated with other medications used for AF, highlight the need for effective non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. One such approach is catheter ablation (CA), a procedure in which a radiofrequency electrical current is applied to regions of the heart to create small ablation lesions that electrically isolate potential AF triggers. CA is a well-established treatment for AF symptoms, that may also decrease the risk of stroke. Recent data showed a significant decrease in the relative risk of stroke and transient ischemic attack events among patients who underwent ablation compared with those undergoing antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Since the left atrial appendage (LAA) is the source of thrombi in more than 90% of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, another approach to stroke prevention is to physically block clots from exiting the LAA. One method for occluding the LAA is via percutaneous placement of the WATCHMAN LAA closure device. The WATCHMAN device

  2. Non-fluoroscopic navigation systems for radiofrequency catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia reduce ionising radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    See, Jason; Amora, Jonah L; Lee, Sheldon; Lim, Paul; Teo, Wee Siong; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Lee, Chee Wan; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The use of non-fluoroscopic systems (NFS) to guide radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is associated with lower radiation exposure. This study aimed to determine if NFS reduces fluoroscopy time, radiation dose and procedure time. METHODS We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing RFCA for SVT. NFS included EnSite™ NavX™ or CARTO® mapping. We compared procedure and fluoroscopy times, and radiation exposure between NFS and conventional fluoroscopy (CF) cohorts. Procedural success, complications and one-year success rates were reported. RESULTS A total of 200 patients over 27 months were included and RFCA was guided by NFS for 79 patients; those with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT), left-sided atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) and right-sided AVRT were included (n = 101, 63 and 36, respectively). Fluoroscopy times were significantly lower with NFS than with CF (10.8 ± 11.1 minutes vs. 32.0 ± 27.5 minutes; p < 0.001). The mean fluoroscopic dose area product was also significantly reduced with NFS (NSF: 5,382 ± 5,768 mGy*cm2 vs. CF: 21,070 ± 23,311 mGy*cm2; p < 0.001); for all SVT subtypes. There was no significant reduction in procedure time, except for left-sided AVRT ablation (NFS: 79.2 minutes vs. CF: 116.4 minutes; p = 0.001). Procedural success rates were comparable (NFS: 97.5% vs. CF: 98.3%) and at one-year follow-up, there was no significant difference in the recurrence rates (NFS: 5.2% vs. CF: 4.2%). No clinically significant complications were observed in both groups. CONCLUSION The use of NFS for RFCA for SVT is safe, with significantly reduced radiation dose and fluoroscopy time. PMID:26805664

  3. Value of Implantable Loop Recorders in Monitoring Efficacy of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Pu, Lijin; Yang, Liuqing; Li, Fang; Luo, Zhiling; Guo, Tao; Hua, Baotong; Li, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of the implantable loop recorder (ILR) in diagnosing atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing the postoperative efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Material/Methods A total of 32 patients who successfully underwent RFCA were selected. These patients discontinued antiarrhythmic medication with no AF recurrence for more than 3 months after RFCA, and underwent ILR placement by a conventional method. The clinical manifestations and information on arrhythmias recorded by the ILR were followed up to assess the efficacy of AF RFCA. Results The mean follow-up period was 24.7±12.5 months. Of 32 patients with ILR information, 27 had successful RFCA and 5 had recurrent AF. The follow-up results obtained by traditional methods showed 29 patients with successful RFCA and 3 with recurrent AF (P<0.05). Among the 18 patients with clinical symptoms, 13 had recorded cardiac arrhythmic events (72.2%) and 5 showed sinus rhythm (27.8%). The ILRs recorded 18 patients with arrhythmic events (56.3%), including 12 cases of atrial arrhythmias, among whom 5 recurred at 9, 12, 16, 17, and 32 months after AF RFCA; there were also 2 patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 4 with bradycardia. Conclusions The value of ILR in assessing the efficacy of AF RFCA was superior to that of traditional methods. ILR can promptly detect asymptomatic AF, and can monitor electrocardiogram features after RFCA, thus providing objective evidence of efficacy. PMID:27518153

  4. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Brennan, Rachel C.; Shook, David R.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J.; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. Methods We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as “non-laminar.” Results Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–21.5; p <0.01; sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 67%). A combined prediction model comprising either change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. Conclusions In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate

  5. Interactive real-time mapping and catheter ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus guided by magnetic resonance imaging in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Boris A.; Koops, Andreas; Rostock, Thomas; Müllerleile, Kai; Steven, Daniel; Karst, Roman; Steinke, Mark U.; Drewitz, Imke; Lund, Gunnar; Koops, Susan; Adam, Gerhard; Willems, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Aims We investigated the feasibility of real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RTMRI) guided ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) by using a MRI-compatible ablation catheter. Methods and results Cavotricuspid isthmus ablation was performed in an interventional RTMRI suite by using a novel 7 French, steerable, non-ferromagnetic ablation catheter in a porcine in vivo model (n = 20). The catheter was introduced and navigated by RTMRI visualization only. Catheter position and movement during manipulation were continuously visualized during the entire intervention. Two porcine prematurely died due to VT/VF. Anatomical completion of the CTI ablation line could be achieved after a mean of 6.3±3 RF pulses (RF energy: 1807±1016.4 Ws/RF pulse, temperature: 55.9±5.9°C) in n = 18 animals. In 15 of 18 procedures (83.3%) a complete CTI block was proven by conventional mapping in the electrophysiological (EP) lab. Conclusion Completely non-fluoroscopic ablation guided by RTMRI using a steerable and non-ferromagnetic catheter is a promising novel technology in interventional electrophysiology. PMID:19897495

  6. Low rate of asymptomatic cerebral embolism and improved procedural efficiency with the novel pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD: results of the PRECISION GOLD trial

    PubMed Central

    De Greef, Yves; Dekker, Lukas; Boersma, Lucas; Murray, Stephen; Wieczorek, Marcus; Spitzer, Stefan G.; Davidson, Neil; Furniss, Steve; Hocini, Mélèze; Geller, J. Christoph; Csanádi, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Aims This prospective, multicentre study (PRECISION GOLD) evaluated the incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism (ACE) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using a new gold multi-electrode radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter, pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) GOLD. Also, procedural efficiency of PVAC GOLD was compared with ERACE. The ERACE study demonstrated that a low incidence of ACE can be achieved with a platinum multi-electrode RF catheter (PVAC) combined with procedural manoeuvres to reduce emboli. Methods and results A total of 51 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) (age 57 ± 9 years, CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.4 ± 1.4) underwent AF ablation with PVAC GOLD. Continuous oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists, submerged catheter introduction, and heparinization (ACT ≥ 350 s prior to ablation) were applied. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed within 48 h before and 16–72 h post-ablation. Cognitive function assessed by the Mini-Mental State Exam at baseline and 30 days post-ablation. New post-procedural ACE occurred in only 1 of 48 patients (2.1%) and was not detectable on MRI after 30 days. The average number of RF applications per patient to achieve PVI was lower in PRECISION GOLD (20.3 ± 10.0) than in ERACE (28.8 ± 16.1; P = 0.001). Further, PVAC GOLD ablations resulted in significantly fewer low-power (<3 W) ablations (15 vs. 23%, 5 vs. 10% and 2 vs. 7% in 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 bipolar:unipolar energy modes, respectively). Mini-Mental State Exam was unchanged in all patients. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation with PVAC GOLD in combination with established embolic lowering manoeuvres results in a low incidence of ACE. Pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD demonstrates improved biophysical efficiency compared with platinum PVAC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01767558. PMID:26826134

  7. Uninterrupted rivaroxaban vs. uninterrupted vitamin K antagonists for catheter ablation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Cappato, Riccardo; Marchlinski, Francis E.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Naccarelli, Gerald V.; Xiang, Jim; Wilber, David J.; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Hess, Susanne; Wells, Darryl S.; Juang, George; Vijgen, Johan; Hügl, Burkhard J.; Balasubramaniam, Richard; De Chillou, Christian; Davies, D. Wyn; Fields, L. Eugene; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Aims VENTURE-AF is the first prospective randomized trial of uninterrupted rivaroxaban and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing catheter ablation (CA). Methods and results Trial size was administratively set at 250, the protocol-specified target. Events were independently and blindly adjudicated. We randomly assigned 248 NVAF patients to uninterrupted rivaroxaban (20 mg once-daily) or to an uninterrupted VKA prior to CA and for 4 weeks afterwards. The primary endpoint was major bleeding events after CA. Secondary endpoints included thromboembolic events (composite of stroke, systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and vascular death) and other bleeding or procedure-attributable events. Patients were 59.5 ± 10 years of age, 71% male, 74% paroxysmal AF, and had a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 1.6. The average total heparin dose used to manage activated clotting time (ACT) was slightly higher (13 871 vs. 10 964 units; P < 0.001) and the mean ACT level attained slightly lower (302 vs. 332 s; P < 0.001) in rivaroxaban and VKA arms, respectively. The incidence of major bleeding was low (0.4%; 1 major bleeding event). Similarly, thromboembolic events were low (0.8%; 1 ischemic stroke and 1 vascular death). All events occurred in the VKA arm and all after CA. The number of any adjudicated events (26 vs. 25), any bleeding events (21 vs. 18), and any other procedure-attributable events (5 vs. 5) were similar. Conclusion In patients undergoing CA for AF, the use of uninterrupted oral rivaroxaban was feasible and event rates were similar to those for uninterrupted VKA therapy. Name of the Trial Registry Clinicaltrials.gov trial registration number is NCT01729871. PMID:25975659

  8. Personnel, equipment, and facilities for electrophysiological and catheter ablation procedures in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Estner, Heidi L; Chen, Jian; Potpara, Tatjana; Proclemer, Alessandro; Todd, Derick; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Clinical electrophysiology (EP) and catheter ablation of arrhythmias are rapidly evolving in recent years. More than 50 000 catheter ablations are performed every year in Europe. Emerging indications, an increasing number of procedures, and an expected high quality require national and international standards as well as trained specialists. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the practice of requirements for EP personnel, equipment, and facilities in Europe. Responses to the questionnaire were received from 52 members of the EHRA research network. The survey involved high-, medium-, and low-volume EP centres, performing >400, 100-399, and under 100 implants per year, respectively. The following topics were explored: (i) EP personnel issues including balance between female and male operators, responsibilities within the EP department, age profiles, role and training of fellows, and EP nurses, (ii) the equipments available in the EP laboratories, (iii) source of patient referrals, and (iv) techniques used for ablation for different procedures including sedation, and peri-procedural use of anticoagulation and antibiotics. The survey reflects the current EP personnel situation characterized by a high training requirement and specialization. Arrhythmia sections are still most often part of cardiology departments and the head of cardiology is seldom a heart rhythm specialist. Currently, the vast majority of EP physicians are men, although in the subgroup of physicians younger than 40 years, the proportion of women is increasing. Uncertainty exists regarding peri-procedural anticoagulation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and the need for sedation during specific procedures. PMID:24966009

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy integrated catheter for characterization of myocardial tissues: preliminary demonstrations to radiofrequency ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment of atrial fibrillation can be limited by the ability to characterize the tissue in contact. Parameters obtained by conventional catheters, such as impedance and temperature can be insufficient in providing physiological information pertaining to effective treatment. In this report, we present a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-integrated catheter capable of extracting tissue optical properties. Validation experiments were first performed in tissue phantoms with known optical properties. We then apply the technique for characterization of myocardial tissues in swine and human hearts, ex vivo. Additionally, we demonstrate the recovery of critical parameters relevant to RFA therapy including contact verification, and lesion transmurality. These findings support the application of NIRS for improved guidance in RFA therapeutic interventions. PMID:26203376

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy integrated catheter for characterization of myocardial tissues: preliminary demonstrations to radiofrequency ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P; Marboe, Charles C; Hendon, Christine P

    2015-07-01

    Effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment of atrial fibrillation can be limited by the ability to characterize the tissue in contact. Parameters obtained by conventional catheters, such as impedance and temperature can be insufficient in providing physiological information pertaining to effective treatment. In this report, we present a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-integrated catheter capable of extracting tissue optical properties. Validation experiments were first performed in tissue phantoms with known optical properties. We then apply the technique for characterization of myocardial tissues in swine and human hearts, ex vivo. Additionally, we demonstrate the recovery of critical parameters relevant to RFA therapy including contact verification, and lesion transmurality. These findings support the application of NIRS for improved guidance in RFA therapeutic interventions. PMID:26203376

  11. Safety and efficacy of multipolar pulmonary vein ablation catheter vs. irrigated radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    McCready, J.; Chow, A. W.; Lowe, M. D.; Segal, O. R.; Ahsan, S.; de Bono, J.; Dhaliwal, M.; Mfuko, C.; Ng, A.; Rowland, E. R.; Bradley, R. J. W.; Paisey, J.; Roberts, P.; Morgan, J. M.; Sandilands, A.; Yue, A.; Lambiase, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The current challenge in atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment is to develop effective, efficient, and safe ablation strategies. This randomized controlled trial assesses the medium-term efficacy of duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation via the circular pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) vs. conventional electro-anatomically guided wide-area circumferential ablation (WACA). Methods and results One hundred and eighty-eight patients (mean age 62 ± 12 years, 116 M : 72 F) with paroxysmal AF were prospectively randomized to PVAC or WACA strategies and sequentially followed for 12 months. The primary endpoint was freedom from symptomatic or documented >30 s AF off medications for 7 days at 12 months post-procedure. One hundred and eighty-three patients completed 12 m follow-up. Ninety-four patients underwent PVAC PV isolation with 372 of 376 pulmonary veins (PVs) successfully isolated and all PVs isolated in 92 WACA patients. Three WACA and no PVAC patients developed tamponade. Fifty-six percent of WACA and 60% of PVAC patients were free of AF at 12 months post-procedure (P = ns) with a significant attrition rate from 77 to 78%, respectively, at 6 months. The mean procedure (140 ± 43 vs. 167 ± 42 min, P<0.0001), fluoroscopy (35 ± 16 vs. 42 ± 20 min, P<0.05) times were significantly shorter for PVAC than for WACA. Two patients developed strokes within 72 h of the procedure in the PVAC group, one possibly related directly to PVAC ablation in a high-risk patient and none in the WACA group (P = ns). Two of the 47 patients in the PVAC group who underwent repeat ablation had sub-clinical mild PV stenoses of 25–50% and 1 WACA patient developed delayed severe PV stenosis requiring venoplasty. Conclusion The pulmonary vein ablation catheter is equivalent in efficacy to WACA with reduced procedural and fluoroscopy times. However, there is a risk of thrombo-embolic and pulmonary stenosis complications which needs to be addressed and prospectively monitored. Clinical

  12. Atrial rhythm influences catheter tissue contact during radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison of contact force between sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisao; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Attanasio, Philipp; Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Blaschke, Florian; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    Catheter tissue contact force (CF) is an important factor for durable lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since CF varies in the beating heart, atrial rhythm during RFCA may influence CF. A high-density map and RFCA points were obtained in 25 patients undergoing RFCA of AF using a CF-sensing catheter (Tacticath, St. Jude Medical). The operators were blinded to the CF information. Contact type was classified into three categories: constant, variable, and intermittent contact. Average CF and contact type were analyzed according to atrial rhythm (SR vs. AF) and anatomical location. A total of 1364 points (891 points during SR and 473 points during AF) were analyzed. Average CFs showed no significant difference between SR (17.2 ± 11.3 g) and AF (17.2 ± 13.3 g; p = 0.99). The distribution of points with an average CF of ≥20 and <10 g also showed no significant difference. However, the distribution of excessive CF (CF ≥40 g) was significantly higher during AF (7.4 %) in comparison with SR (4.2 %; p < 0.05). At the anterior area of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), the average CF during AF was significantly higher than during SR (p < 0.05). Constant contact was significantly higher during AF (32.2 %) when compared to SR (9.9 %; p < 0.01). Although the average CF was not different between atrial rhythms, constant contact was more often achievable during AF than it was during SR. However, excessive CF also seems to occur more frequently during AF especially at the anterior part of RIPV. PMID:26498938

  13. Postoperative amnesia in a patient undergoing general anesthesia for electro-physiologic (EP) catheter ablation of an irritable atrial focus.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, Aris; Chen, Linda; Lin, David; Liu, Renyu

    2014-10-31

    This case report describes the anesthetic management of a 67-year-old who underwent a catheter based pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) of long-standing, persistent atrial fibrillation. When the patient awoke from the 6.5 hour procedure, he was found to have a transient retrograde and anterograde amnesia that persisted for 18-24 hours postoperatively. This is a unique instance of global amnesia following a cardiac ablation procedure under prolonged general anesthesia. This case study highlights important topics in postoperative cognitive deficits including the differential diagnosis, risk factors, and strategies for optimizing patient outcomes in high risk procedures. PMID:25429367

  14. Postoperative amnesia in a patient undergoing general anesthesia for electro-physiologic (EP) catheter ablation of an irritable atrial focus

    PubMed Central

    Sophocles, Aris; Chen, Linda; Lin, David; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the anesthetic management of a 67-year-old who underwent a catheter based pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) of long-standing, persistent atrial fibrillation. When the patient awoke from the 6.5 hour procedure, he was found to have a transient retrograde and anterograde amnesia that persisted for 18–24 hours postoperatively. This is a unique instance of global amnesia following a cardiac ablation procedure under prolonged general anesthesia. This case study highlights important topics in postoperative cognitive deficits including the differential diagnosis, risk factors, and strategies for optimizing patient outcomes in high risk procedures. PMID:25429367

  15. Reduction of Iatrogenic Atrial Septal Defects with an Anterior and Inferior Transseptal Puncture Site when Operating the Cryoballoon Ablation Catheter.

    PubMed

    Rich, Michael E; Tseng, Andrew; Lim, Hae W; Wang, Paul J; Su, Wilber W

    2015-01-01

    The cryoballoon catheter ablates atrial fibrillation (AF) triggers in the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) via transseptal access. The typical transseptal puncture site is the fossa ovalis (FO) - the atrial septum's thinnest section. A potentially beneficial transseptal site, for the cryoballoon, is near the inferior limbus (IL). This study examines an alternative transseptal site near the IL, which may decrease the frequency of acute iatrogenic atrial septal defect (IASD). Also, the study evaluates the acute pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) success rate utilizing the IL location. 200 patients were evaluated by retrospective chart review for acute PVI success rate with an IL transseptal site. An additional 128 IL transseptal patients were compared to 45 FO transseptal patients by performing Doppler intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) post-ablation to assess transseptal flow after removal of the transseptal sheath. After sheath removal and by Doppler ICE imaging, 42 of 128 (33%) IL transseptal patients demonstrated acute transseptal flow, while 45 of 45 (100%) FO transseptal puncture patients had acute transseptal flow. The difference in acute transseptal flow detection between FO and IL sites was statistically significant (P <0.0001). Furthermore, 186 of 200 patients (with an IL transseptal puncture) did not need additional ablation(s) and had achieved an acute PVI by a "cryoballoon only" technique. An IL transseptal puncture site for cryoballoon AF ablations is an effective location to mediate PVI at all four PVs. Additionally, an IL transseptal location can lower the incidence of acute transseptal flow by Doppler ICE when compared to the FO. Potentially, the IL transseptal site may reduce later IASD complications post-cryoballoon procedures. PMID:26132435

  16. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Accessory Atrioventricular Pathways in Infants and Toddlers ≤ 15 kg.

    PubMed

    Backhoff, David; Klehs, Sophia; Müller, Matthias J; Schneider, Heike; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Accessory atrioventricular pathways (AP) are the most common substrate for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in infants and small children. Up-to-date data on AP ablation in infants and small children are limited. The aim of the present study was to gain additional insight into radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of AP in infants and toddlers focusing on efficacy and safety in patients with a body weight of ≤ 15 kg. Since 10/2002, RF ablation of AP was performed in 281 children in our institution. Indications, procedural data as well as success and complication rates in children with a body weight ≤ 15 kg (n = 22) were compared with children > 15 kg (n = 259). Prevalence of structural heart anomalies was significantly higher among children ≤ 15 kg (27 vs. 5.7 %; p = 0.001). Procedure duration (median 262 vs. 177 min; p = 0.001) and fluoroscopy time (median 20.6 vs. 14.0 min; p = 0.007) were significantly longer among patients ≤ 15 kg. Procedural success rate did not differ significantly between the two groups (82 vs. 90 %). More RF lesions were required for AP ablation in the smaller patients (median 12 vs. 7; p = 0.019). Major complication rate was significantly higher in children ≤ 15 kg (9 vs. 1.1 %; p = 0.05) with femoral vessel occlusion being the only major adverse event in patients ≤ 15 kg. Catheter ablation of AP in children was effective irrespective of body weight. In children ≤ 15 kg, however, procedures were more challenging and time-consuming. Complication rate and number of RF lesions in smaller children were higher when compared to older children. PMID:26961570

  17. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways in children and young adults.

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, N; Smeets, J L; Pulles-Heintzberger, C F; Wellens, H J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for reentrant tachyarrhythmias in children and young adults. SETTING--A tertiary cardiac referral centre. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS--Over a 16 month period 22 patients aged less than 20 years (median age 16.5 years) underwent 26 radiofrequency ablation procedures for atrioventricular reentry tachycardia through an accessory pathway. The results of radiofrequency ablation were compared with those in a group of 16 patients (median age 14 years) who had had surgical ablation for atrioventricular reentry tachycardia over a preceding six year period. RESULTS--Ablation of an accessory atrioventricular pathway was accomplished for 18 (76%) of 25 pathways in 16 (73%) of 22 patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Surgery was eventually curative in 15/16 patients (94%). However, three patients required a second open heart surgical procedure because tachyarrhythmia recurred. There were no surgical deaths. Failures for radiofrequency ablation were related to accessory pathway location, and were greater for right free wall and posteroseptal pathways (success rate of 50% and 57% respectively). Recurrence after surgery was also associated with pathways in these locations. CONCLUSIONS--Transcatheter radiofrequency current ablation was safe and achieved a cure with less patient morbidity and improved cost efficiency. It is an attractive alternative to long-term drug therapy or surgery in older children and adolescents. A higher success rate may be expected with increased experience. PMID:8038027

  18. Electrophysiological mapping and radiofrequency catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Michifumi; Stevenson, William G; Nagashima, Koichi; Rubin, David A

    2013-11-01

    A 38-year-old female with prior failed endocardial ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) was referred for further treatment. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy 7 years before and had persistent left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction of 20%. Epicardial voltage mapping showed extensive epicardial scar despite absence of endocardial scar. Five distinct VT morphologies were induced. Ablation was aided by electrogram characteristics, pace mapping, entrainment mapping, and establishing electrical inexcitability along areas of epicardial scar. After epicardial ablation no sustained VT was induced. She had been doing well without VT occurrence but died 1 year later unexpectedly at home. PMID:24102817

  19. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  20. Combined catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and Watchman® left atrial appendage occlusion procedures: Five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Karen P.; Walker, Daniel T.; Humphries, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from undergoing concomitant interventions of left atrial catheter ablation and device occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA) as a two-pronged strategy for rhythm control and stroke prevention. We report on the outcome of combined procedures in a single center case series over a 5-year timeframe. Methods Ninety-eight patients with non-valvular AF and a mean CHA2DS2-VASc score 2.6±1.0 underwent either first time, or redo pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) procedures, followed by successful implant of a Watchman® device. Results All procedures were generally uncomplicated with a mean case time of 213±40 min. Complete LAA occlusion was achieved at initial implant in 92 (94%) patients. Satisfactory LAA occlusion was achieved in 100% of patients at 12 months, with a complete LAA occlusion rate of 86%. All patients discontinued oral anticoagulation. Persistent late peri-device leaks were more frequently associated with device angulation or shoulder protrusion, and were associated with a significantly lower achieved device compression of 12±3% vs. 15±5% (p<0.01) than complete occlusion. One ischemic stroke was recorded over a mean follow-up time of 802±439 days. Twelve months׳ freedom from detectable AF was achieved in 77% of patients. Conclusions Combined procedures of catheter ablation for AF and Watchman® LAA implant appear to be feasible and safe, with excellent rates of LAA occlusion achieved and an observed stroke rate of 0.5% per year during mid-term follow-up. Incomplete occlusion was associated with lower achieved device compression and was more frequently associated with suboptimal device position. PMID:27092193

  1. [Radiofrequency catheter ablation of an accessory atrioventricular conduction pathway with persistent left superior vena cava and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Neuser, H; Hofmann, E; Ebeling, F; Remp, T; Steinbeck, G

    1996-08-01

    A 43-year-old man with a 30-year history of WPW-syndrome and a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed acute heart failure after onset of atrial fibrillation with fast antegrade conduction, which could be converted to sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic medication. Catheterization of the coronary sinus during EP testing demonstrated a persistent left superior vena cava. The accessory pathway could be localized at the orifice of an atypical epicardial vein. It was successfully abolished after subvalvular placement of the electrode catheter in the left ventricle. This constellation indicates a combined defect during the regression of the sinus venosus to the sinus coronarius with persistence of conducting muscle fibers. Successful RF ablation procedure provides an obvious risk reduction as a result of a lower frequency of atrial fibrillation and the eliminated risk of ventricular fibrillation due to rapid conduction via an accessory pathway. Beyond that, harmless therapeutic treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a calcium-channel-blocker (verapamil type) can follow RF ablation. PMID:8975500

  2. Effects of energy delivery via a His bundle catheter during closed chest ablation of the atrioventricular conduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Trantham, J L; Gallagher, J J; German, L D; Broughton, A; Guarnieri, T; Kasell, J

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we summarize our experience and report the characteristics of energy delivery in 23 patients who have undergone closed chest ablation of the normal atrioventricular (AV) conduction system for the treatment of refractory supraventricular arrhythmias. The induction of AV block was achieved by the synchronous delivery of electrical energy with a damped sinusoidal waveform utilizing a standard direct current defibrillator and a standard tripolar His bundle catheter. The procedure was well tolerated, though one patient experienced ventricular fibrillation, which was uneventfully converted with external paddles. Complete AV block was achieved in 20 of 23 patients and all were rendered arrhythmia free, though two still required antiarrhythmic drugs. A stable escape rhythm was seen in all patients with a cycle length of 1,294 +/- 243 ms. Creatine phosphokinase-MB was positive at low levels in 19 of 23 patients and cleared within 24 h. 99mTc pyrophosphate scans were faintly positive in only 2 of 22 patients. Left ventricular wall motion and ejection fractions were unchanged in 19 of 19 patients, two-dimensional echocardiography with microcavitation technique was unchanged in 12 of 12 patients, and a slight increase in pulmonary artery wedge pressure was seen in only 1 of 11 patients. Current, voltage, and their product (power) waveforms were recorded in 12 patients (12 recordings at a defibrillator setting of 200 J and 5 recordings at a defibrillator setting of 300 J) and revealed a complex voltage-current relationship due to changes occurring at the catheter electrode-tissue interface. At 200 J the peak values were 42.2 +/- 3.3 A, 2.16 +/- 0.11 kV, and 87.9 +/- 4.7 kW, while at 300 J the peak values were 58.2 +/- 2.8 A, 2.40 +/- 0.10 kV, and 134.4 +/- 6.7 kW, respectively. No instance of catheter disruption was seen, though "pitting" of the distal electrode (through which current passed) occurred in all but one catheter. Images PMID:6605367

  3. Early Experience of Novel Oral Anticoagulants in Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Efficacy and Safety Comparison to Warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Geum; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Joung-Youn; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Compared with warfarin, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are convenient to use, although they require a blanking period immediately before radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). We compared NOACs and uninterrupted warfarin in the peri-procedural period of AF ablation. Materials and Methods We compared 141 patients treated with peri-procedural NOACs (72% men; 58±11 years old; 71% with paroxysmal AF) and 281 age-, sex-, AF type-, and history of stroke-matched patients treated with uninterrupted warfarin. NOACs were stopped 24 hours before the procedure and restarted on the same procedure day after hemostasis was achieved. Results We found no difference in the CHA2DS2-VASc (p=0.376) and HAS-BLED scores (p=0.175) between the groups. The preprocedural anticoagulation duration was significantly shorter in the NOAC group (76.3±110.7 days) than in the warfarin group (274.7±582.7 days, p<0.001). The intra-procedural total heparin requirement was higher (p<0.001), although mean activated clotting time was shorter (350.0±25.0 s vs. 367.4±42.9 s, p<0.001), in the NOAC group than in the warfarin group. There was no significant difference in thromboembolic events (1.4% vs. 0%, p=0.111) or major bleeding (1.4% vs. 3.9%, p=0.235) between the NOAC and warfarin groups. Minor stroke occurred in two cases within 10 hours of the procedure (underlying CHA2DS2-VASc scores 0 and 1) in the NOAC group. Conclusion Pre-procedural anticoagulation duration was shorter and intra-procedural heparin requirement was higher with NOAC than with uninterrupted warfarin during AF ablation. Although the peri-procedural thromboembolism and bleeding incidences did not differ, minor stroke occurred in two cases in the NOAC group. PMID:26847285

  4. Major complications of cryoballoon catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and their management.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Tariq; Baydoun, Hassan; Asti, Deepak; Rijal, Jharendra; Teli, Sumaya; Tantray, Mohmad; Bhat, Hilal; Kowalski, Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common symptomatic and sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It affects approximately 2-3 million people in the USA alone with an increased incidence and prevalence worldwide. It is associated, in addition to worsening quality of life, with increased morbidity and mortality especially in poorly controlled AF, affecting mostly those older than 65 years of age. Radiofrequency ablation was found to be a good strategy for focal isolation of pulmonary veins triggering from the vulnerable atrial substrate but is a time-consuming procedure and carries the risk of multiple complications like tamponade which could be fatal, atrioesophageal fistula and local thrombus formation at the site of ablation. Cryoballoon ablation with pulmonary vein isolation has emerged in the past few years as a breakthrough novel technology for the treatment of drug-refractory AF. It is a relatively simple alternative for point-by-point radiofrequency ablation of paroxysmal AF and is associated with fewer incidences of fatal complications such as cardiac perforation. As experience with this new tool accumulates, the field faces new challenges in the form of rare compilations including gastroparesis, phrenic nerve palsy, atrioesophageal fistula, pulmonary vein stenosis, thromboembolism pericardial effusion, and tamponade. PMID:25115140

  5. Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: The importance of substrate modification

    PubMed Central

    Letsas, Konstantinos P; Efremidis, Michael; Sgouros, Nikolaos P; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Asvestas, Dimitrios; Sideris, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating data have shown that elimination of atrial fibrillation (AF) sources should be the goal in persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein isolation, linear lesions and complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs) ablation have shown limited efficacy in patients with persistent AF. A combined approach using voltage, CFAEs and dominant frequency (DF) mapping may be helpful for the identification of AF sources and subsequent focal substrate modification. The fibrillatory activity is maintained by intramural reentry centered on fibrotic patches. Voltage mapping may assist in the identification of fibrotic areas. Stable rotors display the higher DF and possibly drive AF. Furthermore, the single rotor is usually consistent with organized AF electrograms without fractionation. It is therefore quite possible that rotors are located at relatively “healthy islands” within the patchy fibrosis. This is supported by the fact that high DF sites have been negatively correlated to the amount of fibrosis. CFAEs are located in areas adjacent to high DF. In conclusion, patchy fibrotic areas displaying the maximum DF along with high organization index and the lower fractionation index are potential targets of ablation. Prospective studies are required to validate the efficacy of substrate modification in left atrial ablation outcomes. PMID:25810810

  6. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. Materials and methods: A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. Results: 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p < 0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: There are subsets of patients with high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC. PMID:25997503

  7. Novel Balloon Catheter Device with Pacing, Ablating, Electroporation, and Drug Eluting Capabilities for Atrial Fibrillation Treatment – Preliminary Efficacy and Safety Studies in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Mikell, Susan B.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Wahnschaffe, Douglas; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Gilles, Emily J.; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Holmes, David R.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation is an established therapeutic procedure for symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF). This approach involves ablation of atrial tissue just outside of the pulmonary veins. However, patient outcomes are limited by a high rate of arrhythmia recurrence. Ablation of electrically active tissue inside the pulmonary vein may improve procedural success, but is currently avoided due to the complication of post-ablation stenosis. An innovative device that can ablate inside pulmonary veins and prevent stenosis is a viable strategy to increase long-term efficacy. We have developed a prototypical balloon catheter device and have demonstrated its functionality in four acute canine experiments. Further optimization of this device may provide an innovative means to simultaneously a blate and prevent pulmonary vein stenosis for improved AF treatment in humans. PMID:25092516

  8. Postprocedural Aspiration Test to Predict Adequacy of Dialysis Following Tunneled Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jason C. Sullivan, Kevin L.; Michael, Beckie

    2006-08-15

    The objective of the study was to determine if a timed aspiration technique with a 20-ml syringe can be used to predict adequacy of blood flow in tunneled dialysis catheters. Sixteen patients referred for de novo placement or manipulation of failing tunneled hemodialysis catheters had the time it takes to fill a 20-ml syringe with the plunger fully withdrawn measured to the nearest tenth of a second. These measurements were correlated with flow rates recorded in dialysis just prior to (if failed catheter) and in the following dialysis session with adequacy determined as at least 300 ml/min. Syringe-filling time (22 catheters in 16 patients) was plotted against adequacy of dialysis. The mean time to fill a 20-ml syringe was 2.2 sec, with a range of 1.0-4.7 sec. The mean time to fill syringes for catheters with adequate dialysis was 1.7 {+-} 0.5 sec, and for inadequate catheters, it was 2.8 {+-} 0.8 sec. These differences are statistically significant (p < 0.001). Using a filling time of greater than or equal to 2 sec as a threshold gives the highest sensitivity (100%) for predicting inadequate dialysis while maintaining high specificity (75%). To achieve a specificity of 100%, a 3-sec cutoff would be necessary, but would lead to a sensitivity of only 20%. A simple and objective aspiration technique can be performed at the time of tunneled dialysis catheter placement/manipulation to reasonably predict adequacy of subsequent dialysis.

  9. Impact of Additional Transthoracic Electrical Cardioversion on Cardiac Function and Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Who Underwent Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deguo; Zhang, Fengxiang; Wang, Ancai

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objective. During the procession of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), transthoracic electrical cardioversion (ECV) is required to terminate AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of additional ECV on cardiac function and recurrence of AF. Methods and Results. Persistent AF patients received extensive encircling pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and additional line ablation. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they need transthoracic electrical cardioversion to terminate AF: electrical cardioversion (ECV group) and nonelectrical cardioversion (NECV group). Among 111 subjects, 35 patients were returned to sinus rhythm after ablation by ECV (ECV group) and 76 patients had AF termination after the ablation processions (NECV group). During the 12-month follow-ups, the recurrence ratio of patients was comparable in ECV group (15/35) and NECV group (34/76) (44.14% versus 44.74%, P = 0.853). Although left atrial diameters (LAD) decreased significantly in both groups, there were no significant differences in LAD and left ventricular cardiac function between ECV group and NECV group. Conclusions. This study revealed that ECV has no significant impact on the maintenance of SR and the recovery of cardiac function. Therefore, ECV could be applied safely to recover SR during the procedure of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation. PMID:27022500

  10. Numerical simulation of RF catheter ablation for the treatment of arterial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuemei; Nan, Qun; Qiao, Aike

    2015-01-01

    Considering the blood coagulation induced by the heating of radio frequency ablation (RFA) and the mechanism of aneurysm embolization, we proposed that RFA may be used to treat arterial aneurysm. But the safety of this method should be investigated. A finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate temperature and pressure distribution in aneurysm with different electrode position, electric field intensity and ablation time. When the electrode is in the middle of the artery aneurysm sac, temperature rose clearly in half side of artery aneurysm, which is not suitable for RFA. Temperature rose in the whole aneurysm when the electrode is under the artery aneurysm orifice, which is suitable for the ablation therapy. And in this way, the highest temperature was 69.585°C when power was 5.0 V/mm with 60 s. It can promote the coagulation and thrombosis generation in the aneurysm sac while the outside tissue temperature rises a little. Meanwhile, the pressure (10 Pa) at the top of aneurysm sac with electrode insertion is less than that (60 Pa) without electrode, so electrode implant may protect the aneurysm from rupture. The results can provide a theoretical basis for interventional treatment of aneurysm with RFA. PMID:26406013

  11. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Raises the Plasma Level of NGF-β Which Is Associated with Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyung; Wi, Jin; Lee, Da Lyung; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The expression of nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) is related to cardiac nerve sprouting and sympathetic hyper innervation. We investigated the changes of plasma levels of NGF-β and the relationship to follow-up heart rate variability (HRV) after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods This study included 147 patients with AF (117 men, 55.8±11.5 years, 106 paroxysmal AF) who underwent RFCA. The plasma levels of NGF-β were quantified using double sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method before (NGF-βpre) and 1 hour after RFCA (NGF-βpost-1hr). HRV at pre-procedure (HRVpre), 3 months (HRVpost-3mo), and 1 year post-procedure (HRVpost-1yr) were analyzed and compared with plasma levels of NGF-β. Results 1) The plasma levels of NGF-β significantly increased after RFCA (20.05±11.09 pg/mL vs. 29.60±19.43 pg/mL, p<0.001). The patients who did not show increased NGF-βpost-1hr were older (p=0.023) and had greater left atrial volume index (p=0.028) than those with increased NGF-βpost-1hr. 2) In patients with NGF-βpre >18 pg/mL, low frequency components (LF)/high-frequency components (HF) (p=0.003) and the number of atrial premature contractions (APCs, p=0.045) in HRVpost-3mo were significantly higher than those with ≤18 pg/mL. 3) The LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo was linearly associated with the NGF-βpre (B=4.240, 95% CI 1.114-7.336, p=0.008) and the NGF-βpost-1hr (B=7.617, 95% CI 2.106-13.127, p=0.007). 4) Both NGF-βpre (OR=1.159, 95% CI 1.045-1.286, p=0.005) and NGF-βpost-1hr (OR=1.098, 95% CI 1.030-1.170, p=0.004) were independent predictors for the increase of LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo. Conclusion AF catheter ablation increases plasma level of NGF-β, and high plasma levels of NGF-βpre was associated with higher sympathetic nerve activity and higher frequency of APCs in HRVpost-3mo. PMID:26446633

  12. Assessment of myocardial lesion size during in vitro radio frequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    He, Ding Sheng; Bosnos, Michael; Mays, Mary Z; Marcus, Frank

    2003-06-01

    We report our experience with a system that utilizes changes in several biophysical characteristics of cardiac tissue to determine lesion formation and to estimate lesion size both on and off-line in vitro during radio frequency (RF) energy delivery. We analyzed the reactive and resistive components of tissue impedance and tracked the change of phase angle during RF ablation. We correlated the amount of tissue damage with these and other biophysical parameters and compared them with off-line analysis. We found that there are irreversible changes in the reactive and resistive components of impedance that occurred during tissue ablation. The irreversible changes of these components are greater in magnitude, and correlate better with the size of lesions than that of impedance alone that is currently used. Numerically, the best single on-line and off-line correlation for combined perpendicular and parallel electrode orientation was with phase angle. On-line and off-line capacitance and susceptance correlations were essentially similar suggesting that they may be useful as lesion size predictors, given these parameter's persistent change without temperature sensitivity. This study indicates that it is technically feasible to assess lesion formation using biophysical parameters. PMID:12814243

  13. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Elicited "Jackhammer Esophagus": A New Complication Due to Vagal Nerve Stimulation?

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-10-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a potentially curative method for treatment of highly symptomatic and drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). However, this technique can provoke esophageal and nerve lesion, due to thermal injury. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of a newly described motor disorder, the Jackhammer esophagus (JE) after RFCA, independently of GERD. We report a case of JE diagnosed by high-resolution manometry (HRM), in whom esophageal symptoms developed 2 weeks after RFCA, in absence of objective evidence of GERD. A 65-year-old male with highly symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF was candidate to complete electrical pulmonary vein isolation with RFCA. Prior the procedure, the patient underwent HRM and impedance-pH to rule out GERD or hiatal hernia presence. All HRM parameters, according to Chicago classification, were within normal limits. No significant gastroesophageal reflux was documented at impedance pH monitoring. Patient underwent RFCA with electrical disconnection of pulmonary vein. After two weeks, patient started to complain of dysphagia for solids, with acute chest-pain. The patient repeated HRM and impedance-pH monitoring 8 weeks after RFCA. HRM showed in all liquid swallows the typical spastic hypercontractile contractions consistent with the diagnosis of JE, whereas impedance-pH monitoring resulted again negative for GERD. Esophageal dysmotility can represent a possible complication of RFCA for AF, probably due to a vagal nerve injury, and dysphagia appearance after this procedure must be timely investigated by HRM. PMID:26351090

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  15. Simulated evaluation of an intraoperative surface modeling method for catheter ablation by a real phantom simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Deyu; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Packer, Douglas; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we propose a phantom experiment method to quantitatively evaluate an intraoperative left-atrial modeling update method. In prior work, we proposed an update procedure which updates the preoperative surface model with information from real-time tracked 2D ultrasound. Prior studies did not evaluate the reconstruction using an anthropomorphic phantom. In this approach, a silicone heart phantom (based on a high resolution human atrial surface model reconstructed from CT images) was made as simulated atriums. A surface model of the left atrium of the phantom was deformed by a morphological operation - simulating the shape difference caused by organ deformation between pre-operative scanning and intra-operative guidance. During the simulated procedure, a tracked ultrasound catheter was inserted into right atrial phantom - scanning the left atrial phantom in a manner mimicking the cardiac ablation procedure. By merging the preoperative model and the intraoperative ultrasound images, an intraoperative left atrial model was reconstructed. According to results, the reconstruction error of the modeling method is smaller than the initial geometric difference caused by organ deformation. As the area of the left atrial phantom scanned by ultrasound increases, the reconstruction error of the intraoperative surface model decreases. The study validated the efficacy of the modeling method.

  16. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Elicited “Jackhammer Esophagus”: A New Complication Due to Vagal Nerve Stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a potentially curative method for treatment of highly symptomatic and drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). However, this technique can provoke esophageal and nerve lesion, due to thermal injury. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of a newly described motor disorder, the Jackhammer esophagus (JE) after RFCA, independently of GERD. We report a case of JE diagnosed by high-resolution manometry (HRM), in whom esophageal symptoms developed 2 weeks after RFCA, in absence of objective evidence of GERD. A 65-year-old male with highly symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF was candidate to complete electrical pulmonary vein isolation with RFCA. Prior the procedure, the patient underwent HRM and impedance-pH to rule out GERD or hiatal hernia presence. All HRM parameters, according to Chicago classification, were within normal limits. No significant gastroesophageal reflux was documented at impedance pH monitoring. Patient underwent RFCA with electrical disconnection of pulmonary vein. After two weeks, patient started to complain of dysphagia for solids, with acute chest-pain. The patient repeated HRM and impedance-pH monitoring 8 weeks after RFCA. HRM showed in all liquid swallows the typical spastic hypercontractile contractions consistent with the diagnosis of JE, whereas impedance-pH monitoring resulted again negative for GERD. Esophageal dysmotility can represent a possible complication of RFCA for AF, probably due to a vagal nerve injury, and dysphagia appearance after this procedure must be timely investigated by HRM. PMID:26351090

  17. Simulated evaluation of an intraoperative surface modeling method for catheter ablation by a real phantom simulation experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Deyu; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Packer, Douglas; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a phantom experiment method to quantitatively evaluate an intraoperative left-atrial modeling update method. In prior work, we proposed an update procedure which updates the preoperative surface model with information from real-time tracked 2D ultrasound. Prior studies did not evaluate the reconstruction using an anthropomorphic phantom. In this approach, a silicone heart phantom (based on a high resolution human atrial surface model reconstructed from CT images) was made as simulated atriums. A surface model of the left atrium of the phantom was deformed by a morphological operation – simulating the shape difference caused by organ deformation between pre-operative scanning and intra-operative guidance. During the simulated procedure, a tracked ultrasound catheter was inserted into right atrial phantom – scanning the left atrial phantom in a manner mimicking the cardiac ablation procedure. By merging the preoperative model and the intraoperative ultrasound images, an intraoperative left atrial model was reconstructed. According to results, the reconstruction error of the modeling method is smaller than the initial geometric difference caused by organ deformation. As the area of the left atrial phantom scanned by ultrasound increases, the reconstruction error of the intraoperative surface model decreases. The study validated the efficacy of the modeling method. PMID:26405371

  18. FBG Sensor for Contact Level Monitoring and Prediction of Perforation in Cardiac Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Nazeri, Alireza; Song, Gangbing

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia, and is characterized by a disordered contractile activity of the atria (top chambers of the heart). A popular treatment for AF is radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In about 2.4% of cardiac RF ablation procedures, the catheter is accidently pushed through the heart wall due to the application of excessive force. Despite the various capabilities of currently available technology, there has yet to be any data establishing how cardiac perforation can be reliably predicted. Thus, two new FBG based sensor prototypes were developed to monitor contact levels and predict perforation. Two live sheep were utilized during the study. It was observed during operation that peaks appeared in rhythm with the heart rate whenever firm contact was made between the sensor and the endocardial wall. The magnitude of these peaks varied with pressure applied by the operator. Lastly, transmural perforation of the left atrial wall was characterized by a visible loading phase and a rapid signal drop-off correlating to perforation. A possible pre-perforation signal was observed for the epoxy-based sensor in the form of a slight signal reversal (12–26% of loading phase magnitude) prior to perforation (occurring over 8 s). PMID:22368507

  19. FBG sensor for contact level monitoring and prediction of perforation in cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Nazeri, Alireza; Song, Gangbing

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia, and is characterized by a disordered contractile activity of the atria (top chambers of the heart). A popular treatment for AF is radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In about 2.4% of cardiac RF ablation procedures, the catheter is accidently pushed through the heart wall due to the application of excessive force. Despite the various capabilities of currently available technology, there has yet to be any data establishing how cardiac perforation can be reliably predicted. Thus, two new FBG based sensor prototypes were developed to monitor contact levels and predict perforation. Two live sheep were utilized during the study. It was observed during operation that peaks appeared in rhythm with the heart rate whenever firm contact was made between the sensor and the endocardial wall. The magnitude of these peaks varied with pressure applied by the operator. Lastly, transmural perforation of the left atrial wall was characterized by a visible loading phase and a rapid signal drop-off correlating to perforation. A possible pre-perforation signal was observed for the epoxy-based sensor in the form of a slight signal reversal (12-26% of loading phase magnitude) prior to perforation (occurring over 8 s). PMID:22368507

  20. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  1. Adenosine-induced atrioventricular block: a rapid and reliable method to assess surgical and radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways.

    PubMed

    Keim, S; Curtis, A B; Belardinelli, L; Epstein, M L; Staples, E D; Lerman, B B

    1992-04-01

    Adenosine has been shown to inhibit anterograde and retrograde conduction through the atrioventricular (AV) node while having little or no effect on accessory pathway conduction. Its rapid onset of action and short half-life make it particularly suitable for repetitive measurements. In this study, the utility of adenosine was tested in assessing completeness of accessory pathway ablation. Sixteen patients with an accessory pathway were studied (eight surgical ablations, eight catheter ablations with radiofrequency energy). Before ablation, no accessory pathway was sensitive to adenosine. Twelve patients with pre-excitation showed high grade AV node block with maximal pre-excitation on the administration of adenosine during atrial pacing. Four patients with a concealed accessory pathway demonstrated high grade AV block without evidence of latent anterograde accessory pathway conduction. Preablation ventriculoatrial (VA) block was not observed in any of the 16 patients in response to adenosine during ventricular pacing. Immediately after accessory pathway ablation, all patients developed AV and VA block with the administration of adenosine during atrial and ventricular pacing, respectively. These findings were confirmed during follow-up study 1 week later. Atrioventricular block during atrial and ventricular pacing with adenosine affords a reliable and immediate assessment of successful pathway ablation. PMID:1552087

  2. The effect of changes in patients’ body position on the back pain intensity and hemodynamic status during and after radiofrequency catheter ablation of cardiac dysrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Hajar; Mansoori, Parisa; Najafi, Saeed; Nikoo, Mohamad Hosein; Zare, Najaf; Jonoobi, Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Background: After radiofrequency catheter ablation of arrhythmias, patients have to bed rest for 4-6 h to prevent bleeding and hematoma. However, such a rest may cause back pain in the patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of continuous change in body position during and after the radiofrequency ablation on the back pain. Materials and Methods: In a quasi-experimental design 75 patients referring to university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to a control group, receiving no change in body position, group A subjected to changes in body position during and after ablation, and group B subjected to changes in body position during ablation. The intensity of pain, blood pressure, heart rate, and extent of bleeding and hematoma were measured. Results: The groups were not significantly different in terms of demographic characteristics, blood pressure, heart rate, overall bleeding, or hematoma at the entry into the coronary care unit. While not significantly different from each other, the intensity of back pain between group A and B were significantly lower than that of group C. Compared to group C, group A and B had a significantly lower pain score up to 6 and 4 h after the procedure, respectively. Group B had a significantly higher pain score at 2, 4, and 6 h post ablation than group A. Conclusions: The findings show that changing the body position during and after the ablation procedure would reduce or prevent the back pain without increasing the chance of bleeding and hematoma. PMID:23983735

  3. Polymorphism rs2200733 at chromosome 4q25 is associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feifei; Yang, Yanzong; Zhang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Shulong; Dong, Yingxue; Yin, Xiaomeng; Chang, Dong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Kejing; Gao, Lianjun; Xia, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    To test polymorphisms rs2200733 (chromosome 4q25) and rs2106261 (ZFHX3) were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in a Chinese Han cohort. A total of 235 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation were recruited consecutively. Two polymorphisms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and genotyped using high resolution melting analysis. Primary endpoints for AF recurrence were defined as the time to the first recurrence of atrial tachycardia/flutter/fibrillation (AT/AF). AT/AF recurrence was observed in 76 patients (35%). Allelic analysis demonstrated that rs2200733 was strongly associated with AF recurrence after ablation (P = 0.011) and the minor allele T increased the risk for recurrence (OR = 1.715). Diameters of the right atrium as well as the left and right superior pulmonary veins (PVs) were associated with rs2200733 in different genetic models (P = 0.040, 0.047 and 0.028, respectively). No significant association was detected between rs2106261 and AT/AF recurrence after ablation or atrial/PV diameters in any models. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only rs2200733 was an independent factor of AF recurrence after ablation (HR = 0.532, P = 0.022). In Chinese Han population, rs2200733 but not rs2106261 is associated with AT/AF recurrence after ablation. The patients with genotype TT have larger size of right atrium and superior PVs than those of CC genotype. The findings suggest that rs2200733 may play a key role in regulating proper development and differentiation of atria/PVs. PMID:27158361

  4. Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia related to a septo-apical left ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Rosu, Radu; Cismaru, Gabriel; Muresan, Lucian; Puiu, Mihai; Andronache, Marius; Gusetu, Gabriel; Pop, Dana; Mircea, Petru-Adrian; Zdrenghea, Dumitru

    2015-01-01

    A 60-year-old male patient with previous myocardial infarction (30 years ago) presented to our cardiology department for sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. The patient presented multiple episodes of tachycardia treated by his internal cardiac defibrillator. Radiofrequency ablation was proposed as curative treatment. The mechanism of the ventricular tachycardia was demonstrated by electrophysiological study using three-dimensional mapping system: Carto 3 (Biosense Webster). Ventricular tachycardia was induced either mechanically or by programmed ventricular stimulation. The tachycardia cycle length was 380 msec. The voltage map confirmed the presence of the septo-apical aneurysm with a local voltage < 0.5 mV. Activation mapping revealed a figure-in-8 circuit of VT with the entrance point inside the dense scar and the exit point at the border zone (between the aneurysm and the healthy tissue of the left ventricular septo-apical region). Radiofrequency energy was delivered at the isthmus of the tachycardia rendering it uniducible by programmed ventricular stimulation. PMID:26770613

  5. Basket catheter-guided three-dimensional activation patterns construction and ablation of common type atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, B; Ndrepepa, G; Schneider, M; Karch, M; Deisenhofer, I; Schreieck, J; Schömig, A; Schmitt, C

    2000-09-01

    Construction of three-dimensional activation maps and evaluation of ablation-created bidirectional block in the tricuspid valve-inferior vena caval (TV-IVC) isthmus in patients with atrial flutter (AF) are difficult with conventional mapping technique. In 36 patients with type I AF (25 men, 11 women; mean age 62 +/- 10.5 years) a multielectrode basket catheter (BC) was deployed in the right atrium (RA). Out of 64 BC electrodes, 56 bipolar electrograms were derived. Three-dimensional activation patterns were constructed with a software program. Stable electrograms of satisfactory quality were obtained in 49 +/- 2 electrode pairs. Capture was possible in 36 +/- 3 of bipoles. In counterclockwise AF (CCW-AF) and clockwise AF (CW-AF) episodes, cycle lengths and TV-IVC isthmus conduction times were 248 +/- 26 ms and 251 +/- 23 ms, (P = 0.74) and 105 +/- 28 ms and 106 +/- 33 ms (P = 0.92), respectively. Conduction velocity in the TV-IVC isthmus was lower than in the anterior or septal limbs of the circuit, in counterclockwise or clockwise episodes. Double potentials were recorded in 94% of patients. Three-dimensional activation patterns were delineated and displayed as isochronal maps. The reentry circuit involved the TV-IVC isthmus, septal, and anterior walls and a part of the RA roof anterior to superior vena cava. Postablation isthmus conduction was evaluated through the sequence criteria, local electrogram-based criteria, and the analysis of three-dimensional activation patterns of the paced rhythms. The complete isthmus block was associated with a significant increase of the low anterior low septal conduction interval (152 +/- 29 vs 104 +/- 32 ms, P = 0.001) and the low septal-low anterior conduction interval (150 +/- 31 vs 107 +/- 33 ms, P = 0.001). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 32 (90%) of 36 patients. In conclusion, the current mapping system enables construction of three-dimensional activation patterns and facilitates evaluation of the postablation TV

  6. Fibrillation number based on wavelength and critical mass in patients who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Minki; Park, Junbeum; Lee, Young-Seon; Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Sung Hwan; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-02-01

    The heart characteristic length, the inverse of conduction velocity (CV), and the inverse of the refractory period are known to determine vulnerability to cardiac fibrillation (fibrillation number, FibN) in in silico or ex vivo models. The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy of FibN through in silico atrial modeling and to evaluate its clinical application in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who had undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation. We compared the maintenance duration of AF at various FibNAF values using in silico bidomain atrial modeling. Among 60 patients (72% male, 54±13 years old, 82% with paroxysmal AF) who underwent circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) for AF rhythm control, we examined the relationship between FibN AF and postprocedural AF inducibility or induction pacing cycle length (iPCL). Clinical FibNAF was calculated using left atrium (LA) dimension (echocardiogram), the inverse of CV, and the inverse of the atrial effective refractory periods measured at proximal and distal coronary sinus. In silico simulation found a positive correlation between AF maintenance duration and FibNAF ( R = 0.90, ). After clinical CPVI, FibNAF ( 0.296±0.038 versus 0.192±0.028, ) was significantly higher in patients with postprocedural AF inducibility ( n = 41) than in those without ( n = 19 ). Among 41 patients with postprocedural AF inducibility, FibNAF ( P = 0.935, ) had excellent correlations with induction pacing cycle length. FibNAF, based on LA mass and wavelength, correlates well with AF maintenance in computational modeling and clinical AF inducibility after CPVI. PMID:25343755

  7. Two-Year Follow-Up after Contact Force Sensing Radiofrequency Catheter and Second-Generation Cryoballoon Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Comparative Single Centre Study.

    PubMed

    Kardos, Attila; Kis, Zsuzsanna; Som, Zoltan; Nagy, Zsofia; Foldesi, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are little comparative data on catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) using the contact force radiofrequency (CF-RF) catheter versus the second-generation cryoballoon (CB2). Methods and results. This is a single center, retrospective, nonrandomized study of 98 patients with symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF who underwent their first PVI ablation using either the CB2 (n = 40) or CF-RF (n = 58). The mean age was 60 years with 63% men, a mean LA size of 42 mm. The procedure duration (74 ± 17 versus 120 ± 49 minutes p < 0.05) was shorter for CB2 group; the fluoroscopy time (14 ± 17 versus 16 ± 5 minutes, p = 0.45) was similar. Complete PVI was achieved in 96% of patients with RF-CF and 98% with CB2. Phrenic nerve palsies (2 transient and 1 persistent) occurred exclusively in the CB2 group and 1 severe, nonlethal complication (pericardial tamponade) occurred in the CF-RF group. At 24-month follow-up, the success rate, defined as freedom from AF/atrial tachycardia (AT) after a single procedure without antiarrhythmic drug, was comparable in CF-RF group and CB2 group (65.5% versus 67%, resp., log rank p = 0.54). Conclusion. Both the CB2 and the RF-CF ablation appeared safe; the success rate at 2 years was comparable between both technologies. PMID:27314032

  8. Two-Year Follow-Up after Contact Force Sensing Radiofrequency Catheter and Second-Generation Cryoballoon Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Comparative Single Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Kardos, Attila; Kis, Zsuzsanna; Som, Zoltan; Nagy, Zsofia; Foldesi, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are little comparative data on catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) using the contact force radiofrequency (CF-RF) catheter versus the second-generation cryoballoon (CB2). Methods and results. This is a single center, retrospective, nonrandomized study of 98 patients with symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF who underwent their first PVI ablation using either the CB2 (n = 40) or CF-RF (n = 58). The mean age was 60 years with 63% men, a mean LA size of 42 mm. The procedure duration (74 ± 17 versus 120 ± 49 minutes p < 0.05) was shorter for CB2 group; the fluoroscopy time (14 ± 17 versus 16 ± 5 minutes, p = 0.45) was similar. Complete PVI was achieved in 96% of patients with RF-CF and 98% with CB2. Phrenic nerve palsies (2 transient and 1 persistent) occurred exclusively in the CB2 group and 1 severe, nonlethal complication (pericardial tamponade) occurred in the CF-RF group. At 24-month follow-up, the success rate, defined as freedom from AF/atrial tachycardia (AT) after a single procedure without antiarrhythmic drug, was comparable in CF-RF group and CB2 group (65.5% versus 67%, resp., log rank p = 0.54). Conclusion. Both the CB2 and the RF-CF ablation appeared safe; the success rate at 2 years was comparable between both technologies. PMID:27314032

  9. Safety and efficacy of dabigatran versus warfarin in patients undergoing catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Providência, Rui; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Combes, Stephane; Bouzeman, Abdeslam; Casteigt, Benjamin; Combes, Nicolas; Narayanan, Kumar; Marijon, Eloi; Boveda, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Dabigatran etexilate, a new thrombin inhibitor, has been shown to be comparable to warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there is a limited body of evidence on the efficacy and safety of using dabigatran among patients undergoing AF catheter ablation. Objective A random effects meta-analysis was performed of controlled trials comparing dabigatran and warfarin in paroxysmal/persistent AF patients undergoing catheter ablation. Methods Data sources included Medline, Embase, and Cochrane (from inception to April 2013). Three independent reviewers selected studies comparing warfarin to dabigatran. Descriptive and quantitative information was extracted from each selected study, regarding periprocedural all cause mortality, thromboembolic events and major bleeding, as well as modalities of periprocedural anticoagulation bridging. Results After a detailed screening of 228 search results, 14 studies were identified enrolling a total of 4782 patients (1823 treated with dabigatran and 2959 with warfarin). No deaths were reported. No significant differences were found between patients treated with dabigatran and warfarin as regards thromboembolic events (0.55% dabigatran vs 0.17% warfarin; risk ratios (RR)=1.78, 95% CI 0.66 to 4.80; p=0.26) and major bleeding (1.48% dabigatran vs 1.35% warfarin; RR=1.07, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.26; p=0.86). No difference was found between the 110 mg twice daily and 150 mg twice daily dabigatran dosages concerning major bleeding (0% vs 1.62%, respectively; RR=0.19, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.18; p=0.25) and thromboembolism (0% vs 0.40%, respectively; RR=0.72, 95% CI 0.04 to 12.98; p=0.82). Conclusions In the specific setting of AF catheter ablation, this first pooled analysis suggests that patients treated with dabigatran have a similar incidence of thromboembolic events and major bleeding compared to warfarin, with low event rates overall. PMID:23878175

  10. Real-time monitoring of cardiac radio-frequency ablation lesion formation using an optical coherence tomography forward-imaging catheter

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Wang, Hui; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (rfa) is the standard of care for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias; however, there are no direct measures of the successful delivery of ablation lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to provide real-time monitoring of cardiac rfa therapy, visualizing lesion formation and assessing tissue contact in the presence of blood. A rfa-compatible forward-imaging conical scanning probe is prototyped to meet this need. The forward-imaging probe provides circular scanning, with a 2-mm scan diameter and 30-μm spot size. During the application of rf energy, dynamics are recorded at 20 frames per second with a 40-kHz A-line rate. Real-time monitoring of cardiac rfa lesion formation and imaging in the presence of blood is demonstrated ex vivo in a swine left ventricle with a forward, flexible, circular scanning OCT catheter. PMID:20614999

  11. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: results from the first European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) Part II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos; Hocini, Melece; Fauchier, Laurent; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Defaye, Pascal; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Estner, Heidi; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-11-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey collecting patient-based data on current clinical practices during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. The participating centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (from September to October 2014). A web-based case report form was employed to collect information of patients and data of procedures. A total of 455 eligible consecutive patients from 13 countries were enrolled (mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 28.8% women). Distinct strategies and endpoints were collected for AF ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) was performed in 96.7% and served as the endpoint in 91.3% of procedures. A total of 52 (11.5%) patients underwent ablation as first-line therapy. The cryoballoon technique was employed in 31.4% of procedures. Procedure, ablation, and fluoroscopy times differed among various types of AF ablation. Divergences in patient selection and complications were observed among low-, medium-, and high-volume centres. Adverse events were observed in 4.6% of AF ablation procedures. In conclusion, PVI was still the main strategy for AF ablation. Procedure-related complications seemed not to have declined. The centre volume played an important role in patient selection, strategy choice, and had impact on the rate of periprocedural complication. PMID:26462700

  12. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  13. Advances in Radiofrequency Ablation of the Cerebral Cortex in Primates Using the Venous System: Improvements for Treating Epilepsy with Catheter Ablation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Benhur D.; Friedman, Paul A.; Bruce, Charles J.; Holmes, David R.; Bower, Mark; Madhavan, Malini; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Wahnschaffe, Douglas; Berhow, Steven; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Johnson, Susan B.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Kara, Tomas; Worrell, Gregory A.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacology frequently fails for the treatment of epilepsy. Although surgical techniques are effective, these procedures are highly invasive. We describe feasibility and efficacy of minimally invasive mapping and ablation for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods Mapping and radiofrequency ablations were performed via the venous system in eleven baboons and three dogs. Results Mapping in deep cerebral areas was obtained in all animals. High-frequency pacing was able to induce seizure activity of local cerebral tissue in 72% of our attempts. Cerebral activity could be seen during mapping. Ablative lesions were deployed at deep brain sites without steam pops or sudden impedance rise. Histologic analysis showed necrosis at the sites of ablation in all primates. Conclusion Navigation through the cerebral venous system to map seizure activity is feasible. Radiofrequency energy can be delivered transvenously or transcortically to successful ablate cortical tissue in this animal model using this innovative approach. PMID:24836846

  14. The Effect of Catheter Ablation on Left Atrial Size and Function for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Bin; Li, Dan; Wang, Jianling; Gyawali, Laxman; Jing, Jinjin; Su, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) is now an important therapeutic modality for patients with AF. However, data regarding changes in left atrial (LA) function after CA have indicated conflicting results depending on the AF types, follow-up period, and the analytical imaging tools. The objective of this review was to analyze the effect of CA on the LA size and function for patients with AF. Methods We searched for studies regarding LA size and function pre- and post-ablation in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge through May 2014. LA function was measured by LA ejective fraction (LAEF), LA active ejective fraction (LAAEF), or both. Total and subgroup analyses were implemented using Cochrane Review Manager Version 5.2. Weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were used to express the results of continuous outcomes using fixed or random effect models. I2 was used to calculate heterogeneity. To assess publication bias, Egger’s test and Begg’s funnel plot were performed using Stata 12.0. Results Twenty-five studies (2040 enrolled patients) were selected for this meta-analysis. The LA diameter (LAD), maximum LA volume, and minimal LA volume were significantly decreased post-ablation, as compared with those at a pre-ablation visit. Compared with the pre-ablation outcomes, we found no significant differences in LAEF/LAAEF at a post-ablation follow-up. Decreases in LA volume and LAEF remained significant post-ablation for paroxysmal AF (PAF); however, the LAEF was insignificant changes in persistent AF (PeAF). Heterogeneity was significant in spite which individual study was excluded. A publication bias was not found. In a meta-regression analysis, we did not find any factor that contributed to the heterogeneity. Conclusion With CA, LA volumes and LAD were decreased significantly in patients with AF; LAEF was not significant changes in patients with PeAF but decreased in those with PAF. PMID:26147984

  15. Effectiveness of impedance monitoring during radiofrequency ablation for predicting popping

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Hiroya; Aihara, Tsukasa; Ikuta, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of impedance monitoring for predicting popping during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using internally cooled electrodes. METHODS: We reviewed 140 patients (94 males, 46 females; age range 73.0 ± 11.1 year) who underwent RFA between February 2006 and November 2008 with a modified protocol using a limited power delivery rather than a conventional one to avoid popping. All the patients provided their written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board. Intraprocedural impedances were measured for the study subjects, and the tumors were classified into three types according to the characteristics of their impedance curves: increasing, flat, or decreasing. The tumors were further sorted into seven subtypes (A-G) depending on the curvature of the impedance curve’s increase or decrease. Relative popping rates were determined for the three types and seven subtypes. A chi-square test was performed to estimate statistical significance. RESULTS: A total of 148 nodules treated by RFA were analyzed. The study samples included 132 nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma, 14 nodules of metastatic liver cancer, and two nodules of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The numbers of nodules with each impedance curve type were as follows: 37 increasing-type nodules, 43 flat-type nodules, and 68 decreasing-type nodules. Popping occurrence rates were 24.3%, 46.5% and 64.7%, respectively. Flat-type nodules exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to increasing-type nodules (P = 0.039). Decreasing-type nodules exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to increasing-type nodules (P < 0.0001). Notably, nodules that showed a sharp decrease in impedance in the latter ablation period (subtype E) exhibited a significantly higher rate of popping compared to other subtypes. CONCLUSION: Intraprocedural impedance monitoring can be a useful tool to predict the occurrence of popping

  16. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  17. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  18. Can bedside patient-reported numbness predict postoperative ambulation ability for total knee arthroplasty patients with nerve block catheters?

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Ganaway, Toni; Kim, T. Edward; Howard, Steven K.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Shum, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Background Adductor canal catheters offer advantages over femoral nerve catheters for knee replacement patients because they produce less quadriceps muscle weakness; however, applying adductor canal catheters in bedside clinical practice remains challenging. There is currently no patient-reported outcome that accurately predicts patients' physical function after knee replacement. The present study evaluates the validity of a relatively new patient-reported outcome, i.e., a numbness score obtained using a numeric rating scale, and assesses its predictive value on postoperative ambulation. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study pooling data from two previously-published clinical trials using identical research methodologies. Both studies recruited patients undergoing knee replacement; one studied adductor canal catheters while the other studied femoral nerve catheters. Our primary outcome was patient-reported numbness scores on postoperative day 1. We also examined postoperative day 1 ambulation distance and its association with postoperative numbness using linear regression, adjusting for age, body mass index, and physical status. Results Data from 94 subjects were included (femoral subjects, n = 46; adductor canal subjects, n = 48). Adductor canal patients reported decreased numbness (median [10th–90th percentiles]) compared to femoral patients (0 [0–5] vs. 4 [0–10], P = 0.001). Adductor canal patients also ambulated seven times further on postoperative day 1 relative to femoral patients. There was a significant association between postoperative day 1 total ambulation distance and numbness (Beta = –2.6; 95% CI: –4.5, –0.8, P = 0.01) with R2 = 0.1. Conclusions Adductor canal catheters facilitate improved early ambulation and produce less patient-reported numbness after knee replacement, but the correlation between these two variables is weak. PMID:26885299

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults: Novel Drugs and Catheter Ablation Techniques Show Promise? Systematic Review on Pharmacotherapy and Interventional Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Carlo; Greco, Cesare; Keylani, Abdul M.; D'Agostino, Darrin C.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide an update on pharmacological and interventional strategies for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adults. Currently US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs including prostanoids, endothelin-receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and soluble guanylate-cyclase stimulators. These agents have transformed the prognosis for pulmonary arterial hypertension patients from symptomatic improvements in exercise tolerance ten years ago to delayed disease progression today. On the other hand, percutaneous balloon atrioseptostomy by using radiofrequency perforation, cutting balloon dilatation, or insertion of butterfly stents and pulmonary artery catheter-based denervation, both associated with very low rate of major complications and death, should be considered in combination with specific drugs at an earlier stage rather than late in the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension and before the occurrence of overt right-sided heart failure. PMID:25013799

  20. Plasma microRNAs are associated with atrial fibrillation and change after catheter-ablation (the miRhythm Study)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Lin, Honghuang; Esa, Nada; Kinno, Menhel; Mandapati, Divakar; Tam, Stanley; Okike, Okike N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Keaney, John F.; Donahue, J, Kevin; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), control gene expression, and are detectable in the circulation. Objective To test the hypothesis that circulating miRNAs would be associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods Using a prospective study design powered to detect subtle differences in miRNAs, we quantified plasma expression of 86 miRNAs by high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in 112 participants with AF and 99 without AF. To examine parallels between cardiac and plasma miRNA profiles, we quantified atrial tissue and plasma miRNA expression using qRT-PCR in 31 participants undergoing surgery. We also explored the hypothesis that lower AF burden after ablation would be reflected in the circulating blood pool by examining change in plasma miRNAs after AF ablation (n=47). Results The mean age of the cohort was 59 years. 58% of participants were men. Plasma miRs-21 and 150 were 2-fold lower in participants with AF than in those without AF after adjustment (p ≤ 0.0006). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 were also lower in participants with paroxysmal AF than in those with persistent AF (p <0.05). Expression of miR-21, but not miR-150, was lower in atrial tissue from patients with AF compared to no AF (p<0.05). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 increased 3-fold after AF ablation (p ≤ 0.0006). Conclusions Cardiac miRs-21 and 150 are known to regulate genes implicated in atrial remodeling. Our findings show associations between plasma miRs-21 and 150 and AF, suggesting that circulating miRNAs provide insights into cardiac gene regulation. PMID:25257092

  1. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  2. Characterization of Pulmonary Vein Dimensions Using High-Definition 64-Slice Computed Tomography prior to Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Stähli, Barbara E.; Klaeser, Bernd; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Ghadri, Jelena R.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Duru, Firat

    2014-01-01

    Background. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is commonly acquired before radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation (AFib) to guide the procedure. We analyzed pulmonary vein (PV) ostial diameter and volumes on a high-definition 64-slice CT (HDCT) scanner in patients with AFib prior to RFCA. Methods and Results. This retrospective study included 50 patients (mean age 60.2 ± 11.4 years, 30 males) undergoing cardiac HDCT scanning before RFCA for drug refractory AFib and 50 age-, BMI-, and sex-matched controls with normal sinus rhythm undergoing HDCT. PV ostial diameter and volume were measured and calculated using a semiautomatic calliper tool. Total ostial PV volume was significantly increased in patients with AFib as compared to controls (P < 0.005). Similarly, total ostial PV diameter was significantly increased in AFib compared to controls (P < 0.001). In AFib, the largest PV volume and diameters were measured in right superior PV (P < 0.05 versus controls). The difference in PV volume between patients and controls was most pronounced in right superior PVs (P = 0.015). Right middle PVs were found more often in patients with AFib (16/50; 32%) than in normal subjects (7/50; 14%). Conclusion. Enlargement of PV ostial area and enlargement of volume are frequent findings in patients with drug refractory AFib. These parameters may add to the risk stratification for AFib recurrence following RFCA. PMID:25089213

  3. Anatomical Evaluation of the Pulmonary Veins and the Left Atrium Using Computed Tomography Before Catheter Ablation: Reproducibility of Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Przemysław; Sławińska, Agata; Martynowska-Rymer, Ida; Strześniewski, Piotr; Rusak, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common supraventricular arrhythmia. ECG-gated MDCT seems to be currently a method of choice for pre-ablation anatomical mapping due to an excellent resolution and truly isotropic three-dimensional nature. The aim of this study was to establish the between-subject variability and inter-observer reproducibility of anatomical evaluation of the pulmonary veins (PV) and the left atrium (LA) using computed tomography. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis included 42 patients with AF, who were scheduled for a cardiac CT for ablation planning. Images were assessed by two independent radiologists using a semi-automatic software tool. The left atrium anatomy (volume, AP diameter), anatomy of the pulmonary veins (number, ostia diameters and surface area) were evaluated. The relative between-subject variability and the inter-observer variability of measurements were calculated. Results The heart rate during scanning ranged from 50 to 133/min. (mean 79.1/min.) and all examinations were of adequate image quality. Accessory pulmonary veins were found in 24% of patients. Between-subject variability of the PV ostial cross-sectional area ranged from 33% to 48%. The variability of the left atrium size was 21% for the diameter and 35% for the volume. The inter-observer agreement for the detection of accessory pulmonary veins was good (κ=0.73; 95% CI, 0.54–0.93). Conclusions Between-subject variability of the pulmonary vein ostial cross-sectional area and the left artial volume is substantial. The anatomical assessment of the pulmonary vein ostia and the left atrium size in computed tomography presents a good inter-observer reproducibility. PMID:27231495

  4. Comparison of Ablation Predictions for Carbonaceous Materials Using CEA and JANAF-Based Species Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    In most previous work at NASA Ames Research Center, ablation predictions for carbonaceous materials were obtained using a species thermodynamics database developed by Aerotherm Corporation. This database is derived mostly from the JANAF thermochemical tables. However, the CEA thermodynamics database, also used by NASA, is considered more up to date. In this work, the FIAT code was modified to use CEA-based curve fits for species thermodynamics, then analyses using both the JANAF and CEA thermodynamics were performed for carbon and carbon phenolic materials over a range of test conditions. The ablation predictions are comparable at lower heat fluxes where the dominant mechanism is carbon oxidation. However, the predictions begin to diverge in the sublimation regime, with the CEA model predicting lower recession. The disagreement is more significant for carbon phenolic than for carbon, and this difference is attributed to hydrocarbon species that may contribute to the ablation rate.

  5. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  6. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  7. A theoretical model to predict tensile deformation behavior of balloon catheter.

    PubMed

    Todo, Mitsugu; Yoshiya, Keiji; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    In this technical note, a simple theoretical model was proposed to express the tensile deformation and fracture of balloon catheter tested by the ISO standard using piece-wise linear force-displacement relations. The model was then validated by comparing with the tensile force-displacement behaviors of two types of typical balloon catheters clinically used worldwide. It was shown that the proposed model can effectively be used to express the tensile deformation behavior and easily be handled by physicians who are not familiar with mechanics of materials. PMID:27214691

  8. Efficacy of Short-Term Antiarrhythmic Drugs Use after Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation—A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses and Trial Sequential Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zhiyu; Xu, Yanping; Fan, Jinqi; Du, Huaan; Xiao, Peilin; Su, Li; Liu, Zengzhang; Lan, Xianbin; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of short-term antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) use compared with no-AADs prescription after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) in preventing atrial arrhythmia recurrence is uncertain. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library through December 2015 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which evaluated the efficacy of short-term AADs use compared with no-AADs prescription after AF ablation in preventing atrial arrhythmia recurrence. The primary outcome was labeled as early atrial arrhythmia recurrence within 3 months after ablation. Secondary outcome was defined as late recurrence after 3 months of ablation. Random-effects model or fixed-effects model was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Six RCTs with 2,667 patients were included into this meta-analysis. Compared with no-AADs administration after AF ablation, short-term AADs use was associated with significant reduction of early atrial arrhythmia recurrence (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.52–0.87; p = 0.003). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) showed that the cumulative Z-curve crossed the trial sequential monitoring boundary for benefit, establishing sufficient and conclusive evidence. However, compared with no-AADs prescription, short-term AADs use after AF ablation didn’t significantly reduce the risk of late atrial arrhythmia recurrence (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83–1.03; p = 0.15). TSA supported this result; meanwhile the estimated required information size (1,486 patients) was also met. Conclusion Short-term use of AADs after AF ablation can significantly decrease the risk of early atrial arrhythmia recurrence but not lead to corresponding reduction in risk of late atrial arrhythmia recurrence. PMID:27224469

  9. Novel P Wave Indices to Predict Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Jingzhou; Ma, Yuedong; Tang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) is a widely used treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Several P wave duration (PWD) parameters have been suggested to predict post-ablation recurrence, but their use remains controversial. This study aimed to identify novel P wave indices that predict post-ablation AF recurrence. MATERIAL AND METHODS We selected 171 consecutive patients undergoing CPVI for paroxysmal AF. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were obtained at the beginning and the end of ablation. PWD was measured in all 12 leads. The PWD variation was calculated by subtracting the pre-ablation PWD from the post-ablation PWD. RESULTS PWD was significantly shortened in leads II, III, aVF, and V1 after ablation. During a mean follow-up of 19.96±4.32 months, AF recurrence occurred in 32 (18.7%) patients. No significant differences in baseline characteristics or pre- or post-ablation PWD were observed between the AF recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Patients with AF recurrence exhibited a smaller PWD variation in leads II (1.21(-0.56, 2.40) vs. -5.77(-9.10, -4.06) ms, P<0.001), III (-5.92(-9.87, 3.27) vs. -9.44(-11.89, -5.57) ms, P=0.001) and V1 (-4.43(-6.64, -3.13) vs. -6.33(-8.19,-4.59) ms, P=0.003). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that smaller PWD variations in lead II and III were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. PWD variation ≥-2.21 ms in lead II displayed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (85.29% and 83.94%, respectively) for predicting post-ablation AF recurrence. A PWD variation ≥0 ms displayed the best practical value in predicting AF recurrence. CONCLUSIONS PWD variation in lead II is an effective predictor of post-ablation AF recurrence. PMID:27450644

  10. Novel P Wave Indices to Predict Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Jingzhou; Ma, Yuedong; Tang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) is a widely used treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Several P wave duration (PWD) parameters have been suggested to predict post-ablation recurrence, but their use remains controversial. This study aimed to identify novel P wave indices that predict post-ablation AF recurrence. Material/Methods We selected 171 consecutive patients undergoing CPVI for paroxysmal AF. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were obtained at the beginning and the end of ablation. PWD was measured in all 12 leads. The PWD variation was calculated by subtracting the pre-ablation PWD from the post-ablation PWD. Results PWD was significantly shortened in leads II, III, aVF, and V1 after ablation. During a mean follow-up of 19.96±4.32 months, AF recurrence occurred in 32 (18.7%) patients. No significant differences in baseline characteristics or pre- or post-ablation PWD were observed between the AF recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Patients with AF recurrence exhibited a smaller PWD variation in leads II (1.21(−0.56, 2.40) vs. −5.77(−9.10, −4.06) ms, P<0.001), III (−5.92(−9.87, 3.27) vs. −9.44(−11.89, −5.57) ms, P=0.001) and V1 (−4.43(−6.64, −3.13) vs. −6.33(−8.19,−4.59) ms, P=0.003). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that smaller PWD variations in lead II and III were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. PWD variation ≥−2.21 ms in lead II displayed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (85.29% and 83.94%, respectively) for predicting post-ablation AF recurrence. A PWD variation ≥0 ms displayed the best practical value in predicting AF recurrence. Conclusions PWD variation in lead II is an effective predictor of post-ablation AF recurrence. PMID:27450644

  11. Pulmonary vein isolation using new technologies to improve ablation lesion formation: Initial results comparing enhanced catheter tip irrigation (Surround Flow®) with contact force measurement (Smarttouch®)

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Stephanie; Reents, Tilko; Ammar, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Kathan, Susanne; Dillier, Roger; Buiatti, Alexandra; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vein reconnection after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a significant problem in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We report about patients who underwent contact force (CF) guided PVI using CF catheter and compared them to patients with PVI using an ablation catheter with enhanced tip irrigation. Methods A total of 59 patients were included in the analysis. In 30 patients circumferential PVI was performed using the Thermocool Smarttouch® ablation catheter (ST) whereas in 29 patients circumferential PVI using the Thermocool Surround Flow SF® ablation catheter (SF) was performed. Patients were compared in regard to procedure time, fluoroscopy time/dose as well as RF-application duration and completeness of PVI. Adverse events (pericardial effusion, PV stenosis, stroke, death) were evaluated. The presence of sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication was assessed during 6 months follow-up using multiple 7 day Holter-ECGs. Results In both groups, all PVs were isolated without serious adverse events. Procedure time was 2.15 ± 0.5 h (ST) vs. 2.37 ± 1.13 h (SF) (p = 0.19). Duration of RF-applications was 46.6 ± 18 min (ST) and 49.8 ± 19 min (SF) (p = 0.52). Fluoroscopy time was 25.2 ± 13 min (ST) vs. 29 ± 18 min (SF), fluoroscopy dose 2675.6 ± 1658 versus 3038.3 ± 1997 cGym2 (p = 0.36 and 0.46 respectively). Sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication validated with 7 day Holter ECGs was present in both groups in 72% of patients after 6 months of follow up. Conclusion PVI using the new contact force catheter is safe and effective in patients with paroxysmal AF. PMID:26937108

  12. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  13. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessory pathway, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Ventricular tachycardia ... consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: ... for personnel, policy, procedures and follow-up. ...

  14. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. Two arteries and one vein in the umbilical cord carry blood back and forth. If the ... catheter is a long, soft, hollow tube. An umbilical artery catheter (UAC) allows blood to be taken ...

  15. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    MedlinePlus

    ... like to see the Circulation web site. Your Personal Message Send Message ... Scholar Cited By... Cardiac tachyarrhythmias and patient values and preferences for their management: the European Heart ...

  16. Optothermal profile of an ablation catheter with integrated microcoil for MR-thermometry during Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies of the liver—An in-vitro experimental and theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Kardoulaki, Evdokia M.; Syms, Richard R. A.; Young, Ian R.; Choonee, Kaushal; Rea, Marc; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Flexible microcoils integrated with ablation catheters can improve the temperature accuracy during local MR-thermometry in Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies. Here, the authors are concerned with obtaining a preliminary confirmation of the clinical utility of the modified catheter. They investigate whether the thin-film substrate and copper tracks of the printed coil inductor affect the symmetry of the thermal profile, and hence of the lesion produced. Methods: Transmission spectroscopy in the near infrared was performed to test for the attenuation at 1064 nm through the 25 μm thick Kapton substrate of the microcoil. The radial transmission profile of an infrared high-power, light emitting diode with >80% normalized power at 1064 nm was measured through a cross section of the modified applicator to assess the impact of the copper inductor on the optical profile. The measurements were performed in air, as well as with the applicator surrounded by two types of scattering media; crystals of NaCl and a layer of liver-mimicking gel phantom. A numerical model based on Huygens–Fresnel principle and finite element simulations, using a commercially available package (COMSOL Multiphysics), were employed to compare with the optical measurements. The impact of the modified optical profile on the thermal symmetry was assessed by examining the high resolution microcoil derived thermal maps from a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a liver-mimicking gel phantom. Results: Less than 30% attenuation through the Kapton film was verified. Shadowing behind the copper tracks was observed in air and the measured radial irradiation correlated well with the diffraction pattern calculated numerically using the Huygens–Fresnel principle. Both optical experiments and simulations, demonstrate that shadowing is mitigated by the scattering properties of a turbid medium. The microcoil derived thermal maps at the end of a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a gel phantom in a

  17. Prediction of Ablation Rates from Solid Surfaces Exposed to High Temperature Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuzlu, Kazim M.; Coote, David

    2013-01-01

    ablation. Two different ablation models are proposed to determine the heat loss from the solid surface due to the ablation of the solid material. Both of them are physics based. Various numerical simulations were carried out using both models to predict the temperature distribution in the solid and in the gas flow, and then predict the ablation rates at a typical NTR motor hydrogen gas temperature and pressure. Solid mass loss rate per foot of a pipe was also calculated from these predictions. The results are presented for fully developed turbulent flow conditions in a sample SS pipe with a 6 inch diameter.

  18. Prediction of early-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after successful trans-catheter device closure of atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Min; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Chun, Kwang Jin; Park, Seung-Jung; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Kang, I-Seok; Song, Jinyoung; Huh, June

    2016-08-01

    Atrial tachyarrhythmia is a well-known long-term complication of atrial septal defect (ASD) in adults, even after successful trans-catheter closure. However, the risk factors for early-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after trans-catheter closure remain unclear. This retrospective study enrolled adults with secundum ASD undergoing trans-catheter closure from January 2000 to March 2014. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients and assessed risk factors for new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia defined as a composite of atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF/AFL) after ASD closure. We enrolled a total of 427 patients; 123 were male (28.8%) and the median age was 37.0 (interquartile range [IQR]: 18.3-49.0). Nineteen (4.4%) patients had documented atrial tachyarrhythmia during the follow-up period (median: 11.4 months [IQR: 5.4-24]). Patients with transient AF/AFL during closure showed a greater incidence of new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia during the follow-up period than patients with consistent sinus rhythm during closure (27.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.01). Most new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmias were documented within 6 months (median: 2.6 [IQR: 1.2-4.1] months) of closure. In the multivariate analysis, the risk for new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia was significant in patients with AF/AFL during closure (hazard ratio [HR]: 9.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.86-34.20; P < 0.001), deficient posteroinferior rim (HR: 5.48, 95% CI: 1.15-25.72; P = 0.04), and age of closure over 48 years (HR: 3.30, 95% CI: 1.30-8.38; P = 0.01). In conclusion, transient AF/AFL during trans-catheter closure of ASD as well as deficient posteroinferior rim and age of closure over 48 years may be useful for predicting early new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after device closure. PMID:27583905

  19. Prediction of early-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after successful trans-catheter device closure of atrial septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Min; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Chun, Kwang Jin; Park, Seung-Jung; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Kang, I-Seok; Song, Jinyoung; Huh, June

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atrial tachyarrhythmia is a well-known long-term complication of atrial septal defect (ASD) in adults, even after successful trans-catheter closure. However, the risk factors for early-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after trans-catheter closure remain unclear. This retrospective study enrolled adults with secundum ASD undergoing trans-catheter closure from January 2000 to March 2014. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients and assessed risk factors for new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia defined as a composite of atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF/AFL) after ASD closure. We enrolled a total of 427 patients; 123 were male (28.8%) and the median age was 37.0 (interquartile range [IQR]: 18.3–49.0). Nineteen (4.4%) patients had documented atrial tachyarrhythmia during the follow-up period (median: 11.4 months [IQR: 5.4–24]). Patients with transient AF/AFL during closure showed a greater incidence of new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia during the follow-up period than patients with consistent sinus rhythm during closure (27.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.01). Most new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmias were documented within 6 months (median: 2.6 [IQR: 1.2–4.1] months) of closure. In the multivariate analysis, the risk for new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia was significant in patients with AF/AFL during closure (hazard ratio [HR]: 9.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.86–34.20; P < 0.001), deficient posteroinferior rim (HR: 5.48, 95% CI: 1.15–25.72; P = 0.04), and age of closure over 48 years (HR: 3.30, 95% CI: 1.30–8.38; P = 0.01). In conclusion, transient AF/AFL during trans-catheter closure of ASD as well as deficient posteroinferior rim and age of closure over 48 years may be useful for predicting early new-onset atrial tachyarrhythmia after device closure. PMID:27583905

  20. Larger low voltage zone in endocardial unipolar map compared with that in epicardial bipolar map indicates difficulty in eliminating ventricular tachycardia by catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Noda, Takashi; Satomi, Kazuhiro; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Okamura, Hideo; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Shimizu, Wataru; Aiba, Takeshi; Kamakura, Shiro; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy often have substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the endocardium (ENDO), epicardium (EPI), and/or intramural. Although it has been reported that the ENDO unipolar (UNI) voltage map is useful in detecting EPI substrate, its feasibility to detect intramural scarring and its usefulness in radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) remain unclear. To assess the relationship between the left ventricle (LV) ENDO UNI voltage map and the LV EPI bipolar (BIP) voltage map, and to determine the usefulness of the ENDO UNI voltage map to guide RFCA for VT in patients with cardiomyopathy undergoing combined ENDO- and EPI RFCA. Eleven patients with VT undergoing detailed ENDO and EPI electroanatomical mapping of the LV were included (mean age 59 ± 11 years, 9 men). We assessed the value of the LV ENDO UNI voltage map in identifying EPI and/or intramural substrate in these 11 patients with non-ischemic or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The underlying heart disease was dilated cardiomyopathy in 4 patients, cardiac sarcoidosis in 3, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2, and ischemic heart disease in 2 patients. The mean LV ejection fraction was 24 ± 7 %. The low voltage zone (LVZ) was defined as <1.5 mV for LV ENDO BIP electrograms (EGMs), <8.3 mV for LV ENDO UNI EGMs, and <1.0 mV for LV EPI BIP EGMs. The surface area of each LVZ was measured. We also measured the LVZ of the spatial overlap between ENDO UNI and EPI BIP voltage maps using the transparency mode on CARTO software. We performed RFCA at the ENDO and EPI based on activation and/or substrate maps, targeting the LVZ and/or abnormal EGMs. The LVZ was present in the LV ENDO BIP voltage map in 10 of 11 patients (42 ± 33 cm(2)), and in the LV ENDO UNI voltage map in 10 of 11 patients (72 ± 45 cm(2)). The LVZ was present in the EPI BIP voltage map in 9 of 11 patients (70 ± 61 cm(2)), and the LVZ in the ENDO UNI voltage map was also seen in all 9 patients

  1. A novel parameter for predicting arterial fusion and ablation in finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankell, Douglas; Kramer, Eric; Taylor, Kenneth; Ferguson, Virginia; Rentschler, Mark E.

    2015-03-01

    Tissue fusion devices apply heat and pressure to ligate or ablate blood vessels during surgery. Although this process is widely used, a predictive finite element (FE) model incorporating both structural mechanics and heat transfer has not been developed, limiting improvements to empirical evidence. This work presents the development of a novel damage parameter, which incorporates stress, water content and temperature, and demonstrates its application in a FE model. A FE model, using the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden strain energy function to represent the structural mechanics and equations developed by Cezo to model water content and heat transfer, was created to simulate the fusion or ablation of a porcine splenic artery. Using state variables, the stresses, temperature and water content are recorded and combined to create a single parameter at each integration point. The parameter is then compared to a critical value (determined through experiments). If the critical value is reached, the element loses all strength. If the value is not reached, no change occurs. Little experimental data exists for validation, but the resulting stresses, temperatures and water content fall within ranges predicted by prior work. Due to the lack of published data, additional experimental studies are being conducted to rigorously validate and accurately determine the critical value. Ultimately, a novel method for demonstrating tissue damage and fusion in a FE model is presented, providing the first step towards in-depth FE models simulating fusion and ablation of arteries.

  2. Differences between real and predicted corneal shapes after aspherical corneal ablation.

    PubMed

    Anera, Rosario G; Villa, César; Jiménez, José R; Gutiérrez, Ramón; del Barco, Luis Jiménez

    2005-07-20

    We study the differences between real and expected corneal shapes, using an aspherical ablation algorithm with a known equation and avoiding the limitation imposed by most studies of refractive surgery in which the ablation equations are not known. We have calculated the theoretical corneal shape predicted by this algorithm, comparing this shape with the real corneal topography. The results indicate that the deviations that appear in the corneal shape are significant for visual performance and for the correction of eye aberrations. If we include in this analysis the effect of reflection losses and nonnormal incidence on the cornea, we can reduce corneal differences, but they will remain significant. These results confirm that it is essential to minimize corneal differences to achieve effective correction in refractive surgery. PMID:16047903

  3. Predictable surface ablation of dielectrics with few-cycle laser pulse even beyond air ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, C.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.; Sanner, N.

    2016-08-01

    We study surface ablation of dielectrics with single-shot few-cycle optical pulse (˜10 fs) in air, at intensities below and above the onset of air ionization. We perform 3D analysis and careful calibration of the fluence distribution at the laser focus, spanning from linear- to nonlinear- focusing regimes, enabling to thoroughly characterize the severe limitation of the fluence delivered onto the sample surface upon increase of incident pulse energy. Despite significant beam reshaping taking place at high fluence, we demonstrate that it is nevertheless possible to confidently predict the resulting crater profiles on fused silica surface, even in the regime of filamentation.

  4. Arrhythmia Termination Versus Elimination of Dormant Pulmonary Vein Conduction as a Procedural End Point of Catheter Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Cathrin; Konrad, Torsten; Mollnau, Hanke; Sonnenschein, Sebastian; Kämpfner, Denise; Potstawa, Maik; Ocete, Blanca Quesada; Bock, Karsten; Himmrich, Ewald; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is still associated with a substantial number of arrhythmia recurrences in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). This prospective, randomized study aimed to compare 2 different procedural strategies. Methods and Results— A total of 152 patients undergoing de novo ablation for paroxysmal AF were randomized to 2 different treatment arms. The procedure in group A consisted of PVI exclusively. In this group, all isolated PVs were challenged with adenosine to reveal and ablate dormant conduction. In group B, PVI was performed with the patient either in spontaneous or in induced AF. If AF did not terminate with PVI, ablation was continued by targeting extra-PV AF sources with the desired procedural end point of termination to sinus rhythm. Primary study end point was freedom from arrhythmia during 1-year follow-up. In group A, adenosine provoked dormant conduction in 31 (41%) patients with a mean of 1.6±0.8 transiently recovered PVs per patient. Termination of AF during PVI was observed in 31 (65%) patients, whereas AF persisted afterward in 17 (35%) patients. AF termination occurred in 13 (76%) patients by AF source ablation. After 1-year follow-up, significantly more group B patients were free of arrhythmia recurrences (87 versus 68%; P=0.006). During redo ablation, the rate of PV reconduction did not differ between both groups (group A: 55% versus group B: 61%; P=0.25). Conclusions— Elimination of extra-PV AF sources after PVI is superior to sole PV isolation with the adjunct of abolishing potential dormant conduction. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02238392. PMID:26297786

  5. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you use a catheter if you have: Urinary incontinence (leaking urine or being unable to control when ... Surgery Bladder Diseases Spinal Cord Injuries Urethral Disorders Urinary Incontinence Urine and Urination Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  7. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  8. DISPARATE EVOLUTION OF RIGHT AND LEFT ATRIAL RATE DURING ABLATION OF LONG-LASTING PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    PubMed Central

    Hocini, Mélèze; Nault, Isabelle; Wright, Matthew; Veenhuyzen, George; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Jaïs, Pierre; Lim, Kang-Teng; Knecht, Sébastien; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Forclaz, Andrei; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Jadidi, Amir; O’Neill, Mark D.; Sacher, Frédéric; Clémenty, Jacques; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether additional ablation in the right atrium(RA) improves termination rate in long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation(PsAF). Background Prolongation of atrial fibrillation(AF) cycle length(CL) measured from the left atrial appendage predicts favorable outcome during catheter ablation of PsAF. However, in some patients despite prolongation of AFCL in the left atrium(LA) with ablation, AF persists. We hypothesized that this is due to RA drivers and these patients may benefit from RA ablation. Methods 148 consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation of PsAF(duration 25±32 months) were studied. AFCL was monitored in both atria during stepwise ablation commencing in the LA. Ablation was performed in the RA when all LA sources in AF had been ablated and a RA-LA gradient existed. The procedural endpoint was AF termination. Results Two distinct patterns of AFCL change emerged during LA ablation. In 104patients(70%), there was parallel increase of AFCL in LA and RA culminating in AF termination (baseline: LA 153ms[140,170], RA 155ms[143,171]; after ablation: LA 181ms[170,200], RA 186ms[175,202]). In 24 patients(19%), RA AFCL did not prolong, creating a right-to-left frequency gradient, (baseline: LA 142ms[143,153], RA 145 ms[139,162]; after ablation: LA 177 ms[165–185], RA 152ms[147,175]). These patients had a longer AF history (23versus12 months, p=0.001), and larger RA diameter (42versus39mm, p=0.005) and RA ablation terminated AF in 55%. In the remaining 20 patients, biatrial ablation failed to terminate AF. Conclusions A divergent pattern of AFCL prolongation after LA ablation resulting in a right-to-left gradient demonstrating that the right atrium is driving AF in about 20 % of PsAF. PMID:20202517

  9. Is dabigatran efficacy enough to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation patient with high CHADS2 score during peri-procedural catheter radiofrequency ablation? A case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiang-Min; Chen, Fu-Kun; Liang, Zhuo; Li, Jian; Lin, Kun; Guo, Jian-Ping; Shan, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major cause of thromboembolic (TE) events including stroke and transient ischemic attacks, catheter radiofrequency ablation (CA) has been demonstrated to effectively eliminate AF in majority of patients. During the peri-procedural CA of AF, dabigatran, a reversible direct thrombin inhibitor, has been proved as safe and efficacy as warfarin in the prevention of thromboembolic complication. However, for patients with CHADS2 score ≥3, sometimes dabigatran may not be an ideal substitute of warfarin. The current study presents delayed stroke occurred in a middle-aged AF patient with high CHADS2 score who had undergone successful CA of AF being on dabigatran, trans esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) detected a clot in the left atrium appendage (LAA) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) indicated stroke of left basal ganglia, therefore anticoagulant was switched to warfarin with well controlled international normalization ratio (INR) ranging from 2.0-3.0 and the patient eventually recovered without any TE events during the subsequent follow-up. PMID:26131290

  10. Advances in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Darge, Alicia; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Germano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common and costly medical problem.1–3 Given the disappointing efficacy and side effects associated with pharmacological therapy for AF, new treatment options are needed. Over the last decade, advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, coupled with iterative improvements in catheter ablation techniques, have spurred the evolution of catheter ablation for AF from an experimental procedure to an increasingly important treatment option.4 This paper will review recent advances in the approaches and outcomes of AF ablation. PMID:19411729

  11. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  12. Predictive value of various Doppler-derived parameters of atrial conduction time for successful atrial fibrillation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Valtuille, Lucas; Choy, Jonathan B; Becher, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Various Doppler-derived parameters of left atrial electrical remodeling have been demonstrated to predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after AF ablation. The aim of this study was to compare three Doppler-derived measures of atrial conduction time in patients undergoing AF ablation, and to investigate their predictive value for successful procedure. In 32 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing the first AF ablation, atrial conduction time was estimated by measuring the time delay between the onset of P-wave on the surface ECG to the peak of the a′-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging of the left atrial lateral wall, and to the peak of the A-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler of the mitral inflow. There was a significant difference in the baseline atrial conduction time measured by different echocardiographic techniques. Most (88%) patients had normal or only mildly dilated left atrium. At 6 months, 12 patients (38%) had recurrent AF/atrial tachycardia. The duration of history of AF was the only predictor of AF/atrial tachycardia recurrence following the first AF ablation (P=0.024; OR 1.023, CI 1.003–1.044). A combination of normal left atrial volume and history of paroxysmal AF of ≤48 months was associated with the best outcome. Predictive value of the Doppler derived parameters of atrial conduction time may be reduced in the early stages of left atrial remodeling. Future studies may determine which echocardiographic parameter correlates best with the extent of left atrial remodeling and is most predictive of successful AF ablation. PMID:26795694

  13. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  14. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  15. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  16. Intrinsic Cardiac Autonomic Ganglionated Plexi within Epicardial Fats Modulate the Atrial Substrate Remodeling: Experiences with Atrial Fibrillation Patients Receiving Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rahul; Lo, Li-Wei; Lin, Yenn-Jiang Lin; Chang, Shih-Lin; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Chiou, Cheun-Wang; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background A recent study reported the close relationship between high dominant frequent (DF) sites [atrial fibrillation (AF) nest] and the intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the regional distribution of epicardial fat and the properties of the biatrial substrates in AF patients. Methods We studied 32 patients with paroxysmal (n = 23) and persistent (n = 9) AF. The epicardial fat volume around the left atrium (LA) was evaluated using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography and the topographic distribution of the fat volume was assessed. The biatrial DFs, voltages, and total activation times (TATs) were obtained during sinus rhythm. Results Out of the 8 divided LA regions, a significant linear correlation existed between the LA fat and mean DF values in the right upper anterior LA, left upper anterior LA, right lower anterior LA, right upper posterior LA, left upper posterior LA, and left lower posterior LA. There was no significant correlation between the regional LA fat distribution and regional LA peak-to-peak bipolar voltage and TAT. During a mean follow-up of 17 ± 8 months, 22 of the 32 (69%) patients were free of AF. In the multivariate analysis, only the mean LA DF was found to be a significant predictor of recurrence. Conclusions There was a close association between the regional distribution of the LA epicardial fat and the atrial substrate manifesting high frequency during sinus rhythm (AF nest). Those nests were related to ablation outcome. Hence, epicardial fat may play a significant role in atrial substrate remodeling and thereby in the pathogenesis and maintenance of AF. PMID:27122948

  17. Planning Irreversible Electroporation in the Porcine Kidney: Are Numerical Simulations Reliable for Predicting Empiric Ablation Outcomes?

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Thomas Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gutta, Narendra; Ezell, Paula C.; Monette, Sebastien; Maybody, Majid; Erinjery, Joseph P.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeNumerical simulations are used for treatment planning in clinical applications of irreversible electroporation (IRE) to determine ablation size and shape. To assess the reliability of simulations for treatment planning, we compared simulation results with empiric outcomes of renal IRE using computed tomography (CT) and histology in an animal model.MethodsThe ablation size and shape for six different IRE parameter sets (70–90 pulses, 2,000–2,700 V, 70–100 µs) for monopolar and bipolar electrodes was simulated using a numerical model. Employing these treatment parameters, 35 CT-guided IRE ablations were created in both kidneys of six pigs and followed up with CT immediately and after 24 h. Histopathology was analyzed from postablation day 1.ResultsAblation zones on CT measured 81 ± 18 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.05) and 115 ± 18 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.09) of the simulated size for monopolar electrodes, and 190 ± 33 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.001) and 234 ± 12 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.0001) for bipolar electrodes. Histopathology indicated smaller ablation zones than simulated (71 ± 41 %, p ≤ 0.047) and measured on CT (47 ± 16 %, p ≤ 0.005) with complete ablation of kidney parenchyma within the central zone and incomplete ablation in the periphery.ConclusionBoth numerical simulations for planning renal IRE and CT measurements may overestimate the size of ablation compared to histology, and ablation effects may be incomplete in the periphery.

  18. Noninvasive Fibrosis Marker Can Predict Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Ah; Kim, Jeong-Han; Hwang, Young; Choi, Hong Seok; Ko, Soon Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Kwon, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Tumor recurrence after curative therapy is common for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As fibrosis and chronic inflammation contribute to the progression of HCC, we aimed to identify the predictive value of inflammatory and fibrosis markers for HCC recurrence after curative therapy using radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with HCC treated with RFA between October 2005 and September 2013. The median duration of follow-up was 40 months (4–95 months). Inflammatory and fibrosis markers and demographic and clinical data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards model using univariate and multivariate analyses and longitudinal analysis. Results: A total of 98 patients were included for analysis. There were 54 cases of HCC recurrence (55.1%). The aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI; 2.3 ± 1.8 vs. 1.3 ± 1.4, P = 0.018) was significantly higher in the recurrence group than in the recurrence-free group. In multivariate analysis, APRI (hazard ratio, 2.64; confidence interval, 1.488–4.714; P = 0.001) was an independent risk factor for tumor recurrence. In particular, patients with APRI >1.38 showed a higher recurrence rate than patients with APRI ≤1.38 (P < 0.001). Longitudinal analysis showed persistently higher APRI values when assessed 12 months after RFA in patients who developed recurrence during follow-up than those who remained recurrence-free. Conclusions: These findings show that a high APRI value is associated with HCC recurrence after RFA. Therefore, APRI could play an important role in predicting HCC recurrence after RFA. PMID:26831608

  19. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  20. Frequency of and Predictive Factors for Vascular Invasion after Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoshinari; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Nakagomi, Ryo; Kondo, Mayuko; Fujiwara, Naoto; Minami, Tatsuya; Sato, Masaya; Uchino, Koji; Enooku, Kenichiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Kondo, Yuji; Shiina, Shuichiro; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular invasion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is representative of advanced disease with an extremely poor prognosis. The detailed course of its development has not been fully elucidated. Methods We enrolled 1057 consecutive patients with HCC who had been treated with curative intent by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) as an initial therapy from 1999 to 2008 at our department. We analyzed the incidence rate of and predictive factors for vascular invasion. The survival rate after detection of vascular invasion was also analyzed. Results During a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years, 6075 nodules including primary and recurrent lesions were treated by RFA. Vascular invasion was observed in 97 patients. The rate of vascular invasion associated with site of original RFA procedure was 0.66% on a nodule basis. The incidence rates of vascular invasion on a patient basis at 1, 3, and 5 years were 1.1%, 5.9%, and 10.4%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size, tumor number, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein were significant risk predictors of vascular invasion. In multivariate analysis, DCP was the most significant predictor for vascular invasion (compared with a DCP of ≤100 mAu/mL, the hazard ratio was 1.95 when DCP was 101–200 mAu/mL and 3.22 when DCP was >200 mAu/mL). The median survival time after development of vascular invasion was only 6 months. Conclusion Vascular invasion occurs during the clinical course of patients initially treated with curative intent. High-risk patients may be identified using tumor markers. PMID:25397677

  1. Direct Pressure Monitoring Accurately Predicts Pulmonary Vein Occlusion During Cryoballoon Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Wooden, Shannnon; Jones, Brian; Deering, Thomas; Wickliffe, Andrew; Dan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein (PV) occlusion is essential for achieving antral contact and PV isolation and is typically assessed by contrast injection. We present a novel method of direct pressure monitoring for assessment of PV occlusion. Transcatheter pressure is monitored during balloon advancement to the PV antrum. Pressure is recorded via a single pressure transducer connected to the inner lumen of the cryoballoon. Pressure curve characteristics are used to assess occlusion in conjunction with fluoroscopic or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) guidance. PV occlusion is confirmed when loss of typical left atrial (LA) pressure waveform is observed with recordings of PA pressure characteristics (no A wave and rapid V wave upstroke). Complete pulmonary vein occlusion as assessed with this technique has been confirmed with concurrent contrast utilization during the initial testing of the technique and has been shown to be highly accurate and readily reproducible. We evaluated the efficacy of this novel technique in 35 patients. A total of 128 veins were assessed for occlusion with the cryoballoon utilizing the pressure monitoring technique; occlusive pressure was demonstrated in 113 veins with resultant successful pulmonary vein isolation in 111 veins (98.2%). Occlusion was confirmed with subsequent contrast injection during the initial ten procedures, after which contrast utilization was rapidly reduced or eliminated given the highly accurate identification of occlusive pressure waveform with limited initial training. Verification of PV occlusive pressure during CBA is a novel approach to assessing effective PV occlusion and it accurately predicts electrical isolation. Utilization of this method results in significant decrease in fluoroscopy time and volume of contrast. PMID:23485956

  2. Direct pressure monitoring accurately predicts pulmonary vein occlusion during cryoballoon ablation.

    PubMed

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Wooden, Shannnon; Jones, Brian; Deering, Thomas; Wickliffe, Andrew; Dan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). Pulmonary vein (PV) occlusion is essential for achieving antral contact and PV isolation and is typically assessed by contrast injection. We present a novel method of direct pressure monitoring for assessment of PV occlusion. Transcatheter pressure is monitored during balloon advancement to the PV antrum. Pressure is recorded via a single pressure transducer connected to the inner lumen of the cryoballoon. Pressure curve characteristics are used to assess occlusion in conjunction with fluoroscopic or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) guidance. PV occlusion is confirmed when loss of typical left atrial (LA) pressure waveform is observed with recordings of PA pressure characteristics (no A wave and rapid V wave upstroke). Complete pulmonary vein occlusion as assessed with this technique has been confirmed with concurrent contrast utilization during the initial testing of the technique and has been shown to be highly accurate and readily reproducible. We evaluated the efficacy of this novel technique in 35 patients. A total of 128 veins were assessed for occlusion with the cryoballoon utilizing the pressure monitoring technique; occlusive pressure was demonstrated in 113 veins with resultant successful pulmonary vein isolation in 111 veins (98.2%). Occlusion was confirmed with subsequent contrast injection during the initial ten procedures, after which contrast utilization was rapidly reduced or eliminated given the highly accurate identification of occlusive pressure waveform with limited initial training. Verification of PV occlusive pressure during CBA is a novel approach to assessing effective PV occlusion and it accurately predicts electrical isolation. Utilization of this method results in significant decrease in fluoroscopy time and volume of contrast. PMID:23485956

  3. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 μm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (˜100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (˜300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  4. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kozub, John A; Shen, Jin-H; Joos, Karen M; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M Shane

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-µm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 µm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 µm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 µm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (~100-µm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies>1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (~300-µm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications. PMID:26456553

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  6. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Guerra, Peter G; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Roy, Denis; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Khairy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP) provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1) the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2) selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3) predictors of efficacy, 4) advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5) strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:22557842

  7. Technetium-99m labelled macroaggregated albumin arterial catheter perfusion scintigraphy: prediction of gastrointestinal toxicity in hepatic arterial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, E; Masaneo, I; Clara, R; Valetto, M R; Bellò, M; Zanon, C; Chiappino, I; Grosso, M; Mussa, A; Bisi, G

    2000-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity from hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of floxuridine in patients with liver metastases is probably due to extrahepatic perfusion or to partial escape of the drug from first-pass liver extraction. The aim of this study was to verify the role of technetium-99m-labelled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) arterial catheter perfusion scintigraphy at the beginning of each chemotherapy cycle in decreasing or preventing gastrointestinal toxicity. We studied 167 consecutive patients. On the basis of the scintigraphic follow-up and the presence or absence of an intrahepatic arteriovenous shunt (IHAVS), we classified our patients into the following groups: (1) FU+ hepatic distribution pattern (DP), comprising 29 patients with regular scintigraphic follow-up who showed the expected distribution pattern at each control or a distribution pattern with transient alterations (extrahepatic escape) promptly reversed by the replacement of the catheter. Among these 29 patients there was one case of gastrointestinal toxicity. (2) FU- hepatic DP, comprising 128 patients who were evaluated with 99mTc-MAA only at the beginning of the first chemotherapy cycle, showed the expected distribution pattern and underwent HAI with no further scintigraphic evaluation. Among these 128 patients there were 28 cases of gastrointestinal toxicity. (3) FU+ pulmonary DP, comprising three patients with abnormally elevated pulmonary uptake (higher than 5%) and with regular scintigraphic follow-up. There were two cases of gastrointestinal toxicity among these three patients. (4) FU- pulmonary DP, comprising seven patients with abnormally elevated pulmonary uptake and without regular scintigraphic follow-up. There were four cases of gastrointestinal toxicity among these seven patients. The incidence of toxicity was significantly higher in group FU- hepatic DP than in group FU+ hepatic DP (21.9% vs 3.4%, P<0.05). In both the FU+ pulmonary DP and FU- pulmonary DP groups, the incidence of

  8. Possible Role for Cryoballoon Ablation of Right Atrial Appendage Tachycardia when Conventional Ablation Fails

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage. PMID:26175651

  9. Numerical predictions of railgun performance including the effects of ablation and arc drag

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, N.M.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    Thermal radiation from plasma armatures in railguns may cause vaporization and partial ionization of the rail and insulator materials. This causes an increase in mass of the arc, which has an adverse effect on projectile velocity. Viscous drag on the arc also has a deleterious effect, particularly at high velocities. Simulations were performed and numerical results were compared with experimental data for a wide range of test performed at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the Ling Temco Vought Aerospace and Defense Company, and the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. The effects of ablation and arc drag on railgun performance are discussed. Some strategies for reducing the effects of ablation are proposed.

  10. Numerical predictions of railgun performance including the effects of ablation and arc drag

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, N.M.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal radiation from plasma armatures in railguns may cause vaporization and partial ionization of the rail and insulator materials. This causes an increase in mass of the arc, which has an adverse effect on projectile velocity. Viscous drag on the arc also has a deleterious effect, particularly at high velocities. These loss mechanisms are modeled in the Los Alamos Railgun Estimator code. Simulations were performed and numerical results were compared with experimental data for a wide range of tests performed at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the Ling Temco Vought Aerospace and Defense Company, and the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. The effects of ablation and arc drag on railgun performance are discussed. Parametric studies illustrate the effects of some design parameters on projectile velocity and launcher efficiency. Some strategies for reducing the effects of ablation are proposed.

  11. Numerical predictions of railgun performance including the effects of ablation and arc drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnurr, N. M.; Kerrisk, J. F.; Parker, J. V.

    Thermal radiation from plasma armatures in railguns may cause vaporization and partial ionization of the rail and insulator materials. This causes an increase in mass of the arc, which has an adverse effect on projectile velocity. Viscous drag on the arc also has a deleterious effect, particularly at high velocities. These loss mechanisms are modeled in the Los Alamos Railgun Estimator code. Simulations were performed and numerical results were compared with experimental data for a wide range of tests performed at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the Ling Temco Vought Aerospace and Defense Company, and the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. The effects of ablation and arc drag on railgun performance are discussed. Parametric studies illustrate the effects of some design parameters on projectile velocity and launcher efficiency. Some strategies for reducing the effects of ablation are proposed.

  12. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  13. [Ablation of supraventricular tachycardias : Complications and emergencies].

    PubMed

    Sawan, N; Eitel, C; Thiele, H; Tilz, R

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment of supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) with high success rates of > 95 %. Complication rates range from 3 to 5 %, with serious complications occurring in about 0.8 %. There are general complications caused either by the vascular access or the catheters (e. g. hematomas, hemo-pneumothorax, embolism, thrombosis and aspiration) und specific ablation related complications (e. g. AV block during ablation of the slow pathway). The complication risk is elevated in elderly and multimorbid patients. Furthermore, the experience of the treating physician and the respective team plays an essential role. The purpose of this article is to give an overview on incidences, causes and management as well as prevention strategies of complications associated with catheter ablation of SVT. PMID:27206630

  14. Image-based modeling and characterization of RF ablation lesions in cardiac arrhythmia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Camp, Jon J.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Holmes, David R.; Robb, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    In spite of significant efforts to enhance guidance for catheter navigation, limited research has been conducted to consider the changes that occur in the tissue during ablation as means to provide useful feedback on the progression of therapy delivery. We propose a technique to visualize lesion progression and monitor the effects of the RF energy delivery using a surrogate thermal ablation model. The model incorporates both physical and physiological tissue parameters, and uses heat transfer principles to estimate temperature distribution in the tissue and geometry of the generated lesion in near real time. The ablation model has been calibrated and evaluated using ex vivo beef muscle tissue in a clinically relevant ablation protocol. To validate the model, the predicted temperature distribution was assessed against that measured directly using fiberoptic temperature probes inserted in the tissue. Moreover, the model-predicted lesions were compared to the lesions observed in the post-ablation digital images. Results showed an agreement within 5°C between the model-predicted and experimentally measured tissue temperatures, as well as comparable predicted and observed lesion characteristics and geometry. These results suggest that the proposed technique is capable of providing reasonably accurate and sufficiently fast representations of the created RF ablation lesions, to generate lesion maps in near real time. These maps can be used to guide the placement of successive lesions to ensure continuous and enduring suppression of the arrhythmic pathway.

  15. Model to predict the melting and ablation of reactive metal shrapnel in a high Weber number environment

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, L.W.

    1984-05-01

    Aerothermoballistic behavior of pyrophoric metal shrapnel ejected at supersonic speeds has been numerically simulated. The theoretical model predicts aerodynamic and chemical heat-transfer rates and particle thermal response, including time and position of melt initiation. Because of the high Weber number environment, the melting particle undergoes liquid layer stripping. The model, incorporated in the PLUTO computer code, predicts the liquid mass loss rate, characteristic liquid droplet diameter, temperature rise across the liquid film, and the coupled particle trajectory. The aeroheating, thermal, and ballistic sections of the PLUTO code have been validated by comparison with independent calculations and qualitative experimental data concerning the melting and ablation of gold microspheres. The model still needs to be field tested against reactive metal particles in high Weber number flows.

  16. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  17. A Review of Mitral Isthmus Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin CK; Betts, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    Mitral isthmus ablation forms part of the electrophysiologist’s armoury in the catheter ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is well recognised however, that mitral isthmus ablation is technically challenging and incomplete ablation may be pro-arrhythmic, leading some to question its role. This article first reviews the evidence for the use of adjunctive mitral isthmus ablation and its association with the development of macroreentrant perimitral flutter. It then describes the practical techniques of mitral isthmus ablation, with particular emphasis on the assessment of bi-directional mitral isthmus block. The anatomy of the mitral isthmus is also discussed in order to understand the possible obstacles to successful ablation. Finally, novel techniques which may facilitate mitral isthmus ablation are reviewed. PMID:22912536

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Colorectal Liver Metastases: Small Size Favorably Predicts Technique Effectiveness and Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea Sacchetto, Paola; Tosetti, Irene; Pagano, Eva; Fava, Cesare; Gandini, Giovanni

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze long-term results of radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) for colorectal metastases (MTS), in order to evaluate predictors for adverse events, technique effectiveness, and survival. One hundred ninety-nine nonresectable MTS (0.5-8 cm; mean, 2.9 cm) in 122 patients underwent a total of 166 RFA sessions, percutaneously or during surgery. The technique was 'simple' or 'combined' with vascular occlusion. The mean follow-up time was 24.2 months. Complications, technique effectiveness, and survival rates were statistically analyzed. Adverse events occurred in 8.1% of lesions (major complication rate: 1.1%), 7.1% with simple and 16.7% with combined technique (p = 0.15). Early complete response was obtained in 151 lesions (81.2%), but 49 lesions (26.3%) recurred locally after a mean of 10.4 months. Sustained complete ablation was achieved in 66.7% of lesions {<=}3 cm versus 33.3% of lesions >3 cm (p < 0.0001). Survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91%, 54%, and 33%, respectively, from the diagnosis of MTS and 79%, 38%, and 22%, respectively, from RFA. Mean survival time from RFA was 31.5 months, 36.2 in patients with main MTS {<=}3 cm and 23.2 in those with at least one lesion >3 cm (p = 0.006). We conclude that 'simple' RFA is safe and successful for MTS {<=}3 cm, contributing to prolong survival when patients can be completely treated.

  19. [Ventricular bigeminy with fixed with fixed coupling at rest and during exercise as the cause of recurrent dizziness and syncope--successful anti-arrhythmic therapy by high frequency current catheter ablation of a right ventricular arrhythmogenic focus. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, L J; Emmerich, K; Wittmann, N; Probst, H; Krakau, I; Horlitz, M; Klevinghaus, K; Gülker, H

    1995-01-01

    In a 52-year-old patient with beginning dilatative cardiomyopathy dizziness and syncopes could be observed due to a ventricular bigeminy at rest and under exercise conditions. The patient also showed a marked reduction of exercise capacity and was handicapped in his profession as electrician and unable to work for more than 10 months. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy including the subsequent use of all available antiarrhythmic agents failed in suppressing this arrhythmia. In an electrophysiological study the arrhythmogenic focus could be localized in the right ventricular outflow tract. Application of radiofrequency current resulted in instantaneous termination of the extrasystoly; this result could be documented in repeat Holter monitorings over 12 weeks to present. This case report shows that radiofrequency catheter ablation can in special cases be applied for therapy of extrasystolic phenomena when clinical symptoms necessitate treatment and antiarrhythmic drug therapy fails. PMID:7571778

  20. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  1. Re-ablation I-131 activity does not predict treatment success in low- and intermediate-risk patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prpic, Marin; Kruljac, Ivan; Kust, Davor; Kirigin, Lora S; Jukic, Tomislav; Dabelic, Nina; Bolanca, Ante; Kusic, Zvonko

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different radioactive iodine (I-131) activities used for re-ablation, to compare various combinations of treatment activities, and to identify predictors of re-ablation failure in low- and intermediate-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients. The study included 128 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients with DTC with ablation failure after total thyroidectomy. Patient characteristics, T status, tumor size, lymph node involvement, postoperative remnant size on whole-body scintigraphy, serum thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-Tg antibody (TgAb), and Tg/TSH ratio were analyzed as potential predictors of the re-ablation success. Re-ablation was successful in 113 out of 128 patients (88.3 %). Mean first I-131 activity was 2868 ± 914 MBq (77.5 ± 24.7 mCi) and mean second I-131 activity 3004 ± 699 MBq (81.2 ± 18.9 mCi). There was no association between the first, second, and cumulative activity with re-ablation treatment outcome. Treatment failure was associated with higher Tg levels prior to re-ablation (Tg2) (OR 1.16, 95 % CI 1.05-1.29, P = 0.003) and N1a status (OR 3.89, 95 % CI 1.13-13.41, P = 0.032). After excluding patients with positive-to-negative TgAb conversion, Tg2 level of 3.7 ng/mL predicted treatment failure with a sensitivity of 75.0 %, specificity of 80.5 %, and a negative predictive value of 97.1 %. Patients with positive-to-negative TgAb conversion had higher failure rates (OR 2.96, 95 % CI 0.94-9.29). Re-ablation success was high in all subgroups of patients and I-131 activity did not influence treatment outcome. Tg may serve as a good predictor of re-ablation failure. Patients with positive-to-negative TgAb conversion represent a specific group, in whom Tg level should not be used as a predictive marker of treatment outcome. PMID:26732041

  2. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  3. Common Genetic Variants and Response to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Bollmann, Andreas; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ueberham, Laura; Saini, Harsimran; Montgomery, Jay; Edwards, Todd; Yoneda, Zachary; Sinner, Moritz F.; Arya, Arash; Sommer, Philipp; Delaney, Jessica; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Saavedra, Pablo; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Whalen, S. Patrick; Roden, Dan M.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Ellis, Christopher R.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Darbar, Dawood; Husser, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (rs2200733, rs10033464 near PITX2), 1q21 (rs13376333 in KCNN3), and 16q22 (rs7193343 in ZFHX3) have consistently been associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Single-center studies have shown that 4q25 risk alleles predict recurrence of AF after catheter ablation of AF. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that these 4 AF susceptibility SNPs modulate response to AF ablation. Methods and Results Patients underwent de novo AF ablation between 2008 and 2012 at Vanderbilt University, the Heart Center Leipzig, and Massachusetts General Hospital. The primary outcome was 12-month recurrence, defined as an episode of AF, atrial flutter, or atrial tachycardia lasting >30 seconds after a 3-month blanking period. Multivariable analysis of the individual cohorts using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Summary statistics from the 3 centers were analyzed using fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 991 patients were included (Vanderbilt University, 245; Heart Center Leipzig, 659; and Massachusetts General Hospital, 87). The overall single procedure 12-month recurrence rate was 42%. The overall risk allele frequency for these SNPs ranged from 12% to 35%. Using a dominant genetic model, the 4q25 SNP, rs2200733, predicted a 1.4-fold increased risk of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.3 [95% confidence intervals, 1.1–1.6]; P=0.011). The remaining SNPs, rs10033464 (4q25), rs13376333 (1q21), and rs7193343 (16q22) were not significantly associated with recurrence. Conclusions Among the 3 genetic loci most strongly associated with AF, the chromosome 4q25 SNP rs2200733 is significantly associated with recurrence of atrial arrhythmias after catheter ablation for AF. PMID:25684755

  4. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  5. Method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armoundas, Antonis A. (Inventor); Feldman, Andrew B. (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor); Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention involves method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation. In particular, it is designed for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In the method of this invention electrical signals are acquired from passive electrodes, and an inverse dipole method is used to identify the site of origin of an arrhytmia. The location of the tip of the ablation catheter is similarly localized from signals acquired from the passive electrodes while electrical energy is delivered to the tip of the catheter. The catheter tip is then guided to the site of origin of the arrhythmia, and ablative radio frequency energy is delivered to its tip to ablate the site.

  6. Atriocaval Rupture After Right Atrial Isthmus Ablation for Atrial Flutter.

    PubMed

    Vloka, Caroline; Nelson, Daniel W; Wetherbee, Jule

    2016-06-01

    A patient with symptomatic typical atrial flutter (AFL) underwent right atrial isthmus ablation with an 8-mm catheter. Eight months later, his typical AFL recurred. Ten months later, he underwent a repeat right atrial isthmus ablation with an irrigated tip catheter and an 8-mm tip catheter. Six weeks after his second procedure, while performing intense sprint intervals on a treadmill, he developed an abrupt onset of chest pain, hypotension, and cardiac tamponade. He underwent emergency surgery to repair an atriocaval rupture and has done well since. Our report suggests that an association of multiple radiofrequency ablations with increased risk for delayed atriocaval rupture occurring 1 to 3 months after ablation. In conclusion, although patients generally were advised to limit exercise for 1 to 2 weeks after AFL ablation procedures in the past, it may be prudent to avoid intense exercise for at least 3 months after procedure. PMID:27112285

  7. Multifiber excimer laser catheter design strategies for various medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Tulleken, Cees A. F.; Boon, Tom A.

    1994-07-01

    For the XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm, 115 ns), special design multifiber laser catheters were developed and theoretically as well as experimentally evaluated. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the penetration depth of 308 nm XeCl excimer light varied from 50 to 200 micrometers for fiber diameters from 50 to 550 micrometers and larger. Tissue ablation is expected to be restricted to this irradiated area. In order to ablate larger tissue areas, a flexible bundle of fibers is used introducing gaps in the irradiance distribution due to dead space in between the individual fibers. Multifiber catheters were developed for a unique neurosurgery bypass procedure and for urethra stricture surgery. Real-time, close-up, high speed video imaging showed that tissue ablation mechanism of these catheters is predominately governed by explosive short-life vapor bubbles fragmenting the tissue to small particles. In order to temper the ablation process, laser energy was delivered in 8 pulses divided over 8 sectors of a multifiber catheter (multiplexing), keeping the same fluence instead of one pulse addressing all the fibers at once.

  8. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts survival after radiofrequency ablation for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Del Prete, Valentina; Crucinio, Nicola; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the correlation between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and survival after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for colorectal liver metastasis (CLMs). METHODS: From July 2003 to Feb 2012, 127 consecutive patients with 193 histologically-proven unresectable CLMs were treated with percutaneous RFA at the University of Foggia. All patients had undergone primary colorectal tumor resection before RFA and received systemic chemotherapy. LMR was calculated by dividing lymphocyte count by monocyte count assessed at baseline. Treatment-related toxicity was defined as any adverse events occurred within 4 wk after the procedure. Overall survival (OS) and time to recurrence (TTR) were estimated from the date of RFA by Kaplan-Meier with plots and median (95%CI). The inferential analysis for time to event data was conducted using the Cox univariate and multivariate regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95%CI. Statistically significant variables from the univariate Cox analysis were considered for the multivariate models. RESULTS: Median age was 66 years (range 38-88) and patients were prevalently male (69.2%). Median LMR was 4.38% (0.79-88) whereas median number of nodules was 2 (1-3) with a median maximum diameter of 27 mm (10-45). Median OS was 38 mo (34-53) and survival rate (SR) was 89.4%, 40.4% and 33.3% at 1, 4 and 5 years respectively in the whole cohort. Running log-rank test analysis found 3.96% as the most significant prognostic cut-off point for LMR and stratifying the study population by this LMR value median OS resulted 55 mo (37-69) in patients with LMR > 3.96% and 34 (26-39) mo in patients with LMR ≤ 3.96% (HR = 0.53, 0.34-0.85, P = 0.007). Nodule size and LMR were the only significant predictors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median TTR was 29 mo (22-35) with a recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate of 72.6%, 32.1% and 21.8% at 1, 4 and 5 years, respectively in the whole study group. Nodule size and LMR were confirmed as significant

  9. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  10. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  11. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal; Gijsbers, Geert; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  12. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  13. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  14. Live volumetric imaging (LVI) intracardiac ultrasound catheter.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Gilchrist, Kristin H; Carlson, James B; Hall, Stephen D; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2013-01-01

    The Live Volumetric Imaging (LVI) catheter is capable of real-time 3D intracardiac echo (ICE) imaging, uniquely providing full volume sectors with deep penetration depth and high volume frame rate. The key enabling technology in this catheter is an integrated piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducer (pMUT), a novel matrix phased array transducer fabricated using semiconductor microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques. This technology innovation may enable better image guidance to improve accuracy, reduce risk, and reduce procedure time for transcatheter intracardiac therapies which are currently done with limited direct visualization of the endocardial tissue. Envisioned applications for LVI include intraprocedural image guidance of cardiac ablation therapies as well as transcatheter mitral and aortic valve repair. PMID:23773496

  15. Should radiofrequency current ablation be performed in asymptomatic patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, G

    1993-03-01

    The exiting new method of ablation of accessory pathways using radiofrequency current applied by catheters will dramatically change our therapeutic decisions in these patients in the near future. This brief survey reviews the existing literature about the risk of the disease as well as of the procedure of catheter ablation. From these data, the risk of sudden death appears to be extremely low in asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) individuals. Side effects of catheter ablation may result from the invasive procedure as well as from radiation exposure (the latter to the patient as well as to operating physicians). While the complication rate in experienced centers is extremely low, a multicenter registry of the success and complication rate is urgently needed in view of the many centers starting with catheter ablation. Based on a subjective benefit-to-risk analysis, asymptomatic WPW individuals should be offered catheter ablation only under special circumstances (high risk profession, athletes, family history of sudden death). On the other hand, catheter ablation need not be and should not be considered generally in asymptomatic individuals with WPW pattern. Finally, this author cannot imagine that the energy, time, and money spent for mass screening and eventual catheter ablation of asymptomatic WPW individuals with its attending risks can be outweighed by the potential benefits for these asymptomatic individuals. PMID:7681970

  16. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  17. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  18. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies. PMID:24709460

  19. New strategies for ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Hooks, Darren A; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Aljefairi, Nora; Frontera, Antonio; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2015-03-01

    Patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) and no reversible cause are difficult to treat. While implantable defibrillators prolong survival, many patients remain symptomatic due to device shocks and syncope. To address this, there have been recent advances in the catheter ablation of VT and VF. For example, non-invasive imaging has improved arrhythmia substrate characterisation, 3D catheter navigation tools have facilitated mapping of arrhythmia and substrate and ablation catheters have advanced in their ability to deliver effective lesions. However, the long-term success rates of ablation for VT and VF remain modest, with nearly half of treated patients developing recurrence within 2-3 years, and this drives the ongoing innovation in the field. This review focuses on the challenges particular to ablation of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, and the strategies that have been recently developed to improve procedural efficacy. Patient sub-groups that illustrate the use of new strategies are described. PMID:25666031

  20. Noninvasive mapping to guide atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Han S; Zellerhoff, Stephan; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Yamashita, Seigo; Berte, Benjamin; Mahida, Saagar; Hooks, Darren; Aljefairi, Nora; Shah, Ashok J; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Meleze; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a dynamic rhythm. Noninvasive mapping overcomes many previous barriers to mapping such a dynamic rhythm, by providing a beat-to-beat, biatrial, panoramic view of the AF process. Catheter ablation of AF drivers guided by noninvasive mapping has yielded promising clinical results and has advanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic processes of this common heart rhythm disorder. PMID:25784025

  1. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  2. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  3. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common reasons to have an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... gov/pubmed/22094023 . Read More Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Transurethral resection of the prostate Urge incontinence Urinary ...

  4. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... vaginal wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension Urinary incontinence - ...

  5. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... store. Other supplies you will need are sterile gloves, a catheter pack, syringes, sterile solution to clean ... your back. Put on two pairs of sterile gloves, one over the other. Then: Make sure your ...

  6. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  7. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  8. Contact force sensing during atrial fibrillation ablation: clinical experience and effects on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jackson J; Santangeli, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF), and pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is the cornerstone of AF ablation. When AF recurs after ablation, PV reconnection is frequently seen during repeat ablation. As such, achieving durable chronic PVI by delivering effective, transmural lesions during the index ablation is key to optimize long-term outcomes. The development of contact force (CF) sensing technologies integrated into ablation catheters now allow for real-time visualization of applied CF during PVI and have been shown to improve ablation efficacy and safety. The aim of this review is to describe the CF technology, summarize the literature on the outcomes of CF-guided ablation, and to discuss procedural aspects that are crucial when using CF. PMID:26998886

  9. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  10. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... central catheters and nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. ... Procedures . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007:chap 4. Mansour JC, Neiderhuber JE. Establishing and ...

  11. Lessons from computer simulations of ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews the simulations of catheter ablation in computer models of the atria, from the first attempts to the most recent anatomical models. It describes how postulated substrates of atrial fibrillation can be incorporated into mathematical models, how modelling studies can be designed to test ablation strategies, what their current trade-offs and limitations are, and what clinically relevant lessons can be learnt from these simulations. Drawing a parallel between clinical and modelling studies, six ablation targets are considered: pulmonary vein isolation, linear ablation, ectopic foci, complex fractionated atrial electrogram, rotors and ganglionated plexi. The examples presented for each ablation target illustrate a major advantage of computer models, the ability to identify why a therapy is successful or not in a given atrial fibrillation substrate. The integration of pathophysiological data to create detailed models of arrhythmogenic substrates is expected to solidify the understanding of ablation mechanisms and to provide theoretical arguments supporting substrate-specific ablation strategies. PMID:26846178

  12. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean between your fingers and under your nails. Wet one of the washcloths with warm water and soap it up. Gently wash all around the area where the catheter goes in with the soapy washcloth. Females should wipe from front to back. Males should wipe from ...

  13. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  14. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  15. Evolving technology in bipolar perfused radiofrequency ablation: assessment of efficacy, predictability and safety in a pig liver model.

    PubMed

    Burdío, Fernando; Navarro, Ana; Sousa, Ramón; Burdío, José M; Güemes, Antonio; Gonzalez, Ana; Cruz, Ignacio; Castiella, Tomás; Lozano, Ricardo; Berjano, Enrique; Figueras, Joan; de Gregorio, Miguel A

    2006-08-01

    Bipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation, especially with perfusion of saline, has been shown to increase volume over monopolar conventional methods. The aims of this study are to study whether this method is linked to too flattened thermal lesions and premature rise of impedance and to elucidate some safety concerns. Eighteen RF ablations were performed using a 1.8-mm-diameter bipolar applicator in the liver of nine healthy pigs through laparotomy with or without temporary vascular occlusion [the Pringle maneuver (PGM)]: group A (n=9), without PGM; group B (n=9), with PGM. Hypertonic saline solutions (3% and 20 %) were injected through the applicator at a rate of 400 ml/h during the procedure. The pigs were followed up and they were euthanased on the 15th day. Impedance, current, power output, energy output, temperatures, diameters of thermal lesion, volume, sphericity ratio of thermal lesion were correlated among groups. Impedance at the end of the procedure (50.00 Omega+/-28.39 and 52.88 Omega+/-26.77, for groups A and B, respectively) was very similar to the starting impedance (50 Omega). In a median of 1 (range, 0-6) time per RF ablation procedure a reduction of 30 W from the selected power supply was observed during the RF ablation procedure linked to a slight increase of impedance. Volume and short diameter of thermal lesion were 21.28 cm3+/-11.78 and 2.85 cm+/-0.87 for group A, 87.51 cm3+/-25.20 and 4.31 cm+/-0.65 for group B. Continuous thermal between both electrodes were described with a global sphericity ratio of 1.91. One major complication (thermal injury to the stomach) was encountered in a case of cross-sectional necrosis of the targeted liver and attributed to heat diffusion after the procedure. This method has been shown to determine: (1) the relative control of impedance during the procedure; (2) ovoid and relatively large thermal lesions with less dependence upon closest vessels. PMID:16541228

  16. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  17. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  18. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  19. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP) procedures under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF) field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany) using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany). The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N). The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation system. The irrigated tip

  20. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  1. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  2. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  3. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model. PMID:21096567

  4. Persistent atrial fibrillation ablation: conventional versus driver-guided strategy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Han S; Sacher, Frédéric; Zellerhoff, Stephan; Jesel, Laurence; Shah, Ashok J; Komatsu, Yuki; Daly, Matthew; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    While pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is highly effective, catheter ablation for persistent AF remains a challenge with varying clinical success reported. Several ablation techniques have been proposed to target persistent AF, with the additional ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and linear lesions shown to provide incremental success to pulmonary vein isolation alone. Recently, several studies have suggested the presence of localized drivers (re-entrant or focal) in AF. By targeting these drivers, clinical outcomes may be maintained while minimizing the extent of ablation. This article will focus on the conventional stepwise ablation approach for persistent AF versus driver-guided ablation with the use of newer mapping technologies. PMID:26610158

  5. Optimizing contact force during ablation of atrial fibrillation: available technologies and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Lennart J; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2016-03-01

    In a select atrial fibrillation population, catheter ablation is considered first-line therapy. Prevention of early reconnection of the isolated pulmonary veins is an important goal for a successful treatment. Here, adequate catheter-tissue contact is crucial. One of the most promising new advances, therefore, is contact force (CF) sensing technology. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of innovations regarding catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation with a special focus on CF optimization. Both experimental and human studies show how CF sensing catheters lead to a reduction of fluoroscopy time, increased procedural safety and a better clinical outcome. Possible future developments include new parameters combining real-time ablation data, direct visualization of lesion formation and incorporation of robotics. PMID:26916025

  6. [The incidence of ventricular arrhythmia following direct current ablation, high-frequency current ablation and laser photo-ablation].

    PubMed

    Hindricks, G; Haverkamp, W; Dute, U; Gülker, H

    1988-11-01

    Incidence and severity of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) following transvenous catheter ablation have so far not been fully elucidated. In the present study we evaluated the comparative incidence of postablation ventricular arrhythmias following high voltage-direct current electrical ablation (DCA), radiofrequency-ablation (RFA), and laser-photoablation (LPA). Experiments were performed on a total of 26 anesthetized mongrel dogs (BW: 20-30 kg). DCA (n = 14; 150-200 J) and RFA (n = 7; 38.5-72.5 J) were performed unipolarly via a 6F USCI catheter, LPA (n = 5; 40-80 J) was delivered through a quarz core fiber (diameter 0.4 mm) housed within a special designed catheter. Energies were delivered to various sites of free wall and apical endocardium of the left ventricle. Immediately after DCA fast runs of ventricular tachycardia (VT) developed in 13 out of 14 dogs degenerating into ventricular fibrillation in two animals. Mean cycle length of induced VT was 298 +/- 86 ms. Persistent VA, morphologically mainly characterized by an accelerated idioventricular rhythm interrupted by runs of ventricular salvoes, occurred in 12 animals (mean rate: 78 +/- 13 VPB/min 3 h after ablation). During VT early endocardial activations were recorded from the ablation site. No significant correlation between total applied energy (150-550 J) and incidence of arrhythmogenic effects was observed. RFA and LPA induced ventricular salvoes and runs of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, in one animal ventricular fibrillation occurred during RFA; however, no persistent arrhythmic activity developed after RFA and LPA, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3213137

  7. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wear a mask, cap, sterile gown, and sterile gloves when putting in the catheter to keep it ... putting in the catheter. • Clean their hands, wear gloves, and clean the catheter opening with an antiseptic ...

  8. [Direct cryothermal ablation eliminates conduction of the slow pathway without inducing ectopic rhythms].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Colín, Luis; Iturralde, Pedro; Nava, Santiago; González, Eric; Rodríguez, Gerardo; Gómez, Jorge; Salica, Gabriel; Cossío, Jorge; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia is based on the elimination of conduction of slow or fast intranodal pathway. To avoid potential atrioventricular (AV) block, a new technology has been developed, cryothermal ablation. We report a case of AV nodal reentrant tachycardia in whom direct cryoablation, without previous ice mapping, was successfully performed. Interestingly and as previously described, cryotherapy did not induce ectopic rhythms, the conventional surrogate during radiofrequency ablation. PMID:15909749

  9. Method and apparatus for the guided ablative therapy of fast ventricular arrhythmia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Barley, Maya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation. The excitation from the previous excitatory wave is significant at the beginning of the next excitation. In particular, it is designed for treatment of fast cardiac arrhythmias. Electrical signals are acquired from recording electrodes, and an inverse dipole method is used to identify the site of origin of an arrhythmia. The location of the tip of an ablation catheter is similarly localized from signals acquired from the recording electrodes while electrical pacing energy is delivered to the tip of the catheter close to or in contact with the cardiac tissue. The catheter tip is then guided to the site of origin of the arrhythmia, and ablative radio frequency energy is delivered to its tip to ablate the site.

  10. Motion compensation by registration-based catheter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Wimmer, Andreas; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    The treatment of atrial fibrillation has gained increasing importance in the field of computer-aided interventions. State-of-the-art treatment involves the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium under fluoroscopic X-ray image guidance. Due to the rather low soft-tissue contrast of X-ray fluoroscopy, the heart is difficult to see. To overcome this problem, overlay images from pre-operative 3-D volumetric data can be used to add anatomical detail. Unfortunately, these overlay images are static at the moment, i.e., they do not move with respiratory and cardiac motion. The lack of motion compensation may impair X-ray based catheter navigation, because the physician could potentially position catheters incorrectly. To improve overlay-based catheter navigation, we present a novel two stage approach for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation. First, a cascade of boosted classifiers is employed to segment a commonly used circumferential mapping catheter which is firmly fixed at the ostium of the pulmonary vein during ablation. Then, a 2-D/2-D model-based registration is applied to track the segmented mapping catheter. Our novel hybrid approach was evaluated on 10 clinical data sets consisting of 498 fluoroscopic monoplane frames. We obtained an average 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm, with a minimum error of 0.26 mm and a maximum error of 1.62 mm. These results demonstrate that motion compensation using registration-based catheter tracking is both feasible and accurate. Using this approach, we can only estimate in-plane motion. Fortunately, compensating for this is often sufficient for EP procedures where the motion is governed by breathing.

  11. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required. PMID:24847039

  12. Ovarian Function, Not Age, Predicts the Benefit from Ovarian Suppression or Ablation for Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Shusen; Shi, Yanxia; An, Xin; Xu, Fei; Yuan, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant ovarian suppression or ablation (OS/OA) in premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to examine which patients might benefit from the addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen. We analyzed the data of 2065 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal carcinomas who were treated at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center from 2000 to 2008. The five-year disease-free survival rate (DFSR) and overall survival rate (OSR) were compared by menstrual status and treatment. Compared with patients older than forty years of age, patients younger than forty years old had significant lower DFSRs and OSRs. The addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen increased the DFSR and OSR of patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy, regardless of their age at diagnosis. Patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy are the main beneficiaries of an adjuvant OS/OA. PMID:26866810

  13. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  14. Rotational angiography of left ventricle to guide ventricular tachycardia ablation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jiri; Starek, Zdenek; Jez, Jiri; Lehar, Frantisek; Lukasova, Marketa; Kulik, Tomas; Novak, Miroslav

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional rotational angiography (3 DRA) is a novel imaging method introduced to guide complex catheter ablations of the left atrium. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of the method in visualization of left ventricular anatomy and to develop a corresponding protocol for guidance of ventricular tachycardia ablation. We performed 3D rotational angiography in 13 patients using a direct left atrial protocol for data acquisition and the 3D reconstruction of the left ventricle was achieved in all patients. Clinical data comparison has proved lower use of radiation and contrast medium during 3 DRA-guided ablations as compared to CT-guided procedures. PMID:25761532

  15. Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Garabelli, Paul; Stavrakis, Stavros; Po, Sunny S

    2016-03-01

    Ventricular tachycardias (VTs) occurring after prior myocardial infarction are usually caused by reentrant circuits formed by surviving myocardial bundles. Although part of the reentrant circuits may be located in the midmyocardium or epicardium, most of the VTs can be safely and successfully ablated by endocardial ablation targeting the late potentials/local abnormal ventricular activation, which are surrogates for the surviving myocardial bundles. A combination of activation, substrate, pace, and entrainment mapping, as well as the use of contact force catheters, further improves ablation success and safety. PMID:26920180

  16. Excimer laser lead extraction catheter with increased laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, M. Sean; Taylor, Kevin D.; Lippincott, Rebecca A.; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Papaioannou, Thanassis

    2001-05-01

    A fiber optic catheter connected to a pulsed excimer laser (308 nm) is currently used to extract chronically implanted pacemaker and defibrillator leads at Fluence of 60 mJ/mm2 and repetition rate of 40 Hz. The object of this study was to determine the effect of higher repetition rates (80 Hz) in the catheter's cutting performance. The penetration rate (micrometers /sec), and the associated mechanical and thermal effects were measured in soft (porcine myocardium) and hard tissue (bovine tendon) at 60 mJ/mm2-80 Hz, and were compared to the corresponding values at commercially available laser parameters (60 mJ/mm2-40 Hz). Ablation rates were measured with perforation experiments and the extent of thermal and mechanical damage was measured under polarized light microscopy. For hard (soft) tissue, the laser catheter demonstrated penetration speed of 106 +/- 32 (302 +/- 101) micrometers /sec at 40 Hz and 343 +/- 120 (830 +/- 364) micrometers /sec at 80 Hz. Maximum extent of thermal effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 114 +/- 35 micrometers (72 +/- 18) and 233 +/- 63 micrometers (71 +/- 16) respectively. Maximum extent of mechanical effects at 40 Hz and 80 Hz was 188 +/- 63 micrometers (590 +/- 237) and 386 +/- 100 micrometers (767 +/- 160) respectively. In vitro testing of the laser catheter with 80 Hz laser parameters has demonstrated increased penetration speed in both soft and hard fibrous tissue, while maintaining associated thermal and mechanical effects within limited ranges.

  17. 6DoF catheter detection, application to intracardiac echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ralovich, Kristóf; John, Matthias; Camus, Estelle; Navab, Nassir; Heimann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid imaging systems, consisting of fluoroscopy and echocardiography, are increasingly selected for intra-operative support of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. Intracardiac echocardiograpy (ICE) is an emerging modality with the promise of removing sedation or general anesthesia associated with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We introduce a novel 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) pose estimation approach for catheters (equipped with radiopaque ball markers) in single X-Ray fluoroscopy projection and investigate the method's application to a prototype ICE catheter. Machine learning based catheter detection is implemented in a Bayesian hypothesis fusion framework, followed by refinement of ball marker locations through template matching. Marker correspondence and 3D pose estimation are solved through iterative optimization. The method registers the ICE volume to the C-arm coordinate system. Experiments are performed on synthetic and porcine in-vivo data. Target registration error (TRE), defined in the echo cone, is the basis of our preliminary evaluation. The method reached 8.06 ± 7.2 mm TRE on 703 cases. Potential uses of our hybrid system include structural heart disease interventions and electrophysiologycal mapping or catheter ablation procedures. PMID:25485433

  18. In-vitro Photoacoustic Visualization of Myocardial Ablation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Nicholas; Biase, Luigi Di; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav; Bouchard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency (RF) ablation to treat atrial arrhythmia is limited by an inability to reliably assess lesion durability and transmurality. Objective Determine feasibility of photoacoustic characterization of myocardial ablation lesions in vitro. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of combined ultrasound (US) and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to visualize RF ablation lesions in 3-D based on unique differences in the optical absorption spectra between normal and ablated myocardial tissue. Methods Tissue samples were excised from the ventricles of fresh porcine hearts. Lesions were generated using an RF catheter ablation system using 20 - 30 W of power applied for 40 - 60 s. Ablated samples were imaged in the NIR regime (740-780 nm) using a combined PA/US imaging system. Measured PA spectra were correlated to the absorption spectra of deoxy-hemoglobin and ablated tissue to produce a tissue characterization map (TCM) identifying 3-D lesion location and extent. Tissue samples were stained and photographed for gross pathology. TCM and gross pathology images were co-registered to assess TCM accuracy. Results The TCM reliably characterized ablated and non-ablated tissue up to depths of 3 mm. The TCM also assessed lesion position and extent with sub-millimeter accuracy in multiple dimensions. Segmented TCMs achieved greater than 69% agreement with gross pathology. Conclusion These results suggest that sPA imaging has the potential to accurately assess RF ablation lesion size and position with sub-millimeter precision and may be well suited to guide trans-catheter RF atrial ablation in clinical practice. PMID:24080065

  19. Model-based lasso catheter tracking in monoplane fluoroscopy for 3D breathing motion compensation during EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui

    2010-02-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) attached to the left atrium (LA) is usually carried out under fluoroscopy guidance. Overlay of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D CT and/or MR volumes onto the fluoroscopy helps visualization and navigation in electrophysiology procedures (EP). Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of static overlay of the volume with fluoroscopy for catheter navigation. In this paper, we propose a B-spline based method for tracking the circumferential catheter (lasso catheter) in monoplane fluoroscopy. The tracked motion can be used for the estimation of the 3-D trajectory of breathing motion and for subsequent motion compensation. A lasso catheter is typically used during EP procedures and is pushed against the ostia of the PVs to be ablated. Hence this method does not require additional instruments, and achieves motion estimation right at the site of ablation. The performance of the proposed tracking algorithm was evaluated on 340 monoplane frames with an average error of 0.68 +/- 0.36 mms. Our contributions in this work are twofold. First and foremost, we show how to design an effective, practical, and workflow-friendly 3-D motion compensation scheme for EP procedures in a monoplane setup. In addition, we develop an efficient and accurate method for model-based tracking of the circumferential lasso catheter in the low-dose EP fluoroscopy.

  20. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  1. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  2. Body Surface Mapping to Guide Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Seigo; Shah, Ashok J; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Berte, Benjamin; Hooks, Darren; Frontera, Antonio; Jefairi, Nora Al; Wielandts, Jean-Yves; Lim, Han S; Amraoui, Sana; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Cochet, Hubert; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common rhythm disorder, and is strongly associated with thromboembolic events and heart failure. Over the past decade, catheter ablation of AF has advanced considerably with progressive improvement in success rates. However, interventional treatment is still challenging, especially for persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Recently, AF analysis using a non-invasive body surface mapping technique has been shown to identify localised reentrant and focal sources, which play an important role in driving and perpetuating AF. Non-invasive mapping-guided ablation has also been reported to be effective for persistent AF. In this review, we describe new clinical insights obtained from non-invasive mapping of persistent AF to guide catheter ablation. PMID:26835121

  3. Body Surface Mapping to Guide Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Seigo; Shah, Ashok J; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Berte, Benjamin; Hooks, Darren; Frontera, Antonio; Jefairi, Nora Al; Wielandts, Jean-Yves; Lim, Han S; Amraoui, Sana; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Cochet, Hubert; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common rhythm disorder, and is strongly associated with thromboembolic events and heart failure. Over the past decade, catheter ablation of AF has advanced considerably with progressive improvement in success rates. However, interventional treatment is still challenging, especially for persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Recently, AF analysis using a non-invasive body surface mapping technique has been shown to identify localised reentrant and focal sources, which play an important role in driving and perpetuating AF. Non-invasive mapping-guided ablation has also been reported to be effective for persistent AF. In this review, we describe new clinical insights obtained from non-invasive mapping of persistent AF to guide catheter ablation. PMID:26835121

  4. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection. PMID:15792563

  5. Effect of imaging and catheter characteristics on clinical outcome for patients in the PRECISE study

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Mei-Yin; Lee, Benjamin; Kunwar, Sandeep; Pedain, Christoph; Wembacher-Schröder, Eva; Mittermeyer, Stephan; Westphal, Manfred; Sampson, John H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Croteau, David; Chang, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The PRECISE study used convection enhanced delivery (CED) to infuse IL13-PE38QQR in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and compared survival to Gliadel Wafers (GW). The objectives of this retrospective evaluation were to assess: (1) catheter positioning in relation to imaging features and (2) to examine the potential impact of catheter positioning, overall catheter placement and imaging features on long term clinical outcome in the PRECISE study. Catheter positioning and overall catheter placement were scored and used as a surrogate of adequate placement. Imaging studies obtained on day 43 and day 71 after resection were each retrospectively reviewed. Catheter positioning scores, catheter overall placement scores, local tumor control and imaging change scores were reviewed and correlated using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. Cox PH regression analysis was used to examine whether these imaging based variables predicted overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) after adjusting for age and KPS. Of 180 patients in the CED group, 20 patients did not undergo gross total resection. Of the remaining 160 patients only 53% of patients had fully conforming catheters in respect to overall placement and 51% had adequate catheter positioning scores. Better catheter positioning scores were not correlated with local tumor control (P = 0.61) or imaging change score (P = 0.86). OS and PFS were not correlated with catheter positioning score (OS: P = 0.53; PFS: P = 0.72 respectively), overall placement score (OS: P = 0.55; PFS: P = 0.35) or imaging changes on day 43 MRI (P = 0.88). Catheter positioning scores and overall catheter placement scores were not associated with clinical outcome in this large prospective trial. PMID:20563833

  6. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  7. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  8. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  9. Atrial Tachycardias Arising from Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Proarrhythmic Bump or an Antiarrhythmic Turn?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashok J.; Jadidi, Amir; Liu, Xingpeng; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Forclaz, Andrei; Nault, Isabelle; Rivard, Lena; Linton, Nick; Xhaet, Olivier; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frederic; Bordachar, Pierre; Ritter, Philippe; Hocini, Meleze; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of atrial tachycardias (AT) is a direct function of the volume of atrial tissue ablated in the patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Thus, the incidence of AT is highest in persistent AF patients undergoing stepwise ablation using the strategic combination of pulmonary vein isolation, electrogram based ablation and left atrial linear ablation. Using deductive mapping strategy, AT can be divided into three clinical categories viz. the macroreentry, the focal and the newly described localized reentry all of which are amenable to catheter ablation with success rate of 95%. Perimitral, roof dependent and cavotricuspid isthmus dependent AT involve large reentrant circuits which can be successfully ablated at the left mitral isthmus, left atrial roof and tricuspid isthmus respectively. Complete bidirectional block across the sites of linear ablation is a necessary endpoint. Focal and localized reentrant AT commonly originate from but are not limited to the septum, posteroinferior left atrium, venous ostia, base of the left atrial appendage and left mitral isthmus and they respond quickly to focal ablation. AT not only represents ablation-induced proarrhythmia but also forms a bridge between AF and sinus rhythm in longstanding AF patients treated successfully with catheter ablation. PMID:20379387

  10. Three-dimensional tracking of cardiac catheters using an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Scanning beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis at multiple planes. This study describes a tomosynthesis-based method for 3D tracking of high-contrast objects and present the first experimental investigation of cardiac catheter tracking using a prototype SBDX system. Methods: The 3D tracking algorithm utilizes the stack of regularly spaced tomosynthetic planes that are generated by SBDX after each frame period (15 frames/s). Gradient-filtered versions of the image planes are generated, the filtered images are segmented into object regions, and then a 3D coordinate is calculated for each object region. Two phantom studies of tracking performance were conducted. In the first study, an ablation catheter in a chest phantom was imaged as it was pulled along a 3D trajectory defined by a catheter sheath (10, 25, and 50 mm/s pullback speeds). SBDX tip tracking coordinates were compared to the 3D trajectory of the sheath as determined from a CT scan of the phantom after the registration of the SBDX and CT coordinate systems. In the second study, frame-to-frame tracking precision was measured for six different catheter configurations as a function of image noise level (662-7625 photons/mm{sup 2} mean detected x-ray fluence at isocenter). Results: During catheter pullbacks, the 3D distance between the tracked catheter tip and the sheath centerline was 1.0{+-}0.8 mm (mean {+-}one standard deviation). The electrode to centerline distances were comparable to the diameter of the catheter tip (2.3 mm), the confining sheath (4 mm outside diameter), and the estimated SBDX-to-CT registration error ({+-}0.7 mm). The tip position was localized for all 332 image frames analyzed and 83% of tracked positions were inside the 3D sheath volume derived from CT. The pullback speeds derived from the catheter trajectories were within 5% of the programed pullback speeds

  11. Initial experience and treatment of atrial fibrillation using a novel irrigated multielectrode catheter: Results from a prospective two-center study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Entem, Felipe; Expósito, Víctor; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; González-Enríquez, Susana; Fernández-López, Xesús Alberte; García-Seara, Javier; Martínez-Sande, José Luis; Olalla, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Background PV electrical isolation has become the cornerstone of catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Several strategies have been proposed to achieve this goal. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of AF ablation using a new circular irrigated multielectrode ablation catheter designed to achieve single-delivery pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. Methods Thirty-five patients with drug refractory paroxysmal AF and normal ejection fraction from two centers were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent PV isolation with an nMARQ circular irrigated multielectrode ablation catheter guided by an electroanatomic mapping system. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude PV stenosis. Results PV isolation was achieved in 138 of 140 (98.57%) targeted veins. The mean procedure time was 79.5 min (SD 39.3 min). During a mean follow up of 16.8±2.8 months, 27 of 35 (77.2%) patients were free of AF. No PV narrowing was observed. One case of pericardial effusion due to perforation of the left atrial free wall during catheter manipulation did occur. Conclusions PV isolation with a circular irrigated multielectrode ablation catheter is a feasible technique with a high acute success rate. The majority of patients remained asymptomatic during the midterm follow-up period. PV stenosis was not detected. While only a single serious adverse event occurred, this technique׳s safety profile should be tested in larger studies. PMID:27092189

  12. Predicting Overall Survival After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Development and External Validation of the Amsterdam Prognostic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Mokhles, Sahar; Rodrigues, George B.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Palma, David A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Warner, Andrew; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Maat, Alex P.W.M.; Woody, Neil M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic model for 5-year overall survival (OS), consisting of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and a nomogram, was developed for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (ES-NSCLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: A primary dataset of 703 ES-NSCLC SABR patients was randomly divided into a training (67%) and an internal validation (33%) dataset. In the former group, 21 unique parameters consisting of patient, treatment, and tumor factors were entered into an RPA model to predict OS. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed for RPA-selected factors to evaluate their relationship with OS. A nomogram for OS was constructed based on factors significant in multivariate modeling and validated with calibration plots. Both the RPA and the nomogram were externally validated in independent surgical (n=193) and SABR (n=543) datasets. Results: RPA identified 2 distinct risk classes based on tumor diameter, age, World Health Organization performance status (PS) and Charlson comorbidity index. This RPA had moderate discrimination in SABR datasets (c-index range: 0.52-0.60) but was of limited value in the surgical validation cohort. The nomogram predicting OS included smoking history in addition to RPA-identified factors. In contrast to RPA, validation of the nomogram performed well in internal validation (r{sup 2}=0.97) and external SABR (r{sup 2}=0.79) and surgical cohorts (r{sup 2}=0.91). Conclusions: The Amsterdam prognostic model is the first externally validated prognostication tool for OS in ES-NSCLC treated with SABR available to individualize patient decision making. The nomogram retained strong performance across surgical and SABR external validation datasets. RPA performance was poor in surgical patients, suggesting that 2 different distinct patient populations are being treated with these 2 effective modalities.

  13. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  18. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  19. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2016-08-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27617095

  20. Anatomical Substrates and Ablation of Reentrant Atrial and Ventricular Tachycardias in Repaired Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Charlotte; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical repair techniques for various types of congenital heart disease have improved survival into adulthood over the past decades, thus exposing these patients to a high risk of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias later in life. These arrhythmias arise from complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Substrate formation may depend on both pathological myocardial remodelling and variable anatomical boundaries, determined by the type and timing of prior corrective surgery. Accordingly, arrhythmogenic substrates after repair have changed as a result of evolving surgical techniques. Radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an important therapeutic option but remains challenging due to the variable anatomy, surgically created obstacles and the complex arrhythmogenic substrates. Recent technical developments including electroanatomical mapping and image integration for delineating the anatomy facilitate complex catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the changing anatomical arrhythmogenic substrates and their potential impact on catheter ablation in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and tachyarrhythmias.

  1. Detached tip of a transseptal sheath during left atrial ablation.

    PubMed

    El-Damaty, Ahmed; Love, Michael; Parkash, Ratika

    2012-02-15

    Left atrial ablation has become more commonplace with the advent of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. A number of transseptal sheaths have been produced to enhance safe and efficient catheter manipulation in the left atrium (LA) for these procedures. Some of the sheaths have been subject to recall due to partial or complete detachment of its radiopaque tip. We report a case of a 46 year-old female diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy that presented with atypical left atrial flutter. During electrophysiologic study, a Swartz braided SL1 (SL-1) transseptal sheath was used to introduce the ablation catheter to the left atrium. During left atrial mapping, the radiopaque tip of the sheath detached from the rest of the sheath and was seen floating in the LA. After exchanging the SL-1 sheath with a deflectable sheath, the detached segment was retrieved out of the LA and eventually out of the vascular system using an angioplasty balloon advanced over a wire and inflated distal to the lumen of the detached tip. The root cause of this malfunction was found to be lack of a secondary bonding process that these sheaths generally undergo during the manufacturing process. We describe the case of a left atrial ablation procedure where a novel percutaneous method was able to successfully retrieve the detached tip of a transseptal sheath from the vascular system, thereby avoiding a potential catastrophic complication or thoracotomy. This method may be useful in other cases where similar circumstances may present. PMID:22162088

  2. Combination of Hansen Robotic system with cryocatheter in a challenging parahisian accessory pathway ablation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Schurmann, Paul; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A perceived distinctive feature of cryoablation is the stability (cryoadherence) of the catheter tip during cold temperatures at the desired location, even during tachycardia. We report the case report of a young patient with a parahisian accessory pathway where stability of the ablation catheter was not achieved despite using the cryocatheter with a steerable sheath. Ultimately, stability at the desired location was achieved robotically by means of Hansen system (Hansen Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA).

  3. Electrophysiology Catheter Detection and Reconstruction From Two Views in Fluoroscopic Images.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Brost, Alexander; Koch, Martin; Bourier, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Kurzidim, Klaus; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Electrophysiology (EP) studies and catheter ablation have become important treatment options for several types of cardiac arrhythmias. We present a novel image-based approach for automatic detection and 3-D reconstruction of EP catheters where the physician marks the catheter to be reconstructed by a single click in each image. The result can be used to provide 3-D information for enhanced navigation throughout EP procedures. Our approach involves two X-ray projections acquired from different angles, and it is based on two steps: First, we detect the catheter in each view after manual initialization using a graph-search method. Then, the detection results are used to reconstruct a full 3-D model of the catheter based on automatically determined point pairs for triangulation. An evaluation on 176 different clinical fluoroscopic images yielded a detection rate of 83.4%. For measuring the error, we used the coupling distance which is a more accurate quality measure than the average point-wise distance to a reference. For successful outcomes, the 2-D detection error was 1.7 mm ±1.2 mm. Using successfully detected catheters for reconstruction, we obtained a reconstruction error of 1.8 mm ±1.1 mm on phantom data. On clinical data, our method yielded a reconstruction error of 2.2 mm ±2.2 mm. PMID:26441411

  4. Heparin Leakage in Central Venous Catheters by Hemodynamic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava for hemodialysis, are routinely filled with heparin, an anticoagulant, while not in use to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. However, the heparin-lock procedure places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences, as heparin is known to leak into the blood stream. We propose that the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage is advective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile blood flow surrounding the catheter tip. This novel hypothesis is based on Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of heparin transport from a CVC placed inside an in vitro pulsatile flow loop and validated with CFD simulations. The results show an initial, fast (<10s), advection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin at the CVC tip, followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin at the tip. These results, which estimate leakage rates consistent with published in vivo data, predict that the concentration of heparin at the catheter tip is effectively zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin lock ineffective.

  5. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  6. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  10. Per-catheter ASD closure.

    PubMed

    Latson, L A

    1998-01-01

    Per-catheter devices for atrial septal defect (ASD) closure have been evolving since 1974. The four major devices available for use on a limited basis in early 1997 are reviewed. These include (in alphabetical order) the Angel Wing device, the ASDOS device, the Buttoned device, and the CardioSeal device (successor to the Clamshell). Sufficient data have been collected to indicate that transcatheter ASD closure is a viable alternative to surgery in selected patients. The advantages of the concept of per-catheter closure over surgical closure should lead to the continued development of devices and techniques for per-catheter treatment of ASD and other septal defects in the years to come. PMID:9396853

  11. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  12. Feasibility of Catheter-Directed Intraluminal Irreversible Electroporation of Porcine Ureter and Acute Outcomes in Response to Increasing Energy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Silk, Mikhail; Wimmer, Thomas; Monette, Sebastien; Kimm, Simon; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.; Coleman, Jonathan; Durack, Jeremy C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of focal intraluminal irreversible electroporation (IRE) in the ureter with a novel electrode catheter and to study the treatment effects in response to increasing pulse strength. Material and Methods Five IRE treatment settings were each evaluated twice for the ablation of normal ureter in five Yorkshire pigs (1–4 ablations/animal, total of 10 ablations) using a prototype device under ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. Animals received either unilateral or bilateral treatment, limited to a maximum of two ablations in any one ureter. Treatment was delivered with increasing pulse strength (1000V–3000V; increments of 500V) while keeping the pulse duration (100 µseconds) and number of pulses (90) constant. Ureter patency was assessed immediately following treatment with an antegrade ureteropyelography. Animals were sacrificed within 4 hours following treatment, and treated urinary tract was harvested for histopathologic analysis using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson’s Trichrome (MT) stains. Results IRE was successfully performed in all animals without evidence of ureteral perforation. H&E analysis of IRE treatments demonstrated full thickness ablation at higher field strengths (mucosa to the adventitia). MT stains showed preservation of connective tissue at all field strengths. Conclusion Intraluminal catheter directed IRE ablation is feasible and produces full thickness ablation of normal ureters. There was no evidence of lumen perforation even at the maximum voltages evaluated in the study. PMID:25769212

  13. Windows software for cardiac electrophysiology studies and ablation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vänttinen, H; Nousiainen, J; Mäkynen, P; Malmivuo, J

    2000-03-01

    A system for cardiac electrophysiology (EP) studies consisting of a Windows software package, a standard 120 MHz Pentium PC with a high-performance video card and a data acquisition card has been developed during this study. The system is capable of real time data acquisition and storage of 24 channels with simultaneous display of 1-16 arbitrarily chosen channels at a sampling rate of 500 Hz. It can be used clinically in electrophysiology studies and during catheter radio-frequency ablation treatment for monitoring the ablation and its effects. The built-in ablation monitoring capability enables combined EP study and ablation treatment, thus helping to reduce exposure times and the total time needed per patient. For clinical use the software includes versatile tools for data analysis and reduction. Our system has been developed in association with Department of Cardiology of Tampere University Hospital and has been in regular clinical use there. PMID:10710184

  14. Orthogonal electrode catheter array for mapping of endocardial focal site of ventricular activation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, J.M.; Nyo, H.; Vera, Z.; Seibert, J.A.; Vogelsang, P.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Precise location of the endocardial site of origin of ventricular tachycardia may facilitate surgical and catheter ablation of this arrhythmia. The endocardial catheter mapping technique can locate the site of ventricular tachycardia within 4-8 cm2 of the earliest site recorded by the catheter. This report describes an orthogonal electrode catheter array (OECA) for mapping and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of endocardial focal site of origin of a plunge electrode paced model of ventricular activation in dogs. The OECA is an 8 F five pole catheter with four peripheral electrodes and one central electrode (total surface area 0.8 cm{sup 2}). In eight mongrel dogs, mapping was performed by arbitrarily dividing the left ventricle (LV) into four segments. Each segment was mapped with OECA to find the earliest segment. Bipolar and unipolar electrograms were obtained. The plunge electrode (not visible on fluoroscopy) site was identified by the earliest wave front arrival times of -30 msec or earlier at two or more electrodes (unipolar electrograms) with reference to the earliest recorded surface ECG (I, AVF, and V1). Validation of the proximity of the five electrodes of the OECA to the plunge electrode was performed by digital radiography and RFA. Pathological examination was performed to document the proximity of the OECA to the plunge electrode and also for the width, depth, and microscopic changes of the ablation. To find the segment with the earliest LV activation a total of 10 {plus minus} 3 (mean {plus minus} SD) positions were mapped. Mean arrival times at the two earlier electrodes were -39 {plus minus} 4 msec and -35 {plus minus} 3 msec. Digital radiography showed the plunge electrode to be within the area covered by all five electrodes in all eight dogs. The plunge electrode was within 1 cm2 area of the region of RFA in all eight dogs.

  15. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  16. Hemodialysis Catheter Care: Identifying Best Cleansing Agents.

    PubMed

    Stupak, Deborah M; Trubilla, Jennifer A; Groller, Susann R

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to create a standardized resource for cleansing both non-tunneled and tunneled hemodialysis catheters, it was discovered that all disinfectants are not compatible with all catheters. This article describes the process used to identify best practices for hemodialysis catheter care and steps taken to standardize practice throughout a hospital network. Standardized evidence-based practice preserves the integrity of catheters while allowing nurses to provide quality care to patients. PMID:27254970

  17. MRI-guided prostate focal laser ablation therapy using a mechatronic needle guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepek, Jeremy; Lindner, Uri; Ghai, Sangeet; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Focal therapy of localized prostate cancer is receiving increased attention due to its potential for providing effective cancer control in select patients with minimal treatment-related side effects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focal laser ablation (FLA) therapy is an attractive modality for such an approach. In FLA therapy, accurate placement of laser fibers is critical to ensuring that the full target volume is ablated. In practice, error in needle placement is invariably present due to pre- to intra-procedure image registration error, needle deflection, prostate motion, and variability in interventionalist skill. In addition, some of these sources of error are difficult to control, since the available workspace and patient positions are restricted within a clinical MRI bore. In an attempt to take full advantage of the utility of intraprocedure MRI, while minimizing error in needle placement, we developed an MRI-compatible mechatronic system for guiding needles to the prostate for FLA therapy. The system has been used to place interstitial catheters for MRI-guided FLA therapy in eight subjects in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. Data from these cases has provided quantification of the level of uncertainty in needle placement error. To relate needle placement error to clinical outcome, we developed a model for predicting the probability of achieving complete focal target ablation for a family of parameterized treatment plans. Results from this work have enabled the specification of evidence-based selection criteria for the maximum target size that can be confidently ablated using this technique, and quantify the benefit that may be gained with improvements in needle placement accuracy.

  18. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  19. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  20. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  1. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  2. Minimizing the complications associated with migrating catheters.

    PubMed

    Billington, A; Crane, C; Jownally, S; Kirkwood, L; Roodhouse, A

    2008-11-01

    This article seeks to explore the clinical practice of urinary catheter fixation. Traditionally, this area of practice has been neglected and nurses are familiar with tension lesions and dermal problems associated with inappropriate or incorrect urinary catheter fixation. A novel solution to this problem is a catheter fixation device. This device secures the catheter safely, making clinical practice safer and the experience of catheterization more tolerable for the patient. An example of a urinary catheter fixation device available in the UK is Bard's StatLock. PMID:18981965

  3. Effectiveness of Integrating Delayed Computed Tomography Angiography Imaging for Left Atrial Appendage Thrombus Exclusion into the Care of Patients Undergoing Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bilchick, Kenneth C.; Mealor, Augustus; Gonzalez, Jorge; Norton, Patrick; Zhuo, David; Mason, Pamela; Ferguson, John D.; Malhotra, Rohit; Mangrum, J. Michael; Darby, Andrew E.; DiMarco, John; Hagspiel, Klaus; Dent, John; Kramer, Christopher M.; Stukenborg, George J.; Salerno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography angiography (CTA) can identify and rule out left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus when delayed imaging is also performed. Objective In patients referred for CTA for pulmonary vein anatomy prior to ablation of atrial fibrillation or atypical left atrial flutter (AF), we sought to determine the effectiveness of a novel clinical protocol for integrating results of CTA delayed imaging of the LAA into pre-procedure care. Methods After making delayed imaging of the LAA part of our routine pre-ablation CTA protocol, we integrated early reporting of pre-ablation CTA LAA imaging results into clinical practice as part of a formal protocol in June 2013. We then analyzed the effectiveness of this protocol by evaluating 320 AF ablation patients with CTA imaging during 2012–2014. Results Among CTA patients with delayed LAA imaging, the sensitivity and negative predictive values for LAA thrombus with intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) or transesophageal echocardiograms (TEEs) as the reference standard were both 100%. ICE during ablation confirmed absence of thrombus in patients with a negative CTA or negative TEE. No patients with either a negative CTA or an equivocal CTA combined with a negative TEE had strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Overall, the need for TEEs decreased from 57.5% to 24.0% during the 3-year period as a result of the CTA protocol. Conclusions Clinical integration of CTA with delayed LAA imaging into the care of patients having catheter ablation of AF is feasible, safe, and effective. Such a protocol could be applied broadly to improve patient care. PMID:26341605

  4. Incorporating a Gaussian model at the catheter tip for improved registration of preoperative surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R., III; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia in which aberrant electrical activity cause the atria to quiver which results in irregular beating of the heart. Catheter ablation therapy is becoming increasingly popular in treating atrial fibrillation, a procedure in which an electrophysiologist guides a catheter into the left atrium and creates radiofrequency lesions to stop the arrhythmia. Typical visualization tools include bi-plane fluoroscopy, 2-D ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps, however, recently there has been increased interest in incorporating preoperative surface models into the procedure. Typical strategies for registration include landmark-based and surface-based methods. Drawbacks of these approaches include difficulty in accurately locating corresponding landmark pairs and the time required to sample surface points with a catheter. In this paper, we describe a new approach which models the catheter tip as a Gaussian kernel and eliminates the need to collect surface points by instead using the stream of continuosly tracked catheter points. We demonstrate the feasibility of this technique with a left atrial phantom model and compare the results with a standard surface based approach.

  5. Saphenous Venous Ablation with Hot Contrast in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Amit Qian Zhong; Kirsch, David; Eissa, Marna; Narra, Pavan; Lopera, Jorge; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wifrido

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To determine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of thermal ablation of the saphenous vein with hot contrast medium. Methods. Twelve saphenous veins of 6 dogs were percutaneously ablated with hot contrast medium. In all animals, ablation was performed in the vein of one leg, followed by ablation in the contralateral side 1 month later. An occlusion balloon catheter was placed in the infragenicular segment of the saphenous vein via a jugular access to prevent unwanted thermal effects on the non-target segment of the saphenous vein. After inflation of the balloon, 10 ml of hot contrast medium was injected under fluoroscopic control through a sheath placed in the saphenous vein above the ankle. A second 10 ml injection of hot contrast medium was made after 5 min in each vessel. Venographic follow-up of the ablated veins was performed at 1 month (n = 12) and 2 months (n = 6). Results. Follow-up venograms showed that all ablated venous segments were occluded at 1 month. In 6 veins which were followed up to 2 months, 4 (66%) remained occluded, 1 (16%) was partially patent, and the remaining vein (16%) was completely patent. In these latter 2 cases, an inadequate amount of hot contrast was delivered to the lumen due to a closed balloon catheter downstream which did not allow contrast to displace blood within the vessel. Discussion. Hot contrast medium thermal ablation of the saphenous vein appears feasible, safe, and effective in the canine model, provided an adequate amount of embolization agent is used.

  6. Development of an "early warning" sensor for encrustation of urinary catheters following Proteus infection.

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Waters, Mark G J; Basil, Leo; Stickler, David J; Williams, David W

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation in long-term urinary catheterized patients can lead to encrustation and blockage of urinary catheters with serious clinical complication. Catheter encrustation stems from infection with urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease generates ammonia from urea, and the elevated pH of the urine results in crystallization of calcium and magnesium phosphates, which block the flow of urine. The aim of this research is to develop an "early warning" silicone sensor for catheter encrustation following bacterial infection of an in vitro bladder model system. The in vitro bladder model was infected with a range of urease positive and negative bacterial strains. Developed sensors enabled catheter blockage to be predicted ~17-24 h in advance of its occurrence. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria and only when catheter blockage followed. In summary, sensors were developed that could predict urinary catheter blockage in in vitro infection models. Translation of these sensors to a clinical environment will allow the timely and appropriate management of catheter blockage in long-term catheterized patients. PMID:21954120

  7. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  8. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  9. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  10. Hemodynamics of Central Venous Catheters: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Clark, Alicia; Ng, Chin Hei; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are used to provide vascular access during hemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Despite several advantages and widespread use, CVCs have a high incidence rate of clot formation during the interdialytic phase (48 hrs). In an attempt the prevent clot formation, hospitals routinely administer heparin, an anticoagulant, into the catheter after a dialysis session. It has been reported, however, that up to 40% of the heparin solution will leak into the blood stream during the interdialytic phase, placing the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences. The aim of this study is to determine the role that advective-diffusive transport plays in the heparin leaking process. Numerical simulations of heparin convective mass transfer have been conducted, showing that while advective losses may be significant at the tip, previous studies may be overestimating the total amount of heparin leakage. To validate the quantitative prediction from the simulations, P.L.I.F. is used to experimentally measure heparin transport from CVCs placed in an idealized Superior Vena Cava with physically accurate pulsatile flow conditions. Improved understanding of flow near the catheter tip is applied to improve catheter design and heparin locking procedures.

  11. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  12. Applications of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in percutaneous ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chyou, Janice Y; Biviano, Angelo; Magno, Pedro; Garan, Hasan; Einstein, Andrew J

    2009-10-01

    Percutaneous catheter ablation is an established therapy for symptomatic drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Accurate delineation of relevant anatomy is critical but often challenging and limited in traditional technologies such as intra-procedural fluoroscopy. There has been an increased interest in non-invasive three-dimensional imaging technologies, especially computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as useful tools for patients undergoing AF ablation. Here, we review applications of CT and MRI before, during, and after AF ablation and highlight areas for future research. PMID:19521756

  13. Laser fiber migration into the pelvic cavity: A rare complication of endovenous laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Lun, Yu; Shen, Shikai; Wu, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Han; Xin, Shijie; Zhang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Endovenous laser ablation is an established alternative to surgery with stripping for the treatment of varicose veins. Ecchymoses and pain are frequently reported side effects of endovenous laser ablation. Device-related complications are rare but serious. We describe here an exceptional complication, necessitating an additional surgical procedure to remove a segment of laser fiber that had migrated into the pelvic cavity. Fortunately, severe damage had not occurred. This case highlights the importance of checking the completeness of the guidewire, catheter, and laser fiber after endovenous laser ablation. PMID:24965101

  14. Thermistor guided radiofrequency ablation of atrial insertion sites in patients with accessory pathways.

    PubMed

    Tracy, C M; Moore, H J; Solomon, A J; Rodak, D J; Fletcher, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has gained acceptance in the treatment of patients with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relation between temperature and other electroconductive parameters in patients undergoing atrial insertion accessory pathway ablation utilizing a thermistor equipped catheter. The mean temperature and power at sites of atrial insertion ablation are lower than has been previously associated with creation of radiofrequency lesions in the ventricle. While high cavitary blood flow in the atrium may result in cooling, the thinner atrial tissue may require less energy to achieve adequate heating than ventricular myocardium. PMID:8552513

  15. Catheter-Based Ultrasound for 3D Control of Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Juang, Titania; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Hsu, I.-Chow; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been investigated for delivering hyperthermia and thermal ablation for the treatment of cancer and benign diseases. Technology includes an intrauterine applicator integrated with an HDR ring applicator, interstitial applicators for hyperthermia delivery during brachytherapy, interstitial applicators for tumor ablation, and transurethral devices for conformal prostate ablation. Arrays of multiple sectored tubular transducers have been fabricated for interstitial and intrauterine hyperthermia applicators. High-power interstitial versions have been evaluated for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control of thermal ablation. Transurethral applicators include curvilinear transducers with rotational sweeping of narrow heating patterns, and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Performance was evaluated in phantom, excised tissue, in vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature monitoring, clinical hyperthermia, and 3D-biothermal simulations with patient anatomy. Interstitial and intrauterine devices can tailor hyperthermia to large treatment volumes, with multisectored control useful to limit exposure to rectum and bladder. Curvilinear transurethral devices with sequential rotation produce target conforming coagulation zones that can cover either the whole gland or defined focal regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the prostate without applicator manipulation. High-power interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate defined target regions while avoiding sensitive tissues. MR temperature monitoring can effectively define the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. In summary, these catheter-based ultrasound devices allow for dynamic control of heating profiles

  16. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  17. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  18. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  19. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  20. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  1. Recent Trends in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Rajesh; Singh, Jagmeet

    2010-01-01

    Catheter ablation provides an important treatment option for patients with both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. It mainly involves pulmonary vein isolation and additional ablations in the left atrium in persistent cases. There have been significant advancements in this procedure to enhance the safety and effectiveness. One of them is the evolution of various imaging modalities to facilitate better visualization of the complex left atrial anatomy and the pulmonary veins in order to deliver the lesions accurately. In this article, we review the electroanatomic mapping systems including the magnetic-based and impedence-based systems. Each of these mapping systems has its own advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we also discuss the role of intracardiac echocardiography and three dimensional rotational angiography in atrial fibrillation ablation. PMID:20473373

  2. Distance of the internal central venous catheter tip from the right atrium is positively correlated with central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Samra, Navdeep S; Gifford, Karen Mathiesen; Roller, Robert; Wolfe, Bruce M; Owings, John T

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with occlusive, infectious, and thrombotic complications. The aim of this study was to determine if internal CVC tip position was correlated with subsequent complications. This was an institutional review board approved single-center retrospective review of 169 consecutive patients who underwent placement of 203 semipermanent CVCs. Using post-placement chest X-rays, a de novo scale of internal catheter tip position was developed. Major complications were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine if catheter tip position predicted subsequent complications. There were 78 men and 91 women with a mean age of 48 ± 11 years. There were 21 catheter tips placed in the subclavian/innominate veins, 32 in the upper superior vena cava, 113 in the atriocaval junction, and 37 in the right atrium. There were 83 complications occurring in 61 (36.1 %) patients, including sepsis in 40 (23.7 %), venous thrombosis in 18 (10.7 %), catheter occlusion in 16 (9.5 %), internal catheter repositioning in 6 (3.6 %), pneumothorax in 2 (1.2 %), and death in 1 (0.6 %). An internal catheter tip position peripheral to the atriocaval junction resulted in a catheter that was more likely to undergo internal repositioning (p < 0.001) and venous thrombosis (p < 0.001). Patients with femoral catheters were more likely to develop sepsis (45 %) than patients whose catheters were inserted through the upper extremity veins (18 %) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, to reduce catheter-associated morbidity and potentially mortality, the internal catheter tip should be positioned at the atriocaval junction or within the right atrium and femoral insertion sites should be avoided whenever possible. PMID:27112774

  3. Ventricular dysfunction following direct-current shock atrioventricular junction ablation.

    PubMed

    Warren, R J; Vohra, J K; Chan, W; Lichtenstein, M; Mond, H G; Hunt, D

    1991-02-01

    Catheter-induced His bundle ablation for refractory supraventricular arrhythmias is most commonly performed with direct-current shock energy of 200-300 joules. The high energy pulse delivered by direct-current shock produces a lesion in the atrioventricular node by fulguration, with the residual energy being dissipated as a pressure wave. The effect of direct-current shock His bundle ablation on global and regional ventricular function was assessed in 14 consecutive patients by radionuclide ventriculography performed before and after ablation and again three months later. All studies were performed with ventricular pacing at 110 bpm. Global left ventricular ejection fraction was found to be significantly reduced at the three month study (0.43 +/- 0.03 vs 0.50 +/- 0.03, pre ablation, p = 0.02). A significant reduction in wall-motion score was also seen in six of the seven patients who had normal wall motion in pacing rhythm prior to ablation. Deterioration was mainly seen at the left and right ventricular apices. The observed reduction in ventricular function that follows direct-current shock His bundle ablation may result from myocardial damage from electro-coagulation or from barotrauma and supports continued investigation into alternative, less traumatic energy sources for the procedure. PMID:2036072

  4. The serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 level is an independent predictor of recurrence after ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Wang, Shun; Cheng, Mian; Peng, Bin; Liang, Jingjun; Huang, He; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Lizhi; Yang, Bo; Cha, Yongmei; Jiang, Hong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether the serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 level is an independent predictor of recurrence after catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Fifty-eight consecutive patients with persistent atrial fibrillation were enrolled and underwent catheter ablation. The serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 level was detected before ablation and its relationship with recurrent arrhythmia was analyzed at the end of the follow-up. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 12.1±7.2 months, 21 (36.2%) patients had a recurrence of their arrhythmia after catheter ablation. At baseline, the matrix metalloproteinase-9 level was higher in the patients with recurrence than in the non-recurrent group (305.77±88.90 vs 234.41±93.36 ng/ml, respectively, p=0.006). A multivariate analysis showed that the matrix metalloproteinase-9 level was an independent predictor of arrhythmia recurrence, as was a history of atrial fibrillation and the diameter of the left atrium. CONCLUSION: The serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 level is an independent predictor of recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. PMID:27276393

  5. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheterin vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangential to the catheter tip. The second, referred to the base to tip method, is an approximation that is used when it is not possible to measure the angle of the tangent line. Optical images of the catheter deflection are analyzed using the absolute tip method to quantitatively validate the predicted deflections from the mathematical model. Optical images of the catheter deflection are also analyzed using the base to tip method to quantitatively determine the differences between the absolute tip and base to tip methods. Finally, the optical images are compared to MR images using the base to tip method to determine the accuracy of measuring the catheter deflection using MR. Results: The optical catheter deflection angles measured for both catheter prototypes using the absolute tip method fit very well to the mathematical model (R{sup 2} = 0.91 and 0.86 for each prototype, respectively). It was found that the angles measured using the base to tip method were consistently smaller than those measured using the absolute tip method. The deflection angles measured

  6. Subpicosecond laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, A. V.; Gamaly, E. G.; Luther-Davies, B.; Taylor, B. T.; Dawes, J.; Chan, A.; Lowe, R. M.; Hannaford, P.

    2002-08-01

    Laser ablation of dental enamel with subpicosecond laser pulses has been studied over the intensity range of (0.1-1.4) x1014 W/cm2 using 95 and 150 fs pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. The experimentally determined ablation threshold of 2.2plus-or-minus0.1 J/cm2 was in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on an electrostatic ablation model. The ablation rate increased linearly with the laser fluence for up to 15 times the ablation threshold. The absence of collateral damage was observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Pulpal temperature measurements showed an increase of about 10 degC during the 200 s course of ablation. However, air cooling at a rate of 5 l/min resulted in the intrapulpal temperature being maintained below the pulpal damage threshhold of 5.5 degC. The material removal rates for subpicosecond precision laser ablation of dental enamel are compared with other techniques.

  7. KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    In 1988, the KTP-532 laser was used to ablate a series of benign urethral strictures. Rather than using a single incision, as in urethrotomy, strictures were treated with a 360$DEG contact photoradiation. Thirty-one males, average age 53.2 years, received 37 treatments. Six patients underwent a second laser treatment. Stricture etiology was commonly iatrogenic (32%), traumatic (16%), and post-gonococcal (10%). Stricture location included mainly bulbar (49%), membranous (20%), and penile (12%) areas. The surgical technique consisted of a circumferential ablation followed by foley catheter placement (mean 10 days). Follow-up on 29 of 31 patients ranged from 1 to 16 months (mean 9.7) Complete success occurred in 17 patients (59%) who had no further symptoms or instrumentation. Partial success was seen in 6 patients (20.5%) with symptoms but no stricture recurrence. Six patients (20.5%) failed therapy requiring additional surgery or regular dilatations. No complications were encountered. Although longer assessment is required, KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures appears efficacious.

  8. KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Turek, P J; Malloy, T R; Cendron, M; Carpiniello, V L; Wein, A J

    1992-10-01

    In 1988 the KTP-532 laser was used to ablate a series of benign urethral strictures. Rather than using a single incision as in urethrotomy, strictures were treated with 360-degree contact photoradiation. Thirty-one male patients, average age 53.2 years, received thirty-seven treatments; 6 patients underwent a second laser treatment. Stricture etiology was commonly iatrogenic (32%), traumatic (16%), and postgonococcal (10%). Stricture location included mainly bulbar (49%), membranous (20%), and penile (12%) areas. The surgical technique consisted of circumferential ablation, followed by Foley catheter placement (mean, 10 days). Follow-up on 29 of 31 patients ranged from one to sixteen months (mean 9.7). Complete success occurred in 17 patients (59%) who had no further symptoms or instrumentation. Partial success was seen in 6 patients (20.5%) with symptom, but not stricture, recurrence. Six patients (20.5%) failed therapy, requiring additional surgery or regular dilations. No complications were seen. Although longer assessment is required, KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures appears efficacious. PMID:1413350

  9. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation without Interruption of Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Sanchez, Javier E; Horton, Rodney; Natale, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) can be cured by pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) in a substantial proportion of patients. The high efficacy of PVAI is partially undermined by a small but concrete periprocedural risk of complications, such as thromboembolic events and bleeding. A correct management of anticoagulation is essential to prevent such complications. Performing PVAI without interruption of oral anticoagulation has been demonstrated feasible by our group in previous studies. Recently, we reported that continuation of therapeutic warfarin during radiofrequency catheter ablation consistently reduces the risk of periprocedural stroke/transient ischemic attack without increasing the risk of hemorrhagic events. Of note, interrupting warfarin anticoagulation may actually increase the risk of stroke even when bridged with heparin. The latter strategy is also associated with an increased risk of minor bleeding. With regard to major bleeding, we found no significant difference between patients with a therapeutic INR and those who were bridged with heparin. Therefore, continuation of therapeutic warfarin during ablation of AF appears to be the best anticoagulation strategy. In this paper we summarize our experience with AF ablation without interruption of anticoagulation. PMID:21577267

  10. Fiber photo-catheters for invasive and less invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshko, Igor; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Vesselov, Leonid; Sigal, Gennady; Laks, Hillel

    2005-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart rhythm abnormality that involves irregular, and often rapid, heartbeats. Recent studies demonstrate the feasibility of treating AF and other structural heart diseases with limited, left-atrial ablation lesion sets. These cardiac ablation procedures reduce the time required to perform the maze procedure surgery, and are less invasive. To produce long continuous transmural lesions, solid-state lasers and high power laser diodes, along with end emitting fiber optic catheters, have been used experimentally. These devices demonstrated promising results, but the absence of side emitting fiber flexible catheters to produce long continuous lesions limits the further development of this technology. In this research, a prototype energy delivery and control system located in a catheter, was demonstrated. The highlight of the proposed system is a flexible 10-cm fiber diffuser that can be used to make continuous photocoagulation lesions for effective maze procedure treatments. The system also includes: a flexible optical reflector; a distributed temperature sensor array for monitoring the temperature in the surrounding tissue; a series of openings for rapid self-attachment to the tissue (vacuum holder - gripper); and an optional closed-loop irrigating chamber with circulating coolant to cool the optical diffuser.

  11. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  16. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure: catheter and surgical interventional therapies.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Ali; Wazni, Oussama

    2014-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation and heart failure commonly coexist in the same patient. Each may adversely affect the other. Atrial fibrillation leads to heart failure exacerbation, left ventricular function deterioration and an increase in thrombo-embolic risk. Therapeutic options targeting atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients include pharmacological and non-pharmacological means. Pharmacological therapy is directed at either rate control using nodal blocking agents or rhythm control using anti-arrhythmic agents, of which the options are limited in patients with heart failure. The landmark AF-CHF trial did not show any benefit of rhythm control strategy as opposed to rate control in patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation. However, patients in this trial as well as in others used mostly amiodarone for rhythm control. This might have negated any positive effects of achieving normal sinus rhythm. Non-pharmacological therapy both for rate and rhythm control is appealing. This includes AV node ablation for rate control, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation and surgical therapy of atrial fibrillation. This review will address non-pharmacologic treatment of AF in heart failure patients. PMID:24132645

  17. Cryo-Balloon Catheter Localization Based on a Support-Vector-Machine Approach.

    PubMed

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Mewes, Philip W; Maier, Andreas; Strobel, Norbert; Brost, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Cryo-balloon catheters have attracted an increasing amount of interest in the medical community as they can reduce patient risk during left atrial pulmonary vein ablation procedures. As cryo-balloon catheters are not equipped with electrodes, they cannot be localized automatically by electro-anatomical mapping systems. As a consequence, X-ray fluoroscopy has remained an important means for guidance during the procedure. Most recently, image guidance methods for fluoroscopy-based procedures have been proposed, but they provide only limited support for cryo-balloon catheters and require significant user interaction. To improve this situation, we propose a novel method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter detection in fluoroscopic images by detecting the cryo-balloon catheter's built-in X-ray marker. Our approach is based on a blob detection algorithm to find possible X-ray marker candidates. Several of these candidates are then excluded using prior knowledge. For the remaining candidates, several catheter specific features are introduced. They are processed using a machine learning approach to arrive at the final X-ray marker position. Our method was evaluated on 75 biplane fluoroscopy images from 40 patients, from two sites, acquired with a biplane angiography system. The method yielded a success rate of 99.0% in plane A and 90.6% in plane B, respectively. The detection achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm±0.82 mm in plane A and 1.13 mm±0.24 mm in plane B. The localization in 3-D was associated with an average error of 0.36 mm±0.86 mm. PMID:26978663

  18. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  19. Tandem balloon catheter for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Finci, L; Meier, B; Steffenino, G; Rutishauser, W

    1986-01-01

    The Tandem balloon catheter is a triple lumen steerable catheter for coronary angioplasty with two separately inflatable balloons of different diameters. Indications and results of 26 consecutive patients treated with a Tandem balloon catheter are reviewed. Adequate distal pressure measurements were obtained in 71% of the cases. In ten patients, the Tandem balloon catheter was selected for two stenoses in different segments of the same coronary artery. Angioplasty was successful for all lesions in five and for at least the strategic lesions in five patients (in one only after changing to a single-balloon catheter). In the seven patients with stenoses in two different coronary arteries of various calibers, angioplasty was successful for both vessels in three and for one vessel in four patients. In the six patients with a very tight stenosis, where the Tandem balloon catheter was selected to predilate with the small balloon, the procedure was technically successful in all, but there was a myocardial infarction in one patient. In the three patients with a chronic total occlusion, where the stiffness of the Tandem balloon was the reason for selection, one recanalization was successful. The Tandem balloon catheter provides a handy tool for complex coronary angioplasty. It offers comparable ease in manipulation and pressure transmission and may save time, money, and radiation exposure by avoiding catheter exchanges. PMID:2949848

  20. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  1. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  2. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  3. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  4. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  5. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  6. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  7. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  8. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  9. In vivo quantitative assessment of catheter patency in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Formation of fibrin sleeves around catheter tips is a central factor in catheter failure during chronic implantation, and such tissue growth can occur despite administration of anticoagulants. We developed a novel method for monitoring catheter patency. This method recognizes the progressive nature of catheter occlusion, and tracks this process over time through measurement of changes in catheter resistance to a standardized 1 mL bolus infusion from a pressurized reservoir. Two indirect measures of catheter patency were used: (a) reservoir residual pressure and (b) reservoir discharge time. This method was applied to the study of catheter patency in rats comparing the effect of catheter material (silastic, polyurethane, Microrenathane™), lock solution (heparin, heparin/dexamethasone) and two different cannulation sites (superior vena cava via the external jugular vein, inferior vena cava via the femoral vein). Our findings reveal that application of flexible smaller-size silastic catheters and a dexamethasone lock solution resulted in prolonged catheter patency. Patency could be maintained over nine weeks with the femoral vein catheters, compared with five weeks with the external jugular vein catheters. The current method for measuring catheter patency provides a useful index for the assessment of tissue growth around the catheter tip. The method also provides an objective and quantitative way of comparing changes in catheter patency for different surgical methods and catheter types. Our method improves on the conventional method of assessing catheter occlusion by judging the ability to aspirate from the catheter. PMID:16004684

  10. Method for Selective Thermal Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  11. Method for selective thermal ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  12. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  13. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  14. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  15. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique. PMID:6421183

  16. Can microbiologists help to assess catheter involvement in candidaemic patients before removal?

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Alcalá, L; Muñoz, P; Martín-Rabadán, P; Guembe, M; Rodríguez-Créixems, M

    2013-02-01

    We compared the efficacy of three techniques--minimal time to positivity (MTTP) of blood cultures (BCs), differential time to positivity (DTTP) of BCs obtained from the catheter and peripheral veins and the number of positive BCs--in predicting catheter involvement in patients with well-demonstrated catheter-related candidaemia (C-RC) and non-catheter-related candidaemia (NC-RC).C-RC was defined as isolation of the same Candida species from blood and catheter tip culture (≥15 cfu/plate). A ROC curve was created for each quantitative variable to determine the best cut-off for predicting C-RC.A total of 108 episodes of candidaemia were included (84 adults and 24 children; 67 C-RC and 41 NC-RC). These were caused mainly by C. albicans (49.1%) and C. parapsilosis (30.6%). The MTTP was significantly shorter in adult patients with C-RC than in those with NC-RC (29.8 vs. 36.8 hours; p 0.035), although no cut-off value provided acceptable accuracy. DTTP had high sensitivity but low specificity for predicting CRC. However, C-RC episodes had a significantly greater number of positive BCs than NC-RC episodes. The optimal cut-off for predicting C-RC was at least two positive BCs out of three, with the following validity values: sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 62.5%; positive predictive value, 83.3%; negative predictive value, 100%; accuracy, 87.0%.None of the tests evaluated allow a clear-cut prediction of C-RC and the criteria accepted for bacteraemia should not be automatically extrapolated to candidaemia. We found that a low number of positive BCs with Candida had a high negative predictive value for a catheter origin. PMID:23231412

  17. In situ treatment of liver using catheter based therapeutic ultrasound with combined imaging and GPS tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Heffter, Tamas; Williams, Emery; Bromfield, Corinne; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Rund, Laurie; Ehrhardt, John M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Burdette, E. Clif

    2013-02-01

    Extensive surgical procedure or liver transplant still remains the gold standard for treating slow-growing tumors in liver. But only few candidates are suitable for such procedure due to poor liver function, tumors in unresectable locations or presence of other liver diseases. In such situations, minimally invasive surgery may be the best therapeutic procedure. The use of RF, laser and ultrasound ablation techniques has gained considerable interest over the past several years to treat liver diseases. The success of such minimally invasive procedure depends on accurately targeting the desired region and guiding the entire procedure. The purpose of this study is to use ultrasound imaging and GPS tracking system to accurately place a steerable acoustic ablator and multiple temperature sensors in porcine liver in situ. Temperature sensors were place at eight different locations to estimate thermal distribution in the three-dimensional treated volume. Acoustic ablator of center frequency of 7 MHz was used for the experiments. During therapy a maximum temperature of 60-65 °C was observed at a distance 8-10 mm from the center of the ablation transducer. The dose distribution was analyzed and compared with the gross pathology of the treated region. Accurate placement of the acoustic applicator and temperature sensors were achieved using the combined image-guidance and the tracking system. By combining ultrasound imaging and GPS tracking system accurate placement of catheter based acoustic ablation applicator can be achieved in livers in situ.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  20. Optimization of the generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Leblanc, Sarah; Vienne, Ariane; Rouquette, Alexandre; Beuvon, Frederic; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimal generator settings for endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. METHODS: Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation was performed in live swine on the ampulla of Vater, the common bile duct and in the hepatic parenchyma. Radiofrequency ablation time, “effect”, and power were allowed to vary. The animals were sacrificed two hours after the procedure. Histopathological assessment of the depth of the thermal lesions was performed. RESULTS: Twenty-five radiofrequency bursts were applied in three swine. In the ampulla of Vater (n = 3), necrosis of the duodenal wall was observed starting with an effect set at 8, power output set at 10 W, and a 30 s shot duration, whereas superficial mucosal damage of up to 350 μm in depth was recorded for an effect set at 8, power output set at 6 W and a 30 s shot duration. In the common bile duct (n = 4), a 1070 μm, safe and efficient ablation was obtained for an effect set at 8, a power output of 8 W, and an ablation time of 30 s. Within the hepatic parenchyma (n = 18), the depth of tissue damage varied from 1620 μm (effect = 8, power = 10 W, ablation time = 15 s) to 4480 μm (effect = 8, power = 8 W, ablation time = 90 s). CONCLUSION: The duration of the catheter application appeared to be the most important parameter influencing the depth of the thermal injury during endobiliary radiofrequency ablation. In healthy swine, the currently recommended settings of the generator may induce severe, supratherapeutic tissue damage in the biliary tree, especially in the high-risk area of the ampulla of Vater. PMID:26566429

  1. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  2. Microsimulation Model Predicts Survival Benefit of Radiofrequency Ablation and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy for Treating Inoperable Stage I Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tramontano, Angela C.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Kong, Chung Yin; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.; Lanuti, Michael; Gazelle, G. Scott; McMahon, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A subset of patients with stage IA and IB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is ineligible for surgical resection and undergoes radiation therapy. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and stereotactic body radiotherapy are newer potentially attractive alternative therapies. MATERIALS AND METHODS We added RFA and stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment modules to a microsimulation model that simulates lung cancer’s natural history, detection, and treatment. Natural history parameters were previously estimated via calibration against tumor registry data and cohort studies; the model was validated with screening study and cohort data. RFA model parameters were calibrated against 2-year survival from the Radiofrequency Ablation of Pulmonary Tumor Response Evaluation (RAPTURE) study, and stereotactic body radiotherapy model parameters were calibrated against 3-year survival from a phase 2 prospective trial. We simulated lifetime histories of identical patients with early-stage NSCLC who were ineligible for resection, who were treated with radiation therapy, RFA, or stereotactic body radiotherapy under a range of scenarios. From 5,000,000 simulated individuals, we selected a cohort of patients with stage I medically inoperable cancer for analysis (n = 2056 per treatment scenario). Main outcomes were life expectancy gains. RESULTS RFA or stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment in patients with peripheral stage IA or IB NSCLC who were nonoperative candidates resulted in life expectancy gains of 1.71 and 1.46 life-years, respectively, compared with universal radiation therapy. A strategy where patients with central tumors underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy and those with peripheral tumors underwent RFA resulted in a gain of 2.02 life-years compared with universal radiation therapy. Findings were robust with respect to changes in model parameters. CONCLUSION Microsimulation modeling results suggest that RFA and stereotactic body radiotherapy could provide life

  3. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  4. Non-fluoroscopic Catheter Tracking for Fluoroscopy Reduction in Interventional Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Philipp; Kircher, Simon; Rolf, Sascha; Richter, Sergio; Doering, Micha; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A technological platform (MediGuide) has been recently introduced for non-fluoroscopic catheter tracking. In several studies, we have demonstrated that the application of this non-fluoroscopic catheter visualization system (NFCV) reduces fluoroscopy time and dose by 90-95% in a variety of electrophysiology (EP) procedures. This can be of relevance not only to the patients, but also to the nurses and physicians working in the EP lab. Furthermore, in a subset of indications such as supraventricular tachycardias, NFCV enables a fully non-fluoroscopic procedure and allows the lab staff to work without wearing lead aprons. With this protocol, we demonstrate that even complex procedures such as ablations of atrial fibrillation, that are typically associated with fluoroscopy times of >30 min in conventional settings, can safely be performed with a reduction of >90% in fluoroscopy exposure by the additional use of NFCV. PMID:26066541

  5. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip radiofrequency ablation in left ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ichiro; Nuo, Min; Okumura, Yasuo; Ohkubo, Kimie; Ashino, Sonoko; Kofune, Masayoshi; Kofune, Tatsuya; Nakai, Toshiko; Kasamaki, Yuji; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2010-05-01

    Steam pop and intramural charring have been reported during cooled-tip radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). We studied the feasibility of temperature-controlled cooled-tip RFCA in the canine heart.An internally cooled ablation catheter was inserted into the left ventricle. A custom-made radiofrequency (RF) generator capable of controlling the tip-temperature at the preset level by slow increases in the power was used. Temperature-controlled cooled-tip RF applications were performed at a target temperature of 40 degrees C for 90 seconds. Acute study: Intramyocardial temperature was measured at the ablation site in 10 dogs by inserting a fluoroptic probe. Chronic study: Lesion depth and volume were measured in 5 dogs after 3 weeks of survival. In the acute study, no pop or abrupt impedance rise was observed. Maximum intramyocardial temperature was 72.4 + or - 14.4 degrees C at 2-4 mm above the endocardium. No coagulum formation, craters, or intramural charring were observed. Maximum lesion depth was 6.7 + or - 1.5 mm, and lesion volume was 404 + or - 219 mm3. In the chronic study, maximum lesion depth was 5.9 + or - 1.1 mm, and lesion volume was 281 + or - 210 mm(3).Temperature controlled RFCA is feasible with a cooled-tip catheter and an RF generator that slowly increases the RF power until the preset catheter-tip temperature is reached. PMID:20558910

  6. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  7. [Radiofrequency ablation in tachycardias due to accessory pathways in a pediatric population].

    PubMed

    Iturralde, P; Saucedo, J; Colín, L; Kershenovich, S; Robledo, R; Garrido, A; González-Hermosillo, J A; Buendía, A

    1994-01-01

    Catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways using radiofrequency current was attempted in 61 children and young adolescents less than 18 years of age who were referred for treatment of symptomatic supraventricular tachycardia. Thirty-three children had the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and 30 tachyarrhythmias related to an accessory pathway conducting only in retrograde fashion. Ablation of left sided accessory pathways was usually attempted utilizing an arterial approach to the annulus of the mitral valve, only in one case we used the transseptal approach, while the venous route to the atrial aspect of the tricuspid valvular annulus was chosen for right sided accessory connections. Ablation of 55 of 63 accessory connections was achieved (87% success) with a range of 1 to 42 applications of radiofrequency current. The sessions were completed within 19 to 180 minutes, and we used within 16 to 45 watts of radiofrequency current. Two patients had complications as a result of their ablation procedure. One patient had complete heart block but did not require pacemaker implantation, and other one had mitral regurgitation. A second session was necessary in three patients, two of three accessory pathways were ablated, giving a success rate of 90%. During a one year period of follow-up, we had 4 recurrences (7.2%). Catheter ablation using radiofrequency current is a highly effective and safe curative approach for treating young patients with supraventricular tachycardia mediated by accessory pathways. PMID:7840718

  8. [The radiofrequency ablation of accessory pathways in 100 consecutive patients with supraventricular tachycardias].

    PubMed

    Colín, L; Kershenovich, S; Iturralde, P; Dan, L; Martínez Ríos, M A; Casanova, M; González Hermosillo, J A

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the results and the complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation, of accessory pathways in 100 consecutive patients. We had one patient with two pathways. Of the 101 accessory pathways, 56 were overt and 45 concealed. Only 19 patients have had a previous electrophysiology study, in the others, the study and the ablation were performed simultaneously. The location of the accessory pathways were as follows: 61 pathways in the free wall of the left ventricle, 4 in the free wall of the right ventricle, 25 in the left posteroseptal region, 9 in the right posteroseptal region and 2 in the right anteroseptal area. The time required for the diagnostic component of the electrophysiology study, the ablation procedure and the fluoroscopic time was recorded for each patient. Ninety-one of 101 accessory AV connections were successfully ablated (90%). Our success rate for the initial attempt was 87%. We had the opportunity to do a second attempt in only 4 out of 14 patients. The mean time of the procedure, including the electrophysiology test and the ablation was 95.6 %/-55.3 minutes. We have had a recurrence of 9% and 4% of non fatal complications. Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be performed safely and with a high success rate. PMID:8466365

  9. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  10. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  11. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  12. [RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Satoru; Miyade, Yoshio; Inaki, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Significant advances in the endovenous technique for treating incompetent saphenous veins could change the surgical strategy in patients with varicose veins. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was approved as a new technique for the treatment of varicose veins in Japan in June 2014. In RFA, the ablation temperature is controlled by a sensor at the upper end of the catheter. The vein wall is heated with stable conductive power of 120 degrees C, resulting in endothelial denudation. The RFA method was approved in 1998 in Europe and in 1999 in the USA. The ClosurePLUS catheter was developed in 2003 and ClosureFAST in 2006. High occlusion rates and lower postoperative complication rates were reported with ClosureFAST than with ClosurePLUS. It is expected that this new ablation technique will control saphenous vein reflux with less pain and less ecchymosis after surgery. The treatment of varicose veins is less invasive with RFA devices and will become widely accepted as an alternative to conventional surgery for varicose veins in Japan. PMID:26281655

  13. Catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Suzan; Ghods, Ahad; Afshar, Reza

    2007-03-01

    Hemodialysis catheter related infections (HCRI) are one of the major causes of increasing mortality, morbidity and cost of therapy in hemodialysis patients. Prevention of HCRI requires the identification of predisposing risk factors. To determine the frequency of HCRI risk factors, we studied 116 patients (54% male, mean age of 49.5+/-16 years) patients with HCRI between 2003-2004. Forty one percent of the patients were diabetic. There was a history of previous catheter placement and infection in 41% and 32% of patients, respectively. Pathogenic organisms isolated from blood cultures included Staphylococcus-aureus 42%, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci 20%, E. Coli 19%, Enterococci 7%, Streptococcus D 7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4%, and Klebsiella 1%. Bacterial resistance to vancomycin and amikacin was present in 7% and 4% of the cases, respectively. Hemodialysis catheter related blood borne infections comprised 67% of the total blood-borne infections in our hospital. No significant statistical association was found between HCRI and age, gender, diabetes mellitus, serum albumin level <30 g/L, leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anatomical location of catheter, mean duration of antibiotic therapy, mean catheter duration, frequency of hemodialysis sessions, pathogenic organisms, and history of previous catheter infection. We conclude that the prevalence of pathogenic organisms of HCRI were similar to previous studies. However, bacterial resistance to antibiotics was low. The mean duration of catheter usage was longer than previously reported. PMID:17237890

  14. Lung Cancer Ablation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    de Baere, Thierry; Farouil, Geoffroy; Deschamps, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated to be both feasible and safe in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique for ablation, has a reported rate of complete ablation of ~90%, with best results obtained in tumors <2 to 3 cm in diameter. The best reported 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of NSCLC are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7%, respectively. It is noteworthy that in most studies, cancer-specific survival is greater than overall survival due to severe comorbidities in patients treated with RFA for NSCLC. Aside from tumor size and tumor stage, these comorbidities are predictive of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave and irreversible electroporation may in the future prove to overcome some of the limitations of RFA, namely for large tumors or tumors close to large vessels. Stereotactic body radiation therapy has also been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in treating small lung tumors and will need to be compared with percutaneous ablation. This article reviews the current evidence regarding RFA for lung cancer. PMID:24436531

  15. Toward guidance of epicardial cardiac radiofrequency ablation therapy using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the standard of care to cure many cardiac arrhythmias. Epicardial ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia has limited success rates due in part to the presence of epicardial fat, which prevents proper rf energy delivery, inadequate contact of ablation catheter with tissue, and increased likelihood of complications with energy delivery in close proximity to coronary vessels. A method to directly visualize the epicardial surface during RFA could potentially provide feedback to reduce complications and titrate rf energy dose by detecting critical structures, assessing probe contact, and confirming energy delivery by visualizing lesion formation. Currently, there is no technology available for direct visualization of the heart surface during epicardial RFA therapy. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to fill this unmet need. Spectral domain OCT at 1310 nm is employed to image the epicardial surface of freshly excised swine hearts using a microscope integrated bench-top scanner and a forward imaging catheter probe. OCT image features are observed that clearly distinguish untreated myocardium, ablation lesions, epicardial fat, and coronary vessels, and assess tissue contact with catheter-based imaging. These results support the potential for real-time guidance of epicardial RFA therapy using OCT imaging. PMID:20799788

  16. Toward guidance of epicardial cardiac radiofrequency ablation therapy using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Christine P.; Quan, Kara J.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is the standard of care to cure many cardiac arrhythmias. Epicardial ablation for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia has limited success rates due in part to the presence of epicardial fat, which prevents proper rf energy delivery, inadequate contact of ablation catheter with tissue, and increased likelihood of complications with energy delivery in close proximity to coronary vessels. A method to directly visualize the epicardial surface during RFA could potentially provide feedback to reduce complications and titrate rf energy dose by detecting critical structures, assessing probe contact, and confirming energy delivery by visualizing lesion formation. Currently, there is no technology available for direct visualization of the heart surface during epicardial RFA therapy. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has the potential to fill this unmet need. Spectral domain OCT at 1310 nm is employed to image the epicardial surface of freshly excised swine hearts using a microscope integrated bench-top scanner and a forward imaging catheter probe. OCT image features are observed that clearly distinguish untreated myocardium, ablation lesions, epicardial fat, and coronary vessels, and assess tissue contact with catheter-based imaging. These results support the potential for real-time guidance of epicardial RFA therapy using OCT imaging.

  17. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  18. [Pericardial tamponade due to malpositioned cooling catheter].

    PubMed

    Löwer, C; Niedeggen, A; Janssens, U

    2016-05-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who received prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiopulmonary arrest is reported. In the hospital, coronary angiography was performed including percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending artery and placement of a cooling catheter. After approximately 30 min, severe hypotension progressively developed. Pericardial tamponade was identified and treated by pericardial puncture. Clear fluid was drained. Transesophageal echocardiography detected a perforation of the right atrial roof by the cooling catheter. Open surgery was performed immediately and the catheter was removed. The patient was discharged from the hospital without any further complication 10 days later. PMID:26065384

  19. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  20. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  1. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  2. Dialysis catheter fibrin sheath stripping: a useful technique after failed catheter exchange.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ali, Af; Uhwut, E; Liew, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheath formation around long-term haemodialysis catheter is a common cause of failed dialysis access. Treatment options include pharmacological and mechanical methods. This paper reports a case of failed dialysis access due to fibrin sheath encasement. Pharmacologic thrombolysis, mechanical disruption using guide wire and catheter exchange had failed to address the issue. Eventually, fibrin sheath stripping using the loop snare technique was able to successfully restore the catheter function. PMID:22970064

  3. Cryoballoon or Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Brugada, Josep; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Metzner, Andreas; Ouyang, Feifan; Chun, K R Julian; Elvan, Arif; Arentz, Thomas; Bestehorn, Kurt; Pocock, Stuart J; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Tondo, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend pulmonary-vein isolation by means of catheter ablation as treatment for drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Radiofrequency ablation is the most common method, and cryoballoon ablation is the second most frequently used technology. Methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized trial to determine whether cryoballoon ablation was noninferior to radiofrequency ablation in symptomatic patients with drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. The primary efficacy end point in a time-to-event analysis was the first documented clinical failure (recurrence of atrial fibrillation, occurrence of atrial flutter or atrial tachycardia, use of antiarrhythmic drugs, or repeat ablation) following a 90-day period after the index ablation. The noninferiority margin was prespecified as a hazard ratio of 1.43. The primary safety end point was a composite of death, cerebrovascular events, or serious treatment-related adverse events. Results A total of 762 patients underwent randomization (378 assigned to cryoballoon ablation and 384 assigned to radiofrequency ablation). The mean duration of follow-up was 1.5 years. The primary efficacy end point occurred in 138 patients in the cryoballoon group and in 143 in the radiofrequency group (1-year Kaplan-Meier event rate estimates, 34.6% and 35.9%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.22; P<0.001 for noninferiority). The primary safety end point occurred in 40 patients in the cryoballoon group and in 51 patients in the radiofrequency group (1-year Kaplan-Meier event rate estimates, 10.2% and 12.8%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.18; P=0.24). Conclusions In this randomized trial, cryoballoon ablation was noninferior to radiofrequency ablation with respect to efficacy for the treatment of patients with drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and there was no significant difference between the two methods with regard to

  4. Serum inflammatory factors and circulating immunosuppressive cells are predictive markers for efficacy of radiofrequency ablation in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T; Sevko, A; Heussel, C P; Umansky, L; Beckhove, P; Dienemann, H; Safi, S; Utikal, J; Hoffmann, H; Umansky, V

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been developed as a new tool in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in non-surgical patients. There is growing evidence that RFA-mediated necrosis can modulate host immune responses. Here we analysed serum inflammatory factors as well as immunosuppressive cells in the peripheral blood to discover possible prognostic indicators. Peripheral blood and serum samples were collected before RFA and within 3 months after the treatment in a total of 12 patients. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors were measured in serum by the Bio-Plex assay. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated in the peripheral blood via flow cytometry. In patients developing local or lymphogenic tumour relapse (n = 4), we found an early significant increase in the concentration of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α as well as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-2 and CCL-4 compared to patients without relapse (n = 4) and healthy donors (n = 5). These changes were associated with an elevated activity of circulating MDSC indicated by an increased nitric oxide (NO) production in these cells. Elevated serum levels of TNF-α, CCL-2 and CCL-4 associated with an increased NO production in circulating MDSCs might be an early indicator of the incomplete RFA and subsequently a potential tumour relapse in NSCLC. PMID:25644608

  5. In vivo thermal ablation monitoring using ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Rudich, Steven M; Alqadah, Amel; Karunakaran, Chandra Priya; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Previous work indicated that ultrasound echo decorrelation imaging can track and quantify changes in echo signals to predict thermal damage during in vitro radiofrequency ablation (RFA). In the in vivo studies reported here, the feasibility of using echo decorrelation imaging as a treatment monitoring tool was assessed. RFA was performed on normal swine liver (N = 5), and ultrasound ablation using image-ablate arrays was performed on rabbit liver implanted with VX2 tumors (N = 2). Echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter were computed from Hilbert transformed pulse-echo data acquired during RFA and ultrasound ablation treatments. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to assess the ability of echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter to predict ablation. Area under the ROC curves (AUROC) was determined for RFA and ultrasound ablation using echo decorrelation imaging. Ablation was predicted more accurately using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC = 0.832 and 0.776 for RFA and ultrasound ablation, respectively) than using integrated backscatter (AUROC = 0.734 and 0.494). PMID:24239361

  6. Contemporary techniques for catheter-based intervention for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cuisset, Thomas; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-05-17

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiovascular affection and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Invasive treatment of symptomatic patients with HOCM refractory to drug therapy was limited to surgical myomectomy for years. In the mid 1990s, alcohol septal ablation (ASA) emerged as a new and less invasive option for septal ablation (SA) and is now considered a good alternative with excellent short- and long-term outcomes. Besides ASA, other techniques have been promoted to treat HOCM. The present review aims to summarise current practice and evidence of catheter-based techniques from the treatment of HOCM. We also detail technical points to achieve a safe and effective procedure. PMID:27174111

  7. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  8. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  9. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  10. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  11. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  12. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  13. Prostate thermal therapy with catheter-based ultrasound devices and MR thermal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Ross, Tony; Wootton, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Ricke, Viola; Liu, Erin H.; Chen, Jing; Bouley, Donna M.; Van den Bosch, Maurice; Sommer, Graham

    2007-02-01

    Four types of transurethral applicators were devised for thermal ablation of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring: sectored tubular transducer devices with directional heating patterns; planar and curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. These devices are integrated with a 4 mm delivery catheter, incorporate an inflatable cooling balloon (10 mm OD) for positioning within the prostate and capable of rotation via an MR-compatible motor. Interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control. In vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate the heating technology and develop treatment control strategies. MR thermal imaging in a 0.5 T interventional MRI was used to monitor temperature and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. Sequential rotation and modulated dwell time can conform thermal ablation to selected regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. Interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate the posterior peripheral zone of the gland while protecting the rectum. The MR derived 52 °C and lethal thermal dose contours (t 43=240 min) allowed for real-time control of the applicators and effectively defined the extent of thermal damage. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, combined with MR thermal monitoring, can produce relatively fast and precise thermal ablation of prostate, with potential for treatment of cancer or BPH.

  14. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  15. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  16. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  17. Comparison of transcatheter laser and direct-current shock ablation of endocardium near tricuspid anulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Wang, Shi-Wen; Li, Junheng

    1993-03-01

    Forty to eighty percent of the patients with accessory pathways (APs) manifest themselves by tachyarrhythmias. Many of these patients needed either life-long medical therapy or surgery. In order to avoid the discomfort and expenses in surgical procedures, closed chest percutaneous catheter ablation of APs became a potentially desirable therapeutic approach. Many investigations indicated that ablation of right APs by transcatheter direct current (dc) shock could cause life-threatening arrhythmias, right coronary arterical (RCA) spasm, etc. With the development of transcatheter laser technique, it has been used in drug-incurable arrhythmias. The results show that laser ablation is much safer than surgery and electric shock therapy. The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness, advantages, and complications with transcatheter Nd:YAG laser and dc shock in the ablation of right atrioventricular accessory pathways in the atrium near the tricuspid annulus (TA) in 20 dogs.

  18. Mechanical properties and imaging characteristics of remanufactured intravascular ultrasound catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Haager, P; Mintz, G; Klues, H

    2000-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as a routine device in interventional cardiology is handicapped by its high price. 19 factory-made, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters which consist of sterilized, used phased-array IVUS transducers inserted into a new catheter shaft were compared with 23 new IVUS catheters. 3 mechanical and 4 imaging characteristics were assessed on a 5 point scale (1 = unacceptable, 5 = excellent). Mechanical as well as imaging properties of 'remanufactured' IVUS catheter were comparable to new catheters with excellent ratings for each of the evaluated characteristics in 38 to 94% of 'remanufactured' catheters and 50 to 96% of new catheters. The initial failure rate for 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters was 31.6% vs. 4.3% for new catheters (P < 0.05). Overall failure rate was 47.3% for "remanufactured" catheters vs. 8.7% for new catheters (P < 0.05). The failure was due to an electronic connecting problem occurring during mechanical stress to the IVUS catheter. In conclusion, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters offer mechanical and imaging characteristics which are comparable to new catheters. Improvements in the 'remanufacturing' process to resolve the high rate of electronic connecting problems may make this a promising approach to substantially lower the price of IVUS catheters. PMID:10832621

  19. Haemolyzed samples: responsibility of short catheters.

    PubMed

    Raisky, F; Gauthier, C; Marchal, A; Blum, D

    1994-01-01

    The haemolysis of blood samples is a source of error in the electrolytic and enzymatic determination in clinical biochemistry. This circumstance seems dependent on the material used for the venepuncture. In this study we compared three kinds of material in 350 patients who were sampled in the emergency department. This randomized study compared the haemolysis of blood samples collected with stainless steel needles and short catheters, either Teflon FEP (Cathlon Critikon) or polyurethane Vialon (Insyte Becton-Dickinson). Quantification of hemolysis was performed by assay of the optical density of plasma haemoglobin. Results were analysed, after verification of the randomization, by one-way analysis of variance by ranks. This study demonstrated a highly significant relation between occurrence of haemolysis and the sampling material, used according to its technical obligations. Haemolysis occurred frequently when short catheters were used in 42% and 55% of cases with the Teflon and Vialon catheters, respectively. Haemolysis was much less frequent with stainless steel needles (12%). This difference was even more marked for haemoglobin levels above 1.5 milligrams of plasma, where the incidence was 4.2%, 9% and 30%, respectively, for the stainless steel needles, the Teflon catheter and the Vialon catheter. This study induced our emergency department to take more blood samples with a needle, even if an infusion was to be given subsequently, or to take them using a Teflon catheter. PMID:7840428

  20. High risk in atrial fibrillation following an ablation procedure: the wide usefulness of the CHADS(2) score.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, Laurent; Taillandier, Sophie; Clementy, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of: Chao TF, Ambrose K, Tsao HM et al. Relationship between the CHADS(2) score and risk of very late recurrences after catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Heart Rhythm 9(8), 1185-1191 (2012). Limited data are available on the predictors of adverse events and recurrences in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. In a retrospective analysis of 238 patients with paroxysmal AF treated with catheter ablation, it was found that the congestive heart failure, hypertension, age >75 years, diabetes and previous stroke/transient ischemic attack (CHADS(2)) score was an independent predictor of AF recurrences. Moreover, among patients without recurrences at 2 years post-ablation, future recurrence rate during the subsequent follow-up was 64% in those with a CHADS(2) score of less than three, while it was only 3% in patients with a CHADS(2) score of zero. Patients with a higher CHADS(2) score have a different substrate, a more marked disease in the atrium and this may explain the higher rate of recurrence observed after AF ablation. Several more complex scores are available to separately identify the risk of different events in AF: stroke and embolic events, bleeding events, AF recurrences and progression to more sustained forms of AF. Whether it is a better strategy to use the simple CHADS(2) score to rapidly identify a global risk of all future events in AF more widely remains to be determined. PMID:23013122

  1. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  2. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  3. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  4. Implementing the Effects of Changing Landscape by the Recent Bark Beetle Infestation on Snow Accumulation and Ablation to More Accurately Predict Stream Flow in the Upper Little Laramie River, Wyoming watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heward, J.; Ohara, N.

    2014-12-01

    In many alpine regions, especially in the western United States, the snow pack is the cause of the peak discharge and most of the annual flow. A distributed snow melt model with a point-scale snow melt theory is used to estimate the timing and intensity of both snow accumulation and ablation. The type and distribution of vegetation across a watershed influences timing and intensity of snow melt processes. Efforts are being made to understand how a changing landscape will ultimately affect stream flow in a mountainous environment. This study includes an analysis of the effects of the recent bark beetle infestation, using leaf area index (LAI) data acquired from MODIS data sets. These changes were incorporated into the snow model to more accurately predict snow melt timing and intensity. It was observed through the primary model implementation that snowmelt was intensified by the LAI reduction. The radiation change and turbulent flux effects were separately quantified by the vegetation parameterization in the snow model. This distributed snow model will be used to more accurately predict stream flow in the Upper Little Laramie River, Wyoming watershed.

  5. Pulmonary vein triggers, focal sources, rotors and atrial cardiomyopathy: implications for the choice of the most effective ablation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pison, L; Tilz, R; Jalife, J; Haïssaguerre, M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism(s) underlying atrial fibrillation (AF) is the foundation on which current ablation strategies are built. In the vast majority of patients with paroxysmal AF, the ablation procedure should target the pulmonary veins. In patients with nonparoxysmal AF, however, pulmonary vein isolation alone seems to be insufficient to prevent the arrhythmia. Several recent clinical trials have investigated the concept that rotors (re-entry based on a meandering central core from which spiral waves emanate) might be the mechanism responsible for sustaining AF. Ablation of these localized AF sources is an important step towards substrate-driven procedures in persistent AF. Hybrid AF ablation procedures, based on the integration of endocardial transcatheter and epicardial off-pump surgical techniques, have been introduced to overcome their mutual shortcomings. The long-term results are encouraging, especially in currently challenging settings such as nonparoxysmal AF and failed endocardial catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26991806

  6. Current ablation techniques for persistent atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Dagres, Nikolaos; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Pison, Laurent; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this survey was to provide insight into current practice regarding ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) among members of the European Heart Rhythm Association electrophysiology research network. Thirty centres responded to the survey. The main ablation technique for first-time ablation was stand-alone pulmonary vein isolation (PVI): in 67% of the centres for persistent but not long-standing AF and in 37% of the centres for long-standing persistent AF as well. Other applied techniques were ablation of fractionated electrograms, placement of linear lesions, stepwise approach until AF termination, and substrate mapping and isolation of low-voltage areas. However, the percentage of centres applying these techniques during first ablation did not exceed 25% for any technique. When stand-alone PVI was performed in patients with persistent but not long-standing AF, the majority (80%) of the centres used an irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter whereas 20% of the respondents used the cryoballoon. Similar results were reported for ablation of long-standing persistent AF (radiofrequency 90%, cryoballoon 10%). Neither rotor mapping nor one-shot ablation tools were used as the main first-time ablation methods. Systematic search for non-pulmonary vein triggers was performed only in 10% of the centres. Most common 1-year success rate off antiarrhythmic drugs was 50-60%. Only 27% of the centres knew their 5-year results. In conclusion, patients with persistent AF represent a significant proportion of AF patients undergoing ablation. There is a shift towards stand-alone PVI being the primary choice in many centres for first-time ablation in these patients. The wide variation in the use of additional techniques and in the choice of endpoints reflects the uncertainties and lack of guidance regarding the most optimal approach. Procedural success rates are modest and long-term outcomes are unknown in most centres. PMID:26498718

  7. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  8. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  9. Recurrent accessory pathway conduction in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: How to ablate?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daniel Y.; Weiner, Shepard D.; Garan, Hasan; Whang, William

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis We report a case of a malignant right free wall AP that showed very rapid conduction during atrial fibrillation. The accessory pathway was attached to from the right atrial appendage to the right ventricle. Catheter ablation from an endocardial approach was met with limited success. Epicardial mapping of the atrial insertion site was achieved via a subxiphoid pericardial puncture. Long-term success was noted after ablation was performed in the epicardial space at the site of the tightest VA interval. PMID:25632309

  10. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  11. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated. PMID:25978469

  12. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  13. Consensus for the Treatment of Varicose Vein with Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Jin Hyun; Kim, Woo-Shik; Jung, In Mok; Park, Ki-Hyuk; Lee, Taeseung; Kang, Jin Mo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the schematic protocol of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of varicose veins. Indication: anatomic or pathophysiologic indication includes venous diameter within 2–20 mm, reflux time ≥0.5 seconds and distance from the skin ≥5 mm or subfascial location. Access: it is recommended to access at or above the knee joint for great saphenous vein and above the mid-calf for small saphenous vein. Catheter placement: the catheter tip should be placed 2.0 cm inferior to the saphenofemoral or saphenopopliteal junction. Endovenous heat-induced thrombosis ≥class III should be treated with low-molecular weight heparin. Tumescent solution: the composition of solution can be variable (e.g., 2% lidocaine 20 mL+500 mL normal saline+bicarbonate 2.5 mL with/without epinephrine). Infiltration can be done from each direction. Ablation: two cycles’ ablation for the first proximal segment of saphenous vein and the segment with the incompetent perforators is recommended. The other segments should be ablated one time. During RF energy delivery, it is recommended to apply external compression. Concomitant procedure: It is recommended to do simultaneously ambulatory phlebectomy. For sclerotherapy, it is recommended to defer at least 2 weeks. Post-procedural management: post-procedural ambulation is encouraged to reduce the thrombotic complications. Compression stocking should be applied for at least 7 days. Minor daily activity is not limited, but strenuous activities should be avoided for 2 weeks. It is suggested to take showers after 24 hours and tub baths, swimming, or soaking in water after 2 weeks. PMID:26217628

  14. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  15. Cryoablation: how to improve results in atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ablation?

    PubMed Central

    Schwagten, Bruno; Van Belle, Yves; Jordaens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Ablation for atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia is very effective, with a potential for damage to the normal conduction system. Cryoablation is an alternative, as it allows cryomapping, which permits assessment of slow pathway elimination at innocent freezing temperatures, avoiding permanent damage to the normal conduction system. It is associated with shorter radiation times and the absence of heart block in all published data. We discuss in this overview different approaches of cryoenergy delivery (focusing on spot catheter ablation), and how lesion formation is influenced by catheter tip size, application duration, and freezing rate. Some advantages of cryoenergy are explained. Whether these features also apply for an approach with a cryoballoon, e.g. for atrial fibrillation is unclear. PMID:20719780

  16. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  17. [Swan Ganz catheter. Experts opinion].

    PubMed

    Cohen Arazi, Hernán; Nani, Sebastián; Giorgi, Mariano; Guardiani, Fernando; Caturla, Nicolás; Benzadón, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Investigators have raised doubts as to the safety of the Swan Ganz catheter (SGC). In order to define the point of view of cardiologists in our country, the Argentine Society of Cardiology's Emergency Council organized a meeting to analyze their views in different settings (non-cardiac surgery, cardiac surgery, acute coronary syndromes and heart failure) using the RAND-UCLA appropriateness method. A detailed review with the scientific evidence was sent to the experts in cardiology prior to the meeting in the SAC auditorium where the panellists selected the clinical variables create the specific situations. These hypothetic situations were resent to the panellists at a second stage for their individual evaluation, rating the benefit-to-harm ratio of the procedure on a scale of 1 to 9 (1 meant that the expected harms greatly outweighed the expected benefits, and 9 that the expected benefits greatly outweighed the expected harms, 5 could mean either that the harms and benefits were roughly equal). Two experts analyzed the results, describing the agreement/disagreement ratio. Finally, each indication was classified as "appropriate" "uncertain" or "inappropriate" ,for the procedure in accordance with the panelists' median score: median scores in the 1-3 range were classified as inappropriate, those in the 4-6 range as uncertain, and those in the 7-9 range as appropriate. We observed high disagreement rates in SGC indications between cardiologists. However, the panelists were in favor of SGC use when situations included shock and myocardial dysfunction, especially in the presence of organic dysfunction. There were some situations when panelists considered SGC not useful, in patients without organ failure. PMID:25188663

  18. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  19. Difference in time to positivity is useful for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Achour, W; Ben Othman, T; Torjman, L; Ladeb, S; Lakhal, A; Hsaïri, M; Kammoun, L; Ben Hassen, A; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2005-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are associated with recognized morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis of such infections results in proper management of patients and in reducing unnecessary removal of catheters. We carried out a prospective study in a bone marrow transplant unit to assess the validity of a test based on the earlier positivity of central venous blood cultures in comparison with peripheral blood cultures for predicting catheter-related bacteremia. Between May 2002 and June 2004, 38 bloodstream infections with positive simultaneous central venous catheter and peripheral vein blood cultures were included. A total of 22 patients had catheter-related bacteremias and 16 had noncatheter-related bacteremias, using the catheter-tip culture/clinical criteria as the criterion standard to define catheter-related bacteremia. Differential time to positivity of 120 min or more was associated with 86% sensitivity and 87% specificity. In conclusion, differential time to positivity of 120 min or more is sensitive and specific for catheter-related bacteremia in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who have nontunnelled short-term catheters. PMID:15640824

  20. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debra; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Spears, B. K.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Landen, Otto L.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Kline, J. L.; Frenje, J.; Wilson, D. C.; Langer, S. H.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Hicks, Damien G.; Olson, Richard Edward

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics: (1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, (2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, (3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and (4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.

  2. Imaging of peritoneal catheter tunnel infection using positron-emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Wiggins, Brenda; Sun, Yijuan; Servilla, Karen S; Last, Reuben E; Hartshorne, Michael F; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2010-01-01

    Imaging by ultrasonography or scintigraphy may assist in the diagnosis and management of tunnel infections of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter. Here, we report a case of tunnel infection in which imaging with positron-emission tomography (PET) correctly predicted failure of conservative management. A 61-year-old man with diabetic nephropathy commenced PD in January 2008. He developed erythema and drainage at the exit site, with negative cultures in February 2008, and frank exit-site infection (ESI) with purulent drainage growing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA (treated with 3 weeks of oral dicloxacillin)] in August 2008. Subsequently, MSSA-growing purulent drainage from the exit site persisted. Systemic antibiotics were not administered, but there was gradual improvement with gentamicin ointment alone. In November 2008, the patient developed partial extrusion of the outer cuff of the PD catheter. In January 2009, a new ESI developed. Despite a week of treatment with cefazolin and gentamicin, the patient still developed his first episode of peritonitis with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. He then received intraperitoneal vancomycin with good response. Although the ESI appeared to have responded to the treatment, PET imaging showed increased fludeoxyglucose (FDG) activity in the whole abdominal wall portion of the PD catheter. The patient resisted removal of the catheter and had no further signs of infection until June 2009. At that time he presented with exuberant inflammatory tissue ("proud flesh") at the exit site. Repeated PET imaging again showed increased FDG activity along the abdominal wall portion of the catheter. The PD catheter was removed and found to be infected. The patient was placed on temporary hemodialysis. This case demonstrates that PET imaging, in addition to other imaging techniques, may be useful for diagnosing and managing PD catheter infections. PMID:21348389

  3. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  4. Rotors as Drivers of Atrial Fibrillation and Targets for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Schricker, Amir A.; Lalani, Gautam G.; Krummen, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia targeted by catheter ablation. Despite significant advances in our understanding of AF, ablation outcomes remain suboptimal, and this is due in large part to an incomplete understanding of the underlying sustaining mechanisms of AF. Recent developments of patient-tailored and physiology-based computational mapping systems have identified localized electrical spiral waves, or rotors, and focal sources as mechanisms that may represent novel targets for therapy. This report provides an overview of Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM) mapping, which reveals that human AF is often not actually driven by disorganized activity but instead that disorganization is secondary to organized rotors or focal sources. Targeted ablation of such sources alone can eliminate AF and, when added to pulmonary vein isolation, improves long-term outcome compared with conventional ablation alone. Translating mechanistic insights from such patient-tailored mapping is likely to be crucial in achieving the next major advances in personalized medicine for AF. PMID:24950671

  5. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  6. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  7. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  8. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  9. Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Erinjeri, Joseph P; Thomas, Contessa T; Samoila, Alaiksandra; Fleisher, Martin; Gonen, Mithat; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Thornton, Raymond H; Siegelbaum, Robert H.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Maybody, Majid; Brown, Karen T.; Getrajdman, George; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify changes in plasma cytokine levels following image-guided thermal ablation of human tumors and to identify the factors that independently predict changes in plasma cytokine levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole blood samples were collected from 36 patients at 3 time points: pre-ablation, post-ablation (within 48 hours), and in follow-up (1–5 weeks after ablation). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFa were measured using a multiplex immunoassay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using cytokine level as the dependent variable and sample collection, time, age, sex, primary diagnosis, metastatic status, ablation site, and ablation type as the independent variables. RESULTS There was a significant increase in the plasma level of IL-6 post-ablation when compared to pre-ablation (9.6+/−31 fold, p<0.002). IL-10 also showed a significant increase postablation (1.9 +/−2.8 fold, p<0.02). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, and TNFa were not significantly changed after ablation. Cryoablation resulted in the largest change in IL-6 level (>54 fold), while radiofrequency and microwave ablation showed 3.6 and 3.4-fold changes, respectively. Ablation of melanomas showed the largest change in IL-6 48 hours after ablation (92×), followed by ablation of kidney (26×), liver (8×), and lung (6×) cancers. Multivariate analysis revealed that ablation type (p<0.0003), and primary diagnosis (p<0.03) were independent predictors of changes to IL-6 following ablation. Age was the only independent predictor of IL-10 levels following ablation (p<0.019). CONCLUSION Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10, without increasing the plasma level of IL-1a, IL-2, or TNFa. PMID:23582441

  10. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  11. Predictors for postoperative esophageal stricture after balloon-based radiofrequency ablation for early esophageal squamous neoplasia: a multicenter validation study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Chang, I-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Chu, Yin-Yi; Wu, Ping-Hsiu; Tai, Wei-Chen; Chen, Po-Yueh; Hsieh, Ping-Hsin; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a rapidly evolving therapeutic modality for early flat esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCNs), but the risk factors for postoperative stricture have not been elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify and validate a predictor for post-RFA stenosis. Methods: We consecutively enrolled patients with flat-type ‘large’ (length no less than 3 cm extending no less than half the circumference of the esophagus), early ESCNs, treated with balloon-based RFA (12 J/cm2–clean–12 J/cm2 regimen). The tumor and technical factors for postoperative stricture were investigated and we validated the results externally with a society-based multicenter cohort using the same ablation regimen. Results: A total of 51 patients were enrolled (30 in the development set and 21 in the validation set). The complete remission rate at 12 months was 93%, and the rates of perforation and postoperative stenosis were 0% and 17%, respectively. Patients with post-RFA stenosis had a significantly larger longitudinal tumor size (mean 115 versus 61 mm, p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in age, body mass index, tumor circumferential extension, pretreatment histological grade, treatment efficacy or size of balloon catheter between the groups with or without stenosis. The optimal cut-off value was set as 9 cm to predict post-RFA stenosis by receiver operating characteristic curve [area under curve (AUC) = 0.881], which was then confirmed to be a reliable predictor by multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 12.7, 95% confidence interval, 1.18–136.28, p = 0.03) and have a good predictive performance in the validation set (AUC = 0.876). Conclusions: The most frequent adverse event of RFA was esophageal stenosis, for which the longitudinal tumor size was a significant predictive factor. Early intervention or prevention for stricture should be applied for those with long segment (⩾9 cm) ESCNs. PMID:27134656

  12. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  13. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  14. Navigation for fluoroscopy-guided cryo-balloon ablation procedures of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourier, Felix; Brost, Alexander; Kleinoeder, Andreas; Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Attila; Schneider, Hans-Juergen; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert; Kurzidim, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common arrhythmia, has been identified as a major cause of stroke. The current standard in interventional treatment of AFib is the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). PVI is guided by fluoroscopy or non-fluoroscopic electro-anatomic mapping systems (EAMS). Either classic point-to-point radio-frequency (RF)- catheter ablation or so-called single-shot-devices like cryo-balloons are used to achieve electrically isolation of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium (LA). Fluoroscopy-based systems render overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then merged with fluoroscopic imaging, thereby adding detailed 3-D information to conventional fluoroscopy. EAMS provide tracking and visualization of RF catheters by means of electro-magnetic tracking. Unfortunately, current navigation systems, fluoroscopy-based or EAMS, do not provide tools to localize and visualize single shot devices like cryo-balloon catheters in 3-D. We present a prototype software for fluoroscopy-guided ablation procedures that is capable of superimposing 3-D datasets as well as reconstructing cyro-balloon catheters in 3-D. The 3-D cyro-balloon reconstruction was evaluated on 9 clinical data sets, yielded a reprojected 2-D error of 1.72 mm +/- 1.02 mm.

  15. Excimer laser coronary angioplasty: experience with a prototype multifibre catheter in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Kochs, M; Haerer, W; Eggeling, T; Hoeher, M; Schmidt, A; Hombach, V

    1992-03-01

    Percutaneous excimer laser coronary angioplasty (ELCA) was performed in a first group of 20 patients with stable angina pectoris caused by significant coronary stenosis, and long-term follow-up was evaluated. Prototype 4 to 5.5 French multifibre catheters with 18-20 quartz fibres of 100 microns diameter, concentrically arranged around a central lumen for taking up a guide wire, were coupled to a commercial XeCl excimer laser. Energy was delivered at a wavelength of 308 nm with a pulse duration of 60 or 120 ns. Operating at a repetition rate of 20 Hz, mean energy transmission was 13.4 +/- 6.8 mJ per pulse. In all but one patient the lesion could be passed by the catheter. Percent diameter stenosis decreased from 77.1 +/- 10.8% to 53.1 +/- 11.8% after ELCA. Complications were frequently observed, intracoronary thrombus formation in eight instances, dissection in six patients and spasm in five cases, causing total vessel occlusion in five procedures. All complications could be managed efficaciously by thrombolytic and vasodilating drugs and/or balloon angioplasty. Subsequent PTCA was performed in case of complication or insufficient stenosis reduction after ELCA in 18 patients with adequate results (residual stenosis, 28.5 +/- 10.2%). Long-term follow-up angiography, which could be performed in 16 of 19 laser treatments, demonstrated significant restenosis in only three patients. Our preliminary results suggest that, using ELCA, ablation of atherosclerotic lesions is feasible in most cases. However, compared with PTCA, stenosis reduction is significantly less, and the acute complication rate is much higher. Thus, further improvements of the catheter system are necessary in order to realize the advantages of excimer laser ablation, which can be demonstrated by experimental studies. PMID:1597220

  16. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  17. Targeted Prostate Thermal Therapy with Catheter-Based Ultrasound Devices and MR Thermal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris; Ross, Anthony; Kinsey, Adam; Nau, Will H.; Rieke, Viola; Butts Pauly, Kim; Sommer, Graham

    2006-05-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices have significant advantages for thermal therapy procedures, including potential for precise spatial and dynamic control of heating patterns to conform to targeted volumes. Interstitial and transurethral ultrasound applicators, with associated treatment strategies, were developed for thermal ablation of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring. Four types of multielement transurethral applicators were devised, each with different levels of selectivity and intended therapeutic goals: sectored tubular transducer devices with fixed directional heating patterns; planar and lightly focused curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. These devices are integrated with a 4 mm delivery catheter, incorporate an inflatable cooling balloon (10 mm OD) for positioning within the prostate and capable of rotation via an MR-compatible motor. Similarly, interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with fixed directional heating patterns (e.g., 180 deg.). In vivo experiments in canine prostate (n=15) under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate the heating technology and develop treatment strategies. MR thermal imaging in a 0.5 T interventional MRI was used to monitor temperature contours and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Sectored transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. The curvilinear applicator produces distinct 2-3 mm wide lesions, and with sequential rotation and modulated dwell time can precisely conform thermal ablation to selected areas or the entire prostate gland. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. Interstitial implants with

  18. Clinical Experience with Cone Beam CT Navigation for Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Van der Sterren, William; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical use and potential benefits of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) navigation to perform image guided percutaneous tumor ablations. Materials and Methods All ablations performed between February 2011 and February 2013 using CBCT navigation, were included. Sixteen patients underwent 20 ablations for 29 lesions. CBCT ablation planning capabilities include multimodality image fusion and tumor segmentation for visualization, depiction of the predicted ablation zones for intra-procedural planning and segmentation of the ablated area for immediate post-treatment verification. Number and purpose of CBCT were examined. The initial ablation plan defined as number of probes and duration of energy delivery was recorded for 20/29 lesions. Technical success and local recurrences were recorded. Primary and secondary effectiveness rates were calculated. Results Image fusion was utilized for 16 lesions and intra-procedural ultrasound for 4. Of the 20/29 lesions, where the ablation plans were recorded, there was no deviation from the plan in 14. In the remaining 6/20, iterative planning was needed for complete tumor coverage. An average of 8.7 ± 3.2 CBCT were performed per procedure, including 1.3 ± 0.5 for tumor segmentation and planning, 1.7 ± 0.7 for probe position confirmation, 3.9 ± 2 to ensure complete coverage. Mean follow-up was 18.6 ± 6.5 months. 28/29 ablations were technically successful (96.5%). Of ablations performed with curative intent, technical effectiveness at one-month was 25/26 (96.1%) and 22/26 (84.6%) at last follow-up. Local tumor progression was observed in 11.5% (3/26). Conclusion CBCT navigation may add information to assist and improve ablation guidance and monitoring. PMID:25645409

  19. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  20. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  1. Everting (toposcopic) catheter for broad clinical application.

    PubMed

    Shook, D R; Doppman, J L; Cattau, E L; Goldstein, S R

    1986-05-01

    The advanced development of the clinical everting (toposcopic) catheter is described. A detailed discussion of the design and outline of the fabrication techniques are followed by a thorough performance evaluation and summary of the first two clinical applications. The everting element is a low-durometer thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer. Surface treatments include the bonding of a hydrophilic polymeric coating, optimized for lubricity, to the sliding internal surfaces of the catheter. Eversion pressures and infusion/aspiration flow rates have been measured under various conditions and the infusate-in-blood mixing potential investigated. A preliminary assessment is given of the clinical performance of the catheter in the vascular delivery of chemotherapy and standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:3724105

  2. Position of Totally Thoracoscopic Surgical Ablation in the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: An Alternative Method of Conduction Testing

    PubMed Central

    Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Haldar, Shouvik; Soliman, Rafik F.B.; Fatullayev, Javid; Jones, David; Hussain, Wajid; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom; Bahrami, Toufan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in surgical techniques and understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation has led to the development of a less invasive thoracoscopic surgical treatment including video-assisted bilateral pulmonary vein isolation using bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamps. More recently, the same operation became possible via a totally thoracoscopic approach. In this paper we describe technical aspects of the thoracoscopic approach to surgical treatment of AF and discuss its features, benefits and limitations. Furthermore, we present a new alternative technique of conduction testing using endoscopic multi-electrode recording catheters. An alternative electrophysiological mapping strategy involves a multi-electrode recording catheter designed primarily for percutaneous endocardial electrophysiologic mapping procedure. According to our initial experience, the recordings obtained from the multi-electrode catheters positioned around the pulmonary veins are more accurate than the recordings obtained from the multifunctional ablation and pacing pen. The totally thoracoscopic surgical ablation approach is a feasible and efficient treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation. The conduction testing can be easily and rapidly performed using a multifunctional pen or multi-electrode recording catheter. PMID:25904211

  3. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  4. Preclinical Assessment of a 980-nm Diode Laser Ablation System in a Large Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahrar, Kamran; Gowda, Ashok; Javadi, Sanaz; Borne, Agatha; Fox, Matthew; McNichols, Roger; Ahrar, Judy U.; Stephens, Clifton; Stafford, R. Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the performance of a 980-nm diode laser ablation system in an in vivo tumor model. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The ablation system consisted of a 15-W, 980-nm diode laser, flexible diffusing tipped fiber optic, and 17-gauge internally cooled catheter. Ten immunosuppressed dogs were inoculated subcutaneously with canine transmissible venereal tumor fragments in eight dorsal locations. Laser ablations were performed at 79 sites where inoculations were successful (99%) using powers of 10 W, 12.5 W, and 15 W, with exposure times between 60 and 180 seconds. In 20 cases, multiple overlapping ablations were performed. After the dogs were euthanized, the tumors were harvested, sectioned along the applicator track, measured and photographed. Measurements of ablation zone were performed on gross specimen. Histopathology and viability staining was performed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH) staining. Results Gross pathology confirmed well-circumscribed ablation zone with sharp boundaries between thermally ablated tumor in the center surrounded by viable tumor tissue. When a single applicator was used, the greatest ablation diameters ranged from 12 mm at the lowest dose (10 W, 60 sec) to 26 mm at the highest dose (15 W, 180 sec). Multiple applicators created ablation zones of up to 42 mm in greatest diameter (with the lasers operating at 15 W for 120 sec). Conclusions The new 980-nm diode laser and internally cooled applicator effectively creates large ellipsoid thermal ablations in less than 3 minutes. PMID:20346883

  5. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  6. Impact of esophageal temperature monitoring guided atrial fibrillation ablation on preventing asymptomatic excessive transmural injury

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Kunihiko; Okajima, Katsunori; Shimane, Akira; Kanda, Gaku; Yokoi, Kiminobu; Teranishi, Jin; Aoki, Kousuke; Chimura, Misato; Toba, Takayoshi; Oishi, Shogo; Sawada, Takahiro; Tsukishiro, Yasue; Onishi, Tetsuari; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Shinichiro; Yasaka, Yoshinori; Kawai, Hiroya; Yoshida, Akihiro; Fukuzawa, Koji; Itoh, Mitsuaki; Imamura, Kimitake; Fujiwara, Ryudo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Soichiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Tada, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Hiro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Igarashi, Miyako; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Even with the use of a reduced energy setting (20–25 W), excessive transmural injury (ETI) following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is reported to develop in 10% of patients. However, the incidence of ETI depends on the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) method and its esophageal temperature monitor setting. Data comparing the incidence of ETI following AF ablation with and without esophageal temperature monitoring (ETM) are still lacking. Methods This study was comprised of 160 patients with AF (54% paroxysmal, mean: 24.0±2.9 kg/m2). Eighty patients underwent ablation accompanied by ETM. The primary endpoint was defined as the occurrence of ETI assessed by endoscopy within 5 d after the AF ablation. The secondary endpoint was defined as AF recurrence after a single procedure. If the esophageal temperature probe registered >39 °C, the radiofrequency (RF) application was stopped immediately. RF applications could be performed in a point-by-point manner for a maximum of 20 s and 20 W. ETI was defined as any injury that resulted from AF ablation, including esophageal injury or periesophageal nerve injury (peri-ENI). Results The incidence of esophageal injury was significantly lower in patients whose AF ablation included ETM compared with patients without ETM (0 [0%] vs. 6 [7.5%], p=0.028), but not the incidence of peri-ENI (2 [2.5%] vs. 3 [3.8%], p=1.0). AF recurrence 12 months after the procedure was similar between the groups (20 [25%] in the ETM group vs. 19 [24%] in the non-ETM group, p=1.00). Conclusions Catheter ablation using ETM may reduce the incidence of esophageal injury without increasing the incidence of AF recurrence but not the incidence of peri-ENI. PMID:26949429

  7. Variations in Alaska tidewater glacier frontal ablation, 1985-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, R. W.; Hock, R.; Huss, M.

    2015-01-01

    Our incomplete knowledge of the proportion of mass loss due to frontal ablation (the sum of ice loss through calving and submarine melt) from tidewater glaciers outside of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets has been cited as a major hindrance to accurate predictions of global sea level rise. We present a 28 year record (1985-2013) of frontal ablation for 27 Alaska tidewater glaciers (representing 96% of the total tidewater glacier area in the region), calculated from satellite-derived ice velocities and modeled estimates of glacier ice thickness. We account for cross-sectional ice thickness variation, long-term thickness changes, mass lost between an upstream fluxgate and the terminus, and mass change due to changes in terminus position. The total mean rate of frontal ablation for these 27 glaciers over the period 1985-2013 is 15.11 ± 3.63Gta-1. Two glaciers, Hubbard and Columbia, account for approximately 50% of these losses. The regional total ablation has decreased at a rate of 0.14Gta-1 over this time period, likely due to the slowing and thinning of many of the glaciers in the study area. Frontal ablation constitutes only ˜4% of the total annual regional ablation, but roughly 20% of net mass loss. Comparing several commonly used approximations in the calculation of frontal ablation, we find that neglecting cross-sectional thickness variations severely underestimates frontal ablation.

  8. Ablation dynamics in coiled wire-array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Knapp, P. F.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Blesener, K. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2013-02-15

    Experiments to study the ablation dynamics of coiled wire arrays were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College, and on the COBRA generator at Cornell University's Laboratory of Plasma Studies (1 MA, 100 ns). The MAGPIE generator was used to drive coiled wires in an inverse array configuration to study the distribution of ablated plasma. Using interferometry to study the plasma distribution during the ablation phase, absolute quantitative measurements of electron line density demonstrated very high density contrasts between coiled ablation streams and inter-stream regions many millimetres from the wire. The measured density contrasts for a coiled array were many times greater than that observed for a conventional array with straight wires, indicating that a much greater axial modulation of the ablated plasma may be responsible for the unique implosion dynamics of coiled arrays. Experiments on the COBRA generator were used to study the complex redirection of plasma around a coiled wire that gives rise to the ablation structure exhibited by coiled arrays. Observations of this complex 3D plasma structure were used to validate the current model of coiled array ablation dynamics [Hall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 065003 (2008)], demonstrating irrefutably that plasma flow from the wires behaves as predicted. Coiled wires were observed to ablate and implode in the same manner on both machines, indicating that current rise time should not be an issue for the scaling of coiled arrays to larger machines with fast current rise times.

  9. Ablation dynamics in coiled wire-array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Knapp, P. F.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Blesener, K. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2013-02-01

    Experiments to study the ablation dynamics of coiled wire arrays were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College, and on the COBRA generator at Cornell University's Laboratory of Plasma Studies (1 MA, 100 ns). The MAGPIE generator was used to drive coiled wires in an inverse array configuration to study the distribution of ablated plasma. Using interferometry to study the plasma distribution during the ablation phase, absolute quantitative measurements of electron line density demonstrated very high density contrasts between coiled ablation streams and inter-stream regions many millimetres from the wire. The measured density contrasts for a coiled array were many times greater than that observed for a conventional array with straight wires, indicating that a much greater axial modulation of the ablated plasma may be responsible for the unique implosion dynamics of coiled arrays. Experiments on the COBRA generator were used to study the complex redirection of plasma around a coiled wire that gives rise to the ablation structure exhibited by coiled arrays. Observations of this complex 3D plasma structure were used to validate the current model of coiled array ablation dynamics [Hall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 065003 (2008)], demonstrating irrefutably that plasma flow from the wires behaves as predicted. Coiled wires were observed to ablate and implode in the same manner on both machines, indicating that current rise time should not be an issue for the scaling of coiled arrays to larger machines with fast current rise times.

  10. Catheter-related bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Santangelo, Rosaria; Fiori, Barbara; De Angelis, Giulia; Conte, Viola; Giaquinto, Alessia; Palucci, Ivana; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Florio, Viviana; Giani, Tommaso; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Spanu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus bacteremia is a rare infection and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present four cases of bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans that were initially identified to the genus level by both Bruker and Vitek matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and later identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of C. metallidurans catheter-related infections. Patients were successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and catheter removal. PMID:25446890

  11. [Phlebitogenicity of venous catheters of Vialon].

    PubMed

    Fassolt, A

    1985-12-01

    During three days 132 surgical patients with postoperative infusion treatment were checked on the frequency of venous reactions in the arms when catheters/cannulas of 4 different materials were used and the outcome compared. A significant result was obtained in connection with the I-cath catheter made of vialon (a polyurethanelike resin polymer) and the L-cath of polyurethane. Phlebitis was decreased to 27.3% resp. 24.2% - approximately half of its usual frequency - when I-cath of polyvinyl-chloride and FEP-teflon vasofix cannulas were applied (both 51.5%). The different predisposing factors of infusion phlebitis are under discussion. PMID:4093198

  12. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  13. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  14. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes People with ... without surgery by an interventional radiologist. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) A CVAC is a tube that ...

  15. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  16. Comparison of catheter tip migration using flexible and stimulating catheters inserted into the adductor canal in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher A J; Kim, T Edward; Funck, Natasha; Howard, Steven K; Harrison, T Kyle; Ganaway, Toni; Keng, Heidi; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Use of adductor canal blocks and catheters for perioperative pain management following total knee arthroplasty is becoming increasingly common. However, the optimal equipment, timing of catheter insertion, and catheter dislodgement rate remain unknown. A previous study has suggested, but not proven, that non-tunneled stimulating catheters may be at increased risk for catheter migration and dislodgement after knee manipulation. We designed this follow-up study to directly compare tip migration of two catheter types after knee range of motion exercises. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 30 catheter insertion trials were randomly assigned to one of two catheter types: flexible or stimulating. All catheters were inserted using an ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane technique. Intraoperative knee manipulation similar to that performed during surgery was simulated by five sequential range of motion exercises. A blinded regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after exercise. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.547) and catheter length within the adductor canal (p = 0.498) were not different between groups. Therefore, catheter type may not affect the risk of catheter tip migration when placed prior to knee arthroplasty. PMID:25510467

  17. Reduced intravascular catheter-related infection by routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kamal, G D; Divishek, D; Kumar, G C; Porter, B R; Tatman, D J; Adams, J R

    1998-03-01

    We report a comparative analysis of intravascular catheter-related infection before and after routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in an intensive care unit. Cefazolin-bonded catheters were placed in patients requiring catheterization for at least 3 days, or with remote infection, standard catheters at other times. One thousand forty-five catheters (259 patients) over 6 months were compared with 801 (236 antibiotic-bonded, 565 standard) catheters (239 patients) the next 6 months. After use of antibiotic-bonded catheters, we found: 1.7% catheters infected versus 3.7% (p = 0.01); catheter-associated bacteremia 0.1% versus 1.3% (p < 0.005); catheter-related infection rate 4.39 versus 10.73 per 1000 patient days (p < 0.005), and 5.06 versus 11.47 per 1000 catheter days (p < 0.01); and cumulative risk of infection decreased (p < 0.005). Antibiotic-bonded catheters were used with more remote infections (52% versus 27%, p < 0.001), had longer indwelling time (4.4 versus 3.1 days, p = 0.0001), and more were inserted over a guide wire (66% vs. 28%, p < 0.001). In conclusion routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters was associated with a significant reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9572020

  18. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  19. Identification and Acute Targeting of Gaps in Atrial Ablation Lesion Sets using a Real Time MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Kholmovski, Eugene G.; Blauer, Joshua; Vijayakumar, Sathya; Volland, Nelly A.; Salama, Mohamed E.; Parker, Dennis L.; MacLeod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation is routinely used to treat cardiac arrhythmias, but gaps remain in ablation lesion sets, as there is no direct visualization of ablation related changes. In this study we describe using a real time MRI (RT-MRI) system to acutely identify and target gaps leading to a complete and transmural ablation in the atrium. Methods and Results A swine model was used for these studies (n=12). Ablation lesions with a gap were created in the atrium using fluoroscopy and an electro-anatomical system in the first group (n=5). The animal was then moved to a 3 Tesla MRI system where high-resolution late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI was used to identify the gap. Using a RT-MRI catheter navigation and visualization system the gap area was ablated in the MR scanner. In a second group (n=7) ablation lesions with varying gaps in between were created under RT-MRI guidance and gap lengths determined using LGE MR images were correlated with gap length measured from gross pathology. Gaps up to 1.0 mm were identified using gross pathology and 1.4 mm using LGE MRI. Using a RT-MRI system with active catheter navigation gaps can be targeted acutely, leading to lesion sets with no gaps. The correlation coefficient (R2) between gap length identified using MRI and gross pathology was 0.95. Conclusions Real time MRI system can be used to identify and acutely target gaps in atrial ablation lesion sets. Acute targeting of gaps in ablation lesion sets can potentially lead to significant improvement in clinical outcomes. PMID:23071143