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Sample records for cation condensed dna

  1. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    PubMed

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations. PMID:24651934

  2. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, C. K. S.; Sundaresan, Neethu; Radhakrishnan Pillai, M.; Thomas, T.; Thomas, T. J.

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physico-chemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li--DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  3. DNA pre-condensation with an amino acid-based cationic amphiphile. A viable approach for liposome-based gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mónica; Penacho, Nuno; Simöes, Sérgio; Lima, Maria C P; Lindman, Björn; Miguel, Maria G

    2008-01-01

    A study related to the development and characterization of a new gene delivery system was performed. The approach consists in both the pre-condensation of plasmid DNA with an arginine-based cationic surfactant, arginine-N-lauroyl amide dihydrochloride (ALA), which was found not to be toxic, and the incorporation of the blood protein transferrin (Tf) into the formulations. Two cationic liposome formulations were used, one composed of a mixture of dioleoyl trimethylammoniopropane and cholesterol (DOTAP:Chol) and the other a pH sensitive formulation constituted of DOTAP, Chol, Dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS). Particles with different ALA/DNA and cationic lipid/DNA charge ratios were produced and a physicochemical characterization of the systems developed was performed. DNA conformational changes in the presence of ALA were studied by Circular Dichroism (CD) and the ALA binding to DNA was followed by surface tension measurements. Insight into the structure and morphology of the various ALA-complexes (complexes composed of ALA, DNA, Tf and liposomes) was obtained by cryogenic-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) and the sizes of the ALA-complexes were determined through Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). We found that the transfection capacity of these systems is directly related with the presence of ALA and the lipidic composition. Complexes based on the pH sensitive liposome formulation present better transfection profiles. The correlation between the inner structure, density and size of the ALA-complexes and their biological activity is discussed. Overall, we demonstrate that the presence of ALA improves the transfection efficiency when conjugated with cationic liposome systems. PMID:18097953

  4. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  5. The structure and intermolecular forces of DNA condensates.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-03-18

    Spontaneous assembly of DNA molecules into compact structures is ubiquitous in biological systems. Experiment has shown that polycations can turn electrostatic self-repulsion of DNA into attraction, yet the physical mechanism of DNA condensation has remained elusive. Here, we report the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the microscopic structure of dense DNA assemblies and the physics of interactions that makes such assemblies possible. Reproducing the setup of the DNA condensation experiments, we measured the internal pressure of DNA arrays as a function of the DNA-DNA distance, showing a quantitative agreement between the results of our simulations and the experimental data. Analysis of the MD trajectories determined the DNA-DNA force in a DNA condensate to be pairwise, the DNA condensation to be driven by electrostatics of polycations and not hydration, and the concentration of bridging cations, not adsorbed cations, to determine the magnitude and the sign of the DNA-DNA force. Finally, our simulations quantitatively characterized the orientational correlations of DNA in DNA arrays as well as diffusive motion of DNA and cations. PMID:26883635

  6. Ion Competition in Condensed DNA Arrays in the Attractive Regime

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangyun; Giannini, John; Howell, Steven C.; Xia, Qi; Ke, Fuyou; Andresen, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Physical origin of DNA condensation by multivalent cations remains unsettled. Here, we report quantitative studies of how one DNA-condensing ion (Cobalt3+ Hexammine, or Co3+Hex) and one nonDNA-condensing ion (Mg2+) compete within the interstitial space in spontaneously condensed DNA arrays. As the ion concentrations in the bath solution are systematically varied, the ion contents and DNA-DNA spacings of the DNA arrays are determined by atomic emission spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction, respectively. To gain quantitative insights, we first compare the experimentally determined ion contents with predictions from exact numerical calculations based on nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equations. Such calculations are shown to significantly underestimate the number of Co3+Hex ions, consistent with the deficiencies of nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann approaches in describing multivalent cations. Upon increasing the concentration of Mg2+, the Co3+Hex-condensed DNA array expands and eventually redissolves as a result of ion competition weakening DNA-DNA attraction. Although the DNA-DNA spacing depends on both Mg2+ and Co3+Hex concentrations in the bath solution, it is observed that the spacing is largely determined by a single parameter of the DNA array, the fraction of DNA charges neutralized by Co3+Hex. It is also observed that only ∼20% DNA charge neutralization by Co3+Hex is necessary for spontaneous DNA condensation. We then show that the bath ion conditions can be reduced to one variable with a simplistic ion binding model, which is able to describe the variations of both ion contents and DNA-DNA spacings reasonably well. Finally, we discuss the implications on the nature of interstitial ions and cation-mediated DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:23972850

  7. The structure and intermolecular forces of DNA condensates

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous assembly of DNA molecules into compact structures is ubiquitous in biological systems. Experiment has shown that polycations can turn electrostatic self-repulsion of DNA into attraction, yet the physical mechanism of DNA condensation has remained elusive. Here, we report the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the microscopic structure of dense DNA assemblies and the physics of interactions that makes such assemblies possible. Reproducing the setup of the DNA condensation experiments, we measured the internal pressure of DNA arrays as a function of the DNA–DNA distance, showing a quantitative agreement between the results of our simulations and the experimental data. Analysis of the MD trajectories determined the DNA–DNA force in a DNA condensate to be pairwise, the DNA condensation to be driven by electrostatics of polycations and not hydration, and the concentration of bridging cations, not adsorbed cations, to determine the magnitude and the sign of the DNA–DNA force. Finally, our simulations quantitatively characterized the orientational correlations of DNA in DNA arrays as well as diffusive motion of DNA and cations. PMID:26883635

  8. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  9. A multi-field approach to DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Jia, Jun-Li

    2015-12-01

    DNA condensation is an important process in many fields including life sciences, polymer physics, and applied technology. In the nucleus, DNA is condensed into chromosomes. In polymer physics, DNA is treated as a semi-flexible molecule and a polyelectrolyte. Many agents, including multi-valent cations, surfactants, and neutral poor solvents, can cause DNA condensation, also referred to as coil-globule transition. Moreover, DNA condensation has been used for extraction and gene delivery in applied technology. Many physical theories have been presented to elucidate the mechanism underlying DNA condensation, including the counterion correlation theory, the electrostatic zipper theory, and the hydration force theory. Recently several single-molecule studies have focused on DNA condensation, shedding new light on old concepts. In this document, the multi-field concepts and theories related to DNA condensation are introduced and clarified as well as the advances and considerations of single-molecule DNA condensation experiments are introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204065 and 20934004) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y4110357).

  10. Condensation of circular DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    A simple model of a circularly closed double-stranded DNA in a poor solvent is considered as an example of a semi-flexible polymer with self-attraction. To find the ground states, the conformational energy is computed as a sum of the bending and torsional elastic components and the effective self-attraction energy. The model includes a relative orientation or sequence dependence of the effective attraction forces between different pieces of the polymer chain. Two series of conformations are analysed: a multicovered circle (a toroid) and a multifold two-headed racquet. The results are presented as a diagram of state. It is suggested that the stability of particular conformations may be controlled by proper adjustment of the primary structure. Application of the model to other semi-flexible polymers is considered.

  11. Catch-bond behavior of DNA condensate under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei-Juan; Lim, Ci-Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-12-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism underlying DNA condensation, which has been investigated extensively by single-molecule experiments in vitro. Here, the de-condensation dynamics of DNA condensates were studied using magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results revealed a surprising non-monotonic dependence of the unfolding rate on the force applied under strong adhesion conditions, resembling the catch-bond behavior reported in the field of ligand-receptor interactions. Simulation results showed that the different unfolding pathways of DNA condensate under large forces derive from the force-dependent deformation of the DNA toroid, which explains the catch-bond behavior of DNA condensate in the magnetic tweezers experiments. These results challenge the universality of the regular toroidal DNA unwrapping mechanism and provide the most complete description to date of multivalent cation-dependent DNA unwrapping under tension. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104341, 11474346, 11274374, and 61275192), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), and the Mechanobiology Institute at National University of Singapore.

  12. Cation charge dependence of the forces driving DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-10-20

    Understanding the strength and specificity of interactions among biologically important macromolecules that control cellular functions requires quantitative knowledge of intermolecular forces. Controlled DNA condensation and assembly are particularly critical for biology, with separate repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces determining the extent of DNA compaction. How these forces depend on the charge of the condensing ion has not been determined, but such knowledge is fundamental for understanding the basis of DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we measure DNA force-distance curves for a homologous set of arginine peptides. All forces are well fit as the sum of two exponentials with 2.4- and 4.8-Å decay lengths. The shorter-decay-length force is always repulsive, with an amplitude that varies slightly with length or charge. The longer-decay-length force varies strongly with cation charge, changing from repulsion with Arg¹ to attraction with Arg². Force curves for a series of homologous polyamines and the heterogeneous protein protamine are quite similar, demonstrating the universality of these forces for DNA assembly. Repulsive amplitudes of the shorter-decay-length force are species-dependent but nearly independent of charge within each species. A striking observation was that the attractive force amplitudes for all samples collapse to a single curve, varying linearly with the inverse of the cation charge. PMID:20959102

  13. Possible prebiotic significance of polyamines in the condensation, protection, encapsulation, and biological properties of DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, I.; Ibanez, M.; Wong, C.; Chavez, P.; Gariglio, P.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    Some properties of DNA condensed with spermidine have been compared with the properties of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 to determine whether condensation of DNA with these trivalent cations protects DNA against the action of DNase I and increases transcription and encapsulation of DNA into liposomes. It was shown that DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was resistant to the action of the endonuclease DNase I such as DNA condensed with spermidine was. However, DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6 was significantly less active in transcription with the E. coli RNA polymerase than DNA-spermidine condensed forms. In addition, it was demonstrated that both compacted forms of DNA were more efficiently encapsulated into neutral liposomes; however, negatively, charged liposomes were scarcely formed in the presence of DNA condensed with Co3+(NH3)6. These experiments and the well documented properties of polyamines increasing the resistance to radiations and hydrolysis of nucleic acids, as well as their biological activities, such as replication, transcription, and translation, together with the low concentration of Co3+ in the environment, lead us to propose spermidine as a plausible prebiotic DNA condensing agent rather than Co3+ and the basic proteins proposed by other authors. Then, we consider the possible role and relevance of the polyamine-nucleic acids complexes in the evolution of life.

  14. Imaging of DNA/Nanosphere Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    DNA forms condensates in a variety of environments. In chromatin, DNA is condensed around 10-nm-diameter, positively-charged histone complexes. To model chromatin formation in cells, lambda-phage (16 microns long) and herring sperm (0.03 to1 micron) DNAs were mixed with polystyrene nanospheres of diameter 40nm and 930nm containing 1.8x10^4 and 2.6x10^8 positive surface charges, respectively, to form condensates. Sphere concentrations were 1-2 times the isoelectric concentration. Condensation vs time was imaged at various concentrations, pH's, viscosities, and ionic strengths. Bright-field and fluorescence (YOYO-1 dye bound to DNA) images were recorded. In general HS DNA aggregate size increased with time. Except in 0.5-0.8 M KCl, herring sperm DNA formed one huge aggregate (100's of microns) and depleted other areas, both in 10% and 20% glycerol. Phage DNA samples rapidly formed longer, fiber-like aggregates. Within 2 hours it formed ordered structures and in most samples, empty, apparently depleted regions were found in the viewing area. Shapes of the phage-DNA aggregates in 20% glycerol, in contrast, formed small clumps like HS DNA.

  15. Effects of Ionic Dependence of DNA Persistence Length on the DNA Condensation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Liu, Yan-Hui; Hu, Lin; Xu, Hou-Qiang

    2016-05-01

    DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. A series of experiments pointed out that, in the DNA condensation process by multivalent cations, the condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in ionic concentration. At the same time, single molecule experiments carried out in solution with multivalent cations (such as spermidine, spermine) indicated that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the ionic concentration. In order to revolve the effects of ionic concentration dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, a model including the ionic concentration dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the ionic concentration dependence of toroidal conformations. With an increase in ion concentration, the first periodic oscillation contained in the autocorrelation function shifts, the number of segment contained in the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments, the average long-axis length is defined to estimate the ionic concentration dependence of condensation process further. The relation between long-axis length and ionic concentration matches the experimental results qualitatively. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11047022, 11204045, 11464004 and 31360215; The Research Foundation from Ministry of Education of China (212152), Guizhou Provincial Tracking Key Program of Social Development (SY20123089, SZ20113069); The General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M562341); The Research Foundation for Young University Teachers from Guizhou University (201311); The West Light Foundation (2015) and College

  16. Molecular forces for the binding and condensation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xian-E; Yang, Jie

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the binding between a double-stranded DNA and bilayers of cationic lipids and zwitterionic lipids in low ionic-strength solutions. The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured. The binding of DNA molecules to cationic lipid bilayers has a minimal strength of approximately 45 pN. On zwitterionic lipid bilayers and mica surface, the minimal binding strength is approximately twice that value. The binding also has a dynamic nature, with only a certain percentage of recorded force curves containing the binding characteristics. Divalent Mg(2+) ions enhance the binding by increasing that percentage without any effect on the binding strength. We have also observed a long-range attraction between DNA molecules and cationic lipid bilayers with a strength much larger than the minimum force and a range well over 50 nm, possibly related to the driving force responsible for the two-dimensional condensation of DNA. PMID:11751322

  17. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body. PMID:26646261

  18. Decondensation behavior of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations: Molecular dynamics simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yang-Wei; Ran, Shi-Yong; He, Lin-Li; Wang, Xiang-Hong; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we study the decondensation process of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations in the presence of short cationic chains in solutions. The typical simulation conformations of DNA chains with varying salt concentrations for multivalent cations imply that the concentration of salt cations and the valence of multivalent cations have a strong influence on the process of DNA decondensation. The DNA chains are condensed in the absence of salt or at low salt concentrations, and the compacted conformations of DNA chains become loose when a number of cations and anions are added into the solution. It is explicitly demonstrated that cations can overcompensate the bare charge of the DNA chains and weaken the attraction interactions between the DNA chains and short cationic chains at high salt concentrations. The condensation-decondensation transitions of DNA are also experimentally observed in mixing spermidine with λ-phage DNA at different concentrations of NaCl/MgCl2 solutions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31340026), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. Z13F20019 and LQ12E01003), and the Science and Technology Project of Zhejiang Science and Technology Department, China (Grant No. 2014C31147).

  19. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  20. Theory and simulations of toroidal and rod-like structures in single-molecule DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Cortini, Ruggero; Caré, Bertrand R; Victor, Jean-Marc; Barbi, Maria

    2015-03-14

    DNA condensation by multivalent cations plays a crucial role in genome packaging in viruses and sperm heads, and has been extensively studied using single-molecule experimental methods. In those experiments, the values of the critical condensation forces have been used to estimate the amplitude of the attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, to describe these experiments, we developed an analytical model and a rigid body Langevin dynamics assay to investigate the behavior of a polymer with self-interactions, in the presence of a traction force applied at its extremities. We model self-interactions using a pairwise attractive potential, thereby treating the counterions implicitly. The analytical model allows to accurately predict the equilibrium structures of toroidal and rod-like condensed structures, and the dependence of the critical condensation force on the DNA length. We find that the critical condensation force depends strongly on the length of the DNA, and finite-size effects are important for molecules of length up to 10(5)μm. Our Langevin dynamics simulations show that the force-extension behavior of the rod-like structures is very different from the toroidal ones, so that their presence in experiments should be easily detectable. In double-stranded DNA condensation experiments, the signature of the presence of rod-like structures was not unambiguously detected, suggesting that the polyamines used to condense DNA may protect it from bending sharply as needed in the rod-like structures. PMID:25770562

  1. Theory and simulations of toroidal and rod-like structures in single-molecule DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Caré, Bertrand R.; Victor, Jean-Marc; Barbi, Maria

    2015-03-01

    DNA condensation by multivalent cations plays a crucial role in genome packaging in viruses and sperm heads, and has been extensively studied using single-molecule experimental methods. In those experiments, the values of the critical condensation forces have been used to estimate the amplitude of the attractive DNA-DNA interactions. Here, to describe these experiments, we developed an analytical model and a rigid body Langevin dynamics assay to investigate the behavior of a polymer with self-interactions, in the presence of a traction force applied at its extremities. We model self-interactions using a pairwise attractive potential, thereby treating the counterions implicitly. The analytical model allows to accurately predict the equilibrium structures of toroidal and rod-like condensed structures, and the dependence of the critical condensation force on the DNA length. We find that the critical condensation force depends strongly on the length of the DNA, and finite-size effects are important for molecules of length up to 105μm. Our Langevin dynamics simulations show that the force-extension behavior of the rod-like structures is very different from the toroidal ones, so that their presence in experiments should be easily detectable. In double-stranded DNA condensation experiments, the signature of the presence of rod-like structures was not unambiguously detected, suggesting that the polyamines used to condense DNA may protect it from bending sharply as needed in the rod-like structures.

  2. Cationic micellar nanoparticles for DNA and doxorubicin co-delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Tao; Zou, Ying; Wang, Chao; Zhong, Yue-Chun; Zhao, Yi; Zhu, Hui-Er; Wang, Guan-Hai; Zhang, Li-Ming; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2014-11-01

    Cationic micellar nanoparticles for chemotherapeutic drugs and therapeutic gene co-delivery were prepared based on a poly-(N-ε-carbobenzyloxy-l-lysine) (PZLL) and dendritic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) block copolymer (PZLL-D3). PZLL-D3 was synthesized by a copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cyclization (click) reaction between α-alkyne-PZLL and azide focal point PAMAM dendrons. Its structure was characterized by (1)H NMR and FTIR, and its buffering capability was determined by acid-base titration. MTT, agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry studies showed that PZLL-D3 revealed low in vitro cytotoxicity, strong pDNA condensation ability, protection of pDNA against deoxyribonuclease I degradation and high gene transfection efficiency in 293T and HeLa cells. In addition, the micellar nanoparticles delivered pDNA and anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) simultaneously and efficiently to tumor cells, and the DOX loaded nanoparticles showed sustained in vitro release at pH=7.4 and 5.8. PMID:25280725

  3. Physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic Hydroxyethylcellulose/DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fayazpour, Farzaneh; Lucas, Bart; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Sanders, Niek N; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C

    2006-10-01

    In this study the physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with the properties of DNA nanoparticles based on polyethylene imine (PEI), which is widely investigated as a gene carrier. The two types of cationic hydroxyethylcelluloses studied, polyquaternium-4 (PQ-4) and polyquaternium-10 (PQ-10), are already commonly used in cosmetic and topical drug delivery devices. Both PQ-4 and PQ-10 spontaneously interact with pDNA with the formation of nanoparticles approximately 200 nm in size. Gel electrophoresis and fluorescence dequenching experiments indicated that the interactions between pDNA and the cationic celluloses were stronger than those between pDNA and PEI. The cationic cellulose/pDNA nanoparticles transfected cells to a much lesser extent than the PEI-based pDNA nanoparticles. The low transfection property of the PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles was attributed to their neutrally charged surface, which does not allow an optimal binding of PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles to cellular membranes. Although the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles were positively charged and thus expected to be taken up by cells, they were also much less efficient in transfecting cells than were PEI/pDNA nanoparticles. Agents known to enhance the endosomal escape were not able to improve the transfection properties of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles, indicating that a poor endosomal escape is, most likely, not the major reason for the low transfection activity of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles. We hypothesized that the strong binding of pDNA to PQ-10 prohibits the release of pDNA from PQ-10 once the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles arrive in the cytosol of the cells. Tailoring the nature and extent of the cationic side chains on this type of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose may be promising to further enhance their DNA delivery properties. PMID:17025362

  4. The Structure of DNA within Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Chad S.; Jas, Gouri S.; Choosakoonkriang, Sirirat; Koe, Gary S.; Smith, Janet G.; Middaugh, C. Russell

    2003-01-01

    The structure of DNA within CLDCs used for gene delivery is controversial. Previous studies using CD have been interpreted to indicate that the DNA is converted from normal B to C form in complexes. This investigation reexamines this interpretation using CD of model complexes, FTIR as well as Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to address this issue. CD spectra of supercoiled plasmid DNA undergo a significant loss of rotational strength in the signal near 275 nm upon interaction with either the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide or 1,2-dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane. This loss of rotational strength is shown, however, by both FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to occur within the parameters of the B-type conformation. Contributions of absorption flattening and differential scattering to the CD spectra of complexes are unable to account for the observed spectra. Model studies of the CD of complexes prepared from synthetic oligonucleotides of varying length suggest that significant reductions in rotational strength can occur within short stretches of DNA. Furthermore, some alteration in the hydrogen bonding of bases within CLDCs is indicated in the FTIR and Raman spectroscopy results. In addition, alterations in base stacking interactions as well as hydrogen bonding are suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. A global interpretation of all of the data suggests the DNA component of CLDCs remains in a variant B form in which base/base interactions are perturbed. PMID:12547792

  5. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  6. Characterizing DNA Condensation and Conformational Changes in Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Fuyou; Luu, Yen Kim; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Liang, Dehai

    2010-01-01

    Organic solvents offer a new approach to formulate DNA into novel structures suitable for gene delivery. In this study, we examined the in situ behavior of DNA in N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at low concentration via laser light scattering (LLS), TEM, UV absorbance and Zeta potential analysis. Results revealed that, in DMF, a 21bp oligonucleotide remained intact, while calf thymus DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA were condensed and denatured. During condensation and denaturation, the size was decreased by a factor of 8–10, with calf thymus DNA forming spherical globules while plasmid DNA exhibited a toroid-like conformation. In the condensed state, DNA molecules were still able to release the counterions to be negatively charged, indicating that the condensation was mainly driven by the excluded volume interactions. The condensation induced by DMF was reversible for plasmid DNA but not for calf thymus DNA. When plasmid DNA was removed from DMF and resuspended in an aqueous solution, the DNA was quickly regained a double stranded configuration. These findings provide further insight into the behavior and condensation mechanism of DNA in an organic solvent and may aid in developing more efficient non-viral gene delivery systems. PMID:20949017

  7. Mechanism for radical cation transport in duplex DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu-Sheng; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Schuster, Gary B

    2004-03-10

    We investigated the photoinduced one-electron oxidation of a series of DNA oligomers having a covalently linked anthraquinone group (AQ) and containing [(A)(n)GG](m) or [(T)(n)GG](m) segments. These oligomers have m GG steps, where m = 4 or 6, separated by (A)(n) or (T)(n) segments, where n = 1-7 for the (A)(n) set and 1-5 for the (T)(n) set. Irradiation with UV light that is absorbed by the AQ causes injection of a radical cation into the DNA. The radical cation migrates through the DNA, causing chemical reaction, primarily at GG steps, that leads to strand cleavage after piperidine treatment. The uniform, systematic structure of the DNA oligonucleotides investigated permits the numerical solution of a kinetic scheme that models these reactions. This analysis yields two rate constants, k(hop), for hopping of the radical cation from one site to adjacent sites, and k(trap), for irreversible reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O or O(2). Analysis of these findings indicates that radical cation hopping in these duplex DNA oligomers is a process that occurs on a microsecond time scale. The value of k(hop) depends on the number of base pairs in the (A)(n) and (T)(n) segments in a systematic way. We interpret these results in terms of a thermally activated adiabatic mechanism for radical cation hopping that we identify as phonon-assisted polaron hopping. PMID:14995205

  8. Weakly charged cationic nanoparticles induce DNA bending and strand separation.

    PubMed

    Railsback, Justin G; Singh, Abhishek; Pearce, Ryan C; McKnight, Timothy E; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Melechko, Anatoli V

    2012-08-16

    Weakly charged cationic nanoparticles cause structural changes including local denaturing and compaction to DNA under mild conditions. The charged ligands bind to the phosphate backbone of DNA and the uncharged ligands penetrate the helix and disrupt base pairing. Mobility shifts in electrophoresis, molecular dynamics, and UV-vis spectrophotometry give clues to the details of the interactions. PMID:22711427

  9. Cationic Polybutyl Cyanoacrylate Nanoparticles for DNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jinghua; Zhang, Yangde; Chen, Wei; Shen, Chengrong; Liao, Mingmei; Pan, Yifeng; Wang, Jiwei; Deng, Xingming; Zhao, Jinfeng

    2009-01-01

    To enhance the intracellular delivery potential of plasmid DNA using nonviral vectors, we used polybutyl cyanoacrylate (PBCA) and chitosan to prepare PBCA nanoparticles (NPs) by emulsion polymerization and prepared NP/DNA complexes through the complex coacervation of nanoparticles with the DNA. The object of our work is to evaluate the characterization and transfection efficiency of PBCA-NPs. The NPs have a zeta potential of 25.53 mV at pH 7.4 and size about 200 nm. Electrophoretic analysis suggested that the NPs with positive charges could protect the DNA from nuclease degradation and cell viability assay showed that the NPs exhibit a low cytotoxicity to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of transfection in HepG2 cells by the nanoparticles carrying plasmid DNA encoding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-N1) was done by digital fluorescence imaging microscopy system and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Qualitative results showed highly efficient expression of GFP that remained stable for up to 96 hours. Quantitative results from FACS showed that PBCA-NPs were significantly more effective in transfecting HepG2 cells after 72 hours postincubation. The results of this study suggested that PBCA-NPs have favorable properties for nonviral delivery. PMID:19300519

  10. Weakly Charged Cationic Nanoparticles Induce DNA Bending and Strand Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, Justin; Singh, Abhishek; Pearce, Ryan; McKnight, Timothy E; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Yingling, Yaroslava; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of interactions between double stranded (ds) DNA and charged nanoparticles will have a broad bearing on many important applications from drug delivery [ 1 4 ] to DNAtemplated metallization. [ 5 , 6 ] Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) can bind to DNA, a negatively charged molecule, through a combination of electrostatic attraction, groove binding, and intercalation. Such binding events induce changes in the conformation of a DNA strand. In nature, DNA wraps around a cylindrical protein assembly (diameter and height of 6 nm) [ 7 ] with an 220 positive charge, [ 8 ] creating the complex known as chromatin. Wrapping and bending of DNA has also been achieved in the laboratory through the binding of highly charged species such as molecular assemblies, [ 9 , 10 ] cationic dendrimers, [ 11 , 12 ] and nanoparticles. [ 13 15 ] The charge of a nanoparticle plays a crucial role in its ability to induce DNA structural changes. If a nanoparticle has a highly positive surface charge density, the DNA is likely to wrap and bend upon binding to the nanoparticle [ 13 ] (as in the case of chromatin). On the other hand, if a nanoparticle is weakly charged it will not induce dsDNA compaction. [ 9 , 10 , 15 ] Consequently, there is a transition zone from extended to compact DNA conformations which depends on the chemical nature of the nanoparticle and occurs for polycations with charges between 5 and 10. [ 9 ] While the interactions between highly charged NPs and DNA have been extensively studied, the processes that occur within the transition zone are less explored.

  11. Self-assembly and hybridization mechanisms of DNA with cationic polythiophene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer; Azene, Elias Gebremedhn; Knoops, Jérémie; Knippenberg, Stefan; Delcourt, Cécile; Thomas, Amandine; Richeter, Sébastien; Mehdi, Ahmad; Dubois, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Beljonne, David; Clément, Sébastien; Surin, Mathieu

    2015-08-28

    The combination of DNA and π-conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) represents a promising approach to develop DNA hybridization biosensors, with potential applications for instance in the detection of DNA lesions and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we exploit the remarkable optical properties of a cationic poly[3-(6'-(trimethylphosphonium)hexyl)thiophene-2,5-diyl] (CPT) to decipher the self-assembly of DNA and CPT. The ssDNA/CPT complexes have chiroptical signatures in the CPT absorption region that are strongly dependent on the DNA sequence, which we relate to differences in supramolecular interactions between the thiophene monomers and the various nucleobases. By studying DNA-DNA hybridization and melting processes on preformed ssDNA/CPT complexes, we observe sequence-dependent mechanisms that can yield DNA-condensed aggregates. Heating-cooling cycles show that non-equilibrium mixtures can form, noticeably depending on the working sequence of the hybridization experiment. These results are of high importance for the use of π-conjugated polyelectrolytes in DNA hybridization biosensors and in polyplexes. PMID:26179509

  12. Molecular recognition of genomic DNA in a condensate with a model surfactant for potential gene-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Chandra, Goutam Kumar; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The functionality of a gene carrying nucleic acid in an artificial gene-delivery system is important for the overall efficiency of the vehicle in vivo. Here, we have studied a well-known artificial gene-delivery system, which is a condensate of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with a model cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to investigate the molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. While dynamic light scattering (DLS) and circular dichroism (CD) reveal structural aspects of the condensate and the constituting DNA respectively, picosecond resolved polarization gated spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) reveal molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. We have considered ethidium bromide (EB) and crystal violet (CV), which are well known DNA-binding agents through intercalative (specific) and electrostatic (non-specific) interactions, respectively, as model ligands for the molecular recognition studies. A fluorescent cationic surfactant, Nonyl Acridine Orange (NAO) is considered to be a mimic of CTAB in the condensate. The polarization gated fluorescence of NAO at various temperatures has been used to investigate the local microviscosity of the condensate. The excellent spectral overlap of NAO emission and the absorption spectra of both EB and CV allow us to investigate FRET-distances of the ligands with respect to NAO in the condensate at various temperatures and thermal stability of ligand-binding of the genomic DNA. The thermodynamic properties of the molecular recognition have also been explored using Van't Hoff equation. We have also extended our studies to molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate as dried thin films. This has important implications for its application in bioelectronics. PMID:26907719

  13. Shapes of minimal-energy DNA ropes condensed in confinement

    PubMed Central

    Šiber, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Shapes of a single, long DNA molecule condensed in a confinement of a virus capsid are described as conformations optimizing a model free energy functional accounting for the interplay between the bending energy of the DNA and the surface energy of the DNA bundled in a “rope”. The rope is formed by bundled DNA brought together by (self-)attractive interactions. The conformations predicted by the model depend on the shape of the confinement, the total amount of the packed DNA but also on the relative contributions of the bending and surface energies. Some of the conformations found were not predicted previously, but many previously proposed DNA conformations, some of which are seemingly contradictory, were found as the solutions of the model. The results show that there are many possible packing conformations of the DNA and that the one which realizes in a particular virus depends on the capsid geometry and the nature of condensing agents. PMID:27364168

  14. Shapes of minimal-energy DNA ropes condensed in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiber, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Shapes of a single, long DNA molecule condensed in a confinement of a virus capsid are described as conformations optimizing a model free energy functional accounting for the interplay between the bending energy of the DNA and the surface energy of the DNA bundled in a “rope”. The rope is formed by bundled DNA brought together by (self-)attractive interactions. The conformations predicted by the model depend on the shape of the confinement, the total amount of the packed DNA but also on the relative contributions of the bending and surface energies. Some of the conformations found were not predicted previously, but many previously proposed DNA conformations, some of which are seemingly contradictory, were found as the solutions of the model. The results show that there are many possible packing conformations of the DNA and that the one which realizes in a particular virus depends on the capsid geometry and the nature of condensing agents.

  15. Catching elusive glycosyl cations in a condensed phase with HF/SbF5 superacid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Arda, A.; Désiré, J.; Martin-Mingot, A.; Probst, N.; Sinaÿ, P.; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Thibaudeau, S.; Blériot, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Glycosyl cations are universally accepted key ionic intermediates in the mechanism of glycosylation, the reaction that covalently links carbohydrates to other molecules. These ions have remained hypothetical species so far because of their extremely short life in organic media as a consequence of their very high reactivity. Here, we report the use of liquid hydrofluoric acid-antimony pentafluoride (HF/SbF5) superacid to generate and stabilize the glycosyl cations derived from peracetylated 2-deoxy and 2-bromoglucopyranose in a condensed phase. Their persistence in this superacid medium allows their three-dimensional structure to be studied by NMR, aided by complementary computations. Their deuteration further confirms the impact of the structure of the glycosyl cation on the stereochemical outcome of its trapping.

  16. Adsorption of Divalent Cations on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Morfin, Isabelle; Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Bley, Françoise; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Rochas, Cyrille; Geissler, Erik

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of divalent ions in semidilute solutions of high-molecular-mass DNA containing both sodium chloride and strontium chloride in near-physiological conditions is studied by small-angle x-ray scattering and by small-angle neutron scattering. Both small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering reveal a continuous increase in the scattering intensity at low q with increasing divalent ion concentration, while at high q the scattering curves converge. The best fit to the data is found for a configuration in which DNA strands of cross-sectional radius 10 Å are surrounded by a counterion sheath of outer radius ∼13.8 Å, independent of the strontium chloride concentration. When the strontium chloride is replaced by calcium chloride, similar results are obtained, but the thickness of the sheath increases when the divalent salt concentration decreases. These results correspond in both cases to partial localization of the counterions within a layer that is thinner than the effective Debye screening length. PMID:15454479

  17. Multistep assembly of DNA condensation clusters by SMC

    PubMed Central

    Kim, HyeongJun; Loparo, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) family members play essential roles in chromosome condensation, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. It remains unclear how SMCs structure chromosomes and how their mechanochemical cycle regulates their interactions with DNA. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize how Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) interacts with flow-stretched DNAs. We report that BsSMC can slide on DNA, switching between static binding and diffusion. At higher concentrations, BsSMCs form clusters that condense DNA in a weakly ATP-dependent manner. ATP increases the apparent cooperativity of DNA condensation, demonstrating that BsSMC can interact cooperatively through their ATPase head domains. Consistent with these results, ATPase mutants compact DNA more slowly than wild-type BsSMC in the presence of ATP. Our results suggest that transiently static BsSMC molecules can nucleate the formation of clusters that act to locally condense the chromosome while forming long-range DNA bridges. PMID:26725510

  18. Multistep assembly of DNA condensation clusters by SMC.

    PubMed

    Kim, HyeongJun; Loparo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) family members play essential roles in chromosome condensation, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. It remains unclear how SMCs structure chromosomes and how their mechanochemical cycle regulates their interactions with DNA. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize how Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) interacts with flow-stretched DNAs. We report that BsSMC can slide on DNA, switching between static binding and diffusion. At higher concentrations, BsSMCs form clusters that condense DNA in a weakly ATP-dependent manner. ATP increases the apparent cooperativity of DNA condensation, demonstrating that BsSMC can interact cooperatively through their ATPase head domains. Consistent with these results, ATPase mutants compact DNA more slowly than wild-type BsSMC in the presence of ATP. Our results suggest that transiently static BsSMC molecules can nucleate the formation of clusters that act to locally condense the chromosome while forming long-range DNA bridges. PMID:26725510

  19. Microscopic insight into the DNA condensation process of a zwitterion-functionalized polycation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhou, Li; Chen, Xiaolu; Han, Xia; Wang, Rui; Liu, Honglai

    2016-11-01

    Zwitterion-functionalized polycations are ideal gene carriers with long circulation, high cellular uptaking and low cell viability. However, the trade-off between the DNA condensation efficiency and the cell viability must be addressed. The purpose of this study is to provide a microscopic insight into the DNA condensation process and to explore the effect of a zwitterionic block of zwitterion-functionalized polycation, which is of great significance in designing novel gene delivery systems. Poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-b-(sulfobetaine methacrylate)] (PDMAEMA-b-PSBMA) copolymers were synthesized and used as the model systems. Different from the conventional concept that the PSBMA zwitterionic block act only as the "stealthy" groups, the subtle differences in physical and colloidal characteristics between the polycation/DNA polyplexes show that the PSBMA segment is capable of wrapping DNA attributed to the quaternary ammonium cations, without compromising the DNA condensation capability. On the other hand, the incorporation of PSBMA block reduces the surface charge of the polyplexes, which substantially result in the inefficient transfection and the reduced cytotoxicity. PMID:27404763

  20. Cisplatin induces loop structures and condensation of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Wei, Kong-Ji; Ji, Chao; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Wei-Chi; Li, Ming; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2009-01-01

    Structural properties of single λ DNA treated with anti-cancer drug cisplatin were studied with magnetic tweezers and AFM. Under the effect of low-concentration cisplatin, the DNA became more flexible, with the persistence length decreased significantly from ∼52 to 15 nm. At a high drug concentration, a DNA condensation phenomenon was observed. Based on experimental results from both single-molecule and AFM studies, we propose a model to explain this kind of DNA condensation by cisplatin: first, di-adducts induce local distortions of DNA. Next, micro-loops of ∼20 nm appear through distant crosslinks. Then, large aggregates are formed through further crosslinks. Finally, DNA is condensed into a compact globule. Experiments with Pt(dach)Cl2 indicate that oxaliplatin may modify the DNA structures in the same way as cisplatin. The observed loop structure formation of DNA may be an important feature of the effect of platinum anti-cancer drugs that are analogous to cisplatin in structure. PMID:19129234

  1. Competitive interaction of monovalent cations with DNA from 3D-RISM.

    PubMed

    Giambaşu, George M; Gebala, Magdalena K; Panteva, Maria T; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A; York, Darrin M

    2015-09-30

    The composition of the ion atmosphere surrounding nucleic acids affects their folding, condensation and binding to other molecules. It is thus of fundamental importance to gain predictive insight into the formation of the ion atmosphere and thermodynamic consequences when varying ionic conditions. An early step toward this goal is to benchmark computational models against quantitative experimental measurements. Herein, we test the ability of the three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) to reproduce preferential interaction parameters determined from ion counting (IC) experiments for mixed alkali chlorides and dsDNA. Calculations agree well with experiment with slight deviations for salt concentrations >200 mM and capture the observed trend where the extent of cation accumulation around the DNA varies inversely with its ionic size. Ion distributions indicate that the smaller, more competitive cations accumulate to a greater extent near the phosphoryl groups, penetrating deeper into the grooves. In accord with experiment, calculated IC profiles do not vary with sequence, although the predicted ion distributions in the grooves are sequence and ion size dependent. Calculations on other nucleic acid conformations predict that the variation in linear charge density has a minor effect on the extent of cation competition. PMID:26304542

  2. Competitive interaction of monovalent cations with DNA from 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Gebala, Magdalena K.; Panteva, Maria T.; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the ion atmosphere surrounding nucleic acids affects their folding, condensation and binding to other molecules. It is thus of fundamental importance to gain predictive insight into the formation of the ion atmosphere and thermodynamic consequences when varying ionic conditions. An early step toward this goal is to benchmark computational models against quantitative experimental measurements. Herein, we test the ability of the three dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) to reproduce preferential interaction parameters determined from ion counting (IC) experiments for mixed alkali chlorides and dsDNA. Calculations agree well with experiment with slight deviations for salt concentrations >200 mM and capture the observed trend where the extent of cation accumulation around the DNA varies inversely with its ionic size. Ion distributions indicate that the smaller, more competitive cations accumulate to a greater extent near the phosphoryl groups, penetrating deeper into the grooves. In accord with experiment, calculated IC profiles do not vary with sequence, although the predicted ion distributions in the grooves are sequence and ion size dependent. Calculations on other nucleic acid conformations predict that the variation in linear charge density has a minor effect on the extent of cation competition. PMID:26304542

  3. Characterization of cationic lipid DNA transfection complexes differing in susceptability to serum inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background Cationic lipid DNA complexes based on DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-(trimethyammonium) propane) and mixtures of DOTAP and cholesterol (DC) have been previously optimized for transfection efficiency in the absence of serum and used as a non-viral gene delivery system. To determine whether DOTAP and DC lipid DNA complexes could be obtained with increased transfection effciency in the presence of high serum concentrations, the composition of the complexes was varied systematically and a total of 162 different complexes were analyzed for transfection efficiency in the presence and absence of high serum concentrations. Results Increasing the ratio of DOTAP or DC to DNA led to a dose dependent enhancement of transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations up to a ratio of approximately 128 nmol lipid/μg DNA. Transfection efficiency could be further increased for all ratios of DOTAP and DC to DNA by addition of the DNA condensing agent protamine sulfate (PS). For DOTAP DNA complexes with ratios of ≤ 32 nmol/μg DNA, peak transfection efficiencies were obtained with 4 μg PS/μg DNA. In contrast, increasing the amount of PS of DC complexes above 0.5 μg PS /μg DNA did not lead to significant further increases in transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations. Four complexes, which had a similar high transfection efficiency in cell culture in the presence of low serum concentrations but which differed largely in the lipid to DNA ratio and the amount of PS were selected for further analysis. Intravenous injection of the selected complexes led to 22-fold differences in transduction efficiency, which correlated with transfection efficiency in the presence of high serum concentrations. The complex with the highest transfection efficiency in vivo consisted of 64 nmol DC/ 16 μg PS/ μg DNA. Physical analysis revealed a predicted size of 440 nm and the highest zeta potential of the complexes analyzed. Conclusions Optimization of

  4. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  5. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+). PMID:24334186

  6. Optical tweezers reveal a dynamic mechanical response of cationic peptide-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy; Zheng, Tai; Sucayan, Sarah; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tricoli, Lucas; Hustedt, Jason; Kahn, Jason; Mixson, A. James; Seog, Joonil

    2013-03-01

    Nonviral carriers have been developed to deliver nucleic acids by forming nanoscale complexes; however, there has been limited success in achieving high transfection efficiency. Our hypothesis is that a factor affecting gene delivery efficiency is the mechanical response of the condensed complex. To begin to test this hypothesis, we directly measured the mechanical properties of DNA-carrier complexes using optical tweezers. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymer, Asparagine-lysine (NK) polymer and poly-L-lysine were used to form complexes with a single DNA molecule. As carriers were introduced, a sudden decrease in DNA extension occurrs at a force level which is defined as critical force (Fc). Fc is carrier and concentration dependent. Pulling revealed reduction in DNA extension length for HK-DNA complexes. The characteristics of force profiles vary by agent and can be dynamically manipulated by changes in environmental conditions such as ionic strength of the buffer as well as pH. Heparin can remove cationic reagents which are otherwise irreversibly bound to DNA. The implications for optimizing molecular interactions to enhance transfection efficiency will be discussed.

  7. Hexamminecobalt(III)-induced condensation of calf thymus DNA: circular dichroism and hydration measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kankia, Besik I.; Buckin, Vitaly; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of hexamminecobalt(III), Co(NH3)63+, with 160 and 3000–8000 bp length calf thymus DNA has been investigated by circular dichroism, acoustic and densimetric techniques. The acoustic titration curves of 160 bp DNA revealed three stages of interaction: (i) Co(NH3)63+ binding up to the molar ratio [Co(NH3)63+]/[P] = 0.25, prior to DNA condensation; (ii) a condensation process between [Co(NH3)63+]/[P] = 0.25 and 0.30; and (iii) precipitation after [Co(NH3)63+]/[P] = 0.3. In the case of 3000–8000 bp DNA only two processes were observed: (i) binding up to [Co(NH3)63+]/[P] = 0.3; and (ii) precipitation after this point. In agreement with earlier observations, long DNA aggregates without changes in its B-form circular dichroism spectrum, while short DNA demonstrates a positive B→Ψ transition after [Co(NH3)63+]/[P] = 0.25. From ultrasonic and densimetric measurements the effects of Co(NH3)63+ binding on volume and compressibility have been obtained. The binding of Co(NH3)63+ to both short and long DNA is characterized by similar changes in volume and compressibility calculated per mole Co(NH3)63+: ΔV = 9 cm3 mol–1 and Δκ = 33 × 10–4 cm3 mol–1 bar–1. The positive sign of the parameters indicates dehydration, i.e. water release from Co(NH3)63+ and the atomic groups of DNA. This extent of water displacement would be consistent with the formation of two direct, hydrogen bonded contacts between the cation and the phosphates of DNA. PMID:11433025

  8. Possible prebiotic significance of polyamines in the condensation, protection, encapsulation, and biological properties of DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baeza, Isabel; Ibanez, Miguel; Wong, Carlos; Chavez, Pedro; Gariglio, Patricio; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    While DNA which has undergone ionic condensation with Co(3+)(NH3)6 is resistant to the action of the endonuclase DNAse I, in much the same way as DNA condensed with spermidine, it was significantly less active in transcription with the E. coli RNA polymerase than DNA-spermidine condensed forms. Although both compacted forms of DNA were more efficiently encapsulated into neutral liposomes, negatively charged liposomes were seldom formed in the presence of the present, positive ion-condensed DNA; spermidine is accordingly proposed as a plausible prebiotic DNA-condensing agent. Attention is given to the relevance of the polyimide-nucleic acids complexes in the evolution of life.

  9. Reversible Condensation of DNA using a Redox-Active Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Melissa E.; Jewell, Christopher M.; Lynn, David M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2008-01-01

    We report characterization of aqueous solutions of dilute Lambda phage DNA containing the redox-active surfactant (11-ferrocenylundecyl)trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) as a function of the oxidation state of the FTMA. FTMA undergoes a reversible one-electron oxidation from a reduced state that forms micelles in aqueous solution to an oxidized state (containing the ferrocenium cation) that does not selfassociate in solution. This investigation sought to test the hypothesis that FTMA can be used to achieve reversible control over the conformation of DNA-surfactant complexes in solution. Whereas DNA adopts extended coil conformations in aqueous solutions, our measurements revealed that addition of reduced FTMA (2–5μM) to aqueous solutions of DNA (5 μM in nucleotide units) resulted in coexistence of extended coils and compact globules in solution. At higher concentrations of reduced FTMA (up to 30μM), the DNA was present as compact globules only. In contrast, oxidized FTMA had no measurable effect on the conformation of DNA, allowing DNA to maintain an extended coil state up to a concentration of 75μM oxidized FTMA. We further demonstrate that it is possible to chemically or electrochemically transform the oxidation state of FTMA in preformed complexes of FTMA and DNA, thus achieving in situ control over the conformations of the DNA in solution. These results provide guidance for the design of surfactant systems that permit active control of DNA-surfactant interactions. PMID:17428073

  10. DNA Compaction Induced by a Cationic Polymer or Surfactant Impact Gene Expression and DNA Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Bartles, Andrew; Muck, Joscha; Dias, Rita S.; Carnerup, Anna M.; Zink, Daniele; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in achieving gene regulation in biotechnological and biomedical applications by using synthetic DNA-binding agents. Most studies have so far focused on synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding agents. Such approaches are relatively complicated and cost intensive and their level of sophistication is not always required, in particular for biotechnological application. Our study is inspired by in vivo data that suggest that DNA compaction might contribute to gene regulation. This study exploits the potential of using synthetic DNA compacting agents that are not sequence-specific to achieve gene regulation for in vitro systems. The semi-synthetic in vitro system we use include common cationic DNA-compacting agents, poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which we apply to linearized plasmid DNA encoding for the luciferase reporter gene. We show that complexing the DNA with either of the cationic agents leads to gene expression inhibition in a manner that depends on the extent of compaction. This is demonstrated by using a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. We show that compaction can also protect DNA against degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our study shows that these effects are reversible and DNA can be released from the complexes. Release of DNA leads to restoration of gene expression and makes the DNA susceptible to degradation by Dnase. A highly charged polyelectrolyte, heparin, is needed to release DNA from dendrimers, while DNA complexed with CTAB dissociates with the non-ionic surfactant C12E5. Our results demonstrate the relation between DNA compaction by non-specific DNA-binding agents and gene expression and gene regulation can be achieved in vitro systems in a reliable dose-dependent and reversible manner. PMID:24671109

  11. Surface area of lipid membranes regulates the DNA-binding capacity of cationic liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    We have applied electrophoresis on agarose gels to investigate the DNA-binding capacity of cationic liposomes made of cationic DC-cholesterol and neutral dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine as a function of membrane charge density and cationic lipid/DNA charge ratio. While each cationic liposome formulation exhibits a distinctive DNA-protection ability, here we show that such a capacity is universally regulated by surface area of lipid membranes available for binding in an aspecific manner. The relevance of DNA protection for gene transfection is also discussed.

  12. Blending of polyethylenimine with a cationic polyurethane greatly enhances both DNA delivery efficacy and reduces the overall cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cherng, J Y; Hung, W C; Kao, H C

    2011-05-01

    Three blending methods were introduced to combine a biodegradable cationic- polyurethane (PUg3) and polyethylenimine (PEI) together with DNA by different mixing sequences. Results of gel electrophoresis assays and particle size measurements show that complexes prepared by method 1 and 3 bear an ability to condense DNA into small nanoparticles. On the contrary, the use of method 2 in making complexes produces significantly large particles because of the weaker interaction with DNA and lack of DNA condensation. Moreover, cell proliferation assays show that no cytotoxicity of the DNA/blended-polymers complexes (exhibited by method 1) was found and due to a result of the outer coating of PUg3, reducing cytotoxic PEI exposure outside the complexes. With a new technique in pharmaceutics, the complexes prepared for DNA delivery by mixing of PEI and PUg3 with DNA in a sequence (method 1) could achieve an even better transfection efficiency (reaching 40% higher) than using PEI alone as well as reduce the cytotoxicity substantially. In conclusion, a new class of complexes (non-viral combo-system) made by a skillful blending sequence (method 1) has been designed and demonstrated to obtain the beneficial properties from two useful and individual polymers for gene delivery. This method can be used in greatly improving the transfection efficiency of polymer-based gene vectors. The blended polymers with DNA also have a better biocompatibility and no cytotoxicity, which are the requirements and critical points for great success in performing gene therapy in vivo. PMID:21446905

  13. Promoting DNA loading on magnetic nanoparticles using a DNA condensation strategy.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhi; Jiang, Youjun; Guo, Mengyu; Bennett, J Craig; Li, Xianghai; Tian, Hefeng; Oakes, Ken; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Yi; Huang, Qianming; Chen, Huaping

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing DNA loading on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is crucial for their successful utilization in gene transfer, DNA isolation, and bio-analytical applications. This enhancement is typically achieved by altering particle size and surfaces as well as charge density and ionic strength. We demonstrate a novel route for promoting DNA loading on amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (ASMNPs) by prior condensation of elongated DNA to a compact globule before adsorption. The enhanced DNA-loading capacity, as demonstrated by a reduction in the number of ASMNPs needed to achieve complexation, was presumably due to the elimination of DNA wrapping around nanoparticles and substantially reduced electrostatic interactions of DNA with nanoparticles because the compacted DNA globule conformation decreases its exposed surface charge. The maximum loading capacity of ASMNPs for condensed DNA was 4.4 times greater than that for elongated coiled DNA, achieving the highest ever reported value of 385 μg mg(-1). Practical applications for plasmid DNA isolation from cleared lysate confirmed the reliability of the proposed method. PMID:25454752

  14. Characterization of complexation of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) thermoresponsive cationic nanogels with salmon sperm DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moselhy, Jim; Vira, Tasnim; Liu, Fei-Fei; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2009-01-01

    Thermoresponsive cationic nanogel (TCNG) networks based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and quaternary alkyl ammonium halide salts of DMAEMA (DMAEMAQ) were synthesized by dispersion polymerization technique. The thermoresponsive properties of TCNGs and TCNG-salmon sperm DNA (sasDNA) polyplexes were characterized in aqueous media of various pH and ionic strength. P[NIPAM] and P[NIPAM/DMAEMA] TCNGs exhibited sharp volume phase transition (VPT) in water at critical temperatures (Tc) of 32 °C and 36 °C, respectively. Quaternized P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ] TCNGs did not undergo sharp VPT up to 50 °C. The VPT of uncomplexed TCNGs were sensitive to the ionic composition and ionic strength of salts in solution, but were insensitive to pH in the range 5.0 to 7.4. The VPT of P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ]/sasDNA diminished in magnitude with increasing Wp/Wd suggesting greater compaction of the polyplexes. The distinct phase-transition properties of P[NIPAM/DMAEMA]/sasDNA and P[NIPAM/DMAEMAQ]/sasDNA polyplexes were attributed to the condensing capability of polycations and to differences in the spatial distribution of structural charges in quaternized and nonquaternized networks. The findings demonstrate that stable TCNGs can be prepared with controllable responsive properties determined by the nature of the cationic charge incorporated and may have potential as vehicles for DNA delivery. PMID:19774114

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  16. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingjie; Wu Jinlu; Chen Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300 kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  17. Interaction between DNA and cationic surfactants: effect of DNA conformation and surfactant headgroup.

    PubMed

    Dias, Rita S; Magno, Luís M; Valente, Artur J M; Das, Dibyendu; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Souvik; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Björn

    2008-11-20

    The interactions between DNA and a number of different cationic surfactants, differing in headgroup polarity, were investigated by electric conductivity measurements and fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that, the critical association concentration (cac), characterizing the onset of surfactant binding to DNA, does not vary significantly with the architecture of the headgroup. However, comparing with the critical micelle concentration (cmc) in the absence of DNA, it can be inferred that the micelles of a surfactant with a simple quaternary ammonium headgroup are much more stabilized by the presence of DNA than those of surfactants with hydroxylated head-groups. In line with previous studies of polymer-surfactant association, the cac does not vary significantly with either the DNA concentration or its chain length. On the other hand, a novel observation is that the cac is much lower when DNA is denaturated and in the single-stranded conformation, than for the double-helix DNA. This is contrary to expectation for a simple electrostatically driven association. Thus previous studies of polyelectrolyte-surfactant systems have shown that the cac decreases strongly with increasing linear charge density of the polyion. Since double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) has twice as large linear charge density as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), the stronger binding in the latter case indicates an important role of nonelectrostatic effects. Both a higher flexibility of ssDNA and a higher hydrophobicity due to the exposed bases are found to play a role, with the hydrophobic interaction argued to be more important. The significance of hydrophobic DNA-surfactant interaction is in line with other observations. The significance of nonelectrostatic effects is also indicated in significant differences in cac between different surfactants for ssDNA but not for dsDNA. For lower concentrations of DNA, the conductivity measurements presented an "anomalous" feature, i.e., a second inflection point

  18. Quaternary ammonium groups exposed at the surface of silica nanoparticles suitable for DNA complexation in the presence of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Nora; Adumeau, Laurent; Lambert, Olivier; Ravaine, Serge; Mornet, Stéphane

    2015-05-28

    The production of silica nanoparticles (NPs) exposing quaternary ammonium groups (NPQ(+)) has been achieved using an optimized chemical surface functionalization protocol. The procedures of surface modification and quaternization of amino groups were validated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. Compared to nonquaternized aminated NP, the colloidal stability of NPQ(+) was improved for various pH and salt conditions as assessed by ζ potential and light scattering measurements. In the context of their use for nucleic acid delivery, DNA efficiently bound to NPQ(+) analyzed by cosedimentation assays for a large pH range and various NaCl concentrations and exhibited a better efficacy at basic pH than nonquaternized NP. The study of NPQ(+)/DNA/cationic lipids ternary complexes was carried out with 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP) and analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Cryo-EM images showed ternary assemblies where condensed DNA strands are sandwiched between the NPQ(+) surface and the cationic lipid bilayer. Because of an unusual electrostatic colloidal stability of NPQ(+) and a high propensity to bind DNA molecules particularly at high salt concentrations, a novel type of ternary assembly has been formed that might impact the delivery properties of these complexes including their stability in biological environment. PMID:25950202

  19. A linear-dendritic cationic vector for efficient DNA grasp and delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sun, Yun-xia; Yi, Wen-jie; Yang, Juan; Liu, Chen-wei; Cheng, Han; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-zheng; Zhuo, Ren-xi

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an attempt to design an efficient and biocompatible cationic gene vector via structural optimization that favors the efficient utilization of amine groups for DNA condensation. To this end, a linear-dendritic block copolymer of methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol)-dendritic polyglycerol-graft-tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA) was prepared with specially designed multiple functions including strong DNA affinity, endosomal buffering and expected serum-tolerance. Based on the transfection in serum-free and serum-conditioned media, the influences of the polymer structures including the degree of polymerization of DPG and TAEA substitution degree were explored. As compared to polyethylenimine (M(w)=5 kDa) (PEI5k) with similar molecular weight and higher amine density, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA displayed comparably high DNA affinity due to the special linear-dendritic architecture. Consequently, at very low N/P ratio, mPEG-DPG-g-TAEA vectors could mediate efficient in vitro luciferase expression at levels that are comparable with or even superior to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000, while being apparently higher than PEI5k. The designed vectors exhibit considerably higher cell biocompatibility and better resistance against bovine serum albumin adsorption than PEI5k. The stability of the complexes on coincubation with heparin was found to be largely dependent on the polymer structure. As concluded from the comparative transfection study in the absence/presence of chloroquine, it is likely that the polycation itself could produce endosomal buffering. This linear-dendritic vector shows promising potential for the application of gene delivery. PMID:22370448

  20. Cationized bovine serum albumin as gene carrier: Influence of specific secondary structure on DNA complexibility and gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianwei; Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Youxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this research, BSA, one of the natural rigid globular proteins with ca. 51% of α-helix secondary structure, was utilized to prepare cationized BSA (cBSA) as gene carrier. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) or polyethylenimine (PEI1800) was grafted to BSA with different grafting levels. Based on the circular dichoism (CD) spectra, all cBSA remained α-helical structure to some degree. This was exciting to endow cBSA with quite different DNA complexibility and cellular biology behavior from the random coiled and flexible polycations such as PEI and poly-l-lysine (PLL). Strangely, the DNA condensability decreased with the increment of TEPA or PEI1800 grafting level. Also, the cBSA could condense DNA effectively to form irregular nanoparticles around 50-200nm above N/P ratio of 10. On account of the excellent hydration of BSA, the cBSA/DNA complexes revealed good colloidal stability under physiological salt condition. Cell culture experiments indicated this BSA-based gene carrier possessed good cellular compatibility. Surprisingly, cBSA/DNA complexes could be uptaken excellently by up to 90% cells. This might be owing to the agitation effect of α-helical structure and the positive potential of these complexes. BSA-PEI1800/DNA complexes with quick endosome escape even had transfection efficiency as high as PEI25k/DNA complexes. Overall, this paper provided us the potential of cBSA as gene carrier and might have some instructions in the design of protein-based gene delivery system. PMID:26998865

  1. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in psoriatic skin cooperate to break innate tolerance to self-DNA.

    PubMed

    Lande, Roberto; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Demaria, Olivier; Frasca, Loredana; Durr, Sophie; Conrad, Curdin; Schröder, Jens; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell-mediated skin autoimmune disease characterized by the aberrant activation of dermal dendritic cells (DCs) and the sustained epidermal expression of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously identified a link between these two events by showing that the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL37 has the ability to trigger self-nucleic acid mediated activation of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in psoriatic skin. Whether other cationic antimicrobial peptides exert similar activities is unknown. By analyzing heparin-binding HPLC fractions of psoriatic scales, we found that human beta-defensin (hBD)2, hBD3, and lysozyme are additional triggers of pDC activation in psoriatic skin lesions. Like LL37, hBD2, hBD3, and lysozyme are able to condense self-DNA into particles that are endocytosed by pDCs, leading to activation of TLR9. In contrast, other antimicrobial peptides expressed in psoriatic skin including elafin, hBD1, and psoriasin (S100A7) did not show similar activities. hBD2, hBD3, and lysozyme were detected in psoriatic skin lesions in the vicinity of pDCs and found to cooperate with LL37 to induce high levels of IFN production by pDCs, suggesting their concerted role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25332209

  2. Grand-canonical simulation of DNA condensation with two salts, effect of divalent counterion size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan T.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of DNA- DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using a generalized grand-canonical Monte-Carlo simulation for a system of two salts. The effect of the divalent counterion size on the condensation behavior of the DNA bundle is investigated. Experimentally, it is known that multivalent counterions have strong effect on the DNA condensation phenomenon. While tri- and tetra-valent counterions are shown to easily condense free DNA molecules in solution into toroidal bundles, the situation with divalent counterions is not as clear cut. Some divalent counterions like Mg+2 are not able to condense free DNA molecules in solution, while some like Mn+2 can condense them into disorder bundles. In restricted environment such as in two dimensional system or inside viral capsid, Mg+2 can have strong effect and able to condense them, but the condensation varies qualitatively with different system, different coions. It has been suggested that divalent counterions can induce attraction between DNA molecules but the strength of the attraction is not strong enough to condense free DNA in solution. However, if the configuration entropy of DNA is restricted, these attractions are enough to cause appreciable effects. The variations among different divalent salts might be due to the hydration effect of the divalent counterions. In this paper, we try to understand this variation using a very simple parameter, the size of the divalent counterions. We investigate how divalent counterions with different sizes can lead to varying qualitative behavior of DNA condensation in restricted environments. Additionally, a grand canonical Monte-Carlo method for simulation of systems with two different salts is presented in detail.

  3. Grand-canonical simulation of DNA condensation with two salts, effect of divalent counterion size.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Toan T

    2016-02-14

    The problem of DNA- DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using a generalized grand-canonical Monte-Carlo simulation for a system of two salts. The effect of the divalent counterion size on the condensation behavior of the DNA bundle is investigated. Experimentally, it is known that multivalent counterions have strong effect on the DNA condensation phenomenon. While tri- and tetra-valent counterions are shown to easily condense free DNA molecules in solution into toroidal bundles, the situation with divalent counterions is not as clear cut. Some divalent counterions like Mg(+2) are not able to condense free DNA molecules in solution, while some like Mn(+2) can condense them into disorder bundles. In restricted environment such as in two dimensional system or inside viral capsid, Mg(+2) can have strong effect and able to condense them, but the condensation varies qualitatively with different system, different coions. It has been suggested that divalent counterions can induce attraction between DNA molecules but the strength of the attraction is not strong enough to condense free DNA in solution. However, if the configuration entropy of DNA is restricted, these attractions are enough to cause appreciable effects. The variations among different divalent salts might be due to the hydration effect of the divalent counterions. In this paper, we try to understand this variation using a very simple parameter, the size of the divalent counterions. We investigate how divalent counterions with different sizes can lead to varying qualitative behavior of DNA condensation in restricted environments. Additionally, a grand canonical Monte-Carlo method for simulation of systems with two different salts is presented in detail. PMID:26874503

  4. Microscopic imaging of DNA condensation in the presence of charged nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Sandhu, Tejdev; Nordlund, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    DNA forms condensates in specific environments. In chromatin, DNA is in condensed form. DNA becomes compact by winding around positively-charged proteins called histones. Negatively-charged DNA phosphates interact electrostatically with histones and wind over them. To model the complex process of chromatin formation in cells, λ -phage (16μ m long) and herring sperm (variable length) DNAs are allowed to interact with nanospheres of size 40nm and 930nm containing 1.8x10^4 and 2.6x10^8 positive surface charges respectively at pH 7.5, to form condensates without any enzyme action. Formation of DNA condensates are imaged at various concentrations, pH's, viscosities, and ionic strengths. Images of condensate in 10-20% glycerol, which has 1.3-1.8 times the viscosity of water show smaller aggregates of size 2-4μ m in contrast to larger aggregates of size 10-50μ m formed in aqueous buffer, which indicates viscosity plays a major role in formation of these condensates. Decreases in the concentration of DNA and spheres cause decrease in the size and number of aggregates. Presence of DNA in the condensate is confirmed by the fluorescence emission from YOYO-1-iodide. We present a simple electrostatic model for this aggregation process.

  5. Binding of cationic surfactants to DNA, protein and DNA-protein mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gani, S A; Chattoraj, D K; Mukherjee, D C

    1999-06-01

    Extent of binding (gamma 2(1)) of cationic surfactants cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), myristyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (MTAB) and dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) to calf-thymus DNA, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and to their binary mixture respectively have been measured as function of bulk concentration of the surfactant by using equilibrium dialysis technique. Binding of CTAB has been studied at different pH, ionic strength (mu), temperature and biopolymer composition and with native and denatured states of the biopolymers. The chain-length of different long chain amines plays a significant role in the extent of binding under identical solution condition. The binding ratios for CTAB to collagen, gelatin, DNA-collagen and DNA-gelatin mixtures respectively have also been determined. The conformational structures of different biopolymers are observed to play significant role in macromolecular interactions between protein and DNA in the presence of CTAB. From the experimental values of the maximum binding ratio (gamma 2m) at the saturation level for each individual biopolymer, ideal values (gamma 2m)id have been theoretically calculated for binary mixtures of biopolymers using additivity rule. The protein-DNA-CTAB interaction in mixture has been explained in terms of the deviation (delta) of (gamma 2m) from (gamma 2m)id in the presence of a surfactant in bulk. The binding of surfactants to biopolymers and to their binary mixtures are compared more precisely in terms of the Gibbs' free energy decrease (-delta G degree) for the saturation of the binding sites in the biopolymers or biopolymer mixtures with the change of the bulk surfactant activity from zero to unity in the rational mole fraction scale. PMID:10650715

  6. Polyethylene glycol and divalent salt-induced DNA reentrant condensation revealed by single molecule measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao; Jia, Jun-Li; Ran, Shi-Yong

    2015-05-21

    In this study, we investigated the DNA condensation induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) with different molecular weights (PEG 600 and PEG 6000) in the presence of NaCl or MgCl2 by using magnetic tweezers (MT) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The MT measurements show that with increasing NaCl concentration, the critical condensation force in the PEG 600-DNA or PEG 6000-DNA system increased approximately linearly. PEG 6000 solution has a larger critical force than PEG 600 solution at a given NaCl concentration. In comparison, a parabolic trend of the critical condensation force was observed with increasing MgCl2 concentration, indicating that DNA undergoes a reentrant condensation. The AFM results show that the morphologies of the compacted DNA-PEG complexes depended on the salt concentration and were consistent with the MT results. PMID:25871460

  7. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  8. DNA strand exchange stimulated by spontaneous complex formation with cationic comb-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Jong; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2002-10-30

    Cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) composed of a polycation backbone and water-soluble side chains accelerate by 4-5 orders the DNA strand exchange reaction (SER) between double helical DNA and its homologous single-strand DNA. The accelerating effect is considered due to alleviation of counterion association during transitional intermediate formation in sequential displacement pathway. CCCs stabilize not only matured hybrids but also the nucleation complex to accelerate hybridization. PMID:12392411

  9. Formation of Stable Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes for Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofland, Hans E. J.; Shephard, Lee; Sullivan, Sean M.

    1996-07-01

    Stable cationic lipid/DNA complexes were formed by solubilizing cationic liposomes with 1% octylglucoside and complexing a DNA plasmid with the lipid in the presence of detergent. Removal of the detergent by dialysis yielded a lipid/DNA suspension that was able to transfect tissue culture cells up to 90 days after formation with no loss in activity. Similar levels of gene transfer were obtained by mixing the cationic lipid in a liposome form with DNA just prior to cell addition. However, expression was completely lost 24 hr after mixing. The transfection efficiency of the stable complex in 15% fetal calf serum was 30% of that obtained in the absence of serum, whereas the transient complex was completely inactivated with 2% fetal calf serum. A 90-day stability study comparing various storage conditions showed that the stable complex could be stored frozen or as a suspension at 4 degrees C with no loss in transfection efficiency. Centrifugation of the stable complex produced a pellet that contained approximately 90% of the DNA and 10% of the lipid. Transfection of cells with the resuspended pellet and the supernatant showed that the majority of the transfection activity was in the pellet and all the toxicity was in the supernatant. Formation of a stable cationic lipid/DNA complex has produced a transfection vehicle that can be stored indefinitely, can be concentrated with no loss in transfection efficiency, and the toxicity levels can be greatly reduced when the active complex is isolated from the uncomplexed lipid.

  10. Why is less cationic lipid required to prepare lipoplexes from plasmid DNA than linear DNA in gene therapy?

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sierra, María B; Biswas, Joydeep; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2011-11-16

    The most important objective of the present study was to explain why cationic lipid (CL)-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA) is better than that of linear DNA in gene therapy, a question that, until now, has remained unanswered. Herein for the first time we experimentally show that for different types of CLs, pDNA, in contrast to linear DNA, is compacted with a large amount of its counterions, yielding a lower effective negative charge. This feature has been confirmed through a number of physicochemical and biochemical investigations. This is significant for both in vitro and in vivo transfection studies. For an effective DNA transfection, the lower the amount of the CL, the lower is the cytotoxicity. The study also points out that it is absolutely necessary to consider both effective charge ratios between CL and pDNA and effective pDNA charges, which can be determined from physicochemical experiments. PMID:21985329

  11. Cationic azacryptands as selective three-way DNA junction binding agents.

    PubMed

    Novotna, Jana; Laguerre, Aurelien; Granzhan, Anton; Pirrotta, Marc; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Monchaud, David

    2015-01-01

    DNA damaging agents are among the most powerful anticancer drugs currently in clinical use. As an alternative to irreversible nucleobase damage and DNA strand breaks, the non-covalent stabilization of unusual, non-B DNA structures is currently emerging as a promising way to cause DNA damage with a high level of specificity. One of such non-B DNA structures is the three-way DNA junction: this Y-shaped multi-stranded architecture may act as an impediment to many DNA transactions, being therefore regarded as an invaluable target to create genomic defects that are improperly dealt with by cancer cells only. Herein, we report on a series of cationic azacryptands that make excellent candidates for assessing and harnessing the actual therapeutic potential of three-way DNA junction interacting compounds. PMID:25369056

  12. Glom is a novel mitochondrial DNA packaging protein in Physarum polycephalum and causes intense chromatin condensation without suppressing DNA functions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Narie; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Nishitani, Chikako; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shirai, Yuki; Sakai, Atsushi; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packed into highly organized structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). To understand the organization of mtDNA and the overall regulation of its genetic activity within the mt-nucleoids, we identified and characterized a novel mtDNA packaging protein, termed Glom (a protein inducing agglomeration of mitochondrial chromosome), from highly condensed mt-nucleoids of the true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum. This protein could bind to the entire mtDNA and package mtDNA into a highly condensed state in vitro. Immunostaining analysis showed that Glom specifically localized throughout the mt-nucleoid. Deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Glom has a lysine-rich region with proline-rich domain in the N-terminal half and two HMG boxes in C-terminal half. Deletion analysis of Glom revealed that the lysine-rich region was sufficient for the intense mtDNA condensation in vitro. When the recombinant Glom proteins containing the lysine-rich region were expressed in Escherichia coli, the condensed nucleoid structures were observed in E. coli. Such in vivo condensation did not interfere with transcription or replication of E. coli chromosome and the proline-rich domain was essential to keep those genetic activities. The expression of Glom also complemented the E. coli mutant lacking the bacterial histone-like protein HU and the HMG-boxes region of Glom was important for the complementation. Our results suggest that Glom is a new mitochondrial histone-like protein having a property to cause intense DNA condensation without suppressing DNA functions. PMID:12960433

  13. Patterned Threadlike Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome-DNA Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey N; Ewert, Kai K; Jacovetty, Erica L; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2015-06-30

    The self-assembly of oppositely charged biomacromolecules has been extensively studied due to its pertinence in the design of functional nanomaterials. Using cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM), optical light scattering, and fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the structure and phase behavior of PEGylated (PEG: poly(ethylene glycol)) cationic liposome-DNA nanoparticles (CL-DNA NPs) as a function of DNA length, topology (linear and circular), and ρ(chg) (the molar charge ratio of cationic lipid to anionic DNA). Although all NPs studied exhibited lamellar internal nanostructure, NPs formed with short (∼2 kbps), linear, polydisperse DNA were defect-rich and contained smaller domains. Unexpectedly, we found distinctly different equilibrium structures away from the isoelectric point. At ρ(chg) > 1, in the excess cationic lipid regime, threadlike micelles rich in PEG-lipid were found to coexist with NPs, cationic liposomes, and spherical micelles. At high concentrations these PEGylated threadlike micelles formed a well-ordered, patterned morphology with highly uniform intermicellar spacing. At ρ(chg) < 1, in the excess DNA regime and with no added salt, individual NPs were tethered together via long, linear DNA (48 kbps λ-phage DNA) into a biopolymer-mediated floc. Our results provide insight into what equilibrium nanostructures can form when oppositely charged macromolecules self-assemble in aqueous media. Self-assembled, well-ordered threadlike micelles and tethered nanoparticles may have a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, including nanoscale lithograpy and the development of lipid-based multifunctional nanoparticle networks. PMID:26048043

  14. Patterned Thread-like Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome–DNA Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Ewert, Kai K.; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Li, Youli; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly of oppositely charged biomacromolecules has been extensively studied due to its pertinence in the design of functional nanomaterials. Using cryo electronic microscopy (cryo-EM), optical light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the structure and phase behavior of PEGylated (PEG: poly(ethylene-glycol)) cationic liposome–DNA nanoparticles (CL–DNA NPs) as a function of DNA length, topology (linear and circular) and ρchg (the molar charge ratio of cationic lipid to anionic DNA). Although all NPs studied showed a lamellar internal nanostructure, NPs formed with short (~ 2 kbps), linear, polydisperse DNA were defect-rich and contained smaller domains. Unexpectedly, we found distinctly different equilibrium structures away from the isoelectric point. At ρchg > 1, in the excess cationic lipid regime, thread-like micelles rich in PEG-lipid were found to coexist with NPs, cationic liposomes and spherical micelles. At high concentrations these PEGylated thread-like micelles formed a well-ordered, patterned morphology with highly uniform inter-micellar spacing. At ρchg < 1, in the excess DNA regime and with no added salt, individual NPs were tethered together via long, linear DNA (48 kbps λ-phage DNA) into a biopolymer-mediated floc. Our results provide insight on what equilibrium nanostructures can form when oppositely charged macromolecules self-assemble in aqueous media. Self-assembled, well-ordered thread-like micelles and tethered nanoparticles may have a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, including nanoscale lithograpy and the development of lipid-based multi-functional nanoparticle networks. PMID:26048043

  15. Complexes of DNA with cationic peptides: conditions of formation and factors effecting internalization by mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Dizhe, E B; Ignatovich, I A; Burov, S V; Pohvoscheva, A V; Akifiev, B N; Efremov, A M; Perevozchikov, A P; Orlov, S V

    2006-12-01

    This work was devoted to the study of conditions of the formation of DNA/K8 complex and analysis of factors effecting the entry of DNA/K8 complex into mammalian cells in comparison with DNA complexes with arginine-rich fragment (47-57) of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) transcription factor Tat (Tat peptide). The stoichiometry of positively charged DNA/K8 complexes has been studied for the first time. Non-cooperative character of DNA-K8 interaction was revealed. It has been shown that along with the positive charge of such complexes, the presence of an excess of free K8 peptide in the culture medium is a necessary condition for maximal efficiency of cell transfection with DNA/K8 complexes. A stimulatory effect of free K8 peptide on the efficiency of mammalian cell transfection by DNA/K8 complexes is likely to be mediated by the interactions of cationic peptide K8 with negatively charged proteoglycans on the cell surface, which leads to protection of DNA/K8 complexes from disruption by cellular heparan sulfates. However, the protective role of free cationic peptides depends not only on their positive charge, but also on the primary structure of the peptide. In contrast with the results obtained for DNA complexes with molecular conjugates based on poly-L-lysine, the aggregation of DNA/K8 complexes leads to a significant increase in the expression of transferred gene. PMID:17223788

  16. Langevin Dynamics Simulation of DNA Condensation Induced by Nanoparticles in Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Guo-Jun; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    We study nanoparticle-induced DNA condensation in a confined suspension of dilute DNA molecules and ideal nanoparticles (NPs) with Langevin dynamics simulation. DNA condensation has been observed in a solution of dilute DNA molecules (persistence length P ~ 50 nm) and high concentration of electrostatically neutral NPs (diameter d ~ 5 to 35 nm) in recent experimental measurements. It is believed that NPs entropically induce an attraction between DNA segments. For NPs much smaller than P, a DNA molecule can be considered as a chain of connected rods, and the NP-induced depletion attraction between DNA segments can be regarded as rod-rod attraction. Thus, the strength of the depletion attraction is proportional to the number of persistence length in a DNA chain, N = L / P , the depletion volume NP2 d , and the NP density ρ, where L is the DNA contour length. In slit confinement, DNA conformation changes are much different from in an unconfined environment. The height of the slit relative to the NPs size (H / d) strongly influences the DNA conformation. For H / d ~ 1 , DNA size decreases monotonically as ρ increases, while non-monotonic dependence happens for H / d ~ 5 , due to the competition between DNA-DNA, DNA-NP, and NP-wall interactions.

  17. A novel cationic conjugated polymer for homogeneous fluorescence-based DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Soeller, Christian; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2006-09-21

    A novel water-soluble cationic conjugated polymer, poly({2,5-bis[3-(N,N-diethylamino)-1-oxapropyl]-para-phenylenevinylene}-alt-para-phenylenevinylene) dibromide, was synthesized and used to develop a simple label-free DNA detection essay. PMID:17047828

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Cationic PLA-PEG Nanoparticles for Delivery of Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Weiwei; Liu, Chunxi; Chen, Zhijin; Zhang, Na

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the present work was to formulate and evaluate cationic poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery nano-device. Cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method. The gene loaded nanoparticles were obtained by incubating the report gene pEGFP with cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles. The physicochemical properties (e.g., morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding efficiency) and biological properties (e.g., integrity of the released DNA, protection from nuclease degradation, plasma stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vitro transfection ability in Hela cells) of the gene loaded PLA-PEG nanoparticles were evaluated, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles and gene loaded nanoparticles were both spherical in shape with average particle size of 89.7 and 128.9 nm, polydispersity index of 0.185 and 0.161, zeta potentials of +28.9 and +16.8 mV, respectively. The obtained cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with high binding efficiency (>95%) could protect the loaded DNA from the degradation by nuclease and plasma. The nanoparticles displayed sustained-release properties in vitro and the released DNA maintained its structural and functional integrity. It also showed lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine 2000 and could successfully transfect gene into Hela cells even in presence of serum. It could be concluded that the established gene loaded cationic PLA-PEG nanoparticles with excellent properties were promising non-viral nano-device, which had potential to make cancer gene therapy achievable.

  19. DNA condensation and how it relates to phase equilibrium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Post, C.B.; Zimm, B.H.

    1980-10-01

    High molecular weight DNA is a randomly coiled polymer usually found to be highly expanded in solution due to its low degree of flexibility. It has been shown, however, that DNA is able to undergo a sudden conformational transition into a highly compacted conformation. The collapse transition or condensation of DNA has been observed to be caused by a number of agents: polyamines, alcohol, acid, and polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyacrylate. In a previous paper we discussed the condensation of single molecules from the point of view of Flory's classical polymer solution theory. In this work we extend the discussion to take account of higher concentrations. Under these conditions the condensation can occur either as a unimolecular phenomenon or as an aggregation of many molecules leading to precipitation of the DNA. Condensation of single molecules and precipitation are thus viewed as two aspects of the effect of reduced solvent power and the accompanying lowering of the free energy of DNA-DNA and solvent-solvent contacts as compared with DNA-solvent contacts.

  20. Efficient Delivery of Plasmid DNA Using Cholesterol-Based Cationic Lipids Containing Polyamines and Ether Linkages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bieong-Kil; Seu, Young-Bae; Bae, Yun-Ui; Kwak, Tae-Won; Kang, Hyungu; Moon, Ik-Jae; Hwang, Guen-Bae; Park, So-Young; Doh, Kyung-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are broadly used as non-viral vectors to deliver genetic materials that can be used to treat various diseases including cancer. To circumvent problems associated with cationic liposome-mediated delivery systems such as low transfection efficiency and serum-induced inhibition, cholesterol-based cationic lipids have been synthesized that resist the effects of serum. The introduction of an ether-type linkage and extension of the aminopropyl head group on the cholesterol backbone increased the transfection efficiency and DNA binding affinity compared to a carbamoyl-type linkage and a mono aminopropyl head group, respectively. Under optimal conditions, each liposome formulation showed higher transfection efficiency in AGS and Huh-7 cells than commercially available cationic liposomes, particularly in the presence of serum. The following molecular structures were found to have a positive effect on transfection properties: (i) extended aminopropyl head groups for a strong binding affinity to plasmid DNA; (ii) an ether linkage that favors electrostatic binding to plasmid DNA; and (iii) a cholesterol backbone for serum resistance. PMID:24786091

  1. How Cations Can Assist DNase I in DNA Binding and Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Guéroult, Marc; Picot, Daniel; Abi-Ghanem, Joséphine; Hartmann, Brigitte; Baaden, Marc

    2010-01-01

    DNase I requires Ca2+ and Mg2+ for hydrolyzing double-stranded DNA. However, the number and the location of DNase I ion-binding sites remain unclear, as well as the role of these counter-ions. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that bovine pancreatic (bp) DNase I contains four ion-binding pockets. Two of them strongly bind Ca2+ while the other two sites coordinate Mg2+. These theoretical results are strongly supported by revisiting crystallographic structures that contain bpDNase I. One Ca2+ stabilizes the functional DNase I structure. The presence of Mg2+ in close vicinity to the catalytic pocket of bpDNase I reinforces the idea of a cation-assisted hydrolytic mechanism. Importantly, Poisson-Boltzmann-type electrostatic potential calculations demonstrate that the divalent cations collectively control the electrostatic fit between bpDNase I and DNA. These results improve our understanding of the essential role of cations in the biological function of bpDNase I. The high degree of conservation of the amino acids involved in the identified cation-binding sites across DNase I and DNase I-like proteins from various species suggests that our findings generally apply to all DNase I-DNA interactions. PMID:21124947

  2. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  3. Bell Curve for Transfection by Lamellar Cationic Lipid--DNA Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Evans, Heather M.; Ewert, K.; George, C. X.; Samuel, C. E.; Safinya, C. R.

    2004-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CL) present a viable alternative to viral delivery of therapeutic DNA to cells. We combine CL with DNA in order to form complexes that can deliver foreign DNA (genes) to cells. In trying to improve the transfection efficiency (TE) of lamellar CL-DNA complexes, we have identified universal trends depending on the headgroup size and charge of the cationic lipid. By using new multivalent lipids ranging from 2+ to 16+ (e.g. Ewert et al, J. Med. Chem. 2002; 45: 5023) we are able to access a wide range of membrane charge density values, or σ _M. TE plots vs. σ M for multivalent lipids merge onto a universal curve with a Gaussian shape. The optimal σ M depends on the overall CL/DNA charge. The universal TE curve shows three regimes related to cellular obstacles: at low σ _M, TE is limited by endosomal escape of CL-DNA, while at high σ M TE is limited by complex dissociation and DNA release into the cytoplasm. Funded by NIH GM-59288 and NSF DMR-0203755.

  4. The effect of pH on charge inversion and condensation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zilong; Wang, Yanwei; Yang, Anthony; Yang, Guangcan

    2016-08-21

    Charge inversion and condensation of DNA in solutions of trivalent and quadrivalent counterions are significantly influenced by the pH value of the solution. We systematically investigated the condensation and charge compensation of DNA by spermidine, hexammine cobalt(iii) (cohex, [Co(NH3)6](3+)) and spermine in solutions of a wide range of pH values from 3 to 9.3 by dynamic light scattering, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy. In trivalent counterion solution, we found that there is a critical concentration (0.75 mM for cohex and 0.5 mM for spermidine), under which the electrophoresis mobility of DNA initially increases, reaches a maximum, and finally decreases when the pH value is decreased. In contrast, above the critical concentration, the electrophoretic mobility of DNA increases monotonously with decreasing pH value of the solution. The corresponding condensing force has the same dependence on the pH value. However, for the case of quadrivalent counterions, the electrophoretic mobility of DNA is monotonously promoted by lowering the pH value of the solution at any concentration of counterions in which charge inversion of DNA may occur. In atomic force microscopy images and force spectroscopy of magnetic tweezers, we found that maximal charge neutralization and condensation force correspond to the most compact DNA condensation. We propose a mechanism of promoting DNA charge neutralization: small and highly mobile hydrogen ions tend to attach to the DNA-counterion complex to further neutralize its remaining charge, which is related to the surface area of the complex. Therefore, this further neutralization is prominent when the complex is toroidal which corresponds to the case of mild ion concentration while it is less prominent for more compact globules or rod complexes at high counterion concentration. PMID:27427090

  5. Effectiveness, against tuberculosis, of pseudo-ternary complexes: peptide-DNA-cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Rosada, Rogério Silva; Silva, Célio Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade; Nakaie, Clóvis Ryuichi; de la Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2012-05-01

    We report the effects of a synthetic peptide designed to act as a nuclear localization signal on the treatment of tuberculosis. The peptide contains 21 amino acid residues with the following specific domains: nuclear localization signal from SV 40T, cationic shuttle sequence, and cysteamide group at the C-terminus. The peptide was complexed with the plasmid DNAhsp65 and incorporated into cationic liposomes, forming a pseudo-ternary complex. The same cationic liposomes, composed of egg chicken L-α-phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (2:1:1M), were previously evaluated as a gene carrier for tuberculosis immunization protocols with DNAhsp65. The pseudo-ternary complex presented a controlled size (250 nm), spherical-like shape, and various lamellae in liposomes as evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. An assay of fluorescence probe accessibility confirmed insertion of the peptide/DNA into the liposome structure. Peptide addition conferred no cytotoxicity in vitro, and similar therapeutic effects against tuberculosis were seen with four times less DNA compared with naked DNA treatment. Taken together, the results indicate that the pseudo-ternary complex is a promising gene vaccine for tuberculosis treatment. This work contributes to the development of multifunctional nanostructures in the search for strategies for in vivo DNA delivery. PMID:21999959

  6. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Satya Ranjan; Aoshima, Yumiko; Hokama, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Sou, Keitaro; Takeoka, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt) in the arginine head group. Methods Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt) that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p) DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in PC-12 cells. However, arginine-based cationic liposomes with TFA salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in HeLa cells, regardless of the presence of serum, with very low associated cytotoxicity. Conclusion The gene

  7. Spontaneous condensation in DNA-polystyrene- b-poly(l-lysine) polyelectrolyte block copolymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, V.; Hamley, I. W.; Kerstens, S. L. H.; Deacon, S.; Thomas, C. D.; Lübbert, A.; Klok, H.-A.

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the condensation of calf thymus DNA by amphiphilic polystyrenem-b-poly(l-lysine)n block copolymers ( PSm-b- PLysn, m, n = degree of polymerization), using small-angle X-ray scattering, polarized optical microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Microscopy studies showed that the DNA condenses in the form of fibrillar precipitates, with an irregular structure, due to electrostatic interactions between PLys and DNA. This is not modified by the presence of hydrophobic PS block. Scattering experiments show that the structure of the polyplexes corresponds to a local order of DNA rods which becomes more compact upon increasing n. It can be concluded that for DNA/ PSm-b- PLysn polyplexes, the balance between the PLys block length and the excess charge in the system plays an essential role in the formation of a liquid crystalline phase.

  8. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Kiviaho, Jenny K; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications. PMID:27219684

  9. A novel cationic lipid with intrinsic antitumor activity to facilitate gene therapy of TRAIL DNA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Miao, Lei; Zhao, Yi; Musetti, Sara; Wang, Yuhua; Shi, Kai; Huang, Leaf

    2016-09-01

    Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has been found to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of cancer. Herein, a novel lipid (1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-biguanide-propane (DOBP)) was elaborately designed by utilizing biguanide as the cationic head group. This novel cationic lipid was intended to act as a gene carrier with intrinsic antitumor activity. When compared with 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), a commercially available cationic lipid with a similar structure, the blank liposomes consisting of DOBP showed much more potent antitumor effects than DOTAP in human lung tumor xenografts, following an antitumor mechanism similar to metformin. Given its cationic head group, biguanide, DOBP could encapsulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plasmids into Lipid-Protamine-DNA (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic gene delivery. DOBP-LPD-TRAIL NPs demonstrated distinct superiority in delaying tumor progression over DOTAP-LPD-TRAIL NPs, due to the intrinsic antitumor activity combined with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumor. These results indicate that DOBP could be used as a versatile and promising cationic lipid for improving the therapeutic index of gene therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27344367

  10. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  11. Plasmid DNA transfection using magnetite cationic liposomes for construction of multilayered gene-engineered cell sheet.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Kawasumi, Tamayo; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-01

    Modification of cellular functions by overexpression of genes is being increasingly practiced for tissue engineering. In the present study, we investigated whether transfection efficiency could be enhanced by magnetofection that involves the use of plasmid DNA (pDNA)/magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) complexes (pDNA/MCL) and magnetic force. The transfection efficiencies of the magnetofection technique by pDNA/MCL in fibroblasts and keratinocytes using reporter genes were 36- and 10-fold higher, respectively, than those of a lipofection technique by cationic liposomes. Moreover, in vitro construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues is an important challenge. We recently proposed a novel technique termed "magnetic force-based tissue engineering" (Mag-TE) to produce 3D tissues. Since the fibroblasts after magnetofection incorporated both magnetite nanoparticles and pDNA, we investigated whether multilayered heterotypic cell sheets expressing transgene could be fabricated by Mag-TE. First, the fibroblasts were seeded onto an ultra-low attachment culture plate. When a magnet was placed under the plate, the cells accumulated at the bottom of the culture plate. After 24 h of culture, the transgene-expressing cells formed a multilayered cell sheet-like structure. These results indicated that MCLs are a potent biomanipulation tool for both gene transfer and 3D tissue construction, suggesting that these techniques are useful for tissue engineering. PMID:18078300

  12. [The "condensation" and "ligand" theory in describing DNA helix-coil transition: comparative analysis].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Galkin, V L; Volchok, I V; Blagoĭ, Iu P

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data on DNA melting in the presence of magnesium and calcium ions are compared with the calculated results by the "ligand" theory and "condensation" theory developed by de Marky and Manning (TMM). The maximum is observed in TMM dependences of DNA melting temperature change (delta Tm) on the ion concentration (D), absent in the experimental dependences and the "ligand" theory. The main cause of the discrepancy of calculated and experimental dependences delta Tm (D) is the fact that TMM neglects Na+ ion effects on Me2+ ion binding ("condensation") to DNA. The results obtained show that in comparison with TMM the "ligand" theory describes more adequately DNA helix-coil transition in the presence of divalent metal ions in the region of both low and high ionic strengths of solution. PMID:9044618

  13. Radioprotective effects produced by the condensation of plasmid DNA with avidin and biotinylated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christopher C; Urata, Sarah M; Lee, Melissa; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-11-01

    The treatment of aqueous solutions of plasmid DNA with the protein avidin results in significant changes in physical, chemical, and biochemical properties. These effects include increased light scattering, formation of micron-sized particles containing both DNA and protein, and plasmid protection against thermal denaturation, radical attack, and nuclease digestion. All of these changes are consistent with condensation of the plasmid by avidin. Avidin can be displaced from the plasmid at higher ionic strengths. Avidin is not displaced from the plasmid by an excess of a tetra-arginine ligand, nor by the presence of biotin. Therefore, this system offers the opportunity to reversibly bind biotin-labeled species to a condensed DNA-protein complex. An example application is the use of biotinylated gold nanoparticles. This system offers the ability to examine in better detail the chemical mechanisms involved in important radiobiological effects. Examples include protein modulation of radiation damage to DNA, and radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles. PMID:22825766

  14. Condensin targets and reduces unwound DNA structures associated with transcription in mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Sutani, Takashi; Sakata, Toyonori; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Masuda, Koji; Ishibashi, Mai; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hirano, Tatsuya; Bando, Masashige; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome condensation is a hallmark of mitosis in eukaryotes and is a prerequisite for faithful segregation of genetic material to daughter cells. Here we show that condensin, which is essential for assembling condensed chromosomes, helps to preclude the detrimental effects of gene transcription on mitotic condensation. ChIP-seq profiling reveals that the fission yeast condensin preferentially binds to active protein-coding genes in a transcription-dependent manner during mitosis. Pharmacological and genetic attenuation of transcription largely rescue bulk chromosome segregation defects observed in condensin mutants. We also demonstrate that condensin is associated with and reduces unwound DNA segments generated by transcription, providing a direct link between an in vitro activity of condensin and its in vivo function. The human condensin isoform condensin I also binds to unwound DNA regions at the transcription start sites of active genes, implying that our findings uncover a fundamental feature of condensin complexes. PMID:26204128

  15. Interaction of cationic liposomes and their DNA complexes with monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, P; Simões, S; Nir, S; Gaspar, R; Düzgünes, N; Pedroso de Lima, M C

    1999-04-14

    Cationic liposomes complexed with DNA have been used extensively as non-viral vectors for the intracellular delivery of reporter or therapeutic genes in culture and in vivo. We examined the relationship between the characteristics of the lipoplexes, their mode of interaction with monocytic THP-1 cells and their ability to transfect these cells. We determined the size and zeta potential of cationic liposomes (composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP) and its mixtures with neutral lipids), and lipoplexes at different (+/-) charge ratios. As the (+/-) charge ratio of the lipoplexes decreased to (1/1), a significant reduction in zeta potential and an increase in size was observed. The increase in size resulted from fusion between liposomes promoted by DNA, as demonstrated by a lipid mixing assay, and from aggregation of the complexes. Interaction of liposomes and lipoplexes with THP-1 cells was assessed by monitoring lipid mixing ('fusion') as well as binding and cell association. While no lipid mixing was observed with the 1/2 (+/-) lipid/DNA complexes, lipoplexes with higher (+/-) charge ratios underwent significant fusion in conjunction with extensive cell binding. Liposome binding to cells was dependent on the positive charge of the liposomes, and their fusion could be modulated by the co-lipid. DOTAP/phosphatidylethanolamine (1:1) liposomes fused with THP-1 cells, unlike DOTAP/phosphatidylcholine (1:1) liposomes, although both liposome types bound to the cells to a similar extent. The use of inhibitors of endocytosis indicated that fusion of the cationic liposomes with cells occurred mainly at the plasma membrane level. The presence of serum increased the size of the cationic liposomes, but not that of the lipoplexes. Low concentrations of serum (3%) completely inhibited the fusion of cationic liposomes with cells, while inhibiting binding by only 20%. Our results suggest that binding of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes to cells is governed

  16. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, Affc; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The

  17. The circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction of DNA condensed from ethanolic solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D M; Edmondson, S P; Lang, D; Vaughan, M

    1979-01-01

    It is known that DNA in aqueous-ethanol solutions undergoes a B to A conformational change between 60% and 80% (w/w) ethanol. We have found that precipitates formed by adding salt to DNA in 60% and 80% ethanolic solutions can be very different. DNA precipitated from 60% ethanol forms a fine condensate that only slowly settles out of suspension and shows a characteristic differential scattering of circularly polarized light at long wavelengths. DNA precipitated from 80% ethanol forms a flocculent aggregate that exhibits the CD spectral features of the A conformation. Data from circular dichroism spectra of natural and synthetic nucleic acids and from X-ray diffraction patterns of the precipitates show that DNA molecules precipitated from 60% and 80% ethanol are, respectively, in the B and A conformation. Therefore, the different secondary conformations of DNA in ethanolic solutions are maintained during precipitation under these conditions. These results are of general importance for the preparation and study of condensed forms of DNA, since a relatively small change in the extent of dehydration can change the secondary conformation of DNA and markedly affect the character of a subsequent precipitate. Images PMID:572544

  18. Birefringence and DNA Condensation of Liquid Crystalline Chromosomes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Man H.; Yan, Kosmo T. H.; Bennett, Michael J.; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    DNA can self-assemble in vitro into several liquid crystalline phases at high concentrations. The largest known genomes are encoded by the cholesteric liquid crystalline chromosomes (LCCs) of the dinoflagellates, a diverse group of protists related to the malarial parasites. Very little is known about how the liquid crystalline packaging strategy is employed to organize these genomes, the largest among living eukaryotes—up to 80 times the size of the human genome. Comparative measurements using a semiautomatic polarizing microscope demonstrated that there is a large variation in the birefringence, an optical property of anisotropic materials, of the chromosomes from different dinoflagellate species, despite their apparently similar ultrastructural patterns of bands and arches. There is a large variation in the chromosomal arrangements in the nuclei and individual karyotypes. Our data suggest that both macroscopic and ultrastructural arrangements affect the apparent birefringence of the liquid crystalline chromosomes. Positive correlations are demonstrated for the first time between the level of absolute retardance and both the DNA content and the observed helical pitch measured from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photomicrographs. Experiments that induced disassembly of the chromosomes revealed multiple orders of organization in the dinoflagellate chromosomes. With the low protein-to-DNA ratio, we propose that a highly regulated use of entropy-driven force must be involved in the assembly of these LCCs. Knowledge of the mechanism of packaging and arranging these largest known DNAs into different shapes and different formats in the nuclei would be of great value in the use of DNA as nanostructural material. PMID:20400466

  19. Self-assembled DNA-cationic-lipid complexes: Two-dimensional smectic ordering, correlations, and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salditt, T.; Koltover, I.; Rädler, J. O.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-07-01

    We report a synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study of the mutilayered, self-assembled structure (complex) that is formed by mixing DNA with cationic liposomes. In these complexes the DNA is confined between charged lipid bilayers and orders as a two-dimensional (2D) smectic liquid crystal. The power-law bilayer-bilayer correlations of the 3D multilayer smectic liquid crystal, which are coupled to the 2D lattice of DNA chains, are found to deviate significantly from those described by the standard Caillé model of smectic-A phases. To model the DNA ordering, the 2D smectic correlation function and the corresponding structure factor are derived from the smectic Hamiltonian in harmonic approximation. The resulting line shape is then fitted to the DNA correlation peak. It is found that for samples of higher d, short-range correlations between the DNA in adjacent sheets have to be assumed to explain the data. From the least-square fitting, the 2D DNA interchain compressibility modulus B is extracted as a function of d and discussed in view of different possible microscopic interactions responsible for the ordering.

  20. Effect of Mg2+ cations on the dynamics and efficiency of hole transport in DNA.

    PubMed

    Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Trifonov, Anton; Wasielewski, Michael R; Lewis, Frederick D

    2014-11-13

    The effect of Mg(2+) cations on the electronic spectra and dynamics and efficiency of hole transport has been determined by means of femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy for DNA hairpins possessing stilbene electron acceptor and donor chromophores. The results are compared with those obtained previously for the same hairpins in the presence of Na(+) cations and for one hairpin with no added salt. Quantum yields and rate constants for charge separation are smaller in the presence of Mg(2+) than Na(+), the largest differences being observed for the hairpins with the largest number of base pairs. Slower charge separation is attributed to minor groove binding by Mg(2+), which results in a stiffer duplex structure rather than a change in ground state geometry. Reduction in the Na(+) concentration has little effect on either the dynamics or efficiency of hole transport. PMID:24912084

  1. Charge-mediated topical delivery of plasmid DNA with cationic lipid nanoparticles to the skin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-Eon; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2014-04-01

    Cationic lipid nanoparticles (cLNs) were modified to develop a gene delivery system for topical use via a dermal route. The cLNs were formulated using high pressure homogenization method and were composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), Tween 20, and tricaprin as a solid core (1:1:1:1.67, w/w). The prepared cLNs were nanoscale-sized (<100 nm) and were highly positive (51 mV). The cLN/DNA complexes demonstrated enhanced transfection potential in the cells at the optimal ratio without cytotoxic effects. To evaluate its efficacy in topical application, in vitro skin transfer of the cLN/DNA complexes was monitored using the measurement of the surface zeta potential of hairless mouse skin and validated using confocal microscopy of the sectioned skin. The in vivo delivery of plasmid DNA with the cLN formulation was examined using the relative expression levels of mRNA after non-invasive application with the cLN/DNA complexes on hair-removed dorsal skin of mice. The cLNs successfully transferred plasmid DNA to the skin, which was facilitated by the charge-mediated interaction between the cLN/DNA complexes and the skin. These results suggest the promising potential of cLNs as a topical gene delivery system for gene vaccine delivery and cutaneous gene therapy in preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:24631964

  2. DNA-Redox Cation Interaction Improves the Sensitivity of an Electrochemical Immunosensor for Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Ge, Bixia; Ou, Lily M.-L.; Yao, Zhihui; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    A simple DNA-redox cation interaction enhancement strategy has been developed to improve the sensitivity of electrochemical immunosensors for protein detection. Instead of labeling with fluorophores or redox-active groups, the detection antibodies were tethered with DNA single strands. Based on the electrostatic interaction between redox cations ([Ru(NH3)6]3+) and negatively charged DNA backbone, enhanced electrochemical signals were obtained. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) detection has been performed as a trial analysis. A linear response range up to the concentration of 25 mIU/mL and a detection limit of 1.25 mIU/mL have been achieved, both are comparable with the ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests. The method also shows great selectivity towards hCG over other hormones such as thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). By and large, our approach bears the merits of cost effectiveness and simplicity of instrumentation in comparison with conventional optical detection methods. PMID:26307986

  3. Phase diagram of the ground states of DNA condensates.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Trinh X; Trinh, Hoa Lan; Giacometti, Achille; Podgornik, Rudolf; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2015-12-01

    The phase diagram of the ground states of DNA in a bad solvent is studied for a semiflexible polymer model with a generalized local elastic bending potential characterized by a nonlinearity parameter x and effective self-attraction promoting compaction. x=1 corresponds to the wormlike chain model. Surprisingly, the phase diagram as well as the transition lines between the ground states are found to be a function of x. The model provides a simple explanation for the results of prior experimental and computational studies and makes predictions for the specific geometries of the ground states. The results underscore the impact of the form of the microscopic bending energy at macroscopic observable scales. PMID:26764619

  4. Modulation of cellular immune response against hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 by cationic liposome encapsulated DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xuanmao; Wang, Richard Y-H; Feng, Zhiming; Alter, Harvey J; Shih, James Wai-Kuo

    2003-02-01

    A vaccine strategy directed to increase Th1 cellular immune responses, particularly to hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), has considerable potential to overcome the infection with HCV. DNA vaccination can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, but it became apparent that the cellular uptake of naked DNA injected into muscle was not very efficient, as much of the DNA is degraded by interstitial nucleases before it reaches the nucleus for transcription. In this paper, cationic liposomes composed of different cationic lipids, such as dimethyl-dioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB), 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-ethylphosphocholine (DOEPC), were used to improve DNA immunization in mice, and their efficiencies were compared. It was found that cationic liposome-mediated DNA immunization induced stronger HCV NS3-specific immune responses than immunization with naked DNA alone. Cationic liposomes composed of DDAB and equimolar of a neutral lipid, egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), induced the strongest antigen-specific Th1 type immune responses among the cationic liposome investigated, whereas the liposomes composed of 2 cationic lipids, DDAB and DOEPC, induced an antigen-specific Th2 type immune response. All cationic liposomes used in this study triggered high-level, nonspecific IL-12 production in mice, a feature important for the development of maximum Th1 immune responses. In conclusion, the cationic liposome-mediated gene delivery is a viable HCV vaccine strategy that should be further tested in the chimpanzee model. PMID:12540796

  5. Condensations of single DNA molecules induced by heptaplatin and its chiral isomer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2014-08-15

    Heptaplatin is a third-generation platinum antitumor drug. It has a chiral isomer. We studied the interactions between the two isomers and DNA by using magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the effect of chiralities of the isomers on the interactions. We found that the extension curves and average condensation rates of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were nearly the same as those incubated with its chiral isomer. In addition, the structures of DNA molecules incubated with heptaplatin were also similar to those incubated with its chiral isomer. These results indicate the difference in chirality of the two isomers does not induce different interactions of the isomers with DNA. Our study may facilitate the understanding of interactions of platinum complexes with DNA and the design of new antitumor platinum complexes.

  6. Cooperativity or phase transition? Unfolding transition of DNA cationic surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'nikov, Sergey M.; Sergeyev, Vladimir G.; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hatta, Ichiro

    1997-11-01

    We recently reported that single duplex DNA, with the size above the order of several tens kilobase pairs, undergoes a large discrete transition from an elongated coil into a collapsed globule with the addition of a cationic surfactant. In the present article, we describe the manner of the unfolding transition of compact long DNA, or globule DNA, complexed with cationic surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and distearyldimethylammonium bromide (D18DAB), as is induced by the addition of sodium bromide. The conformational dynamics of individual single duplex T4DNA molecules was directly observed with the use of fluorescence microscopy. We found that on the level of individual DNAs, the salt-induced unfolding transition of the globules is largely discrete, or first-order phase transition for the both complexes with CTAB and D18DAB. On the other hand, for the ensemble average of the DNAs, the transition is discrete with CTAB but is continuous (sigmoidal) with D18DAB. The discreteness for the coil-globule transition in the ensemble of DNAs complexed with CTAB is attributed to the existence of the phase transition in whole over the bulk solution: the sphere-rod transition in surfactant micelles. On the other hand, for D18DAB such phase transition on the micelle structure in the bulk solution seems to be absent. In correspondence to such a large difference on the manner of the transition, x-ray diffraction analysis indicates marked difference on the structure of DNA complexes with CTAB and with D18DAB.

  7. Time-resolved FRET and PCT in cationic conjugated polymer/dye-labeled DNA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inhong; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Bumjin; Kang, Mijeong; Woo, Han Young; Kyhm, Kwangseuk

    2011-12-01

    The energy transfer mechanism between cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes and a single stranded DNA labeled with fluorescein was investigated in terms of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and photo-induced charge transfer (PCT) by time-resolved fluorescence. Both FRET and PCT rate efficiencies were obtained by phenomenological coupled rate equations, which are in excellent agreement with experiments. We found the total energy transfer in the complex is maximized as a consequence of FRET and PCT at an optimum distance 32.7Å.

  8. DNA and its cationic lipid complexes induce CpG motif-dependent activation of murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kei; Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2007-01-01

    Unmethylated CpG motifs in bacterial DNA, but not in vertebrate DNA, are known to trigger an inflammatory response of antigen-presenting cells (APC). In this study, we investigated the cytokine release from murine dendritic cells (DC) by the addition of various types of DNA in the free or complexed form with cationic lipids. Naked plasmid DNA and Escherichia coli DNA with immunostimulatory unmethylated CpG motifs induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-cultured bone marrow-derived DC and the DC cell-line, DC2.4 cells, though vertebrate calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) with less CpG motifs did not. These characteristics differed from mouse peritoneal resident macrophages that do not respond to any naked DNA. The amount of cytokines released from the DC was significantly increased by complex formation with cationic lipids when CpG-motif positive DNAs were used. Unlike murine macrophages or Flt-3 L cultured DC, GM-CSF DC did not release inflammatory cytokines in response to the addition of CT DNA/cationic lipid complex, suggesting that the activation is completely dependent on CpG motifs. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that murine DC produce pro-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with CpG-containing DNAs and the responses are enhanced by cationic lipids. These results also suggest that DC are the major cells that respond to naked CpG DNA in vivo, although both DC and macrophages will release inflammatory cytokines after the administration of a DNA/cationic lipid complex. PMID:17199803

  9. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L; Ilies, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact on the plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes, and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and the internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that the blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. The transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to the transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of colipids, their nature, and amount present in lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically to obtain efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  10. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L.; Ilies, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact towards plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process, and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity and internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. Transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of co-lipids, their nature and amount present into lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically for obtaining efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  11. Nanodosimetry of Low Energy (0.1 - 100 eV) Cation Damage to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, L.; Martin, F.; Hunting, D.; Lacombe, S.; Huels, M. A.

    2004-03-01

    The importance of heavy ions in radiobiology is twofold: (1) they represent the most efficient and volume selective mode of radiotherapy of deep-seated and non-operable tumors, (2) in space environments, or at supersonic altitudes, the most lethal radiation consists of cosmic rays which have a high efficiency to induce clustered DNA lesions, mutations, and cancer. Thus, the study of their effects on DNA is essential for radiation risk assessment, dosimetry, and efficient use of hadrontherapy. Here, we investigate damage to DNA and its components, induced by heavy ion impact, via a novel ion-plasma method, which allows us to probe ion energy depositions in the 0.1-100 eV/nm range in nanoscopic biomolecular films. Cations are generated by electron impact in ultra pure gases (Ar, N2, CO, etc.), and are uniformly accelerated by grids towards the inside surface of a cylinder where an organic film was deposited. After ion irradiation at a specific energy and ion dose, the film is recovered and analyzed. For DNA, gel electrophoresis is used to quantify yields of single, double, and multiple strand breaks. For DNA components (mononucleotides), fragmentation and new products are measured by HPLC and MS.

  12. Contribution of hydrophobicity, DNA and proteins to the cytotoxicity of cationic PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Halets, Inessa; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Klajnert, Barbara; Bryszewska, Maria

    2013-09-15

    In most articles, cytotoxicity of cationic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers toward red blood cells has been exclusively explained by their surface charge. We have focused on dendrimer hydrophobicity as a second possible factor that determines this cytotoxicity. Using PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers from the 3rd to the 6th generations and PAMAM-NH2-C12(25%) dendrimer of the 4th generation bearing 25% acyl groups, these induced hemolysis that increased with their surface charge and hydrophobicity. Interaction of PAMAM-NH2-C12(25%) G4 dendrimer with blood proteins (γ-globulin, α-thrombin, human serum albumin) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) significantly reduced their cytotoxicity toward red blood cells. PMID:23831196

  13. DNA Cleavage and Condensation Activities of Mono- and Binuclear Hybrid Complexes and Regulation by Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Dai, Mingxing; Zhang, Chunping; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Junqiang; Zhou, Dewen; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid complexes with N,N'-bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine and cyclen moieties are novel enzyme mimics and controlled DNA release materials, which could interact with DNA through three models under different conditions. In this paper, the interactions between plasmid DNA and seven different complexes were investigated, and the methods to change the interaction patterns by graphene oxide (GO) or concentrations were also investigated. The cleavage of pUC19 DNA promoted by target complexes were via hydrolytic or oxidative mechanisms at low concentrations ranging from 3.13 × 10(-7) to 6.25 × 10(-5) mol/L. Dinuclear complexes 2a and 2b can promote the cleavage of plasmid pUC19 DNA to a linear form at pH values below 7.0. Furthermore, binuclear hybrid complexes could condense DNA as nanoparticles above 3.13 × 10(-5) mol/L and partly release DNA by graphene oxide with π-π stacking. Meanwhile, the results also reflected that graphene oxide could prevent DNA from breaking down. Cell viability assays showed dinuclear complexes were safe to normal human hepatic cells at relative high concentrations. The present work might help to develop novel strategies for the design and synthesis of DNA controllable releasing agents, which may be applied to gene delivery and also to exploit the new application for GO. PMID:27428945

  14. The formation of DNA sugar radicals from photoexcitation of guanine cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Lata I; Pazdro, Robert; Huang, James; DeVreugd, Christopher; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    In this investigation of radical formation and reaction in gamma- irradiated DNA and model compounds, we report the conversion of the guanine cation radical (one-electron oxidized guanine, G(.+)) to the C1' sugar radical and another sugar radical at the C3' or C4' position (designated C3'(.)/C4'(.)) by visible and UV photolysis. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic investigations were performed on salmon testes DNA as well as 5'-dGMP, 3'-dGMP, 2'-deoxyguanosine and other nucleosides/nucleotides as model systems. DNA samples (25- 150 mg/ml D(2)O) were prepared with Tl(3+) or Fe(CN)(3-)(6) as electron scavengers. Upon gamma irradiation of such samples at 77 K, the electron-gain path in the DNA is strongly suppressed and predominantly G(.+) is found; after UV or visible photolysis, the fraction of the C1' sugar radical increases with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of G(.+). In model systems, 3'- dGMP(+.) and 5'-dGMP(+.) were produced by attack of Cl(.-)(2) on the parent nucleotide in 7 M LiCl glass. Subsequent visible photolysis of the 3'-dGMP(+.) (77 K) results predominantly in formation of C1'(.) whereas photolysis of 5'-dGMP(+.) results predominantly in formation of C3'(.)/C4'(.). We propose that sugar radical formation is a result of delocalization of the hole in the electronically excited base cation radical into the sugar ring, followed by deprotonation at specific sites on the sugar. PMID:15161365

  15. PEGylated Cationic Liposome – DNA Complexation in Brine is Pathway-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bruno F.B.; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Chan, Chia-Ling; Li, Youli; Olsson, Ulf; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic liposome-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes, are regarded as promising materials for safe and efficient delivery of genes for therapeutical applications. In order to be used in vivo, these complexes may be coated with a hydrophilic polymer (e.g. polyethylene-glycol, PEG) that provides steric stabilization towards adhesion of proteins and removal by the immune system. In this work we study the influence of the initial salt concentration (Cs) – which modulates the electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged vesicles and DNA – on the structure and stability of PEGylated CL-DNA particles. Previous small-angle X-ray scattering has shown that if non-PEGylated or PEGylated CL-DNA lamellar complexes are prepared in water, their structure is well defined with a high number of lipid membrane-DNA layers (larger than 20). Here we show that if these complexes are transferred to saline media (150 mM NaCl or DMEM, both near physiological conditions), this structure remains nearly unchanged. Conversely, if PEGylated complexes are prepared in saline media, their lamellar structure is much looser, with fewer number of layers. This pathway dependent behavior of PEGylated complex formation in brine is modulated by the liposome membrane charge density and the mole fraction of PEG 2000 in the membranes, with the average number of layers decreasing with increasing Cs and in going from 5 mol% to 10 mol% PEG-lipid. Each of these structures (high and low number of layers) is stable with time, suggesting that despite complex formation being thermodynamically favored, the complexation process in PEGylated membranes, which determines the number of layers per particle, is kinetically controlled. In the extreme case (when polymer repulsions from 10 mol% PEG-lipid are maximized and electrostatic attraction between PEGylated CLs and DNA are minimized at low membrane charge density) complex formation is suppressed at high Cs=150 mM. PMID:24060564

  16. Interaction between a cationic bolaamphiphile and DNA: The route towards nanovectors for oligonucleotide antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mamusa, Marianna; Resta, Claudio; Barbero, Francesco; Carta, Davide; Codoni, Doroty; Hatzixanthis, Kostas; McArthur, Michael; Berti, Debora

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials is a global threat that requires development of innovative therapeutics that circumvent its onset. The use of Transcription Factor Decoys (TFDs), DNA fragments that act by blocking essential transcription factors in microbes, represents a very promising approach. TFDs require appropriate carriers to protect them from degradation in biological fluids and transfect them through the bacterial cell wall into the cytoplasm, their site of action. Here we report on a bolaform cationic surfactant, [12-bis-THA]Cl2, with proven transfection activity in vivo. By studying the physical-chemical properties of its aqueous solutions with light scattering, cryo-TEM, ζ-potential, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, we prove that the bolaamphiphiles associate into transient vesicles which convert into one-dimensional elongated structures over time. These surfactant assemblies complex TFDs with extremely high efficiency, if compared to common cationic amphiphiles. At Z+/-=11, the nanoplexes are stable and have a size of 120nm, and they form independently of the original morphology of the [12-bis-THA]Cl2 aggregate. DNA is compacted in the nanoplexes, as shown through CD spectroscopy and fluorescence, but is readily released in its native form if sodium taurocholate is added. PMID:26998876

  17. Role of the central cations in the mechanical unfolding of DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Arias-Gonzalez, J. Ricardo; Morón, María Carmen; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Cations are known to mediate diverse interactions in nucleic acids duplexes but they are critical in the arrangement of four-stranded structures. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to analyse the mechanical unfolding of representative intramolecular G-quadruplex structures: a parallel, a hybrid and an antiparallel DNA and a parallel RNA, in the presence of stabilising cations. We confirm the stability of these conformations in the presence of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\rm {K}^+$\\end{document} central ions and observe distortions from the tetrad topology in their absence. Force-induced unfolding dynamics is then investigated. We show that the unfolding events in the force-extension curves are concomitant to the loss of coordination between the central ions and the guanines of the G-quadruplex. We found lower ruptures forces for the parallel configuration with respect to the antiparallel one, while the behaviour of the force pattern of the parallel RNA appears similar to the parallel DNA. We anticipate that our results will be essential to interpret the fine structure rupture profiles in stretching assays at high resolution and will shed light on the mechanochemical activity of G-quadruplex-binding machinery. PMID:26170233

  18. Role of the central cations in the mechanical unfolding of DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Morón, María Carmen; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Falo, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Cations are known to mediate diverse interactions in nucleic acids duplexes but they are critical in the arrangement of four-stranded structures. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to analyse the mechanical unfolding of representative intramolecular G-quadruplex structures: a parallel, a hybrid and an antiparallel DNA and a parallel RNA, in the presence of stabilising cations. We confirm the stability of these conformations in the presence of [Formula: see text] central ions and observe distortions from the tetrad topology in their absence. Force-induced unfolding dynamics is then investigated. We show that the unfolding events in the force-extension curves are concomitant to the loss of coordination between the central ions and the guanines of the G-quadruplex. We found lower ruptures forces for the parallel configuration with respect to the antiparallel one, while the behaviour of the force pattern of the parallel RNA appears similar to the parallel DNA. We anticipate that our results will be essential to interpret the fine structure rupture profiles in stretching assays at high resolution and will shed light on the mechanochemical activity of G-quadruplex-binding machinery. PMID:26170233

  19. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  20. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  1. Highly condensed potato pericentromeric heterochromatin contains rDNA-related tandem repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Robert M; Song, Junqi; Tek, Ahmet L; Cheng, Zhukuan; Dong, Fenggao; Jiang, Jiming

    2002-01-01

    The heterochromatin in eukaryotic genomes represents gene-poor regions and contains highly repetitive DNA sequences. The origin and evolution of DNA sequences in the heterochromatic regions are poorly understood. Here we report a unique class of pericentromeric heterochromatin consisting of DNA sequences highly homologous to the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the 18S.25S ribosomal RNA genes in potato. A 5.9-kb tandem repeat, named 2D8, was isolated from a diploid potato species Solanum bulbocastanum. Sequence analysis indicates that the 2D8 repeat is related to the IGS of potato rDNA. This repeat is associated with highly condensed pericentromeric heterochromatin at several hemizygous loci. The 2D8 repeat is highly variable in structure and copy number throughout the Solanum genus, suggesting that it is evolutionarily dynamic. Additional IGS-related repetitive DNA elements were also identified in the potato genome. The possible mechanism of the origin and evolution of the IGS-related repeats is discussed. We demonstrate that potato serves as an interesting model for studying repetitive DNA families because it is propagated vegetatively, thus minimizing the meiotic mechanisms that can remove novel DNA repeats. PMID:12454086

  2. Synthesis, G-quadruplexes DNA binding, and photocytotoxicity of novel cationic expanded porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shu-fang; Zhao, Ping; Xu, Lian-cai; Zheng, Min; Lu, Jia-zheng; Zhao, Peng-liang; Su, Qiu-lan; Chen, Hui-xian; Tang, Ding-tong; Chen, Jiong; Lin, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Intensive reports allowed the conclusion that molecules with extended aromatic surfaces always do good jobs in the DNA interactions. Inspired by the previous successful researches, herein, we designed a series of cationic porphyrins with expanded planar substituents, and evaluated their binding behaviors to G-quadruplex DNA using the combination of surface-enhanced raman, circular dichroism, absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer melting assays. Asymmetrical tetracationic porphyrin with one phenyl-4-N-methyl-4-pyridyl group and three N-methyl-4-pyridyl groups exhibit the best G4-DNA binding affinities among all the designed compounds, suggesting that the bulk of the substituents should be matched to the width of the grooves they putatively lie in. Theoretical calculations applying the density functional theory have been carried out and explain the binding properties of these porphyrins reasonably. Meanwhile, these porphyrins were proved to be potential photochemotherapeutic agents since they have photocytotoxic activities against both myeloma cell (Ag8.653) and gliomas cell (U251) lines. PMID:25989424

  3. Chromomycin dimer-DNA oligomer complexes. Sequence selectivity and divalent cation specificity.

    PubMed

    Gao, X L; Patel, D J

    1990-12-11

    This paper reports on a solution NMR characterization of the sequence selectivity and metal ion specificity in chromomycin-DNA oligomer complexes in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence selectivity studies have focused on chromomycin complexes with the self-complementary d(A1-A2-G3-G4-C5-C6-T7-T8) duplex containing a pair of adjacent (G3-G4).(C5-C6) steps and the self-complementary d(A1-G2-G3-A4-T5-C6-C7-T8) duplex containing a pair of separated (G2-G3).(C6-C7) steps in aqueous solution. The antitumor agent (chromomycin) and nucleic acid protons have been assigned following analysis of distance connectivities in NOESY spectra and coupling connectivities in DQF-COSY spectra for both complexes in H2O and D2O solution. The observed intermolecular NOEs establish that chromomycin binds as a Mg(II)-coordinated dimer [1 Mg(II) per complex] and contacts the minor-groove edge with retention of 2-fold symmetry centered about the (G3-G4-C5-C6).(G3-G4-C5-C6) segment of the d(A2G2C2T2) duplex. By contrast, complex formation is centered about the (G2-G3-A4-T5).(A4-T5-C6-C7) segment and results in removal of the two fold symmetry of the d(AG2ATC2T) duplex. Thus, the binding of one subunit of the chromomycin dimer at its preferred (G-G).(C-C) site assists in the binding of the second subunit to the less preferred adjacent (A-T).(A-T) site. These observations suggest a hierarchy of chromomycin binding sites, with a strong site detected at the (G-G) step due to the hydrogen-bonding potential of acceptor N3 and donor NH2 groups of guanosine that line the minor groove. The divalent cation specificity has been investigated by studies on the symmetric chromomycin-d(A2G2C2T2) complex in the presence of diamagnetic Mg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cations and paramagnetic Ni(II) and Co(II) cations. A comparative NOESY study of the Mg(II) and Ni(II) symmetric complexes suggests that a single tightly bound divalent cation aligns the two chromomycins in the dimer through coordination to

  4. The role of monovalent cations in the ATPase reaction of DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Stephen James; Chung, Terence Tsz-Hong; Stevenson, Clare Elizabeth Mary; Maxwell, Anthony; Lawson, David Mark

    2015-04-01

    Four new crystal structures of the ATPase domain of the GyrB subunit of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase have been determined. One of these, solved in the presence of K(+), is the highest resolution structure reported so far for this domain and, in conjunction with the three other structures, reveals new insights into the function of this domain. Evidence is provided for the existence of two monovalent cation-binding sites: site 1, which preferentially binds a K(+) ion that interacts directly with the α-phosphate of ATP, and site 2, which preferentially binds an Na(+) ion and the functional significance of which is not clear. The crystallographic data are corroborated by ATPase data, and the structures are compared with those of homologues to investigate the broader conservation of these sites. PMID:25849408

  5. Recyclable magnetite nanoparticle coated with cationic polymers for adsorption of DNA.

    PubMed

    Rutnakornpituk, B; Theppaleak, T; Rutnakornpituk, M; Vilaivan, T

    2016-08-01

    Magnetite nanoparticle (MNP) grafted with a cationic copolymer between poly(2-(N,N-diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) and poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)) for efficient and recyclable adsorption of 5'-fluorescein-tagged DNA (FAM-dT9) was prepared. MNP having highest degree of positive charge (+32.1 ± 1.9 mV) retained 100% adsorption of FAM-dT9 during eight adsorption-separation-desorption cycles. The MNP having lower degree of positive charge showed a slight decrease in adsorption percentages (94-98% adsorption) after multiple recycling processes. This biocompatible hybrid material with charged surface and magnetic-responsive properties might be applicable for use as a nanosolid support for efficient and facile separation of various bioentities. PMID:27206488

  6. Role of cholesterol on the transfection barriers of cationic lipid/DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Cardarelli, Francesco; Salomone, Fabrizio; Marchini, Cristina; Amenitsch, Heinz; Barbera, Giorgia La; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    Most lipid formulations need cholesterol for efficient transfection, but the precise motivation remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the effect of cholesterol on the transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic liposomes made of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane and dioleoylphosphocholine in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The transfection mechanisms of cholesterol-containing lipoplexes have been investigated by TE, synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering, and laser scanning confocal microscopy experiments. We prove that cholesterol-containing lipoplexes enter the cells using different endocytosis pathways. Formulations with high cholesterol content efficiently escape from endosomes and exhibit a lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition in mixture with biomembrane mimicking lipid formulations. This might explain both the DNA release ability and the high transfection efficiency. These studies highlight the enrichment in cholesterol as a decisive factor for transfection and will contribute to the rational design of lipid nanocarriers with superior TE.

  7. Double proton transfer dynamics of model DNA base pairs in the condensed phase

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of excited-state double proton transfer of model DNA base pairs, 7-azaindole dimers, is reported using femtosecond fluorescence spectroscopy. To elucidate the nature of the transfer in the condensed phase, here we examine variation of solvent polarity and viscosity, solute concentration, and isotopic fractionation. The rate of proton transfer is found to be significantly dependent on polarity and on the isotopic composition in the pair. Consistent with a stepwise mechanism, the results support the presence of an ionic intermediate species which forms on the femtosecond time scale and decays to the final tautomeric form on the picosecond time scale. We discuss the results in relation to the molecular motions involved and comment on recent claims of concerted transfer in the condensed phase. The nonconcerted mechanism is in agreement with previous isolated-molecule femtosecond dynamics and is also consistent with the most-recent high-level theoretical study on the same pair. PMID:17502610

  8. Helical Structure Determines Different Susceptibilities of dsDNA, dsRNA, and tsDNA to Counterion-Induced Condensation

    PubMed Central

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Leikin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of counterion-induced condensation of nucleic acid helices into aggregates produced several puzzling observations. For instance, trivalent cobalt hexamine ions condensed double-stranded (ds) DNA oligomers but not their more highly charged dsRNA counterparts. Divalent alkaline earth metal ions condensed triple-stranded (ts) DNA oligomers but not dsDNA. Here we show that these counterintuitive experimental results can be rationalized within the electrostatic zipper model of interactions between molecules with helical charge motifs. We report statistical mechanical calculations that reveal dramatic and nontrivial interplay between the effects of helical structure and thermal fluctuations on electrostatic interaction between oligomeric nucleic acids. Combining predictions for oligomeric and much longer helices, we also interpret recent experimental studies of the role of counterion charge, structure, and chemistry. We argue that an electrostatic zipper attraction might be a major or even dominant force in nucleic acid condensation. PMID:23663846

  9. Release of cationic polymer-DNA complexes from the endosome: A theoretical investigation of the proton sponge hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; May, Sylvio

    2008-11-14

    Polyplexes are complexes composed of DNA and cationic polymers; they are promising transport vehicles for nonviral gene delivery. Cationic polymers that contain protonatable groups, such as polyethylenimine, have been suggested to trigger endosomal escape of polyplexes according to the "proton sponge hypothesis." Here, osmotic swelling is induced by a decrease in the endosomal pH value, leading to an accumulation of polymer charge accompanied by the influx of Cl(-) ions to maintain overall electroneutrality. We study a theoretical model of the proton sponge mechanism. The model is based on the familiar Poisson-Boltzmann approach, modified so as to account for the presence of ionizable polyelectrolytes within self-consistent field theory with assumed ground state dominance. We consider polyplexes, composed of fixed amounts of DNA and cationic polymer, to coexist with uncomplexed cationic polymer in an enclosing vesicle of fixed volume. For such a system, we calculate the increase in osmotic pressure upon moderately decreasing the pH value and relate that pressure to the rupture tension of the enclosing membrane. Our model predicts membrane rupture upon pH decrease only within a certain range of free polymer content in the vesicle. That range narrows with increasing amount of DNA. Consequently, there exists a maximal amount of DNA that can be incorporated into a vesicle while maintaining the ability of content release through the proton sponge mechanism. PMID:19045433

  10. Highly sensitive colorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) detection based on cationic polymer/DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingyue; Cai, Yilin; Zhu, Yibo; Zheng, Lixue; Ding, Jianying; Quan, Ying; Wang, Limei; Qi, Bin

    2015-07-15

    The detection of ultralow concentrations of mercury is a currently significant challenge. Here, a novel strategy is proposed: the colorimetric detection of Hg(2+) based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) driven by a cationic polymer. In this three-component system, DNA combines electrostatically with phthalic diglycol diacrylate (PDDA) in a solution of AuNPs. In the presence of Hg(2+), thymine (T)-Hg(2+)-T induced hairpin turns are formed in the DNA strands, which then do not interact with PDDA, enabling the freed PDDA to subsequently facilitate aggregation of the AuNPs. Thus, according to the change in color from wine-red to blue-purple upon AuNPs aggregation, a colorimetric sensor is established to detect Hg(2+). Under optimal conditions, the color change is clearly seen with the naked eye. A linear range of 0.25-500nM was obtained by absorption spectroscopy with a detection limit of approximately 0.15nM. Additionally, the proposed method shows high selectivity toward Hg(2+) in the presence of other heavy metal ions. Real sample analysis was evaluated with the use of lake water and the results suggest good potential for practical application. PMID:25727033

  11. Effects of low-energy electrons on DNA constituents: effective cross sections for condensed thymidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panajotovic, Radmila

    2009-05-01

    Since the first experiments of low-energy electron scattering from condensed DNA [1] have been performed, the interest in studying low-energy electron-biomolecule interactions has been increasing. Knowledge of effective cross sections for single- and double-strand breaks of DNA and for vibrational and electronic excitation of nucleic bases and nucleosides are opening the door to better understanding of effects of radiation on live tissue and possibly indicating interaction pathways leading to gene mutations and cancer. The strong variation of effective cross sections for DNA single-strand breaks with incident electron energy and the resonant enhancement at 1 eV suggested that considerable damage is inflicted by very low-energy electrons to DNA, and indicates the important role of π* shape resonances in the bond-breaking process. However, the complexity of DNA, even if studied as a short single-strand chain, imposes a need to perform measurements on its isolated constituents, such as nucleic bases and nucleosides. Thymidine is one of the most important nucleosides of DNA and an important component of antiviral compounds. In the condensed phase, thymidine's 2'-deoxyribose ring is in the pentose sugar ring form, which is a true conformation of this nucleoside in DNA. Results from High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss [2] study of monomolecular films of thymidine will be discussed and the presence of resonances in the effective cross sections at incident energy below 5 eV will be commented as a possible indication of the dissociative electron attachment. In addition, results on the resonance structures in the effective cross sections for electronic excitations for the incident electron energy from 1.5 to 12 eV will be discussed as a possible pathway for strand brakes in DNA. [4pt] [1] Boudaiffa B, Cloutier P, Hunting D, Huels M A and Sanche L 2002 Rad. Res. 157 227-234[0pt] [2] Panajotovic R, Martin F, Cloutier P, Hunting, D, and Sanche L, 2006 Rad.Res. 165 452

  12. Charge inversion, condensation and decondensation of DNA and polystyrene sulfonate by polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Mengarelli, V; Auvray, L; Pastré, D; Zeghal, M

    2011-11-01

    We study the formation and structure of stable electrostatic complexes between polyanions (DNA and poly(styrene-sulfonate)) and linear polyethylenimine. The charge ratio x of the mixture is tuned by varying the concentration of the polycation at constant concentration of polyanion. In agreement with recent theories, dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic mobility measurements show two distinct regimes of weak and strong complexation. At low polycation concentration, negatively charged small complexes involving a few polyanion chains are observed first. By further increasing x, these small complexes condense at a precise charge ratio x(c) < 1 to form large anionic aggregates. The inversion of the charge of the condensed complexes coincides with the maximum of complexation and precedes the dissolution of the aggregates which occurs at a well-defined decondensation threshold x(d) > 1. Above x(d), positively charged complexes containing again a few overcharged polyanion chains are observed. The macroscopic phase diagram is qualitatively well corroborated by AFM observation of the complexes. The influence of entropic effects is probed by varying parameters like concentration, polycation molecular weight and ionic strength. Structure of stable negatively charged complexes is investigated at higher concentration using Small Angle Neutron Scattering. In the condensed regime, we observe large soluble bundles with sharp interfaces where the local structure of the polyanions is preserved. PMID:22113400

  13. Structural fluctuation observed in Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)2 in the absence of divalent metal cations and polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, Z-DNA d(CGCGCG)2 was crystallized from a DNA solution in the absence of divalent metal cations and polyamines, and its X-ray structure was determined at 0.98 Å resolution. Comparison of this structure and previously reported Z-DNA structures, containing Mg2+ cations and/or polyamines, demonstrated that Z-DNA can have structural fluctuations with respect to phosphate groups and hydration in the minor groove. At the GpC steps, a two-state structural equilibrium between the ZI and ZII conformations was frequently observed. In contrast, at the CpG steps, the phosphate groups exhibited rotational fluctuation, which could induce distortion of sugar puckering. In addition, alternative positions of water molecules were found in the middle of the minor groove of the Z-DNA. These structural fluctuations were likely observable because of the absence of Mg2+ cations and polyamines. The results related to these phenomena were supported by those of other experimental methods, suggesting the possibility of these fluctuations occurring in biological conditions. PMID:24121329

  14. Kinetic study of the binding of triplex-forming oligonucleotides containing partial cationic modifications to double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Ijitsu, Shin; Akabane-Nakata, Masaaki; Yoshida, Takuya; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-07-15

    Several triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) partially modified with 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl)- or 2'-O-(2-guanidinoethyl)-nucleotides were synthesized and their association rate constants (kon) with double-stranded DNA were estimated by UV spectrophotometry. Introduction of cationic modifications in the 5'-region of the TFOs significantly increased the kon values compared to that of natural TFO, while no enhancement in the rate of triplex DNA formation was observed when the modifications were in the middle and at the 3'-region. The kon value of a TFO with three adjacent cationic modifications at the 5'-region was found to be 3.4 times larger than that of a natural one. These results provide useful information for overcoming the inherent sluggishness of triplex DNA formation. PMID:24865415

  15. CNT loading into cationic cholesterol suspensions show improved DNA binding and serum stability and ability to internalize into cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhikara, Bhupender S.; Misra, Santosh K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2012-02-01

    Methods which disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water as ‘debundled’, while maintaining their unique physical properties are highly useful. We present here a family of cationic cholesterol compounds (Chol+) {Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl pyridinium bromide (Chol-PB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl pyrrolidinium bromide (Chol-MPB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl morpholinium bromide (Chol-MMB+) and Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl diazabicyclo octanium bromide (Chol-DOB+)}. Each of these could be easily dispersed in water. The resulting cationic cholesterol (Chol+) suspensions solubilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by the non-specific physical adsorption of Chol+ to form stable, transparent, dark aqueous suspensions at room temperature. Electron microscopy reveals the existence of highly segregated CNTs in these samples. Zeta potential measurements showed an increase in potential of cationic cholesterol aggregates on addition of CNTs. The CNT-Chol+ suspensions were capable of forming stable complexes with genes (DNA) efficiently. The release of double-helical DNA from such CNT-Chol+ complexes could be induced upon the addition of anionic micellar solution of SDS. Furthermore, the CNT-based DNA complexes containing cationic cholesterol aggregates showed higher stability in fetal bovine serum media at physiological conditions. Confocal studies confirm that CNT-Chol+ formulations adhere to HeLa cell surfaces and get internalized more efficiently than the cationic cholesterol suspensions alone (devoid of any CNTs). These cationic cholesterol-CNT suspensions therefore appear to be a promising system for further use in biological applications.

  16. Cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte/molecular beacon complex for sensitive, sequence-specific, real-time DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuli; Duan, Xinrui; Liu, Libin; An, Lingling; Feng, Fude; Wang, Shu

    2008-11-01

    A new fluorescence method has been developed for DNA detection at room temperature in a sensitive, selective, economical, and real-time manner that interfaces the superiority of a molecular beacon in mismatch discrimination with the light-harvesting property of water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes. The probe solution contains a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (PFP-NMe3+), a molecular beacon with a five base pairs double-stranded stem labeled at the 5'-terminus with fluorescein (DNA P-Fl), and ethidium bromide (EB, a specific intercalator of dsDNA). The electrostatic interactions between DNA P-Fl and PFP-NMe3+ keep them in close proximity, facilitating the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-NMe3+ to fluorescein. Upon adding a complementary strand to the probe solution, the conformation of DNA P-Fl transits into dsDNA followed by the intercalation of EB into the grooves. Two-step FRET, from PFP-NMe3+ to DNA P-Fl (FRET-1), followed by FRET from DNA P-Fl to EB (FRET-2) takes place. In view of the observed fluorescein or EB emission changes, DNA can be detected in aqueous solution. Because the base mismatch in target DNA inhibits the transition of DNA P-Fl from the stem-loop to duplex structure, single nucleotide mismatch can be clearly detected. PMID:18834161

  17. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines. PMID:26851653

  18. Imaging and energetics of single SSB-ssDNA molecules reveal intramolecular condensation and insight into RecOR function

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jason C; Liu, Bian; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein (SSB) is the defining bacterial member of ssDNA binding proteins essential for DNA maintenance. SSB binds ssDNA with a variable footprint of ∼30–70 nucleotides, reflecting partial or full wrapping of ssDNA around a tetramer of SSB. We directly imaged single molecules of SSB-coated ssDNA using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and observed intramolecular condensation of nucleoprotein complexes exceeding expectations based on simple wrapping transitions. We further examined this unexpected property by single-molecule force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers. In conditions favoring complete wrapping, SSB engages in long-range reversible intramolecular interactions resulting in condensation of the SSB-ssDNA complex. RecO and RecOR, which interact with SSB, further condensed the complex. Our data support the idea that RecOR--and possibly other SSB-interacting proteins—function(s) in part to alter long-range, macroscopic interactions between or throughout nucleoprotein complexes by microscopically altering wrapping and bridging distant sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08646.001 PMID:26381353

  19. Influence of phospholipid composition on cationic emulsions/DNA complexes: physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity, and transfection on Hep G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Michelle; Bruxel, Fernanda; Lagranha, Valeska Lizzi; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira; Matte, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Background Cationic nanoemulsions have been recently considered as potential delivery systems for nucleic acids. This study reports the influence of phospholipids on the properties of cationic nanoemulsions/DNA plasmid complexes. Methods Nanoemulsions composed of medium-chain triglycerides, stearylamine, egg lecithin or isolated phospholipids, ie, DSPC, DOPC, DSPE, or DOPE, glycerol, and water were prepared by spontaneous emulsification. Gene transfer to Hep G2 cells was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The procedure resulted in monodispersed nanoemulsions with a droplet size and zeta potential of approximately 250 nm and +50 mV, respectively. The complexation of cationic nanoemulsions with DNA plasmid, analyzed by agarose gel retardation assay, was complete when the complex was obtained at a charge ratio of ≥1.0. In these conditions, the complexes were protected from enzymatic degradation by DNase I. The cytotoxicity of the complexes in Hep G2 cells, evaluated by MTT assay, showed that an increasing number of complexes led to progressive toxicity. Higher amounts of reporter DNA were detected for the formulation obtained with the DSPC phospholipid. Complexes containing DSPC and DSPE phospholipids, which have high phase transition temperatures, were less toxic in comparison with the formulations obtained with lecithin, DOPC, and DOPE. Conclusion The results show the effect of the DNA/nanoemulsion complexes composition on the toxicity and transfection results. PMID:22114484

  20. Spin-spin coupling constants in [corrected] artificial DNA intercalated with silver cations: theoretical prediction.

    PubMed

    Kauch, Małgorzata; Pecul, Magdalena

    2012-04-10

    The indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of Ag(+) cation intercalated between imidazole rings in DNA chains are calculated by means of DFT with relativistic effects taken into account by the use of the zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian (DFT-ZORA). The calculations model how the (1)J((15)N,(109)Ag) coupling constant is affected by different types of geometry deformations and by the presence of water, which is simulated by means of the polarizable continuum model and explicitly present water molecules. Calculations for systems containing two and three imidazole pairs are also carried out to model the influence of stacking interactions. The computed (1)J((15)N,(109)Ag) spin-spin coupling constant is in the range of 85-105 Hz (depending on the computational model) and is in good agreement with the experimental value (ca. 92 Hz). This coupling constant is very little affected by the presence of solvent, stacking interactions, and geometry deformations. Such behavior is explained by visualization of the coupling path by means of coupling energy density (CED). Bigger models allow the coupling constant between two adjacent silver ions to be computed, and give a value of approximately 1 Hz, which is probably too small to be of practical interest. The (2)J((15)N,(15)N) value is calculated to be about 2.5 Hz, and is therefore of measurable magnitude. PMID:22389050

  1. Fragmentation of condensed-phase DNA components by hyperthermal He{sup +} impact

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Zongwu; Imhoff, Marjorie; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A.

    2006-07-15

    We have observed severe damage to films of DNA components (thymine, D-ribose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, and thymidine) induced by 10 to 100 eV He{sup +} ions (2.5-25 eV/amu). The damage is attributed to the kinetic and potential energies, as well as the chemical reactivity of the He{sup +} projectiles. Hyperthermal He{sup +} ion impact on these films results in the complete destruction of the molecules via fragmentation, and direct and indirect (secondary fragment) reactive scattering, all of which leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. The chemical composition of the fragments is identified, and the fragmentation patterns are compared to those produced by Ar{sup +} irradiation. While the lower mass of He{sup +} ions causes less efficient desorption of very heavy fragments, several reactive collisions are also observed, including hydrogen abstraction by incident He{sup +} from any of the molecules studied to yield desorbing HeH{sup +}. This process likely occurs via the formation of an intermediate molecular ion (He-H-R)*{sup +}, which decays to HeH{sup +}+R . Compared to Ar{sup +}, here a significant (x23) enhancement in H{sup +} desorption is observed during He{sup +} ion irradiation, which likely involves (a) the decay of the intermediate (He-H-R)*{sup +}, or desorbing HeH{sup +}, and (b) Auger or quasiresonant excitations of C, N, or O atom centers (or C-H, N-H, or O-H bonds) by the incident He{sup +} ion. The formation of several molecular cations, e.g., H{sub 3}O{sup +}, also requires hydrogen abstraction from its parent or adjacent molecules by initial cation fragments prior to desorption.

  2. Controlling DNA compaction with cationic amphiphiles for efficient delivery systems A step forward towards non-viral Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarala, Sushma

    The synthesis of pyridinium cationic lipids, their counter-ion exchange, and the transfection of lipoplexes consisting of these lipids with firefly luciferase plasmid DNA (6.7 KDa), into lung, prostate and breast cancer cell lines was investigated. The transfection ability of these newly synthesized compounds was found to be twice as high as DOTAP/cholesterol and Lipofectamine TM (two commercially available successful transfection agents). The compaction of the DNA onto silica (SiO2) nanoparticles was also investigated. For this purpose, it was necessary to study the stability and fusion studies of colloidal systems composed of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a zwitterionic lipid, and mixtures of DMPC with cationic DMTAP (1,2-dimyristoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane).

  3. Development and validation of a ReaxFF reactive force field for Cu cation/water interactions and copper metal/metal oxide/metal hydroxide condensed phases.

    PubMed

    van Duin, Adri C T; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Diallo, Mamadou S; Goddard, William A; Rahaman, Obaidur; Doren, Douglas J; Raymand, David; Hermansson, Kersti

    2010-09-01

    To enable large-scale reactive dynamic simulations of copper oxide/water and copper ion/water interactions we have extended the ReaxFF reactive force field framework to Cu/O/H interactions. To this end, we employed a multistage force field development strategy, where the initial training set (containing metal/metal oxide/metal hydroxide condensed phase data and [Cu(H(2)O)(n)](2+) cluster structures and energies) is augmented by single-point quantum mechanices (QM) energies from [Cu(H(2)O)(n)](2+) clusters abstracted from a ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation. This provides a convenient strategy to both enrich the training set and to validate the final force field. To further validate the force field description we performed molecular dynamics simulations on Cu(2+)/water systems. We found good agreement between our results and earlier experimental and QM-based molecular dynamics work for the average Cu/water coordination, Jahn-Teller distortion, and inversion in [Cu(H(2)O)(6)](2+) clusters and first- and second-shell O-Cu-O angular distributions, indicating that this force field gives a satisfactory description of the Cu-cation/water interactions. We believe that this force field provides a computationally convenient method for studying the solution and surface chemistry of metal cations and metal oxides and, as such, has applications for studying protein/metal cation complexes, pH-dependent crystal growth/dissolution, and surface catalysis. PMID:20707333

  4. Co-delivery of drug and DNA from cationic dual-responsive micelles derived from poly(DMAEMA-co-PPGMA).

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Ong, Shi Jie; Tung, Yin Ting; Choo, Hoi Teng

    2013-12-01

    The synthesis and gene transfection efficiency of a series of amphiphilic copolymers with poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), and poly(propylene glycol methacrylate) (PPGMA) segments is reported. The hydrophobic PPGMA interior allows a cell-sensitizing drug such as paclitaxel to be incorporated while the cationic and hydrophilic PDMAEMA corona allows the complexation of anionic DNA to form a nano-sized polyplex. These drug-encapsulated copolymers display excellent gene transfection efficiency as compared to PEI or PDMAEMA homopolymers. PMID:24094158

  5. Controlled DNA condensation and targeted cellular imaging by ligand exchange in a polysaccharide-quantum dot conjugate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Chen, Li-Xia; Liu, Yu

    2016-05-01

    A multicomponent supramolecular nanoparticle composed of a polysaccharide-quantum dot conjugate was successfully constructed using a ligand-exchange method, which possessed low cellular cytotoxicity and showed controlled DNA condensation and targeted cellular imaging abilities toward cancer cells. PMID:27064053

  6. Theoretical study of ionic liquids based on the cholinium cation. Ab initio simulations of their condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Campetella, Marco; Bodo, Enrico; Montagna, Maria; De Santis, Serena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2016-03-14

    We have explored by means of ab initio molecular dynamics the homologue series of 11 different ionic liquids based on the combination of the cholinium cation with deprotonated amino acid anions. We present a structural analysis of the liquid states of these compounds as revealed by accurate ab initio computations of the forces. We highlight the persistent structural motifs that see the ionic couple as the basic building block of the liquid whereby a strong hydrogen bonding network substantially determines the short range structural behavior of the bulk state. Other minor docking features of the interaction network are also discovered and described. Special cases along the series such as Cysteine and Phenylalanine are discussed in the view of their peculiar properties due to zwitterion formation and additional long-range structural organization. PMID:26979694

  7. Theoretical study of ionic liquids based on the cholinium cation. Ab initio simulations of their condensed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campetella, Marco; Bodo, Enrico; Montagna, Maria; De Santis, Serena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    We have explored by means of ab initio molecular dynamics the homologue series of 11 different ionic liquids based on the combination of the cholinium cation with deprotonated amino acid anions. We present a structural analysis of the liquid states of these compounds as revealed by accurate ab initio computations of the forces. We highlight the persistent structural motifs that see the ionic couple as the basic building block of the liquid whereby a strong hydrogen bonding network substantially determines the short range structural behavior of the bulk state. Other minor docking features of the interaction network are also discovered and described. Special cases along the series such as Cysteine and Phenylalanine are discussed in the view of their peculiar properties due to zwitterion formation and additional long-range structural organization.

  8. The dynamics of 57Fe nuclei in Fe(II)-DNA and [Fe(II)(1-methyl-2-mercaptoimidazole)2]-DNA condensates.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Arturo; Ruisi, Giuseppe; Girasolo, Maria Assunta

    2002-11-25

    Alcoholic solutions of FeCl(2) and Fe(II)(Hmmi)(2)Cl(2) (Hmmi=1-methyl-2-mercaptoimidazole) induce calf thymus DNA condensation from aqueous solutions buffered at pH 7.4. A 1:1 Fe(II)-(DNA monomer) stoichiometry is assumed. The (57)Fe Mössbauer hyperfine parameters suggest an octahedral coordination environment, severely distorted, in both Fe(II)-(DNA monomer) and [Fe(II)(Hmmi)(2)]-(DNA monomer) condensates. The dynamic properties of iron nuclei in freeze-dried samples were investigated by means of variable temperature (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mean square displacements, (T), were calculated, such as the effective vibrating mass and the Mössbauer lattice temperature of the solids. increases linearly with the temperature in the whole temperature range explored; the absolute values are typical for lattice or solid-state vibrations. Very similar values for the effective vibrating masses were extracted, suggesting comparable covalency of the bonding interaction between the metal atom and its ligands, while the Mössbauer lattice temperatures show a softening of the lattice for [Fe(II)(Hmmi)(2)]-(DNA monomer) with respect to Fe(II)-(DNA monomer) condensate. PMID:12433425

  9. Sperm chromatin condensation, DNA integrity, and apoptosis in men with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ali Reza; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Vahidi, Serajodin; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Tabibnejad, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of cord injury on (1) sperm parameters and (2) DNA chromatin status. Design Case–control study. Setting Data were collected from men referred to Research and Clinical Center for Infertility, Yazd, Iran. Participants Thirty infertile men with the presence of any level of spinal cord injury (SCI) were compared with 30 healthy donors with definite fertility and normal sperm parameters. Interventions Not applicable. Outcome measures Sperm chromatin integrity was assessed using aniline blue (AB), chromomycin A3 (CMA3), toluidine blue (TB), and acridine orange (AO) assays. The rate of apoptotic spermatozoa was evaluated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining. Results Sperm concentration, motility, and morphology in men with SCI were significantly decreased compared with control group (P < 0.05). In addition, with regard to cytochemical staining and TUNEL test, the rate of reacted spermatozoa was increased significantly in SCI group when compared with the controls (P < 0.05). The majority of AB, TB, AO, and CMA3-reacted spermatozoa were higher than the “cut-off” value in men with SCI, as were the number of apoptotic spermatozoa stained with TUNEL. Conclusion Results showed that SCI disturbs sperm parameters, nuclear maturity, and DNA integrity of spermatozoa. Therefore, the production of spermatozoa with less condensed chromatin and more apoptotic rate increases after cord injury and this may be one possible cause of infertility following SCI. PMID:23809529

  10. Cationic lipid-mediated nucleic acid delivery: beyond being cationic.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2010-03-01

    Realization of the potential of nucleic acids as drugs is intricately linked to their in vivo delivery. Cationic lipids demonstrated tremendous potential as safe, efficient and scalable in vitro carriers of nucleic acids. For in vivo delivery of nucleic acids, the extant two component liposomal preparations consisting of cationic lipids and nucleic acids have been largely found to be insufficient. Being a soft matter, liposomes readily respond to many physiological variables leading to complex component and morphological changes, thus confounding the efforts in a priori identification of a "competent" formulation. In the recent past many chemical moieties that provide advantage in facing the challenges of barriers in vivo, were incorporated into cationic lipids to improve the transfection efficiency. The cationic lipids, essential for DNA condensation and protection, definitely require additional components to be efficient in vivo. In addition, formulations of cationic lipid carriers with non-lipidic components, mainly peptides, have demonstrated success in in vivo transfection. The present review describes some recent successes of in vivo nucleic acid delivery by cationic lipids. PMID:20060819

  11. Design and Synthesis of Heterocyclic Cations for Specific DNA Recognition: From AT-Rich to Mixed-Base-Pair DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The compounds synthesized in this research were designed with the goal of establishing a new paradigm for mixed-base-pair DNA sequence-specific recognition. The design scheme starts with a cell-permeable heterocyclic cation that binds to AT base pair sites in the DNA minor groove. Modifications were introduced in the original compound to include an H-bond accepting group to specifically recognize the G-NH that projects into the minor groove. Therefore, a series of heterocyclic cations substituted with an azabenzimidazole ring has been designed and synthesized for mixed-base-pair DNA recognition. The most successful compound, 12a, had an azabenzimidazole to recognize G and additional modifications for general minor groove interactions. It binds to the DNA site −AAAGTTT– more strongly than the −AAATTT– site without GC and indicates the design success. Structural modifications of 12a generally weakened binding. The interactions of the new compound with a variety of DNA sequences with and without GC base pairs were evaluated by thermal melting analysis, circular dichroism, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular modeling. PMID:24422528

  12. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  13. UVA-visible photo-excitation of guanine radical cations produces sugar radicals in DNA and model structures

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Malkhasian, Aramice Y. S.; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents evidence that photo-excitation of guanine radical cations results in high yields of deoxyribose sugar radicals in DNA, guanine deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides. In dsDNA at low temperatures, formation of C1′• is observed from photo-excitation of G•+ in the 310–480 nm range with no C1′• formation observed ≥520 nm. Illumination of guanine radical cations in 2′dG, 3′-dGMP and 5′-dGMP in aqueous LiCl glasses at 143 K is found to result in remarkably high yields (∼85–95%) of sugar radicals, namely C1′•, C3′• and C5′•. The amount of each of the sugar radicals formed varies dramatically with compound structure and temperature of illumination. Radical assignments were confirmed using selective deuteration at C5′ or C3′ in 2′-dG and at C8 in all the guanine nucleosides/tides. Studies of the effect of temperature, pH, and wavelength of excitation provide important information about the mechanism of formation of these sugar radicals. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations verify that specific excited states in G•+ show considerable hole delocalization into the sugar structure, in accord with our proposed mechanism of action, namely deprotonation from the sugar moiety of the excited molecular radical cation. PMID:16204456

  14. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    PubMed Central

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes—internal and external—distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. PMID:25123663

  15. Study of mitochondrial DNA alteration in the exhaled breath condensate of patients affected by obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Carpagnano, G E; Lacedonia, D; Carone, M; Soccio, P; Cotugno, G; Palmiotti, G A; Scioscia, G; Foschino Barbaro, M P

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) has been studied as an expression of oxidative stress in asthma, COPD, lung cancer and obstructive sleep apnea, but it has been mainly investigated systemically, although the pathogenetic mechanisms begin in the airways and only later progress to systemic circulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the MtDNA alterations in the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of patients with asthma, COPD and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). In order to analyze better what happens to mitochondria, both locally and systemically, we compared MtDNA/nDNA in blood and EBC of paired patients. Thirteen (13) COPD patients, 14 asthmatics, 23 ACOS (10 according to Spanish guidelines, 13 in line with GINA guidelines) and 12 healthy subjects were enrolled. Patients underwent clinical and functional diagnostic tests as foreseen by the guidelines. They underwent blood and EBC collection. Content of MtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) was measured in the blood cells and EBC of patients by Real Time PCR. The ratio between MtDNA/nDNA was calculated. For the first time we were able to detect MtDNA/nDNA in the EBC. We found higher exhaled MtDNA/nDNA in COPD, asthmatic and ACOS patients respectively compared to healthy subjects (21.9  ±  4.9 versus 6.51  ±  0.21, p  <  0.05; 7.9  ±  2.5 versus 6.51  ±  0.21, p  =  0.06; 18.3  ±  3.4 versus 6.51  ±  0.21, p  <  0.05). The level of exhaled MtDNA/nDNA was positively correlated with the plasmatic one. The levels of MtDNA/nDNA in the EBC, as expression of oxidative stress, are increased in COPD, asthmatic and ACOS patients compared to healthy subjects. These are preliminary results in a small number of well characterized patients that requires confirmation on a larger population. We support new studies directed toward the analysis of exhaled MtDNA/nDNA as a new exhaled non-invasive marker in other inflammatory/oxidative airways diseases. PMID

  16. A self-cleaving DNA enzyme modified with amines, guanidines and imidazoles operates independently of divalent metal cations (M2+)

    PubMed Central

    Hollenstein, Marcel; Hipolito, Christopher J.; Lam, Curtis H.; Perrin, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The selection of modified DNAzymes represents an important endeavor in expanding the chemical and catalytic properties of catalytic nucleic acids. Few examples of such exist and to date, there is no example where three different modified bases have been simultaneously incorporated for catalytic activity. Herein, dCTP, dATP and dUTP bearing, respectively, a cationic amine, an imidazole and a cationic guanidine, were enzymatically polymerized on a DNA template for the selection of a highly functionalized DNAzyme, called DNAzyme 9-86, that catalyzed (M2+)-independent self-cleavage under physiological conditions at a single ribo(cytosine)phosphodiester linkage with a rate constant of (0.134 ± 0.026) min−1. A pH rate profile analysis revealed pKa's of 7.4 and 8.1, consistent with both general acid and base catalysis. The presence of guanidinium cations permits cleavage at significantly higher temperatures than previously observed for DNAzymes with only amines and imidazoles. Qualitatively, DNAzyme 9-86 presents an unprecedented ensemble of synthetic functionalities while quantitatively it expresses one of the highest reported values for any self-cleaving nucleic acid when investigated under M2+-free conditions at 37°C. PMID:19153138

  17. Controlled complexation of plasmid DNA with cationic polymers: effect of surfactant on the complexation and stability of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Marjukka; Murtomäki, Lasse; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2008-10-01

    The aggregation of the cationic polymer-plasmid DNA complexes of two commonly used polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) were systematically compared. The complexation was studied in 5% glucose solution at 25 degrees C using dynamic light scattering and isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation of the complexes was controlled by addition of the surfactant polyoxyethylene stearate (POES). The stability of the complexes was evaluated using dextran sulphate (DS) as relaxing agent. The relaxation of the complexes in the presence of DS was studied using agarose gel electrophoresis. This study elucidates the role of surfactant in controlling the size of the PEI/pDNA complex and reveals the differences of the two polymers as complexing agents. PMID:18583110

  18. A Novel Cationic Microbubble Coated with Stearic Acid-Modified Polyethylenimine to Enhance DNA Loading and Gene Delivery by Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Wang, Zhiyong; Yan, Fei; Deng, Zhiting; Ni, Fei; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-01-01

    A novel cationic microbubble (MB) for improvement of the DNA loading capacity and the ultrasound-mediated gene delivery efficiency has been developed; it has been prepared with commercial lipids and a stearic acid modified polyethylenimine 600 (Stearic-PEI600) polymer synthesized via acylation reaction of branched PEI600 and stearic acid mediated by N, N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI). The MBs’ concentration, size distribution, stability and zeta potential (ζ-potential) were measured and the DNA loading capacity was examined as a function of the amount of Stearic-PEI600. The gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity were also examined using breast cancer MCF-7 cells via the reporter plasmid pCMV-Luc, encoding the firefly luciferase gene. The results showed that the Stearic-PEI600 polymer caused a significant increase in magnitude of ζ-potential of MBs. The addition of DNA into cationic MBs can shift ζ-potentials from positive to negative values. The DNA loading capacity of the MBs grew linearly from (5±0.2) ×10−3 pg/µm2 to (20±1.8) ×10−3 pg/µm2 when Stearic-PEI600 was increased from 5 mol% to 30 mol%. Transfection of MCF-7 cells using 5% PEI600 MBs plus ultrasound exposure yielded 5.76±2.58×103 p/s/cm2/sr average radiance intensity, was 8.97- and 7.53-fold higher than those treated with plain MBs plus ultrasound (6.41±5.82) ×102 p/s/cm2/sr, (P<0.01) and PEI600 MBs without ultrasound (7.65±6.18) ×102 p/s/cm2/sr, (P<0.01), respectively. However, the PEI600 MBs showed slightly higher cytotoxicity than plain MBs. The cells treated with PEI600-MBs and plain MBs plus ultrasound showed 59.5±6.1% and 71.4±7.1% cell viability, respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the novel cationic MBs were able to increase DNA loading capacity and gene transfection efficiency and could be potentially applied in targeted gene delivery and therapy. PMID:24086748

  19. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Johnson, Mark R.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-11-01

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric --> line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded --> condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding, together with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds some light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities.

  20. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Johnson, Mark R.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric → line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded → condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding, together with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds some light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities. PMID:25371012

  1. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Johnson, Mark R.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-11-05

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric → line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded → condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds somemore » light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities.« less

  2. Continuity of states between the cholesteric → line hexatic transition and the condensation transition in DNA solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasar, Selcuk; Podgornik, Rudolf; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Johnson, Mark R.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-11-05

    A new method of finely temperature-tuning osmotic pressure allows one to identify the cholesteric → line hexatic transition of oriented or unoriented long-fragment DNA bundles in monovalent salt solutions as first order, with a small but finite volume discontinuity. This transition is similar to the osmotic pressure-induced expanded → condensed DNA transition in polyvalent salt solutions at small enough polyvalent salt concentrations. Therefore there exists a continuity of states between the two. This finding with the corresponding empirical equation of state, effectively relates the phase diagram of DNA solutions for monovalent salts to that for polyvalent salts and sheds some light on the complicated interactions between DNA molecules at high densities.

  3. Synthesis of linear and cyclic peptide-PEG-lipids for stabilization and targeting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Kai K; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Steffes, Victoria M; Wonder, Emily A; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-03-15

    Because nucleic acids (NAs) have immense potential value as therapeutics, the development of safe and effective synthetic NA vectors continues to attract much attention. In vivo applications of NA vectors require stabilized, nanometer-scale particles, but the commonly used approaches of steric stabilization with a polymer coat (e.g., PEGylation; PEG=poly(ethylene glycol)) interfere with attachment to cells, uptake, and endosomal escape. Conjugation of peptides to PEG-lipids can improve cell attachment and uptake for cationic liposome-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes. We present several synthetic approaches to peptide-PEG-lipids and discuss their merits and drawbacks. A lipid-PEG-amine building block served as the common key intermediate in all synthetic routes. Assembling the entire peptide-PEG-lipid by manual solid phase peptide synthesis (employing a lipid-PEG-carboxylic acid) allowed gram-scale synthesis but is mostly applicable to linear peptides connected via their N-terminus. Conjugation via thiol-maleimide or strain-promoted (copper-free) azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry is highly amenable to on-demand preparation of peptide-PEG-lipids, and the appropriate PEG-lipid precursors are available in a single chemical step from the lipid-PEG-amine building block. Azide-alkyne cycloaddition is especially suitable for disulfide-bridged peptides such as iRGD (cyclic CRGDKGPDC). Added at 10 mol% of a cationic/neutral lipid mixture, the peptide-PEG-lipids stabilize the size of CL-DNA complexes. They also affect cell attachment and uptake of nanoparticles in a peptide-dependent manner, thereby providing a platform for preparing stabilized, affinity-targeted CL-DNA nanoparticles. PMID:26874401

  4. Molecular docking and dynamics simulations on the interaction of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids with DNA G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Arba, Muhammad; Kartasasmita, Rahmana E; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2016-01-01

    A series of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing either pyridine, imidazole, or pyrazole rings at the meso-positions have been investigated for their interaction with DNA G-quadruplexes by employing molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Three types of DNA G-quadruplexes were utilized, which comprise parallel, antiparallel, and mixed hybrid topologies. The porphyrin hybrids have a preference to bind with parallel and mixed hybrid structures compared to the antiparallel structure. This preference arises from the end stacking of porphyrin moiety following G-stem and loop binding of anthraquinone tail, which is not found in the antiparallel due to the presence of diagonal and lateral loops that crowd the G-quartet. The binding to the antiparallel, instead, occurred with poorer affinity through both the loop and wide groove. All sites of porphyrin binding were confirmed by 6 ns molecular dynamics simulation, as well as by the negative value of the total binding free energies that were calculated using the MMPBSA method. Free energy analysis shows that the favorable contribution came from the electrostatic term, which supposedly originated from the interaction of either cationic pyridinium, pyrazole, or imidazole groups and the anionic phosphate backbone, and also from the van der Waals energy, which primarily contributed through end stacking interaction. PMID:25808513

  5. Compaction and multiple chain assembly of DNA with the cationic polymer poly(aluminum chloride) (PAC).

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yukiko; Kanbe, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2004-07-20

    Assembly of DNA molecules by the addition of poly(aluminum chloride) (PAC) was studied. In the absence of PAC, electron microscopy indicated the formation of elongated coiled DNA molecules. In the presence of PAC, multiple doughnut-like structures, 8-15 nm thick, formed and fused together. When salt was added, the doughnut-like structures tended to be thinner and the morphology of the fused doughnuts became irregular. We obtained a view of a single DNA structure by fluorescent microscopy, which revealed that individual DNA molecules undergo a discrete transition from an elongated to compacted state with an increase in PAC concentration. Electron microscopic observation showed that a regular doughnut is the typical structure seen under low salt conditions. At high salt concentrations, the doughnut shape deformed, yielding results similar to those produced by the salt effect on DNA assembly at high DNA concentrations. PMID:15248734

  6. Selenium Incorporated Cationic Organochalcogen: Live Cell Compatible and Highly Photostable Molecular Stain for Imaging and Localization of Intracellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Pankaj; Kumar, Ajay; Dey, Gourab; Kumar, Rajendra; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    Successful integration of selenium unit into a newly designed cationic chemical architecture led to the development of a highly photostable molecular maker PA5 to be used in fluorescence microscopy as cellular nucleus staining agent for longer duration imaging under continuous laser illumination. Adaptation of a targeted single-atom modification strategy led to the development of a series of proficient DNA light-up probes (PA1-PA5). Further, their comparative photophysical studies in the presence of DNA revealed the potential of electron rich heteroatoms of chalcogen family in improving binding efficiency and specificity of molecular probes toward DNA. The findings of cell studies confirmed the outstanding cell compatibility of probe PA5 in terms of cell permeability, biostability, and extremely low cytotoxicity. Moreover, the photostability experiment employing continuous laser illumination in solution phase as well as in cell assay (both fixed and live cells) revealed the admirable photobleaching resistance of PA5. Finally, while investigating the phototoxicity of PA5, the probe was found not to exhibit light-induced toxicity even when irradiated for longer duration. All these experimental results demonstrated the promising standing of PA5 as a futuristic cell compatible potential stain for bioimaging and temporal profiling of DNA. PMID:27066840

  7. Cationic Polymer Intercalation into the Lipid Membrane Enables Intact Polyplex DNA Escape from Endosomes for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chen, Junjie; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2016-06-01

    Developing improved cationic polymer-DNA polyplexes for gene delivery requires improved understanding of DNA transport from endosomes into the nucleus. Using a FRET-capable oligonucleotide molecular beacon (OMB), we monitored the transport of intact DNA to cell organelles. We observed that for effective (jetPEI) and ineffective (G5 PAMAM) vectors, the fraction of cells displaying intact OMB in the cytosol (jetPEI ≫ G5 PAMAM) quantitatively predicted the fraction expressing transgene (jetPEI ≫ G5 PAMAM). Intact OMB delivered with PAMAM and confined to endosomes could be released to the cytosol by the subsequent addition of L-PEI, with a corresponding 10-fold increase in transgene expression. These results suggest that future vector development should optimize vectors for intercalation into, and destabilization of, the endosomal membrane. Finally, the study highlights a two-step strategy in which the pDNA is loaded in cells using one vector and endosomal release is mediated by a second agent. PMID:27111496

  8. Preparation of DNA films for studies under vacuum conditions. The influence of cations in buffer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, M. A.; Balog, R.; Jones, N. C.; Field, D.; Mason, N. J.

    2010-10-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions required for the preparation of uniform films of supercoiled plasmid DNA to be used in irradiation experiments under high vacuum conditions. Investigations reveal that significant damage to the DNA molecules occurs due to the evacuation process when films were formed from DNA samples in ultra high purity water only. A variety of bases were tested for their possible protective capabilities and sodium hydroxide solution was found to be the most effective in maintaining the supercoiled structure of plasmid DNA during the preparation process. Using a transmission electron microscope we also examined the structure of the DNA films which are formed upon evacuation and how the proposed adducts influence the preparation process. It was found that the addition of bases cause the DNA to aggregate, noting that a base is required for the stability of the DNA molecules. The experimental results presented in this paper show that it may not be possible to perform experiments on so-called pure DNA under vacuum with no stabilizers being added to the sample before the evacuation process.

  9. The N-terminal domains of TRF1 and TRF2 regulate their ability to condense telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Poulet, Anaïs; Pisano, Sabrina; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Pei, Bei; Tauran, Yannick; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Brunet, Frédéric; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Ledu, Marie-Hélène; Montel, Fabien; Hugo, Nicolas; Amiard, Simon; Argoul, Françoise; Chaboud, Annie; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2012-01-01

    TRF1 and TRF2 are key proteins in human telomeres, which, despite their similarities, have different behaviors upon DNA binding. Previous work has shown that unlike TRF1, TRF2 condenses telomeric, thus creating consequential negative torsion on the adjacent DNA, a property that is thought to lead to the stimulation of single-strand invasion and was proposed to favor telomeric DNA looping. In this report, we show that these activities, originating from the central TRFH domain of TRF2, are also displayed by the TRFH domain of TRF1 but are repressed in the full-length protein by the presence of an acidic domain at the N-terminus. Strikingly, a similar repression is observed on TRF2 through the binding of a TERRA-like RNA molecule to the N-terminus of TRF2. Phylogenetic and biochemical studies suggest that the N-terminal domains of TRF proteins originate from a gradual extension of the coding sequences of a duplicated ancestral gene with a consequential progressive alteration of the biochemical properties of these proteins. Overall, these data suggest that the N-termini of TRF1 and TRF2 have evolved to finely regulate their ability to condense DNA. PMID:22139926

  10. End-to-end stacking and liquid crystal condensation of 6- to 20-base pair DNA duplexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Zanchetta, G.; Chapman, B.D.; Christopher, D.; Jones, D.; Cross, J.O.; Pindak, R.; Bellini, T.; Noel, N.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Colorado; Univ. di Milano; BNL

    2007-11-23

    Short complementary B-form DNA oligomers, 6 to 20 base pairs in length, are found to exhibit nematic and columnar liquid crystal phases, even though such duplexes lack the shape anisotropy required for liquid crystal ordering. Structural study shows that these phases are produced by the end-to-end adhesion and consequent stacking of the duplex oligomers into polydisperse anisotropic rod-shaped aggregates, which can order into liquid crystals. Upon cooling mixed solutions of short DNA oligomers, in which only a small fraction of the DNA present is complementary, the duplex-forming oligomers phase-separate into liquid crystal droplets, leaving the unpaired single strands in isotropic solution. In a chemical environment where oligomer ligation is possible, such ordering and condensation would provide an autocatalytic link whereby complementarity promotes the extended polymerization of complementary oligomers.

  11. DNA adduct formation in mice following dermal application of smoke condensates from cigarettes that burn or heat tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Brown, B.G.; Reed, E.A.; Mosberg, A.T.; Doolittle, D.J.; Hayes, A.W. ); Hejtmancik, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A prototype cigarette that heats tobacco (test cigarette), developed by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, has yielded consistently negative results in several in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology tests. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) from the test cigarette to induce DNA adducts in mouse tissues and compare the results with those obtained with CSC from a reference tobacco-burning cigarette (1R4F). CD-1 mice were skin-painted with CSF from reference and test cigarettes three times a week for 4 weeks. The highest mass of CSC applied was 180 mg tar per week per animal for both reference and test cigarette. DNA adducts were analyzed in skin and lung tissues using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling method with the P[sub 1] nuclease modification. Distinct diagonal radioactive zones (DRZ) were observed in the DNA from both skin and lung tissues of animals dosed with reference CSC, whereas no corresponding DRZ were observed from the DNA of animals dosed with either test CSC or acetone (solvent control). The relative adduct labeling (RAL) values of skin and lung DNA from reference CSC-treated animals were significantly greater than those of the test CSC-treated animals. The RAL values of the test CSC-treated animals were no greater than those of solvent controls. The negative results in DNA adduct assays with test CSC are consistent with all previous results of in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology testing on this cigarette and provide additional evidence that smoke condensate from the test cigarette is not genotoxic. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A cationic dye triplet as a unique "glue" that can connect fully matched termini of DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Kashida, Hiromu; Hayashi, Takamitsu; Fujii, Taiga; Asanuma, Hiroyuki

    2011-02-25

    In this study, we propose that three consecutive cationic p-methylstilbazoles tethered on D-threoninols (Z residues) at 5' termini act as a unique "glue" connecting DNA duplexes by their interstrand cluster formation. Interstrand clustering of p-methylstilbazoles (ZZZ triplets) induces narrowing and hypsochromic shift of bands at 350 nm, which can be assigned to the absorption of p-methylstilbazole. However, single-stranded DNA conjugates involving a ZZZ triplet at the 5' terminus of 8-mer native nucleotides is found not to induce such large spectral changes, which implies that the intrinsic self-assembling property of ZZZ triplets is weak. Interestingly, when this conjugate is hybridized with a complementary 8-mer native oligonucleotide, a remarkable spectral change is observed, indicating the dimerization of a duplex through the interstrand clustering of ZZZ triplets. Dimerization of the duplex is also evidenced by cold-spray ionization mass spectrometry. This interstrand clustering is observed only when a ZZZ triplet is tethered to a 5' rather than 3' terminus. Furthermore, the stability of the interstrand cluster increases by increasing the number of nucleobases of the DNA portion, and when mismatched base pairs are incorporated or when a base next to the Z residue is deleted, the stability substantially drops. When we apply the ZZZ triplet to the formation of a nanowire using two complementary DNA conjugates, each of which has a ZZZ triplet at the 5' termini as overhang, we demonstrate the successful formation of a nanowire by native PAGE analysis. Since native sticky ends that have three nucleotides do not serve as "glue", ZZZ triplets with their unique glue-like properties are prime candidates for constructing DNA-based nanoarchitectures. PMID:21305625

  13. Visualizing the Formation and Collapse of DNA Toroids

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Bram; Noom, Maarten C.; van Mameren, Joost; Battle, Christopher; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In living organisms, DNA is generally confined into very small volumes. In most viruses, positively charged multivalent ions assist the condensation of DNA into tightly packed toroidal structures. Interestingly, such cations can also induce the spontaneous formation of DNA toroids in vitro. To resolve the condensation dynamics and stability of DNA toroids, we use a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence imaging to visualize in real-time spermine-induced (de)condensation in single DNA molecules. By actively controlling the DNA extension, we are able to follow (de)condensation under tension with high temporal and spatial resolution. We show that both processes occur in a quantized manner, caused by individual DNA loops added onto or removed from a toroidal condensate that is much smaller than previously observed in similar experiments. Finally, we present an analytical model that qualitatively captures the experimentally observed features, including an apparent force plateau. PMID:20441754

  14. Pel is a cationic exopolysaccharide that cross-links extracellular DNA in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Laura K.; Storek, Kelly M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Coulon, Charlène; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Sadovskaya, Irina; Secor, Patrick R.; Tseng, Boo Shan; Scian, Michele; Filloux, Alain; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a complex, ordered process. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Psl and Pel exopolysaccharides and extracellular DNA (eDNA) serve as structural components of the biofilm matrix. Despite intensive study, Pel’s chemical structure and spatial localization within mature biofilms remain unknown. Using specialized carbohydrate chemical analyses, we unexpectedly found that Pel is a positively charged exopolysaccharide composed of partially acetylated 1→4 glycosidic linkages of N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Guided by the knowledge of Pel’s sugar composition, we developed a tool for the direct visualization of Pel in biofilms by combining Pel-specific Wisteria floribunda lectin staining with confocal microscopy. The results indicate that Pel cross-links eDNA in the biofilm stalk via ionic interactions. Our data demonstrate that the cationic charge of Pel is distinct from that of other known P. aeruginosa exopolysaccharides and is instrumental in its ability to interact with other key biofilm matrix components. PMID:26311845

  15. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  16. Structural basis for stabilization of Z-DNA by cobalt hexaammine and magnesium cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessner, R. V.; Quigley, G. J.; Wang, A. H.; van der Marel, G. A.; van Boom, J. H.; Rich, A.

    1985-01-01

    In the equilibrium between B-DNA and Z-DNA in poly(dC-dG), the [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion stabilizes the Z form 4 orders of magnitude more effectively than the Mg2+ ion. The structural basis of this difference is revealed in Z-DNA crystal structures of d(CpGpCpGpCpG) stabilized by either Na+/Mg2+ or Na+/Mg2+ plus [Co(NH3)6]3+. The crystals diffract X-rays to high resolution, and the structures were refined at 1.25 A. The [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion forms five hydrogen bonds onto the surface of Z-DNA, bonding to a guanine O6 and N7 as well as to a phosphate group in the ZII conformation. The Mg2+ ion binds through its hydration shell with up to three hydrogen bonds to guanine N7 and O6. Higher charge, specific fitting of more hydrogen bonds, and a more stable complex all contribute to the great effectiveness of [Co(NH3)6]3+ in stabilizing Z-DNA.

  17. Mixtures of Cationic Lipid O-Ethylphosphatidylcholine with Membrane Lipids and DNA: Phase Diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Ethylphosphatidylcholines are positively charged membrane lipid derivatives, which effectively transfect DNA into cells and are metabolized by the cells. For this reason, they are promising nonviral transfection agents. With the aim of revealing the kinds of lipid phases that may arise when lipoplexes interact with cellular lipids during DNA transfection, temperature-composition phase diagrams of mixtures of the O-ethyldipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine with representatives of the major lipid classes (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, cholesterol) were constructed. Phase boundaries were determined using differential scanning calorimetry and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The effects of ionic strength and of DNA presence were examined. A large variety of polymorphic and mesomorphic structures were observed. Surprisingly, marked enhancement of the affinity for nonlamellar phases was observed in mixtures with phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol as well as with phosphatidylglycerol (previously reported). Because of the potential relevance to transfection, it is noteworthy that such phases form at close to physiological conditions, and in the presence of DNA. All four mixtures exhibit a tendency to molecular clustering in the gel phase, presumably due to the specific interdigitated molecular arrangement of the O-ethyldipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine gel bilayers. It is evident that a remarkably broad array of lipid phases could arise in transfected cells and that these could have significant effects on transfection efficiency. The data may be particularly useful for selecting possible “helper” lipids in the lipoplex formulations, and in searches for correlations between lipoplex structure and transfection activity. PMID:14507708

  18. The intracellular plasmid DNA localization of cationic reducible cholesterol-disulfide lipids.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ruilong; Luo, Ting; Zhu, Yingdan; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Chen, Shengdian; Sun, Wenyan; Cao, Amin

    2011-05-01

    Stimuli-responsive biomaterials derived from natural products toward efficient drug/gene delivery have been attracting increasing attention in the past decade. In this work, we first designed and prepared a new series of cholesterol-disulfide lipids, namely CHOSS-N, CHOSS-N+, CHOSS-Lys and CHOSS-4N bearing cholesterol and a variety of headgroups via disulfide and carbonate bond linkages, and their molecular structures were characterized by NMR and ESI-MS. Furthermore, plasmid DNA binding affinity for these new CHOSS lipids was separately examined by ethidium bromide displacement and agarose-gel retardant assay. Average diameter sizes and surface potentials of the CHOSS/pDNA lipoplex particles prepared under various N/P charge ratios were analyzed by dynamic laser light scattering (DLS). Under 10 mm dithiothreitol (DTT), stability and disassembly of the CHOSS/pDNA lipoplex nanoparticles were investigated by agarose-gel retardant assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Employing a COS-7 cell line, cell viability was examined for the prepared CHOSS lipids and their pDNA lipoplexes with branched PEI-25k as the reference. Finally, COS-7 cell gene transfection efficacies with these CHOSS lipids as potential delivery vectors were investigated by luciferase and EGFP transfection assay in the absence and presence of serum, and intracellular uptake capability, trafficking and cellular localization of Cy3-labeled pEGFP-N1 DNA were studied with a flow cytometer and fluorescent microscopy with Lipofectamine™ 2000 as the control. The results demonstrated low cytotoxicity, strong pDNA binding affinity and high transgenetic efficacy for new prepared CHOSS lipids, and particularly high intracellular uptake capability and specific cellular localization of pDNA at the periphery of cell nuclei were for the first time interestingly observed for the CHOSS lipid delivery carriers. In general, these may pave a new way to utilize cholesterol, amino acids and other functional natural

  19. Ordered DNA-Surfactant Hybrid Nanospheres Triggered by Magnetic Cationic Surfactants for Photon- and Magneto-Manipulated Drug Delivery and Release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Yitong; Wei, Guangcheng; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-12-14

    Here we construct for the first time ordered surfactant-DNA hybrid nanospheres of double-strand (ds) DNA and cationic surfactants with magnetic counterion, [FeCl3Br](-). The specificity of the magnetic cationic surfactants that can compact DNA at high concentrations makes it possible for building ordered nanospheres through aggregation, fusion, and coagulation. Cationic surfactants with conventional Br(-) cannot produce spheres under the same condition because they lose the DNA compaction ability. When a light-responsive magnetic cationic surfactant is used to produce nanospheres, a dual-controllable drug-delivery platform can be built simply by the applications of external magnetic force and alternative UV and visible light. These nanospheres obtain high drug absorption efficiency, slow release property, and good biocompatibility. There is potential for effective magnetic-field-based targeted drug delivery, followed by photocontrollable drug release. We deduce that our results might be of great interest for making new functional nucleic-acid-based nanomachines and be envisioned to find applications in nanotechnology and biochemistry. PMID:26571346

  20. The Relation between the Physical Properties of Self-Assembling Cationic Lipid:DNA Complexes and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Slack, N. L.; Evans, Heather M.; Lin, Alison; Martin, A.; Safinya, C. R.

    2000-03-01

    The use of cationic lipids (CL) as carriers of genes (DNA sequences) for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral-carriers. Previous work on CL:DNA complexes has focused on binary mixtures of lipids and has shown that the optimal gene delivery vehicle may be mediated by physical properties of the lipid self-assembly(1). Using x-ray diffraction and biological assays, we show that membrane charge density and geometric shape may be universal parameters for successful gene delivery by binary CL mixtures in vitro. Preliminary results from complexes containing novel ternary CL mixtures further elucidate key parameters for gene delivery. Funded by NIH R01-GM59288-01 and R37-AI12520-24, UCBiotechnology Research and Education Program (97-02), NSF-DMR-9972246. 1. J. Raedler et al, Science 275, 810 (1997), Koltover et al Science 281, 78-81 (1998), Koltover et al, Biophysical Journal 77, 95 (1999), A. J. Lin, N. L. Slack, A. Ahmad, I. Koltover, C. X. George, C. E. Samuel, C. R. Safinya, Journal of Drug Targeting (to appear)

  1. Characterizing radiation-induced oxidation of DNA by way of the monohydrated guanine-cytosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Heather M; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-11

    The interaction of one water molecule with the guanine-cytosine radical cation has been studied with ab initio and density functional methods in order to help elucidate the nature of oxidized aqueous DNA. The theoretical spin density of [GC]*(+) reveals that the radical center is localized on guanine. The adiabatic ionization potential lowers from 7.63 to 6.71 eV in concurrence with the formation of the Watson-Crick base pair and hydration by one water molecule. A natural bond orbital analysis of partial charges shows that approximately 80% of the positive charge persists on guanine upon hydration and formation of the Watson-Crick base pair with cytosine. Hydration energies were computed with second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2) using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set at 11 stationary points on the B3LYP/DZP++ potential energy surface. The hydration energy at the global minimum is 14.2 kcal mol(-1). The lowest energy structures correspond to hydration near the glycosidic bond sites. Structural changes in the Watson-Crick base pair are predominantly seen for monohydration in the groove regions of double-helix DNA. PMID:19445496

  2. Intercalative and nonintercalative binding of large cationic porphyrin ligands to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Carvlin, M J; Fiel, R J

    1983-01-01

    The large meso-substituted porphine, meso-tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphine has been identified as a DNA-interactive ligand with a capacity for intercalation (1,2). Subsequently, the 2-N-methyl, 3-N-methyl and N-trimethylanilinium analogues of this porphyrin intercalator have been obtained for physico-chemical analyses (absorption spectroscopy, viscometry, circular dichroism, unwinding of supercoiled DNA). In this paper we discuss the factors affecting the character of porphyrin binding (intercalative, as is the case for the 4-N-methyl and 3-N-methyl porphines, versus non-intercalative, as is the case for the 2-N-methyl and N-trimethylanilinium porphines) and the impact that porphyrins' binding has upon the structure of DNA. The molecular conformation of the porphyrin ligand varies slightly within this series so that the ability of a given porphyrin to intercalate may be correlated with the arrangement of charged groups, the planarity of the porphine ring and the effective width of the individual molecules. The results from these studies indicate that sequence selective binding occurs within a small aperture of solution conditions. Images PMID:6889138

  3. Efficient in vivo gene delivery by the negatively charged complexes of cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Son, K K; Tkach, D; Hall, K J

    2000-09-29

    We examined changes in zeta potential (the surface charge density, zeta) of the complexes of liposome (nmol)/DNA (microg) (L/D) formed in water at three different ratios (L/D=1, 10 and 20) by changing the ionic strength or pH to find an optimum formulation for in vivo gene delivery. At high DNA concentrations, zeta of the complexes formed in water at L/D=10 was significantly lowered by adding NaCl (zeta=+8.44+/-3.1 to -27.6+/-3.5 mV) or increasing pH from 5 (zeta=+15.3+/-1.0) to 9 (zeta=-22.5+/-2.5 mV). However, the positively charged complexes formed at L/D=20 (zeta=+6.2+/-3.5 mV) became negative as NaCl was added at alkaline pH as observed in medium (zeta=-19.7+/-9.9 mV). Thus, the complexes formed in water under the optimum condition were stable and largely negatively charged at L/D=1 (zeta=-58.1+/-3.9 mV), unstable and slightly positively charged at L/D=10 (zeta=+8.44+/-3.7 mV), and unstable and largely positively charged at L/D=20 (zeta=+24.3+/-3.6 mV). The negatively charged complexes efficiently delivered DNA into both solid and ascitic tumor cells. However, the positively charged complexes were very poor in delivering DNA into solid tumors, yet were efficient in delivering DNA into ascitic tumors grown in the peritoneum regardless of complex size. This slightly lower gene transfer efficiency of the negatively charged complexes can be as efficient as the positively charged ones when an injection is repeated (at least two injections), which is the most common case for therapy regimes. The results indicate that optimum in vivo lipofection may depend on the site of tumor growth. PMID:11018645

  4. Cationic nanoemulsions as potential carriers for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Khachane, P V; Jain, A S; Dhawan, V V; Joshi, G V; Date, A A; Mulherkar, R; Nagarsenker, M S

    2015-04-01

    Successful cytosolic delivery enables opportunities for improved treatment of various genetic disorders, infectious diseases and cancer. Cationic nanoemulsions were designed using alternative excipients and evaluated for particle size, charge, effect of sterilization on its stability, DNA condensation potential and cellular uptake efficiency. Various concentrations of non-ionic and ionic stabilizers were evaluated to design formula for colloidally stable cationic nanoemulsion. The nanoemulsion comprised of 5% Capmul MCM, 0.5% didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), 1% phospholipid, 1% Poloxamer 188 and 2.25% glycerol and possessed particle size of 81.6 ± 3.56 nm and 137.1 ± 1.57 nm before and after steam sterilization, respectively. DNA condensation studies were carried out at various nanoemulsion: DNA ratios ranging from 1:1 to 10:1. Cell uptake studies were conducted on human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines which are widely reported for transfection studies. The nanoemulsions showed excellent cellular uptake as evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Overall, a colloidally stable cationic nanoemulsion with good DNA condensation ability was successfully fabricated for efficient cytosolic delivery and potential for in vivo effectiveness. PMID:25972740

  5. Confocal Microscopy Studies of Cationic Lipid/dna Complexes Reveal Distinct Pathways of Gene Delivery in Cells as a Function of Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Evans, Heather M.; George, Cyril X.; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2000-03-01

    We have identified multiple pathways of gene delivery in mouse L cells using cationic lipids as carriers of DNA. Transfection, the process of delivering foreign DNA into cells, using cationic lipid/DNA (CL-DNA) complexes was monitored by laser confocal microscopy. By following the progress of fluorescently labelled lipid and DNA, we have determined distinct pathways of entry of complexes into cells and the subsequent DNA release from the complexes. We have correlated the microscopy results with the x-ray diffraction data on complex structures and the corresponding transfection efficiencies. X-ray diffraction results elucidated the structures of CL-DNA complexes as a function of the membrane charge density of the system. Luciferase protein assays disclosed novel trends of transfection efficiencies along the structural phase diagram. Similar results were obtained with GFP plasmids. Funded by NIH R01-GM59288-01, R37-AI12520-24, NSF-DMR 9972246, UC-Biotechnology Research and Education Program (97-02).

  6. Mucosal application of cationic poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles as carriers of DNA vaccine and adjuvants to protect chickens against infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Negash, Tamiru; Liman, Martin; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2013-08-12

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an immunosuppressive virus of chickens. The virus protein (VP) 2 induces neutralizing antibodies, which protect chickens against the disease. The aim of this study was to develop a cationic poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticle (MP) based IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccine (MP-IBDV-DNA) for chickens to be delivered orally and by eye drop route. The tested IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccines were immunogenic for specific-pathogen-free chickens and induced an antibody response after intramuscular application. Co-inoculation with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) or CpG-ODN did not significantly improve protection against IBDV challenge. However, the application of a MP-IBDV-DNA vaccine alone or in combination with a delayed oral and eye drop application of cationic MP loaded with CpG-ODN or chIL-2 improved protection against challenge. The MP-IBDV-DNA-vaccinated chickens showed less pathological and histopathological bursal lesions, a reduced IBDV antigen load as well as T-cell influx into the bursa of Fabricius (BF) compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The addition of chIL-2 loaded MP improved challenge virus clearance from the BF as demonstrated by lower neutralizing antibody titers and reduced IL-4 and IFN-α mRNA expression in the bursa at 7 days postchallenge compared to the other challenged groups. Overall, the efficacy of the IBDV-DNA vaccine was improved by adsorption of the DNA vaccine onto cationic PLGA-MP, which also allowed mucosal application of the DNA vaccine. PMID:23777953

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of DNA fragment hydration in the presence of alkaline cations using novel atom-atom potential functions.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, A V; Malenkov, G G; Poltev, V I

    1998-10-01

    The set of atom-atom potential functions specially adjusted to simulation of nucleic acid fragment hydration (Poltev, Grokhlina & Malenkov, J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 2, 413, 1984) is extended by including alkaline cation interactions. The choice of new potential functions was realized using experimental data on crystal hydrates of nucleotides and related compounds as well as thermodynamic data on ion solutions. The extended set of potential functions allows to reproduce many features of interactions between alkaline cations and nucleic acid fragments in water solutions. The sites of preferential cation localization near bases and phosphate groups were obtained and examined. The potential functions reproduce the dissociation tendency of cation-phosphate group and cation-base complexes in aqueous medium. Pathways of cation dissociations from nucleic acid components have been studied, and metastable water-bridged positions of cations near bases and phosphate group have been revealed. PMID:9833668

  8. Nucleoside transporters and human organic cation transporter 1 determine the cellular handling of DNA-methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Arimany-Nardi, C; Errasti-Murugarren, E; Minuesa, G; Martinez-Picado, J; Gorboulev, V; Koepsell, H; Pastor-Anglada, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), such as azacytidine, decitabine and zebularine, are used for the epigenetic treatment of cancer. Their action may depend upon their translocation across the plasma membrane. The aim of this study was to identify transporter proteins contributing to DNMT inhibitor action. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Drug interactions with selected hCNT and hENT proteins were studied in transiently transfected HeLa and MDCK cells. Interaction with human organic cation transporters (hOCTs) was assessed in transiently transfected HeLa cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes. KEY RESULTS Zebularine uptake was mediated by hCNT1, hCNT3 and hENT2. Decitabine interacted with but was not translocated by any nucleoside transporter (NT) type. hCNT expression at the apical domain of MDCK cells promoted net vectorial flux of zebularine. Neither hOCT1 nor hOCT2 transported decitabine, but both were involved in the efflux of zebularine, suggesting these proteins act as efflux transporters. hOCT1 polymorphic variants, known to alter function, decreased zebularine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study highlights the influence of human NTs and hOCTs on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of selected DNMT inhibitors. As hOCTs may also behave as efflux transporters, they could contribute either to chemoresistance or to chemosensitivity, depending upon the nature of the drug or combination of drugs being used in cancer therapy. PMID:24780098

  9. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  10. Gene transfer by cationic surfactants is essentially limited by the trapping of the surfactant/DNA complexes onto the cell membrane: a fluorescence investigation.

    PubMed

    Clamme, J P; Bernacchi, S; Vuilleumier, C; Duportail, G; Mély, Y

    2000-08-25

    The interaction between complexes of plasmid DNA with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and L929 fibroblasts was first examined using confocal microscopy. The complexes labeled with the DNA intercalator, YOYO-1, were found to be trapped onto the external face of the plasma membrane; a feature that may constitute a major limiting step in transfection. Moreover, since no cytotoxic effect appeared in these conditions, we further inferred that the CTAB molecules remained bound to the DNA. The interaction of the complexes with the membranes was best modeled with neutral vesicles. From anisotropy thermotropic curves of DPHpPC-labeled vesicles and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements between these vesicles and YOYO-labeled complexes, we evidenced that the binding of the complexes to the vesicle surface opened the micelle-like domains and unwound DNA. However, DNA was not released but remained stably bound via electrostatic interactions to the CTAB molecules incorporated in the external liposome leaflet. Consequently, the large diameter of the unwound plasmid DNA is likely the major factor that precludes its internalization into the cells by endocytosis. In contrast, anionic vesicles that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the plasma membrane rapidly released DNA from the complex. This may explain the previously reported high transfection efficiency of DNA complexed with liposomes composed of neutral lipids and cationic surfactants, since the latter may destabilize the endosomal membrane and induce the release of DNA in the cytoplasm. PMID:11030593

  11. Phosphorylation of the synthetic octapeptide pyroGlu-ASP-ASP-SER-ASP-GLU-GLU-ASN and binding to DNA in presence of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Cardellini, E; Ponti, D; Gianfranceschi, G L

    1999-12-01

    Small acidic peptides involved in gene expression have been isolated from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Synthetic peptides, designed on the basis of native peptides characteristics, show a biological activity similar to that of native peptides in in vitro reconstituted systems. These synthetic peptides are able to bind to DNA in presence of divalent cations (Cu2+, Fe2+, Mg2+) and salt/ethanol. PMID:10634508

  12. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1540693

  13. Fragmentation of DNA components by hyperthermal heavy ion (Ar+ and Xe+) impact in the condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Sarvenaz Sarabipour, Ms; Michaud, Marc; Deng, Zongwu; Huels, Michael A.

    The overriding environmental factor that presently limits human endeavors in space is exposure to heavy ion radiation. While knowledge of its damage to living tissue is essential for radiation protection and risk estimates for astronauts, very little data exists at the molecular level regarding the nascent DNA damage by the primary particle track, or by secondary species during subsequent reaction cascades. This persistent lack of a basic understanding of nascent damage induced by such low dose, high LET radiation, introduces unacceptable errors in radiation risk estimates (based mainly on extrapolation from high dose, low LET radiation), particularly for long term exposure. Mutagenic effects induced by heavy ion radiation to cells are largely due to DNA damage by secondary transient species, i.e. secondary ballistic ions, electrons and radicals generated along the ion tracks; the secondary ions have hyperthermal energies up to several 100 eV, which they will deposit within a few nm in the surrounding medium; thus their LET is very high, and yields lethal clustered DNA lesions. We present measurements of molecular damage induced in films of DNA components by ions with precisely such low energies (1-100 eV) and compare results to conventional electron impact measurements. Experiments are conducted in UHV using a mass selected low energy ion source, and a high-resolution quadrupole MS to monitor ion yields desorbing from molecular films. Among the major fragments, NH4 + is identified in the desorption mass spectra of irradiated films of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, indicating efficient deamination; in cells this results in pre-mutagenic lesions. Experiments with 5-amino-Uracil, and comparison to previous results on uracil and thymine show that deamination is a key step in the NH4 + fragment formation. For Adenine, we also observe formation of amine aducts in the films, viz. amination of Adenine, and global fragmentation in all ion impact mass spectra, attributed

  14. The characteristics and transfection efficiency of cationic poly (ester-co-urethane) - short chain PEI conjugates self-assembled with DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Yi; Ho, Wen-Yueh; Hung, Wei Jing; Shau, Min-Da

    2009-12-01

    To improve the transfection efficiency of polycations with DNA, we synthesized poly(ester-co-urethane)(PEU-g-PEI800) with short chain PEI800 in the side chain, and poly(ester-co-urethane)(PEU) without short chain PEI800. Both PEU-g-PEI800 and PEU, readily self-assembled with plasmid DNA (pCMV-betagal) in a HEPES buffer, were characterized by dynamic light scattering and zeta-potential. The results reveal that PEU-g-PEI800 and PEU were able to self-assemble particles with DNA and yield nano-sized complexes (<200nm) with positive charge at N/P ratios of 20/1 and 120/1, respectively. The degradation studies indicate that the half-life of PEU-g-PEI800 and PEU in the HEPES buffer were 14 and 35h at pH 7.4, respectively. Titration studies were performed to determine the buffering capacities of the polymers. The COS-7 cell viabilities in the presence of PEU-g-PEI800/DNA, PEU/DNA, and PEI25k/DNA were studied. In addition, The PEU-g-PEI800/DNA complexes were able to transfect COS-7 cells in vitro with a high efficiency comparable to a well-known gene carrier PEI25k. The results indicate that PEU-g-PEI800 is an attractive cationic poly (ester-co-urethane) for gene delivery and an interesting candidate for further study. PMID:19775745

  15. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  16. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  17. Novel cationic polyene glycol phospholipids as DNA transfer reagents--lack of a structure-activity relationship due to uncontrolled self-assembling processes.

    PubMed

    Øpstad, Christer L; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Zaidi, Asma; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Nicholson, David G; Surve, Chinmay; Izower, Mitchell A; Bilchuk, Natalia; Lou, Howard H; Leopold, Philip L; Larsen, Helge; Liberska, Alexandra; Khalique, Nada Abdul; Raju, Liji; Flinterman, Marcella; Jubeli, Emile; Pungente, Michael D

    2014-10-01

    Cationic glycol phospholipids were synthesized introducing chromophoric, rigid polyenoic C20:5 and C30:9 chains next to saturated flexible alkyl chains of variable lengths C6-20:0. Surface properties and liposome formation of the amphiphilic compounds were determined, the properties of liposome/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) were established using three formulations (no co-lipid, DOPE as a co-lipid, or cholesterol as a co-lipid), and the microstructure of the best transfecting compounds inspected using small angle X-ray diffraction to explore details of the partially ordered structures of the systems that constitute the series. Transfection and cytotoxicity of the lipoplexes were evaluated by DNA delivery to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells using the cationic glycerol phospholipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) as a reference compound. The uncontrollable self-association of the molecules in water resulted in aggregates and liposomes of quite different sizes without a structure-property relationship. Likewise, adding DNA to the liposomes gave rise to unpredictable sized lipoplexes, which, again, transfected without a structure-activity relationship. Nevertheless, one compound among the novel lipids (C30:9 chain paired with a C20:0 chain) exhibited comparable transfection efficiency and toxicity to the control cationic lipid EPC. Thus, the presence of a rigid polyene chain in this best performing achiral glycol lipid did not have an influence on transfection compared with the chiral glycerolipid reference ethyl phosphocholine EPC with two flexible saturated C14 chains. PMID:24814958

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate reduces DNA damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and cigarette smoke condensate in human mucosa tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Philipp; Reiter, Maximilian; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Matthias, Christoph; Harréus, Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Although epidemiological studies indicate cancer preventive effects of diets rich in fruit and vegetables, large clinical intervention studies conducted to evaluate dietary supplementation with micronutrients, mostly vitamins, showed disappointing results in large parts. In contrast, there is encouraging epidemiologic data indicating great chemopreventive potential of a large group of phytochemicals, namely polyphenols. This study shows the DNA protective effect epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a tea catechin, and one of the best-studied substances within this group, on carcinogen-induced DNA fragmentation in upper aerodigestive tract cells. Cell cultures from fresh oropharyngeal mucosa biopsies were preincubated with epigallocatechin-3-gallate in different concentrations before DNA damage was introduced with the metabolically activated carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide or cigarette smoke condensate. Effects on resulting DNA fragmentation were measured using the alkaline single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet assay). Epigallocatechin-3-gallate significantly reduced benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide-induced DNA damage by up to 51% (P<0.001). Fragmentation induced by cigarette smoke condensate could be lowered by 47% (P<0.001). Data suggest a cancer preventive potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate as demonstrated on a subcellular level. An additional mechanism of tea catechin action is revealed by using a primary mucosa culture model. PMID:19491610

  19. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  20. DNA Self-Assembling Nanostructures Induced by Trivalent Ions and Polycations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyanenko, Nina; Afanasieva, Daria

    The purpose of this work is to compare DNA condensation induced by small multivalent ions and polycations. DNA complexes with trivalent ions Fe3+, La3+, [Co(NH3)6]3+, spermidine and cationic polymers in a solution were investigated. The influence of cations on the volume, persistent length, and secondary structure of DNA was studied. A comparison of DNA packaging induced by trivalent ions and polycations was made. DNA complexes with trivalent metal ions and polycations were characterized by means of low gradient viscometry, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, UV spectrometry, flow birefringence, and atomic force microscopy.

  1. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  2. Quantitative Measurement of Cationic Polymer Vector and Polymer-pDNA Polyplex Intercalation into the Cell Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Anderson, Kevin B; Merzel, Rachel L; Jacobovitz, Binyamin; Kaushik, Milan P; Kelly, Christina N; van Dongen, Mallory A; Dougherty, Casey A; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-06-23

    Cationic gene delivery agents (vectors) are important for delivering nucleotides, but are also responsible for cytotoxicity. Cationic polymers (L-PEI, jetPEI, and G5 PAMAM) at 1× to 100× the concentrations required for translational activity (protein expression) induced the same increase in plasma membrane current of HEK 293A cells (30-50 nA) as measured by whole cell patch-clamp. This indicates saturation of the cell membrane by the cationic polymers. The increased currents induced by the polymers are not reversible for over 15 min. Irreversibility on this time scale is consistent with a polymer-supported pore or carpet model and indicates that the cell is unable to clear the polymer from the membrane. For polyplexes, although the charge concentration was the same (at N/P ratio of 10:1), G5 PAMAM and jetPEI polyplexes induced a much larger current increase (40-50 nA) than L-PEI polyplexes (<20 nA). Both free cationic lipid and lipid polyplexes induced a lower increase in current than cationic polymers (<20 nA). To quantify the membrane bound material, partition constants were measured for both free vectors and polyplexes into the HEK 293A cell membrane using a dye influx assay. The partition constants of free vectors increased with charge density of the vectors. Polyplex partition constants did not show such a trend. The long lasting cell plasma permeability induced by exposure to the polymer vectors or the polyplexes provides a plausible mechanism for the toxicity and inflammatory response induced by exposure to these materials. PMID:25952271

  3. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA. PMID:15384057

  4. Thermodynamic stoichiometries of participation of water, cations and anions in specific and non-specific binding of lac repressor to DNA. Possible thermodynamic origins of the "glutamate effect" on protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ha, J H; Capp, M W; Hohenwalter, M D; Baskerville, M; Record, M T

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the contributions of cations, anions and water to stability and specificity of the interaction of lac repressor (lac R) protein with the strong-binding symmetric lac operator (Osym) DNA site. To this end, binding constants Kobs and their power dependences on univalent salt (MX) concentration (SKobs = d log Kobs/d log[MX]) have been determined for the interactions of lac R with Osym operator and with non-operator DNA using filter binding and DNA cellulose chromatography, respectively. For both specific and non-specific binding of lac R, Kobs at fixed salt concentration [KX] increases when chloride (Cl-) is replaced by the physiological anion glutamate (Glu-). At 0.25 M-KX, the increase in Kobs for Osym is observed to be approximately 40-fold, whereas for non-operator DNA the increase in Kobs is estimated by extrapolation to be approximately 300-fold. For non-operator DNA, SKobsRD is independent of salt concentration within experimental uncertainty, and is similar in KCl (SKobs,RDKCl = -9.8(+/- 1.0) between 0.13 M and 0.18 M-KCl) and KGlu (SKobs,RDKGlu = -9.3(+/- 0.7) between 0.23 M and 0.36 M-KGlu). For Osym DNA, SKobsRO varies significantly with the nature of the anion, and, at least in KGlu appears to decrease in magnitude with increasing [KGlu]. Average magnitudes of SKobsRO are less than SKobsRD, and, for specific binding decrease in the order [SKobsRO,KCl[>[SKobsRO,KAc[>[SKobsRO,KGlu[ . Neither KobsRO nor SKobsRO is affected by the choice of univalent cation M+ (Na+, K+, NH4+, or mixtures thereof, all as the chloride salt), and SKobsRO is independent of [MCl] in the range examined (0.125 to 0.3 M). This behavior of SKobsRO is consistent with that expected for a binding process with a large contribution from the polyelectrolyte effect. However, the lack of an effect of the nature of the cation on the magnitude of KobsRO at a fixed [MX] is somewhat unexpected, in view of the order of preference of cations for the

  5. A dimeric DNA interface stabilized by stacked A.(G.G.G.G).A hexads and coordinated monovalent cations.

    PubMed

    Kettani, A; Gorin, A; Majumdar, A; Hermann, T; Skripkin, E; Zhao, H; Jones, R; Patel, D J

    2000-03-31

    We report on the identification of an A.(G.G.G.G).A hexad pairing alignment which involves recognition of the exposed minor groove of opposing guanines within a G.G.G.G tetrad through sheared G.A mismatch formation. This unexpected hexad pairing alignment was identified for the d(G-G-A-G-G-A-G) sequence in 150 mM Na(+) (or K(+)) cation solution where four symmetry-related strands align into a novel dimeric motif. Each symmetric half of the dimeric "hexad" motif is composed of two strands and contains a stacked array of an A.(G.G.G.G).A hexad, a G.G.G.G tetrad, and an A.A mismatch. Each strand in the hexad motif contains two successive turns, that together define an S-shaped double chain reversal fold, which connects the two G-G steps aligned parallel to each other along adjacent edges of the quadruplex. Our studies also establish a novel structural transition for the d(G-G-A-G-G-A-N) sequence, N=T and G, from an "arrowhead" motif stabilized through cross-strand stacking and mismatch formation in 10 mM Na(+) solution (reported previously), to a dimeric hexad motif stabilized by extensive inter-subunit stacking of symmetry-related A.(G.G.G.G).A hexads in 150 mM Na(+) solution. Potential monovalent cation binding sites within the arrowhead and hexad motifs have been probed by a combination of Brownian dynamics and unconstrained molecular dynamics calculations. We could not identify stable monovalent cation-binding sites in the low salt arrowhead motif. By contrast, five electronegative pockets were identified in the moderate salt dimeric hexad motif. Three of these are involved in cation binding sites sandwiched between G.G.G. G tetrad planes and two others, are involved in water-mediated cation binding sites spanning the unoccupied grooves associated with the adjacent stacked A.(G.G.G.G).A hexads. Our demonstration of A.(G. G.G.G).A hexad formation opens opportunities for the design of adenine-rich G-quadruplex-interacting oligomers that could potentially target base

  6. Combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vaccines with the cationic lipid SAINT-18: studies on formulation, biodistribution and vector clearance.

    PubMed

    Endmann, Anne; Oswald, Detlef; Riede, Oliver; Talman, Eduard G; Vos, Roelien E; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that the combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vectors with the cationic lipid SAINT-18 increases the immune response to the encoded antigen in mice. Here, we report on experiments to further optimize and characterize this approach. We evaluated different formulations of MIDGE-Th1 vectors with SAINT-18 by assessing their influence on the transfection efficiency in cell culture and on the immune response in mice. We found that high amounts of SAINT-18 in formulations with a w/w ratio MIDGE Th1/SAINT-18 of 1:4.8 are beneficial for cell transfection in vitro. In contrast, the formulation of HBsAg-encoding MIDGE-Th1 DNA vectors with the lowest amount of SAINT-18 (w/w ratio MIDGE Th1/SAINT-18 of 1:0.5) resulted in the highest serum IgG1 and IgG2a levels after intradermal immunization of mice. Consequently, latter formulation was selected for a comparative biodistribution study in rats. Following intradermal administration of both naked and formulated MIDGE-Th1 DNA, the vectors localized primarily at the site of injection. Vector DNA levels decreased substantially over the two months duration of the study. When administered in combination with SAINT-18, the vectors were found in significantly higher amounts in draining lymph nodes in comparison to administration of naked MIDGE-Th1 DNA. We propose that the high immune responses induced by MIDGE-Th1/SAINT-18 lipoplexes are mediated by enhanced transfection of cells in vivo, resulting in stronger antigen expression and presentation. Importantly, the combination of MIDGE-Th1 vectors with SAINT-18 was well tolerated in mice and rats and is expected to be safe in human clinical applications. PMID:24681271

  7. Nuclear DNA Methylation and Chromatin Condensation Phenotypes Are Distinct Between Normally Proliferating/Aging, Rapidly Growing/Immortal, and Senescent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Tajbakhsh, Jian

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on probing the utility of in situ chromatin texture features such as nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation patterns — visualized by fluorescent staining and evaluated by dedicated three-dimensional (3D) quantitative and high-throughput cell-by-cell image analysis — in assessing the proliferative capacity, i.e. growth behavior of cells: to provide a more dynamic picture of a cell population with potential implications in basic science, cancer diagnostics/prognostics and therapeutic drug development. Two types of primary cells and four different cancer cell lines were propagated and subjected to cell-counting, flow cytometry, confocal imaging, and 3D image analysis at various points in culture. Additionally a subset of primary and cancer cells was accelerated into senescence by oxidative stress. DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels decreased with declining doubling times when primary cells aged in culture with the lowest levels reached at the stage of proliferative senescence. In comparison, immortal cancer cells with constant but higher doubling times mostly displayed lower and constant levels of the two in situ-derived features. However, stress-induced senescent primary and cancer cells showed similar levels of these features compared with primary cells that had reached natural growth arrest. With regards to global DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels, aggressively growing cancer cells seem to take an intermediate level between normally proliferating and senescent cells. Thus, normal cells apparently reach cancer-cell equivalent stages of the two parameters at some point in aging, which might challenge phenotypic distinction between these two types of cells. Companion high-resolution molecular profiling could provide information on possible underlying differences that would explain benign versus malign cell growth behaviors. PMID:23562889

  8. How does the spacer length of cationic gemini lipids influence the lipoplex formation with plasmid DNA? Physicochemical and biochemical characterizations and their relevance in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2012-12-10

    Lipoplexes formed by the pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and lipid mixtures containing cationic gemini surfactant of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium) alkanes family referred to as C16CnC16, where n=2, 3, 5, or 12, and the zwitterionic helper lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have been studied from a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological standpoints. The study has been carried out using several experimental methods, such as zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), cryo-TEM, gene transfection, cell viability/cytotoxicity, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. As reported recently in a communication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 18014), the detailed physicochemical and biological studies confirm that, in the presence of the studied series lipid mixtures, plasmid DNA is compacted with a large number of its associated Na+ counterions. This in turn yields a much lower effective negative charge, qpDNA−, a value that has been experimentally obtained for each mixed lipid mixture. Consequently, the cationic lipid (CL) complexes prepared with pDNA and CL/DOPE mixtures to be used in gene transfection require significantly less amount of CL than the one estimated assuming a value of qDNA−=−2. This drives to a considerably lower cytotoxicity of the gene vector. Depending on the CL molar composition, α, of the lipid mixture, and the effective charge ratio of the lipoplex, ρeff, the reported SAXS data indicate the presence of two or three structures in the same lipoplex, one in the DOPE-rich region, other in the CL-rich region, and another one present at any CL composition. Cryo-TEMand SAXS studies with C16CnC16/DOPE-pDNA lipoplexes indicate that pDNA is localized between the mixed lipid bilayers of lamellar structures within a monolayer of ∼2 nm. This is consistent with a highly compacted supercoiled pDNA conformation compared with that of linear DNA. Transfection studies were carried out

  9. Development of polymeric–cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid–polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size <200 nm and encapsulation efficiency >80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA. PMID:26648722

  10. Effects of a delocalizable cation on the headgroup of gemini lipids on the lipoplex-type nanoaggregates directly formed from plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Datta, Sougata; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2013-11-11

    Lipoplex-type nanoaggregates prepared from pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and mixed liposomes, with a gemini cationic lipid (CL) [1,2-bis(hexadecyl imidazolium) alkanes], referred as (C16Im)2Cn (where Cn is the alkane spacer length, n = 2, 3, 5, or 12, between the imidazolium heads) and DOPE zwitterionic lipid, have been analyzed by zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, SAXS, cryo-TEM, fluorescence anisotropy, transfection efficiency, fluorescence confocal microscopy, and cell viability/cytotoxicity experiments to establish a structure-biological activity relationship. The study, carried out at several mixed liposome compositions, α, and effective charge ratios, ρeff, of the lipoplex, demonstrates that the transfection of pDNA using CLs initially requires the determination of the effective charge of both. The electrochemical study confirms that CLs with a delocalizable positive charge in their headgroups yield an effective positive charge that is 90% of their expected nominal one, while pDNA is compacted yielding an effective negative charge which is only 10-25% than that of the linear DNA. SAXS diffractograms show that lipoplexes formed by CLs with shorter spacer (n = 2, 3, or 5) present three lamellar structures, two of them in coexistence, while those formed by CL with longest spacer (n = 12) present two additional inverted hexagonal structures. Cryo-TEM micrographs show nanoaggregates with two multilamellar structures, a cluster-type (at low α value) and a fingerprint-type, that coexist with the cluster-type at moderate α composition. The optimized transfection efficiency (TE) of pDNA, in HEK293T, HeLa, and H1299 cells was higher using lipoplexes containing gemini CLs with shorter spacers at low α value. Each lipid formulation did not show any significant levels of toxicity, the reported lipoplexes being adequate DNA vectors for gene therapy and considerably better than both Lipofectamine 2000 and CLs of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl ammnoniun) alkane series, recently

  11. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies on the Multilamellae Formed by Mixing Lamella-Forming Cationic Diblock Copolymers with Lipids and Their Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Liu, I-Ting; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2016-02-23

    We demonstrate that the lamella-forming polystyrene-block-poly(N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodine) (PS-b-P4VPQ), with similar sizes of the PS and P4VPQ blocks, can be dispersed in the aqueous solutions by forming lipid/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-DPPC) in D2O, a broad correlation peak is found in the scattering profile that signifies the formation of the loosely ordered d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. The thicknesses of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are close to the PS layer and the condensed brush layer thicknesses as determined from previous neutron reflectometry studies on the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer at the air-water interface. Such well-dispersed d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are capable of forming multilamellae with DNA in aqueous solution. It is found that the encapsulation of DNA in the hydrophilic layer of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae slightly increases the thickness of the hydrophilic layer. Adding CaCl2 can enhance the DNA adsorption in the hydrophilic brush layer, and it is similar to that observed in the neutron reflectometry study of the DNA adsorption by the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer. PMID:26818185

  12. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes - An in vitro and in vivo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad ) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy.

  13. Lasing the DNA fragments through β-diketimine framed Knoevenagel condensed Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes--an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, Natarajan; Pravin, Narayanaperumal

    2014-01-24

    The syntheses, structures and spectroscopic properties of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes having Knoevenagel condensate β-diketimine Schiff base ligands have been investigated in this paper. Characterization of these complexes was carried out using FTIR, NMR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, mass and EPR techniques. Absorption titration, electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. Interaction of ligands and their complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Antimicrobial studies showed an effective antimicrobial activity of the metal ions after coordination with the ligands. The antioxidant properties of the Schiff base ligands and their complexes were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and H2O2 free radical scavengers. In vivo and in vitro antitumor functions of the complexes against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma tumor model have also been investigated. All the results support that β-diketone derived Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base complexes may act as novel antitumor drugs and suggest that their potent cell life inhibition may contribute to their anti-cancer efficacy. PMID:24161850

  14. Cationic Glycopolymers for the Delivery of pDNA to Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kizjakina, Karina; Bryson, Joshua M.; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Progenitor and pluripotent cell types offer promise as regenerative therapies but transfecting these sensitive cells has proven difficult. Herein, a series of linear trehalose-oligoethyleneamine “click” copolymers were synthesized and examined for their ability to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) to two progenitor cell types, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn) and rat mesenchymal stem cells (RMSC). Seven polymer vehicle analogs were synthesized in which three parameters were systematically varied: the number of secondary amines (4–6) within the polymer repeat unit (Tr433, Tr530, and Tr632), the end group functionalities [PEG (Tr4128PEG-a, Tr4118PEG-b), triphenyl (Tr4107-c), or azido (Tr499-d)], and the molecular weight (degree of polymerization of about 30 or about 100) and the biological efficacy of these vehicles was compared to three controls: Lipofectamine 2000, JetPEI, and Glycofect. The trehalose polymers were all able to bind and compact pDNA polyplexs, and promote pDNA uptake and gene expression [luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)] with these primary cell types and the results varied significantly depending on the polymer structure. Interestingly, in both cell types, Tr433 and Tr530 yielded the highest luciferase gene expression. However, when comparing the number of cells transfected with a reporter plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein, Tr433 and Tr4107-c yielded the highest number of HDFn cells positive for EGFP. Interestingly, with RMSC, all of the higher molecular weight analogs (Tr4128PEG-a, Tr4118PEG-b, Tr4107-c, Tr499-d) yielded high percentages of cells positive for EGFP (30–40%). PMID:22138032

  15. DNA binding of Pd(TC3), a conformable cationic porphyrin with a long-lived triplet state.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Srijana; Bork, Matthew A; Zhang, Hanyu; Fanwick, Phillip E; Zeller, Matthias; Choi, Jong Hyun; McMillin, David R

    2016-09-28

    The goal of this work has been to synthesize and investigate Pd(TC3), an intercalating porphyrin that has conformable substituents capable of groove binding to B-form DNA. (TC3 denotes the doubly deprotonated form of 5,10,15,20-tetra[3-(3'-methylimidazolium-1'-yl)prop-1-yl]porphyrin.) Palladium(ii) is an apt choice for the central metal ion because it remains strictly four-coordinate and provides for a luminescent triplet excited state with a long lifetime. The DNA hosts are hairpin-forming sequences programmed to differ in base composition. Luminescence, absorbance, and circular dichroism results are consistent with the idea that congruent structural reorganization takes place at the host and ligand during uptake. Photoexcitation of DNA-bound Pd(TC3) generates a comparatively modest steady state concentration of singlet oxygen, due to a relatively slow reaction with molecular oxygen in solution. The sheer size of the substituent groups disfavors quenching, but groove-binding interactions compound the problem by inhibiting mobility. The results show how ligand design affects adduct structure as well as function. PMID:27534907

  16. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM--the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution-is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures. PMID:26382433

  17. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM—the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution—is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures.

  18. Rab11 and Lysotracker Markers Reveal Correlation between Endosomal Pathways and Transfection Efficiency of Surface-Functionalized Cationic Liposome-DNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey N; Wonder, Emily; Ewert, Kai K; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Teesalu, Tambet; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-07-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are widely studied as carriers of DNA and short-interfering RNA for gene delivery and silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency (TE) requires understanding of CL-nucleic acid nanoparticle (NP) interactions with cells, NP endosomal pathways, endosomal escape, and events leading to release of active nucleic acid from the lipid carrier. Here, we studied endosomal pathways and TE of surface-functionalized CL-DNA NPs in PC-3 prostate cancer cells displaying overexpressed integrin and neuropilin-1 receptors. The NPs contained RGD-PEG-lipid or RPARPAR-PEG-lipid, targeting integrin, and neuropilin-1 receptors, respectively, or control PEG-lipid. Fluorescence colocalization using Rab11-GFP and Lysotracker enabled simultaneous colocalization of NPs with recycling endosome (Rab11) and late endosome/lysosome (Rab7/Lysotracker) pathways at increasing mole fractions of pentavalent MVL5 (+5 e) at low (10 mol %), high (50 mol %), and very high (70 mol %) membrane charge density (σM). For these cationic NPs (lipid/DNA molar charge ratio, ρchg = 5), the influence of membrane charge density on pathway selection and transfection efficiency is similar for both peptide-PEG NPs, although, quantitatively, the effect is larger for RGD-PEG compared to RPARPAR-PEG NPs. At low σM, peptide-PEG NPs show preference for the recycling endosome over the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Increases in σM, from low to high, lead to decreases in colocalization with recycling endosomes and simultaneous increases in colocalization with the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Combining colocalization and functional TE data at low and high σM shows that higher TE correlates with a larger fraction of NPs colocalized with the late endosome/lysosome pathway while lower TE correlates with a larger fraction of NPs colocalized with the Rab11 recycling pathway. The findings lead to a hypothesis that increases in σM, leading to enhanced

  19. Effects of pulling forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and viscosity on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection from bacteriophages to bacterial cells: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Douglas, Scott S.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we report on simulations of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ejection from bacteriophage ϕ29 into a bacterial cell. The ejection was studied with a coarse-grained model, in which viral dsDNA was represented by beads on a torsion-less string. The bacteriophage’s capsid and the bacterial cell were defined by sets of spherical constraints. To account for the effects of the viscous medium inside the bacterial cell, the simulations were carried out using a Langevin dynamics protocol. Our simplest simulations (involving constant viscosity and no external biasing forces) produced results compatible with the push-pull model of DNA ejection, with an ejection rate significantly higher in the first part of ejection than in the latter parts. Additionally, we performed more complicated simulations, in which we included additional factors such as external forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and ejection-dependent viscosity. The effects of these factors (independently and in combination) on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection were studied. We found that, in general, the dependence of ejection forces and ejection rates on the amount of DNA ejected becomes more complex if the ejection is modeled with a broader, more realistic set of parameters and influences (such as variation in the solvent’s viscosity and the application of an external force). However, certain combinations of factors and numerical parameters led to the opposition of some ejection-driving and ejection-inhibiting influences, ultimately causing an apparent simplification of the ejection profiles.

  20. Interaction of cationic porphyrins with DNA: Importance of the number and position of the charges and minimum structural requirements for intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, M.A.; Battioni, J.P.; Dupre, D.; Mansuy, D. ); Le Pecq, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-three porphyrins or metalloporphyrins corresponding to the general formula (meso-(N-methyl-4(or 3 or 2)-pyridiniumyl){sub n}(aryl){sub 4-n}porphyrin)M (M = H{sub 2}, Cu{sup II}, or ClFe{sup III}), with n = 2-4, have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These porphyrins differ not only in the number (2-4) and position of their cationic charges but also in the steric requirements to reach even temporarily a completely planar geometry. Interaction of these porphyrins or metalloporphyrins with calf thymus DNA has been studied and their apparent affinity binding constants have been determined by use of a competition method with ethidium bromide which was applicable not only for all the free base porphyrins but also for their copper (II) or iron (III) complexes. Whatever their mode of binding may be, their apparent affinity binding constants were relatively high and a linear decrease of log K{sub app} with the number of porphyrin charges was observed. Studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosimetry, and fluorescence energy transfer experiments showed that not only the tetracationic meso-tetrakis(N-methyl-4(or 3)-pyridiniumyl)porphyrins, which both involved four freely rotating meso-aryl groups, but also the corresponding tri- and dicationic porphyrins were able to intercalate into calf thymus DNA. These results show that only half of the porphyrin ring is necessary for intercalation to occur.

  1. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles with controlled loading of cationic dendrimer for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian-Tao; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Yi; Wang, Guan-Hai

    2014-09-01

    In this work, a series of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with predictable and adjustable cationic charge densities for gene delivery were designed, synthesized and characterized. The ‘clickable’ MSNs with controlled and randomly distributed azide groups were synthesized by co-condensation method, and PAMAM dendrimer was conjugated to MSNs via quantitative click modification. The structures of PAMAM-functionalized MSNs were characterized by FTIR, XRD and TEM analyses. Dendrimer-functionalized MSNs formed complexes with plasmid DNA (pDNA), and the complexes were successfully transfected into human kidney cell 293 T. The in vitro cytotoxicity and gene transfection efficacy were also investigated.

  2. Single-Molecule Kinetics Reveal Cation-Promoted DNA Duplex Formation Through Ordering of Single-Stranded Helices

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the kinetics of short, fully complementary oligonucleotides are investigated at the single-molecule level. Constructs 6–9 bp in length exhibit single exponential kinetics over 2 orders of magnitude time for both forward (kon, association) and reverse (koff, dissociation) processes. Bimolecular rate constants for association are weakly sensitive to the number of basepairs in the duplex, with a 2.5-fold increase between 9 bp (k′on = 2.1(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) and 6 bp (k′on = 5.0(1) × 106 M−1 s−1) sequences. In sharp contrast, however, dissociation rate constants prove to be exponentially sensitive to sequence length, varying by nearly 600-fold over the same 9 bp (koff = 0.024 s−1) to 6 bp (koff = 14 s−1) range. The 8 bp sequence is explored in more detail, and the NaCl dependence of kon and koff is measured. Interestingly, konincreases by >40-fold (kon = 0.10(1) s−1 to 4.0(4) s−1 between [NaCl] = 25 mM and 1 M), whereas in contrast, koffdecreases by fourfold (0.72(3) s−1 to 0.17(7) s−1) over the same range of conditions. Thus, the equilibrium constant (Keq) increases by ≈160, largely due to changes in the association rate, kon. Finally, temperature-dependent measurements reveal that increased [NaCl] reduces the overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) of duplex formation, albeit by an amount smaller than the reduction in entropic penalty (−TΔΔS° < 0). This reduced entropic cost is attributed to a cation-facilitated preordering of the two single-stranded species, which lowers the association free-energy barrier and in turn accelerates the rate of duplex formation. PMID:23931323

  3. Interaction of cationic porphyrins with DNA: importance of the number and position of the charges and minimum structural requirements for intercalation.

    PubMed

    Sari, M A; Battioni, J P; Dupré, D; Mansuy, D; Le Pecq, J B

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-three porphyrins or metalloporphyrins corresponding to the general formula [meso-[N-methyl-4(or 3 or 2)-pyridiniumyl]n(aryl)4-nporphyrin]M (M = H2, CuII, or ClFeIII), with n = 2-4, have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible and 1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These porphyrins differ not only in the number (2-4) and position of their cationic charges but also in the steric requirements to reach even temporarily a completely planar geometry. In particular, they contain 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 meso-aryl substituents not able to rotate. Interaction of these porphyrins or metalloporphyrins with calf thymus DNA has been studied and their apparent affinity binding constants have been determined by use of a competition method with ethidium bromide which was applicable not only for all the free base porphyrins but also for their copper(II) or iron(III) complexes. Whatever their mode of binding may be, their apparent affinity binding constants were relatively high (Kapp between 1.2 x 10(7) and 5 x 10(4) M-1 under our conditions), and a linear decrease of log Kapp with the number of porphyrin charges was observed. Studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosimetry, and fluorescence energy transfer experiments showed that not only the tetracationic meso-tetrakis[N-methyl-4(or 3)-pyridiniumyl]porphyrins, which both involved four freely rotating meso-aryl groups, but also the corresponding tri- and dicationic porphyrins were able to intercalate into calf thymus DNA. Moreover, the cis dicationic meso-bis(N-methyl-2-pyridiniumyl)diphenylporphyrin, which involved only two freely rotating meso-aryl groups in a cis position, was also able to intercalate. The other meso-(N-methyl-2-pyridiniumyl)n(phenyl)4-nporphyrins, which involved either zero, one, or two trans freely rotating meso-aryl groups, could not intercalate into DNA. These results show that only half of the porphyrin ring is necessary for intercalation to occur

  4. DNA methylation is associated with downregulation of the organic cation transporter OCT1 (SLC22A1) in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Organic cation transporters (OCTs) determine not only physiological processes but are also involved in the cellular uptake of anticancer agents. Based on microarray analyses in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), SLC22A1/OCT1 mRNA seems to be downregulated, but systematic protein expression data are currently missing. Moreover, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for altered SLC22A1 expression in HCC are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of DNA methylation in the transcriptional regulation of the family members SLC22A1/OCT1, SLC22A2/OCT2 and SLC22A3/OCT3 in HCC. Methods Semiquantitative immunohistochemistry of SLC22A1 protein expression was performed in paired HCC and histological normal adjacent liver tissues (n = 71) using tissue microarray analyses, and the results were correlated with clinicopathological features. DNA methylation, quantified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gene expression of SLC22A1, SLC22A2 and SLC22A3 were investigated using fresh-frozen HCC (n = 22) and non-tumor adjacent liver tissues as well as histologically normal liver samples (n = 120) from a large-scale liverbank. Results Based on tissue microarray analyses, we observed a significant downregulation of SLC22A1 protein expression in HCC compared to normal adjacent tissue (P < 0.0001). SLC22A1 expression was significantly inverse correlated with expression of the proliferation marker MIB1/Ki-67 (rs = -0.464, P < 0.0001). DNA methylation of SLC22A1 was significantly higher in HCC compared with non-tumor adjacent liver tissue and was lowest in histologically normal liver tissue. Methylation levels for SLC22A1 in combination with RASSF1A resulted in a specificity of > 90% and a sensitivity of 82% for discriminating HCC and tumor-free liver tissue. Conclusions DNA methylation of SLC22A1 is associated with downregulation of SLC22A1 in HCC and might be a new biomarker for HCC diagnosis and prognosis. Moreover, targeting SLC22A1 methylation by

  5. DNA conformational behavior and compaction in biomimetic systems: Toward better understanding of DNA packaging in cell.

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, Anatoly

    2016-06-01

    In a living cell, long genomic DNA is strongly compacted and exists in the environment characterized by a dense macromolecular crowding, high concentrations of mono- and divalent cations, and confinement of ca. 10μm size surrounded by a phospholipid membrane. Experimental modelling of such complex biological system is challenging but important to understand spatiotemporal dynamics and functions of the DNA in cell. The accumulated knowledge about DNA condensation/compaction in conditions resembling those in the real cell can be eventually used to design and construct partly functional "artificial cells" having potential applications in drug delivery systems, gene therapy, and production of synthetic cells. In this review, I would like to overview the past progress in our understanding of the DNA conformational behavior and, in particular, DNA condensation/compaction phenomenon and its relation to the DNA biological activity. This understanding was gained by designing relevant experimental models mimicking DNA behavior in the environment of living cell. Starting with a brief summary of classic experimental systems to study DNA condensation/compaction, in later parts, I highlight recent experimental methodologies to address the effects of macromolecular crowding and nanoscale and microscale confinements on DNA conformation dynamics. All the studies are discussed in the light of their relevance to DNA behavior in living cells, and future prospects of the field are outlined. PMID:26976700

  6. Localization of a hole on an adenine-thymine radical cation in B-form DNA in water.

    PubMed

    Kravec, S M; Kinz-Thompson, C D; Conwell, E M

    2011-05-19

    A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out using CP2K for a hole introduced into a B-form DNA molecule consisting of 10 adenine-thymine (A/T) pairs in water. At the beginning of the simulation, the hole wave function is extended over several adenines. Within 20-25 fs, the hole wave function contracts so that it is localized on a single A. At 300 K, it stays on this A for the length of the simulation, several hundred fs, with the wave function little changed. In a range of temperatures below 300 K, proton transfer from A to T is seen to take place within the A/T occupied by the hole; it is completed by ∼40 fs after the contraction. We show that the contraction is due to polarization of the water by the hole. This polarization also plays a role in the proton transfer. Implications for transport are considered. PMID:21491917

  7. Reactions of 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in DNA and model systems: thermal deprotonation from the 5-methyl group vs. excited state deprotonation from sugar

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Palmer, Brian J.; Todd, Andrew D.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the formation and subsequent reactions of the 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine cation radical (5-Me-2′-dC•+) in nucleosides and DNA-oligomers and compare to one electron oxidized thymidine. Materials and methods Employing electron spin resonance (ESR), cation radical formation and its reactions were investigated in 5-Me-2′-dC, thymidine (Thd) and their derivatives, in fully double stranded (ds) d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and in the 5-Me-C/A mismatched, d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], where C* = 5-Me-C. Results We report 5-Me-2′-dC•+ production by one-electron oxidation of 5-Me-2′-dC by Cl2•− via annealing in the dark at 155 K. Progressive annealing of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ at 155 K produces the allylic radical (C-CH2•). However, photoexcitation of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ by 405 nm laser or by photoflood lamp leads to only C3′• formation. Photoexcitation of N3-deprotonated thyminyl radical in Thd and its 5′-nucleotides leads to C3′• formation but not in 3′-TMP which resulted in the allylic radical (U-CH2•) and C5′• production. For excited 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, absence of the 3′-OH group does not prevent C3′• formation. For d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], intra-base paired proton transferred form of G cation radical (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) is found with no observable 5-Me-2′-dC•+ formation. Photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 produced only C1′• and not the expected photoproducts from 5-Me-2′-dC•+. However, photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG] led to C5′• and C1′• formation. Conclusions C-CH2• formation from 5-Me-2′-dC•+ occurs via ground state deprotonation from C5-methyl group on the base. In the excited 5-Me-2′-dC•+ and 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, spin and charge localization at C3′ followed by deprotonation leads to C3′• formation. Thus, deprotonation from C3′ in the excited cation radical is kinetically controlled and sugar C-H bond energies are

  8. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byeng R.; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats. PMID:24669219

  9. Formulation of highly functionalizable DNA nanoparticles based on 1,2-dithiolane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Charrat, Coralie; Biscotti, Anaïs; Godeau, Guilhem; Greiner, Jacques; Vierling, Pierre; Guigonis, Jean-Marie; Di Giorgio, Christophe

    2015-03-23

    We describe the formulation of synthetic virus models based on ionic compounds bearing the polymerizable 1,2-dithiolane moiety. First, cationic amphiphiles containing the polymeric inducer were prepared and used to efficiently condense a DNA plasmid (pDNA) into a highly monodisperse population of small polymeric cationic DNA nanoparticles (NPs; Dh ∼100 nm). These nonspecific cationic particles were then functionalized with anionic PEGylated conjugates, also based on the 1,2-dithiolane motifs, in order to produce stable and fully dispersible stealth DNA nanoparticles. Our results show that both ionic interactions and polymerization based on the 1,2-dithiolane pattern occur and that they produce highly functionalizable nonviral DNA NPs. PMID:25689838

  10. Direct real-time molecular scale visualisation of the degradation of condensed DNA complexes exposed to DNase I

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhady, Hosam G.; Allen, Stephanie; Davies, Martyn C.; Roberts, Clive J.; Tendler, Saul J. B.; Williams, Philip M.

    2003-01-01

    The need to protect DNA from in vivo degradation is one of the basic tenets of therapeutic gene delivery and a standard test for any proposed delivery vector. The currently employed in vitro tests, however, presently provide no direct link between the molecular structure of the vector complexes and their success in this role, thus hindering the rational design of successful gene delivery agents. Here we apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid to visualise at the molecular scale and in real time, the effect of DNase I on generation 4 polyamidoamine dendrimers (G4) complexed with DNA. These complexes are revealed to be dynamic in nature showing a degree of mobility, in some cases revealing the addition and loss of dendrimers to individual complexes. The formation of the G4–DNA complexes is observed to provide a degree of protection to the DNA. This protection is related to the structural morphology of the formed complex, which is itself shown to be dependent on the dendrimer loading and the time allowed for complex formation. PMID:12853616

  11. MIDGET Unravels Functions of the Arabidopsis Topoisomerase VI Complex in DNA Endoreduplication, Chromatin Condensation, and Transcriptional Silencing[W

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Viktor; Schrader, Andrea; Uhrig, Joachim F.; Hulskamp, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The plant homologs of the archaeal DNA topoisomerase VI complex are required for the progression of endoreduplication cycles. Here, we describe the identification of MIDGET (MID) as a novel component of topoisomerase VI. We show that mid mutants show the same phenotype as rhl1, rhl2, and top6B mutants and that MID protein physically interacts with RHL1. The phenotypic analysis revealed new phenotypes, indicating that topoisomerase VI is involved in chromatin organization and transcriptional silencing. In addition, genetic evidence is provided suggesting that the ATR-dependent DNA damage repair checkpoint is activated in mid mutants, and CYCB1;1 is ectopically activated. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of CYCB1;2 can rescue the endoreduplication defects in mid mutants, suggesting that in mid mutants, a specific checkpoint is activated preventing further progression of endoreduplication cycles. PMID:17951446

  12. Electrostatic theory of the assembly of PAMAM dendrimers and DNA.

    PubMed

    Perico, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    The electrostatic interactions mediated by counterions between a cationic PAMAM dendrimer, modelized as a sphere of radius and cationic surface charge highly increasing with generation, and a DNA, modelized as an anionic elastic line, are analytically calculated in the framework of condensation theory. Under these interactions the DNA is wrapped around the sphere. For excess phosphates relative to dendrimer primary amines, the free energy of the DNA-dendrimer complex displays an absolute minimum when the complex is weakly negatively overcharged. This overcharging opposes gene delivery. For a highly positive dendrimer and a DNA fixed by experimental conditions to a number of phosphates less than the number of dendrimer primary amines, excess amine charges, the dendrimer may at the same time bind stably DNA and interact with negative cell membranes to activate cell transfection in fair agreement with molecular simulations and experiments. PMID:26756793

  13. An efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector based on hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Ren, Xianyue; Liu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Yingliang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Jingnan; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, David YB; Quan, Daping; Yang, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives as an efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector. Methods A series of hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine (DMAPA-Glyp) and 1-(2-aminoethyl) piperazine (AEPZ-Glyp) residues were synthesized and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Their buffer capacity was assessed by acid–base titration in aqueous NaCl solution. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (pDNA) condensation ability and protection against DNase I degradation of the glycogen derivatives were assessed using agarose gel electrophoresis. The zeta potentials and particle sizes of the glycogen derivative/pDNA complexes were measured, and the images of the complexes were observed using atomic force microscopy. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity were evaluated by hemolysis assay and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, respectively. pDNA transfection efficiency mediated by the cationic glycogen derivatives was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy in the 293T (human embryonic kidney) and the CNE2 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma) cell lines. In vivo delivery of pDNA in model animals (Sprague Dawley rats) was evaluated to identify the safety and transfection efficiency. Results The hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with DMAPA and AEPZ residues were synthesized. They exhibited better blood compatibility and lower cytotoxicity when compared to branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI). They were able to bind and condense pDNA to form the complexes of 100–250 nm in size. The transfection efficiency of the DMAPA-Glyp/pDNA complexes was higher than those of the AEPZ-Glyp/pDNA complexes in both the 293T and CNE2 cells, and almost equal to those of bPEI. Furthermore, pDNA could be more safely delivered to the blood vessels in brain

  14. Gene Delivery from Supercharged Coiled-coil Protein and Cationic Lipid Hybrid Complex

    PubMed Central

    More, Haresh T.; Frezzo, Joseph A.; Dai, Jisen; Yamano, Seiichi; Montclare, Jin K.

    2014-01-01

    A lipoproteoplex comprised of an engineered supercharged coiled-coil protein (CSP) bearing multiple arginines and the cationic lipid formulation FuGENE HD (FG) was developed for effective condensation and delivery of nucleic acids. The CSP was able to maintain helical structure and self-assembly properties while exhibiting binding to plasmid DNA. The ternary CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex complex demonstrated enhanced transfection of β-galactosidase DNA into MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts. The lipoproteoplexes showed significant increases in transfection efficiency when compared to conventional FG and an mTat•FG lipopolyplex with a 6- and 2.5-fold increase in transfection, respectively. The CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex assembled into spherical particles with a net positive surface charge, enabling efficient gene delivery. These results support the application of lipoproteoplexes with protein engineered CSP for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:24875765

  15. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  16. MD and NMR analyses of choline and TMA binding to duplex DNA: on the origins of aberrant sequence-dependent stability by alkyl cations in aqueous and water-free solvents.

    PubMed

    Portella, Guillem; Germann, Markus W; Hud, Nicholas V; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-02-26

    It has been known for decades that alkylammonium ions, such as tetramethyl ammonium (TMA), alter the usual correlation between DNA GC-content and duplex stability. In some cases it is even possible for an AT-rich duplex to be more stable than a GC-rich duplex of the same length. There has been much speculation regarding the origin of this aberration in sequence-dependent DNA duplex stability, but no clear resolution. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy we demonstrate that choline (2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium) and TMA are preferentially localized in the minor groove of DNA duplexes at A·T base pairs and these same ions show less pronounced localization in the major groove compared to what has been demonstrated for alkali and alkali earth metal ions. Furthermore, free energy calculations show that single-stranded GC-rich sequences exhibit more favorable solvation by choline than single-stranded AT-rich sequences. The sequence-specific nature of choline and TMA binding provides a rationale for the enhanced stability of AT-rich sequences when alkyl-ammonium ions are used as the counterions of DNA. Our combined theoretical and experimental study provides one of the most detailed pictures to date of cations localized along DNA in the solution state, and provides insights that go beyond understanding alkyl-ammonium ion binding to DNA. In particular, because choline and TMA bind to DNA in a manner that is found to be distinct from that previously reported for Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), our results reveal the important but underappreciated role that most other cations play in sequence-specific duplex stability. PMID:24490755

  17. A novel method for detecting apoptosis shows that hepatocytes undergo a time dependent increase in DNA cleavage and chromatin condensation which is augmented after TGF-beta 1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Cain, K; Inayat-Hussain, S H; Couet, C; Qin, H M; Oberhammer, F A

    1996-04-01

    This study describes a new method for quantitating apoptosis in hepatocyte monolayers in which nuclei were isolated from the cells and DNA strand breaks detected by in situ end-labeling and flow cytometry. Most (97%) nuclei from untreated hepatocytes had low end-labelling and were derived from non-apoptotic cells. Approximately 2-3% of the nuclei had high end-labelling and originated from apoptotic hepatocytes. The numbers of these nuclei increased linearly from 3 to 85% between 0 and 48 h after treatment with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). However, a morphological assessment of apoptosis with Hoechst H33258 showed that the proportion of apoptotic nuclei plateaued at 18-19% between 24 and 48 h after TGF-beta 1 treatment. Thus, the in situ end-labeling technique also detected DNA cleavage in nuclei which did not have an obvious apoptotic morphology. Confocal microscopy of low and high end-labelled nuclei which had been separated by fluorescent cell sorting showed that nuclei with high levels of end-labeling exhibited a wide diversity of morphologies. These included nuclei with little or no chromatin condensation and nuclei with characteristic apoptotic morphology. In addition, nuclei from untreated hepatocytes contained low levels of DNA cleavage, which were localized in areas of condensed chromatin and increased according to the time in culture. Thus, hepatocytes undergo a progressive and cumulative process of DNA cleavage/chromatin condensation which is markedly enhanced by TGF-beta 1. PMID:8900474

  18. Surface Charge Density Determines the Efficiency of Cationic Gemini Surfactant Based Lipofection

    PubMed Central

    Ryhänen, Samppa J.; Säily, Matti J.; Paukku, Tommi; Borocci, Stefano; Mancini, Giovanna; Holopainen, Juha M.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficiencies of the binary liposomes composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and cationic gemini surfactant, (2S,3R)-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-bis(N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium)butane dibromide as transfection vectors, were measured using the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding plasmid and COS-1 cells. Strong correlation between the transfection efficiency and lipid stoichiometry was observed. Accordingly, liposomes with XSR−1 ≥ 0.50 conveyed the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding plasmid effectively into cells. The condensation of DNA by liposomes with XSR−1 > 0.50 was indicated by static light scattering and ethidium bromide intercalation assay, whereas differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene revealed stoichiometry dependent reorganization in the headgroup region of the liposome bilayer, in alignment with our previous Langmuir-balance study. Surface charge density and the organization of positive charges appear to determine the mode of interaction of DNA with (2S,3R)-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-bis(N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium)butane dibromide/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, only resulting in DNA condensation when XSR−1 > 0.50. Condensation of DNA in turn seems to be required for efficient transfection. PMID:12524311

  19. Quantitative study of effects of free cationic chains on gene transfection in different intracellular stages.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinge; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Yanjing; Jin, Zhenyu; Jin, Fan; Wu, Chi

    2016-09-28

    Previously, we revealed that in the application of using cationic polymer chains, polyethylenimine (PEI), to condense anionic plasmid DNA chains (pDNA) to form the DNA/polymer polyplexes, after all the pDNAs are complexed with PEI, further added PEIs exist individual chains and free in the solution mixture. It is those uncomplexed polycation chains that dramatically promote the gene transfection. In the current study, we studied how those free cationic chains with different lengths and topologies affect the intracellular trafficking of the polyplexes, the translocation of pDNA through the nuclear membrane, the transcription of pDNA to mRNA and the translocation of mRNA from nucleus to cytosol in HepG2 cells by using a combination of the three-dimensional confocal microscope and TaqMan real-time PCR. We found that free branched PEI chains with a molar mass of 25,000g/mol and a total concentration of 1.8×10(-6)g/mL promote the overall gene transfection efficiency by a factor of ~500 times. Our results quantitatively reveal that free chains help little in the cellular uptake, but clearly reduce the lysosomal entrapment of those internalized polyplexes (2-3 folds); assist the translocation of pDNA through nuclear membrane after it is released from the polyplexes in the cytosol (~5 folds); enhance the pDNA-to-mRNA transcription efficiency (~4 folds); and facilitate the nucleus-to-cytosol translocation of mRNA (7-8 folds). The total enhancement of those steps agrees well with the overall efficiency, demonstrating, for the first time, how free cationic polymer chains quantitatively promote the gene transfection in each step in the intracellular space. PMID:27448443

  20. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  1. A cationic poly(2-oxazoline) with high in vitro transfection efficiency identified by a library approach.

    PubMed

    Rinkenauer, Alexandra C; Tauhardt, Lutz; Wendler, Felix; Kempe, Kristian; Gottschaldt, Michael; Traeger, Anja; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-03-01

    To date, cationic polymers with high transfection efficiencies (TE) often have a high cytotoxicity. By screening an 18-membered library of cationic 2-oxazoline-based polymers, a polymer with similar TE as linear poly(ethylene imine) but no detectable cytotoxicity at the investigated concentrations could be identified. The influence of the polymer side chain hydrophobicity and the type and content of amino groups on the pDNA condensation, the TE, the cytotoxicity, the cellular membrane interaction as well as the size, charge, and stability of the polyplexes was studied. Primary amines and an amine content of at least 40% were required for an efficient TE. While polymers with short side chains were non-toxic up to an amine content of 40%, long hydrophobic side chains induced a high cytotoxicity. PMID:25403084

  2. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  3. In vitro studies of the genotoxic effects of bitumen and coal-tar fume condensates: comparison of data obtained by mutagenicity testing and DNA adduct analysis by 32P-postlabelling.

    PubMed

    De Méo, M; Genevois, C; Brandt, H; Laget, M; Bartsch, H; Castegnaro, M

    1996-08-14

    Bitumens contain traces of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), a part of which will end up in the fumes emitted during hot handling of bitumen-containing products, e.g. during roadpaving. Although exposure of workers to these fumes is low, it might lead to health problems. Studies on bitumen fume condensates (BFCs) showed weak to moderate mutagenic activities, but studies on DNA adduct formation have not been reported. Therefore, a study was initiated in which fumes were generated from two road grade bitumens, in such a way that they were representative of the fumes produced in the field. The combined vapour/particulates were tested in vitro for their ability to produce DNA adducts and in modified Ames mutation assays, using a number of different strains. An attempt was made to relate the results to chemical data, such as the content of a number of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and with a measure for the total PAC content. As a reference material fume condensate from coal-tar (coal-tar pitch volatiles; CTPV) were subjected to the same tests. All fume condensates tested were mutagenic to all strains and induced the formation of DNA adducts. The patterns of DNA adducts, obtained by 32P-postlabelling, arising from the BFCs were qualitatively different from the patterns of adducts obtained from the CTPVs, implying qualitative differences in the nature of the compounds responsible for the formation of these adducts. This is corroborated by the observation that for BFCs quantitative adduct levels are higher than would be expected based on the PAH content. These data thus indicate that the PAHs analysed are not the sole components responsible for adduct formation from BFCs, but that an important contribution comes from other (hetero- and/or substituted-) PACs. PMID:8760390

  4. DNA incision evaluation, binding investigation and biocidal screening of novel metallonucleases of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione based Knoevenagel condensate having methionine: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Raman, Natarajan

    2015-02-01

    Four new metallonucleases of the composition [MLCl] (where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Co(II); L = Knoevenagel condensate Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione with p-nitrobenzaldehyde and methionine amino acid) have been synthesised and characterized thoroughly by microanalytical data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity, UV-Vis., IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EPR spectral techniques. Their geometry is investigated and established to have square planar geometry. Electronic absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements reveal that the complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via an intercalation mechanism. DNA cleavage efficiency of these complexes is explored by gel electrophoresis, and they are found to endorse the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. These results reveal that all the complexes show better nuclease activity. Moreover, the biological screening against few pathogens reveals that that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligand.

  5. Versatile Types of MRI-Visible Cationic Nanoparticles Involving Pullulan Polysaccharides for Multifunctional Gene Carriers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yajun; Hu, Hao; Li, Rui-Quan; Yu, Bingran; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-02-17

    Owing to the low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, polysaccharides are good candidates for the development of promising biomaterials. In this paper, a series of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible cationic polymeric nanoparticles involving liver cell-targeting polysaccharides were flexibly designed for multifunctional gene delivery systems. The pullulan-based vector (PuPGEA) consisting of one liver cell-targeting pullulan backbone and ethanolamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (denoted by BUCT-PGEA) side chains with abundant hydroxyl units and secondary amine was first prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization. The resultant cationic nanoparticles (PuPGEA-GdL or PuPGEA-GdW) with MRI functions were produced accordingly by assembling PuPGEA with aminophenylboronic acid-modified Gd-DTPA (GdL) or GdW10O36(9-) (GdW) via the corresponding etherification or electrostatic interaction. The properties of the PuPGEA-GdL and PuPGEA-GdW nanoparticles including pDNA condensation ability, cytotoxicity, gene transfection, cellular uptake, and in vitro and in vivo MRI were characterized in details. Such kinds of cationic nanoparticles exhibited good performances in gene transfection in liver cells. PuPGEA-GdW demonstrated much better MRI abilities. The present design of PuPGEA-based cationic nanoparticles with the liver cell-targeting polysaccharides and MRI contrast agents would shed light on the exploration of tumor-targetable multifunctional gene delivery systems. PMID:26841955

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies on the DNA-binding of cationic yttrium(III) complex containing 2,2‧-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Akbari, Alireza; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of DNA with [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3, where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine has been studied at physiological pH in Tris-HCl buffer. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy, agarose gel electrophoresis as well as EB quenching experiments are used to study DNA binding of the complex. The results reveal that DNA have the strong ability to bind with Y(III) complex. The binding constant, Kb and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV are determined. For characterization of the binding mode between the Y(III) complex and DNA various procedures such as: iodide quenching assay, salt effect and thermodynamical investigation are used. The results suggest that minor groove binding should be the interaction mode of complex to DNA. A gel electrophoresis assay demonstrates the ability of the complex to cleave the DNA via oxidative pathway. Electronic structure of [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3 was also carried out applying the density functional theory (DFT) method and applied to explain some obtained experimental observations.

  7. On the phase diagram of reentrant condensation in polyelectrolyte-liposome complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennato, S.; Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.

    2004-09-01

    Complexation of polyions with oppositely charged spherical liposomes has been investigated by means of dynamic light scattering measurements and a well-defined reentrant condensation has been observed. The phase diagram of charge inversion, recently derived [T. T. Nguyen and B. I. Shklovskii, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 7298 (2001)] for the complexation of DNA with charged spherical macroions, has been employed in order to define the boundaries of the region where polyion-liposome complexes begin to condense, forming larger aggregates, and where aggregates dissolve again, towards isolated polyion-coated-liposome complexes. A reasonable good agreement is observed in the case of complexes formed by negatively charged polyacrylate sodium salt polyions and liposomes built up by cationic lipids (dioleoyltrimethylammoniumpropane), in an extended liposome concentration range.

  8. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  9. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  10. Effect of lipid composition on the structure and theoretical phase diagrams of DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA lipoplexes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ubeda, Mónica; Rodríguez-Pulido, Alberto; Nogales, Aurora; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Aicart, Emilio; Junquera, Elena

    2010-12-13

    Lipoplexes constituted by calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and mixed cationic liposomes consisting of varying proportions of the cationic lipid 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]cholesterol hydrochloride (DC-Chol) and the zwitterionic lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoetanolamine (DOPE) have been analyzed by means of electrophoretic mobility, SAXS, and fluorescence anisotropy experiments, as well as by theoretically calculated phase diagrams. Both experimental and theoretical studies have been run at several liposome and lipoplex compositions, defined in terms of cationic lipid molar fraction, α, and either the mass or charge ratios of the lipoplex, respectively. The experimental electrochemical results indicate that DC-Chol/DOPE liposomes, with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of around (120 ± 10) nm, compact and condense DNA fragments at their cationic surfaces by means of a strong entropically driven electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the positive charges of cationic liposomes are compensated by the negative charges of DNA phosphate groups at the isoneutrality L/D ratio, (L/D)(ϕ), which decreases with the cationic lipid content of the mixed liposome, for a given DNA concentration. This inversion of sign process has been also studied by means of the phase diagrams calculated with the theoretical model, which confirms all the experimental results. SAXS diffractograms, run at several lipoplex compositions, reveal that, irrespectively of the lipoplex charge ratio, DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA lipoplexes show a lamellar structure, L(α), when the cationic lipid content on the mixed liposomes α ≥ 0.4, while for a lower content (α = 0.2) the lipoplexes show an inverted hexagonal structure, H(II), usually related with improved cell transfection efficiency. A similar conclusion is reached from fluorescence anisotropy results, which indicate that the fluidity on liposome and lipoplexes membrane, also related with better transfection results, increases as long as the