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Sample records for cation diffusion facilitator

  1. Cation Diffusion Facilitator family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Russell, David; Hayes, Kevin A; Pembroke, J Tony; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2015-05-22

    The Cation Diffusion Facilitators (CDFs) form a family of membrane-bound proteins capable of transporting zinc and other heavy metal ions. Involved in metal tolerance/resistance by efflux of ions, CDF proteins share a two-modular architecture consisting of a transmembrane domain (TMD) and C-terminal domain (CTD) that protrudes into the cytoplasm. Discovery of a Zn²⁺ and Cd²⁺ CDF transporter from a marine bacterium Maricaulis maris that does not possess the CTD questions current perceptions regarding this family of proteins. This article describes a new, CTD-lacking subfamily of CDFs and our current knowledge about this family of proteins in the view of these findings. PMID:25896018

  2. Cation Diffusion Facilitators Transport Initiation and Regulation Is Mediated by Cation Induced Conformational Changes of the Cytoplasmic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michal; Davidov, Geula; Baram, Michal; Raschdorf, Oliver; Nadav-Tsubery, Merav; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Bitton, Ronit; Goobes, Gil; Friedler, Assaf; Miller, Yifat; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are part of a highly conserved protein family that maintains cellular divalent cation homeostasis in all domains of life. CDF's were shown to be involved in several human diseases, such as Type-II diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we employed a multi-disciplinary approach to study the activation mechanism of the CDF protein family. For this we used MamM, one of the main ion transporters of magnetosomes – bacterial organelles that enable magnetotactic bacteria to orientate along geomagnetic fields. Our results reveal that the cytosolic domain of MamM forms a stable dimer that undergoes distinct conformational changes upon divalent cation binding. MamM conformational change is associated with three metal binding sites that were identified and characterized. Altogether, our results provide a novel auto-regulation mode of action model in which the cytosolic domain's conformational changes upon ligand binding allows the priming of the CDF into its transport mode. PMID:24658343

  3. Structure and evolution of the plant cation diffusion facilitator family of ion transporters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Members of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family are integral membrane divalent cation transporters that transport metal ions out of the cytoplasm either into the extracellular space or into internal compartments such as the vacuole. The spectrum of cations known to be transported by proteins of the CDF family include Zn, Fe, Co, Cd, and Mn. Members of this family have been identified in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and archaea, and in sequenced plant genomes. CDF families range in size from nine members in Selaginella moellendorffii to 19 members in Populus trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the CDF family has expanded within plants, but a definitive plant CDF family phylogeny has not been constructed. Results Representative CDF members were annotated from diverse genomes across the Viridiplantae and Rhodophyta lineages and used to identify phylogenetic relationships within the CDF family. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CDF amino acid sequence data supports organizing land plant CDF family sequences into 7 groups. The origin of the 7 groups predates the emergence of land plants. Among these, 5 of the 7 groups are likely to have originated at the base of the tree of life, and 2 of 7 groups appear to be derived from a duplication event prior to or coincident with land plant evolution. Within land plants, local expansion continues within select groups, while several groups are strictly maintained as one gene copy per genome. Conclusions Defining the CDF gene family phylogeny contributes to our understanding of this family in several ways. First, when embarking upon functional studies of the members, defining primary groups improves the predictive power of functional assignment of orthologous/paralogous genes and aids in hypothesis generation. Second, defining groups will allow a group-specific sequence motif to be generated that will help define future CDF family sequences and aid in functional motif identification, which currently is

  4. Mn tolerance in rice is mediated by MTP8.1, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator family

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Daisei

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but is toxic when present in excess. The rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) accumulates high concentrations of Mn in the aerial parts; however, the molecular basis for Mn tolerance is poorly understood. In the present study, genes encoding Mn tolerance were screened for by expressing cDNAs of genes from rice shoots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A gene encoding a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family member, OsMTP8.1, was isolated, and its expression was found to enhance Mn accumulation and tolerance in S. cerevisiae. In plants, OsMTP8.1 and its transcript were mainly detected in shoots. High or low supply of Mn moderately induced an increase or decrease in the accumulation of OsMTP8.1, respectively. OsMTP8.1 was detected in all cells of leaf blades through immunohistochemistry. OsMTP8.1 fused to green fluorescent protein was localized to the tonoplast. Disruption of OsMTP8.1 resulted in decreased chlorophyll levels, growth inhibition in the presence of high concentrations of Mn, and decreased accumulation of Mn in shoots and roots. However, there was no difference in the accumulation of other metals, including Zn, Cu, Fe, Mg, Ca, and K. These results suggest that OsMTP8.1 is an Mn-specific transporter that sequesters Mn into vacuoles in rice and is required for Mn tolerance in shoots. PMID:23963678

  5. Heterologous production and functional and thermodynamic characterization of cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) transporters of mesophilic and hyperthermophilic origin.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Devrishi; Kaur, Jagdeep; Surade, Sachin; Grell, Ernst; Michel, Hartmut

    2012-07-01

    The members of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family transport heavy metal ions and play an important function in zinc ion homeostasis of the cell. A recent structure of an Escherichia coli CDF transporter protein YiiP has revealed its dimeric nature and autoregulatory zinc transport mechanism. Here, we report the cloning and heterologous production of four different CDF transporters, two each from the pathogenic mesophilic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium and from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in E. coli host cells. STM0758 of S. typhimurium was able to restore resistance to zinc ions when tested by complementation assays in the zinc-sensitive GG48 strain. Furthermore, copurification of bicistronically produced STM0758 and cross-linking experiments with the purified protein have revealed its possible oligomeric nature. The interaction between heavy metal ions and Aq_2073 of A. aeolicus was investigated by titration calorimetry. The entropy-driven, high-affinity binding of two Cd2+ and two Zn2+ per protein monomer with Kd values of around 100 nm and 1 μm, respectively, was observed. In addition, at least one more Zn2+ can be bound per monomer with low affinity. This low-affinity site is likely to possess a functional role contributing to Zn2+ transport across membranes. PMID:22944666

  6. Functional analysis of two genes coding for distinct cation diffusion facilitators of the ectomycorrhizal Zn-accumulating fungus Russula atropurpurea.

    PubMed

    Sácký, Jan; Leonhardt, Tereza; Kotrba, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Russula atropurpurea can accumulate remarkably high concentrations of Zn in its sporocarps. We have previously demonstrated that 40 % of the intracellular Zn in this species is sequestered by MT-like RaZBP peptides. To see what other mechanisms for the handling of the accumulated Zn are available to R. atropurpurea, we searched its transcriptome for cDNAs coding for transporters of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family. The transcriptome search enabled us to identify RaCDF1 and RaCDF2, which were further subjected to functional studies in metal sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of RaCDF1 and its translational fusion with green fluorescent protein (GFP) protected the yeasts against Zn and Co, but not Cd or Mn, toxicity and led to increased Zn accumulation in the cells. The GFP fluorescence, observed in the RaCDF1::GFP-expressing yeasts on tonoplasts, indicated that the RaCDF1-mediated Zn and Co tolerance was a result of vacuolar sequestration of the metals. The expression of RaCDF2 supported Zn, but not Mn, tolerance in the yeasts and reduced the cellular uptake of Zn, which is congruent with the proposed idea of the Zn-efflux function of RaCDF2, supported by the localization of GFP-derived fluorescence on the plasma membrane of the yeasts expressing functional RaCDF2::GFP. Contrarily, RaCDF2 increased the sensitivity to Co and Cd in the yeasts and significantly promoted Cd uptake, which suggested that it can act as a bidirectional metal transporter. The notion that RaCDF1 and RaCDF2 are genuine CDF transporters in R. atropurputrea was further reinforced by the fact that the RaCDF-associated metal tolerance and uptake phenotypes were lost upon the replacement of histidyl (in RaCDF1) and aspartyl (in RaCDF2), which are highly conserved in the second transmembrane domain and known to be essential for the function of CDF proteins. PMID:26906559

  7. Cation Diffusion in Xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2004-05-01

    Xenotime is an important mineral in metamorphic paragenesis, and useful in isotopic dating, garnet-xenotime thermometry, and monazite-xenotime thermometry, so diffusion data for xenotime of cations of geochronological and geochemical importance are of some interest. We report here on diffusion of the rare earth elements Sm, Dy and Yb in synthetic xenotime under dry conditions. The synthetic xenotime was grown via a Na2}CO{3}-MoO_{3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were REE phosphate powders, with experiments run with sources containing a single REE. Experiments were performed by placing source and xenotime in Pt capsules, and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from thirty minutes to a month, at temperatures from 1000 to 1400C. The REE distributions in the xenotime were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relations are obtained for diffusion in xenotime, normal to (101): DSm = 1.7x10-4 exp(-442 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DDy = 3.5x10-7 exp(-365 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DYb = 7.4x10-7 exp(-371 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1. Diffusivities of these REE do not differ greatly in xenotime, in contrast to the findings noted for the REE in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997), where the LREE diffuse more slowly, and with higher activation energies for diffusion, than the heavier rare earths. In zircon, these differences among diffusion of the rare earths are attributed to the relatively large size of the REE with respect to Zr, for which they substitute in the zircon lattice. With the systematic increase in ionic radius from the heavy to lighter REE, this size mismatch becomes more pronounced and diffusivities of the LREE are as consequence slower. Although xenotime is isostructural with zircon, the REE are more closely matched in size to Y, so in xenotime this effect appears much smaller and the REE diffuse at similar rates. In addition, the process of diffusion in xenotime likely involves simple REE+3

  8. Disease-Homologous Mutation in the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Protein MamM Causes Single-Domain Structural Loss and Signifies Its Importance

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Uebe, René; Davidov, Geula; Navon, Yotam; Sherf, Dror; Chill, Jordan H.; Kass, Itamar; Bitton, Ronit; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are highly conserved, metal ion efflux transporters that maintain divalent transition metal cation homeostasis. Most CDF proteins contain two domains, the cation transporting transmembrane domain and the regulatory cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD). MamM is a magnetosome-associated CDF protein essential for the biomineralization of magnetic iron-oxide particles in magnetotactic bacteria. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CDF cytoplasmic domains, we characterized a MamM M250P mutation that is synonymous with the disease-related mutation L349P of the human CDF protein ZnT-10. Our results show that the M250P exchange in MamM causes severe structural changes in its CTD resulting in abnormal reduced function. Our in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies indicate that the CTD fold is critical for CDF proteins’ proper function and support the previously suggested role of the CDF cytoplasmic domain as a CDF regulatory element. Based on our results, we also suggest a mechanism for the effects of the ZnT-10 L349P mutation in human. PMID:27550551

  9. Disease-Homologous Mutation in the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Protein MamM Causes Single-Domain Structural Loss and Signifies Its Importance.

    PubMed

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Uebe, René; Davidov, Geula; Navon, Yotam; Sherf, Dror; Chill, Jordan H; Kass, Itamar; Bitton, Ronit; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are highly conserved, metal ion efflux transporters that maintain divalent transition metal cation homeostasis. Most CDF proteins contain two domains, the cation transporting transmembrane domain and the regulatory cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD). MamM is a magnetosome-associated CDF protein essential for the biomineralization of magnetic iron-oxide particles in magnetotactic bacteria. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CDF cytoplasmic domains, we characterized a MamM M250P mutation that is synonymous with the disease-related mutation L349P of the human CDF protein ZnT-10. Our results show that the M250P exchange in MamM causes severe structural changes in its CTD resulting in abnormal reduced function. Our in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies indicate that the CTD fold is critical for CDF proteins' proper function and support the previously suggested role of the CDF cytoplasmic domain as a CDF regulatory element. Based on our results, we also suggest a mechanism for the effects of the ZnT-10 L349P mutation in human. PMID:27550551

  10. The perforin pore facilitates the delivery of cationic cargos.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Kondos, Stephanie C; Matthews, Antony Y; D'Angelo, Michael E; Dunstone, Michelle A; Whisstock, James C; Trapani, Joseph A; Bird, Phillip I

    2014-03-28

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes eliminate virally infected or neoplastic cells through the action of cytotoxic proteases (granzymes). The pore-forming protein perforin is essential for delivery of granzymes into the cytoplasm of target cells; however the mechanism of this delivery is incompletely understood. Perforin contains a membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and oligomerizes to form an aqueous pore in the plasma membrane; therefore the simplest (and best supported) model suggests that granzymes passively diffuse through the perforin pore into the cytoplasm of the target cell. Here we demonstrate that perforin preferentially delivers cationic molecules while anionic and neutral cargoes are delivered inefficiently. Furthermore, another distantly related pore-forming MACPF protein, pleurotolysin (from the oyster mushroom), also favors the delivery of cationic molecules, and efficiently delivers human granzyme B. We propose that this facilitated diffusion is due to conserved features of oligomerized MACPF proteins, which may include an anionic lumen. PMID:24558045

  11. In Vivo Facilitated Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maximilian; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model. PMID:23349772

  12. Diffusion of highly charged cations in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Liang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion of tungsten, titanium and phosphorus have been measured in natural iron-bearing olivine (~Fo90) and synthetic forsterite. Experiments were run under buffered conditions (with iron-wustite or Ni-NiO buffers) in 1-atm furnaces. The sources of diffusant for experiments were MgWO4 for tungsten diffusion, Mg2TiO4 for Ti diffusion, and AlPO4 for P diffusion; in all cases these compounds were pre-reacted at high temperature with Mg2SiO4 or Fe-bearing olivine prior to diffusion anneals. Samples were placed with the source materials in noble metal or silica capsules, which were sealed under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was used to measure depth profiles for all sets of experiments; measurements of P were also made with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the 31P(α,p)34S reaction. These new data suggest marked differences among diffusivities of these cations, with titanium diffusion faster than diffusion of tungsten, but slower than diffusion of phosphorus over the conditions investigated. Diffusivities of all of these elements appear significantly slower than those of divalent cations in olivine. These results will be discussed in context with extant diffusion data for major, trace and minor elements in olivine. The effects of oxygen fugacity and olivine composition on diffusion, and potential implications for diffusion mechanisms will also be considered.

  13. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion (3D diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA) when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise. PMID:25314467

  14. Dimer-mediated cation diffusion in the stoichiometric ionic conductor Li3N.

    PubMed

    Mulliner, Alexander D; Battle, Peter D; David, William I F; Refson, Keith

    2016-02-21

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics has been used to model cation diffusion in stoichiometric Li3N over the temperature range 50 < T/K < 800. The resulting diffusion coefficients are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. We present a detailed atomistic account of the diffusion process. Contrary to the conclusions drawn from previous studies, our calculations show that it is unnecessary to invoke the presence of a small concentration of intrinsic defects in order to initiate diffusion. The structure can be considered to consist of alternating layers of composition Li2N and Li. As the temperature increases an increasing number of cations leave the Li2N layers and migrate either to the interlayer space or to the Li layer. Those that move into the interlayer space form Li2 dimers with cations in the Li2N layers and those that move into the neighboring layer form dimers with cations therein. The two types of dimer are aligned parallel and perpendicular to [001], respectively and have lifetimes of ∼3 ps. The vacancies so created facilitate rapid diffusion in the Li2N layers and the interlayer cation motion results in slower diffusion perpendicular to the layers. PMID:26863512

  15. Oxygen and cation diffusion in YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, S.; Koritala, R. E.; Li, M.; Goretta, K. C.; Adachi, M.; Baker, J. E.; Routbort, J. L.

    2003-10-01

    Biaxially textured YBa 2Cu 3O x (YBCO) films 0.3 μm thick were deposited on single-crystal LaAlO 3 and buffered Hastelloy C276 substrates. After annealing in 18O at 400 °C, secondary-ion mass spectrometry was used to determine oxygen-diffusion profiles and several cation-diffusion profiles within the various layers of the conductors. Oxygenation in the YBCO/LaAlO 3 specimen was relatively slow and hours would be required for full oxygenation of the YBCO. Oxygen diffusion was rapid in the coated conductor. It was dominated by diffusion along a- b planes and full oxygenation of a 0.3-μm-thick YBCO layer was achieved in several minutes. Cation interdiffusion was limited in the YBCO/LaAlO 3 specimen, but was significant within the coated conductor. Although Cu diffused out of the superconductor, an SrTiO 3 layer between textured MgO and YBCO limited diffusion of cations from the various substrate layers into the superconductor.

  16. Cation self-diffusion in Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, K.; Peterson, N. L.

    Self-diffusion of Fe(59) in single crystals of Fe2O3 parallel to the c-axis has been measured as a function of temperature (1150 to 1340 C) and oxygen partial pressure 0.002 less than or equal to Po2 less than or equal to 1 atm). The oxygen partial pressure dependence of the diffusivity indicates that cation self-diffusion occurs by an interstitial-type mechanism. The simultaneous diffusion of Fe(52) and Fe(59) was measured in Fe2O3 at 1251 C and Po2 = .0191 atm. The small value of the isotope effect (f(DELTA)K = 0.067 + or - 0.016) is consistent with diffusion of Fe ions by an interstitially mechanism.

  17. Diffusion and isotope effects in the diffusion of homovalent cations in cesium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotsman, S. M.; Polikarpova, I. P.; Tatarinova, G. N.; Timofeev, A. N.

    1988-10-01

    Preexponentials D0 and activation energies Q for self-diffusion and diffusion of homovalent cations of small radius in single crystals of CsI measured by the tracer sectioning method are as follows: for 137Cs, 19+/-1.5 cm2 s-1 and 35.59+/-0.18 kcal/mol; for 86Rb, 30.7+/-3.0 cm2 s-1 and 35.13+/-0.22 kcal/mol; for 42K, 47+/-6 cm2 s-1 and 35.30+/-0.30 kcal/mol; for 22Na, 34.94+/-0.20 kcal/mol, respectively. The temperature dependence of the isotope effect for diffusion of 22,24Na in CsI is described by a simple exponent: E=126 exp[-(13.3+/-1.5 kcal/mol)/RT]. Calculations based on these experimental results and the ``five-frequency model'' of diffusion are provided to obtain the main diffusion parameters for all homovalent cations in CsI. The diffusion behavior of these cations in CsI is in good agreement with the model of ``displaced homovalent cations of small radius.''

  18. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  19. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped. PMID:26503882

  20. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Makarova, Olga; Müller, Uta; Rolff, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection. PMID:26430769

  1. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Makarova, Olga; Müller, Uta; Rolff, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection. PMID:26430769

  2. Facilitated Diffusion as a Method for Selective Accumulation of Materials from the Primordial Oceans by a Lipid Vesicle Protocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, William

    1980-09-01

    A model is proposed for the selective accumulation of amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, cations and protons from the primordial oceans into a lipid vesicle type of protocell. The model is built on facilitated diffusion using simple, primordial, lipid-soluble carriers. The advantages a lipid vesicle protocell would have had over the other potential types of protocells are discussed.

  3. Facilitated diffusion in the presence of obstacles on the DNA.

    PubMed

    Gomez, David; Klumpp, Stefan

    2016-04-20

    Biological functions of DNA depend on the sequence-specific binding of DNA-binding proteins to their corresponding binding sites. Binding of these proteins to their binding sites occurs through a facilitated diffusion process that combines three-dimensional diffusion in the cytoplasm with one-dimensional diffusion (sliding) along the DNA. In this work, we use a lattice model of facilitated diffusion to study how the dynamics of binding of a protein to a specific site (e.g., binding of an RNA polymerase to a promoter or of a transcription factor to its operator site) is affected by the presence of other proteins bound to the DNA, which act as 'obstacles' in the sliding process. Different types of these obstacles with different dynamics are implemented. While all types impair facilitated diffusion, the extent of the hindrance depends on the type of obstacle. As a consequence of hindrance by obstacles, more excursions into the cytoplasm are required for optimal target binding compared to the case without obstacles. PMID:27048915

  4. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y.

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  6. Facilitated Diffusion of Acetonitrile Revealed by Quantitative Breath Analysis Using Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag+) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1–4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds. PMID:23386969

  7. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  8. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  9. Reactive radical facilitated reaction-diffusion modeling for holographic photopolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jianhua; Pu Haihui; Gao Bin; Gao Hongyue; Yin Dejin; Dai Haitao

    2010-02-08

    A phenomenological concentration of reactive radical is proposed to take the role of curing light intensity in explicit proportion to the reaction rate for the conventional reaction-diffusion model. This revision rationally eliminates the theoretical defect of null reaction rate in modeling of the postcuring process, and facilitates the applicability of the model in the whole process of holographic photopolymerizations in photocurable monomer and nematic liquid crystal blend system. Excellent consistencies are obtained in both curing and postcuring processes between simulated and experimentally measured evolutions of the first order diffraction efficiency of the formed composite Bragg gratings.

  10. Investigation of cation self-diffusion mechanisms in UO2±x using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Potashnikov, S. I.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2013-11-01

    This article is devoted to investigation of cation self-diffusion mechanisms, taking place in UO2, UO2+x, and UO2-x crystals simulated under periodic (PBC) and isolated (IBC) boundary conditions using the method of molecular dynamics in the approximation of rigid ions and pair interactions. It is shown that under PBC the cations diffuse via an exchange mechanism (with the formation of Frenkel defects) with activation energy of 15-22 eV, while under IBC there is competition between the exchange and vacancy (via Schottky defects) diffusion mechanisms, which give the effective activation energy of 11-13 eV near the melting temperature of the simulated UO2.00 nanocrystals. Vacancy diffusion with lower activation energy of 6-7 eV was dominant in the non-stoichiometric crystals UO2.10, UO2.15 and UO1.85. Observations showed that a cation vacancy is accompanied by different number of anion vacancies depending on the deviation from stoichiometry: no vacancies in UO2.15, single vacancy in UO2.00 and four vacancies in UO1.85. The corresponding law of mass action formulas derived within the Lidiard-Matzke model allowed explaining the obtained activation energies and predicting a change in the activation energy within the temperature range of the superionic phase transition. The diffusion of cations on the surface of nanocrystals had activation energy of 3.1-3.6 eV. Obtain reliable cation diffusion coefficients for the uranium dioxide system without artificial defects (i.e. diffusion via intrinsic defect formation), using high-performance graphics processors and the original methodology, successfully tested on the diffusion of anions [17,4]. Identify and characterize the cation diffusion mechanisms occurring in the model crystals using visual observations and diffusing ions trajectory analysis. Study the effect of boundary conditions on the diffusion of cations, expecting that PBC will allow examining of the exchange diffusion mechanism, and that under IBC Schottky defects

  11. Facilitated diffusion framework for transcription factor search with conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartailler, Jérôme; Reingruber, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Cellular responses often require the fast activation or repression of specific genes, which depends on transcription factors (TFs) that have to quickly find the promoters of these genes within a large genome. TFs search for their DNA promoter target by alternating between bulk diffusion and sliding along the DNA, a mechanism known as facilitated diffusion. We study a facilitated diffusion framework with switching between three search modes: a bulk mode and two sliding modes triggered by conformational changes between two protein conformations. In one conformation (search mode) the TF interacts unspecifically with the DNA backbone resulting in fast sliding. In the other conformation (recognition mode) it interacts specifically and strongly with DNA base pairs leading to slow displacement. From the bulk, a TF associates with the DNA at a random position that is correlated with the previous dissociation point, which implicitly is a function of the DNA structure. The target affinity depends on the conformation. We derive exact expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to bind to the promoter and the conditional probability to bind before detaching when arriving at the promoter site. We systematically explore the parameter space and compare various search scenarios. We compare our results with experimental data for the dimeric Lac repressor search in E. coli bacteria. We find that a coiled DNA conformation is absolutely necessary for a fast MFPT. With frequent spontaneous conformational changes, a fast search time is achieved even when a TF becomes immobilized in the recognition state due to the specific bindings. We find a MFPT compatible with experimental data in presence of a specific TF-DNA interaction energy that has a Gaussian distribution with a large variance.

  12. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  13. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Cation Diffusion in Low-K Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Low thermal conductivity (low-K) ceramic materials are of interest to the aerospace community for use as the thermal barrier component of coating systems for turbine engine components. In particular, zirconia-based materials exhibit both low thermal conductivity and structural stability at high temperature, making them suitable for such applications. Because creep is one of the potential failure modes, and because diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, we have performed computer simulations of cation diffusion in a variety of zirconia-based low-K materials. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation method is an alternative to the more widely known molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is designed to study "infrequent-event" processes, such as diffusion, for which MD simulation can be highly inefficient. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of cation diffusion in several zirconia-based materials, specifically, zirconia doped with Y, Gd, Nb and Yb. Diffusion paths are identified, and migration energy barriers are obtained from density functional calculations and from the literature. We present results on the temperature dependence of the diffusivity, and on the effects of the presence of oxygen vacancies in cation diffusion barrier complexes as well.

  14. Diffusion of cations in chromia layers grown on iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobnig, R.E.; Hennesen, K.; Grabke, H.J. ); Schmidt, H.P.

    1992-02-01

    Diffusion of the cations Cr, Fe, Mn, and Ni in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated at 1,173 K. The diffusion measurements were performed on chromia layers grown on the model alloys Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-12Ni in order to consider effects of small amounts of dissolved alien cations in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The samples were diffusion annealed in H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at an oxygen partial pressure close to the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Cr equilibrium. For all tracers the lattice-diffusion coefficients are 3-5 orders of magnitude smaller than the grain-boundary diffusion coefficients. The lattice diffusivity of Mn is about two orders of magnitude greater than the other lattice-diffusion coefficients, especially in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on Fe-20Cr-12Ni. The values of the diffusion coefficients for Cr, Fe, and Ni are in the same range. Diffusion of the tracers in Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on different alloys did not show significant differences with the exception of Mn.

  15. Enhancement of cation diffusion rates across the 410-kilometer discontinuity in Earth's mantle

    PubMed

    Chakraborty; Knoche; Schulze; Rubie; Dobson; Ross; Angel

    1999-01-15

    Rates of cation diffusion (magnesium, iron, and nickel) have been determined in olivine and its high-pressure polymorph, wadsleyite, at 9 to 15 gigapascals and 1100 degrees to 1400 degreesC for compositions that are relevant to Earth's mantle. Diffusion in olivine becomes strongly dependent on composition at high pressure. In wadsleyite, diffusion is one to two orders of magnitude faster than in olivine, depending on temperature. Homogenization of mantle heterogeneities (chemical mixing) and mineral transformations involving a magnesium-iron exchange will therefore occur considerably faster in the transition zone than at depths of less than 410 kilometers. PMID:9888846

  16. Modeling cation diffusion in compacted water-saturated sodium bentonite at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C M

    2007-12-01

    Sodium bentonites are used as barrier materials for the isolation of landfills and are under consideration for a similar use in the subsurface storage of high-level radioactive waste. The performance of these barriers is determined in large part by molecular diffusion in the bentonite pore space. We tested two current models of cation diffusion in bentonite against experimental data on the relative apparent diffusion coefficients of two representative cations, sodium and strontium. On the "macropore/nanopore" model, solute molecules are divided into two categories, with unequal pore-scale diffusion coefficients, based on location: in macropores or in interlayer nanopores. On the "surface diffusion" model, solute molecules are divided into categories based on chemical speciation: dissolved or adsorbed. The macropore/nanopore model agrees with all experimental data at partial montmorillonite dry densities ranging from 0.2 (a dilute bentonite gel) to 1.7 kg dm(-3) (a highly compacted bentonite with most of its pore space located in interlayer nanopores), whereas the surface diffusion model fails at partial montmorillonite dry densities greater than about 1.3 kg dm(-3). PMID:18186346

  17. Modeling cation diffusion in compacted water-saturatedNa-bentonite at low ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2007-08-28

    Sodium bentonites are used as barrier materials for the isolation of landfills and are under consideration for a similar use in the subsurface storage of high-level radioactive waste. The performance of these barriers is determined in large part by molecular diffusion in the bentonite pore space. We tested two current models of cation diffusion in bentonite against experimental data on the relative apparent diffusion coefficients of two representative cations, sodium and strontium. On the 'macropore/nanopore' model, solute molecules are divided into two categories, with unequal pore-scale diffusion coefficients, based on location: in macropores or in interlayer nanopores. On the 'surface diffusion' model, solute molecules are divided into categories based on chemical speciation: dissolved or adsorbed. The macropore/nanopore model agrees with all experimental data at partial montmorillonite dry densities ranging from 0.2 (a dilute bentonite gel) to 1.7 kg dm{sup -3} (a highly compacted bentonite with most of its pore space located in interlayer nanopores), whereas the surface diffusion model fails at partial montmorillonite dry densities greater than about 1.2 kg dm{sup -3}.

  18. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape. PMID:21636475

  19. Rhizobium leguminosarum HupE is a highly-specific diffusion facilitator for nickel uptake.

    PubMed

    Albareda, Marta; Rodrigue, Agnès; Brito, Belén; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Imperial, Juan; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Palacios, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria require nickel transporters for the synthesis of Ni-containing metalloenzymes in natural, low nickel habitats. In this work we carry out functional and topological characterization of Rhizobium leguminosarum HupE, a nickel permease required for the provision of this element for [NiFe] hydrogenase synthesis. Expression studies in the Escherichia coli nikABCDE mutant strain HYD723 revealed that HupE is a medium-affinity permease (apparent Km 227 ± 21 nM; Vmax 49 ± 21 pmol Ni(2+) min(-1) mg(-1) bacterial dry weight) that functions as an energy-independent diffusion facilitator for the uptake of Ni(ii) ions. This Ni(2+) transport is not inhibited by similar cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+), or Co(2+), but is blocked by Cu(2+). Analysis of site-directed HupE mutants allowed the identification of several residues (H36, D42, H43, F69, E90, H130, and E133) that are essential for HupE-mediated Ni uptake in E. coli cells. By using translational fusions to reporter genes we demonstrated the presence of five transmembrane domains with a periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain buried in the lipid bilayer. The periplasmic N-terminal domain contributes to stability and functionality of the protein. PMID:25652141

  20. Effect of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy diffusion pathways in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Pilania, Ghanshyam

    2015-07-08

    Perovskite structured oxides (ABO3) are attractive for a number of technological applications, including as superionics because of the high oxygen conductivities they exhibit. Double perovskites (AA’BB’O6) provide even more flexibility for tailoring properties. Using accelerated molecular dynamics, we examine the role of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy mobility in one model double perovskite SrLaTiAlO6. We find that the mobility of the vacancy is very sensitive to the cation ordering, with a migration energy that varies from 0.6 to 2.7 eV. In the extreme cases, the mobility is both higher and lower than either of the two end member single perovskites. Further, the nature of oxygen vacancy diffusion, whether one-dimensional, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional, also varies with cation ordering. We correlate the dependence of oxygen mobility on cation structure to the distribution of Ti4+ cations, which provide unfavorable environments for the positively charged oxygen vacancy. The results demonstrate the potential of using tailored double perovskite structures to precisely control the behavior of oxygen vacancies in these materials.

  1. Effect of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy diffusion pathways in double perovskites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Pilania, Ghanshyam

    2015-07-08

    Perovskite structured oxides (ABO3) are attractive for a number of technological applications, including as superionics because of the high oxygen conductivities they exhibit. Double perovskites (AA’BB’O6) provide even more flexibility for tailoring properties. Using accelerated molecular dynamics, we examine the role of cation ordering on oxygen vacancy mobility in one model double perovskite SrLaTiAlO6. We find that the mobility of the vacancy is very sensitive to the cation ordering, with a migration energy that varies from 0.6 to 2.7 eV. In the extreme cases, the mobility is both higher and lower than either of the two end member single perovskites.more » Further, the nature of oxygen vacancy diffusion, whether one-dimensional, two-dimensional, or three-dimensional, also varies with cation ordering. We correlate the dependence of oxygen mobility on cation structure to the distribution of Ti4+ cations, which provide unfavorable environments for the positively charged oxygen vacancy. The results demonstrate the potential of using tailored double perovskite structures to precisely control the behavior of oxygen vacancies in these materials.« less

  2. Instantaneous normal mode prediction for cation and anion diffusion in ionic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. C. C.; Madden, P. A.

    1997-05-01

    Instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis was undertaken for several ionic melts: NaCl at six distinct thermodynamic states, and for a particular state of liquid LiCl, LiF, KF, KI, NaI, ZnCl2, and CuCl. In this Communication, we show that, in most cases, the ratio between the diffusion constants for cations (Dca) and anions (Dan) is predicted from the average frequency of the real ("stable" <ωs>) and imaginary ("unstable" <ωu>) frequency modes of the projection of the total density of states on cations and anions, respectively. The proposed relationship, Dca/Dan=(mca-1<ωu>ca<ωs>ca-2)ṡ(man-1<ωu>an<ωs>an-2)-1, where mi is the mass of a particular species, is suggested by Keyes' INM theory for diffusion [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 5081 (1994)], with the further assumption that the parameters which are related to the topology of the multidimensional potential surface are equal for cations and anions. The above equation is shown to be valid for the simple melts NaCl, LiCl, LiF, KF, KI, and NaI, but to fail for the network forming melt ZnCl2 and for CuCl, which shows fast ionic diffusion characteristics.

  3. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Michael G.; Yeung, Bertrand Z.; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity.Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30 mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine,1-20 mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44 mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30 mol% DOTAP and ≤10 mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposomesize increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomessuggestsconcentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135 nm diameter, -49 to +44 mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10 mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoralsubcompartments within spheroids. PMID:24995948

  4. A novel cationic lipid with intrinsic antitumor activity to facilitate gene therapy of TRAIL DNA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Miao, Lei; Zhao, Yi; Musetti, Sara; Wang, Yuhua; Shi, Kai; Huang, Leaf

    2016-09-01

    Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has been found to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of cancer. Herein, a novel lipid (1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-biguanide-propane (DOBP)) was elaborately designed by utilizing biguanide as the cationic head group. This novel cationic lipid was intended to act as a gene carrier with intrinsic antitumor activity. When compared with 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), a commercially available cationic lipid with a similar structure, the blank liposomes consisting of DOBP showed much more potent antitumor effects than DOTAP in human lung tumor xenografts, following an antitumor mechanism similar to metformin. Given its cationic head group, biguanide, DOBP could encapsulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plasmids into Lipid-Protamine-DNA (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic gene delivery. DOBP-LPD-TRAIL NPs demonstrated distinct superiority in delaying tumor progression over DOTAP-LPD-TRAIL NPs, due to the intrinsic antitumor activity combined with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumor. These results indicate that DOBP could be used as a versatile and promising cationic lipid for improving the therapeutic index of gene therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27344367

  5. Effect of cation on diffusion coefficient of ionic liquids at onion-like carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Katherine L; McDonough, John K; Li, Song; Feng, Guang; Chathoth, Suresh M; Mamontov, Eugene; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Cummings, Peter T; Dai, Sheng; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-07-16

    While most supercapacitors are limited in their performance by the stability of the electrolyte, using neat ionic liquids (ILs) as the electrolyte can expand the voltage window and temperature range of operation. In this study, ILs with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N) as the anion were investigated as the electrolyte in onion-like carbon-based electrochemical capacitors. To probe the influence of cations on the electrochemical performance of supercapacitors, three different cations were used: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium and 1,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl). A series of electrochemical characterization tests was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Diffusion coefficients were measured using EIS and correlated with quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation. These three techniques were used in parallel to confirm a consistent trend between the three ILs. It was found that the IL with the smaller sized cation had a larger diffusion coefficient, leading to a higher capacitance at faster charge-discharge rates. Furthermore, the IL electrolyte performance was correlated with increasing temperature, which limited the voltage stability window and led to the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase on the carbon electrode surface, evident in both the CV and EIS experiments. PMID:24920163

  6. Gel for Simultaneous Chemical Imaging of Anionic and Cationic Solutes Using Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species. PMID:24256092

  7. Gel for simultaneous chemical imaging of anionic and cationic solutes using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    PubMed

    Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Prohaska, Thomas; Wenzel, Walter W

    2013-12-17

    We report on a novel gel based on diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for the simultaneous measurement of cations and anions and its suitability for high resolution chemical imaging by using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The new high resolution mixed binding gel (HR-MBG) is based on zirconium-hydroxide and suspended particulate reagent-iminodiacetate (SPR-IDA) as resin materials which are embedded in an ether-based urethane polymer hydrogel. The use of this polymer hydrogel material allows the production of ultrathin, highly stable and tear-proof resin gel layers with superior handling properties compared to existing ultrathin polyacrylamide gels. The gel was characterized regarding its uptake kinetics, the anion and cation capacities, and the effects of pH, ionic strength, and aging on the performance of the HR-MBG. Our results demonstrate the capability of this novel gel for concomitant sampling of anions and cations. The suitability of this new gel type for DGT chemical imaging at submm spatial resolution in soils using LA-ICPMS is shown. 2D images of P, As, Co, Cu, Mn, and Zn distributions around roots of Zea mays L. demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the HR-MBG for high-resolution mapping of solute dynamics in soil and sediment hotspots, such as the rhizosphere, by simultaneous observation of anionic and cationic solute species. PMID:24256092

  8. Cation Diffusivity and the Mixed Network Former Effect in Borosilicate Glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Mauro, John C; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-06-11

    Understanding the structural origins of cationic diffusion processes in silicate glasses is important for high-tech applications of silicate glasses. For glasses with more than one network former, transport properties such as diffusivity are often nonlinear functions of the particular distribution of these network formers, a phenomenon known as the mixed network former effect. Here, we investigate the sodium-potassium interdiffusion (D̅Na-K) and the calcium inward diffusion (DCa) in soda lime borosilicate glasses with varying silica/borate ratio but constant modifier content. Indeed, the structural organization of borosilicate glasses results in a pronounced nonlinear composition dependence of D̅Na-K and DCa (i.e., the mixed network former effect). Initial addition of B2O3 to the glass system results in a significant decrease in both diffusivities, whereas the change in diffusivity per mole of added B2O3 decreases with increasing B2O3 concentration. Besides the influences of water content and atomic packing degree, we find that 99% of the composition dependence of log D̅Na-K can be ascribed to the change in concentration of tetrahedral boron groups. This indicates that the formation of BO4/2 groups slows down diffusion processes of alkali and alkaline earth ions. Therefore, the mixed network former effect of the studied glass series is linked with the change of the concentration of tetrahedral boron groups, which is caused by the interactions between the different types of network formers. PMID:25978700

  9. EVIDENCE FOR DIACETYLENE CATION AS THE CARRIER OF A DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BAND

    SciTech Connect

    Krelowski, J.; Beletsky, Y.; LoCurto, G.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Kolos, R.; Gronowski, M. E-mail: ybialets@eso.org E-mail: runizag@gmail.com

    2010-05-01

    High-quality spectra acquired at three different observatories point to the presence of a new diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 5069 A. The spectral profile of this DIB matches published laboratory measurements of the diacetylene cation A {sup 2}{pi} {sub u} -X {sup 2}{pi} {sub g} (0-0) low-temperature gas-phase optical absorption. HC{sub 4}H{sup +} is approximately 60-80 times less abundant than CH along the analyzed lines of sight. Only an upper limit could presently be inferred from the search for an analogous band of the triacetylene cation HC{sub 6}H{sup +}, expected at 6001.1 A, which implies the HC{sub 6}H{sup +} to HC{sub 4}H{sup +} ratio of less than {approx}1/3.

  10. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  11. On the Possibility of Facilitated Diffusion of Dendrimers Along DNA.

    PubMed

    Ficici, Emel; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-06-11

    We investigate the electrostatics, energetics, and dynamics of dendrimer-DNA interactions that mimic protein-DNA complexes as a means to design facilitated mechanisms by which dendrimers can slide and search DNA for targets. By using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we calculated the free energy profiles of dendrimer-binding around the DNA via umbrella sampling. We also calculated electrostatic interaction maps in comparison to proteins, as well as the dynamical changes induced by DNA-dendrimer interactions via NMR-measurable order parameters. Our results show that for dendrimers to go around DNA, there is a free-energy barrier of 8.5 kcal/mol from the DNA major groove to DNA minor groove, with a minimum in the major groove. This barrier height makes it unlikely for an all-amine dendrimer to slide along DNA longitudinally, but following a helical path may be possible along the major groove. Comparison of the nonbonded interaction energy and the interaction free-energy profiles reveal a considerable entropic cost as the dendrimer binds to DNA. This is also supported by the mobility patterns obtained from NMR-measurable order parameter values, which show a decreased mobility of the dendrimer N-H bond vectors in the DNA-binding mode. PMID:25989627

  12. Cation diffusion in the interlayer space of swelling clay minerals - A combined macroscopic and microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Prêt, Dimitri; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the diffusion process of calcium cations confined in the interlayer space of 5 mm disks of vermiculite swelling clay minerals during the Na-for-Ca exchange process. Diffusion experiments were performed at four NaCl salinities (3 × 10-3, 5 × 10-2, 0.1 and 1 M) of the exchanger solution. A macroscopic analysis of the diffusion process based on the aqueous calcium concentrations released in the solution and on Ca-profiles obtained in the solid was performed using a pore diffusion model that has been classically used in the literature. The results obtained at the macroscopic scale showed that the apparent diffusion coefficients describing both aqueous and profiles data for Ca depend on the diffusion time and salinity of the aqueous reservoir. Such variations suggested that interlayer diffusion was driven by (1) the gradient of the sorbed species in the interlayer, which depends on the diffusion time due to the ion exchange equilibrium; and (2) the discontinuity, due to Donnan equilibrium, existing at the limit between the "internal disk border" and the "external disk border" in contact with the aqueous reservoir. Then, a set of molecular and Brownian dynamics simulations was used to (1) assess such interpretations and (2) quantitatively predict aqueous and profile data obtained at the macroscopic scale. For an aqueous reservoir with high salinity (1 M NaCl), a good agreement was obtained between the macroscopic data and the predictions obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations, confirming the role played by the gradient of the interlayer species that is suggested at the macroscopic scale and which is at the basis of the "surface diffusion models" published in literature. In addition, for aqueous reservoirs with lower salinity (5 × 10-2 M), the results obtained by Brownian dynamics simulations and normalized to the exchange rate measured at infinite time showed that the diffusion properties of the species in the aqueous reservoir cannot be

  13. Nuclear Spin Dependent Chemistry of the Trihydrogen Cation in Diffuse Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Kyle

    2015-05-01

    The trihydrogen cation, H3+,long thought to be the species responsible for initiating ion-molecule chemistry in the interstellar medium, was first observed in interstellar clouds twenty years ago. Since its detection, this cation has been used to infer temperatures, densities, cloud sizes, and the local cosmic ray ionization rate. However, in diffuse molecular clouds the excitation temperature of its two nuclear spin modifications, ortho (I = 3 / 2) and para-H3+(I = 1 / 2) is found to differ markedly from the cloud kinetic temperature inferred from the spin modifications of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the same environment. A steady state analysis of the chemical kinetics of ortho and para-H3+suggests that the interplay of thermalizing collisions with H2 and nuclear spin dependent dissociative recombination with electrons may result in a nonthermal excitation temperature. Each of these processes is complex. Collisions between H3+and H2 must obey selection rules based on conservation of nuclear spin angular momentum, and the allowed spin conversion reactions, which proceed through the fluxional (H5+)* intermediate, each have different statistical weights and energetic requirements. Meanwhile, theoretical and experimental studies of H3+electron recombination carried out over the past 40 years have yielded rates that span 4 orders of magnitude in range. We will present experimental measurements of the nuclear spin dependence of the reactions of H3+with H2 and with electrons, as well as astronomical observations of H3+in diffuse molecular clouds and time-dependent chemical modeling of these environments. Astrochemical models incorporating the latest experimental data still do not satisfactorily explain the observed excitation temperature in diffuse molecular clouds, and point to the need for state-selective measurements of the H3+electron recombination rate.

  14. Azole Drugs Are Imported By Facilitated Diffusion in Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Bryce E.; Oltean, Hanna N.; Oliver, Brian G.; Hoot, Samantha J.; Leyde, Sarah E.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; White, Theodore C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC) was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a Km of 0.64 uM and Vmax of 0.0056 pmol/min/108 cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs. PMID:20941354

  15. Cation exchange resin immobilized bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles to facilitate their application in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Yang, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) usually suffers from reduction of reactivity by aggregation, difficulty of assembling, environmental release and health concerns. Furthermore, data are lacking on the effect of cheap nickel on debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) by immobilized nZVI in aqueous system. In this study, strong acid polystyrene cation-exchange resins with particle diameter from 0.4 to 0.6 mm were utilized as matrices to immobilize bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles in order to minimize aggregation and environmental leakage risks of nZVI and to enhance their reactivity. Elemental distribution mapping showed that iron particles distributed uniformly on the surface of the resin and nickel particles were dispersed homogeneously into Fe phase. The reaction rate of resin-bound nZVI is about 55% higher than that of dispersed nZVI. The immobilized bimetallic nanoparticles with 9.69% Ni had the highest debromination percent (96%) and reaction rate (0.493 1/h). The existence of Ni significantly improved the debromination rate, due to the surface coverage of catalytic metal on the reductive metal and the formation of a galvanic cell. The environmental dominant congeners, such as BDE 154, 153, 100, 99 and 47, were produced during the process. Outstanding reactive performance, along with magnetic separation assured that resin-bound bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles are promising material that can be utilized to remediate a wide variety of pollutants contaminated sites including polybrominated diphenyl ethers. PMID:24559714

  16. The effect of the cation alkyl chain length on density and diffusion in dialkylpyrrolidinium bis(mandelato)borate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Andrei; Taher, Mamoun; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N

    2014-12-28

    The physicochemical properties of ionic liquids are strongly affected by the selective combination of the cations and anions comprising the ionic liquid. In particular, the length of the alkyl chains of ions has a clear influence on the ionic liquid's performance. In this paper, we study the self-diffusion of ions in a series of halogen-free boron-based ionic liquids (hf-BILs) containing bis(mandelato)borate anions and dialkylpyrrolidinium cations with long alkyl chains CnH2n+1 with n from 4 to 14 within a temperature range of 293-373 K. It was found that the hf-BILs with n = 4-7 have very similar diffusion coefficients, while hf-BILs with n = 10-14 exhibit two liquid sub-phases in almost the entire temperature range studied (293-353 K). Both liquid sub-phases differ in their diffusion coefficients, while values of the slower diffusion coefficients are close to those of hf-BILs with shorter alkyl chains. To explain the particular dependence of diffusion on the alkyl chain length, we examined the densities of the hf-BILs studied here. It was shown that the dependence of the density on the number of CH2 groups in long alkyl chains of cations can be accurately described using a "mosaic type" model, where regions of long alkyl chains of cations (named 'aliphatic' regions) and the residual chemical moieties in both cations and anions (named 'ionic' regions) give additive contributions. Changes in density due to an increase in temperature and the number of CH2 groups in the long alkyl chains of cations are determined predominantly by changes in the free volume of the 'ionic' regions, while 'aliphatic' regions are already highly compressed by van der Waals forces, which results in only infinitesimal changes in their free volumes with temperature. PMID:25372279

  17. Modeling sorption of divalent metal cations on hydrous manganese oxide using the diffuse double layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tonkin, J.W.; Balistrieri, L.S.; Murray, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Manganese oxides are important scavengers of trace metals and other contaminants in the environment. The inclusion of Mn oxides in predictive models, however, has been difficult due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), and the discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using the available models. The authors have compiled a set of surface complexation reactions for synthetic hydrous Mn oxide (HMO) using a two surface site model and the diffuse double layer SCM which complements databases developed for hydrous Fe (III) oxide, goethite and crystalline Al oxide. This compilation encompasses a range of data observed in the literature for the complex HMO surface and provides an error envelope for predictions not well defined by fitting parameters for single or limited data sets. Data describing surface characteristics and cation sorption were compiled from the literature for the synthetic HMO phases birnessite, vernadite and ??-MnO2. A specific surface area of 746 m2g-1 and a surface site density of 2.1 mmol g-1 were determined from crystallographic data and considered fixed parameters in the model. Potentiometric titration data sets were adjusted to a pH1EP value of 2.2. Two site types (???XOH and ???YOH) were used. The fraction of total sites attributed to ???XOH (??) and pKa2 were optimized for each of 7 published potentiometric titration data sets using the computer program FITEQL3.2. pKa2 values of 2.35??0.077 (???XOH) and 6.06??0.040 (???YOH) were determined at the 95% confidence level. The calculated average ?? value was 0.64, with high and low values ranging from 1.0 to 0.24, respectively. pKa2 and ?? values and published cation sorption data were used subsequently to determine equilibrium surface complexation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd 2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn 2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Sr2+ and Zn 2+. In addition, average model parameters were used to predict additional

  18. Generalized Facilitated Diffusion Model for DNA-Binding Proteins with Search and Recognition States

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maximilian; Metzler, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) such as the lac repressor find their target sequence on DNA at remarkably high rates. In the established Berg-von Hippel model for this search process, the TF alternates between three-dimensional diffusion in the bulk solution and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA chain. To overcome the so-called speed-stability paradox, in similar models the TF was considered as being present in two conformations (search state and recognition state) between which it switches stochastically. Combining both the facilitated diffusion model and alternating states, we obtain a generalized model. We explicitly treat bulk excursions for rodlike chains arranged in parallel and consider a simplified model for coiled DNA. Compared to previously considered facilitated diffusion models, corresponding to limiting cases of our generalized model, we surprisingly find a reduced target search rate. Moreover, at optimal conditions there is no longer an equipartition between the time spent by the protein on and off the DNA chain. PMID:22677385

  19. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Large Compact PAH Cations: Implications for the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Gordon-Head, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the electronic absorption spectra of several maximally pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations with time dependent density functional theory calculations. We find interesting trends in the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths for this series containing pyrene through circumcoronene, the largest species containing more than 50 carbon atoms. We discuss the implications of these new results for the size and structure distribution of the diffuse interstellar band carriers.

  20. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain. PMID:26010460

  1. Multifunctional cationic lipid-based nanoparticles facilitate endosomal escape and reduction-triggered cytosolic siRNA release.

    PubMed

    Gujrati, Maneesh; Malamas, Anthony; Shin, Tesia; Jin, Erlei; Sun, Yunlu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has garnered much attention in recent years as a promising avenue for cancer gene therapy due to its ability to silence disease-related genes. Effective gene silencing is contingent upon the delivery of siRNA into the cytosol of target cells and requires the implementation of delivery systems possessing multiple functionalities to overcome delivery barriers. The present work explores the multifunctional properties and biological activity of a recently developed cationic lipid carrier, (1-aminoethyl)iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinyl-1-amino-ethyl)propionamide]) (ECO). The physicochemical properties and biological activity of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles were assessed over a range of N/P ratios to optimize the formulation. Potent and sustained luciferase silencing in a U87 glioblastoma cell line was observed, even in the presence of serum proteins. ECO/siRNA nanoparticles exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption at pH levels corresponding to various stages of the intracellular trafficking pathway. It was found that disulfide linkages created during nanoparticle formation enhanced the protection of siRNA from degradation and facilitated site-specific siRNA release in the cytosol by glutathione-mediated reduction. Confocal microscopy confirmed that ECO/siRNA nanoparticles readily escaped from late endosomes prior to cytosolic release of the siRNA cargo. These results demonstrate that the rationally designed multifunctionality of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles is critical for intracellular siRNA delivery and the continuing development of safe and effective delivery systems. PMID:25020033

  2. Facilitated diffusion of 6-deoxy-D-glucose in bakers' yeast: evidence against phosphorylation-associated transport of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H

    1982-01-01

    6-Deoxy-D-glucose, a structural homomorph of D-glucose which lacks a hydroxyl group at carbon 6 and thus cannot be phosphorylated, is transported by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a facilitated diffusion system with affinity equivalent to that shown with D-glucose. This finding supports the facilitated diffusion mechanism for glucose transport and contradicts theories of transport-associated phosphorylation which hold that sugar phosphorylation is necessary for high-affinity operation of the glucose carrier. PMID:6754704

  3. An improved analysis of coupled multicomponent diffusion of divalent cations in aluminosilicate garnet: An experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, S. A.; Chakraborty, S.; Hoppe, U.

    2010-12-01

    Garnets in natural rocks show a variety of compositional zoning. These zonings preserve memory of the thermal and growth histories of the minerals which could be retrieved if appropriate cation diffusion data were available. Coupled multicomponent diffusion of major divalent cations in aluminosilicate garnet has been studied experimentally e.g. in [1,2,3]. Diffusion coefficients were retrieved from experimentally induced concentration profiles assuming that (i) garnets behaved thermodynamically ideally at the high temperatures of the experiments and (ii) the convolution effect on microprobe analysis could be approximated by an equation for convolution effect of a profile with a single, constant diffusivity. Further, calculated and measured profiles were matched visually without any statistical criteria. We have now carried out diffusion experiments in a piston cylinder apparatus using diffusion couples made from homogeneous gem quality natural pyrope and almandine garnets. These were annealed within graphite capsules under nominally anhydrous conditions at 25-35 kbar, 1260-1400 °C. The resulting profiles were described by diffusion coefficient matrices that accounted for the effects of thermodynamic non-ideality using the garnet solution model of [4]. Convolution was calculated using a numerical scheme that did not require any assumption of constant D. And finally, results obtained from visual fitting were compared to those obtained by error minimization according to the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method. We find that the visual and error minimization routines yield diffusion coefficients that are within a factor of two of each other. Further, it is shown that for some compositional ranges it is impossible to constrain tracer diffusion coefficients of certain elements. This needs to be consid-ered in future studies designed to determine diffusion coefficients. The effects of thermodynamic non-ideality and a more exact convolution correction are small, but when

  4. Cation and oxygen diffusion in periclase crystals and grain boundaries measured to 25 GPa and 2273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orman, J. A.; Fei, Y.; Hauri, E. H.; Wang, J.

    2002-05-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in creep, phase transformations, and electrical conduction in the Earth's mantle. Constraints on the influence of pressure are crucial for extrapolating diffusion data to deep mantle conditions. We have measured rates of cation (Mg, Al) and oxygen diffusion in periclase crystals and grain boundaries over a large range of pressure extending to lower mantle conditions (25 GPa). The experiments were performed in a multi-anvil device using diffusion couples consisting of a single crystal of high-purity periclase surrounded by 25Mg18O powder, which sintered to a dense polycrystal with ~10 μ m grain size during pressurization and heating. Isotopic concentration profiles in quenched samples were measured by SIMS, using a Cs+ ion beam ~1 μ m in diameter. Volume diffusion coefficients were determined from the single crystal side of the couple by fitting the data to an error function solution. On the polycrystalline side, both volume and grain boundary transport were significant (Type B kinetic regime), and the Whipple solution (Whipple 1954 Philos. Mag. 45:1225-1236) was used to determine grain boundary diffusion coefficients for Mg and O. One set of experiments was designed to measure Mg and O tracer diffusion rates in high purity MgO (<200 ppm impurities) in the absence of any chemical gradients. These experiments, combined with experiments at atmospheric pressure by Wuensch et al. (1973 J. Chem. Phys. 58:5258-5266) on crystals with similar impurity contents, yield a precise determination of the activation volume for Mg diffusion of 3.0 +/- 0.3 cm3 mol-1 (2σ uncertainty). This value is in excellent agreement with the theoretical migration volume of 3.1 cm3 mol-1 determined from first principles by Ita and Cohen (1997 Phys. Rev. Lett. 79:3198-3201). It is also in good agreement with estimates based on a simple elastic theory for atomic migration in crystals (e.g. Flynn 1968 Phys. Rev. 171:682-698). Oxygen volume diffusion rates in these

  5. Matrix diffusion of simple cations, anions, and neutral species in fractured crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Haruo . Tokai Works)

    1999-08-01

    The diffusion of radionuclides into the pore spaces of a rock matrix and the pore properties in fractured crystalline rocks were studied. The work concentrated on the predominant water-conducting fracture system in the host granodiorite of the Kamaishi In Situ Test Site, which consists of fracture fillings and altered grandodiorite. Through-diffusion experiments to obtain effective and apparent diffusion coefficients (De and Da, respectively) for Na[sup +], Cs[sup +], HTO, Cl[sup [minus

  6. Cation self-diffusion of 44Ca, 88Y, and 96Zr in single-crystalline calcia- and yttria-doped zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilo, M.; Taylor, M. A.; Argirusis, Ch.; Borchardt, G.; Lesage, B.; Weber, S.; Scherrer, S.; Scherrer, H.; Schroeder, M.; Martin, M.

    2003-12-01

    Self-diffusion of calcium, yttrium, and zirconium in single-crystalline YSZ and CSZ (YSZ: yttria-stabilized zirconia; containing 10 to 32 mol % Y2O3; CSZ: calcia-stabilized zirconia; containing 11 and 17 mol % CaO) was measured at temperatures between 960 and 1700 °C. For zirconium and calcium diffusion, the stable isotopes 44Ca and 96Zr were used as tracers and the samples were analyzed with secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the case of yttrium diffusion, the radioactive tracer 88Y was used and an abrasive sectioning technique was applied. Zirconium bulk diffusion is slower than yttrium and calcium bulk diffusion, and there is a nearly linear correlation of diffusion coefficient with cation radius. In YSZ, zirconium and yttrium bulk diffusivity are maximum for a stabilizer content of 10-11 mol %, while in CSZ both calcium and zirconium tracer diffusion are independent of the calcium content. The activation enthalpy of yttrium stabilizer bulk diffusion (4.2 eV) is, as in CSZ, slightly smaller than for zirconium bulk diffusion (4.5 eV). The yttrium dislocation pipe diffusivity is five to six orders of magnitude faster than the bulk diffusivity, and its activation enthalpy (3.5 eV) is also smaller than that of the bulk diffusion. From the activation enthalpy and from the concentration dependence of the cation bulk diffusion, it is concluded that the cation diffusion occurs either via free vacancies (VZr4' in YSZ) or via bound vacancies ([VZr4'-2VO2•]x in CSZ).

  7. Tuning Equilibrium Compositions in Colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe Nanocrystals Using Diffusion Doping and Cation Exchange.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Chakraborty, Pradip; Kornowske, Lindsey M; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-01-26

    The physical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals can be tuned dramatically via composition control. Here, we report a detailed investigation of the synthesis of high-quality colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals by diffusion doping of preformed CdSe nanocrystals. Until recently, Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals proved elusive because of kinetic incompatibilities between Mn(2+) and Cd(2+) chemistries. Diffusion doping allows Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals to be prepared under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control, allowing access to broader composition ranges. We now investigate this chemistry as a model system for understanding the characteristics of nanocrystal diffusion doping more deeply. From the present work, a Se(2-)-limited reaction regime is identified, in which Mn(2+) diffusion into CdSe nanocrystals is gated by added Se(2-), and equilibrium compositions are proportional to the amount of added Se(2-). At large added Se(2-) concentrations, a solubility-limited regime is also identified, in which x = xmax = ∼0.31, independent of the amount of added Se(2-). We further demonstrate that Mn(2+) in-diffusion can be reversed by cation exchange with Cd(2+) under exactly the same reaction conditions, purifying Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals back to CdSe nanocrystals with fine tunability. These chemistries offer exceptional composition control in Cd1-xMnxSe NCs, providing opportunities for fundamental studies of impurity diffusion in nanocrystals and for development of compositionally tuned nanocrystals with diverse applications ranging from solar energy conversion to spin-based photonics. PMID:26643033

  8. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Kim, Won Kyu; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two-dimensional model system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains, while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that higher activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate the looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer’s centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our results are applicable to rationalising the dimensions and looping kinetics of biopolymers at constantly fluctuating and often actively driven conditions inside biological cells or in suspensions of active colloidal particles or bacteria cells.

  9. Channel-Facilitated Diffusion Boosted by Particle Binding at the Channel Entrance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate single-file diffusion of Brownian particles in arrays of closely confining microchannels permeated by a variety of attractive optical potentials and connecting two baths with equal particle concentration. We simultaneously test free diffusion in the channel, diffusion in optical traps coupled in the center of the channel, and diffusion in traps extending into the baths. We found that both classes of attractive optical potentials enhance the translocation rate through the channel with respect to free diffusion. Surprisingly, for the latter class of potentials we measure a 40-fold enhancement in the translocation rate with respect to free diffusion and find a sublinear power law dependence of the translocation rate on the average number of particles in the channel. Our results reveal the function of particle binding at the channel entrances for diffusive transport and open the way to a better understanding of membrane transport and design of synthetic membranes with enhanced diffusion rate.

  10. Channel-facilitated diffusion boosted by particle binding at the channel entrance.

    PubMed

    Pagliara, Stefano; Dettmer, Simon L; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2014-07-25

    We investigate single-file diffusion of Brownian particles in arrays of closely confining microchannels permeated by a variety of attractive optical potentials and connecting two baths with equal particle concentration. We simultaneously test free diffusion in the channel, diffusion in optical traps coupled in the center of the channel, and diffusion in traps extending into the baths. We found that both classes of attractive optical potentials enhance the translocation rate through the channel with respect to free diffusion. Surprisingly, for the latter class of potentials we measure a 40-fold enhancement in the translocation rate with respect to free diffusion and find a sublinear power law dependence of the translocation rate on the average number of particles in the channel. Our results reveal the function of particle binding at the channel entrances for diffusive transport and open the way to a better understanding of membrane transport and design of synthetic membranes with enhanced diffusion rate. PMID:25105657

  11. Kinetics of Coloration in Photochromic Tungsten(VI) Oxide/Silicon Oxycarbide/Silica Hybrid Xerogel: Insight into Cation Self-diffusion Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kenta; Tokushige, Masataka; Omata, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Silicon oxycarbide/silica composites with well-dispersed tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) nanoparticles were obtained as transparent hybrid xerogels via an acid-catalyzed sol-gel process (hydrolysis/condensation polymerization) of 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TESPMA) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The self-diffusion mechanism of alkali-metal cations and the kinetics of the photochromic coloration process in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel systems have been systematically investigated. Under continuous UV illumination, a gradual color change (colorless → blue) corresponding to the reduction of W(6+) into W(5+) states in WO3 nanoparticles can be confirmed from the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogels containing alkali-metal sulfates, although no coloration of the hybrid xerogel without alkali-metal sulfate was observed. The coloration behavior depended exclusively on a variety of alkali-metal cations present in the hybrid xerogel system. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the self-diffusion mechanism confirmed that the alkali-metal cations electrostatically interact with a layer of unreacted silanol groups on the TESPMA/TEOS matrix surface, and subsequently pass through the interconnected pore network of the hybrid xerogel. More interestingly, in the context of an Arrhenius analysis, we found a good coincidence between the activation energies for alkali-metal cation self-diffusion and UV-induced coloration in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system containing the corresponding alkali-metal sulfate. It is experimentally obvious that the photochromic properties are dominated by the diffusion process of alkali-metal cations in the WO3/TESPMA/TEOS hybrid xerogel system. Such hybrid materials with cation-controlled photochromic properties will show promising prospects in applications demanding energy-efficient "smart windows" and "smart glasses". PMID:27159661

  12. Solid state theory of competitive diffusion of associated Na+ and K+ in cells by free cation and vacancy (hole) mechanisms, with application to nerve.

    PubMed

    Cope, F W

    1977-01-01

    If, as recent evidence indicates, most cell potassium is associated with macromolecular fixed charge, then diffusion of potassium ions in cells might occur by (1) diffusion of the small fraction of free potassium in cell water (analogous to electrons in the conduction band of a semiconductor) or by (2) diffusion of vacancies on association sites (analogous to holes in a semiconductor). Derivations of the Fick first law of diffusion predict that partial substitution of sodium for potassium in the cell produces opposite effects on the effective diffusion constant of potassium for those mechanisms. Application of that substitution to nerve data suggests that rubidium ions diffuse by a free cation result when the nerve is clamped at its resting potential, but by a vacancy mechanism when the nerve is clamped at zero voltage. PMID:613332

  13. Isotopic mass-dependence of metal cation diffusion coefficients in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Richter, F.M.; Christensen, J.N.; Sposito, G.

    2009-01-11

    Isotope distributions in natural systems can be highly sensitive to the mass (m) dependence of solute diffusion coefficients (D) in liquid water. Isotope geochemistry studies routinely have assumed that this mass dependence either is negligible (as predicted by hydrodynamic theories) or follows a kinetic-theory-like inverse square root relationship (D {proportional_to} m{sup -0.5}). However, our recent experimental results and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that the mass dependence of D is intermediate between hydrodynamic and kinetic theory predictions (D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}} with 0 {<=} {beta} < 0.2 for Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, Mg{sup 2+}, and the noble gases). In this paper, we present new MD simulations and experimental results for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+} that confirm the generality of the inverse power-law relation D {proportional_to} m{sup -{beta}}. Our new findings allow us to develop a general description of the influence of solute valence and radius on the mass dependence of D for monatomic solutes in liquid water. This mass dependence decreases with solute radius and with the magnitude of solute valence. Molecular-scale analysis of our MD simulation results reveals that these trends derive from the exponent {beta} being smallest for those solutes whose motions are most strongly coupled to solvent hydrodynamic modes.

  14. Machine Learning Based Dimensionality Reduction Facilitates Ligand Diffusion Paths Assessment: A Case of Cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Rydzewski, J; Nowak, W

    2016-04-12

    In this work we propose an application of a nonlinear dimensionality reduction method to represent the high-dimensional configuration space of the ligand-protein dissociation process in a manner facilitating interpretation. Rugged ligand expulsion paths are mapped into 2-dimensional space. The mapping retains the main structural changes occurring during the dissociation. The topological similarity of the reduced paths may be easily studied using the Fréchet distances, and we show that this measure facilitates machine learning classification of the diffusion pathways. Further, low-dimensional configuration space allows for identification of residues active in transport during the ligand diffusion from a protein. The utility of this approach is illustrated by examination of the configuration space of cytochrome P450cam involved in expulsing camphor by means of enhanced all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The expulsion trajectories are sampled and constructed on-the-fly during molecular dynamics simulations using the recently developed memetic algorithms [ Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W. J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 ( 12 ), 124101 ]. We show that the memetic algorithms are effective for enforcing the ligand diffusion and cavity exploration in the P450cam-camphor complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that machine learning techniques are helpful in inspecting ligand diffusion landscapes and provide useful tools to examine structural changes accompanying rare events. PMID:26989997

  15. Limited diffusive fluxes of substrate facilitate coexistence of two competing bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Or, Dani; Smets, Barth F

    2008-04-01

    Soils are known to support a great bacterial diversity down to the millimeter scale, but the mechanisms by which such a large diversity is sustained are largely unknown. A feature of unsaturated soils is that water usually forms thin, poorly-connected films, which limit solute diffusive fluxes. It has been proposed, but never unambiguously experimentally tested, that a low substrate diffusive flux would impact bacterial diversity, by promoting the coexistence between slow-growing bacteria and their potentially faster-growing competitors. We used a simple experimental system, based on a Petri dish and a perforated Teflon membrane to control diffusive fluxes of substrate (benzoate) whilst permitting direct observation of bacterial colonies. The system was inoculated with prescribed strains of Pseudomonas, whose growth was quantified by microscopic monitoring of the fluorescent proteins they produced. We observed that substrate diffusion limitation reduced the growth rate of the otherwise fast-growing Pseudomonas putida KT2440 strain. This strain out-competed Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 in liquid culture, but its competitive advantage was less marked on solid media, and even disappeared under conditions of low substrate diffusion. Low diffusive fluxes of substrate, characteristic of many unsaturated media (e.g. soils, food products), can thus promote bacterial coexistence in a competitive situation between two strains. This mechanism might therefore contribute to maintaining the noncompetitive diversity pattern observed in unsaturated soils. PMID:18312376

  16. Partial cordierite breakdown during post-seismic recovery: the significance of plastic deformation for cation diffusion and metamorphic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Steffen; Costin, Gelu

    2010-05-01

    phases. The average modal composition of the alteration zone is: 2.3 Sil + 2.0 Mag + 4.3 Qtz + 3.9 St+ 87.5 CrdS (vol%) Thermodynamic modelling of primary cordierite breakdown using Theriak Domino shows that the observed breakdown is possible only in a small P -T window around P =450 MPa and T =555 ° C, which is in good agreement with the retrograde P - T path of the Sierra de Quilmes migmatites. Modes calculated using Theriak Domino are similar to results using descriptive methods (point counting), or methods based on chemistry and petrography (MODAN, CSpace). Since modes predicted on the assumption of petrological equilibrium are close to the observed modes, the breakdown reaction seen in the alteration zone most likely represents conditions of, or close to, thermodynamic equilibrium. The formation of the secondary mineral assemblage in the alteration zone depends upon the efficient supply of cations, essentially Si, Al, Fe and Mg. The bulk composition of new secondary minerals (Qtz, St, Mag, Sil) is enriched in Fe compared to CrdP, whereas CrdS is Fe depleted. The provision of Si and Al required for Sil, Qtz, and St can be assigned to partial cordierite breakdown. The excess Fe needed for Mag and St, and the removal of surplus Mg from CrdP breakdown, depends on Fe-Mg diffusion within CrdS. Since CrdS forms exclusively in the post-seismic recovery zone, we interpret dislocation creep, and hence cation diffusion related to plastic deformation, as the key process for the formation of reaction products reflecting thermodynamic equilibrium.

  17. Cation diffusion in the electrical double layer enhances the mass transfer rates for Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaus, M. A.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, C. A. J.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced mass transfer rates have been frequently observed in diffusion studies with alkaline and earth alkaline elements in compacted clay minerals and clay rocks. Whether this phenomenon - often termed surface diffusion - is also relevant for more strongly sorbing species is an open question. We therefore investigated the diffusion of Sr2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ in compacted illite with respect to variations of the concentration of the background electrolyte, pH and carbonate. New experimental techniques were developed in order to avoid artefacts stemming from the confinement of the clay sample. A distinct dependence of the effective diffusion coefficients on the concentration of the background electrolyte was observed for all three elements. A similar correlation was found for the sorption distribution ratio (Rd) derived from tracer breakthrough in the case of Sr2+, while this dependence was much weaker for Co2+ and Zn2+. Model calculations using Phreeqc resulted in a good agreement with the experimental data when it was assumed that the cationic species, present in the electrical double layer (EDL) of the charged clay surface, are mobile. Species bound to the specific surface complexation sites at the clay edges were assumed to be immobile. An assessment of the mobility of the type of cationic elements studied here in argillaceous media thus requires an analysis of their distribution among specifically sorbed surface species and species in the EDL. The normal approach of deriving unknown effective diffusion coefficients from reference values of an uncharged water tracer may significantly underestimate the mobility of metal cations in argillaceous media.

  18. Understanding innovators' experiences of barriers and facilitators in implementation and diffusion of healthcare service innovations: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare service innovations are considered to play a pivotal role in improving organisational efficiency and responding effectively to healthcare needs. Nevertheless, healthcare organisations encounter major difficulties in sustaining and diffusing innovations, especially those which concern the organisation and delivery of healthcare services. The purpose of the present study was to explore how healthcare innovators of process-based initiatives perceived and made sense of factors that either facilitated or obstructed the innovation implementation and diffusion. Methods A qualitative study was designed. Fifteen primary and secondary healthcare organisations in the UK, which had received health service awards for successfully generating and implementing service innovations, were studied. In-depth, semi structured interviews were conducted with the organisational representatives who conceived and led the development process. The data were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Four main themes were identified in the analysis of the data: the role of evidence, the function of inter-organisational partnerships, the influence of human-based resources, and the impact of contextual factors. "Hard" evidence operated as a proof of effectiveness, a means of dissemination and a pre-requisite for the initiation of innovation. Inter-organisational partnerships and people-based resources, such as champions, were considered an integral part of the process of developing, establishing and diffusing the innovations. Finally, contextual influences, both intra-organisational and extra-organisational were seen as critical in either impeding or facilitating innovators' efforts. Conclusions A range of factors of different combinations and co-occurrence were pointed out by the innovators as they were reflecting on their experiences of implementing, stabilising and diffusing novel service initiatives. Even though the innovations studied were of various

  19. Application of the diffusive gradients in thin films technique for available potassium measurement in agricultural soils: effects of competing cations on potassium uptake by the resin gel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Mason, Sean; McNeill, Ann; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of Amberlite (IRP-69 ion-exchange resin, 100-500 wet mesh) as the binding phase in the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique has shown potential to improve the assessment of plant-available K in soils. The binding phase has recently been optimized by using a mixed Amberlite and ferrihydrite (MAF) gel which results in linear K uptake over extended deployment periods and in solutions with higher K concentrations. As restriction of K uptake by Ca on the Amberlite based resin gel has been previously proposed, potential competing effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and NH(4+) on K uptake by the MAF gel were investigated. These cations had no effect on K elution efficiency which was 85%. However, K uptake by the MAF gel was restricted in the presence of competing cations in solution. Consequently, the diffusion coefficient of K decreased in the presence of cations compared to previous studies but was stable at 1.12×10(-5)cm(2)s(-1) at 25°C regardless of cation concentrations. Uptake of K by the DGT device was affected by the presence of excessive Ca in more than 30% of twenty typical Australian agricultural soils. However, this problem could be circumvented by using a shorter deployment time than the normal 24 h. Moderate correlation of concentrations of K extracted by DGT with Colwell K (extracted by NaHCO(3), R(2)=0.69) and NH4OAc K (R(2)=0.61) indicates that DGT measures a different pool of K in soils than that measured by the standard extractants used. In addition, the MAF gel has the ability to measure Ca and Mg simultaneously. PMID:25127648

  20. Antigenic epitopes fused to cationic peptide bound to oligonucleotides facilitate Toll-like receptor 9-dependent, but CD4+ T cell help-independent, priming of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Riedl, Petra; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Akira, Shizuo; Reimann, Jörg

    2003-11-15

    A priority in current vaccine research is the development of adjuvants that support the efficient priming of long-lasting, CD4(+) T cell help-independent CD8(+) T cell immunity. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) with immune-stimulating sequences (ISS) containing CpG motifs facilitate the priming of MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses to proteins or peptides. We show that the adjuvant effect of ISS(+) ODN on CD8(+) T cell priming to large, recombinant Ag is enhanced by binding them to short, cationic (arginine-rich) peptides that themselves have no adjuvant activity in CD8(+) T cell priming. Fusing antigenic epitopes to cationic (8- to 10-mer) peptides bound to immune-stimulating ISS(+) ODN or nonstimulating NSS(+) ODN (without CpG-containing sequences) generated immunogens that efficiently primed long-lasting, specific CD8(+) T cell immunity of high magnitude. Different MHC class I-binding epitopes fused to short cationic peptides of different origins showed this adjuvant activity. Quantitative ODN binding to cationic peptides strikingly reduced the toxicity of the latter, suggesting that it improves the safety profile of the adjuvant. CD8(+) T cell priming supported by this adjuvant was Toll-like receptor 9 dependent, but required no CD4(+) T cell help. ODN (with or without CpG-containing sequences) are thus potent Th1-promoting adjuvants when bound to cationic peptides covalently linked to antigenic epitopes, a mode of Ag delivery prevailing in many viral nucleocapsids. PMID:14607920

  1. Analysis of experimental data on divalent cation diffusion kinetics in aluminosilicate garnets with application to timescales of peak Barrovian metamorphism, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xu; Ague, Jay J.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new statistical framework to analyze the diffusion data for divalent cations (Fe, Mg, Mn, and Ca) in aluminosilicate garnet using published experimental data and an Arrhenius relationship that accounts for dependence on temperature, pressure, garnet unit-cell dimension, and oxygen fugacity. The regression is based on Bayesian statistics and is implemented by the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. All reported experimental uncertainties are incorporated, and the data are weighted by the precision of the experimental conditions. We also include a new term, the inter-experiment bias, to compensate for possible inconsistencies among experiments and to represent any experimental variability not explicitly presented in the Arrhenius relationship (e.g., water content, defect density). At high temperatures where most experiments were conducted, the diffusion coefficients calculated with the new parameters agree well with previous diffusion models (e.g., Chakraborty and Ganguly in Contrib Mineral Petrol, 111:74-86, 1992; Carlson in Am Mineral, 91:1-11, 2006). However, the down-temperature extrapolation leads to notable differences at lower temperatures for common petrological applications. For example, at 600 °C, the diffusion coefficients of Fe and Mn are one half-to-one order of magnitude faster and the diffusion coefficient of Ca is about one order of magnitude slower than calculated with parameters in Carlson (2006). Our statistical analysis also provides well-defined uncertainty bounds for timescale estimates based on garnet diffusion profiles. Application of the newly derived coefficients indicates that the timescale of the thermal peak of Barrovian metamorphism (Dalradian belt of Scotland) is about four to seven times longer than that estimated using previously published diffusion coefficients. The peak is still geologically brief, however—of the order of 106 years (0.75 Myr +0.70/-0.36 Myr; ±1σ). This brevity requires pulsed advective heat input

  2. Electrically facilitated molecular transport. Analysis of the relative contributions of diffusion, migration, and electroosmosis to solute transport in an ion-exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Bath, B D; White, H S; Scott, E R

    2000-02-01

    Electrically facilitated molecular transport in an ion-exchange membrane (Nafion, 1100 equiv wt) has been studied using a scanning electrochemical microscope. The transport rates of ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium (a cation), acetaminophen (a neutral molecule), and ascorbate (an anion) through approximately 120-micron-thick membranes were measured as a function of the iontophoretic current passed across the membrane (-1.0 to +1.0 A/cm2). Transport rates were analyzed by employing the Nernst-Planck equation, modified to account for electric field-driven convective transport. Excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the molecular flux was obtained using a single fitting parameter for each molecule (electroosmotic drag coefficient). The electroosmotic velocity of the neutral molecule, acetaminophen, was shown to be a factor of approximately 500 larger than that of the cation ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium, a consequence of the electrostatic interaction of the cation with the negatively charged pore walls of the ion-exchange membrane. Electroosmotic transport of ascorbate occurred at a negligible rate due to repulsion of the anion by the cation-selective membrane. These results suggest that electroosmotic velocities of solute molecules are determined by specific chemical interactions of the permeant and membrane and may be very different from the average solution velocity. The efficiency of electroosmotic transport was also shown to be a function of the membrane thickness, in addition to membrane/solute interactions. PMID:10695125

  3. Huntingtin regulates Ca(2+) chemotaxis and K(+)-facilitated cAMP chemotaxis, in conjunction with the monovalent cation/H(+) exchanger Nhe1, in a model developmental system: insights into its possible role in Huntington׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F; Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Myre, Michael A; Soll, David R

    2014-10-01

    Huntington׳s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, attributable to an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the coding region of the human HTT gene, which encodes the protein huntingtin. These mutations lead to huntingtin fragment inclusions in the striatum of the brain. However, the exact function of normal huntingtin and the defect causing the disease remain obscure. Because there are indications that huntingtin plays a role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, we studied the deletion mutant of the HTT ortholog in the model developmental system Dictyostelium discoideum, in which Ca(2+) plays a role in receptor-regulated behavior related to the aggregation process that leads to multicellular morphogenesis. The D. discoideum htt(-)-mutant failed to undergo both K(+)-facilitated chemotaxis in spatial gradients of the major chemoattractant cAMP, and chemotaxis up a spatial gradient of Ca(2+), but behaved normally in Ca(2+)-facilitated cAMP chemotaxis and Ca(2+)-dependent flow-directed motility. This was the same phenotypic profile of the null mutant of Nhel, a monovalent cation/H(+)exchanger. The htt(-)-mutant also failed to orient correctly during natural aggregation, as was the case for the Nhel mutant. Moreover, in a K(+)-based buffer the normal localization of actin was similarly defective in both htt(-) and nhe1(-) cells in a K(+)-based buffer, and the normal localization of Nhe1 was disrupted in the htt(-) mutant. These observations demonstrate that Htt and Nhel play roles in the same specific cation-facilitated behaviors and that Nhel localization is directly or indirectly regulated by Htt. Similar cation-dependent behaviors and a similar relationship between Htt and Nhe1 have not been reported for mammalian neurons and deserves investigation, especially as it may relate to Huntington׳s disease. PMID:25149514

  4. Cation diffusion and hybridization effects at the Mn-GaSe(0001) reacted interface: Ab initio calculations and soft x-ray electron spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Joshi, N.; Drera, G.; Ghosh, P.; Magnano, E.; Bondino, F.; Galinetto, P.; Mozzati, M. C.; Salvinelli, G.; Aguekian, V.; Sangaletti, L.

    2016-03-01

    The electronic properties of the Mn:GaSe interface, produced by evaporating Mn at room temperature on a ɛ -GaSe(0001) single-crystal surface, have been studied by soft x-ray spectroscopies, and the experimental results are discussed at the light of ab initio DFT+U calculations of a model Ga1 -xMnxSe (x =0.055 ) surface alloy. Consistently with these calculations that also predict a high magnetic moment for the Mn ions (4.73 -4.83 μB), XAS measurements at the Mn L edge indicate that Mn diffuses into the lattice as a Mn2 + cation with negligible crystal-field effects. Ab initio calculations also show that the most energetically favorable lattice sites for Mn diffusion are those where Mn substitutes Ga cations in the Ga layers of the topmost Se-Ga-Ga-Se sandwich. Mn s and p states are found to strongly hybridize with Se and Ga p states, while weaker hybridization is predicted for Mn d states with Se s and p orbitals. Furthermore, unlike other Mn-doped semiconductors, there is strong interaction between the Ga -s and Mn -dz2 states. The effects of hybridization of Mn 3 d electrons with neighboring atoms are still clearly detectable from the characteristic charge-transfer satellites observed in the photoemission spectra. The Mn 3 d spectral weight in the valence band is probed by resonant photoemission spectroscopy at the Mn L edge, which also allowed an estimation of the charge transfer (Δ =2.95 eV) and Mott-Hubbard (U =6.4 eV) energies on the basis of impurity-cluster configuration-interaction model of the photoemission process. The Mott-Hubbard correlation energy U is consistent with the Ueff on-site Coulomb repulsion parameter (5.84 eV) determined for the ab initio calculations.

  5. Wetting effects versus ion pairs diffusivity: interactions of anionic surfactants with highly soluble cationic drugs and its impact on tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Desai, Divyakant; Wong, Benjamin; Huang, Yande; Ye, Qingmei; Guo, Hang; Huang, Ming; Timmins, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A study was conducted to develop a mechanistic understanding of dissolution of a highly soluble cationic drug, metformin hydrochloride, under the influence of anionic surfactants, sodium alkyl sulfates. The surfactants did not influence the saturated solubility of the drug, but reduced the surface tension of the dissolution media as the alkyl chain length increased. Their influence on tablet wetting based on the contact angles did not show any trend. The dissolution of 850 mg metformin hydrochloride tablets in 0.1 N HCl and pH 4.5 acetate buffer with 0.01% (w/v) sodium n-octyl sulfate (C8), sodium n-decyl sulfate (C10), or sodium n-tetradecyl sulfate (C14) was similar to the control, but was enhanced by sodium lauryl sulfate (C12). At 0.1% (w/v) concentration, the dissolution was not enhanced by C12 because the reduction in surface tension was counterbalanced by an increase in hydrophobic ion pairs that showed slower diffusivity by nuclear magnetic resonance. At 0.1% (w/v), metformin also formed an insoluble salt (1:2 molar ratios) with C10 (pH 1.2), C12, and C14 (pH 1.2 and 4.5) but not with C8. Three competing factors influenced the drug dissolution by surfactants: reduction in surface tension of the dissolution media, ion pairs with low diffusivity, and formation of an insoluble salt. PMID:26017286

  6. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  7. Development of Online pH Gradient-Eluted Strong Cation Exchange Nanoelectrospray-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic Analysis Facilitating Basic and Histidine-Containing Peptides Identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Gao, Jing; Yu, Chengli; He, Han; Yang, Yiming; Figeys, Daniel; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A novel one-dimensional online pH gradient-eluted strong cation exchange-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (SCX-nano-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for protein identification and tested with a mixture of six standard proteins, total lysate of HuH7 and N2a cells, as well as membrane fraction of N2a cells. This method utilized an online nanoflow SCX column in a nano-LC system coupled with a nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protein digests were separated on a nanoflow SCX column with a pH gradient and directly introduced into a mass spectrometer through nanoelectrospray ionization. More than five thousand unique peptides were identified in each 90 min LC-MS/MS run using 500 nanogram of protein digest either from total cell lysate or from membrane fraction. The unique peptide overlap between online strong cation exchange nano-ESI-MS/MS (SCXLC-MS/MS) and reverse phase nano-ESI-MS/MS (RPLC-MS/MS) is only ≤30%, which indicated these two methods were complementary to each other. The correlation coefficient of retention time and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of identified peptides in SCXLC-MS/MS was higher than 0.4, which showed that peptides elution in SCXLC-MS/MS was dependent on their charge states. Furthermore, SCXLC-MS/MS showed identification capability for a higher proportion of basic peptides compared to the RPLC-MS/MS method, especially for histidine-containing peptides. Our SCXLC-MS/MS method is an excellent alternative method to the RPLC-MS/MS method for analysis of standard proteins, total cell and membrane proteomes. PMID:26646553

  8. A pH-Sensitive Function and Phenotype: Evidence that EutH Facilitates Diffusion of Uncharged Ethanolamine in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Penrod, Joseph T.; Mace, Christopher C.; Roth, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The eutH gene is part of an operon that allows Salmonella enterica to use ethanolamine as a sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Although the sequence of EutH suggests a role in transport, eutH mutants use ethanolamine normally under standard conditions (pH 7.0). These mutants fail to use ethanolamine at a low pH. Evidence is presented that protonated ethanolamine (Eth0) does not enter cells, while uncharged ethanolamine (Eth0) diffuses freely across the membrane. The external concentration of Eth0 varies with the pH (pK = 9.5). At pH 7.0, the standard ethanolamine concentration (41 mM) provides enough Eth0 for an influx rate that can support growth with or without EutH. When a lowered pH and/or ethanolamine concentration reduced the Eth0 concentration below 25 μM, EutH was needed to facilitate diffusion. EutH+ cells grew normally at Eth0 concentrations above 3 μM, close to the Km (9 μM) of the first degradative enzyme, ethanolamine ammonia lyase. It is suggested that EutH facilitates diffusion of Eth0. As predicted for a transporter, EutH contributed to the toxicity of ethanolamine seen under some conditions; furthermore, fusion of EutH to fluorescent Yfp protein provided evidence that EutH is a membrane protein. PMID:15466042

  9. The role of facilitated diffusion in oxygen transport by cell-free hemoglobins: implications for the design of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M R; Vandegriff, K D; Winslow, R M

    2001-08-30

    We compared rates of oxygen transport in an in vitro capillary system using red blood cells (RBCs) and cell-free hemoglobins. The axial PO(2) drop down the capillary was calculated using finite-element analysis. RBCs, unmodified hemoglobin (HbA(0)), cross-linked hemoglobin (alpha alpha-Hb) and hemoglobin conjugated to polyethylene-glycol (PEG-Hb) were evaluated. According to their fractional saturation curves, PEG-Hb showed the least desaturation down the capillary, which most closely matched the RBCs; HbA(0) and alpha alpha-Hb showed much greater desaturation. A lumped diffusion parameter, K*, was calculated based on the Fick diffusion equation with a term for facilitated diffusion. The overall rates of oxygen transfer are consistent with hemoglobin diffusion rates according to the Stokes-Einstein Law and with previously measured blood pressure responses in rats. This study provides a conceptual framework for the design of a 'blood substitute' based on mimicking O(2) transport by RBCs to prevent autoregulatory changes in blood flow and pressure. PMID:11527583

  10. Phylogenetic relationships within cation transporter families of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mäser, P; Thomine, S; Schroeder, J I; Ward, J M; Hirschi, K; Sze, H; Talke, I N; Amtmann, A; Maathuis, F J; Sanders, D; Harper, J F; Tchieu, J; Gribskov, M; Persans, M W; Salt, D E; Kim, S A; Guerinot, M L

    2001-08-01

    Uptake and translocation of cationic nutrients play essential roles in physiological processes including plant growth, nutrition, signal transduction, and development. Approximately 5% of the Arabidopsis genome appears to encode membrane transport proteins. These proteins are classified in 46 unique families containing approximately 880 members. In addition, several hundred putative transporters have not yet been assigned to families. In this paper, we have analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of over 150 cation transport proteins. This analysis has focused on cation transporter gene families for which initial characterizations have been achieved for individual members, including potassium transporters and channels, sodium transporters, calcium antiporters, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, cation diffusion facilitator proteins, natural resistance-associated macrophage proteins (NRAMP), and Zn-regulated transporter Fe-regulated transporter-like proteins. Phylogenetic trees of each family define the evolutionary relationships of the members to each other. These families contain numerous members, indicating diverse functions in vivo. Closely related isoforms and separate subfamilies exist within many of these gene families, indicating possible redundancies and specialized functions. To facilitate their further study, the PlantsT database (http://plantst.sdsc.edu) has been created that includes alignments of the analyzed cation transporters and their chromosomal locations. PMID:11500563

  11. Message spreading in networks with stickiness and persistence: Large clustering does not always facilitate large-scale diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pengbi; Tang, Ming; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2014-09-01

    Recent empirical studies have confirmed the key roles of complex contagion mechanisms such as memory, social reinforcement, and decay effects in information diffusion and behavior spreading. Inspired by this fact, we here propose a new agent-based model to capture the whole picture of the joint action of the three mechanisms in information spreading, by quantifying the complex contagion mechanisms as stickiness and persistence, and carry out extensive simulations of the model on various networks. By numerical simulations as well as theoretical analysis, we find that the stickiness of the message determines the critical dynamics of message diffusion on tree-like networks, whereas the persistence plays a decisive role on dense regular lattices. In either network, the greater persistence can effectively make the message more invasive. Of particular interest is that our research results renew our previous knowledge that messages can spread broader in networks with large clustering, which turns out to be only true when they can inform a non-zero fraction of the population in the limit of large system size.

  12. Reptation-induced coalescence of tunnels and cavities in Escherichia Coli XylE transporter conformers accounts for facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    Structural changes and xylose docking to eight conformers of Escherichia Coli XylE, a xylose transporter similar to mammalian passive glucose transporters GLUTs, have been examined. Xylose docks to inward and outward facing conformers at a high affinity central site (K(i) 4-20 µM), previously identified by crystallography and additionally consistently docks to lower affinity sites in the external and internal vestibules (K(i) 12-50 µM). All these sites lie within intramolecular tunnels and cavities. Several local regions in the central transmembrane zone have large positional divergences of both skeleton carbon Cα positions and side chains. One such in TM 10 is the destabilizing sequence G388-P389-V390-C391 with an average RMSD (4.5 ± 0.4 Å). Interchange between conformer poses results in coalescence of tunnels with adjacent cavities, thereby producing a transitory channel spanning the entire transporter. A fully open channel exists in one inward-facing apo-conformer, (PDB 4ja4c) as demonstrated by several different tunnel-finding algorithms. The conformer interchanges produce a gated network within a branched central channel that permits staged ligand diffusion across the transporter during the open gate periods. Simulation of this model demonstrates that small-scale conformational changes required for sequentially opening gate with frequencies in the ns-μs time domain accommodate diffusive ligand flow between adjacent sites with association-dissociation rates in the μs-ms domain without imposing delays. This current model helps to unify the apparently opposing concepts of alternate access and multisite models of ligand transport. PMID:25163893

  13. Effect of cation structure on the oxygen solubility and diffusivity in a range of bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion based ionic liquids for lithium-air battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Neale, Alex R; Li, Peilin; Jacquemin, Johan; Goodrich, Peter; Ball, Sarah C; Compton, Richard G; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-04-28

    This paper reports on the solubility and diffusivity of dissolved oxygen in a series of ionic liquids (ILs) based on the bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide anion with a range of related alkyl and ether functionalised cyclic alkylammonium cations. Cyclic voltammetry has been used to observe the reduction of oxygen in ILs at a microdisk electrode and chronoamperometric measurements have then been applied to simultaneously determine both the concentration and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in different ILs. The viscosity of the ILs and the calculated molar volume and free volume are also reported. It is found that, within this class of ILs, the oxygen diffusivity generally increases with decreasing viscosity of the neat IL. An inverse relationship between oxygen solubility and IL free volume is reported for the two IL families implying that oxygen is not simply occupying the available empty space. In addition, it is reported that the introduction of an ether-group into the IL cation structure promotes the diffusivity of dissolved oxygen but reduces the solubility of the gas. PMID:27052672

  14. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the diffusion of two organic cations across a negatively charged lipid bilayer probed by second harmonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, R. K.; Varshney, G. K.; Dube, A.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6) on the real time diffusion kinetics of two organic cations, LDS (LDS-698) and Malachite Green (MG) across a negatively charged phospholipid bilayer is investigated by Second Harmonic (SH) spectroscopy. The diffusion time constant of LDS at neutral pH in liposomes containing either Curcumin or Cp6 is significantly reduced, the effect being more pronounced with Curcumin. At acidic pH, the quantum of reduction in the diffusion time constant of MG by both the drugs was observed to be similar. The relative changes in the average diffusion time constants of the cations with increasing drug concentration at pH 5.0 and 7.4 shows a substantial pH effect for Curcumin induced membrane permeability, while a modest pH effect was observed for Cp6 induced membrane permeability. Based on available evidence this can be attributed to the increased interaction between the drug and the polar head groups of the lipid at pH 7.4 where the drug resides closer to the lipid-water interface.

  15. Modeling packed bed sorbent systems with the Pore Surface Diffusion Model: Evidence of facilitated surface diffusion of arsenate in nano-metal (hydr)oxide hybrid ion exchange media.

    PubMed

    Dale, Sachie; Markovski, Jasmina; Hristovski, Kiril D

    2016-09-01

    This study explores the possibility of employing the Pore Surface Diffusion Model (PSDM) to predict the arsenic breakthrough curve of a packed bed system operated under continuous flow conditions with realistic groundwater, and consequently minimize the need to conduct pilot scale tests. To provide the nano-metal (hydr)oxide hybrid ion exchange media's performance in realistic water matrices without engaging in taxing pilot scale testing, the multi-point equilibrium batch sorption tests under pseudo-equilibrium conditions were performed; arsenate breakthrough curve of short bed column (SBC) was predicted by the PSDM in the continuous flow experiments; SBC tests were conducted under the same conditions to validate the model. The overlapping Freundlich isotherms suggested that the water matrix and competing ions did not have any denoting effect on sorption capacity of the media when the matrix was changed from arsenic-only model water to real groundwater. As expected, the PSDM provided a relatively good prediction of the breakthrough profile for arsenic-only model water limited by intraparticle mass transports. In contrast, the groundwater breakthrough curve demonstrated significantly faster intraparticle mass transport suggesting to a surface diffusion process, which occurs in parallel to the pore diffusion. A simple selection of DS=1/2 DP appears to be sufficient when describing the facilitated surface diffusion of arsenate inside metal (hydr)oxide nano-enabled hybrid ion-exchange media in presence of sulfate, however, quantification of the factors determining the surface diffusion coefficient's magnitude under different treatment scenarios remained unexplored. PMID:26672387

  16. Effect of Structure on Transport Properties (Viscosity, Ionic Conductivity, and Self-Diffusion Coefficient) of Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion (AHA) Room Temperature Ionic Liquids. 2. Variation of Alkyl Chain Length in the Phosphonium Cation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyuan; Morales-Collazo, Oscar; Xia, Han; Brennecke, Joan F

    2016-06-30

    A series of room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) composed of triethyl(alkyl)phosphonium cations paired with three different aprotic heterocyclic anions (AHAs) (alkyl = butyl ([P2224](+)) and octyl ([P2228](+))) were prepared to investigate the effect of cationic alkyl chain length on transport properties. The transport properties and density of these ILs were measured from 283.15 to 343.15 K at ambient pressure. The dependence of the transport properties (viscosity, ionic conductivity, diffusivity, and molar conductivity) on temperature can be described by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. The ratio of the molar conductivity obtained from the molar concentration and ionic conductivity measurements to that calculated from self-diffusion coefficients (measured by pulsed gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) using the Nernst-Einstein equation was used to quantify the ionicity of these ILs. The molar conductivity ratio decreases with increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain, indicating that the reduced Coulombic interactions resulting from lower density are more than balanced by the increased van der Waals interactions between the alkyl chains. The results of this study may provide insight into the design of ILs with enhanced dynamics that may be suitable as electrolytes in lithium ion batteries and other electrochemical applications. PMID:27243107

  17. Glycerol uptake is by passive diffusion in the heart but by facilitated transport in RBCs at high glycerol levels in cold acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax).

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Driedzic, William R

    2012-04-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small fish that accumulates glycerol at low winter seawater temperatures. In laboratory-held fish, glycerol concentration typically reaches 225 mM in plasma and in all cells. Glycerol uptake by the heart and red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed by tracking [(14)C(U)]glycerol into the acid-soluble pool. In fish acclimated to 9-10°C a decrease in perfusion/incubation temperature from 8 to 1°C resulted in a decrease in glycerol uptake with a Q(10) of 3.2 in heart and 2.4 in RBCs. Acclimation to ∼1.5°C did not result in an adaptive enhancement of glycerol uptake as rates were unchanged in heart and RBCs. Glycerol uptake at 1°C was by passive diffusion in heart as evidenced by a linear relationship between glycerol uptake and extracellular glycerol concentration and a lack of inhibition by phloretin. In contrast, in RBCs, glycerol uptake with respect to glycerol concentration showed two linear relationships with a transition point around 50 mM extracellular glycerol. The slope of the second phase was much steeper and eliminated with the inclusion of phloretin. In RBCs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a related species that does not accumulate glycerol, glycerol uptake showed only a single linear curve and was not inhibited by phloretin. The data imply a strong facilitated component to glycerol uptake in rainbow smelt RBCs at high glycerol concentrations. We propose this is related to cyclic changes in RBC glycerol content involving a loss of glycerol at the gill and a reaccumulation during passage through the liver. PMID:22319051

  18. Efficacy of HGF carried by ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposomes complex for treating hepatic fibrosis in a bile duct ligation rat model, and its relationship with the diffusion-weighted MRI parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-hong; Wen, Kun-ming; Wu, Wei; Li, Wen-yan; Zhao, Jian-nong

    2013-12-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a major consequence of liver aggression. Finding novel ways for counteracting this damaging process, and for evaluating fibrosis with a non-invasive imaging approach, represent important therapeutic and diagnostic challenges. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an anti-fibrosis cell growth factor that induces apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells, reduces excessive collagen deposition, and stimulates hepatocyte regeneration. Thus, using HGF in gene therapy against liver fibrosis is an attractive approach. The aims of the present study were: (i) to explore the efficacy of treating liver fibrosis using HGF expression vector carried by a novel ultrasound microbubble delivery system; (ii) to explore the diagnostic interest of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) in evaluating liver fibrosis. We established a rat model of hepatic fibrosis. The rats were administered HGF linked to novel ultrasound micro-bubbles. Progression of hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology, hydroxyproline content, and DWI-MRI to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Our targeted gene therapy produced a significant anti-fibrosis effect, as shown by liver histology and significant reduction of hydroxyproline content. Moreover, using DWI-MRI, the b value (diffusion gradient factor) was equal to 300s/mm(2), and the ADC values significantly decreased as the severity of hepatic fibrosis increased. Using this methodology, F0-F2 could be distinguished from F3 and F4 (P<0.01). This is the first in vivo report of using an ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposome complex for gene delivery. The data indicate that, this approach is efficient to counteract the fibrosis process. DWI-MRI appears a promising imaging technique for evaluating liver fibrosis. PMID:24012221

  19. The cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-04-16

    The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author's perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forego aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction (Li(+) binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4(+) with 19 kcal/mol) distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2-5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) C(δ-)-H(δ+) bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+): as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane is

  20. The Cation-π Interaction

    PubMed Central

    DOUGHERTY, DENNIS A.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author’s perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forgo aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction – Li+ binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4+ with 19 kcal/mol– distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2 – 5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) Cδ−–Hδ+ bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li+>Na+>K+>Rb+: as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane

  1. Electrochemically influenced cation inter-diffusion and Co3O4 formation on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 infiltrated into SOFC cathodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Xueyan; Lee, Shiwoo; Chen, Yun; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-06-18

    Nanosized LSC electrocatalyst was infiltrated into a porous scaffold cathode composed of Sm2O3-doped CeO2 (SDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) in a commercial button solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). To understand the stability of cathodes infiltrated with LSC, the infiltrated composite cells were subjected to both electrochemical operating and thermal aging states at 750 °C for 1500 h. Nanostructure and local chemistry evolution of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 (LSC) infiltrated cathodes upon operation and aging were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. After operation, the LSC remained a cubic perovskite, and the crystal grains exhibit comparable size to as-infiltrated LSC grains. Inter-diffusion of Fe from themore » LSCF to a Fe-incorporated LSC layer developed on the LSCF backbone. However, only sharp interfaces were observed between LSC and SDC backbone in the as-infiltrated cathode and such interfaces remain after operation. The infiltrated LSC on the SDC backbone also retains granular particle morphology. Furthermore, newly grown Co3O4 nanocrystals were found in the operated cathode. After thermal aging, on the other hand, cation inter-diffusion across the interfaces of the infiltrate particles and the cathode backbones is less than that from the operated cells. Lastly, the following hypothesis is proposed: Co3O4 forms on LSC arising from local charge balancing between cobalt and oxygen vacancies.« less

  2. Selective Cation Exchange in the Core Region of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied cation exchange (CE) in core/shell Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS nanorods with two cations, Ag+ and Hg2+, which are known to induce rapid exchange within metal chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) at room temperature. At the initial stage of the reaction, the guest ions diffused through the Cu2–xS shell and reached the Cu2–xSe core, replacing first Cu+ ions within the latter region. These experiments prove that CE in copper chalcogenide NCs is facilitated by the high diffusivity of guest cations in the lattice, such that they can probe the whole host structure and identify the preferred regions where to initiate the exchange. For both guest ions, CE is thermodynamically driven as it aims for the formation of the chalcogen phase characterized by the lower solubility under the specific reaction conditions. PMID:26360611

  3. Method for the analysis of contribution of sliding and hopping to a facilitated diffusion of DNA-binding protein: Application to in vivo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaka, Marcin; Burdzy, Krzysztof; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-08-01

    DNA-binding protein searches for its target, a specific site on DNA, by means of diffusion. The search process consists of many recurrent steps of one-dimensional diffusion (sliding) along the DNA chain and three-dimensional diffusion (hopping) after dissociation of a protein from the DNA chain. Here we propose a computational method that allows extracting the contribution of sliding and hopping to the search process in vivo from the measurements of the kinetics of the target search by the lac repressor in Escherichia coli [P. Hammar et al., Science 336, 1595 (2012), 10.1126/science.1221648]. The method combines lattice Monte Carlo simulations with the Brownian excursion theory and includes explicitly steric constraints for hopping due to the helical structure of DNA. The simulation results including all experimental data reveal that the in vivo target search is dominated by sliding. The short-range hopping to the same base pair interrupts one-dimensional sliding while long-range hopping does not contribute significantly to the kinetics of the search of the target in vivo.

  4. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures. PMID:26880646

  5. Casebook of Selected State Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Network of Innovative Schools, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The U.S. Office of Education's National Diffusion Network is designed to transport and systematically promote the adoption of validated innovative programs throughout the nation. The 13 case studies in this publication are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the state facilitator effort and accurately represent the range and diversity…

  6. Mechanism of oligonucleotide release from cationic liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Zelphati, O; Szoka, F C

    1996-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for oligonucleotide (ODN) release from cationic lipid complexes in cells that accounts for various observations on cationic lipid-nucleic acid-cell interactions. Fluorescent confocal microscopy of cells treated with rhodamine-labeled cationic liposome/ fluorescein-labeled ODN (F-ODN) complexes show the F-ODN separates from the lipid after internalization and enters the nucleus leaving the fluorescent lipid in cytoplasmic structures. ODN displacement from the complex was studied by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. Anionic liposome compositions (e.g., phosphatidylserine) that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the cell membrane released ODN from the complex at about a 1:1 (-/+) charge ratio. Release was independent of ionic strength and pH. Physical separation of the F-ODN from monovalent and multivalent cationic lipids was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Fluid but not solid phase anionic liposomes are required, whereas the physical state of the cationic lipids does not effect the release. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density, dextran sulfate, or heparin also release ODN. However, ATP, spermidine, spermine, tRNA, DNA, polyglutamic acid, polylysine, bovine serum albumin, or histone did not release ODN, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). Based upon these results, we propose that the complex, after internalization by endocytosis, induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic facing monolayer. Anionic lipids laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charged neutralized ion-pair with the cationic lipids. This leads to displacement of the ODN from the cationic lipid and its release into the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8876163

  7. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  8. Cationic cetylpyridinium micelle as a novel electrolyte system for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanacharoenchumrut, Sakon; Angboonpong, Natee; Pakawatpanurut, Pasit

    2016-03-01

    The charge transfer process within the electrolyte system is an active area for further improving the conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). In this work, micelle formed by cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium (CP) chloride was used in the electrolyte to enhance the ion transport of the redox couple. Using a mixed solvent of ethylene glycol and acetonitrile at 1:9 volume ratio and 0.50 M CP, an 83% improvement in DSSC efficiency was observed. Because of a strong correlation between the efficiency and the current density as a function of the CP concentration, the presence of CP micelle likely caused a favorable shift in the ion transport within the electrolyte. According to the cyclic voltammetry, such improved ion transport can be attributed to a faster diffusion of the redox couple, particularly the I3- diffusion. In addition, the impedance analysis also revealed a short electron lifetime for the diffusion process in the presence of the CP micelle. From these results, it is plausible that the CP micelle in the electrolyte provides an extensive network of positively-charged interfaces, which facilitates the diffusion of the redox couple and enhances the overall performance of the DSSC.

  9. Illinois Statewide Facilitator Center. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Statewide Facilitator Center, Metropolis.

    This report summarizes the activities of the Illinois Statewide Facilitator Center for fiscal year 1979. The Facilitator Center is the Illinois link in the National Diffusion Network (NDN) and assists educators in Illinois by providing improved educational opportunities through surveying school needs within the state and reviewing exemplary…

  10. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion and transport of nanoparticles (NPs) though nanochannels is important for desalination, drug delivery, and biomedicine. Their surface composition dictate their efficiency separating them by reverse osmosis, delivering into into cells, as well as their toxicity. We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through nanochannels of NPs with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns, less water soluble, and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. For equivalent patterns, anionic NPs solubilize more than cationic NPs since the Coulomb interaction of free anionic NPs, which are much stronger than hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are about twice that of cationic NPs.

  11. Role of organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the brain.

    PubMed

    Couroussé, Thomas; Gautron, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Organic cation transporters (OCTs) are polyspecific facilitated diffusion transporters that contribute to the absorption and clearance of various physiological compounds and xenobiotics in mammals, by mediating their vectorial transport in kidney, liver or placenta cells. Unexpectedly, a corpus of studies within the last decade has revealed that these transporters also fulfill important functions within the brain. The high-affinity monoamine reuptake transporters (SERT, NET and DAT) exert a crucial role in the control of aminergic transmission by ensuring the rapid clearance of the released transmitters from the synaptic cleft and their recycling into the nerve endings. Substantiated evidence indicate that OCTs may serve in the brain as a compensatory clearance system in case of monoamine spillover after high-affinity transporter blockade by antidepressants or psychostimulants, and in areas of lower high-affinity transporter density at distance from the aminergic varicosities. In spite of similar anatomical profiles, the two brain OCTs, OCT2 and OCT3, show subtle differences in their distribution in the brain and their functional properties. These transporters contribute to shape a variety of central functions related to mood such as anxiety, response to stress and antidepressant efficacy, but are also implicated in other processes like osmoregulation and neurotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge and emerging concepts on the role of OCTs in the uptake of aminergic neurotransmitters in the brain and in these various physiological functions, focusing on the implications for mental health. PMID:25251364

  12. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-04-01

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm-1 to 44 500 cm-1. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D1←D0 transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH2 or CH3. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  13. [PAH Cations as Viable Carriers of DIBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Ted

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to fill in the blanks in NASA's file system for our lab astro study of molecular ions of astrophysical interest. In order to give NASA what it needs for its files, I attach below the text of the section from our recent proposal to continue this work, in which we describe progress to date, including a large number of publications. Our initial studies were focused on PAH cations, which appear to be viable candidates as the carriers of the DIBs, an idea that has been supported by laboratory spectroscopy of PAH cations in inert matrices. Beginning with the simplest aromatic (benzene; C6H6) and moving progressively to larger species (naphthalene, C10OH8; pyrene, C16H10; and most recently chrysene, C18H12), we have been able to derive rate coefficients for reactions with neutral spices that are abundant in the diffuse interstellar medium.

  14. Facilitating Facilitators: Enhancing PBL through a Structured Facilitator Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinitri, Francine D.; Wilhelm, Sheila M.; Crabtree, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing adoption of the problem-based learning (PBL) model, creative approaches to enhancing facilitator training and optimizing resources to maintain effective learning in small groups is essential. We describe a theoretical framework for the development of a PBL facilitator training program that uses the constructivist approach as the…

  15. The Zen of Facilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen P.; Simmons, Lynn A.

    1992-01-01

    Distinguishes between training and facilitation, examines the belief system of a facilitator, and shares a process for moving from the familiar mind-set of the trainer to the zen (the practice of seeking the truth) of facilitation. (GLR)

  16. Computation Of Facilitated Transport of O2 In Hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    Report describes computations of unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen through liquid membrane of hemoglobin. Used here, "facilitated transport" means diffusion of permeant through membrane in which that diffusion enhanced by reversible chemical reaction between permeant and membrane. In this case, reversible reactions between hemoglobin and oxygen.

  17. Penetrating cations enhance uncoupling activity of anionic protonophores in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Khailova, Ljudmila S; Knorre, Dmitry A; Markova, Olga V; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Ilyasova, Tatyana M; Severina, Inna I; Kotova, Elena A; Karavaeva, Yulia E; Prikhodko, Anastasia S; Severin, Fedor F; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Protonophorous uncouplers causing a partial decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential are promising candidates for therapeutic applications. Here we showed that hydrophobic penetrating cations specifically targeted to mitochondria in a membrane potential-driven fashion increased proton-translocating activity of the anionic uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluorophenylhydrazone (FCCP). In planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) separating two compartments with different pH values, DNP-mediated diffusion potential of H(+) ions was enhanced in the presence of dodecyltriphenylphosphonium cation (C12TPP). The mitochondria-targeted penetrating cations strongly increased DNP- and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP)-mediated steady-state current through BLM when a transmembrane electrical potential difference was applied. Carboxyfluorescein efflux from liposomes initiated by the plastoquinone-containing penetrating cation SkQ1 was inhibited by both DNP and FCCP. Formation of complexes between the cation and CCCP was observed spectophotometrically. In contrast to the less hydrophobic tetraphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), SkQ1 and C12TPP promoted the uncoupling action of DNP and FCCP on isolated mitochondria. C12TPP and FCCP exhibited a synergistic effect decreasing the membrane potential of mitochondria in yeast cells. The stimulating action of penetrating cations on the protonophore-mediated uncoupling is assumed to be useful for medical applications of low (non-toxic) concentrations of protonophores. PMID:23626747

  18. Penetrating Cations Enhance Uncoupling Activity of Anionic Protonophores in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Antonenko, Yuri N.; Khailova, Ljudmila S.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Markova, Olga V.; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I.; Ilyasova, Tatyana M.; Severina, Inna I.; Kotova, Elena A.; Karavaeva, Yulia E.; Prikhodko, Anastasia S.; Severin, Fedor F.; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Protonophorous uncouplers causing a partial decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential are promising candidates for therapeutic applications. Here we showed that hydrophobic penetrating cations specifically targeted to mitochondria in a membrane potential-driven fashion increased proton-translocating activity of the anionic uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluorophenylhydrazone (FCCP). In planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) separating two compartments with different pH values, DNP-mediated diffusion potential of H+ ions was enhanced in the presence of dodecyltriphenylphosphonium cation (C12TPP). The mitochondria-targeted penetrating cations strongly increased DNP- and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP)-mediated steady-state current through BLM when a transmembrane electrical potential difference was applied. Carboxyfluorescein efflux from liposomes initiated by the plastoquinone-containing penetrating cation SkQ1 was inhibited by both DNP and FCCP. Formation of complexes between the cation and CCCP was observed spectophotometrically. In contrast to the less hydrophobic tetraphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), SkQ1 and C12TPP promoted the uncoupling action of DNP and FCCP on isolated mitochondria. C12TPP and FCCP exhibited a synergistic effect decreasing the membrane potential of mitochondria in yeast cells. The stimulating action of penetrating cations on the protonophore-mediated uncoupling is assumed to be useful for medical applications of low (non-toxic) concentrations of protonophores. PMID:23626747

  19. MLKL forms cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingqing; Fang, Sui; Chen, Xueqin; Hu, Hong; Chen, Peiyuan; Wang, Huayi; Gao, Zhaobing

    2016-01-01

    The mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) protein is a key factor in tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis. Recent studies on necroptosis execution revealed a commitment role of MLKL in membrane disruption. However, our knowledge of how MLKL functions on membrane remains very limited. Here we demonstrate that MLKL forms cation channels that are permeable preferentially to Mg2+ rather than Ca2+ in the presence of Na+ and K+. Moreover, the N-terminal domain containing six helices (H1-H6) is sufficient to form channels. Using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we further determine that helix H1, H2, H3, H5 and H6 are transmembrane segments, while H4 is located in the cytoplasm. Finally, MLKL-induced membrane depolarization and cell death exhibit a positive correlation to its channel activity. The Mg2+-preferred permeability and five transmembrane segment topology distinguish MLKL from previously identified Mg2+-permeable channels and thus establish MLKL as a novel class of cation channels. PMID:27033670

  20. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  1. Novel penetrating cations for targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Boris V; Antonenko, Yuri N; Domnina, Lidia V; Ivanova, Olga Yu; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Pustovidko, Antonina V; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A

    2013-01-01

    Novel penetrating cations were used for the design of mitochondria-targeted compounds and tested in model lipid membranes, in isolated mitochondria and in living human cells in culture. Rhodamine-19, berberine and palmatine were conjugated by aliphatic linkers with plastoquinone possessing antioxidant activity. These conjugates (SkQR1,SkQBerb, SkQPalm) and their analogs lacking plastoquinol moiety (C12R1,C10Berb and C10Palm) penetrated bilayer phospholipid membrane in their cationic forms and accumulated in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria of living cells due to membrane potential negative inside. Reduced forms of SkQR1, SkQBerb and SkQPalm inhibited lipid peroxidation in isolated mitochondria at nanomolar concentrations. In human fibroblasts SkQR1, SkQBerb and SkQPalm prevented fragmentation of mitochondria and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide. SkQR1 was effective at subnanomolar concentrations while SkQberb, SkQPalm and SkQ1 (prototypic conjugate of plastoquinone with dodecyltriphenylphosphonium) were effective at 10-times higher concentrations. The aliphatic conjugates of berberine and palmatine (as well as the conjugates of triphenylphosphonium) induced proton transport mediated by free fatty acids (FA) both in the model and mitochondrial membrane. In mitochondria this process was facilitated by the adenine nucleotide carrier. In contrast to the other cationic conjugates, SkQR1 and C12R1 induced FA-independent proton conductivity due to protonation/deprotonation of the rhodamine residue. This property in combination with the antioxidant activity probably makes rhodamine conjugates highly effective in protection against oxidative stress. The novel cationic conjugates described here are promising candidates for drugs against various pathologies and aging as mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and selective mild uncouplers. PMID:23092317

  2. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  3. Electrochemically influenced cation inter-diffusion and Co3O4 formation on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 infiltrated into SOFC cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xueyan; Lee, Shiwoo; Chen, Yun; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-06-18

    Nanosized LSC electrocatalyst was infiltrated into a porous scaffold cathode composed of Sm2O3-doped CeO2 (SDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) in a commercial button solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). To understand the stability of cathodes infiltrated with LSC, the infiltrated composite cells were subjected to both electrochemical operating and thermal aging states at 750 °C for 1500 h. Nanostructure and local chemistry evolution of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 (LSC) infiltrated cathodes upon operation and aging were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. After operation, the LSC remained a cubic perovskite, and the crystal grains exhibit comparable size to as-infiltrated LSC grains. Inter-diffusion of Fe from the LSCF to a Fe-incorporated LSC layer developed on the LSCF backbone. However, only sharp interfaces were observed between LSC and SDC backbone in the as-infiltrated cathode and such interfaces remain after operation. The infiltrated LSC on the SDC backbone also retains granular particle morphology. Furthermore, newly grown Co3O4 nanocrystals were found in the operated cathode. After thermal aging, on the other hand, cation inter-diffusion across the interfaces of the infiltrate particles and the cathode backbones is less than that from the operated cells. Lastly, the following hypothesis is proposed: Co3O4 forms on LSC arising from local charge balancing between cobalt and oxygen vacancies.

  4. Aryl sulfoxide radical cations. Generation, spectral properties, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2006-08-17

    Aromatic sulfoxide radical cations have been generated by pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis techniques. In water (pulse radiolysis) the radical cations showed an intense absorption band in the UV region (ca. 300 nm) and a broad less intense band in the visible region (from 500 to 1000 nm) whose position depends on the nature of the ring substituent. At very low pulse energy, the radical cations decayed by first-order kinetics, the decay rate increasing as the pH increases. It is suggested that the decay involves a nucleophilic attack of H(2)O or OH(-) (in basic solutions) to the positively charged sulfur atom to give the radical ArSO(OH)CH(3)(*). By sensitized [N-methylquinolinium tetrafluoborate (NMQ(+))] laser flash photolysis (LFP) the aromatic sulfoxide radical cations were generated in acetonitrile. In these experiments, however, only the band of the radical cation in the visible region could be observed, the UV band being covered by the UV absorption of NMQ(+). The lambda(max) values of the bands in the visible region resulted almost identical to those observed in water for the same radical cations. In the LFP experiments the sulfoxide radical cations decayed by second-order kinetics at a diffusion-controlled rate, and the decay is attributed to the back electron transfer between the radical cation and NMQ(*). DFT calculations were also carried out for a number of 4-X ring substituted (X = H, Me, Br, OMe, CN) aromatic sulfoxide radical cations (and their neutral parents). In all radical cations, the conformation with the S-O bond almost coplanar with the aromatic ring is the only one corresponding to the energy minimum. The maximum of energy corresponds to the conformation where the S-O bond is perpendicular to the aromatic ring. The rotational energy barriers are not very high, ranging from 3.9 to 6.9 kcal/mol. In all radical cations, the major fraction of charge and spin density is localized on the SOMe group. However, a substantial delocalization

  5. Insights into dynamic processes of cations in pyrochlores and other complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Perriot, Romain

    2015-08-26

    Complex oxides are critical components of many key technologies, from solid oxide fuel cells and superionics to inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. In many cases, understanding mass transport is important for predicting performance and, thus, extensive effort has been devoted to understanding mass transport in these materials. However, most work has focused on the behavior of oxygen while cation transport has received relatively little attention, even though cation diffusion is responsible for many phenomena, including sintering, radiation damage evolution, and deformation processes. Here, we use accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to examine the kinetics of cation defects in one class of complex oxides, A₂B₂O₇ pyrochlore. In some pyrochlore chemistries, B cation defects are kinetically unstable, transforming to A cation defects and antisites at rates faster than they can diffuse. When this occurs, transport of B cations occurs through defect processes on the A sublattice. Further, these A cation defects, either interstitials or vacancies, can interact with antisite disorder, reordering the material locally, though this process is much more efficient for interstitials than vacancies. Whether this behavior occurs in a given pyrochlore depends on the A and B chemistry. Pyrochlores with a smaller ratio of cation radii exhibit this complex behavior, while those with larger ratios exhibit direct migration of B interstitials. Similar behavior has been reported in other complex oxides such as spinels and perovskites, suggesting that this coupling of transport between the A and B cation sublattices, while not universal, occurs in many complex oxide.

  6. Golgi localized barley MTP8 proteins facilitate Mn transport.

    PubMed

    Pedas, Pai; Schiller Stokholm, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Ladegård, Anne Hald; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Husted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2, which encode membrane-bound proteins belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family in the cereal species barley (Hordeum vulgare). Transient expression in onion epidermal cells showed that MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are localized to Golgi. When heterologously expressed in yeast, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 were found to be Mn transporters catalysing Mn efflux in a similar manner as the Golgi localized endogenous yeast protein Pmr1p. The level of MTP8.1 transcripts in barley roots increased with external Mn supply ranging from deficiency to toxicity, while MTP8.2 transcripts decreased under the same conditions, indicating non-overlapping functions for the two genes. In barley leaves, the expression of both MTP8 genes declined in response to toxic Mn additions to the roots suggesting a role in ensuring proper delivery of Mn to Golgi. Based on the above we suggest that barley MTP8 proteins are involved in Mn loading to the Golgi apparatus and play a role in Mn homeostasis by delivering Mn to Mn-dependent enzymes and/or by facilitating Mn efflux via secretory vesicles. This study highlights the importance of MTP transporters in Mn homeostasis and is the first report of Golgi localized Mn2+ transport proteins in a monocot plant species. PMID:25486417

  7. Golgi Localized Barley MTP8 Proteins Facilitate Mn Transport

    PubMed Central

    Pedas, Pai; Schiller Stokholm, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Ladegård, Anne Hald; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Husted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2, which encode membrane-bound proteins belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family in the cereal species barley (Hordeum vulgare). Transient expression in onion epidermal cells showed that MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are localized to Golgi. When heterologously expressed in yeast, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 were found to be Mn transporters catalysing Mn efflux in a similar manner as the Golgi localized endogenous yeast protein Pmr1p. The level of MTP8.1 transcripts in barley roots increased with external Mn supply ranging from deficiency to toxicity, while MTP8.2 transcripts decreased under the same conditions, indicating non-overlapping functions for the two genes. In barley leaves, the expression of both MTP8 genes declined in response to toxic Mn additions to the roots suggesting a role in ensuring proper delivery of Mn to Golgi. Based on the above we suggest that barley MTP8 proteins are involved in Mn loading to the Golgi apparatus and play a role in Mn homeostasis by delivering Mn to Mn-dependent enzymes and/or by facilitating Mn efflux via secretory vesicles. This study highlights the importance of MTP transporters in Mn homeostasis and is the first report of Golgi localized Mn2+ transport proteins in a monocot plant species. PMID:25486417

  8. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-05-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core-shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core-shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals.

  9. Ti Diffusion in Pyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    ), but more than two orders of magnitude slower than those of Fe-Mg (ter Heege et al., 2006) and Cr (Ganguly et al., 2007). These respective variations may reflect the interplay of cation size and charge, or may point to the substitution of Ti on the tetrahedral site. Measurements of diffusion under a broader range of conditions and for other high field strength elements are underway to better interpret these findings. Major and trace element zoning in pyroxenes have been observed in residual peridotites and mafic cumulates. The large differences in cation mobility among Ti, Cr, and Fe-Mg in pyroxene may allow us to distinguish the dominant process that gives rise to the chemical disequilibria. In contrast to those produced by subsolidus reequilibration during cooling, the apparent diffusive boundary layer thicknesses as measured by major and trace elements in a pyroxene grain are not sensitive to the respective cation diffusion rates if zoning is produced by magmatic processes that involves dissolution- precipitation. Examples of zoning in pyroxenes produced by magmatic and subsolidus processes will be discussed. Ganguly et al. (2007) GCA 71, 3915-3925; ter Heege et al. (2006) Eos Trans. AGU 87, Fall Mtg. Suppl. MR21A-0004; Cherniak and Liang (2007) GCA 71, 1324-1340

  10. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications. PMID:27335229

  11. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures. PMID:27203790

  12. Cationic lipid-mediated nucleic acid delivery: beyond being cationic.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2010-03-01

    Realization of the potential of nucleic acids as drugs is intricately linked to their in vivo delivery. Cationic lipids demonstrated tremendous potential as safe, efficient and scalable in vitro carriers of nucleic acids. For in vivo delivery of nucleic acids, the extant two component liposomal preparations consisting of cationic lipids and nucleic acids have been largely found to be insufficient. Being a soft matter, liposomes readily respond to many physiological variables leading to complex component and morphological changes, thus confounding the efforts in a priori identification of a "competent" formulation. In the recent past many chemical moieties that provide advantage in facing the challenges of barriers in vivo, were incorporated into cationic lipids to improve the transfection efficiency. The cationic lipids, essential for DNA condensation and protection, definitely require additional components to be efficient in vivo. In addition, formulations of cationic lipid carriers with non-lipidic components, mainly peptides, have demonstrated success in in vivo transfection. The present review describes some recent successes of in vivo nucleic acid delivery by cationic lipids. PMID:20060819

  13. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  14. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  15. Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose with high antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Achraf; Boufi, Sami

    2015-10-20

    Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose (C-NFC) has been prepared via a high pressure homogenization using quaternized cellulose fibers with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. It has been shown that the quaternization of dried softwood pulp facilitated the defibrillation processes and prevented clogging of the homogenizer. The effects of the trimethylammonium chloride content on the fibrillation yield, the transparency degree of the gel, the rheological behavior of the NFC suspension and their electrokinetic properties were investigated. AFM observation showed that the NFC suspension consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 4-5nm in width and length in the micronic scale. In addition to their strong reinforcing potential, the inclusion of C-NFC into a polymer matrix was shown to efficiently enhance the antibacterial activity. The reinforcing potential of C-NFC, studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was compared to anionic NFC and the difference was explained in terms of the nanofibrils capacities to build up a strong networks held by hydrogen bonding. PMID:26256179

  16. A Facilitation Performance Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Presents a guide, derived from the Situational Leadership model, which describes the process that should be used in facilitating a group discussion. The process includes preparation, assessment, diagnosis, prescription, development, reinforcement, and follow-up. Three figures depict the Situational Leadership model, the facilitation process, and…

  17. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Ammonium Cationized Polyethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasioudis, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M. A.; van Doormalen, Irene; de Wijs-Rot, Nicolette; van den Brink, Oscar F.

    2011-05-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (Quats) and amines are known to facilitate the MS analysis of high molar mass polyethers by forming low charge state adduct ions. The formation, stability, and behavior upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) of adduct ions of polyethers with a variety of Quats and amines were studied by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, and linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The linear ion trap instrument was part of an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer that allowed accurate mass MS/MS measurements. The Quats and amines studied were of different degree of substitution, structure, and size. The stability of the adduct ions was related to the structure of the cation, especially the amine's degree of substitution. CID of singly/doubly charged primary and tertiary ammonium cationized polymers resulted in the neutral loss of the amine followed by fragmentation of the protonated product ions. The latter reveals information about the monomer unit, polymer sequence, and endgroup structure. In addition, the detection of product ions retaining the ammonium ion was observed. The predominant process in the CID of singly charged quaternary ammonium cationized polymers was cation detachment, whereas their doubly charged adduct ions provided the same information as the primary and tertiary ammonium cationized adduct ions. This study shows the potential of specific amines as tools for the structural elucidation of high molar mass polyethers.

  18. Cationic polymers and their self-assembly for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pradee

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the amphiphilic cationic polymers as antibacterial agents. These polymers undergo self-assembly in aqueous conditions and impart biological activity by efficiently interacting with the bacterial cell wall, hence, used in preparing chemical disinfectants and biocides. Both cationic charge as well as hydrophobic segments facilitate interactions with the bacterial cell surface and initiate its disruption. The perturbation in transmembrane potential causes leakage of cytosolic contents followed by cell death. Out of two categories of macromolecules, peptide oligomers and cationic polymers, which have extensively been used as antibacterials, we have elaborated on the current advances made in the area of cationic polymer-based (naturally occurring and commonly employed synthetic polymers and their modified analogs) antibacterial agents. The development of polymer-based antibacterials has helped in addressing challenges posed by the drug-resistant bacterial infections. These polymers provide a new platform to combat such infections in the most efficient manner. This review presents concise discussion on the amphiphilic cationic polymers and their modified analogs having low hemolytic activity and excellent antibacterial activity against array of fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms. PMID:25858132

  19. Electrolyte diffusion in compacted montmorillonite engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, F.M.; Radke, C.J.

    1985-09-01

    The bentonite-based engineered barrier or packing is a proposed component of several designs conceived to dispose of high-level nuclear waste in geologic repositories. Once radionuclides escape the waste package, they must first diffuse through the highly impermeable clay-rich barrier before they reach the host repository. To determine the effectiveness of the packing as a sorption barrier in the transient release period and as a mass-transfer barrier in the steady release period over the geologic time scales involved in nuclear waste disposal, a fundamental understanding of the diffusion of electrolytes in compacted clays is required. We present, and compare with laboratory data, a model quantifying the diffusion rates of cationic cesium and uncharged tritium in compacted montmorillonite clay. Neutral tritium characterizes the geometry (i.e., tortuosity) of the particulate gel. After accounting for cation exchange, we find that surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism of cation transport, with an approximate surface diffusion coefficient of 2 x 10 W cmS/s for cesium. This value increases slightly with increasing background ionic strength. The implications of this work for the packing as a migration barrier are twofold. During the transient release period, K/sub d/ values are of little importance in retarding ion migration. This is because sorption also gives rise to a surface diffusion path, and it is surface diffusion which controls the diffusion rate of highly sorbing cations in compacted montmorillonite. During the steady release period, the presence of surface diffusion leads to a flux through the packing which is greatly enhanced. In either case, if surface diffusion is neglected, the appropriate diffusion coefficient of ions in compacted packing will be in considerable error relative to current design recommendations. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  1. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-01-01

    We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through hydrophobic nanochannels of nanoparticles (NPs) with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Ten different charge pattern types including Janus charged-hydrophobic NPs are studied. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. The NP-water Coulomb interaction of anionic NPs in the bulk, which are much stronger than the hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are stronger for NPs with higher localized charge, and stronger than in the cationic NPs counterparts. The diffusion and transport of anionic NPs such as proteins and protein charge ladders with the same total charge but different surface charge patterns are slowest for the highest localized charge pattern, which also adsorb strongest onto surfaces. Our model demonstrates the separation (by reverse osmosis, capillary electrophoresis, or chromatography) of cationic NPs, including proteins with equal net charge but different surface charge distributions.

  2. Diffusion of uranium in compacted sodium bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Muurinen, A.; Ollila, K.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1993-12-31

    In this study the diffusion of uranium dissolved from uranium oxide fuel was studied experimentally in compacted sodium bentonite (Wyoming bentonite MX-80). The parameters varied in the study were the density of bentonite, the salt content of the solution and the redox conditions. In the studies with non-saline water of total dissolved solids about 300 ppm, uranium was both in aerobic and anaerobic experiments as anionic complexes and followed the anionic diffusion mechanism. Anion exclusion decreased effective diffusion coefficients, especially in more dense samples. In the studies with saline water of total dissolves solids about 35000 ppm, uranium appeared in the aerobic experiments probably as cationic complexes and followed the cationic diffusion mechanism. Uranium in the saline, anaerobic experiment was probably U(OH){sub 4} and followed the diffusion mechanism of neutral species.

  3. Cation Ordering in Layered Nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Zhou, Hua; Cammarata, Antonio; Hoffman, Jason; Balachandran, Prasanna; Rondinelli, James; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2013-03-01

    The single layer Ruddlesden-Popper nickelates present a model system to understand how the effects of digital dopant cation ordering may affect the properties of 2-dimensional conducting sheets. We investigate the effects of aliovalent A-site cation order on LaSrNiO4 films. Using molecular beam epitaxy, we interleave full layers of SrO and LaO in a series of chemically equivalent films, varying the pattern of SrO and LaO layers relative to the NiO2 layers. Through synchrotron surface x-ray diffraction and Coherant Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA), we directly investigate the A-site cation order and the resulting atomic displacements for each ordering pattern. We correlate these results with theoretical calculations and transport measurements of the layered nickelate films.

  4. Cu3-xP Nanocrystals as a Material Platform for Near-Infrared Plasmonics and Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis approaches to colloidal Cu3P nanocrystals (NCs) have been recently developed, and their optical absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR) have been interpreted as arising from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Our pump–probe measurements on platelet-shaped Cu3-xP NCs corroborate the plasmonic character of this absorption. In accordance with studies on crystal structure analysis of Cu3P dating back to the 1970s, our density functional calculations indicate that this material is substoichiometric in copper, since the energy of formation of Cu vacancies in certain crystallographic sites is negative, that is, they are thermodynamically favored. Also, thermoelectric measurements point to a p-type behavior of the majority carriers from films of Cu3-xP NCs. It is likely that both the LSPR and the p-type character of our Cu3-xP NCs arise from the presence of a large number of Cu vacancies in such NCs. Motivated by the presence of Cu vacancies that facilitate the ion diffusion, we have additionally exploited Cu3-xP NCs as a starting material on which to probe cation exchange reactions. We demonstrate here that Cu3-xP NCs can be easily cation-exchanged to hexagonal wurtzite InP NCs, with preservation of the anion framework (the anion framework in Cu3-xP is very close to that of wurtzite InP). Intermediate steps in this reaction are represented by Cu3-xP/InP heterostructures, as a consequence of the fact that the exchange between Cu+ and In3+ ions starts from the peripheral corners of each NC and gradually evolves toward the center. The feasibility of this transformation makes Cu3-xP NCs an interesting material platform from which to access other metal phosphides by cation exchange. PMID:25960605

  5. Mechanisms of impurity diffusion in rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, N.L.; Sasaki, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion of /sup 46/Sc, /sup 51/Cr, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 60/Co, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 95/Zr, was measured as functions of crystal orientation, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure in rutile single crystals using the radioactive tracer sectioning technique. Compared to cation self-diffusion, divalent impurities (e.g., Co and Ni) diffuse extremely rapidly in TiO/sub 2/ and exhibit a large anisotropy in the diffusion behavior; divalent-impurity diffusion parallel to the c-axis is much larger than it is perpendicular to the c-axis. The diffusion of trivalent impurity ions (Sc and Cr) and tetravalent impurity ions (Zr) is similar to cation self-diffusion, as a function of temperature and of oxygen partial pressure. The divalent impurity ions Co and Ni apparently diffuse as interstitial ions along open channels parallel to the c-axis. The results suggest that Sc, Cr, and Zr ions diffuse by an interstitialcy mechanism involving the simultaneous and cooperative migration of tetravalent interstitial titanium ions and the tracer-impurity ions. Iron ions diffused both as divalent and as trivalent ions. 8 figures.

  6. Diffuse sorption modeling.

    PubMed

    Pivovarov, Sergey

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a simple solution for the diffuse double layer model, applicable to calculation of surface speciation as well as to simulation of ionic adsorption within the diffuse layer of solution in arbitrary salt media. Based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Gaines-Thomas selectivity coefficient for uni-bivalent exchange on clay, K(GT)(Me(2+)/M(+))=(Q(Me)(0.5)/Q(M)){M(+)}/{Me(2+)}(0.5), (Q is the equivalent fraction of cation in the exchange capacity, and {M(+)} and {Me(2+)} are the ionic activities in solution) may be calculated as [surface charge, mueq/m(2)]/0.61. The obtained solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation was applied to calculation of ionic exchange on clays and to simulation of the surface charge of ferrihydrite in 0.01-6 M NaCl solutions. In addition, a new model of acid-base properties was developed. This model is based on assumption that the net proton charge is not located on the mathematical surface plane but diffusely distributed within the subsurface layer of the lattice. It is shown that the obtained solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation makes such calculations possible, and that this approach is more efficient than the original diffuse double layer model. PMID:19159896

  7. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  8. Improvement in the assessment of direct and facilitated ion transfers by electrochemically induced redox transformations of common molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Dong, Xiandui; Ulstrup, Jens; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li

    2012-03-14

    A new strategy based on a thick organic film modified electrode allowed us, for the first time, to explore the voltammetric processes for a series of hydrophilic ions by electrochemically induced redox transformations of common molecular probes. During the limited time available for voltammetry, this thick organic film ensured that the generated product of the molecular probe, which is within a limited diffusion layer, was kept far away from the aqueous-organic solvent interface; therefore, regardless of the degree of hydrophobicity, the generated product never participates in ion exchange across the interface and the charge neutrality of the organic film (containing an extremely hydrophobic electrolyte) can only be maintained by the injection of ions from the aqueous phase. Taking advantage of this fact, common redox probes, such as ferrocene (Fc) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), which are almost useless for both three-phase electrode (TPE) and thin-layer cyclic voltammetry (TLCV) methods, can induce the transfer of numerous highly hydrophilic anions and cations. Consequently, the majority of their Gibbs transfer energies have been accurately determined for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With this in mind, using TCNQ as a redox probe to induce facilitated cation transfer, a stategy that is more advantageous than traditional methods has been developed. The main advantages are that: (i) voltammetric experiments performed on this system were free from the polarized potential window (ppw) in the aqueous phase and, as a result, this allowed the assessment of weakly assisted ion transfers, which appear at the terminal of the ppw at single polarized interfaces; (ii) without introducing the tetraphenylarsonium-tetraphenylborate (TPAs-TPB) thermodynamic assumption, one can conveniently evaluate both the association constant and the stoichiometric parameter between the ion and its ionophore by comparison of their direct and facilitated ion transfer

  9. Cation-cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO2)3(WO6)(H2O)5 (1), Ag(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3 (2), K(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)4 (3), Rb(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3.5 (4), and Cs(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)3 (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1-5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation-cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2-5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO2)2+ uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO6 octahedra. Chains are linked through cation-cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [-1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C.

  10. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  11. Optimal Network Modularity for Information Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ferrara, Emilio; Flammini, Alessandro; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the impact of community structure on information diffusion with the linear threshold model. Our results demonstrate that modular structure may have counterintuitive effects on information diffusion when social reinforcement is present. We show that strong communities can facilitate global diffusion by enhancing local, intracommunity spreading. Using both analytic approaches and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the existence of an optimal network modularity, where global diffusion requires the minimal number of early adopters.

  12. Understanding Facilitation: Theory and Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Christine

    This book introduces newcomers to the concept of facilitation, and it presents a critical analysis of established and current theory on facilitation for existing practitioners. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) emergence of the field of facilitation; (2) development of facilitation in management; (3) development of facilitation in…

  13. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  14. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  15. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  16. Action Research Facilitator's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro-Bruce, Cathy

    This handbook is a roadmap for action research facilitators to help groups as they work through the research process. It offers quotations, handouts, strategies, resources, and insights from actual experiences. The sections of the handbook follow the action research cycle, focusing on: "What is Action Research?"; "What is the Action Research…

  17. Facilitative Strategies in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Thara M. A.; Haugabrook, Adrian K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes campus-based strategies to facilitate collaboration by examining the process of restructuring a division of student affairs as an educational partner with academic affairs. Describes three collaborative efforts at the University of Massachusetts Boston: the Beacon Leadership Project, the Diversity Research Initiative, and the Beacon…

  18. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  19. A microscale method of protein extraction from bacteria: Interaction of Escherichia coli with cationic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Trefilov, Alexandru; Imendoerffer, Moritz; Sekot, Gerhard; Strobl, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Hahn, Rainer

    2015-08-10

    We developed a simple, highly selective, efficient method for extracting recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. Our recombinant protein yield was equivalent to those obtained with high pressure homogenization, and did not require exposure to harsh thermal, chemical, or other potentially denaturing factors. We first ground conventional resin, designed for the exchange of small anions, into microparticles about 1μm in size. Then, these cationic microparticles were brought convectively into close contact with bacteria, and cell membranes were rapidly perforated, but solid cell structures were not disrupted. The released soluble components were adsorbed onto the cell wall associated microparticles or diffused directly into the supernatant. Consequently, the selective adsorption and desorption of acidic molecules is built into our extraction method, and replaces the equally effective subsequent capture on anion exchange media. Simultaneously to cell perforation flocculation was induced by the microparticles facilitating separation of cells yet after desorption of proteins with NaCl. Relative to high pressure homogenization, endogenous component release was reduced by up to three orders of magnitude, including DNA, endotoxins, and host cell proteins, particularly outer membrane protein, which indicates the presence of cell debris. PMID:25959169

  20. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  1. Insights into dynamic processes of cations in pyrochlores and other complex oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Perriot, Romain

    2015-08-26

    Complex oxides are critical components of many key technologies, from solid oxide fuel cells and superionics to inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. In many cases, understanding mass transport is important for predicting performance and, thus, extensive effort has been devoted to understanding mass transport in these materials. However, most work has focused on the behavior of oxygen while cation transport has received relatively little attention, even though cation diffusion is responsible for many phenomena, including sintering, radiation damage evolution, and deformation processes. Here, we use accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to examine the kinetics of cation defects in onemore » class of complex oxides, A₂B₂O₇ pyrochlore. In some pyrochlore chemistries, B cation defects are kinetically unstable, transforming to A cation defects and antisites at rates faster than they can diffuse. When this occurs, transport of B cations occurs through defect processes on the A sublattice. Further, these A cation defects, either interstitials or vacancies, can interact with antisite disorder, reordering the material locally, though this process is much more efficient for interstitials than vacancies. Whether this behavior occurs in a given pyrochlore depends on the A and B chemistry. Pyrochlores with a smaller ratio of cation radii exhibit this complex behavior, while those with larger ratios exhibit direct migration of B interstitials. Similar behavior has been reported in other complex oxides such as spinels and perovskites, suggesting that this coupling of transport between the A and B cation sublattices, while not universal, occurs in many complex oxide.« less

  2. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  3. Gaseous protein cations are amphoteric

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-02-19

    Singly- and multiply-protonated ubiquitin molecules are found to react with iodide anions, and certain other anions, by attachment of the anion, in competition with proton transfer to the anion. The resulting adduct ions are relatively weakly bound and dissociate upon collisional activation by loss of the neutral acid derived from the anion. Adduct ions that behave similarly can also be formed via ion/molecule reactions involving the neutral acid. The ion/molecule reaction phenomenology, however, stands in contrast with that expected based on the reaction site(s) being charged. Reaction rates increase inversely with charge state and the total number of neutral molecules that add to the protein cations increases inversely with cation charge. These observations are inconsistent with the formation of proton-bound clusters but are fully consistent with the formation of ion pairs or dipole/dipole bonding involving the neutral acid and neutral basic sites in the protein. The ion/ion reactions can be interpreted on the basis of conjugate acid/base chemistry in which the anion, which is a strong gaseous base, reacts with a protonated site, which is a strong gaseous acid. Adduct ions can also be formed via ion/molecule reaction which, on the basis of microscopic reversibility, implies that the neutral acid interacts with neutral basic sites on the protein cation. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  5. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Cravens, Shannen L.; Schonhoft, Joseph D.; Rowland, Meng M.; Rodriguez, Alyssa A.; Anderson, Breeana G.; Stivers, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  6. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Shannen L; Schonhoft, Joseph D; Rowland, Meng M; Rodriguez, Alyssa A; Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2015-04-30

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  7. Specific distributions of anions and cations of an ionic liquid through confinement between graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Alibalazadeh, Mahtab; Foroutan, Masumeh

    2015-07-01

    This work was aimed to investigate the behavior, morphology, structure, and dynamical properties of pure ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([emim][BF4]) confined between two parallel and flat graphene sheets at different interwall distances, H. Thus, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were performed for different interwall distances including (10, 14, 16, 20, 23, and 28) Å at seven temperatures from 278 to 308 K. These results showed that the distribution and orientation of cations and anions on the graphene sheets depended on H. At the shortest H, a dense monolayer of the anions and cations was formed between two graphene sheets. The number of these layers increased as H increased. The potential energy diagram as a function of H demonstrated a minimum potential energy at H = 16 Å. Also, there was a minimum overlap between the density profiles of the cations and anions at H = 16 Å. Diffusion coefficients of the cations and anions increased as temperature and H increased. Moreover, slope of the plot of the diffusion coefficients of the cations and anions versus H significantly changed at H = 16 Å. Orientation functions revealed that most of the cations oriented parallel to the graphene sheets. PMID:26048248

  8. Hyperconjugation in diethyl ether cation versus diethyl sulfide cation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masato; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Tomoya; Mikami, Naohiko; Fujii, Asuka; Takahashi, Kaito

    2015-09-28

    Ionization of a molecule can greatly alter its electronic structure as well as its geometric structure. In this collaborative experimental and theoretical study, we examined variance in hyperconjugation upon ionization of diethyl ether (DEE) and diethyl sulfide (DES). We obtained the experimental gas phase vibrational spectra of DEE, DES, DEE(+), DES(+), DEE(+)-Ar, and DES(+)-Ar in the wavenumber region of 2500 to 3600 cm(-1). For DEE(+) and DEE(+)-Ar, we observed a greatly red shifted CH stretching peak at 2700 cm(-1), while the lowest CH stretching peaks for DEE, DES, DES(+) and DES(+)-Ar were observed around 2850 cm(-1). For DEE(+), we calculated a drastic red shifted CH stretching peak at 2760 cm(-1), but for DEE, DES, and DES(+) the lowest CH stretching peaks were calculated to be at 2860, 2945, and 2908 cm(-1), respectively. In addition, for DEE, the minima (maxima) geometry in the neutral state becomes a maxima (minima) geometry in the cationic state, while similar minima geometries are seen in neutral and cationic states of DES. These experimental and theoretical findings were rationalized through the natural bond orbital analysis by quantifying the hyperconjugation between the σCH orbital and the ionized singly occupied p orbital of the oxygen (sulfur) in DEE(+) (DES(+)). This study showed how orientation with the ionized orbital can greatly affect the neighboring CH bond strength and its polarity, as well as the geometry of the system. Furthermore, this change in the CH bond strength between DEE(+) and DES(+) is quantified from the energies for intramolecular proton transfer in the two cations. PMID:26300267

  9. SEARCHING FOR NAPHTHALENE CATION ABSORPTION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Searles, Justin M.; Destree, Joshua D.; Snow, Theodore P.; Salama, Farid; York, Donald G.; Dahlstrom, Julie E-mail: destree@colorado.edu E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov E-mail: jdahlstrom1@carthage.edu

    2011-05-01

    Interstellar naphthalene cations (C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8}) have been proposed by a study to be the carriers of a small number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Using an archive of high signal-to-noise spectra obtained at the Apache Point Observatory, we used two methods to test the hypothesis. Both methods failed to detect significant absorption at lab wavelengths of interstellar spectra with laboratory spectra. We thereby conclude that C{sub 10}H{sup +}{sub 8} is not a DIB carrier in typical reddened sight lines.

  10. Cation and anion transport in a dicationic imidazolium-based plastic crystal ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Bryce E; Lingwood, Mark D; Lee, Minjae; Gibson, Harry W; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-02-27

    Here we investigate the organic ionic plastic crystal 1,2-bis[N-(N'-hexylimidazolium-d2(4,5))]ethane 2PF6(-) in one of its solid plastic crystal phases by means of multinuclear solid-state (SS) NMR and pulsed-field-gradient NMR diffusometry. We quantify distinct cation and anion diffusion coefficients as well as the Arrhenius diffusion activation energies (Ea) in this dicationic imidazolium-based plastic crystal. Our studies suggest a change in transport mechanism for the cation upon varying thermal and magnetic treatment (9.4 T), evidenced by differences in cation and anion Ea. Moreover, variable temperature (2)H SSNMR line shapes support a change in local molecular environment upon slow cooling in B0. We quantify the percentage of mobile anions as a function of temperature with (19)F SSNMR, wherein two distinct spectral features are present. We also comment on the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion (D0), giving insight into the number of degrees of freedom for transport for both cation and anion as a function of thermal treatment. Given the breadth and depth of our measurements, we propose that bulk ion transport is dominated by anion diffusion in ionic-liquid-like domain boundaries separating crystallites. This study elucidates fundamental properties of this plastic crystal, and allows for a more general and deeper understanding of ion transport within such materials. PMID:24495282

  11. Prediction of Intrinsic Cesium Desorption from Na-Smectite in Mixed Cation Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Fukiage, Tomo

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative understanding of the stability of sorbed radionuclides in smectite is necessary to assess the performance of engineering barriers used for nuclear waste disposal. Our previous study demonstrated that the spatial organization of the smectite platelets triggered by the divalent cations led to the apparent fixation of intrinsic Cs in smectite, because some Cs is retained inside the formed tactoids. Natural water is usually a mixture of Na(+) and divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). This study therefore investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs in Na-smecite in mixed Na(+)-divalent cation solutions under widely various cation concentrations using batch experiments, grain size measurements, and cation exchange modeling (CEM). Results show that increased Na(+) concentrations facilitate Cs desorption because Na(+) serves as the dispersion agent. A linear relation was obtained between the logarithm of the Na(+) fraction and the accessible Cs fraction in smectite. That relation enables the prediction of accessible Cs fraction as a function of solution cationic compositions. The corrected CEM considering the effects of the spatial organization suggests that the stability of intrinsic Cs in the smectite is governed by the Na(+) concentration, and suggests that it is almost independent of the concentrations of divalent cations in natural water. PMID:26206200

  12. Ti Diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion of Ti under anhydrous conditions at 1 atmosphere and under fluid-present conditions at 1.1-1.2 GPa has been measured in natural zircon. The source of diffusant for 1-atm experiments was a ZrO2- TiO2-ZrSiO4 mixture, with experiments run in Pt capsules. Diffusion experiments conducted in the presence of H2O-CO2 fluid were run in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using a source of ground TiO2, ZrSiO4 and SiO2, with oxalic acid added to produce H2O-CO2 vapor and partially melt the solid source material, yielding an assemblage of rutile + zircon + melt + vapor. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with the nuclear reaction ^{48}Ti(p,Γ)^{49}V was used to measure diffusion profiles for both sets of experiments. The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for Ti diffusion normal to c over the temperature range 1350-1550C at one atmosphere: DTi = 3.3x102 exp(-754 ± 56 kJ mol-1 /RT) m2sec-1 Ti diffusivities were found to be similar for experiments run under fluid-present conditions. A fit to all of the data yields the Arrhenius relation D = 1.3x103 exp(-741 ± 46 kJ mol-1 /RT) m2sec-1. These data suggest that zircon should be extremely retentive of Ti chemical signatures, indicating that the recently developed Ti-in-zircon crystallization geothermometer (Watson and Harrison, 2005; Watson et al., 2006) will be quite robust in preserving temperatures of zircon crystallization. Titanium diffuses somewhat faster in zircon than larger tetravalent cations U, Th, and Hf, but considerably more slowly than Pb, the REE, and oxygen; hence Ti crystallization temperatures may be retained under circumstances when radiometric ages or other types of geochemical information are lost. Watson EB, Harrison TM (2005) Science 308, 841-844. Watson EB, Wark DA, Thomas JB (2006) CMP(in press).

  13. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. A.; Holland, D.; Bland, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Thomas, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb2O3]x - [ZnCl2]1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb)2(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn)2(OSb)2].

  14. Use of laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS) to determine equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Silva, R.J.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Laser Induced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (LIPAS) is a relatively new, photothermal technique to examine solutions. Studies in the past have shown it to be more sensitive than conventional absorption spectroscopy, while, yielding the same information thus allowing lower concentrations to be used. This study is using LIPAS to examine solutions to determine the equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes. It has been found that actinyl(V) cations form cation-cation complexes with a variety of cations, including actinyl(VI) cations. The radioactive nature of the actinide elements requires special handling techniques and also require limits be placed on the amount of material that can be used. The sensitivity of some oxidation states of the actinides to oxygen also presents a problem. Preliminary results will be presented for actinyl(V)-actinyl(VI) cation-cation complexes that were studied using a remote LIPAS system incorporating fiber optics for transmission of laser signals.

  15. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  16. Structural Chemistry of Cation-Reacted Bacteriogenic UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, E.; Bargar, J.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Sharp, J.; Veeramani, H.; Clark, D.; Conradson, S.; Mehta, A.

    2007-12-01

    The chemical stability of bacteriogenic uraninite, "UO2", is one of the seminal issues governing its success as an in-situ immobilization strategy in contaminated subsurface locations. Little detail is known about the structure and reactivity of this material, but based on comparison to its closest abiotic analog, UO2+x (0 < x < 0.25), we expect that it is complex and disordered, likely to exhibit non-stoichiometry, and capable of structurally incorporating common ground water cations and U(VI). Such fundamental changes in mineralogy are expected to substantially impact its stability in ground water. In this study, the product of microbial U(VI) reduction under varying conditions of pH, carbonate and divalent cation concentration was investigated. To facilitate x-ray scattering and oxidation kinetics measurements, cleaning methods were investigated to separate the biooxide and organic components. The local and long-range atomic and nano-scale structures of the wet oxides have been measured using EXAFS, WAXS, XPS and TEM. The lattice parameter of the nanoparticulate phase is seen to be consistent with bulk UO2. The first oxygen shell is distorted, indicating a nonstoichiometric composition. A significant change in the lattice parameter and local structure is produced when bacteriogenic UO2 is reacted with divalent cations and NaOH. These findings suggest that bacteriogenic UO2 and its reactivity can be modified by groundwater composition.

  17. Role of cation choice in the radiation tolerance of pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sundgren, Christina J.

    2012-12-21

    We have used atomistic computer simulations to study anion diffusion coefficients and the response to swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2TixZr2-xO7 pyrochlore for x values of 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2. In Gd2Ti2O7, thermal energy deposition per unit length of 12 keV/nm results in a cylindrical amorphous track of radius 2 nm in good agreement with experiment. The volume swelling of the track is 4%, which suggests that it is partially amorphous. Gd vacancies and Ti interstitials along with cation exchange play a role in damage accumulation in the titanate. In sharp contrast, Gd2Zr2O7 does not swell and merely transforms from fluorite to pyrochlore under the same conditions. The activation energy barrier for oxygen hopping by the vacancy mechanism in these pyrochlores is 0.26-0.44 eV. The radiation tolerance of gadolinium zirconate pyrochlore is related to the efficient annihilation of cation Frenkel pairs, the low energy cost and negligible volume expansion associated with the resulting cation exchange, and efficient annealing of anion sublattice damage.

  18. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  19. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  1. Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Cation with Various Anions and the Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Anion with Various Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hui; O'Hare, Bernie; Dong, Jing; Arzhantsev, Sergei; Baker, Gary A; Wishart, James F.; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Physical properties of 4 room-temperature ionic liquids consisting of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with various perfluorinated anions and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N-) anion with 12 pyrrolidinium-, ammonium-, and hydroxyl-containing cations are reported. Electronic structure methods are used to calculate properties related to the size, shape, and dipole moment of individual ions. Experimental measurements of phase-transition temperatures, densities, refractive indices, surface tensions, solvatochromic polarities based on absorption of Nile Red, 19F chemical shifts of the Tf2N- anion, temperature-dependent viscosities, conductivities, and cation diffusion coefficients are reported. Correlations among the measured quantities as well as the use of surface tension and molar volume for estimating Hildebrand solubility parameters of ionic liquids are also discussed.

  2. Selone-stabilized aryltellurenyl cations.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sangeeta; Raju, Saravanan; Singh, Harkesh B; Butcher, Ray J

    2016-05-28

    Controlled bromination of a diarylditelluride, R2Te2 (R = 2,6-dimethylphenyl) (6) in dichloromethane led to the formation of a Te(II)-Te(IV) mixed-valent tellurenyl bromide, RBr2TeTeR (7). A further reaction of 7 with 1,3-dibutylbenzimidazolin-2-selone, C15H22N2Se (L) (9), produced the first selone adduct of the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl cation with the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurium dibromide anion, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)](+)[(2,6-Me2C6H3)TeBr2](-) (10). The red colored cationic adduct 10 is not stable in acetonitrile and disproportionated to give the selone adduct of 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl bromide, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)Br] (11b) and bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)tellurium dibromide, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)2TeBr2], (13). The metathesis reaction of 11b with AgBF4 produced a stable dark red colored selone adduct of the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl cation with the BF4(-) anion, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)](+)BF4(-) (15). The selone adducts of aryltellurenyl halides, i.e. [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)X] (X = Cl, Br, I) (11a-11c), have been synthesized by a one-pot reaction of 6 with an equimolar mixture of 9 and 1,3-dibutylbenzimidazolin-2-dihaloselones, C15H22N2SeX2 (14a-14c). Triphenylphosphine (PPh3), when treated with [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)X] (11a-11c), substitutes selone from the adduct to afford the triphenylphosphine adducts of aryltellurenyl halides, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(PPh3)X] (16a-16c). PMID:27111528

  3. Influence of cations on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Praveen; Nanny, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    The influence of cations (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic acids (FAs) (Norman landfill leachate fulvic acid (NLFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)) and dissolved humic acids (HAs) (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) and Leonardite humic acid (LHA)) was examined using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 4, 7 and 10 as a function of cation concentration (up to 25-100mM). Regardless of pH and cation concentration, PRODAN quenching by FA was unaffected by cations. However, interactions between PRODAN and HA decreased in the presence of cations at pH 7 and 10. Cation concentrations below the HA charge density resulted in the greatest decrease of PRODAN quenching, while very little additional decrease in PRODAN quenching occurred at cation concentrations above the HA charge density. This suggests that as the HA carboxylic acid functional groups form inner sphere complexes with divalent cations, intramolecular interactions result in a contraction of the HA molecular structure, thereby preventing PRODAN from associating with the condensed aromatic, electron accepting moieties inherent within HA molecules and responsible for PRODAN quenching. However, once the HA carboxylic acid functional groups are fully titrated with divalent cations, PRODAN quenching is no longer significantly influenced by the further addition of cations, even though these additional cations facilitate intermolecular interactions between the HA molecules to form supramolecular HA aggregates that can continue to increase in size. Regardless of FA and HA type, pH, cation type and concentration, the lack of blue-shifted fluorescence emission spectra indicated that micelle-like hydrophobic regions, amenable to PRODAN partitioning, were not formed by intra- and intermolecular interactions of FA and HA. PMID:18849058

  4. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  5. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  6. Gradualness facilitates knowledge refinement.

    PubMed

    Rada, R

    1985-05-01

    To facilitate knowledge refinement, a system should be designed so that small changes in the knowledge correspond to small changes in the function or performance of the system. Two sets of experiments show the value of small, heuristically guided changes in a weighted rule base. In the first set, the ordering among numbers (reflecting certainties) makes their manipulation more straightforward than the manipulation of relationships. A simple credit assignment and weight adjustment strategy for improving numbers in a weighted, rule-based expert system is presented. In the second set, the rearrangement of predicates benefits from additional knowledge about the ``ordering'' among predicates. A third set of experiments indicates the importance of the proper level of granularity when augmenting a knowledge base. Augmentation of one knowledge base by analogical reasoning from another knowledge base did not work with only binary relationships, but did succeed with ternary relationships. To obtain a small improvement in the knowledge base, a substantial amount of structure had to be treated as a unit. PMID:21869290

  7. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  8. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  9. Memory facilitation educed by food intake.

    PubMed

    Oomura, Y; Sasaki, K; Li, A J

    1993-09-01

    Acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) in rat CSF increased 1000 times in the 2-h period after food intake, or IP, or ICV glucose infusion. The ICV application of aFGF dose dependently depresses and anti-aFGF antibody facilitates food intake. aFGF is produced in the ependymal cells and released into the CSF in response to increased glucose in the CSF caused by food intake. Released aFGF diffused into the brain parenchyma and was taken up into neurons in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, etc. IP injection of glucose 2 h before a task that combined acquisition with passive avoidance significantly increased retention of avoidance by mice tested 24 h later. In a Morris water maze task, IP glucose injection 2 h before a first trial block reduced time to find and climb onto a platform hidden just below the water surface. The glucose facilitation of these affective and spatial memory were abolished by pretreatment with anti-aFGF antibody applied ICV. Continuous ICV infusion of aFGF into rats also significantly increased the reliability of passive avoidance for several days. After food intake, centrally released aFGF reaches the hippocampus and facilitates memory; peripherally released cholecystokinin reaches the endings of the afferent vagal nerves in the portal vein and changes their activity, which modulates hippocampal activity, to lead to memory facilitation. This, however, is blocked by vagotomy below the diaphragm. The results indicate the importance of food intake, not only to maintain homeostasis, but also to prepare a readiness state for memory facilitation. PMID:7692459

  10. Human skin is permselective for the small, monovalent cations sodium and potassium but not for nickel and chromium.

    PubMed

    La Count, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-07-01

    The molar conductance of excised human skin (Λ(skin)) immersed in electrolyte solutions comprising four cationic (Na(+), K(+), Ni(2+), and Cr(3+)) and five anionic (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), CrO4(2-), and Cr2O7(2-)) species was determined as a function of concentration in Franz diffusion cells. Cation transport numbers for four of these electrolytes were measured in Franz cells by the electromotive force method. Parallel experiments were conducted in solutions alone to establish the validity of the technique. Molar conductance decreased with increasing concentration, following the Kohlrausch law, over a 4-12-fold concentration range. Molar conductance and cation transport values at infinite dilution were extrapolated from these data and used to estimate ionic conductances at infinite dilution. These values were subsequently used to calculate limiting ion mobilities and diffusivities in solution and skin. Results for skin showed the expected increase in cation permselectivity for monovalent cations and a 40-110-fold reduction in effective diffusivities with respect to those in solution. However, Ni(2+) and Cr(3+) were relatively less mobile in skin than in solution. Salt diffusivities calculated from ionic mobilities in skin provided a partial explanation for the difference in allergenic potency of NiCl2 compared with NiSO4 and Cr(3+) versus Cr(6+) salts. PMID:23686652

  11. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-01-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core–shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core–shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals. PMID:27160371

  12. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  13. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  14. Effect of Cations on Effective Permeability of Leaf Cuticles to Sulfuric Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, S. J.; Hauser, H. D.; Berg, V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Many plants are exposed to prolonged episodes of anthropogenic acid precipitation with pH values of 4 or less, but there is little evidence of widespread direct damage to the plant cells. Acids appear to permeate leaf cuticle via charged pores, which act as a fixed buffer that delays but does not stop acid movement. We investigated the effect of cations on the movement of protons through astomatous isolated leaf cuticles of pear (Pyrus communis L.) and rough lemon (Citrus limon [L.] Burm. fils cv Ponderosa). Chloride salt solutions of Na, K, Ca, Cd, Mg, Gd, or Y in a diffusion apparatus were applied to the morphological inner surface of the cuticle, while the outer surface faced a large volume of pH 3 or 4 sulfuric acid. Effective permeability was calculated from the change in the pH of the inner solution as measured with a pH microelectrode. Monovalent cations caused either no change (pear) or promotion (rough lemon) of proton movement. Divalent cations reduced proton movement in a concentration-dependent manner (both species), whereas trivalent cations (rough lemon only) caused the effective permeability to decrease to near zero. Inhibition by 10 mM CaCl2 was reversed with water. The effects of these cations on the permeability of cuticles to protons was used to elucidate mechanisms by which cations can protect leaves from acid precipitation in nature. PMID:12231931

  15. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  16. Implications of cation exchange on clay release and colloid-facilitated transport in porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Column experiments were conducted to study chemical factors that influence the release of clay (kaolinite and quartz minerals) from saturated Ottawa sand of different sizes (710, 360, and 240 µm). A relatively minor enhancement of clay release occurred when the pH was increased (5.8 to 10) or the i...

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam; Delacourt, Charles

    2008-09-11

    Transport phenomena in an ion-exchange membrane containing both H+ and K+ are described using multicomponent diffusion equations (Stefan-Maxwell). A model is developed for transport through a Nafion 112 membrane in a hydrogen-pump setup. The model results are analyzed to quantify the impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It is shown that limiting current densities can result due to a decrease in proton concentration caused by the build-up of contaminant ions. An average cation concentration of 30 to 40 percent is required for appreciable effects to be noticed under typical steady-state operating conditions.

  18. Surfactant properties of ionic liquids containing short alkyl chain imidazolium cations and ibuprofenate anions.

    PubMed

    Tourné-Péteilh, Corine; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Vioux, André; Judeinstein, Patrick; In, Martin; Viau, Lydie

    2011-09-14

    Interfacial tension, electrical conductivity, NMR self-diffusion and DLS experiments have been used to investigate the self-aggregation in water of ionic liquids associating an ibuprofenate anion and 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [C(n)MIm](+) (n = 4, 6, 8) cations. Despite the short alkyl chain on imidazolium cations (n ≤ 8), these ionic liquids exhibit particularly low Critical Aggregation Concentrations (CAC), significantly lower than their parent 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride salts. This behaviour is attributed to the formation of catanionic pairs between ibuprofenate and imidazolium. PMID:21799958

  19. Pleurotus eryngii Polysaccharide Promotes Pluripotent Reprogramming via Facilitating Epigenetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Yan; Yu, Qingtong; Zhang, Zhijian; Qu, Rui; Chen, Jingjing; Shao, Genbao; Gao, Xiangdong; Xu, Ximing; Yu, Jiangnan

    2016-02-17

    Pleurotus eryngii is a medicinal/edible mushroom with great nutritional value and bioactivity. Its polysaccharide has recently been developed into an effective gene vector via cationic modification. In the present study, cationized P. eryngii polysaccharide (CPS), hybridized with calcium phosphate (CP), was used to codeliver plasmids (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc) for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The results revealed that the hybrid nanoparticles could significantly enhance the process and efficiency of reprogramming (1.6-fold increase) compared with the CP nanoparticles. The hybrid CPS also facilitated epigenetic modification during the reprogramming. Moreover, these hybrid nanoparticles exhibited multiple pathways (both caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis) in their cellular internalization, which accounted for the improved iPSCs generation. These findings therefore present a novel application of P. eryngii polysaccharide in pluripotent reprogramming via active epigenetic modification. PMID:26809505

  20. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  1. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  2. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  3. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  4. Synthesis, structure determination, and infrared spectroscopy of (NpO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}: Prevalence of cation-cation interactions and cationic nets in neptunyl sulfate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, T.Z. Burns, P.C.

    2009-01-15

    The compound (NpO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} was synthesized by evaporation of a Np{sup 5+} sulfate solution. The crystal structure was determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and refined to an R{sub 1}=0.0310. (NpO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} crystallizes in triclinic space group P-1, a=8.1102(7) A, b=8.7506(7) A, c=16.234(1) A, {alpha}=90.242(2){sup o}, {beta}=92.855(2){sup o}, {gamma}=113.067(2){sup o}, V=1058.3(2) A{sup 3}, and Z=2. The structure contains neptunyl pentagonal bipyramids that share vertices through cation-cation interactions to form a sheet or cationic net. The sheet is decorated on each side by vertex sharing with sulfate tetrahedra, and adjacent sheets are linked together through hydrogen bonding. A graphical representation of (NpO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} was constructed to facilitate the structural comparison to similar Np{sup 5+} compounds. The prevalence of the cationic nets in neptunyl sulfate compounds related to the overall stability of the structure is also discussed. - Graphical abstract: (NpO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} was synthesized by hydrothermal methods and its structure determined. A graphical representation of the compound was constructed to facilitate the structural comparison to similar Np{sup 5+} compounds and the prevalence of the cationic nets in neptunyl sulfate compounds related to the overall stability of the structure is discussed.

  5. Insights into the transport of aqueous quaternary ammonium cations: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Himanshu N; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Yang, Yuan; Felberg, Lisa E; Voth, Gregory A; Herring, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    This study focuses on understanding the relative effects of ammonium substituent groups (we primarily consider tetramethylammonium, benzyltrimethylammonium, and tetraethylammonium cations) and anion species (OH(-), HCO3(-), CO3(2-), Cl(-), and F(-)) on ion transport by combining experimental and computational approaches. We characterize transport experimentally using ionic conductivity and self-diffusion coefficients measured from NMR. These experimental results are interpreted using simulation methods to describe the transport of these cations and anions considering the effects of the counterion. It is particularly noteworthy that we directly probe cation and anion diffusion with pulsed gradient stimulated echo NMR and molecular dynamics simulations, corroborating these methods and providing a direct link between atomic-resolution simulations and macroscale experiments. By pairing diffusion measurements and simulations with residence times, we were able to understand the interplay between short-time and long-time dynamics with ionic conductivity. With experiment, we determined that solutions of benzyltrimethylammonium hydroxide have the highest ionic conductivity (0.26 S/cm at 65 °C), which appears to be due to differences for the ions in long-time diffusion and short-time water caging. We also examined the effect of CO2 on ionic conductivity in ammonium hydroxide solutions. CO2 readily reacts with OH(-) to form HCO(-)3 and is found to lower the solution ionic conductivity by almost 50%. PMID:24437699

  6. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  7. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  8. Antibacterial properties of cationic steroid antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Paul B; Li, Chunhong; Taotafa, Uale; Ding, Bangwei; Guan, Qunying

    2002-11-19

    Cationic steroid antibiotics have been developed that display broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. These compounds are comprised of steroids appended with amine groups arranged to yield facially amphiphilic morphology. Examples of these antibiotics are highly bactericidal, while related compounds effectively permeabilize the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria sensitizing these organisms to hydrophobic antibiotics. Cationic steroid antibiotics exhibit various levels of eukaryote vs. prokaryote cell selectivity, and cell selectivity can be increased via charge recognition of prokaryotic cells. Studies of the mechanism of action of these antibiotics suggest that they share mechanistic aspects with cationic peptide antibiotics. PMID:12445638

  9. Structural Insights into Divalent Cation Modulations of ATP-Gated P2X Receptor Channels.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-02-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-gated cation channels involved in physiological processes ranging widely from neurotransmission to pain and taste signal transduction. The modulation of the channel gating, including that by divalent cations, contributes to these diverse physiological functions of P2X receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of an invertebrate P2X receptor from the Gulf Coast tick Amblyomma maculatum in the presence of ATP and Zn(2+) ion, together with electrophysiological and computational analyses. The structure revealed two distinct metal binding sites, M1 and M2, in the extracellular region. The M1 site, located at the trimer interface, is responsible for Zn(2+) potentiation by facilitating the structural change of the extracellular domain for pore opening. In contrast, the M2 site, coupled with the ATP binding site, might contribute to regulation by Mg(2+). Overall, our work provides structural insights into the divalent cation modulations of P2X receptors. PMID:26804916

  10. Release of colloidal particles in natural porous media by monovalent and divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Grolimund, Daniel; Borkovec, Michal

    2006-10-10

    We study mobilization of colloidal particles from natural porous media, such as soils and groundwater aquifers. Extensive laboratory scale column experiments of particle release from four different subsurface materials are presented. The important characteristics of the release process are (i) its non-exponential kinetics, (ii) the finite supply of colloidal particles and (iii) the strong dependence of the release kinetic on the nature of the adsorbed cations. Particle release depends most sensitively on the relative saturation of the medium with divalent cations. We propose a mathematic model, which captures all these aspects quantitatively, and can be used to describe the coupling between transport of major cations and the release of colloidal particles. The present experimental investigations as well as the developed modeling framework represent an important step towards the understanding of colloid-facilitated transport phenomena in natural porous media. PMID:16844263

  11. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  12. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  13. The Essential Elements of Facilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon; Gass, Michael; Gillis, Lee

    Most organizations find it difficult to implement change, and only about 10 percent of learning from training and development experiences is actually applied in the workplace. This book advocates facilitation as a means of enhancing change and increasing productivity. Facilitation engages employees by enhancing the processes associated with their…

  14. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  15. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  16. Cation-cation clusters in ionic liquids: Cooperative hydrogen bonding overcomes like-charge repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Anne; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions is reported for the ionic liquid, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. New infrared bands in the OH frequency range appear at low temperatures indicating the formation of H-bonded cation-cation clusters similar to those known for water and alcohols. Supported by DFT calculations, these vibrational bands can be assigned to attractive interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the cations. The repulsive Coulomb interaction is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between ions of like charge. The transition energy from purely cation-anion interacting configurations to those including cation-cation H-bonds is determined to be 3–4 kJmol−1. The experimental findings and DFT calculations strongly support the concept of anti-electrostatic hydrogen bonds (AEHBs) as recently suggested by Weinhold and Klein. The like-charge configurations are kinetically stabilized with decreasing temperatures. PMID:26626928

  17. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  18. Electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of a carotenoid cation radicals and dications: Effect of deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Khaled, M.; Hadjipetrou, A.; Kispert, L. )

    1990-06-14

    The oxidation process involving the transfer of two electrons for {beta}-carotene is confirmed by bulk electrolysis in a CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solvent and the observation of {Delta}E = 42 mV from cyclic voltammetric measurements. A similar process is also found to occur for {beta}-apo-8{prime}-carotenal and canthaxanthin. An additional cathodic peak between 0.2 0.5 relative to SCE is shown to be dependent on the initial formation of dications followed by the loss of H{sup +} as evidenced by a large isotope effect and most likely due to the reduction of a carotenoid cation. EPR evidence exists for the formation of radical cations by the reaction of diffusing carotenoid dictations with neutral carotenoids. The rate of formation is consistent with the differences in the diffusion coefficients of the carotenoids deduced by chronocoulometric measurements, being fastest for canthaxanthin.

  19. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  20. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; Trujillo, Marianela; Rempala, Pawel; Kirby, James P.; Noll, Bruce C.; Michl, Josef

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF–4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical,more » whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a« less

  1. PEGylated Cationic Serum Albumin for Boosting Retroviral Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Palesch, David; Boldt, Felix; Müller, Janis A; Eisele, Klaus; Stürzel, Christina M; Wu, Yuzhou; Münch, Jan; Weil, Tanja

    2016-08-17

    Retroviral vectors are common tools for introducing genes into the genome of a cell. However, low transduction rates are a major limitation in retroviral gene transfer, especially in clinical applications. We generated cationic human serum albumin (cHSA) protected by a shell of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG); this significantly enhanced retroviral gene transduction with potentially attractive pharmacokinetics and low immunogenicity. By screening a panel of chemically optimized HSA compounds, we identified a very potent enhancer that boosted the transduction rates of viral vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed a drastically increased number of viral particles attached to the surfaces of target cells. In accordance with the positive net charge of cationic and PEGylated HSA, this suggests a mechanism of action in which the repulsion of the negatively charged cellular and viral vector membranes is neutralized, thereby promoting attachment and ultimately transduction. Importantly, the transduction-enhancing PEGylated HSA derivative evaded recognition by HSA-specific antibodies and macrophage activation. Our findings hold great promise for facilitating improved retroviral gene transfer. PMID:27239020

  2. Electronic Spectra of the Tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) Cation and Radical.

    PubMed

    Craig, Peter R; Havlas, Zdeněk; Trujillo, Marianela; Rempala, Pawel; Kirby, James P; Miller, John R; Noll, Bruce C; Michl, Josef

    2016-05-26

    Properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF4(-) anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical, whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ∼0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a. Unsuccessful attempts to prepare several other aryl substituted derivatives of 1 by the classical synthetic route are described in the Supporting Information . PMID:27136127

  3. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  4. Effects of cation concentration on photocatalytic performance over magnesium vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Defa; Umezawa, Naoto E-mail: ABE.Hideki@nims.go.jp; Abe, Hideki E-mail: ABE.Hideki@nims.go.jp; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-10-01

    A series of magnesium vanadates (MgV {sub 2}O{sub 6}, Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7}, and Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8}) were synthesized to investigate the effect of cation concentration on photocatalytic performance. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic O{sub 2} evolution experiments under visible light irradiation showed Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibits the best performance, while Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8} has the lowest activity. The density functional theory calculations indicated that the lowest unoccupied states of Mg{sub 3}V {sub 2}O{sub 8} are the mostly localized by the cation layers. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence decay curves gave evident performances of excited states of magnesium vanadates and pointed out MgV {sub 2}O{sub 6} has a very short excited electron lift-time. Mg{sub 2}V {sub 2}O{sub 7} performs high photocatalytic activity because of its high electron mobility and long electron life-time.

  5. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  6. Cationic-modified cyclodextrin nanosphere/anionic polymer as flocculation/sorption systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huining; Cezar, Norlito

    2005-03-15

    Simultaneous removal of dissolved and colloidal substances has been a challenging task. The cationic-modified beta-cyclodextrin nanospheres synthesized in this work, in conjunction with a water-soluble polyacrylamide-based anionic polymer, potentially provide a novel approach to address the problem. The cyclodextrin was rendered cationic using (2,3-epoxypropyl)trimethylammonium chloride as a reagent. The cationicity of the modified cyclodextrin and the reaction between cyclodextrin and the reagent were characterized by electrophoresis measurement, polyelectrolyte titration, and NMR. As a dual-component flocculation system, the cationic cyclodextrin/anionic polymer significantly induced clay flocculation, lowering the relative turbidity of the clay suspension over a wide pH range. Meanwhile, as a nanospherical absorbent, the modified cyclodextrins exhibited strong affinity toward aromatic compounds via inclusion complex formation in the hydrophobic cavities, which was monitored by UV spectroscopy. These systems facilitated the simultaneous removal of dissolved and colloidal substances, which was unachievable previously. In addition, the interaction between anionic polymers and the clay particles pretreated with cationic cyclodextrin was investigated in order to reveal the flocculation mechanism. PMID:15721912

  7. Low-temperature EPR and quantum chemical study of lactone radical cations and their transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, S.; Janovský, I.; Knolle, W.; Mehnert, R.; Turin, D. A.

    2005-07-01

    Radical cations of a number of lactones ( β-butyro-, γ-butyro-, γ-valero-, δ-hexano-, δ-valero- and ɛ-capro-) were radiolytically generated in CF 3CCl 3 matrix and investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The primary radical cation of the 4-membered ring β-butyrolactone is unstable even at 77 K and undergoes spontaneous ring opening and fragmentation, leading to the deprotonated neutral (CH 2CHCH 2) rad radical. The stability of the primary carbonyl-centred radical cations of the 5-, 6- and 7-membered lactone rings towards intramolecular H-shift from the C1 in α-position to carbonyl oxygen depends primarily on the ring size, which determines the activation energy of the transformation and distance L(H-O) of the carbonyl oxygen to the nearest H-atom on the ring. The larger the ring, the smaller the L(H-O) and also activation energy of the H-shift, making the transformation of the primary radical cation more feasible. The quantum chemical calculations facilitated the interpretation of the EPR spectra of the secondary radical cations.

  8. An electrodynamics-based model for ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Felmy, Andrew; Gorby, Yuri

    2004-10-10

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides. The fixed charges and electrostatic double layers that may associate with microbial polysaccharides and their effects on ion diffusion were explicitly built into the model. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion formulation that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a cation exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. An illustrative example was also provided to simulate dynamic behavior of ionic current during ion diffusion within a charged bacterial cell wall polysaccharide and the effects of the ionic current on the compression or expansion of the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution. PMID:15465305

  9. Quantum diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S.

    1994-10-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ``quantum diffusion`` terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source.

  10. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  11. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  12. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions' transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  13. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  14. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2015-12-21

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (E{sub a}) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, E{sub a} increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  15. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofu, Maiko; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2015-12-01

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (Ea) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, Ea increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  16. Collinear facilitation in color vision.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pi-Chun; Mullen, Kathy T; Hess, Robert F

    2007-01-01

    The detection of a luminance-defined Gabor is improved by two high contrast, aligned, flanking Gabors, an effect termed collinear facilitation. We investigate whether this facilitation also occurs for isoluminant chromatic stimuli, and whether it can occur for chromatic targets with luminance flanks and vice versa. We measured collinear facilitation for Gabor stimuli (0.75 cpd, 1 octave bandwidth) of three different contrast types: achromatic, red-green that isolates the L/M-cone opponent mechanism, and blue-yellow that isolates the S-cone opponent mechanism. Three conditions were investigated: (1) target and flanks all of the same contrast type and spatial phase; (2) target and flanks of the same contrast type but opposite phases (0 degrees and 180 degrees ); and (3) target and flanks of different contrast types (chromatic with achromatic contrast) and two opposite phase combinations. We find that a similar degree of collinear facilitation occurs for the isoluminant chromatic stimuli as for the achromatic stimuli, and all exhibit phase dependency. Facilitation did not occur, however, between chromatic and achromatic target and flanking stimuli. This suggests that at the level of collinear facilitation, the chromatic and the achromatic postreceptoral mechanisms have their own spatial interactions that are segregated from one another. PMID:17997661

  17. Influence of the Ion Coordination Number on Cation Exchange Reactions with Copper Telluride Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tu, Renyong; Xie, Yi; Bertoni, Giovanni; Lak, Aidin; Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo; Cavalli, Andrea; Trizio, Luca De; Manna, Liberato

    2016-06-01

    Cu2-xTe nanocubes were used as starting seeds to access metal telluride nanocrystals by cation exchanges at room temperature. The coordination number of the entering cations was found to play an important role in dictating the reaction pathways. The exchanges with tetrahedrally coordinated cations (i.e., with coordination number 4), such as Cd(2+) or Hg(2+), yielded monocrystalline CdTe or HgTe nanocrystals with Cu2-xTe/CdTe or Cu2-xTe/HgTe Janus-like heterostructures as intermediates. The formation of Janus-like architectures was attributed to the high diffusion rate of the relatively small tetrahedrally coordinated cations, which could rapidly diffuse in the Cu2-xTe NCs and nucleate the CdTe (or HgTe) phase in a preferred region of the host structure. Also, with both Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) ions the exchange led to wurtzite CdTe and HgTe phases rather than the more stable zinc-blende ones, indicating that the anion framework of the starting Cu2-xTe particles could be more easily deformed to match the anion framework of the metastable wurtzite structures. As hexagonal HgTe had never been reported to date, this represents another case of metastable new phases that can only be accessed by cation exchange. On the other hand, the exchanges involving octahedrally coordinated ions (i.e., with coordination number 6), such as Pb(2+) or Sn(2+), yielded rock-salt polycrystalline PbTe or SnTe nanocrystals with Cu2-xTe@PbTe or Cu2-xTe@SnTe core@shell architectures at the early stages of the exchange process. In this case, the octahedrally coordinated ions are probably too large to diffuse easily through the Cu2-xTe structure: their limited diffusion rate restricts their initial reaction to the surface of the nanocrystals, where cation exchange is initiated unselectively, leading to core@shell architectures. Interestingly, these heterostructures were found to be metastable as they evolved to stable Janus-like architectures if annealed at 200 °C under vacuum. PMID:27177274

  18. Innate cation sensitivity in a semiconducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Althagafi, Talal M; Algarni, Saud A; Grell, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Water-gated organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using the hole transporting semiconducting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT), show an innate response of their threshold voltage to the addition of divalent metal cations to the gating water, without deliberately introducing an ion-sensitive component. A similar threshold response is shown for several divalent cations, but is absent for monovalent cations. Response is absent for transistors using the inorganic semiconductor ZnO, or the similar organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rrP3HT), instead of PBTTT. We assign innate cation sensitivity to residues of the organometallic Pd(0) complex used as catalyst in PBTTT synthesis which bears strong resemblance to typical metal chelating agents. Organometallic Pd(0) residues are absent from ZnO, and also from rrP3HT which is polymerised with a different type of catalyst. However, when Pd(0) complex is deliberately added to rrP3HT casting solutions, resulting OTFTs also display threshold response to a divalent cation. PMID:27343580

  19. Cation-pi interactions as a mechanism in technical lignin adsorption to cationic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Karthik V; Renneckar, Scott

    2009-04-13

    The assembly of dissolved technical lignins in aqueous and organic medium has been studied at the solid-liquid interface. Adsorption of alkali lignin onto gold coated crystals treated with a cationic polymer was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Complete coverage of the cationic surface with alkali lignin occurred at low solution concentration, revealing a high affinity coefficient under both alkali and neutral conditions. With additional adsorption studies from organosolv lignin in organic solvent and spectroscopic analysis of mixtures of cationic polymer and alkali lignin, a noncovalent interaction between lignin's aromatic rings and the cation of the quaternary ammonium group was shown to exist. The work underscores how polyphenolic biopolymers can strongly interact with cations through noncovalent interactions to control molecular architecture. PMID:19226174

  20. Engineering of indole-based tethered biheterocyclic alkaloid meridianin into β-carboline-derived tetracyclic polyheterocycles via amino functionalization/6-endo cationic π-cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Piyush Kumar; Dathi, Meena Devi; Saifuddin, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Summary A mild, efficient and versatile method has been developed for the construction of a functionalized natural product, meridianin, and its post conversion to pyrimido-β-carboline by cationic π- cyclization. The strategy involves the introduction of an amino group at the C-5 of the pyrimidine ring and utilizing the nucleophilictiy of the C-2 in the indole ring to facilitate cationic π-cyclization. PMID:23209529

  1. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to make use of products obtained from renewable plant sources as monomers for the direct production of polymers which can be used for a wide range of plastic applications. In this report is described progress in the synthesis and polymerization of cationically polymerizable monomers and oligomers derived from botanical oils, terpenes, natural rubber, and lignin. Nine different botanical oils were obtained from various sources, characterized and then epoxidized. Their photopolymerization was carried out using cationic photoinitiators and the mechanical properties of the resulting polymers characterized. Preliminary biodegradation studies are being conducted on the photopolymerized films from several of these oils. Limonene was cationically polymerized to give dimers and the dimers epoxidized to yield highly reactive monomers suitable for coatings, inks and adhesives. The direct phase transfer epoxidation of squalene and natural rubber was carried out. The modified rubbers undergo facile photocrosslinking in the presence of onium salts to give crosslinked elastomers. 12 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Solution of trivalent cations into uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleburgh, S. C.; Parfitt, D. C.; Grimes, R. W.; Dorado, B.; Bertolus, M.; Blair, P. R.; Hallstadius, L.; Backman, K.

    2012-01-01

    The accommodation of trivalent oxides (M 2O 3) in uranium dioxide has been investigated using atomic scale simulation. Calculations suggest that all trivalent oxides studied preferentially enter UO 2 by associating the substitutional ion with an oxygen vacancy, larger cations forming the cluster {2MU':VOrad rad }×. Solution into hyper-stoichiometric UO 2+ x was accompanied by the formation of the {MU':UUrad }× cluster and smaller solution energies than into stoichiometric UO 2. Solubility is a particularly strong function of hyper-stoichiometry for smaller cations such as Cr 3+, which has implications for the use of Cr 2O 3 as a grain enlarger but not so for larger cations such s Gd 3+.

  3. Cationic Lipid-Based Nucleic Acid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, Emile; Goldring, William P D; Pungente, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids into cells remains an important laboratory cell culture technique and potential clinical therapy, based upon the initial cellular uptake, then translation into protein (in the case of DNA), or gene deletion by RNA interference (RNAi). Although viral delivery vectors are more efficient, the high production costs, limited cargo capacity, and the potential for clinical adverse events make nonviral strategies attractive. Cationic lipids are the most widely applied and studied nonviral vectors; however, much remains to be solved to overcome limitations of these systems. Advances in the field of cationic lipid-based nucleic acid (lipoplex) delivery rely upon the development of robust and reproducible lipoplex formulations, together with the use of cell culture assays. This chapter provides detailed protocols towards the formulation, delivery, and assessment of in vitro cationic lipid-based delivery of DNA. PMID:27436310

  4. Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water

    SciTech Connect

    B. Widman

    2003-01-01

    Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

  5. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  6. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  7. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-01

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning. PMID:27050014

  8. Chemistry of alkali cation exchanged faujasite and mesoporous NaX using alkyl halides and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Hong

    The purpose of this work was to increase the reactivity of Faujasite X (NaX) zeolite toward the reactive decontamination of materials subject to nucleophilic attack by means of zeolite cation optimization and by means of the synthesis of mesoporous Faujasite X. Primary alkyl halides and trialkyl phosphates have been the test materials on which the cation-optimized and mesoporous zeolites have been tested. In the alkali cation optimization work, reactions of methyl iodide and 1-chloropropane with alkali metal cation exchanged Faujasite zeolite X were investigated at room temperature. The reactivity of the framework and the product formation were shown to depend on zeolite framework counter-cation. A quantitative study of zeolite product formation has been carried out, primarily using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Large alkali cations showed preference toward substitution chemistry. In contrast, alkyl halide exposed LiX and NaX zeolites underwent both substitution and elimination. Subsequently introduced water molecules led to hydrolysis of framework species that was sensitive to framework counter-cation. The mesoporous NaX zeolites work undertakes to test whether an improvement in surface chemical reactivity can be achieved by introducing mesopores into the already reactive nucleophilic microporous NaX zeolite. Incorporation of the polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) template and the formation of mesopores in Faujasite X zeolite (NaX) were successful and well-characterized. The mesopores are proposed to have occurred from incorporation of the cationic PDADMAC polymer into the zeolite by compensating zeolite framework charge. Subsequent sodium cation exchange of calcined mesoporous NaX was shown to restore the chemical reactivity characteristic of as-synthesized NaX. Trialkyl organophosphorous compounds underwent substitution reactions. The reactivity of both microporous and mesoporous Faujasite zeolite X and the product formation was shown to depend on

  9. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action. PMID:16878011

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and electrical conductivity in montmorillonite interlayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Cygan, Randall T.; Fredrich, Joanne T.; Jerauld, Gary R.

    2016-01-20

    In this study, the diffusion of water and ions in the interlayer region of smectite clay minerals represents a direct probe of the type and strength of clay–fluid interactions. Interlayer diffusion also represents an important link between molecular simulation and macroscopic experiments. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate trends in cation and water diffusion in montmorillonite interlayers, looking specifically at the effects of layer charge, interlayer cation and cation charge (sodium or calcium), water content, and temperature. For Na-montmorillonite, the largest increase in ion and water diffusion coefficients occurs between the one-layer and two-layer hydrates, corresponding to themore » transition from inner-sphere to outer-sphere surface complexes. Calculated activation energies for ion and water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite are similar to each other and to the water hydrogen bond energy, suggesting the breaking of water–water and water–clay hydrogen bonds as a likely mechanism for interlayer diffusion. A comparison of interlayer diffusion with that of bulk electrolyte solutions reveals a clear trend of decreasing diffusion coefficient with increasing electrolyte concentration, and in most cases the interlayer diffusion results are nearly coincident with the corresponding bulk solutions. Trends in electrical conductivities computed from the ion diffusion coefficients are also compared.« less

  11. Facilitating Conditions for School Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; McInerney, Dennis M.

    Primary and high school students (277 in grades 5-6; 615 in grades 7-12) in the United States (47 percent boys) responded to 26 items of the Facilitating Conditions Questionnaire (FCQ). Results indicate 7 distinct FCQ factors: perceived value of schooling; affect toward schooling; peer positive academic climate (Peer Positive); encouragement from…

  12. Producing gestures facilitates route learning.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Chee; Ching, Terence Han-Wei; Lim, Phoebe Elizabeth; Cheng, Xiaoqin; Ip, Kit Yee

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates whether producing gestures would facilitate route learning in a navigation task and whether its facilitation effect is comparable to that of hand movements that leave physical visible traces. In two experiments, we focused on gestures produced without accompanying speech, i.e., co-thought gestures (e.g., an index finger traces the spatial sequence of a route in the air). Adult participants were asked to study routes shown in four diagrams, one at a time. Participants reproduced the routes (verbally in Experiment 1 and non-verbally in Experiment 2) without rehearsal or after rehearsal by mentally simulating the route, by drawing it, or by gesturing (either in the air or on paper). Participants who moved their hands (either in the form of gestures or drawing) recalled better than those who mentally simulated the routes and those who did not rehearse, suggesting that hand movements produced during rehearsal facilitate route learning. Interestingly, participants who gestured the routes in the air or on paper recalled better than those who drew them on paper in both experiments, suggesting that the facilitation effect of co-thought gesture holds for both verbal and nonverbal recall modalities. It is possibly because, co-thought gesture, as a kind of representational action, consolidates spatial sequence better than drawing and thus exerting more powerful influence on spatial representation. PMID:25426624

  13. SUPERFUND GROUNDWATER ISSUE - FACILITATED TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Superfund Ground Water Forum is a group of ground-water scientists representing EPA's Regional Superfund Offices, organized to exchange up to date information related to ground-water remediation at Superfund sites. Facilitated transport is an issue identified by the ...

  14. Facilitation of Mourning During Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; And Others

    This paper discusses case studies of children psychologically disturbed by the death of parents or siblings. Illustrations of mourning facilitation were mainly gathered from 16 orphaned children, ages 3-14. Some techniques used in helping children mourn include: discussing physical details of the illness, discussing previous deaths of animals and…

  15. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  16. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  17. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  18. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  19. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  20. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  1. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. he sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaC12,...

  2. Dynamics of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2008-03-01

    Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) has been used in KrF excimer laser (248 nm) lithography as a backbone polymer, and is also a promising material for EUV or electron beam lithography. Analysis of the intermediate species is important for the control of reactions in resist materials. Since the size of integrated circuits fabricated for mass production will decrease below 30 nm and the size error must also be decreased to the molecular level, the elucidation of proton dynamics at the molecular level is also important for reducing the deviation of the resist pattern size. In this study, the dynamics of PHS radical cations were studied, because PHS radical cation is main source of proton. The transient absorption of PHS was observed in the near-infrared region (NIR) in p-dioxane solutions by pulse radiolysis. The intramolecular PHS dimer radical cation (M2 +.) were observed, whereas p-cresol shows no distinct CR band. Although the radical cations of phenol derivatives are known to be easily deprotonated, it was found that M2 +. formation prevents deprotonation by its charge resonance stabilization.

  3. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. The sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaCl,...

  4. Process and apparatus for the production of Bi-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Hines, J.J.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.

    1998-12-29

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  5. Process and apparatus for the production of BI-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Hines, John J.; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  6. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  7. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lincopan, Nilton; Santana, Mariana RA; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana; da Costa, Maria Helena B; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM) by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp) onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH) and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid. PMID:19152701

  8. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  11. Ultrafine Na-4-mica: uptake of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations by ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Ueda, Masahito; Nakamuro, Yumiko; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2004-06-01

    The cation exchange properties of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations at room temperature were investigated on an ultrafine, highly charged Na-4-mica (with the ideal mica composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4.xH2O). Ultrafine mica crystallites of 200 nm in size led to faster Sr2+ uptake kinetics in comparison to larger mica crystallites. The alkali metal ion (K+, Cs+, and Li+) exchange uptake was rapid, and complete exchange occurred within 30 min. For the alkaline earth metal ions Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, however, the exchange uptake required lengthy periods from 3 days to 4 weeks to be completed, similar to its Sr uptake, as previously reported. Kinetic models of the modified Freundlich and parabolic diffusion were examined for the experimental data on the Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ uptakes. The modified Freundlich model described well the Ba2+ ion uptake kinetics as well as that for the Sr2+ ion, while for the Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions the parabolic diffusion model showed better fitting. The alkali and alkaline earth ion exchange isotherms were also determined in comparison to the Sr2+ exchange isotherm. The thermodynamic equilibria for these cations were compared by using Kielland plots evaluated from the isotherms. PMID:15984251

  12. The effect of various electrolyte cations on electrochemical performance of polypyrrole/RGO based supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianbo; Xu, Youlong; Wang, Jie; Lin, Jun; Sun, Xiaofei; Mao, Shengchun

    2015-11-21

    In this work, polypyrrole/graphene doped by p-toluenesulfonic is prepared as an active material for supercapacitors, and its capacitance performance is investigated in various aqueous electrolytes including HCl, LiCl, NaCl, and KCl with a concentration of 3 M, respectively. A rising trend of capacitance is observed according to the cationic mobility (Li(+) < Na(+) < K(+) < H(+)), which is due to its effect on the ionic conductivity, efficient ion/charge diffusion/exchange and relaxation time. On the other hand, long-term cycling stability is in the following order: KCl < NaCl < LiCl < HCl, corresponding to the decreasing tendency of cation size (K(+) > Na(+) > Li(+) > H(+)). The reason can be attributed to the fact that the insertion/de-insertion of large size cation brings a significant doping level decrease and an over-oxidation increase during the charging-discharging cycles. Hence, we not only obtain good capacitance performance (280.3 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1)), superior rate capability (225.8 F g(-1) at 500 mV s(-1)) and high cycling stability (92.0% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles at 1 A g(-1)) by employing 3 M HCl as an electrolyte, but also reveal that the electrolyte cations have a significant effect on the supercapacitors' electrochemical performance. PMID:26444443

  13. Multi-physical model of cation and water transport in ionic polymer-metal composite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Chang, Longfei; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Takagi, Kentaro; Aabloo, Alvo; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-03-01

    Ion-migration based electrical potential widely exists not only in natural systems but also in ionic polymer materials. We presented a multi-physical model and investigated the transport process of cation and water of ionic polymer-metal composites based on our thorough understanding on the ionic sensing mechanisms in this paper. The whole transport process was depicted by transport equations concerning convection flux under the total pressure gradient, electrical migration by the built-in electrical field, and the inter-coupling effect between cation and water. With numerical analysis, the influence of critical material parameters, the elastic modulus Ewet, the hydraulic permeability coefficient K, the diffusion coefficient of cation dII and water dWW, and the drag coefficient of water ndW, on the distribution of cation and water was investigated. It was obtained how these parameters correlate to the voltage characteristics (both magnitude and response speed) under a step bending. Additionally, it was found that the effective relative dielectric constant ɛr has little influence on the voltage but is positively correlated to the current. With a series of optimized parameters, the predicted voltage agreed with the experimental results well, which validated our model. Based on our physical model, it was suggested that an ionic polymer sensor can benefit from a higher modulus Ewet, a higher coefficient K and a lower coefficient dII, and a higher constant ɛr.

  14. Effect of Sulfuric and Triflic Acids on the Hydration of Vanadium Cations: An ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) may be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage applications, but the crossover of any of the redox active species V(2+), V(3+), VO(2+), and VO2(+) through the ion exchange membrane will result in self-discharge of the battery. Hence, a molecular level understanding of the states of vanadium cations in the highly acidic environment of a VRFB is needed. We examine the effects of sulfuric and triflic (CF3SO3H) acids on the hydration of vanadium species as they mimic the electrolyte and functional group of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes. Hybrid density functional theory in conjunction with a continuum solvation model was utilized to obtain the local structures of the hydrated vanadium cations in proximity to H2SO4, CF3SO3H, and their conjugate anions. The results indicate that none of these species covalently bond to the vanadium cations. The hydration structure of V(3+) is more distorted than that of V(2+) in an acidic medium. The oxo-group of VO2(+) is protonated by either acid, in contrast to VO(2+) which is not protonated. The atomic partial charge of the four oxidation states of vanadium varies from +1.7 to +2.0. These results provide the local solvation structures of vanadium cations in the VRFBs environment that are directly related to the electrolytes stability and diffusion of vanadium ions into the membrane. PMID:25954916

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  16. Facilitating Facilitators to Facilitate, in Problem or Enquiry Based Learning Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable…

  17. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  18. Mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound with cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl rings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2013-11-01

    A new mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound has been synthesized by evaporation of a neptunium(V) acidic solution. The structure of the compound features cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl(V) rings. These rings are further connected by Np(IV) ions through cation-cation interactions (CCIs) into a three-dimensional neptunium cationic open framework. This example illustrates the possibility of isolating neptunyl(V) CCI oligomers in inorganic systems using other cations to compete with Np(V) in bonding with the neptunyl oxygen. PMID:24187926

  19. Cation-cation interactions, magnetic communication and reactivity of the pentavalent uraniumion [U(NR)2]+

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Liam P; Schelter, Eric J; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Gsula, Robyn L; Scott, Brian L; Thompson, Joe D; Kiplinger, Jacqueline L; Batista, Enrique R

    2009-01-01

    The dimeric bis(imido) uranium complex [{l_brace}U(NtBu)2(I)(tBu2bpy){r_brace}2] (see picture; U green, N blue, I red) has cation-cation interactions between [U(NR)2]+ ions. This f1-f1 system also displays f orbital communication between uranium(V) centers at low temperatures, and can be oxidized to generate uranium(VI) bis(imido) complexes.

  20. Characteristic sounds facilitate visual search.

    PubMed

    Iordanescu, Lucica; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2008-06-01

    In a natural environment, objects that we look for often make characteristic sounds. A hiding cat may meow, or the keys in the cluttered drawer may jingle when moved. Using a visual search paradigm, we demonstrated that characteristic sounds facilitated visual localization of objects, even when the sounds carried no location information. For example, finding a cat was faster when participants heard a meow sound. In contrast, sounds had no effect when participants searched for names rather than pictures of objects. For example, hearing "meow" did not facilitate localization of the word cat. These results suggest that characteristic sounds cross-modally enhance visual (rather than conceptual) processing of the corresponding objects. Our behavioral demonstration of object-based cross-modal enhancement complements the extensive literature on space-based cross-modal interactions. When looking for your keys next time, you might want to play jingling sounds. PMID:18567253

  1. Counterfactual Thinking Facilitates Behavioral Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Smallman, Rachel; Roese, Neal J.

    2009-01-01

    People often ponder what might have been, and these counterfactual inferences have been linked to behavior regulation. Counterfactuals may enhance performance by either a content-specific pathway (via shift in behavioral intentions) and/or a content-neutral pathway (via mindsets or motivation). Three experiments provided new specification of the content-specific pathway. A sequential priming paradigm revealed that counterfactual judgments facilitated RTs to complete behavioral intention judgments relative to control judgments and to a no-judgment baseline (Experiment 1). This facilitation effect was found only for intention judgments that matched the information content of the counterfactual (Experiment 2) and only for intention judgments as opposed to a different judgment that nevertheless focused on the same information content (Experiment 3). These findings clarify the content-specific pathway by which counterfactuals influence behavior. PMID:20161221

  2. The menopause: stressors and facilitators.

    PubMed Central

    el-Guebaly, N; Atchison, B; Hay, W

    1984-01-01

    Between about ages 40 and 55 years, women experience a transition known as the menopause, which marks the end of their childbearing years. Although the most striking feature of the menopause is the cessation of menstruation, other biologic and psychosocial events occur and can be classified as stressors and "facilitators". For a predisposed group of women the stressors are likely to cause psychiatric disorders. At the same time, the facilitators are opportunities for personal growth and development. Physicians who understand both types of events during this phase of life and who are sensitive to the overall effects of ageing on marital partners can provide comprehensive care to the menopausal patient rather than automatically pursuing drug therapy (substitution hormonal therapy) alone. PMID:6488116

  3. A kinetic study of the reaction between N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine and its electrogenerated radical cation in a room temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Evans, Russell G; Compton, Richard G

    2006-02-13

    The reaction between N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMT) and the radical cation generated through its one-electron oxidation has been studied electrochemically in the room temperature ionic liquid N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Py14][NTf2]. Kinetic information obtained as linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry collected at 5 microm, 10 microm and 0.3 mm diameter platinum disk electrodes over a range of initial substrate concentrations and scan rates spanning five orders of magnitude was complemented by chronoamperometric measurements designed to probe the rate of diffusion. At the fastest scan rates the homogeneous reactions following the initial electron transfer were effectively out-run, facilitating an assessment of the electrode kinetics using DIGISIM and a validated Nicholson's method. Through digital simulation the voltammetry was then shown to be consistent with a mechanism established for the same reaction in acetonitrile, involving dimerisation of the DMT radicals following an initial and rate-determining proton transfer step. After careful consideration of all parameters, a bimolecular rate constant of (3.4 +/- 1.1) x 10(2) dm3 mol(-1) s(-1) was deduced by fitting the data. This was compared to the equivalent value for acetonitrile and, in light of this, the implications on the viability of ionic liquids for use as alternative mainstream solvents briefly assessed. PMID:16463338

  4. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  5. Large electropositive cations as surfactants for the growth of polar epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Alfred K. C.; Elfimov, Ilya; Berciu, Mona; Sawatzky, George A.

    2015-03-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) we demonstrate that the adsorption of large cations such as potassium or cesium facilitates the epitaxial growth of polar LaAlO3(LAO ) on SrTiO3(STO ). The low ionization potential of K favors efficient electron transfer to the STO conduction band and results in a two-dimensional electron gas which exactly compensates for the diverging potential with increasing layer thickness. For large cations like K or Cs, DFT total energy considerations show that they remain adsorbed on the LAO surface and do not enter substitutionally into LAO. These results suggest a scheme for growing clean LAO/STO interface systems, and polar systems in general, by performing the growth process in the presence of large, low ionization potential alkali-metal ions.

  6. Enzymatic phosphorylation of hair keratin enhances fast adsorption of cationic moieties.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The current study describes the in vitro phosphorylation of a human hair keratin, using protein kinase for the first time. Phosphorylation of keratin was demonstrated by (31)P NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) techniques. Phosphorylation induced a 2.5 fold increase of adsorption capacity in the first 10 min for cationic moiety like methylene blue (MB). Thorough description of MB adsorption process was performed by several isothermal models. Reconstructed fluorescent microscopy images depict distinct amounts of dye bound to the differently treated hair. The results of this work suggest that the enzymatic phosphorylation of keratins might have significant implications in hair shampooing and conditioning, where short application times of cationic components are of prime importance. PMID:26756110

  7. Efficient scavenging of β-carotene radical cations by antiinflammatory salicylates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Liang, Ran; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2014-02-01

    The radical cation generated during photobleaching of β-carotene is scavenged efficiently by the anion of methyl salicylate from wintergreen oil in a second-order reaction approaching the diffusion limit with k2 = 3.2 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1) in 9 : 1 v/v chloroform-methanol at 23 °C, less efficiently by the anion of salicylic acid with 2.2 × 10(8) L mol(-1) s(-1), but still of possible importance for light-exposed tissue. Surprisingly, acetylsalicylate, the aspirin anion, reacts with an intermediate rate in a reaction assigned to the anion of the mixed acetic-salicylic acid anhydride formed through base induced rearrangements. The relative scavenging rate of the β-carotene radical cation by the three salicylates is supported by DFT-calculations. PMID:24336797

  8. How We Think and Talk about Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Fumitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, the notion of "facilitation" has been increasingly gaining attention and acceptance in Japan, especially in the context of education and training. Today, Japanese educators think and talk about facilitation, even if it is not yet clear what facilitation is. Interestingly enough, the term "facilitation" does not exist in…

  9. Monovalent cation transport in irreversibly sickled cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M R; Morrison, C E; Shohet, S B

    1978-01-01

    Using discontinuous density gradients of Stractan II, we have separated sickle cell blood into discrete subpopulations of reticulocytes, mature discoid cells, and irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs). We have measured active and passive fluxes of monovalent cations in mature discoid cells, ISCs, and normal control cells, also separated upon density gradients. These measurements revealed a decreased active cation transport in ISC-rich populations. However, parallel measurements of Na, K-ATPase activity showed normal ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity in ISCs. Passive permeability to external Rb was also normal in ISCs. The observation of depressed pump activity in intact ISCs, contrasted with normal ATPase activity in ISC membranes, suggests the presence of factors in the intact cell which inhibit the active transport of Na and K in ISCs. PMID:149799

  10. Structurally Distinct Cation Channelrhodopsins from Cryptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are remarkable for the diversity of their functional mechanisms based on the same protein scaffold. A class of rhodopsins from cryptophyte algae show close sequence homology with haloarchaeal rhodopsin proton pumps rather than with previously known channelrhodopsins from chlorophyte (green) algae. In particular, both aspartate residues that occupy the positions of the chromophore Schiff base proton acceptor and donor, a hallmark of rhodopsin proton pumps, are conserved in these cryptophyte proteins. We expressed the corresponding polynucleotides in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and studied electrogenic properties of the encoded proteins with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Despite their lack of residues characteristic of the chlorophyte cation channels, these proteins are cation-conducting channelrhodopsins that carry out light-gated passive transport of Na(+) and H(+). These findings show that channel function in rhodopsins has evolved via multiple routes. PMID:27233115

  11. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    PubMed

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules. PMID:19666545

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of water in cationic micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of confinement on the dynamical properties of liquid water is investigated for water enclosed in cationic reverse micelles. The authors performed mid-infrared ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy on the OH-stretch vibration of isotopically diluted HDO in D2O in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) reverse micelles of various sizes. The authors observe that the surfactant counterions are inhomogeneously distributed throughout the reverse micelle, and that regions of extreme salinity occur near the interfacial Stern layer. The authors find that the water molecules in the core of the micelles show similar orientational dynamics as bulk water, and that water molecules in the counterion-rich interfacial region are much less mobile. An explicit comparison is made with the dynamics of water confined in anionic sodium bis(2-ethythexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles. The authors find that interfacial water in cationic CTAB reverse micelles has a higher orientational mobility than water in anionic AOT reverse micelles.

  13. Plant NHX cation/proton antiporters

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rosales, M Pilar; Gálvez, Francisco J; Huertas, Raúl; Aranda, M Nieves; Baghour, Mourad; Cagnac, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Although physiological and biochemical data since long suggested that Na+/H+ and K+/H+ antiporters are involved in intracellular ion and pH regulation in plants, it has taken a long time to identify genes encoding antiporters that could fulfil these roles. Genome sequencing projects have now shown that plants contain a very large number of putative Cation/Proton antiporters, the function of which is only beginning to be studied. The intracellular NHX transporters constitute the first Cation/Proton exchanger family studied in plants. The founding member, AtNHX1, was identified as an important salt tolerance determinant and suggested to catalyze Na+ accumulation in vacuoles. It is, however, becoming increasingly clear, that this gene and other members of the family also play crucial roles in pH regulation and K+ homeostasis, regulating processes from vesicle trafficking and cell expansion to plant development. PMID:19794841

  14. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations. PMID:26370502

  15. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  16. Fast doping of Cu into ZnSe NCs by hydrazine promoted cation exchange in aqueous solution at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haibao; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Yin, Haihong; Cui, Yiping

    2015-03-01

    Controllable doping is an effective way of tuning the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). In this work, a simple strategy of fast doping Cu ions into ZnSe NCs under ambient conditions was proposed. The principle of doping is based on hydrazine (N2H4) promoted cation exchange reaction. By direct addition of Cu ion stock solution into the preformed ZnSe NCs, Cu doped ZnSe NCs can be obtained. Furthermore, the emission of doped NCs can be tuned by changing the amount of impurity ion addition. The cation exchange reaction is facilitated by three factors: 1) N2H4 addition, 2) fast impurity ions, and 3) partial stabilizer removal. The proposed cation exchange reaction in aqueous solution could be an alternate route for NC doping as well as synthesis of ionic NCs. PMID:25605441

  17. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  18. How the spontaneous insertion of amphiphilic imidazolium-based cations changes biological membranes: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Geraldine S; Jaenicke, Stephan; Klähn, Marco

    2015-11-21

    The insertion of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (OMIM(+)) from a diluted aqueous ionic liquid (IL) solution into a model of a bacterial cell membrane is investigated. Subsequently, the mutual interactions of cations inside the membrane and their combined effect on membrane properties are derived. The ionic liquid solution and the membrane model are simulated using molecular dynamics in combination with empirical force fields. A high propensity of OMIM(+) for membrane insertion is observed, with a cation concentration at equilibrium inside the membrane 47 times larger than in the solvent. Once inserted, cations exhibit a weak effective attraction inside the membrane at a distance of 1.3 nm. At this free energy minimum, negatively charged phosphates of the phospholipids are sandwiched between two OMIM(+) to form energetically favorable OMIM(+)-phosphate-OMIM(+) types of coordination. The cation-cation association free energy is 5.9 kJ mol(-1), whereas the activation barrier for dissociation is 10.1 kJ mol(-1). Subsequently, OMIM(+) are inserted into the leaflet of the membrane bilayer that represents the extracellular side. The cations are evenly distributed with mutual cation distances according to the found optimum distance of 1.3 nm. Because of the short length of the cation alkyl chains compared to lipid fatty acids, voids are generated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. These voids disorder the fatty acids, because they enable fatty acids to curl into these empty spaces and also cause a thinning of the membrane by 0.6 nm. Additionally, the membrane density increases at its center. The presence of OMIM(+) in the membrane facilitates the permeation of small molecules such as ammonia through the membrane, which is chosen as a model case for small polar solutes. The permeability coefficient of the membrane with respect to ammonia increases substantially by a factor of seven. This increase is caused by a reduction of the involved free energy barriers

  19. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Lawrie; Benmore, Chris J; Du, Jincheng; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Parise, John B

    2014-01-01

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  20. Study of the fluoro- and chlorodimethylbutyl cations

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of the 2,3-dimethyl-3-fluoro-2-butyl cation and its chloro analog was carried out by the ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (gauge invariant atomic orbital-coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation) method. The structures and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the cations were calculated at the GIAO-CCSD(T)/tzp/dz//MP2/cc-pVTZ level. Bridged fluoronium ion 1, carbenium ion 2, and fluorocarbenium ion 3 were found to be minima on the potential energy surface. Bridged fluoronium ion 1, although a minimum on the potential energy surface, is 12.8 kcal/mol less stable than the open chain fluorobutyl cation 3. In contrast to the fluorinated ion, bridged chloronium ion 5 was found to be the lowest energy minimum being 10.6 kcal/mol more stable than ion 6 and 7.4 kcal/mol more stable than ion 7. PMID:23650369

  1. Stochastic facilitation in the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lawrence M.; Greenwood, Priscilla E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the context for three unsolved problems of noise in the brain as well as provide some new results relevant to one of them. The problems are: are neural oscillations better described as noisy limit cycles or as noise-driven quasicycles, does noise facilitate synchronization and information transmission in the brain, and do noise-driven spatial patterns (quasipatterns) coexist with noise-driven quasicycles in the brain? We provide a few new results indicating that, in models at least, spatial quasipatterns of quasicycles can occur, and resemble patterns observed in other areas, such as predator-prey systems and chemical reactions.

  2. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of imidazolium-based ionic liquids. I. Dynamics and diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kowsari, M H; Alavi, Saman; Ashrafizaadeh, Mahmud; Najafi, Bijan

    2008-12-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamics and transport properties of 12 room-temperature ionic liquids of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [amim](+) (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl) family with PF(6)(-), NO(3)(-), and Cl(-) counterions. The explicit atom transferable force field of Canongia Lopes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 2038 (2004)] is used in the simulations. In this first part, the dynamics of the ionic liquids are characterized by studying the mean-square displacement (MSD) and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) for the centers of mass of the ions at 400 K. Trajectory averaging was employed to evaluate the diffusion coefficients at two temperatures from the linear slope of MSD(t) functions in the range of 150-300 ps and from the integration of the VACF(t) functions at 400 K. Detailed comparisons are made between the diffusion results from the MSD and VACF methods. The diffusion coefficients from the integration of the VACFs are closer to experimental values than the diffusion coefficients calculated from the slope of MSDs. Both methods can show good agreement with experiment in predicting relative trends in the diffusion coefficients and determining the role of the cation and anion structures on the dynamical behavior of this family of ionic liquids. The MSD and self-diffusion of relatively heavier imidazolium cations are larger than those of the lighter anions from the Einstein results, except for the case of [bmim][Cl]. The cationic transference number generally decreases with temperature, in good agreement with experiments. For the same anion, the cationic transference numbers decrease with increasing length of the alkyl chain, and for the same cation, the trends in the cationic transference numbers are [NO(3)](-) < [Cl](-) < [PF(6)](-). The trends in the diffusion coefficient in the series of cations with identical anions are [emim](+) > [pmim](+) > [bmim](+) and those for anions with identical cations are [NO(3

  4. An Electrodynamics-Based Model for Ion Diffusion in Microbial Polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2004-08-03

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides with fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion model that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a classic exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. Numerical simulations also showed that ion diffusive transport within a bacterial cell wall polysaccharide may induce an ionic current that compresses or expands the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution.

  5. Facilitation of learning: part 2.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Tyler; Houghton, Trish; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-27

    The previous article in this series of 11, Facilitation of learning: part 1, reviewed learning theories and how they relate to clinical practice. Developing an understanding of these theories is essential for mentors and practice teachers to enable them to deliver evidence-based learning support. This is important given that effective learning support is dependent on an educator who possesses knowledge of their specialist area as well as the relevent tools and methods to support learning. The second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice relates to the facilitation of learning. To fulfil this domain, mentors and practice teachers are required to demonstrate their ability to recognise the needs of learners and provide appropriate support to meet those needs. This article expands on some of the discussions from part 1 of this article and considers these from a practical perspective, in addition to introducing some of the tools that can be used to support learning. PMID:27191319

  6. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Miho S.; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each other, coinciding, and moving away, presented with a brief sound. We found that for participants with lower depressive tendency, induced happy moods increased the width of the temporal binding window of the sound-induced bounce percept in the stream/bounce display, while no effect was found for the participants with higher depressive tendency. In contrast, no effect of mood was observed for a simple audiovisual simultaneity discrimination task in Experiment 2. These results provide the first empirical evidence of a dependency of multisensory binding upon emotional states and traits, revealing that positive emotions can facilitate the multisensory binding processes at a perceptual level. PMID:26834585

  7. The Diffusion of Innovations: A Review of Research and Theory with Implications for Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.

    A review of the general literature on diffusion, innovation, and social change is worthwhile as a basis for developing more effective methods for facilitating the adoption of computer-based technologies. Much of the research on diffusion has focused on (1) characteristics of the innovation which influence the diffusion process, (2) a description…

  8. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  9. Detachment of surface membrane invagination systems by cationic amphiphilic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Sangar; Taylor, Kirk A.; Allcock, Natalie; Rainbow, Richard D.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Several cell types develop extensive plasma membrane invaginations to serve a specific physiological function. For example, the megakaryocyte demarcation membrane system (DMS) provides a membrane reserve for platelet production and muscle transverse (T) tubules facilitate excitation:contraction coupling. Using impermeant fluorescent indicators, capacitance measurements and electron microscopy, we show that multiple cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) cause complete separation of the DMS from the surface membrane in rat megakaryocytes. This includes the calmodulin inhibitor W-7, the phospholipase-C inhibitor U73122, and anti-psychotic phenothiazines. CADs also caused loss of T tubules in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes and the open canalicular system of human platelets. Anionic amphiphiles, U73343 (a less electrophilic U73122 analogue) and a range of kinase inhibitors were without effect on the DMS. CADs are known to accumulate in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane where they bind to anionic lipids, especially PI(4,5)P2. We therefore propose that surface detachment of membrane invaginations results from an ability of CADs to interfere with PI(4,5)P2 interactions with cytoskeletal or BAR domain proteins. This establishes a detubulating action of a large class of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:26725955

  10. Gas-phase electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, N.; Catani, K. J.; Sanelli, J. A.; Dryza, V.; Bieske, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    The visible and near-UV electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation is measured in the gas phase by photodissociation of indole+-Ar and indole+-He complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. A series of resolved vibronic transitions extending from 610 to 460 nm are assigned to the D2 ← D0 band system, while weak transitions between 390 and 360 nm are assigned to the D3 ← D0 system, and a stronger, broad, unresolved absorption between 350 and 300 nm is attributed to the D4 ← D0 system. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to assign vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system, and show that the main active vibrational modes correspond to in-plane ring deformations. The strongest D2 ← D0 vibronic transitions of indole+-He do not correspond with any catalogued diffuse interstellar bands, even considering band displacements of up to 50 cm-1possibly caused by the attached He atom.

  11. Radiolytic generation of radical cations in xenon matrices. Tetramethylcyclopropane radical cation and its transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, X.Z.; Trifunac, A.D. )

    1990-04-05

    Radiolytic generation of radical cations in xenon matrices containing electron scavengers is illustrated by studying the 1,1,2,2-tetramethylcyclopropane radical cation. Dilute and concentrated solutions of tetramethylcyclopropane in xenon without electron scavengers and neat tetramethylcyclopropane yielded neutral radicals upon {gamma}-irradiation. Speculation on the mechanisms of radical formation is presented. The radical species observed in the {gamma}-irradiation of neat tetramethylcyclopropane appears to be identical with the paramagnetic species observed in CF{sub 2}ClCFCl{sub 2} above 120 K, suggesting that a neutral radical rather than the ring-opened distonic radical cation is observed in the CF{sub 2}ClCFCl{sub 2} matrix.

  12. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  13. No facilitator required for membrane transport of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Missner, Andreas; Kügler, Philipp; Saparov, Sapar M.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Lee, John K.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as a new and important member in the group of gaseous signaling molecules. However, the molecular transport mechanism has not yet been identified. Because of structural similarities with H2O, it was hypothesized that aquaporins may facilitate H2S transport across cell membranes. We tested this hypothesis by reconstituting the archeal aquaporin AfAQP from sulfide reducing bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus into planar membranes and by monitoring the resulting facilitation of osmotic water flow and H2S flux. To measure H2O and H2S fluxes, respectively, sodium ion dilution and buffer acidification by proton release (H2S ⇆ H+ + HS−) were recorded in the immediate membrane vicinity. Both sodium ion concentration and pH were measured by scanning ion-selective microelectrodes. A lower limit of lipid bilayer permeability to H2S, PM,H2S ≥ 0.5 ± 0.4 cm/s was calculated by numerically solving the complete system of differential reaction diffusion equations and fitting the theoretical pH distribution to experimental pH profiles. Even though reconstitution of AfAQP significantly increased water permeability through planar lipid bilayers, PM,H2S remained unchanged. These results indicate that lipid membranes may well act as a barrier to water transport although they do not oppose a significant resistance to H2S diffusion. The fact that cholesterol and sphingomyelin reconstitution did not turn these membranes into an H2S barrier indicates that H2S transport through epithelial barriers, endothelial barriers, and membrane rafts also occurs by simple diffusion and does not require facilitation by membrane channels. PMID:19805349

  14. Sign Crossover in All Maxwell-Stefan Diffusivities for Molten Salt LiF-BeF2: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda

    2015-08-20

    Applying Green-Kubo formalism and equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have studied for the first time the dynamic correlation, Onsager coefficients, and Maxwell-Stefan (MS) diffusivities of molten salt LiF-BeF2, which is a potential candidate for a coolant in a high temperature reactor. We observe an unusual composition dependence and strikingly a crossover in sign for all the MS diffusivities at a composition of around 7% of LiF where the MS diffusivity between cation-anion pair (Đ(BeF) and Đ(LiF)) jumps from positive to negative value while the MS diffusivity between cation-cation pair (Đ(LiBe)) becomes positive from a negative value. Even though the negative MS diffusivities have been observed for electrolyte solutions between cation-cation pair, here we report negative MS diffusivity between cation-anion pair where Đ(BeF) shows a sharp rise around 66% of BeF2, reaches maximum value at 70% of BeF2, and then decreases almost exponentially with a sign change for BeF2 around 93%. For low mole fraction of LiF, Đ(BeF) follows the Debye-Huckel theory and rises with the square root of LiF mole fraction similar to the MS diffusivity between cation-anion pair in aqueous solution of electrolyte salt. Negative MS diffusivities while unusual are, however, shown to satisfy the non-negative entropy constraints at all thermodynamic states as required by the second law of thermodynamics. We have established a strong correlation between the structure and dynamics and predict that the formation of flouride polyanion network between Be and F ions and coulomb interaction is responsible for sharp variation of the MS diffusivities which controls the multicomponent diffusion phenomenon in LiF-BeF2 which has a strong impact on the performance of the reactor. PMID:26192629

  15. The role of helper lipids in cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S W; Langner, M; Zhao, Y L; Ross, P; Hurley, E; Chan, K

    1996-01-01

    -directed membrane motion, after their respective DNA:liposome complexes attached to cell surfaces by electrostatic means. Formation of granules on the cell surface facilitated and/or triggered endocytosis. Fusion between cationic liposomes and the cell membrane played a secondary role in determining transfection efficiency. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8842198

  16. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  17. The Influence of Facilitator and Facilitation Characteristics on Participants' Ratings of Stepfamily Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Brian J.; Myler, Cory

    2010-01-01

    We examine the relative importance of facilitator and facilitation characteristics on participant ratings of a stepfamily education program. Data from 48 facilitators and 598 participants suggest that quality facilitation is more meaningful to participants than whether facilitators have comparable demographic characteristics or life experiences.…

  18. Sensing of biologically important cations such as Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) using magnetic nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, V; Philip, John

    2013-04-01

    We report a simple approach to the ultrasensitive detection of biologically important metal ions using a magnetic nanoemulsion. The nanoemulsion used in our study was an oil-in-water emulsion droplet of average size ∼190 nm containing ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of average size ∼10 nm. In a static magnetic field, the emulsion droplets self-assemble into a nanoarray with distinct interdroplet spacing. In the presence of cations in the solution, the nanofluid array shows a large blue shift in the diffracted Bragg peak and a visually perceivable color change due to changes in the electrical double layer upon the diffusion of cations. The colloidal force-distance measurements in the presence of cations show large variations at the onset of repulsion in the presence of cations. The sensor shows good selectivity to Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) ions and offers a rapid response compared to conventional techniques. This approach can be useful for the recognition of biologically important cations. PMID:23477486

  19. Characterization of perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC surface modified with halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A.; Afonin, D.; Kononenko, N.; Shkirskaya, S.

    2015-10-01

    The electrical conductivity and diffusion permeability through perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC (Russian analog of the Nafion-type membrane), whose surface is modified by nanotubes of halloysite using short exposures of low temperature microwave plasma, are theoretically investigated using the Nernst-Planck approach. The method of quantitative evaluation of physicochemical parameters (individual and averaged diffusion coefficients and averaged distribution coefficients of ion pairs in the membrane) of the systems `electrolyte solution - bi-layer ion-exchange membrane - water/electrolyte solution', which was proposed by us earlier, is further developed. The aforementioned parameters of modified MF-4SC/halloysite membranes were found using the least squares method. For this purpose we used electrical conductivity as well as diffusion permeability data experimentally obtained for NaCl and HCl solutions of different concentration. A new model of bi-layer membrane system can be used for refining the calculated results by taking into account the difference between co- and counter-ion diffusivities inside the membrane layers. We showed that grafting the layer of halloysite nanotubes onto the membrane surface noticeably affects the exchange capacity as well as the structural and transport characteristics of the original perfluorinated membrane. In particular, such a membrane may show weak asymmetry of diffusion permeability when its position inside a measuring cell is changed. Hybrid MF-4SC/halloysite membranes can thus be productively used in fuel cells and catalysis.

  20. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  1. How to Facilitate Social Contagion?

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Achieving the Millennium Development Goals has proven to be a real challenge. Providing evidence on cost-effective interventions did not prove to be sufficient to secure the trust of national authorities, health care providers and patients. Introducing change in a health system requires a good understanding of the relationships between the actors of the system. Social network analysis can provide a new avenue to analyse the diffusion of innovations within a health system or a health organisation and analyse the structure and the properties of a health system. Evidence has been generated on the necessity of not only identifying the actors of a system but also qualifying the relationships between these actors. PMID:24596863

  2. Facilitating submetering implementation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Residential submetering is the measurement and billing of electric use in individual apartments in master-metered buildings. In master-metered building situations, residents do not bear electricity costs in proportion to consumption levels. As a result, studies have confirmed that residents in master-metered buildings tend to consume more electricity than residents with individual apartment metering, and have established electrical submetering as an effective energy conservation measure. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) has commissioned a project called Facilitating Submetering Implementation to identify and analyze barriers to the implementation of residential electrical submetering in New York and to formulate recommendations that would facilitate the removal of these barriers, streamlining the process. Experienced professionals in the technical, legal, regulatory, analytical, financial, and other aspects of submetering were retained to interview key interested parties and conduct public forums. This and other data were then analyzed to ascertain the barriers to submetering and develop recommendations designed to reduce or eliminate these barriers. The key barriers to submetering implementation were found to be the Public Service Commission (PSC) requirement for a vote of a majority of shareholders (for coops and condos) and the high initial cost that cannot easily be recouped by owners of both rental and shareholder-owned buildings. The key recommendations are to repeal the voting requirement, maintain the utility incentives, adopt a uniform dispute resolution mechanism, and increase awareness through an Ad-hoc Submetering Committee and supporting educational materials. Other funding sources not fully available can also be made available with regulatory agency support.

  3. Ultrafast dynamics of pyrrolidinium cation ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Hideaki; Funston, Alison M; Wishart, James F; Castner, Edward W

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast molecular dynamics of five pyrrolidinium cation room temperature ionic liquids using femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The ionic liquids studied are N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P14+/NTf2-), N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bromide P1EOE+, and N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanoamide P1EOE+/DCA-). For comparing dynamics among the five ionic liquids, we categorize the ionic liquids into two groups. One group of liquids comprises the three pyrrolidinium cations P14+, P1EOM+, and P1EOE+ paired with the NTf2- anion. The other group of liquids consists of the P1EOE+ cation paired with each of the three anions NTf2-, Br-, and DCA-. The overdamped relaxation for time scales longer than 2 ps has been fit by a triexponential function for each of the five pyrrolidinium ionic liquids. The fast ( approximately 2 ps) and intermediate (approximately 20 ps) relaxation time constants vary little among these five ionic liquids. However, the slow relaxation time constant correlates with the viscosity. Thus, the Kerr spectra in the range from 0 to 750 cm(-1) are quite similar for the group of three pyrrolidinium ionic liquids paired with the NTf2- anion. The intermolecular vibrational line shapes between 0 and 150 cm(-1) are fit to a multimode Brownian oscillator model; adequate fits required at least three modes to be included in the line shape. PMID:15918734

  4. Ultrafast dynamics of pyrrolidinium cation ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Hideaki; Funston, Alison M.; Wishart, James F.; Castner, Edward W.

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast molecular dynamics of five pyrrolidinium cation room temperature ionic liquids using femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The ionic liquids studied are N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P14+/NTf2-), N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bromideP1EOE+, and N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanoamide P1EOE+/DCA-). For comparing dynamics among the five ionic liquids, we categorize the ionic liquids into two groups. One group of liquids comprises the three pyrrolidinium cations P14+, P1EOM+, and P1EOE+ paired with the NTf2- anion. The other group of liquids consists of the P1EOE+ cation paired with each of the three anions NTf2-,Br-, and DCA-. The overdamped relaxation for time scales longer than 2 ps has been fit by a triexponential function for each of the five pyrrolidinium ionic liquids. The fast (˜2ps) and intermediate (˜20ps) relaxation time constants vary little among these five ionic liquids. However, the slow relaxation time constant correlates with the viscosity. Thus, the Kerr spectra in the range from 0 to 750cm-1 are quite similar for the group of three pyrrolidinium ionic liquids paired with the NTf2- anion. The intermolecular vibrational line shapes between 0 and 150cm-1 are fit to a multimode Brownian oscillator model; adequate fits required at least three modes to be included in the line shape.

  5. Cellular mechanism underlying the facilitation of contractile response of vas deferens smooth muscle by sodium orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Zhe; Ruan, Ye-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2012-07-01

    In the earlier study, sodium orthovanadate (SOV) has been reported to be a powerful inhibitor of (Na(+), K(+)) adenosine triphosphatase, exhibit widespread actions on the renal and cardiovascular systems, induces smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which SOV facilitated contractile response of vas deferens smooth muscle and its potential therapeutic advantage. Exogenous application of ATP and NA-caused contraction was strengthened by pretreatment with SOV. This facilitation was inhibited not by bath with the inhibitor of P2 receptor, PPADS, or the inhibitor of α1 receptor, Prazosin, but by bath with the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Genistein. SOV induced a sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) of smooth muscle cells, which was abolished by 100 μM Genistein or Ca(2+)-free solution. The facilitation of SOV could also be inhibited by the selective inhibitors of TRP channel, 2-APB and non-selective cation channel, Gd(3+), Ni(+). The in vivo study showed that peritoneal injection of SOV in dystrophic mice (mdx mice) enhanced the contraction of vas deferens smooth muscle stimulated by electrical field stimulation, ATP, noradrenaline, or KCl. The above results suggest that SOV facilitates the concentration of vas deferens smooth muscle through the tyrosine phosphorylation activated the non-selective cation channels, which has potential use in the therapy for muscle dysfunction. PMID:22476902

  6. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  7. Cationic bituminous emulsions and emulsion aggregate slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1986-07-01

    A cationic bituminous emulsion is described which consists of from about 30% to about 80% by weight of bitumen, from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of reaction products of a polyamine reacted with a member of the group consisting of epoxidized unsaturated fatty acids of chain lengths between C/sub 8/ and C/sub 22/ and the esters thereof and adding water to make up 100% by weight, the emulsion having a pH in the range of from 2-7.

  8. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)). PMID:26862680

  9. Mobility of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, J. R.; Sonder, E.; Weeks, R. A.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    Transport of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel due to an applied electric field at approximately 1000 °C has been measured by observing changes in elemental concentrations near the cathode and anode surfaces using ion backscattering techniques. The results indicate that magnesium ions are the mobile species at 1000 °C and that these ions combine with ambient oxygen at the cathode surface to form a MgO layer. Quantitative interpretation of the data leads to the conclusion that the ionic transference number of spinel becomes approximately 0.5 after treatment in an electric field.

  10. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  11. Soil Cation Status in Southern California: Interactions of Vehicular Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D. J.; Jenerette, D.; Clarke, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Roadside soils are often enriched in trace metals due to vehicular deposition. However, less attention is given to base cation pools in roadside soils. Relatively high loadings of nitrate from vehicular exhaust should acidify roadside soils, potentially mobilizing cationic species by displacing them from soil exchange sites. In contrast, weathering of road materials can contribute substantial amounts of these cations to the same soils, potentially replenishing cation pools. Base cations are essential nutrients and these dynamics may alter ecosystem processes in near-road environments. Metal concentrations in park and garden soils collected from Southern California (Los Angeles and Riverside Counties) were examined across gradients of road network intensity, climate and geology. In these samples, base cation concentrations decrease in areas of denser road networks. Base cation concentrations also decrease with distance from the road, with near-road samples relatively depleted in base cation concentrations. In addition, base cation concentrations are associated with traffic flux density, with exchange pools decreasing near heavily trafficked areas. These relationships suggest road activity is mobilizing cations, depleting near-road soils of essential nutrient pools, despite road material weathering. This depletion of soil nutrients from exchange pools in roadside soils likely influences local ecological function in unpredictable ways. This observation lays the groundwork for continued characterization of soil metal processes in the increasingly common roadside environment.

  12. Evaluation of cation-anion interaction strength in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Rocha, Marisa A A; Freire, Mara G; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2011-04-14

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with variable collision induced dissociation of the isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) ions of imidazolium-, pyridinium-, pyrrolidinium-, and piperidinium-based ionic liquids (ILs) combined with a large set of anions, such as chloride, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, trifluoromethanesulfonate, and bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, was used to carry out a systematic and comprehensive study on the ionic liquids relative interaction energies. The results are interpreted in terms of main influences derived from the structural characteristics of both anion and cation. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, the effect of the anion upon the dissociation energies of the ionic liquid pair, and isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) aggregates, were estimated and are in good agreement with the experimental data. Both experimental and computational results indicate an energetic differentiation between the cation and the anion to the ionic pair. Moreover, it was found that the quantum chemical calculations can describe the trend obtained for the electrostatic cation-anion attraction potential. The impact of the cation-anion interaction strengths in the surface tension of ionic liquids is further discussed. The surface tensions dependence on the cation alkyl chain length, and on the anion nature, follows an analogous pattern to that of the relative cation-anion interaction energies determined by mass spectrometry. PMID:21425809

  13. Diffusion on spatial network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  14. A systematic determination of diffusion coefficients of trace elements in open and restricted diffusive layers used by the diffusive gradients in a thin film technique.

    PubMed

    Shiva, Amir Houshang; Teasdale, Peter R; Bennett, William W; Welsh, David T

    2015-08-12

    A systematic comparison of the diffusion coefficients of cations (Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) and oxyanions (Al, As, Mo, Sb, V, W) in open (ODL) and restricted (RDL) diffusive layers used by the DGT technique was undertaken. Diffusion coefficients were measured using both the diffusion cell (Dcell) method at pH 4.00 and the DGT time-series (D(DGT)) method at pH 4.01 and 7.04 (pH 8.30 was used instead of 7.04 for Al) using the Chelex-Metsorb mixed binding layer. The performance of Chelex-Metsorb as a new DGT binding layer for Al uptake was also evaluated for the first time. Reasonable agreement was observed between D(cell) and D(DGT) measurements for both ODL and RDL, except for V and W. The ratios of D(cell)/D(DGT) for V of 0.44 and 0.39, and for W of 0.66 and 0.63 with ODL and RDL respectively, were much lower due to the formation of a high proportion of polyoxometalate species at the higher concentrations required with the D(cell) measurements. This is the first time that D values have been reported for several oxyanions using RDL. Except for Al at pH 8.30 with ODL, all D(DGT) measurements were retarded relative to diffusion coefficients in water (DW) for both diffusive hydrogels. Diffusion in RDL was further retarded compared with ODL, for all elements (0.66-0.78) with both methods. However, the degree of retardation observed changed for cations and anions at each pH. At pH 7.04 cations had a slightly higher D(DGT) and oxyanions had a slightly lower D(DGT) than at pH 4.01 for both ODL and RDL. It is proposed that this is due to partial formation of acrylic acid functional groups (pKa ≈4.5), which would be fully deprotonated at pH 7.04 (negative) and mostly protonated at pH 4.01 (neutral). As Al changes from being cationic at pH 4.01 to anionic at pH 8.30 the results were more complex. PMID:26320970

  15. Ionic diffusion in single crystals of vermiculite

    SciTech Connect

    Maraqah, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    Novel guest-host compounds, based on single crystal vermiculite, were synthesized by diffusive techniques through a new hydrogen vermiculite. Single crystals were chosen because of the ease of characterization. An investigation of the ion transport properties of these single crystals was done to determine the mechanism of conductivity including the predominant charge carrier. Measurements of the ionic conductivity using impedance spectroscopy and X-ray lattice parameters of the ion-exchanged samples strongly suggest that the native cations and not protons are the major current carriers. Single crystals of hydrogen vermiculite were synthesized at room temperature by ion exchange from sodium-vermiculite using 1 molar acetic acid for a one week. Subsequent ion exchange with other cations was found to be much enhanced. Thus transition metals were exchanged in about a week in contrast to the need of several months using previous methods. The ionic conductivity of hydrogen vermiculite was measured and shown to be much lower than that of many other monovalent cations in the same host lattice. Its enthalpy of motion is also much lower. These marked differences suggest that protonic species do not play a significant role in charge transport in these layered materials. These materials were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and acid-base titration. Hydrogen-vermiculite was found to react with organic bases, like methylamine, ethylamine, n-butylamine, n-hexylamine, n-octylamine, n-decylamine, aniline, acrylamide, methacrylaminde, urea, 1,10phenanthroline, and 1,1phenanthroline ferrous sulfate complex, to undergo ion exchange with metal cations like sodium, zinc, copper(II) ions and polymerization reactions could be performed in the galleries of the structure like pyrrole and aniline. Its behavior was compared with that of powdered montmorillonite.

  16. Technologies and Techniques for Supporting Facilitated Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, demand for education of all kinds is increasing beyond the capacity to provide it. One approach that shows potential for addressing this demand is facilitated video. In facilitated video, an educator is recorded teaching, and that video is sent to a remote site where it is shown to students by a facilitator who creates interaction…

  17. Facilitated IEP Meetings: An Emerging Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), 2004

    2004-01-01

    To help special education planning teams reach agreements, several State Education Agencies (SEAs) provide the option of facilitated Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings. The use of externally facilitated IEP meetings is growing nationally. When relationships between parents and schools are strained, facilitated meetings may be…

  18. Evaluation of the Facilitated Communication Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Special Education and Student Services asked the Office of Shared Accountability to evaluate the "Facilitated Communication Pilot." In facilitated communication (FC), people with communication impairments express themselves by typing with the aid of a communication partner, called a facilitator, who provides physical (and…

  19. The Teacher and Town Planner as Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of theories of facilitation in teaching focuses on citizen participation and the role of the facilitator in town planning. Highlights include hierarchies of learning; student-centered learning; facilitating community participation; information technology skills and interpersonal skills; and a rationale for participation. (LRW)

  20. Fungal phylogenetic diversity drives plant facilitation.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Segarra-Moragues, J G; Valiente-Banuet, A; Verdú, M

    2016-06-01

    Plant-plant facilitation is a crucial ecological process, as many plant species (facilitated) require the presence of an established individual (nurse) to recruit. Some plant facilitative interactions disappear during the ontogenetic development of the facilitated plant but others persist, even when the two plants are adults. We test whether the persistence of plant facilitative interactions is explained by the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi that the nurse and the facilitated species add to the shared rhizosphere. We classify plant facilitative interactions as persistent and non-persistent interactions and quantify the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi added by the plant species to the shared rhizosphere. Our results show that the facilitated species add less phylogenetic diversity of non-mutualistic fungi when plant facilitative interactions persist than when they do not persist. However, persistent and non-persistent facilitative interactions did not differ in the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic fungi added by the facilitated species to the shared rhizosphere. Finally, the fungal phylogenetic diversity added by the nurse to the shared rhizosphere did not differ between persistent and non-persistent interactions. This study suggests that considering the fungal associates of the plant species involved in facilitative interactions can shed light on the mechanisms of persistence for plant-plant interactions. PMID:26915080

  1. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas‐phase Cl−X and [HCl−X]+ complexes for X+= H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl− and HCl for the various cations. The Cl−X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+ = H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS‐MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  2. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  3. UPDATING APPLIED DIFFUSION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Socie...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  5. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)). PMID:27035210

  6. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance. PMID:26606647

  8. Divalent cation affinity sites in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G; Kaneshiro, E S; Peters, P D

    1976-05-01

    Sites with high calcium affinity in Paramecium aurelia were identified by high calcium (5 mM) fixation and electron microscope methods. Electron-opaque deposits were observed on the cytoplasmic side of surface membranes, particularly at the basal regions of cilia and trichocyst-pellicle fusion sites. Deposits were also observed on some smooth cytomembranes, within the axoneme of cilia, and on basal bodies. The divalent cations, Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Ba2+, and Zn2+, could be substituted for Ca2+ in the procedure. Deposits were larger with 5 mM Sr2+. Ba2+, and Mn2+ at ciliary transverse plates and the terminal plate of basal bodies. Microprobe analysis showed that Ca and C1 were concentrated within deposits. In some analyses, S and P were detected in deposits. Also, microprobe analysis of 5 mM Mn2+-fixed P. aurelia showed that those deposits were enriched in Mn and C1 and sometimes enriched in P. Deposits were seen only when the ciliates were actively swimming at the time of fixation. Locomotory mutants having defective membrane Ca-gating mechanisms and ciliates fixed while exhibiting ciliary reversal showed no obvious differences in deposition pattern and intensity. Possible correlations between electron-opaque deposits and the locations of intramembranous particles seen by freeze-fracture studied, as well as sites where fibrillar material associate with membranes are considered. The possibility that the action sites of calcium and other divalent cations were identified is discussed. PMID:1262398

  9. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  10. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  11. Interaction of Hyaluronan with Cationic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Carril, Mónica; Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Richter, Ralf P

    2015-08-01

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is a main component of peri- and extracellular matrix, and an attractive molecule for materials design in tissue engineering and nanomedicine. Here, we study the morphology of complexes that form upon interaction of nanometer-sized amine-coated gold particles with this anionic, linear, and regular biopolymer in solution and grafted to a surface. We find that cationic nanoparticles (NPs) have profound effects on HA morphology on the molecular and supramolecular scale. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) shows that depending on their relative abundance, cationic NPs promote either strong compaction or swelling of films of surface-grafted HA polymers (HA brushes). Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy reveal that the NPs do also give rise to complexes of distinct morphologies-compact nanoscopic spheres and extended microscopic fibers-upon interaction with HA polymers in solution. In particular, stable and hydrated spherical complexes of single HA polymers with NPs can be prepared when balancing the ionizable groups on HA and NPs. The observed self-assembly phenomena could be useful for the design of drug delivery vehicles and a better understanding of the reorganization of HA-rich synthetic or biological matrices. PMID:26146006

  12. A cation counterflux supports lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Huynh, Kassidy K.; Brodovitch, Alexandre; Jabs, Sabrina; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The profound luminal acidification essential for the degradative function of lysosomes requires a counter-ion flux to dissipate an opposing voltage that would prohibit proton accumulation. It has generally been assumed that a parallel anion influx is the main or only counter-ion transport that enables acidification. Indeed, defective anion conductance has been suggested as the mechanism underlying attenuated lysosome acidification in cells deficient in CFTR or ClC-7. To assess the individual contribution of counter-ions to acidification, we devised means of reversibly and separately permeabilizing the plasma and lysosomal membranes to dialyze the cytosol and lysosome lumen in intact cells, while ratiometrically monitoring lysosomal pH. Replacement of cytosolic Cl− with impermeant anions did not significantly alter proton pumping, while the presence of permeant cations in the lysosomal lumen supported acidification. Accordingly, the lysosomes were found to acidify to the same pH in both CFTR- and ClC-7–deficient cells. We conclude that cations, in addition to chloride, can support lysosomal acidification and defects in lysosomal anion conductance cannot explain the impaired microbicidal capacity of CF phagocytes. PMID:20566682

  13. Complex hydrogen diffusion in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron-Navarta, J.

    2013-12-01

    The singular geodynamic and chemical evolution of the Earth seems to be dictated by the influence of 'water' (more specifically hydrogen structurally bonded to oxygen forming hydroxyl groups, OH-) on the physical properties of the nominally minerals of the Earth's mantle. In the most abundant upper mantle phase, olivine, the presence of hydrogen has been shown to significantly modify the timescale of chemical diffusion, plastic deformation, electrical conductivity and the attenuation of seismic waves. In olivine there are four different hydrogen substitution mechanisms, associated with Mg vacancies, Si vacancies, trivalent cations and titanium substitution, hereafter referred to as H[Mg], H[Si], H[triv] and H[Ti] respectively. It seems possible that hydrogen diffusion rates vary with the type of defect. We addressed this hypothesis by an experimental investigation of the dehydroxylation of synthetic forsterite with two contrasting hydrous defect populations: (1) Ti4+-doped forsterite with H[Si], and H[Ti] dominant and H[Mg] and H[triv] subsidiary; and (2) MgO-buffered forsterite with only H[Si] hydrous defects. The experiments were conducted by annealing the hydroxylated forsterites at atmospheric pressure and 1073 to 1273 K, with OH- contents monitored at intervals by room-temperature FTIR spectroscopy. For the Ti4+-doped forsterite, four stages were observed during dehydoxylation. Firstly, the small amounts of H[Mg] and H[triv] disappear very quickly. Secondly, Ti is removed from the forsterite lattice by precipitation of a new phase; thirdly, the dehydroxylation of H[Ti] as monitored by the 3525 cm-1 peak proceeds at the same rate as H[Si] monitored by the 3613 cm-1 peak; and fourthly, once H[Ti] reaches zero, the dehydroxylation of H[Si] slows drastically, to rates that are unobservable in the duration of our experiments (1073-1273 K). Whereas the rates of loss of H[Mg] and H[triv] are in agreement with previous measurements of bulk hydrogen diffusion in

  14. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopic Studies of Radical Cation Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra in this work is derived by using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schrodinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between beta-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations is derived through the use of a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and syn-sesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl_3 matrix at low temperature. The ESR spectra of the former radical cation exhibit a novel alternating linewidth effect arising from an internal relation between the coupling constants for the four equivalent pairs of hydrogens. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is shown to be the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical) resulting from a symmetry-allowed 1,2-hydrogen shift in the parent radical cation. The nucleophilic endocyclization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran -3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexadiyne have resulted in the first spectroscopic characterization of the radical cation Cope rearrangement, the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5 -hexatetraene radical cation. ESR studies show that the symmetric(C_{rm 2v}) bicyclo (3.3.0) -octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4 -bishomobenzene species) radical cation is

  15. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  16. An optical spectrum of a large isolated gas-phase PAH cation: C78H26+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Mulas, Giacomo; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine

    2016-03-01

    A gas-phase optical spectrum of a large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation - C78H26+ - in the 410 -610 nm range is presented. This large all-benzenoid PAH should be large enough to be stable with respect to photodissociation in the harsh conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The spectrum is obtained via multi-photon dissociation (MPD) spectroscopy of cationic C78H26 stored in the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) cell of the PIRENEA setup using the radiation from a mid-band optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser. The experimental spectrum shows two main absorption peaks at 431 nm and 516 nm, in good agreement with a theoretical spectrum computed via time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT calculations indicate that the equilibrium geometry, with the absolute minimum energy, is of lowered, nonplanar C2 symmetry instead of the more symmetric planar D2h symmetry that is usually the minimum for similar PAHs of smaller size. This kind of slightly broken symmetry could produce some of the fine structure observed in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). It can also favor the folding of C78H26+ fragments and ultimately the formation of fullerenes. This study opens up the possibility to identify the most promising candidates for DIBs amongst large cationic PAHs.

  17. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A.

    2014-02-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations (1H) and anions (19F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes.

  18. Observation of separate cation and anion electrophoretic mobilities in pure ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-02-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) continue to show relevance in many fields, from battery electrolytes, to carbon capture, to advanced separations. These highly ion-dense fluids present unique challenges in understanding their electrochemical properties due to deviations in behavior from existing electrolyte theories. Here we present a novel characterization of ILs using electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to determine separate cation and anion mobilities. This method uses an applied electric field coincident with a pulsed magnetic field gradient to encode the E-field driven flow into NMR signals for cations ((1)H) and anions ((19)F). We describe the detailed design of these experiments, including quantitative analysis of artifact mitigation and necessary control experiments. We then explore mobilities and diffusion coefficients for two representative ILs: 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2mim][BF4]) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C2mim][TfO]). We further use the individual ion mobilities to calculate the bulk net conductivity, which closely agrees with bulk conductivity measurements obtained using impedance spectroscopy. These observations represent the first reliable measurements of cation and anion mobilities in pure ILs, with errors of ±7%. We discuss this advanced experimental methodology in detail, as well as implications of these sensitive measurements for understanding conduction mechanisms in ion-dense electrolytes. PMID:24588161

  19. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; De Napoli, I E; Fedecostante, M; Schophuizen, C M S; Chevtchik, N V; Wilmer, M J; van Asbeck, A H; Croes, H J; Pertijs, J C; Wetzels, J F M; Hilbrands, L B; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Stamatialis, D; Masereeuw, R

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing 'living membranes' for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP(+) uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a 'living membrane' of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  20. An optical spectrum of a large isolated gas-phase PAH cation: C78H26+

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junfeng; Mulas, Giacomo; Bonnamy, Anthony; Joblin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A gas-phase optical spectrum of a large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cation - C78H26+- in the 410-610 nm range is presented. This large all-benzenoid PAH should be large enough to be stable with respect to photodissociation in the harsh conditions prevailing in the interstellar medium (ISM). The spectrum is obtained via multi-photon dissociation (MPD) spectroscopy of cationic C78H26 stored in the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) cell using the radiation from a mid-band optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser. The experimental spectrum shows two main absorption peaks at 431 nm and 516 nm, in good agreement with a theoretical spectrum computed via time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT calculations indicate that the equilibrium geometry, with the absolute minimum energy, is of lowered, nonplanar C2 symmetry instead of the more symmetric planar D2h symmetry that is usually the minimum for similar PAHs of smaller size. This kind of slightly broken symmetry could produce some of the fine structure observed in some diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). It can also favor the folding of C78H26+ fragments and ultimately the formation of fullerenes. This study opens up the possibility to identify the most promising candidates for DIBs amongst large cationic PAHs. PMID:26942230

  1. Single particle dynamics in ionic liquids of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations.

    PubMed

    Urahata, Sérgio M; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2005-01-01

    Ionic dynamics in room temperature molten salts (ionic liquids) containing 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations is investigated by molecular-dynamics simulations. Calculations were performed with united atom models, which were used in a previous detailed study of the equilibrium structure of ionic liquids [S. M. Urahata and M. C. C. Ribeiro, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1855 (2004)]. The models were used in a systematic study of the dependency of several single particle time correlation functions on anion size (F-, Cl-, Br-, and PF6-) and alkyl chain length (1-methyl-, 1-ethyl-, 1-butyl-, and 1-octyl-). Despite of large mass and size of imidazolium cations, they exhibit larger mean-square displacement than anions. A further detailed picture of ionic motions is obtained by using appropriate projections of displacements along the plane or perpendicular to the plane of the imidazolium ring. A clear anisotropy in ionic displacement is revealed, the motion on the ring plane and almost perpendicular to the 1-alkyl chain being the less hindered one. Similar projections were performed on velocity correlation functions, whose spectra were used to relate short time ionic rattling with the corresponding long time diffusive regime. Time correlation functions of cation reorientation and dihedral angles of the alkyl chains are discussed, the latter decaying much faster than the former. A comparative physical picture of time scales for distinct dynamical processes in ionic liquids is provided. PMID:15638602

  2. Single particle dynamics in ionic liquids of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urahata, Sérgio M.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2005-01-01

    Ionic dynamics in room temperature molten salts (ionic liquids) containing 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations is investigated by molecular-dynamics simulations. Calculations were performed with united atom models, which were used in a previous detailed study of the equilibrium structure of ionic liquids [S. M. Urahata and M. C. C. Ribeiro, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1855 (2004)]. The models were used in a systematic study of the dependency of several single particle time correlation functions on anion size (F-, Cl-, Br-, and PF6-) and alkyl chain length (1-methyl-, 1-ethyl-, 1-butyl-, and 1-octyl-). Despite of large mass and size of imidazolium cations, they exhibit larger mean-square displacement than anions. A further detailed picture of ionic motions is obtained by using appropriate projections of displacements along the plane or perpendicular to the plane of the imidazolium ring. A clear anisotropy in ionic displacement is revealed, the motion on the ring plane and almost perpendicular to the 1-alkyl chain being the less hindered one. Similar projections were performed on velocity correlation functions, whose spectra were used to relate short time ionic rattling with the corresponding long time diffusive regime. Time correlation functions of cation reorientation and dihedral angles of the alkyl chains are discussed, the latter decaying much faster than the former. A comparative physical picture of time scales for distinct dynamical processes in ionic liquids is provided.

  3. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; De Napoli, I. E; Fedecostante, M.; Schophuizen, C. M. S.; Chevtchik, N. V.; Wilmer, M. J.; van Asbeck, A. H.; Croes, H. J.; Pertijs, J. C.; Wetzels, J. F. M.; Hilbrands, L. B.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Stamatialis, D.; Masereeuw, R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing ‘living membranes’ for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP+ uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a ‘living membrane’ of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  4. Cation separations using a proton-ionizable macrocycle in a dual module hollow fiber membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R.M.; Lamb, J.D.; Bruening, R.L.; Chuan Wang; Edge, N.; Bradshaw, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Separation of metal cations in aqueous solution using a proton-ionizable macrocycle in a dual module hollow fiber membrane system is described. The advantages of this system, such as easy access to all phases, rapid transport rates, and the potential for continuous operation are maintained with the proton-ionizable macrocycles which allow for proton driven transport. Transport is diffusion limited in the organic phase boundary layer near and on the fibers. Hence, the selectivity of the extraction system is maintained. Selective transport of Ag{sup +} over all other cations tested from neutral source phases and of K{sup +} over other alkali metal cations from basic source phases using a triazole-18-crown-6 carrier has been demonstrated. Selective K{sup +} transport from less basic source phases has been demonstrated using the more acidic thiopyridone-18-crown-6 ligand. However, the large aqueous partition of this ligand makes it difficult to maintain it in the organic phase. Design of the separation systems requires a knowledge of extraction equilibrium constants and partition coefficients. These data have been measured in order to understand these membrane systems.

  5. Effects of ionic liquids on cation dynamics in amorphous polyethylene oxide electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chattoraj, Joyjit Diddens, Diddo; Heuer, Andreas

    2014-01-14

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymer electrolyte material containing lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt for a wide temperature regime above and below the experimental crystallization temperature with and without N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquid (IL). The impact of the IL-concentration on the cation dynamics is studied. The increase of the cation mobility upon addition of IL is significant but temperature-independent. This can be related to distinct variations of the underlying transport properties as expressed within the previously introduced transport model of polymer electrolytes. Even for the largest IL concentration the transport model perfectly predicts the non-trivial time-dependence of the cationic mean square displacement for all temperatures. Finally, we compare our numerical and theoretical findings with the results of recent nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In this way we can exclusively relate the strong experimentally observed dependence of the low-temperature Li-diffusivity on the IL concentration to the impact of IL on crystallization.

  6. Proton diffusion along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, E. S.; Stuchebrukhov, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Biological surfaces are known to be capable of retaining protons and facilitating their lateral diffusion. Since the surface dynamically exchanges protons with the bulk, the proton movement from a source to a target at the surface acquires a complicated pattern of coupled surface and bulk (2D + 3D) diffusion of which the main feature is that the surface acts as a proton-collecting antenna enhancing the proton flux from the bulk. A phenomenological model of this process is reviewed and its applications to recent experiments on lipid bilayers and small unilaminar vesicles are discussed. The model (i) introduces the important notions of the fast and slow regimes of proton exchange between the surface and the bulk, (ii) permits evaluation of the antenna radius and amplification coefficient in both regimes, (iii) explains the observed macroscopically large distances (in the micrometer range; Antonenko and Pohl 1998 FEBS Lett. 429 197) that the proton can travel along lipid membranes embedded into pure aqueous solutions, and (iv) predicts the dependence of the steady-state proton flux and the kinetics of the non-stationary diffusion upon the buffer concentration in buffered solutions. The surface diffusion coefficient for small unilaminar vesicles is calculated from experimental data (Sandén et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 4129) to be 1 × 10 - 5 cm2 s - 1. The dependence of the shape of the kinetic curves representing protonation/deprotonation of a lipid-bound pH-sensitive dye attached to a planar bilayer lipid membrane upon the buffer concentration (Serowy et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 1031) and the effect of changing the membrane composition (Antonenko and Pohl 2008 Eur. Biophys. J. 37 865) are explained.

  7. Proton diffusion along biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, E S; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2011-06-15

    Biological surfaces are known to be capable of retaining protons and facilitating their lateral diffusion. Since the surface dynamically exchanges protons with the bulk, the proton movement from a source to a target at the surface acquires a complicated pattern of coupled surface and bulk (2D + 3D) diffusion of which the main feature is that the surface acts as a proton-collecting antenna enhancing the proton flux from the bulk. A phenomenological model of this process is reviewed and its applications to recent experiments on lipid bilayers and small unilaminar vesicles are discussed. The model (i) introduces the important notions of the fast and slow regimes of proton exchange between the surface and the bulk, (ii) permits evaluation of the antenna radius and amplification coefficient in both regimes, (iii) explains the observed macroscopically large distances (in the micrometer range; Antonenko and Pohl 1998 FEBS Lett. 429 197) that the proton can travel along lipid membranes embedded into pure aqueous solutions, and (iv) predicts the dependence of the steady-state proton flux and the kinetics of the non-stationary diffusion upon the buffer concentration in buffered solutions. The surface diffusion coefficient for small unilaminar vesicles is calculated from experimental data (Sandén et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 4129) to be 1 × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). The dependence of the shape of the kinetic curves representing protonation/deprotonation of a lipid-bound pH-sensitive dye attached to a planar bilayer lipid membrane upon the buffer concentration (Serowy et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 1031) and the effect of changing the membrane composition (Antonenko and Pohl 2008 Eur. Biophys. J. 37 865) are explained. PMID:21613715

  8. Controlling Cesium Cation Recognition via Cation Metathesis within and Ion Pair Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Vargas-Zuniga, Gabriela; Hay, Benjamin; Young, Neil J; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Lee, Prof. Chang-Hee; Kim, Jong Seung; Lynch, Vincent M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion pair receptor 3 bearing an anion binding site and multiple cation binding sites has been synthesized and shown to function in a novel binding-release cycle that does not necessarily require displacement to effect release. The receptor forms stable complexes with the test cesium salts, CsCl and CsNO{sub 3}, in solution (10% methanol-d{sub 4} in chloroform-d) as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The addition of KClO{sub 4} to these cesium salt complexes leads to a novel type of cation metathesis in which the 'exchanged' cations occupy different binding sites. Specifically, K{sup +} becomes bound at the expense of the Cs{sup +} cation initially present in the complex. Under liquid-liquid conditions, receptor 3 is able to extract CsNO{sub 3} and CsCl from an aqueous D{sub 2}O layer into nitrobenzene-d{sub 5} as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses and radiotracer measurements. The Cs{sup +} cation of the CsNO{sub 3} extracted into the nitrobenzene phase by receptor 3 may be released into the aqueous phase by contacting the loaded nitrobenzene phase with an aqueous KClO{sub 4} solution. Additional exposure of the nitrobenzene layer to chloroform and water gives 3 in its uncomplexed, ion-free form. This allows receptor 3 to be recovered for subsequent use. Support for the underlying complexation chemistry came from single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and gas-phase energy-minimization studies.

  9. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  10. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  11. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  12. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  13. Two types of diffusions at the cathode/electrolyte interface in IT-SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Auchterlonie, Graeme John; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-09-15

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, in particular with the combination of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), has been performed to investigate the microstructure and microchemistry of the interfacial region between the cathode (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, LSCF) and the electrolyte (Gd-doped ceria, GDC). Two types of diffusions, mutual diffusion between cathode and electrolyte as well as the diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified. These diffusions suggest that the chemical stability of LSCF and GDC are not as good as previously reported. The results are more noteworthy if we take into consideration the fact that such interdiffusions occur even during the sintering process of cell preparation. - Graphical Abstract: Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and the diffusion along grain boundaries, occurred at the cathode/electrolyte interface of intermediate temperature solid state fuel cells, during cell preparation. The mutual diffusion is denoted by black arrows and the diffusion along grain boundaries assigned by pink arrows. Highlights: > All the cations in cathode (LSCF) and electrolyte (GDC) can mutually diffuse into each other. > Diffusing elements will segregate at grain boundaries or triple junctions around the cathode/electrolyte interface. > Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified thereafter.

  14. Ground state of naphthyl cation: Singlet or triplet?

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana Pal, Sourav; Manohar, Prashant U.

    2014-03-21

    We present a benchmark theoretical investigation on the electronic structure and singlet-triplet(S-T) gap of 1- and 2-naphthyl cations using the CCSD(T) method. Our calculations reveal that the ground states of both the naphthyl cations are singlet, contrary to the results obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations reported in previous theoretical studies. However, the triplet states obtained in the two structural isomers of naphthyl cation are completely different. The triplet state in 1-naphthyl cation is (π,σ) type, whereas in 2-naphthyl cation it is (σ,σ{sup ′}) type. The S-T gaps in naphthyl cations and the relative stability ordering of the singlet and the triplet states are highly sensitive to the basis-set quality as well as level of correlation, and demand for inclusion of perturbative triples in the coupled-cluster ansatz.

  15. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  16. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  17. Solvent effect on cation-π interactions with Al3+.

    PubMed

    Larrucea, Julen

    2012-09-01

    Cation-π interactions are known to be one of the strongest noncovalent forces in the gas phase, but they rarely occur in a fully solvated environment. The present work used two different ab initio molecular dynamics-based approaches to describe the correlation between the strength of the cation-π interactions and the number of water molecules surrounding the cation. Five different complexes between an aluminum cation and different molecules containing aromatic rings were studied, and the degree of hydration of each complex was varied. Results indicated that cation-π interactions vanish when the aluminum cation is surrounded by more than three water molecules. The results also highlighted the influence of -OH ligands on the interaction strength. PMID:22581060

  18. Arousal facilitates involuntary eye movements.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, Gregory J; Patel, Neha; Blaukopf, Clare L

    2016-07-01

    Attention plays a critical role in action selection. However, the role of attention in eye movements is complicated as these movements can be either voluntary or involuntary, with, in some circumstances (antisaccades), these two actions competing with each other for execution. But attending to the location of an impending eye movement is only one facet of attention that may play a role in eye movement selection. In two experiments, we investigated the effect of arousal on voluntary eye movements (antisaccades) and involuntary eye movements (prosaccadic errors) in an antisaccade task. Arousal, as caused by brief loud sounds and indexed by changes in pupil diameter, had a facilitation effect on involuntary eye movements. Involuntary eye movements were both significantly more likely to be executed and significantly faster under arousal conditions (Experiments 1 and 2), and the influence of arousal had a specific time course (Experiment 2). Arousal, one form of attention, can produce significant costs for human movement selection as potent but unplanned actions are benefited more than planned ones. PMID:26928432

  19. Non-linear diffusion paths in two-phase ternary diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongwei

    2005-11-01

    Prediction of diffusion paths facilitates the understanding of interdiffusion microstructure development at the vicinity of a common interface between two alloys. Understanding the influence of interdiffusion on microstructure is critically important to the design of many advanced materials systems such as high temperature coatings. The current study using DICTRA finite difference software predicts non-linear features formed on the diffusion path as the initial interface is approached. The non-linear diffusion path deviates from the linear zigzag shape predicted by an error function model for multiphase diffusion couples. The deviations appear as "horns" that protrude from the linear paths. The horns were found to be of two types. When the two outer legs of the diffusion path bend in the same direction, a "single-horn" is formed. When they bend in opposite directions a "double-horn" is formed. The formation of horns is attributed to the concentration dependence of the diffusivity. It results in a shift on the maximum of the flux profile from the initial interface, which accordingly leads to a rapid rise or decrease of the precipitate fraction as the interface is approached. It was found that the horn length is proportional to the composition vector component along the major eigenvector of the effective diffusivity matrix. Applying these results to a study on Ni-Cr-Al diffusion couples prepared from gamma + beta alloys, it also was found that the formation of single-phase beta layers could be attributed to the horns pointing away from each other, in which case the diffusion path could intersect the single phase beta region of the phase diagram. Comparison between EPMA data and DICTRA simulation shows that existence of second phase could introduce microstructure effect on diffusion. This microstructure effect may be taken into account for promoting or blocking the diffusion.

  20. Characterizing molecular probes for diffusion measurements in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurjinder; Hrabetova, Sabina; Guilfoyle, David N.; Nicholson, Charles; Hrabe, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Brain diffusion properties are at present most commonly evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion imaging. MR cannot easily distinguish between the extracellular and intracellular signal components, but the older technique of Real-Time Iontophoresis (RTI) detects exclusively extracellular diffusion. Interpretation of the MR results would therefore benefit from auxiliary RTI measurements. This requires a molecular probe detectable by both techniques. Our aim was to specify a minimum set of requirements that such a diffusion probe should fulfill and apply it to two candidate probes: the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA+), used routinely in the RTI experiments, and the anion hexafluoroantimonate (SbF6−). Desirable characteristics of a molecular diffusion probe include predictable diffusion properties, stability, minimum interaction with cellular physiology, very slow penetration into the cells, and sufficiently strong and selective MR and RTI signals. These properties were evaluated using preparations of rat neocortical slices under normal and ischemic conditions, as well as solutions and agarose gel. While both molecules can be detected by MR and RTI, neither proved an ideal candidate. TMA+ was very stable but it penetrated into the cells and accumulated there within tens of minutes. SbF6− did not enter the cells as readily but it was not stable, particularly in ischemic tissue and at higher temperatures. Its presence also resulted in a decreased extracellular volume. These probe properties help to interpret previously published MR data on TMA+ diffusion and might play a role in other diffusion experiments obtained with them. PMID:18466980

  1. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Bourg, Alain C M; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient (K(d)). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species. PMID:12598111

  2. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of cationic ethanol, propanol, and butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Harigaya, Hiroyuki; Xie, Min; Takahashi, Kaito; Fujii, Asuka

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of the alcohol cations of ethanol, propanol, and butanol was performed to investigate their structures and hyperconjugation mechanisms. In the ethanol cation, the Csbnd C bond hyperconjugates with the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) at the oxygen atom, so that the Csbnd C bond weakens and the bond length elongates. Multiple hyperconjugations among SOMO, the Csbnd C bond, and the end Csbnd H bond occur in the propanol cation and enhance the acidity of the Csbnd H bond through the delocalization of its bonding σ electron. The butanol cation forms the oxonium-type structure through the proton transfer from the terminal CH bond.

  3. Solvation structure and transport properties of alkali cations in dimethyl sulfoxide under exogenous static electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Vijayakumar, M. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov; Han, Kee Sung; Mueller, Karl T. E-mail: karl.mueller@pnnl.gov

    2015-06-14

    A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to investigate the role of exogenous electric fields on the solvation structure and dynamics of alkali ions in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and as a function of temperature. Good agreement was obtained, for select alkali ions in the absence of an electric field, between calculated and experimentally determined diffusion coefficients normalized to that of pure DMSO. Our results indicate that temperatures of up to 400 K and external electric fields of up to 1 V nm{sup −1} have minimal effects on the solvation structure of the smaller alkali cations (Li{sup +} and Na{sup +}) due to their relatively strong ion-solvent interactions, whereas the solvation structures of the larger alkali cations (K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}) are significantly affected. In addition, although the DMSO exchange dynamics in the first solvation shell differ markedly for the two groups, the drift velocities and mobilities are not significantly affected by the nature of the alkali ion. Overall, although exogenous electric fields induce a drift displacement, their presence does not significantly affect the random diffusive displacement of the alkali ions in DMSO. System temperature is found to have generally a stronger influence on dynamical properties, such as the DMSO exchange dynamics and the ion mobilities, than the presence of electric fields.

  4. Treatment of boundary conditions in through-diffusion: A case study of 85Sr2 + diffusion in compacted illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaus, M. A.; Aertsens, M.; Maes, N.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    Valuable techniques to measure effective diffusion coefficients in porous media are an indispensable prerequisite for a proper understanding of the migration of chemical-toxic and radioactive micropollutants in the subsurface and geosphere. The present article discusses possible pitfalls and difficulties in the classical through-diffusion technique applied to situations where large diffusive fluxes of cations in compacted clay minerals or clay rocks occur. The results obtained from a benchmark study, in which the diffusion of 85Sr2 + tracer in compacted illite has been studied using different experimental techniques, are presented. It is shown that these techniques may yield valuable results provided that an appropriate model is used for numerical simulations. It is further shown that effective diffusion coefficients may be systematically underestimated when the concentration at the downstream boundary is not taken adequately into account in modelling, even for very low concentrations. A criterion is derived for quasi steady-state situations, by which it can be decided whether the simplifying assumption of a zero-concentration at the downstream boundary in through-diffusion is justified or not. The application of the criterion requires, however, knowledge of the effective diffusion coefficient of the clay sample. Such knowledge is often absent or only approximately available during the planning phase of a diffusion experiment.

  5. Treatment of boundary conditions in through-diffusion: A case study of (85)Sr(2+) diffusion in compacted illite.

    PubMed

    Glaus, M A; Aertsens, M; Maes, N; Van Laer, L; Van Loon, L R

    2015-01-01

    Valuable techniques to measure effective diffusion coefficients in porous media are an indispensable prerequisite for a proper understanding of the migration of chemical-toxic and radioactive micropollutants in the subsurface and geosphere. The present article discusses possible pitfalls and difficulties in the classical through-diffusion technique applied to situations where large diffusive fluxes of cations in compacted clay minerals or clay rocks occur. The results obtained from a benchmark study, in which the diffusion of (85)Sr(2+) tracer in compacted illite has been studied using different experimental techniques, are presented. It is shown that these techniques may yield valuable results provided that an appropriate model is used for numerical simulations. It is further shown that effective diffusion coefficients may be systematically underestimated when the concentration at the downstream boundary is not taken adequately into account in modelling, even for very low concentrations. A criterion is derived for quasi steady-state situations, by which it can be decided whether the simplifying assumption of a zero-concentration at the downstream boundary in through-diffusion is justified or not. The application of the criterion requires, however, knowledge of the effective diffusion coefficient of the clay sample. Such knowledge is often absent or only approximately available during the planning phase of a diffusion experiment. PMID:26004771

  6. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a 'volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss. PMID:27295099

  7. Cloning and first functional characterization of a plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Q.; Mercier, R.W.; Yao, W.; Berkowitz, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (cng) non-selective cation channels have been cloned from a number of animal systems. These channels are characterized by direct gating upon cAMO or cGMO binding to the intracellular portion of the channel protein, which leads to an increase in channel conductance. Animal cng channels are involved in signal transduction systems; they translate stimulus-induced changes in cytosolic cyclic nucleotide into altered cell membrane potential and/or cation flux as part of a signal cascade pathway. Putative plant homologs of animal cng channels have been identified. However, functional characterization (i.e., demonstration of cyclic-nucleotide-dependent ion currents) of a plant cng channel has not yet been accomplished. The authors report the cloning and first functional characterization of a plant member of this family of ion channels. The Arabidopsis cDNA AtCNGC2 encodes a polypeptide with deduced homology to the {alpha}-subunit of animal channels, and facilitates cyclic nucleotide-dependent cation currents upon expression in a number of heterologous systems. AtCNGC2 expression in a yeast mutant lacking a low-affinity K{sup +} uptake system complements growth inhibition only when lipophilic nucleotides are present in the culture medium. Voltage clamp analysis indicates that Xenopus lawvis oocytes injected with AtCNGC2 cRNA demonstrate cyclic-nucleotide-dependent, inward-rectifying K{sup +} currents. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) transfected with AtCNGC2 cDNA demonstrate increased permeability to Ca{sup 2+} only in the presence of lipophilic cyclic nucleotides. The evidence presented here supports the functional classification of AtCNGC2 as a cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channel, and presents the first direct evidence identifying a plant member of this ion channel family.

  8. Cation trapping by cellular acidic compartments: Beyond the concept of lysosomotropic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, François; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Lodge, Robert; Bouthillier, Johanne; Gagné-Henley, Angélique; Gaudreault, René C.; Morissette, Guillaume

    2012-02-15

    “Lysosomotropic” cationic drugs are known to concentrate in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping); they draw water by an osmotic mechanism, leading to a vacuolar response. Several aspects of this phenomenon were recently reexamined. (1) The proton pump vacuolar (V)-ATPase is the driving force of cationic drug uptake and ensuing vacuolization. In quantitative transport experiments, V-ATPase inhibitors, such as bafilomycin A1, greatly reduced the uptake of cationic drugs and released them in preloaded cells. (2) Pigmented or fluorescent amines are effectively present in a concentrated form in the large vacuoles. (3) Consistent with V-ATPase expression in trans-Golgi, lysosomes and endosomes, a fraction of the vacuoles is consistently labeled with trans-Golgi markers and protein secretion and endocytosis are often inhibited in vacuolar cells. (4) Macroautophagic signaling (accumulation of lipidated and membrane-bound LC3 II) and labeling of the large vacuoles by the autophagy effector LC3 were consistently observed in cells, precisely at incubation periods and amine concentrations that cause vacuolization. Vacuoles also exhibit late endosome/lysosome markers, because they may originate from such organelles or because macroautophagosomes fuse with lysosomes. Autophagosome persistence is likely due to the lack of resolution of autophagy, rather than to nutritional deprivation. (5) Increased lipophilicity decreases the threshold concentration for the vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology, because simple diffusion into cells is limiting. (6) A still unexplained mitotic arrest is consistently observed in cells loaded with amines. An extended recognition of relevant clinical situations is proposed for local or systemic drug administration.

  9. Role of cations as components of jelly coats in Bufo arenarum fertilization.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marcela Fátima; Crespo, Claudia Alejandra; Ramos, Inés; Fernández, Silvia Nélida

    2010-02-01

    The role of monovalent (Na+, K+) and divalent (Ca2+, Mg2+) cations in Bufo arenarum fertilization was analysed. Our results showed that the highest fertilization percentages were obtained when strings of uterine oocytes (UO) were inseminated. Under these conditions, full jelly (FJ), which represents the jelly coats surrounding the oocytes at the time of deposition, contained 68.5 +/- 7.0 mM Na+, 27.4 +/- 2.4 mM K+, 6.3 +/- 0.9 mM Ca2+ and 6.9 +/- 0.9 mM Mg2+. When the strings of oocytes were washed in deionized water, these cations diffused into the liquid medium surrounding them. There was a marked similarity between the loss of Ca2+ in the jelly and the decrease in the fertilizability of the UO. Furthermore, the use of chelating agents of divalent cations showed the importance of the Ca2+ contained in the jelly. When Ca2+ was sequestered from the jelly coats by the addition of the chelating agents to the insemination medium as well as by pretreatment of the UO strings, a decrease in fertilization percentages occurred, this effect being dose dependent and more marked with EGTA. These results demonstrate that the Ca2+ in the jelly plays a role in fertilization. Nevertheless, taking into account that during the washing of the jelly other jelly coat components were diffused and considering that the addition of Ca2+ to the insemination medium reverted significantly, but only partially, the loss of fertilizability of jellied UO (washed), the participation of other components in the fertilization mechanism is suggested. PMID:19664308

  10. VUV photo-processing of PAH cations: quantitative study on the ionization versus fragmentation processes

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castillo, Sarah Rodriguez; Joblin, Christine; Mulas, Giacomo; Sabbah, Hassan; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent; Martin, Serge; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Mayer, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strongly affected by the absorption of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the interstellar medium (ISM), yet the branching ratio between ionization and fragmentation is poorly studied. This is crucial for the stability and charge state of PAHs in the ISM in different environments, affecting in turn the chemistry, the energy balance, and the contribution of PAHs to the extinction and emission curves. We studied the interaction of PAH cations with VUV photons in the 7 – 20 eV range from the synchrotron SOLEIL beamline, DESIRS. We recorded by action spectroscopy the relative intensities of photo-fragmentation and photo-ionization for a set of eight PAH cations ranging in size from 14 to 24 carbon atoms, with different structures. At photon energies below ~13.6 eV fragmentation dominates for the smaller species, while for larger species ionization is immediately competitive after the second ionization potential (IP). At higher photon energies, all species behave similarly, the ionization yield gradually increases, leveling off between 0.8 and 0.9 at ~18 eV. Among isomers, PAH structure appears to mainly affect the fragmentation cross section, but not the ionization cross section. We also measured the second IP for all species and the third IP for two of them, all are in good agreement with theoretical ones confirming that PAH cations can be further ionized in the diffuse ISM. Determining actual PAH dication abundances in the ISM will require detailed modeling. Our measured photo-ionization yields for several PAH cations provide a necessary ingredient for such models. PMID:27212712

  11. VUV Photo-processing of PAH Cations: Quantitative Study on the Ionization versus Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Rodriguez Castillo, Sarah; Joblin, Christine; Mulas, Giacomo; Sabbah, Hassan; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent; Martin, Serge; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Mayer, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strongly affected by the absorption of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the interstellar medium (ISM), yet the branching ratio between ionization and fragmentation is poorly studied. This is crucial for the stability and charge state of PAHs in the ISM in different environments, affecting in turn the chemistry, the energy balance, and the contribution of PAHs to the extinction and emission curves. We studied the interaction of PAH cations with VUV photons in the 7–20 eV range from the synchrotron SOLEIL beamline, DESIRS. We recorded by action spectroscopy the relative intensities of photo-fragmentation and photo-ionization for a set of eight PAH cations ranging in size from 14 to 24 carbon atoms, with different structures. At photon energies below ∼13.6 eV fragmentation dominates for the smaller species, while for larger species ionization is immediately competitive after the second ionization potential (IP). At higher photon energies all species behave similarly; the ionization yield gradually increases, leveling off between 0.8 and 0.9 at ∼18 eV. Among isomers, PAH structure appears to mainly affect the fragmentation cross section but not the ionization cross section. We also measured the second IP for all species and the third IP for two of them; all are in good agreement with theoretical ones, confirming that PAH cations can be further ionized in the diffuse ISM. Determining actual PAH dication abundances in the ISM will require detailed modeling. Our measured photo-ionization yields for several PAH cations provide a necessary ingredient for such models.

  12. Permeation of Water through Cation Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanaiah, N.

    1967-01-01

    Water permeabilities as well as other membrane parameters, such as exchange capacity, water content, and specific conductance, have been measured for two cation exchange membranes in the H form. The conductance of membrane with low water content was less than that of the membrane with high water content. These data have been discussed in the light of an existing theory and found inadequate to explain the results in a quantitative way. Water permeability of the membranes subject to mechanical pressure was found to be higher than their isotopic water permeability, according to expectation. These data have been examined from the standpoint of thermodynamic and kinetic theories of water flow in membranes and used to estimate the average size of membrane pores. PMID:6048874

  13. Univalent-cation-elicited acidification by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kotyk, A; Georghiou, G

    1994-08-01

    Addition of univalent cations to sugar-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Lodderomyces elongisporus brought about a powerful acidification of the external medium with rates up to nearly 20 nmol H+ per min per mg dry wt. in S. cerevisiae, over 15 nmol in S. pombe, and 4.7 nmol in L. elongisporus. These rates were as much as 20 times, 5.5 times and 10.3 times, respectively. higher than in the absence of K+. Use of galactose-induced cells, of H(+)-ATPase-deficient mutants and observations over the entire growth curve indicated that the K+ effect on H+ extrusion is not connected with the H(+)-ATPase function as such but rather depends on metabolic reactions producing ATP. The effect has apparently nothing to do with the electrical potential across the plasma membrane. PMID:7804140

  14. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  15. The temperature of formation of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001: constraints from cation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I D; Kent, A; Phinney, D L; Ryerson, F J

    1999-08-13

    An important test of the hypothesis that Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains fossil remnants of an ancient Martian biota is the thermal history of the carbonate rosettes associated with the proposed biomarkers. If carbonates formed at temperatures over {approximately} 110 C (the limit for terrestrial life), it is unlikely that these minerals are associated with a terrestrial-like biota.

  16. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  17. The cation channel mucolipin-1 is a bifunctional protein that facilitates membrane remodeling via its serine lipase domain

    PubMed Central

    LaPlante, Janice M.; Falardeau, John L.; Brown, Edward M.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Vassilev, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipase modulators have been shown to affect the topology of lipid bilayers and the formation of tubulo-vesicular structures, but the specific endogenous phospholipases involved have yet to be identified. Here we show that TRPML1 (MLN1), a Ca2+-permeable channel contributes to membrane remodeling through a serine-lipase consensus domain, and thus represents a novel type of bifunctional protein. Remarkably, this serine lipase active site determines the ability of MLN1 to generate tubulo-vesicular extensions in mucolipin-1-expressing oocytes, human fibroblasts and model membrane vesicles. Our demonstration that MLN1 is involved in membrane remodeling and the formation of extensions suggests that it may play a role in the formation of cellular processes linked to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/L) pathway. MLN1 is absent or mutated in patients with mucolipidosis IV (MLIV), a lysosomal disorder with devastating neurological and other consequences. This study provides potential insight into the pathophysiology of MLIV. PMID:21256127

  18. Adsorption of a water soluble cationic dye into a cationic Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shil, Ashis; Hussain, S. A.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2015-05-01

    This communication reports the successful adsorption of a water soluble cationic fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (RhB) into a cationic Langmuir monolayer of Octadecylamine (ODA). Anionic nano clay platelets Hectorite played an important role in the process of adsorption. Surface pressure vs. area per molecule (π-A) isotherms were studied to monitor the adsorption process. In-situ fluorescence Imaging Microscopic (FIM) technique was employed to visualize the domain structures formed at the air-water interface. Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) image of the monolayer Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were taken to study the morphology and ultrastructure of the film. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out on the mono- and multilayer Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films.

  19. Does cation break the cyano bond? A critical evaluation of nitrile-cation interaction.

    PubMed

    Woi, Pei Meng; Bakar, Maizathul Akmam A; Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Zain, Sharifuddin; Alias, Yatimah

    2014-05-01

    DFT and G4 results reveal that cations display the following trends in imparting its positive charge to acrylonitrile; H⁺ > Li⁺ > Na⁺ > K⁺ for group I and Be²⁺ > Mg²⁺ > Ca²⁺ for group II. Solvation by water molecules and interaction with cation make the cyano bond more polarized and exhibits ketene-imine character. Bond order in nitrile-cation complexes has been predicted based on the s character of the covalent bond orbitals. Mulliken, CHELPG, and NPA charges are in good agreement in predicting positive charge buildup and GIAO nuclear deshileding on C1. G4 enthalpies show that Mg²⁺ is more strongly bound to acrylonitrile than to acetonitrile by 3 kcal mol⁻¹, and the proton affinity of the former is higher by 0.8 kcal mol⁻¹. G4 enthalpies of reductions support prior experimental observation that metalated conjugated nitriles show enhanced reactivity toward weak nucleophiles to afford Michael addition products. PMID:24770548

  20. 4-Spiro[2.n]alkyl cations and their rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Prakash, G K; Fung, A P; Olah, G A; Rawdah, T N

    1987-08-01

    A series of 4-spiro[2.n]alkanols, where n = 3-7, were ionized in either FSO3H x SbF5/SO2ClF or SbF5/SO2ClF at -78 degrees C and -130 degrees C. The resulting solutions were studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy over the temperature range of -130 degrees C to -10 degrees C. The 4-spiro[2.5]octanol gave the expected static 4-spiro[2.5]octyl cation, which can be considered as a long-lived secondary cyclohexyl cation stabilized by an adjacent spirocyclopropane ring. The same spiro[2.5]octyl cation was also obtained by ionization of isomeric bicyclo[4.2.0]octan-1-ol and bicyclo[4.1.0]heptyl-1-methanol. The static spiro[2.5]-octyl cation was found to rearrange to the equilibrating 1-bicyclo[3.3.0]octyl cation above -10 degrees C. On the other hand, the 4-spiro[2.4]heptanol gave the rearranged 1-methylcyclohexenyl cation. The spiro[2.6]nonanol gave directly the equilibrating 1-bicyclo[4.3.0]nonyl cation. The other 4-spiro[2.n]-alkanols (n = 3 and 7) gave unidentifiable polymeric products. The ionization of 3-spirocyclopropyl-2-norbornanol yields only the rearranged 2-methylbicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-ene-2-yl cation. PMID:3474642

  1. 4-Spiro[2.n]alkyl cations and their rearrangements.

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G K; Fung, A P; Olah, G A; Rawdah, T N

    1987-01-01

    A series of 4-spiro[2.n]alkanols, where n = 3-7, were ionized in either FSO3H x SbF5/SO2ClF or SbF5/SO2ClF at -78 degrees C and -130 degrees C. The resulting solutions were studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy over the temperature range of -130 degrees C to -10 degrees C. The 4-spiro[2.5]octanol gave the expected static 4-spiro[2.5]octyl cation, which can be considered as a long-lived secondary cyclohexyl cation stabilized by an adjacent spirocyclopropane ring. The same spiro[2.5]octyl cation was also obtained by ionization of isomeric bicyclo[4.2.0]octan-1-ol and bicyclo[4.1.0]heptyl-1-methanol. The static spiro[2.5]-octyl cation was found to rearrange to the equilibrating 1-bicyclo[3.3.0]octyl cation above -10 degrees C. On the other hand, the 4-spiro[2.4]heptanol gave the rearranged 1-methylcyclohexenyl cation. The spiro[2.6]nonanol gave directly the equilibrating 1-bicyclo[4.3.0]nonyl cation. The other 4-spiro[2.n]-alkanols (n = 3 and 7) gave unidentifiable polymeric products. The ionization of 3-spirocyclopropyl-2-norbornanol yields only the rearranged 2-methylbicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-ene-2-yl cation. PMID:3474642

  2. Cation Effects on Nitrate Mobility in an Unsaturated Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient, unsaturated, horizontal column experiments were carried out with a computer controlled syringe pump for the purpose of assessing counterion (accompanying cation) effects on nitrate (NO3-) mobility in unsaturated soil. A loam soil with calcium dominated cation exchange sites was used in al...

  3. Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria and Biofilms Using Cationic Bacteriochlorins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, G. A.; Tiganova, I. G.; Makarova, E. A.; Meerovich, I. G.; Romanova Ju., M.; Tolordova, E. R.; Alekseeva, N. V.; Stepanova, T. V.; Yu, Koloskova; Luk'anets, E. A.; Krivospitskaya, N. V.; Sipailo, I. P.; Baikova, T. V.; Loschenov, V. B.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of two new synthetic bacteriochlorins with four and eight cationic substitutes as the photosensitizers in the photodynamic process. The spectral and antibacterial properties of these photosensitizers in saline solution were investigated. It is shown, that the aggregation ability decreases and the antibacterial efficiency grows as the cationic substitute number increases.

  4. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO SOILS AND SUBSURFACE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the fundamentals of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on natural and pristine surfaces was conducted to elucidate (i) the factors that influence the extent of adsorption and (ii) indirect effects of adsorption of organic cations: the competitive adsorption of o...

  5. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  6. CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1959-07-14

    A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

  7. Effects of cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose on glucose tolerance and obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cholestyramine is a cationic polymer prescribed to lower cholesterol in humans. We investigated the effects of cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose (cHEC) on weight loss and metabolic disorders associated with obesity using both hamster and diet-induced obese mouse models. Golden Syrian hamsters and ob...

  8. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  9. Theoretical study of the electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part II. Dynamics consequences.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Nuclear dynamics is investigated theoretically from first principles by employing the ab initio vibronic models of the prototypical naphthalene and anthracene radical cations developed in Part I. This Part is primarily aimed at corroborating a large amount of available experimental data with a specific final goal to establish an unambiguous link with the current observations in astrophysics and astronomy. The detailed analyses presented here perhaps establish that these two prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations are indeed potential carriers of the observed diffuse interstellar bands. PMID:21750791

  10. Diffusion in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion in disordered systems does not follow the classical laws which describe transport in ordered crystalline media, and this leads to many anomalous physical properties. Since the application of percolation theory, the main advances in the understanding of these processes have come from fractal theory. Scaling theories and numerical simulations are important tools to describe diffusion processes (random walks: the 'ant in the labyrinth') on percolation systems and fractals. Different types of disordered systems exhibiting anomalous diffusion are presented (the incipient infinite percolation cluster, diffusion-limited aggregation clusters, lattice animals, and random combs), and scaling theories as well as numerical simulations of greater sophistication are described. Also, diffusion in the presence of singular distributions of transition rates is discussed and related to anomalous diffusion on disordered structures.

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma. PMID:24892564

  12. Membrane stress increases cation permeability in red cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R M

    1994-11-01

    The human red cell is known to increase its cation permeability when deformed by mechanical forces. Light-scattering measurements were used to quantitate the cell deformation, as ellipticity under shear. Permeability to sodium and potassium was not proportional to the cell deformation. An ellipticity of 0.75 was required to increase the permeability of the membrane to cations, and flux thereafter increased rapidly as the limits of cell extension were reached. Induction of membrane curvature by chemical agents also did not increase cation permeability. These results indicate that membrane deformation per se does not increase permeability, and that membrane tension is the effector for increased cation permeability. This may be relevant to some cation permeabilities observed by patch clamping. PMID:7858123

  13. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  14. Multinomial diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced fluctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete particles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N→∞, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  15. Multinomial diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Ariel I.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2011-06-24

    We describe a new, microscopic model for diffusion that captures diffusion induced uctuations at scales where the concept of concentration gives way to discrete par- ticles. We show that in the limit as the number of particles N ! 1, our model is equivalent to the classical stochastic diffusion equation (SDE). We test our new model and the SDE against Langevin dynamics in numerical simulations, and show that our model successfully reproduces the correct ensemble statistics, while the classical model fails.

  16. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  17. Computational study of the energetics of charge and cation mixing in U1-xCexO₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hanken, B. E.; Stanek, C. R.; Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Asta, M.

    2011-08-26

    The formalism of electronic density-functional theory (DFT), with Hubbard-U corrections (DFT+U), is employed in a computational study of the energetics of fluorite-structured U1-xCexO₂ mixtures. The computational approach makes use of a procedure which facilitates convergence of the calculations to multiple self-consistent DFT+U solutions for a given cation arrangement, corresponding to different charge states for the U and Ce ions in several prototypical cation arrangements. Results indicate a significant dependence of the structural and energetic properties on the nature of both charge and cation ordering. With the effective Hubbard-U parameters that reproduce well the measured oxidation-reduction energies for urania and ceria,more » we find that charge transfer between U⁴⁺ and Ce⁴⁺ ions, leading to the formation of U⁵⁺ and Ce³⁺, gives rise to an increase in the mixing energy in the range of 4–14 kJ/mol of the formula unit, depending on the nature of the cation ordering. The results suggest that although charge transfer between uranium and cerium ions is disfavored energetically, it is likely to be entropically stabilized at the high temperatures relevant to the processing and service of urania-based solid solutions.« less

  18. Cationic liposomes modified with non-ionic surfactants as effective non-viral carrier for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Zhuo; Gao, Jian-Qing; Chen, Jin-Liang; Liang, Wen-Quan

    2006-05-01

    A defined change in formulation components affects the physical and chemical characteristics of cationic liposomes (CLs) carriers in many ways. Therefore, a great degree of control can be exercised over the structure by modifying the CLs with various materials, leading to new innovations for carrier improvement. In the present study, surface modifications of cationic liposomes with non-ionic surfactants--sorbitan monoesters serials (Span 85, 80, 40 and 20) were carried out for developing a new gene transfer carrier. Span modified cationic liposomes (Sp-CLs) were prepared by reverse phase evaporation method (RPV) and self-assemble complexes of antisense oligonucleotides/surfactant modifying cationic liposomes were prepared by auto-coacervation through electrostatic effect. Characterization of Sp-CLs and the self-assembled complex was performed by electron microscope, particle size, zeta potential, turbidity and agarose electrophoresis. Furthermore, in vitro cellular uptake experiment showed that Span plays a role in enhancing the cellular uptake of encapsulated oligonucleotides mediated by Sp-CLs by the endocytosis-dependent route. CLs modified with Span 40 significantly facilitated the cellular uptake by COS-7 cells and HeLa cells; also showed some positive effect on gene expression. That suggests it is a potential non-viral carrier for efficient gene transfer. PMID:16626948

  19. Solid Solutions of Rare Earth Cations in Mesoporous Anatase Beads and Their Performances in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Carmen; Salleo, Alberto; Gozzi, Daniele; Di Pascasio, Francesco; Quaranta, Simone; Panetta, Riccardo; Latini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of the rare earth (RE) cations Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ in anatase TiO2 have been synthesized as mesoporous beads in the concentration range 0.1–0.3% of metal atoms. The solid solutions were have been characterized by XRD, SEM, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy, BET and BJH surface analysis. All the solid solutions possess high specific surface areas, up to more than 100 m2/g. The amount of adsorbed dye in each photoanode has been determined spectrophotometrically. All the samples were tested as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using N719 as dye and a nonvolatile, benzonitrile based electrolyte. All the cells were have been tested by conversion efficiency (J–V), quantum efficiency (IPCE), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and dark current measurements. While lighter RE cations (Pr3+, Nd3+) limit the performance of DSSCs compared to pure anatase mesoporous beads, cations from Sm3+ onwards enhance the performance of the devices. A maximum conversion efficiency of 8.7% for Er3+ at a concentration of 0.2% has been achieved. This is a remarkable efficiency value for a DSSC employing N719 dye without co-adsorbents and a nonvolatile electrolyte. For each RE cation the maximum performances are obtained for a concentration of 0.2% metal atoms. PMID:26577287

  20. Solid Solutions of Rare Earth Cations in Mesoporous Anatase Beads and Their Performances in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, Carmen; Salleo, Alberto; Gozzi, Daniele; di Pascasio, Francesco; Quaranta, Simone; Panetta, Riccardo; Latini, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Solid solutions of the rare earth (RE) cations Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Er3+ and Yb3+ in anatase TiO2 have been synthesized as mesoporous beads in the concentration range 0.1-0.3% of metal atoms. The solid solutions were have been characterized by XRD, SEM, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy, BET and BJH surface analysis. All the solid solutions possess high specific surface areas, up to more than 100 m2/g. The amount of adsorbed dye in each photoanode has been determined spectrophotometrically. All the samples were tested as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using N719 as dye and a nonvolatile, benzonitrile based electrolyte. All the cells were have been tested by conversion efficiency (J-V), quantum efficiency (IPCE), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and dark current measurements. While lighter RE cations (Pr3+, Nd3+) limit the performance of DSSCs compared to pure anatase mesoporous beads, cations from Sm3+ onwards enhance the performance of the devices. A maximum conversion efficiency of 8.7% for Er3+ at a concentration of 0.2% has been achieved. This is a remarkable efficiency value for a DSSC employing N719 dye without co-adsorbents and a nonvolatile electrolyte. For each RE cation the maximum performances are obtained for a concentration of 0.2% metal atoms.

  1. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  2. ESR study of the aziridine and azetidine radical cations: evidence for the C. C ring-opened aziridine radical cation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, X.Z.; Williams, F.

    1986-05-22

    The radical cations from aziridine and azetidine have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy following their generation in the solid state by ..gamma.. irradiation of dilute solutions of the parent compounds in the CFCl/sub 3/ matrix at 77 K. The ESR parameters of the azetidine radical cation are typical of those for nitrogen-centered amine radical cations such as Me/sub 2/NH*/sup +/. On the other hand, the radical cation formed from aziridine has very different ESR parameters that compare closely to those for the isoelectronic C...C ring-opened form of the oxirane radical cation and the allyl radical. The radical cation formed from azetidine is therefore assigned a ring-closed structure with the unpaired electron in a 2p/sub z/ orbital on nitrogen perpendicular to the ring plane, whereas the cation from aziridine is an allylic C...C ring-opened planar isomer with the unpaired electron in a nonbonding ..pi.. orbital centered mainly on the two end carbon atoms. The neutral 1-aziridinyl and 1-azetidinyl radicals have been detected as radical products following the ..gamma.. irradiation of the parent compounds in the CFCl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/Cl and CF/sub 3/CCl/sub 3/ matrices. In particular, the 1-azetidinyl radical is produced cleanly from the azetidine radical cation in the CFCl/sub 2/CF/sub 2/Cl matrix at ca. 100 K.

  3. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  4. Parent Involvement Facilitators: Unlocking Social Capital Wealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    This case study provides an overview of a family outreach intervention that supports student retention in school through a school-home communication link. This intervention structure, which employs staff appropriately called parent involvement facilitators (PIFs), is one that school districts have employed to facilitate family engagement in…

  5. Framing the Future: Workbased Learning Facilitation Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Melbourne.

    This resource provides tips to assist facilitators as they work with Australia's Framing the Future project teams. The 16 tips are about group selection; how to prepare for input; participant roles; how to use participants and observers; scribes and recorders; some ideas for launches and fun; praise! praise! praise!; making facilitation the key to…

  6. Reconceptualizing the Pedagogical Value of Student Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztok, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Sustained discourse is critical to the learning potential of online courses. And, while research has surfaced many factors that mediate interaction, it further suggests that sustained interaction remains elusive. In this paper, I propose that student facilitation may have an impact on the quality of facilitators' interactions following a week of…

  7. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  8. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  9. Facilitator's Manual: Summer Transitions. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenzli, Linda A., Ed.

    A facilitator's manual for the Summer Transition Enrichment Program at Bowling Green State University is presented. The overall objectives of the program are: (1) to facilitate the transition of entering freshmen into the academic and cultural life of the university; and (2) to assist students in their personal growth and adjustment to the…

  10. 50 CFR 17.107 - Facilitating enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Protection Areas § 17.107 Facilitating enforcement. Water vehicles operating in manatee sanctuary or refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facilitating enforcement. 17.107 Section 17.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  11. 50 CFR 17.107 - Facilitating enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Protection Areas § 17.107 Facilitating enforcement. Water vehicles operating in manatee sanctuary or refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facilitating enforcement. 17.107 Section 17.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  12. 50 CFR 17.107 - Facilitating enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Protection Areas § 17.107 Facilitating enforcement. Water vehicles operating in manatee sanctuary or refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2014-10-01 2013-10-01 true Facilitating enforcement. 17.107 Section 17.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  13. A Guide to Facilitating Cases in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara; Kantrov, Ilene

    This book for teachers, administrators, and central office staff provides guidelines for orchestrating and extending conversations among case users, with strategies for improving facilitators' effectiveness and a conceptual framework for understanding and acting in the role of facilitator. The book describes how to foster an entire professional…

  14. Facilitated Communication: The Clinical and Social Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Howard C., Ed.

    This text explains the phenomenon of facilitated communication (FC) from an empirical, data-based, and/or clinical perspective. It is not a how-to-facilitate text, but one that explores the clinical and sociological reality of FC. A common theme running through each of the papers in the book is the question of FC's legitimacy. The papers reveal…

  15. Facilitator Talk in EAP Reading Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Current sociocultural perspectives on language learning call on teachers to reinvent themselves in ways which facilitate student learning rather than transmit knowledge. For teachers, this means adopting new roles, and acquiring a new repertoire of teacher talk. This paper aims to further the work on facilitator talk begun by Clifton (2006) and…

  16. White Educators Facilitating Discussions about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Facilitating democratic discussions about race among students in classroom environments continues to be a problem facing educators. When these discussions occur, they are facilitated mostly by faculty of color. However, given the underrepresentation of faculty of color within higher education institutions and that white students respond…

  17. 50 CFR 17.107 - Facilitating enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protection Areas § 17.107 Facilitating enforcement. Water vehicles operating in manatee sanctuary or refuge... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Facilitating enforcement. 17.107 Section 17.107 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  18. A Model of Small Group Facilitator Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Judith A.; Jin, Sungmi; Song, Ji Hoon

    2008-01-01

    This study used small group theory, quantitative and qualitative data collected from experienced practicing facilitators at three points of time, and a building block process of collection, analysis, further collection, and consolidation to develop a model of small group facilitator competencies. The proposed model has five components:…

  19. Peervention: Training Peer Facilitators for Prevention Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Robert D.; Folk, Betsy E.

    This book introduces students to the helping relationship and appropriate methods of responding to others through a variety of experiential training activities. The first chapter discusses the need for peer facilitators. The peer facilitator movement is traced to the 1970s, and the power of peer relationships is described. Four basic helping roles…

  20. The Role of Touch in Facilitated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezuka, Emiko

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the role of touch in the use of facilitated communication with Japanese individuals with autism. Five experiments were conducted involving a "telepathy game" using a rod with an attached strain gauge. Results found the facilitator's contact controlled the motor responses of the subjects. (Author/CR)

  1. Facilitating Reflective Thought in Novice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pultorak, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the facilitation of reflection among novice teachers using three types of journal writing and reflective interviews to encourage novice teachers to reflect upon their teaching. The procedures solicited different types of reflection in the student teachers, suggesting that facilitation of teacher reflectivity is vital in teacher…

  2. Optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaocan; Du, Ruping; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Studies demonstrate that community structure plays an important role in information spreading recently. In this paper, we investigate the impact of multi-community structure on information diffusion with linear threshold model. We utilize extended GN network that contains four communities and analyze dynamic behaviors of information that spreads on it. And we discover the optimal multi-community network modularity for information diffusion based on the social reinforcement. Results show that, within the appropriate range, multi-community structure will facilitate information diffusion instead of hindering it, which accords with the results derived from two-community network.

  3. Water Adsorption on Free Cobalt Cluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Jamshidi, Zahra; Visscher, Lucas; Waters, L B F M

    2015-11-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con(+)-H2O (n = 6-20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-1700 cm(-1) spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm(-1) frequency of the free water bending vibration, indicating that the water molecule remains intact upon adsorption. For n = 6, the frequency of this band is blue-shifted, but it gradually converges to the free water value with increasing cluster size. In the lower-frequency range (200-650 cm(-1)) the spectra contain several bands which show a very regular frequency evolution, suggesting that the exact cluster geometry has little effect on the water-surface interaction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out at the OPBE/TZP level for three representative sizes (n = 6, 9, 13) and indicate that the vibrations responsible for the resonances correspond to bending and torsional modes between the cluster and water moieties. The potential energy surfaces describing these interactions are very shallow, making the calculated harmonic frequencies and IR intensities very sensitive to small geometrical perturbations. We conclude that harmonic frequency calculations on (local) minima structures provide insufficient information for these types of cluster complexes and need to be complemented with calculations that provide a more extensive sampling of the potential energy surface. PMID:26447780

  4. Therapeutic potential of cationic steroid antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Chanaz; Brunel, Jean M

    2007-08-01

    Antibiotics were one of the great health successes of the 20th century. Antibiotics, both naturally derived and synthetic, have resulted in huge decreases in both morbidity and mortality from bacterial infections. As a consequence, the 'antibiotic age' has changed public expectations about the results of infectious disease. However, this has led to high levels of inappropriate prescribing, where antibiotics may be administered to fulfil patient expectations rather than for clinical benefit. Along with unwise uses in agriculture and elsewhere, this has contributed to recent rises in numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. As a result, many commentators have described this as the end of the antibiotic age and the term 'superbug' has entered the common vocabulary for multi-drug-resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this context, an attractive approach for the development of antibacterial agents is the use of a new class of cationic steroidal compounds mimicking polymyxin activities. The permeabilization properties of these agents of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria are reported in this review, as well as a discussion of literature results. PMID:17685865

  5. Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2011-10-06

    We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their O’s atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 Å. This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 Å. We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

  6. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  7. A phosphotyrosine switch regulates organic cation transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.; Ong, Su Sien; Gibson, Alice A.; Hu, Shuiying; Du, Guoqing; Lin, Wenwei; Li, Lie; Bharill, Shashank; Ness, Rachel A.; Stecula, Adrian; Offer, Steven M.; Diasio, Robert B.; Nies, Anne T.; Schwab, Matthias; Cavaletti, Guido; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Sali, Andrej; Chen, Taosheng; Baker, Sharyn D.; Sparreboom, Alex; Pabla, Navjotsingh

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters are key determinants of therapeutic outcomes. They regulate systemic and cellular drug levels influencing efficacy as well as toxicities. Here we report a unique phosphorylation-dependent interaction between drug transporters and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which has uncovered widespread phosphotyrosine-mediated regulation of drug transporters. We initially found that organic cation transporters (OCTs), uptake carriers of metformin and oxaliplatin, were inhibited by several clinically used TKIs. Mechanistic studies showed that these TKIs inhibit the Src family kinase Yes1, which was found to be essential for OCT2 tyrosine phosphorylation and function. Yes1 inhibition in vivo diminished OCT2 activity, significantly mitigating oxaliplatin-induced acute sensory neuropathy. Along with OCT2, other SLC-family drug transporters are potentially part of an extensive ‘transporter-phosphoproteome' with unique susceptibility to TKIs. On the basis of these findings we propose that TKIs, an important and rapidly expanding class of therapeutics, can functionally modulate pharmacologically important proteins by inhibiting protein kinases essential for their post-translational regulation. PMID:26979622

  8. Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

    2007-10-24

    High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

  9. Cationic Noncovalent Interactions: Energetics and Periodic Trends.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M T; Armentrout, P B

    2016-05-11

    In this review, noncovalent interactions of ions with neutral molecules are discussed. After defining the scope of the article, which excludes anionic and most protonated systems, methods associated with measuring thermodynamic information for such systems are briefly recounted. An extensive set of tables detailing available thermodynamic information for the noncovalent interactions of metal cations with a host of ligands is provided. Ligands include small molecules (H2, NH3, CO, CS, H2O, CH3CN, and others), organic ligands (O- and N-donors, crown ethers and related molecules, MALDI matrix molecules), π-ligands (alkenes, alkynes, benzene, and substituted benzenes), miscellaneous inorganic ligands, and biological systems (amino acids, peptides, sugars, nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides). Hydration of metalated biological systems is also included along with selected proton-based systems: 18-crown-6 polyether with protonated peptides and base-pairing energies of nucleobases. In all cases, the literature thermochemistry is evaluated and, in many cases, reanchored or adjusted to 0 K bond dissociation energies. Trends in these values are discussed and related to a variety of simple molecular concepts. PMID:26953819

  10. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C; Anand, Atul; Cederkvist, Luise; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Mellemgaard, Anders; Østerlind, Kell; Friis, Søren; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27333030

  11. Galactic Diffuse Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2007-10-25

    Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

  12. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  13. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  14. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  15. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  16. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media. PMID:25569300

  17. Cationic Membrane Peptides: Atomic-Level Insight of Structure-Activity Relationships from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Li, Shenhui; Hong, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane-active peptides, such as cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), conduct their biological functions by interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions of charged residues with lipids and water facilitate membrane insertion, translocation or disruption of these highly hydrophobic species. In this mini-review we will summarize high-resolution structural and dynamic findings towards the understanding of the structure-activity relationship of lipid membrane-bound CPPs and AMPs, as examples of the current development of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for studying membrane peptides. We will present the most recent atomic-resolution structure of the guanidinium-phosphate complex, as constrained from experimentally measured site-specific distances. These SSNMR results will be valuable specifically for understanding the intracellular translocation pathway of CPPs and antimicrobial mechanism of AMPs, and more generally broaden our insight into how cationic macromolecules interact with and cross the lipid membrane. PMID:23108593

  18. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous. PMID:21867316

  19. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  20. Diffusion on strained surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1997-03-01

    The change of diffusion kinetics when elastic fields are present is discussed for diffusion on (001) surfaces of simple cubic, fcc and bcc lattices. All particles interact pairwise with a Lennard-Jones potential. The simple cubic lattice was stabilized by an anisotropic prefactor. It is found that generically compressive strain enhances diffusion whereas tensile strain increases the activation barrier. An approximately linear dependence of the barrier in a wide range of misfits is found. In heteroepitaxy, diffusion on top of large clusters is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. The kinetics close to edges and centers of islands are remarkably different. In many cases changes of binding energies are small compared to those of saddle point energies. Thermodynamic arguments (minimization of free energy) are not appropriate to describe diffusion on strained surfaces in these cases.

  1. Hierarchical modelling of solute diffusion in clays: From the molecular to the continuum scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmi, T.; Churakov, S.

    2009-04-01

    The diffusion properties of clays are most often investigated in laboratory small-scale experiments using uncharged, anionic, and cationic tracers. Typically, the flux of anions through clay samples is lower than that of water tracers like tritiated water. This is explained by anion exclusion effects, which push back anions from the charged clay surfaces towards the centre of the pores and thus reduce the anion accessible porosity to half or less of the water accessible porosity. The diffusion of cations is slowed down because of sorption to the negatively charged clay surfaces. In certain cases, however, the cation flux is larger than expected from the sorption capacity, which is often attributed to surface diffusion, that is, a diffusion of sorbed cations along the clay interlayers or along external surfaces. The consistent description of such phenomena like anion exclusion and surface diffusion with continuum-scale models is rather complicated and relies mostly on empirical parameters. A consistent prediction requires consideration of pore-scale processes, because the ion or tracer specific diffusion behaviour depends on the type and the precise arrangement of the clay phases within the sample. In this presentation, we report on our approach to upscale the specific transport behaviour of anions, cations, and water tracers from the molecular or pore scale to the continuum scale. We developed a random walk model that operates on a pore-scale description of the clay structure. Obtaining such a description for clays is itself a difficult task, because it is hardly possible to directly visualise the very small pores in the nanometre range. Instead, the description has to rely on a combination of mostly indirect methods. We then used the model to predict diffusion coefficients of water tracers, anions, and cations in a given clay. It is possible to obtain these coefficients in a consistent way for a single structural description, using input parameters derived from

  2. Magnetic Fields Facilitate DNA-Mediated Charge Transport.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Lee, Kee Jin; Shu, Jian-Jun; Shao, Fangwei

    2015-06-01

    Exaggerated radical-induced DNA damage under magnetic fields is of great concern to medical biosafety and biomolecular electronic devices. In this report, the effects of an external magnetic field (MF) on DNA electronic conductivity were investigated by studying the efficiencies of photoinduced DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) via guanine damage. Under a static MF of 300 mT, positive enhancements in the decomposition of 8-cyclopropyldeoxyguanosine ((8CP)G) were observed at both the proximal and distal guanine doublets, indicating a more efficient propagation of radical cations and higher electronic conductivity of duplex DNA. MF-assisted CT has shown sensitivity to magnetic field strength, duplex structures, and the integrity of base pair stacking. Spin evolution of charge injection and the alignment of base pairs to the CT-active conformation during radical propagation were proposed to be the two major factors that MF contributes to facilitate DNA-mediated CT. Herein, MF-assisted CT may offer a new avenue for designing DNA-based electronic devices and unraveling MF effects on redox and radical relevant biological processes. PMID:25946473

  3. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  4. Lipopolythioureas: a new non-cationic system for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Jeanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Largeau, Céline; Spanedda, Maria-Vittoria; Seguin, Johanne; Scherman, Daniel; Herscovici, Jean

    2007-01-01

    A DNA-transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of thiourea non-cationic synthetic lipid, N-[1,3-bis(carbamothioylamino)propan-2-yl]-2-(dialkycarbamoylmethoxy)acetamide. It was found that these new compounds could be formulated without helper lipid and that the N-decanoyl and N-lauryl derivatives transfected B16 cells in the presence of serum with an efficiency at the same level as cationic lipids, under identical conditions. In vivo transfection using intratumoral injection was also investigated. It was found that compounds 18c and 19 showed an efficiency of the same magnitude as naked DNA and cationic lipid. PMID:17373770

  5. Anion, cation, and zwitterion selectivity of phospholemman channel molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Kowdley, G C; Ackerman, S J; Chen, Z; Szabo, G; Jones, L R; Moorman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Phospholemman (PLM), a 72-amino acid membrane protein with a single transmembrane domain, forms taurine-selective ion channels in lipid bilayers. Because taurine forms zwitterions, a taurine-selective channel might have binding sites for both anions and cations. Here we show that PLM channels indeed allow fluxes of both cations and anions, making instantaneous and voltage-dependent transitions among conformations with drastically different ion selectivity characteristics. This surprising and novel ion channel behavior offers a molecular explanation for selective taurine flux across cell membranes and may explain why molecules in the phospholemman family can induce cation- or anion-selective conductances when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:8994599

  6. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  7. Increased Vascular permeability produced by human platelet granule cationic extract

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Ralph L.; Weksler, Babette; Ferris, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    A cationic protein extract obtained from isolated human platelet granules increased vascular permeability in mouse and rabbit skin. The permeability-enhancing effect was not inhibited by soybean trypsin and pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, methylsergide maleate, carboxypeptidase B, and C[unk]1 inactivator. Permeability-enhancing activity was blocked by prior treatment of challenged animals with antihistamine. The nondializable relatively heat-stable cationic granule protein extract possessed potent mastocytolytic activity. The experiments described suggest that human platelets exert a permeability-enhancing effect by lysosomal release of cationic proteins which cause histamine release from adjacent tissue mast cells. Images PMID:4391559

  8. Electrostatic charge confinement using bulky tetraoctylammonium cation and four anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nadezhda A.; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to large opposite electrostatic charges, cations and anions establish strong ionic bonds. However, applications of ionic systems - electrolytes, gas capture, solubilization, etc. - benefit from weaker non-covalent bonds. The common approaches are addition of cosolvents and delocalization of electron charge density via functionalization of ions. We report fine tuning of closest-approach distances, effective radii, and cation geometry by different anions using the semi-empirical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that long fatty acid chains employed in the tetraalkylammonium cation are largely inefficient and new substituents must be developed. The reported results foster progress of task-specific ionic liquids.

  9. Radical cations of sulfides and disulfides: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazzola, L.; Michaut, J.P.; Roncin, J.

    1985-09-15

    Exposure of dilute solutions of dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, tetrahydrothiophene, terbutyl and diterbutyl-sulfides, dimethyl-disulfide, and diterbutyldisulfide, in freon at 77 K to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays gave the corresponding cations. From the reported ESR spectra, g tensors were obtained. It was found that both sulfide and disulfide cations exhibit the same g tensor: (g/sub max/ = 2.034 +- 0.002, g/sub int/ = 2.017 +- 0.001, g/sub min/ = 2.001 +- 0.005). From this result it has been shown that the disulfide cation is planar. This finding was supported by fully optimized geometry ab initio calculations.

  10. Facilitated versus Non-Facilitated Online Case Discussions: Comparing Differences in Problem Space Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Koehler, Adrie A.

    2015-01-01

    The facilitator plays a key role in guiding students' efforts during case discussions. However, few studies have compared differences in learning outcomes for students participating in facilitated versus non-facilitated discussions. In this research, we used "problem space coverage" as a learning measure to compare outcomes between…

  11. A new approach for preparation of magnetite-graphite composite: Intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cation into graphite oxide in L-arginine medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuqiong; Chen, Zhen; Jin, Yongdong; Chen, Shuihua; Wang, Hang; Geng, Junxia; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian; Qin, Zhi; Zheng, Chong

    2011-05-01

    A new approach to prepare magnetite nanoparticle pillared graphite has been put forward. The magnetic composite was normally obtained by calcining iron-intercalated graphite oxide, but the latter was prepared via intercalation reaction using polyhydroxy iron cation as iron precursor and pillaring agent, and a strong organic guanidine base, L-arginine, as alkaline agent and also intercalating agent. L-arginine, used herein instead of inorganic alkali, which would lead to the deoxygenation and reduction of graphite oxide into graphite, not only provided the alkaline condition for the formation of polyhydroxy iron cations, but also increased the interlayer spacing of graphite oxide to facilitate the intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cations into graphite oxide. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and nitrogen absorption indicated that the composite was nanoscale Fe 3O 4 pillared graphite with superparamagnetic property.

  12. Theoretical study of electronically excited radical cations of naphthalene and anthracene as archetypal models for astrophysical observations. Part I. Static aspects.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, S; Reddy, V Sivaranjana; Mahapatra, S

    2011-08-28

    Motivated by the recent discovery of new diffuse interstellar bands and results from laboratory experiments, ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are carried out for the lowest six electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations. The calculated adiabatic electronic energies are utilized to construct suitable diabatic electronic Hamiltonians in order to perform nuclear dynamics studies in Part II. Complex entanglement of the electronic states is established for both the radical cations and the coupling surfaces among them are also derived in accordance with the symmetry selection rules. Critical examination of the coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian suggests that 29 (out of 48) and 31 (out of 66) vibrational modes are relevant in the nuclear dynamics in the six lowest electronic states of naphthalene and anthracene radical cations, respectively. PMID:21750790

  13. Absorbable microparticulate cation exchanger for immunotherapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Waleed S W; Yeh, Heidi; Woo, Edward; Corbett, Joel T; Gray, Heidi; June, Carl H; Shalaby, Shalaby W

    2004-05-15

    An absorbable microparticulate cation exchanger was synthesized as a versatile carrier for biologically active proteins. In this work, acid-terminated polyglycolide (or polyglycolic acid) microparticulates (PG-MP) were surface modified for either sustained release of cytokines or as a platform for immunomodulation. The intended goal was to achieve in situ recruitment/maturation of dendritic cells and activation of T cells for tumor immunotherapy. PG-MP were prepared with a volume weighted mean diameter of 7.02 micro (range: 2.09-14.58 micro). Accessible carboxylic acid groups were determined to be 0.3 mmol/g with a corresponding zeta potential of -21.87 mV in phosphate-buffered saline. Under low magnification, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a highly textured surface due to processing from repetitive jet milling. However, a moderately porous architecture was noted at higher magnification. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to characterize the PG-MP surface before and after adsorption of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Adsorption of GM-CSF on PG-MP (PG-GMCSF) resulted in a modest increase in the surface atomic concentration of nitrogen (0.97%). Pretreating the surface with poly-L-lysine (PG/Lys-GMCSF) prior to adding GM-CSF produced a nearly threefold increase in the surface nitrogen concentration (4.20% compared to 1.47%). This manipulation not only increased loading content, but also prolonged the release of GM-CSF released from 6 days to 26 days. ESCA on the post-release PG-MP samples (PG-GMCSF and PG/Lys-GMCSF) revealed a similar residual surface nitrogen concentration (2.26% vs. 2.35%). The observation was consistent with irreversibly adsorbed GM-CSF. It is postulated that irreversibly bound GM-CSF is released over time as a function of microparticulate degradation. Biological activity of released GM-CSF was confirmed by the proliferation of a GM-CSF-dependent cell line (TF-1) in the presence of

  14. Solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation: Application to ionic diffusion in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Sloot, H.A. van der

    2013-02-15

    A robust numerical solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for asymmetric polyelectrolyte solutions in discrete pore geometries is presented. Comparisons to the linearized approximation of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation reveal that the assumptions leading to linearization may not be appropriate for the electrochemical regime in many cementitious materials. Implications of the electric double layer on both partitioning of species and on diffusive release are discussed. The influence of the electric double layer on anion diffusion relative to cation diffusion is examined.

  15. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  16. Dissociative Recombination Dynamics of the Ozone Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Geppert, W.; sterdahl, F.; Larsson, Mats; Thomas, R. D.; Bahati Musafiri, Eric; Bannister, Mark E; Fogle, Mark R.; Vane, C Randy

    2008-02-01

    The dissociative recombination of the ozone cation has been studied at the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING. The total cross section and branching fractions have been measured. The cross section from {approx}0eV to 0.2 eV follows a nearly E{sup -1} dependence, which was theoretically predicted to be a characteristic of the direct dissociative recombination mechanism. The thermal rate coefficient has been deduced from the cross section to be 7.37x10{sup -7}(T/300){sup -0.55}cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}. The branching fraction analysis carried out at {approx}0eV interaction energy has shown a strong propensity (94%) to dissociate through the three-body channel. Due to the overwhelming dominance of this channel it has been investigated in more detail. Of the six energetically available three-body pathways only three are significantly populated, such that the production of O(S1) is highly unfavored and all atomic oxygen fragments are predominantly formed in P3 and D1 states. Analysis of the breakup geometries has been performed by means of the Dalitz plot. It is observed that the molecules dissociating through the O(P3)+O(P3)+O(P3) and O(P3)+O(P3)+O(D1) channels have an open linear geometry where the cleavage of two valence bonds occurs preferentially in unison, while the O(P3)+O(D1)+O(D1) breakup might proceed partly through a sequential mechanism.

  17. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag(+) under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5mgL(-1), the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100mgL(-1) as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag(+). Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100mgL(-1) as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. PMID:27016684

  18. Novel cationic polyelectrolyte coatings for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Duša, Filip; Witos, Joanna; Karjalainen, Erno; Viitala, Tapani; Tenhu, Heikki; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2016-01-01

    The use of bare fused silica capillary in CE can sometimes be inconvenient due to undesirable effects including adsorption of sample or instability of the EOF. This can often be avoided by coating the inner surface of the capillary. In this work, we present and characterize two novel polyelectrolyte coatings (PECs) poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium iodide) (PMOTAI) and poly(3-methyl-1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-imidazolium chloride) (PIL-1) for CE. The coated capillaries were studied using a series of aqueous buffers of varying pH, ionic strength, and composition. Our results show that the investigated polyelectrolytes are usable as semi-permanent (physically adsorbed) coatings with at least five runs stability before a short coating regeneration is necessary. Both PECs showed a considerably decreased stability at pH 11.0. The EOF was higher using Good's buffers than with sodium phosphate buffer at the same pH and ionic strength. The thickness of the PEC layers studied by quartz crystal microbalance was 0.83 and 0.52 nm for PMOTAI and PIL-1, respectively. The hydrophobicity of the PEC layers was determined by analysis of a homologous series of alkyl benzoates and expressed as the distribution constants. Our result demonstrates that both PECs had comparable hydrophobicity, which enabled separation of compounds with log Po/w > 2. The ability to separate cationic drugs was shown with β-blockers, compounds often misused in doping. Both coatings were also able to separate hydrolysis products of the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene acetate at highly acidic conditions, where bare fused silica capillaries failed to accomplish the separation. PMID:26464098

  19. Recognition of metal cations by biological systems.

    PubMed

    Truter, M R

    1975-11-01

    Recognition of metal cations by biological systems can be compared with the geochemical criteria for isomorphous replacement. Biological systems are more highly selective and much more rapid. Methods of maintaining an optimum concentration, including storage and transfer for the essential trace elements, copper and iron, used in some organisms are in part reproducible by coordination chemists while other features have not been reporduced in models. Poisoning can result from a foreign metal taking part in a reaction irreversibly so that the recognition site or molecule is not released. For major nutrients, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium, there are similarities to the trace metals in selective uptake but differences qualitatively and quantitatively in biological activity. Compounds selective for potassium replace all the solvation sphere with a symmetrical arrangement of oxygen atoms; those selective for sodium give an asymmetrical environment with retention of a solvent molecule. Experiments with naturally occurring antibiotics and synthetic model compounds have shown that flexibility is an important feature of selectivity and that for transfer or carrier properties there is an optimum (as opposed to a maximum) metal-ligand stability constant. Thallium is taken up instead of potassium and will activate some enzymes; it is suggested that the poisonous characteristics arise because the thallium ion may bind more strongly than potassium to part of a site and then fail to bind additional atoms as required for the biological activity. Criteria for the design of selective complexing agents are given with indications of those which might transfer more than one metal at once. PMID:1815

  20. Translational diffusion in mixtures of imidazolium ILs with polar aprotic molecular solvents.

    PubMed

    Marekha, Bogdan A; Kalugin, Oleg N; Bria, Marc; Buchner, Richard; Idrissi, Abdenacer

    2014-05-22

    Self-diffusion coefficients of cations and solvent molecules were determined with (1)H NMR in mixtures of 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (Bmim(+)) tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)), hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO(-)), and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (TFSI(-)) with acetonitrile (AN), γ-butyrolactone (γ-BL), and propylene carbonate (PC) over the entire composition range at 300 K. The relative diffusivities of solvent molecules to cations as a function of concentration were found to depend on the solvent but not on the anion (i.e., IL). In all cases the values exhibit a plateau at low IL content (x(IL) < 0.2) and then increase steeply (AN), moderately (γ-BL), or negligibly (PC) at higher IL concentrations. This behavior was related to the different solvation patterns in the employed solvents. In BmimPF6-based systems, anionic diffusivities were followed via (31)P nuclei and found to be higher than the corresponding cation values in IL-poor systems and lower in the IL-rich region. The inversion point of relative ionic diffusivities was found around equimolar composition and does not depend on the solvent. At this point, a distinct change in the ion-diffusion mechanism appears to take place. PMID:24792375

  1. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpała, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids. PMID:24985656

  2. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Meier, R.; Rachocki, A.; Korpała, A.; Singh, R. K.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-06-01

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by 19F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the 1H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the 1H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the 19F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  3. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  4. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  5. Interparticle migration of metal cations in stream sediments as a factor in toxics transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Kennedy, V.C.; Bhatia, N.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of metal cations by stream sediments is an important process affecting the movement of released contaminants in the environment. The ability of cations to desorb from one sediment particle and subsequently sorb to another can greatly affect metal transport rates but rates for this process have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the rate at which sorbed metals can migrate from contaminated sediment particles to uncontaminated sediment particles as a function of the concentration of the contaminating solution and the duration of the contact with the contaminating solution. Samples of small sediment particles were exposed to solutions containing cobalt, after which they were rinsed and combined with larger uncontaminated sediment particles in the presence of stream water. Initial concentrations of the contaminating solution ranged from 1ng/l to 1000mg/l and exposures to the contaminating solution ranged from 6h to 14 days. The rate of the migration increased with increasing concentrations in the contaminating solution and with decreasing times of exposure to the contaminating solution. Under the conditions of these experiments, the time required for the migration to reach equilibrium was on the order of months or longer. In separate experiments, the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of cobalt were measured as a function of concentration of the contaminating solution. The time required to reach adsorption equilibrium increased with increasing concentration in the contaminating solution. Times to sorption equilibrium were on the order of months. Desorption was much slower than adsorption and, together with intraparticle diffusion, probably controls the rate of migration from contaminated to uncontaminated sediment. The results of this study show that interparticle migration of metal cations can proceed at significant rates that are strongly influenced by the length of time that the metal has been in contact with the sediment

  6. Role of nonselective cation channels in spontaneous and protein kinase A-stimulated calcium signaling in pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Kretschmannova, Karla; Li, Shuo; Nesterova, Maria; Stratakis, Constantine A; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2011-08-01

    Several receptors linked to the adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway stimulate electrical activity and calcium influx in endocrine pituitary cells, and a role for an unidentified sodium-conducting channel in this process has been proposed. Here we show that forskolin dose-dependently increases cAMP production and facilitates calcium influx in about 30% of rat and mouse pituitary cells at its maximal concentration. The stimulatory effect of forskolin on calcium influx was lost in cells with inhibited PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) and in cells that were haploinsufficient for the main PKA regulatory subunit but was preserved in cells that were also haploinsufficient for the main PKA catalytic subunit. Spontaneous and forskolin-stimulated calcium influx was present in cells with inhibited voltage-gated sodium and hyperpolarization-activated cation channels but not in cells bathed in medium, in which sodium was replaced with organic cations. Consistent with the role of sodium-conducting nonselective cation channels in PKA-stimulated Ca(2+) influx, cAMP induced a slowly developing current with a reversal potential of about 0 mV. Two TRP (transient receptor potential) channel blockers, SKF96365 and 2-APB, as well as flufenamic acid, an inhibitor of nonselective cation channels, also inhibited spontaneous and forskolin-stimulated electrical activity and calcium influx. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated the expression of mRNA transcripts for TRPC1 > TRPC6 > TRPC4 > TRPC5 > TRPC3 in rat pituitary cells. These experiments suggest that in pituitary cells constitutively active cation channels are stimulated further by PKA and contribute to calcium signaling indirectly by controlling the pacemaking depolarization in a sodium-dependent manner and directly by conducting calcium. PMID:21586701

  7. Cation-Cation Interactions in [(UO2)2(OH)n](4-n) Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Govind, Niranjan; Schreckenbach, Georg; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-10-07

    The structures and bonding of gas-phase [(UO2)2(OH)n]4-n (n=2-6) complexes have been studied using density functional theory (DFT), MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with particular emphasis on ground state structures featuring cation-cation interactions (CCIs) between the uranyl groups. An interesting trend is observed in the stabilities of members of this series of complexes. The structures of [(UO2)2(OH)2]2+, [(UO2)2(OH)4] and [(UO2)2(OH)6]2- featuring CCIs are found at higher energies (by 3-20 kcal/mol) in comparison to their conventional μ2-dihydroxo structures. In contrast, the CCI structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- are respectively almost degenerate with and lower in energy than the structures with the μ2-dihydroxo format. The origin of this trend lies in the ‘symmetry’-based need to balance the coordination numbers and effective atomic charges of each uranium center. The calculated IR vibrational frequencies provide signature probes that can be used in differentiating the lowenergy structures and in experimentally confirming the existence of the structures featuring CCIs. Analysis of the bonding in the structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- shows that the CCIs and bridging hydroxo between the dioxo-uranium units are mainly electrostatic in nature.

  8. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  9. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  10. Reduction by monovalent zinc, cadmium, and nickel cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerstein, D.; Mulac, W. A.

    1969-01-01

    Understanding of chemical properties of monovalent transition metal cations in aqueous solutions was obtained by a study of kinetics of reduction of different inorganic substrates by zinc, cadmium, and nickel.

  11. Investigation of Fragmentation of Tryptophan Nitrogen Radical Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkivskyi, Andrii; Happ, Marshall; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Siu, K. W. Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2015-08-01

    This work describes investigation of the fragmentation mechanism of tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation, H3N+-TrpN• ( m/ z 204) studied via DFT calculations and several gas-phase experimental techniques. The main fragment ion at m/ z 131, shown to be a mixture of up to four isomers including 3-methylindole (3MI) π-radical cation, was found to undergo further loss of an H atom to yield one of the two isomeric m/ z 130 ions. 3-Methylindole radical cation generated independently (via CID of [CuII(terpy)3MI]•2+) displayed gas-phase reactivity partially similar to that of the m/ z 131 fragment, further confirming our proposed mechanism. CID of deuterated tryptophan N-indolyl radical cation ( m/ z 208) suggested that up to six H atoms are involved in the pathway to formation of the m/ z 131 ion, consistent with hydrogen atom scrambling during CID of protonated Trp.

  12. Study on cationic photopolymerization reaction of epoxy polysiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, J.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of epoxy monomers, concentration of photoinitiator and radical photoinitiators on the photosensitive properties of cationic phopolymerization system with a novel epoxy polysiloxane oligomer (CEPS) were investigated via a gel yield method. The results showed that among the tested epoxy monomers, the reactivity of ERL-4221 with cycloaliphatic epoxy groups was the highest. The optimum concentration of diaryldiodonium salt (SR-1012) was determined as 4-5 wt.%. Increasing the amounts of ERL-4221 in the CEPS cationic photopolymerization system, UV-curing rate increased. Radical photoinitiators with ArC dbnd O structure possessed sensitization capacity to the cationic photoinitiator SR-1012. The photosensitivity of the CEPS system could be up to 165 mJ/cm 2. Adding a small amount of IPA and BP could greatly improve the photosensitivity of CEPS cationic photosensitive system. The optimal quantity of isopropanol added to the system was not more than 2 wt.%.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected metal carbonyl cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricks, A. M.; Reed, Z. E.; Duncan, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Metal carbonyl cations of the form M(CO)n+ are produced in a molecular beam by laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source. These ions, and their corresponding rare gas atom "tagged" analogs, M(CO)n(RG)m+, are studied with mass-selected infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the carbonyl stretching region and with density functional theory computations. The number of infrared-active bands, their frequency positions, and their relative intensities provide distinctive patterns allowing determination of the geometries and electronic structures of these complexes. Cobalt penta carbonyl and manganese hexacarbonyl cations are compared to isoelectronic iron pentacarbonyl and chromium hexacarbonyl neutrals. Gold and copper provide examples of "non-classical" carbonyls. Seven-coordinate carbonyls are explored for the vanadium group metal cations (V +, Nb + and Ta +), while uranium cations provide an example of an eight-coordinate carbonyl.

  14. Cationic RAFT polymerization using ppm concentrations of organic acid.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2015-02-01

    A metal-free, cationic, reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization was proposed and realized. A series of thiocarbonylthio compounds were used in the presence of a small amount of triflic acid for isobutyl vinyl ether to give polymers with controlled molecular weight of up to 1×10(5) and narrow molecular-weight distributions (Mw /Mn <1.1). This "living" or controlled cationic polymerization is applicable to various electron-rich monomers including vinyl ethers, p-methoxystyrene, and even p-hydroxystyrene that possesses an unprotected phenol group. A transformation from cationic to radical RAFT polymerization enables the synthesis of block copolymers between cationically and radically polymerizable monomers, such as vinyl ether and vinyl acetate or methyl acrylate. PMID:25511364

  15. DFT study on the cycloreversion of thietane radical cations.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Argüello, Juan E; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanism of the cycloreversion (CR) of thietane radical cations has been analyzed in detail at the UB3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Results have shown that the process takes place via a stepwise mechanism leading to alkenes and thiobenzophenone; alternatively, formal [4+2] cycloadducts are obtained. Thus, the CR of radical cations 1a,b(•+) is initiated by C2-C3 bond breaking, giving common intermediates INa,b. At this stage, two reaction pathways are feasible involving ion molecule complexes IMCa,b (i) or radical cations 4a,b(•+) (ii). Calculations support that 1a(•+) follows reaction pathway ii (leading to the formal [4+2] cycloadducts 5a). By contrast, 1b(•+) follows pathway i, leading to trans-stilbene radical cation (2b(•+)) and thiobenzophenone. PMID:21561127

  16. α-Cationic Arsines: Synthesis, Structure, Reactivity, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Dube, Jonathan W; Zheng, Yiying; Thiel, Walter; Alcarazo, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    A series of structurally differentiated cationic arsines containing imidazolium, cyclopropenium, formamidinium, and pyridinium substituents have been synthesized through short and scalable routes. Evaluation of the donor properties of these compounds by IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations reveals similar σ-electron-releasing abilities for all of them; however, their π-acceptor properties are strongly influenced by the nature of the positively charged group. We describe the coordination chemistry of the newly prepared α-cationic arsines toward different metal centers and their reactivity in the presence of strong oxidants to afford cationic As(V) species. Their unique electronic properties have been exploited in Pt(II) catalysis to develop a new catalyst with remarkable activity in the cycloisomerization of enynes to trisubstituted cyclopropanes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of α-cationic arsine ligands in catalysis. PMID:27214007

  17. The Ziegler—Natta olefin insertion reaction for cationic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Vidar R.; Siegban, Per E. M.

    1993-09-01

    The catalytic Ziegler—Natta polymerization reaction has been studied for a set of metal cations, in order to identify the role of the positive charge on this process. Geometry optimizations have been performed for the reactant metal—methyl systems, the π-coordinated olefin systems, the transition states for the olefin insertion and finally for the product metal—propyl systems. All valence electrons are correlated. The cations selected for this study are the transition metals Zr + and Ti +, the non-transition metals Be +, Mg +, Al + and finally also Si +. The transition metal cations are found to have very low barriers for the insertion, but the lowest barrier is actually found for Be +. The results are discussed in terms of the ionization energies and the accessibility to valence p and d orbitals. Comparisons are made to previous theoretical work on cationic model systems.

  18. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  19. Facilitating LOS Debriefings: A Training Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonnell, Lori K.; Jobe, Kimberly K.; Dismukes, R. Key

    1997-01-01

    This manual is a practical guide to help airline instructors effectively facilitate debriefings of Line Oriented Simulations (LOS). It is based on a recently completed study of Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) debriefings at several U.S. airlines. This manual presents specific facilitation tools instructors can use to achieve debriefing objectives. The approach of the manual is to be flexible so it can be tailored to the individual needs of each airline. Part One clarifies the purpose and objectives of facilitation in the LOS setting. Part Two provides recommendations for clarifying roles and expectations and presents a model for organizing discussion. Part Tree suggests techniques for eliciting active crew participation and in-depth analysis and evaluation. Finally, in Part Four, these techniques are organized according to the facilitation model. Examples of how to effectively use the techniques are provided throughout, including strategies to try when the debriefing objectives are not being fully achieved.

  20. Facilitating the discharge of patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Significant numbers of older people with dementia use general hospital services, and facilitating the safe discharge of patients with poor cognition, impaired judgement, misperception or reduced risk awareness is challenging for many healthcare professionals. PMID:27581918