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Sample records for cation exchange reactions

  1. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  2. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  3. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  4. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  5. Sequential Anion and Cation Exchange Reactions for Complete Material Transformations of Nanoparticles with Morphological Retention.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James M; Kletetschka, Karel; Fenton, Julie L; Read, Carlos G; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-07-20

    Ion exchange reactions of colloidal nanocrystals provide access to complex products that are synthetically challenging using traditional hot-injection methods. However, such reactions typically achieve only partial material transformations by employing either cation or anion exchange processes. It is now shown that anion and cation exchange reactions can be coupled together and applied sequentially in one integrated pathway that leads to complete material transformations of nanocrystal templates. Although the product nanocrystals do not contain any of the original constituent elements, the original morphology is retained, thereby fully decoupling morphology and composition control. The sequential anion/cation exchange process was applied to pseudo-spherical CdO nanocrystals and ZnO tetrapods, producing fully transformed and shape-controlled nanocrystals of copper and silver sulfides and selenides. Furthermore, hollow core-shell tetrapod ZnS@CdS heterostructures were readily accessible. PMID:26110653

  6. Cation Exchange Reactions for Improved Quality and Diversity of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beberwyck, Brandon James

    Observing the size and shape dependent physical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals requires synthetic methods capable of not only composition and crystalline phase control but also molecular scale uniformity for a particle consisting of tens to hundreds of thousands of atoms. The desire for synthetic methods that produce uniform nanocrystals of complex morphologies continues to increase as nanocrystals find roles in commercial applications, such as biolabeling and display technologies, that are simultaneously restricting material compositions. With these constraints, new synthetic strategies that decouple the nanocrystal's chemical composition from its morphology are necessary. This dissertation explores the cation exchange reaction of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, a template-based chemical transformation that enables the interconversion of nanocrystals between a variety of compositions while maintaining their size dispersity and morphology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the versatility of this replacement reaction as a synthetic method for semiconductor nanocrystals. An overview of the fundamentals of the cation exchange reaction and the diversity of products that are achievable is presented. Chapter 2 examines the optical properties of nanocrystal heterostructures produced through cation exchange reactions. The deleterious impact of exchange on the photoluminescence is correlated to residual impurities and a simple annealing protocol is demonstrated to achieve photoluminescence yields comparable to samples produced by conventional methods. Chapter 3 investigates the extension of the cation exchange reaction beyond ionic nanocrystals. Covalent III-V nanocrystal of high crystallinity and low size dispersity are synthesized by the cation exchange of cadmium pnictide nanocrystals with group 13 ions. Lastly, Chapter 4 highlights future studies to probe cation exchange reactions in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and progress that needs to be

  7. Influence of the Ion Coordination Number on Cation Exchange Reactions with Copper Telluride Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tu, Renyong; Xie, Yi; Bertoni, Giovanni; Lak, Aidin; Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo; Cavalli, Andrea; Trizio, Luca De; Manna, Liberato

    2016-06-01

    Cu2-xTe nanocubes were used as starting seeds to access metal telluride nanocrystals by cation exchanges at room temperature. The coordination number of the entering cations was found to play an important role in dictating the reaction pathways. The exchanges with tetrahedrally coordinated cations (i.e., with coordination number 4), such as Cd(2+) or Hg(2+), yielded monocrystalline CdTe or HgTe nanocrystals with Cu2-xTe/CdTe or Cu2-xTe/HgTe Janus-like heterostructures as intermediates. The formation of Janus-like architectures was attributed to the high diffusion rate of the relatively small tetrahedrally coordinated cations, which could rapidly diffuse in the Cu2-xTe NCs and nucleate the CdTe (or HgTe) phase in a preferred region of the host structure. Also, with both Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) ions the exchange led to wurtzite CdTe and HgTe phases rather than the more stable zinc-blende ones, indicating that the anion framework of the starting Cu2-xTe particles could be more easily deformed to match the anion framework of the metastable wurtzite structures. As hexagonal HgTe had never been reported to date, this represents another case of metastable new phases that can only be accessed by cation exchange. On the other hand, the exchanges involving octahedrally coordinated ions (i.e., with coordination number 6), such as Pb(2+) or Sn(2+), yielded rock-salt polycrystalline PbTe or SnTe nanocrystals with Cu2-xTe@PbTe or Cu2-xTe@SnTe core@shell architectures at the early stages of the exchange process. In this case, the octahedrally coordinated ions are probably too large to diffuse easily through the Cu2-xTe structure: their limited diffusion rate restricts their initial reaction to the surface of the nanocrystals, where cation exchange is initiated unselectively, leading to core@shell architectures. Interestingly, these heterostructures were found to be metastable as they evolved to stable Janus-like architectures if annealed at 200 °C under vacuum. PMID:27177274

  8. Time-Resolved Structural Analysis of Cation Exchange Reactions in Birnessite Using Synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Hanson, J. C.; Lee, Y.; Komarneni, S.

    2002-12-01

    Birnessite ((Na,Ca,Mn2+) Mn7O142.8H2O) is a layered Mn-oxide with a 7.2Å spacing between the Mn octahedral sheets. Since birnessite is an abundant phase in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules, it plays a significant role in soil and groundwater chemistry. Experiments by Golden et al. (1986,1987) have demonstrated that Na-buserite (hydrated birnessite) readily exchanges Na+ for a variety of other cations, including K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Ni2+, and Sr2+. In light of its high cation exchange capacity, birnessite is industrially important for ion and molecular sieves and cathodic materials. In addition, birnessite serves as a precursor in the synthesis of todorokite, which has a 3x3 tunnel structure and is used as an octahedral sieve. We monitored cation-exchange reactions in birnessite by time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction with a simple flow-through cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The flow-through cell was developed by Lee and Parise at SUNY-Stony Brook, and this work represents its first application to Mn oxides. A series of synthetic Na-birnessite samples were saturated with chloride solutions containing dissolved K+, Mg2+, and Ba2+, ranging from 0.1M to 0.001M. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every ~ 3 minutes. The synchrotron experiments revealed that complete cation exchange occurs within three hours, and significant modifications of the arrangements of interlayer cations and water molecules accompany the exchange. Specifically, the replacement of Na by Mg resulted in the continuous growth of a discrete buserite-like phase with a 10Å layer spacing, while replacement of Na by K and Ba retained the 7Å spacing. K replacement of Na resulted in gradually decreasing peak intensity and peak merging. The Ba exchange yielded an abrupt decrease in diffraction intensities followed by a more gradual lattice change over the last 2 hours. Rietveld analysis led to the first determination of the structure of Ba-birnessite in space

  9. Synthesis of ordered mesoporous crystalline CuS and Ag2S materials via cation exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Weiming; Bao, Haifeng; Shi, Yifeng

    2015-02-01

    Cation exchange reaction is a strong tool for the synthesis of new ionic nanomaterials. Most of them are isolated nanoparticles with simple geometric features, such as nanodots, nanorods and nanospheres. In this work, we demonstrated that ordered mesoporous CdS with a complex cubic Ia3d gyroidal 3D bicontinuous porous structure and large particle size can be successfully converted to crystalline CuS and Ag2S materials via cation exchange reaction without destroying the well-defined nanostructure. The change in crystal structure is an important factor for a successful conversion when the reaction is carried out without the presence of a silica template. In addition, the cation exchange reaction is sufficient for a complete compositional conversion, even when the mesostructured CdS precursor is embedded inside a mesoporous silica matrix. Our results indicate that cation exchange reaction may be applied to highly complex nanostructures with extremely large particle sizes.Cation exchange reaction is a strong tool for the synthesis of new ionic nanomaterials. Most of them are isolated nanoparticles with simple geometric features, such as nanodots, nanorods and nanospheres. In this work, we demonstrated that ordered mesoporous CdS with a complex cubic Ia3d gyroidal 3D bicontinuous porous structure and large particle size can be successfully converted to crystalline CuS and Ag2S materials via cation exchange reaction without destroying the well-defined nanostructure. The change in crystal structure is an important factor for a successful conversion when the reaction is carried out without the presence of a silica template. In addition, the cation exchange reaction is sufficient for a complete compositional conversion, even when the mesostructured CdS precursor is embedded inside a mesoporous silica matrix. Our results indicate that cation exchange reaction may be applied to highly complex nanostructures with extremely large particle sizes. Electronic supplementary

  10. Independent control of the shape and composition of ionic nanocrystals through sequential cation exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Joseph Matthew; Zheng, Haimei; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-07-06

    Size- and shape-controlled nanocrystal growth is intensely researched for applications including electro-optic, catalytic, and medical devices. Chemical transformations such as cation exchange overcome the limitation of traditional colloidal synthesis, where the nanocrystal shape often reflects the inherent symmetry of the underlying lattice. Here we show that nanocrystals, with established synthetic protocols for high monodispersity, can be templates for independent composition control. Specifically, controlled interconversion between wurtzite CdS, chalcocite Cu2S, and rock salt PbS occurs while preserving the anisotropic dimensions unique to the as-synthesized materials. Sequential exchange reactions between the three sulfide compositions are driven by the disparate solubilites of the metal ion exchange pair in specific coordinating molecules. Starting with CdS, highly anisotropic PbS nanorods are created, which serve as an important material for studying strong 2-dimensional quantum confinement, as well as for optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, interesting nanoheterostructures of CdS|PbS are obtained by precise control over ion insertion and removal.

  11. Fluorescent metal ion chemosensors via cation exchange reactions of complexes, quantum dots, and metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghui; Zhou, Xiangge; Xiang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Due to their wide range of applications and biological significance, fluorescent sensors have been an active research area in the past few years. In the present review, recent research developments on fluorescent chemosensors that detect metal ions via cation exchange reactions (transmetalation, metal displacement, or metal exchange reactions) of complexes, quantum dots, and metal-organic frameworks are described. These complex-based chemosensors might have a much better selectivity than the corresponding free ligands/receptors because of the shielding function of the filled-in metal ions. Moreover, not only the chemical structure of the ligands/receptors but also the identity of the central metal ions have a tremendous impact on the sensing performances. Therefore, sensing via cation exchange reactions potentially provides a new, simple, and powerful way to design fluorescent chemosensors. PMID:26375420

  12. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of 90Sr 2+ from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; Zachara, J. M.; Smith, S. C.; Liu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr 2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr 2+, 90Sr 2+, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr 2+ to the water table.

  13. Cation Exchange Reactions Controlling Desorption of 90Sr2+ From Coarse-Grained Contaminated Sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; Zachara, J. M.; Smith, S. C.; Liu, C.

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. We desorbed Sr2+, 90Sr2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, and monitored total inorganic carbon concentration during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model produced an excellent prediction for desorption data. We also examined the contaminated sediment using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in a sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explains the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicate that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr2+ to the water table.

  14. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  15. Cu3-xP Nanocrystals as a Material Platform for Near-Infrared Plasmonics and Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis approaches to colloidal Cu3P nanocrystals (NCs) have been recently developed, and their optical absorption features in the near-infrared (NIR) have been interpreted as arising from a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Our pump–probe measurements on platelet-shaped Cu3-xP NCs corroborate the plasmonic character of this absorption. In accordance with studies on crystal structure analysis of Cu3P dating back to the 1970s, our density functional calculations indicate that this material is substoichiometric in copper, since the energy of formation of Cu vacancies in certain crystallographic sites is negative, that is, they are thermodynamically favored. Also, thermoelectric measurements point to a p-type behavior of the majority carriers from films of Cu3-xP NCs. It is likely that both the LSPR and the p-type character of our Cu3-xP NCs arise from the presence of a large number of Cu vacancies in such NCs. Motivated by the presence of Cu vacancies that facilitate the ion diffusion, we have additionally exploited Cu3-xP NCs as a starting material on which to probe cation exchange reactions. We demonstrate here that Cu3-xP NCs can be easily cation-exchanged to hexagonal wurtzite InP NCs, with preservation of the anion framework (the anion framework in Cu3-xP is very close to that of wurtzite InP). Intermediate steps in this reaction are represented by Cu3-xP/InP heterostructures, as a consequence of the fact that the exchange between Cu+ and In3+ ions starts from the peripheral corners of each NC and gradually evolves toward the center. The feasibility of this transformation makes Cu3-xP NCs an interesting material platform from which to access other metal phosphides by cation exchange. PMID:25960605

  16. Room Temperature Cation Exchange Reaction in Nanocrystals for Ultrasensitive Speciation Analysis of Silver Ions and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Tang, Jie; Yang, Lu; Zhou, Jingrong; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and Ag(+) and gain deep insight into the transformation of AgNPs in the environment or organisms, ultrasensitive analytical methods are needed for their speciation analysis. About 40-fold of Cd(2+) in CdTe ionic nanocrystals can be "bombarded-and-exploded" (exchanged) in less than 1 min simply by mixing the nanocrystals with Ag(+) solution at room temperature, while this cation exchange reaction did not occur when only silver nanoparticles were present. On the basis of this striking difference, an ultrasensitive method was developed for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in complex matrices. The released Cd(2+) was reduced to its volatile species by sodium tetrahydroborate, which was separated and swept to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) or an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) for the indirect but ultrasensitive detection of Ag(+). Owing to the remarkable signal amplification via the cation exchange reaction and the advantages of chemical vapor generation for sampling, the limit of detection was 0.0003 μg L(-1) for Ag(+) by ICPMS, which was improved by 100-fold compared to the conventional method. Relative standard deviations are better than 2.5% at a concentration of 0.5 μg L(-1) Ag(+) or AgNPs regardless of the detector. The proposed method retains several unique advantages, including ultrahigh sensitivity, speciation analysis, simplicity and being organic reagent-free, and has been successfully utilized for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in environmental water samples and paramecium cells. PMID:26017198

  17. Reversible Dissociation and Ligand-Glutathione Exchange Reaction in Binuclear Cationic Tetranitrosyl Iron Complex with Penicillamine

    PubMed Central

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO4·5H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO4·2H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)  k1 = (4.6 ± 0.1)·10−3 s−1 and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k2 = (1.8 ± 0.2)·10−3 s−1 at 25°C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer,  pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS− during decomposition of 1.5·10−4 M (I) in the presence of 10−3 M GSH, with 76% yield in 24 h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity. PMID:24790592

  18. Reversible dissociation and ligand-glutathione exchange reaction in binuclear cationic tetranitrosyl iron complex with penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Syrtsova, Lidia; Sanina, Natalia; Lyssenko, Konstantin; Kabachkov, Evgeniy; Psikha, Boris; Shkondina, Natal'ja; Pokidova, Olesia; Kotelnikov, Alexander; Aldoshin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of the decomposition of two nitrosyl iron complexes (NICs) with penicillamine thiolic ligands [Fe2(SC5H11NO2)2(NO)4]SO4 ·5H2O (I) and glutathione- (GSH-) ligands [Fe2(SC10H17N3O6)2(NO)4]SO4 ·2H2O (II), which spontaneously evolve to NO in aqueous medium. NO formation was measured by a sensor electrode and by spectrophotometric methods by measuring the formation of a hemoglobin- (Hb-) NO complex. The NO evolution reaction rate from (I)  k 1 = (4.6 ± 0.1)·10(-3) s(-1) and the elimination rate constant of the penicillamine ligand k 2 = (1.8 ± 0.2)·10(-3) s(-1) at 25°C in 0.05 M phosphate buffer,  pH 7.0, was calculated using kinetic modeling based on the experimental data. Both reactions are reversible. Spectrophotometry and mass-spectrometry methods have firmly shown that the penicillamine ligand is exchanged for GS(-) during decomposition of 1.5·10(-4) M (I) in the presence of 10(-3) M GSH, with 76% yield in 24 h. As has been established, such behaviour is caused by the resistance of (II) to decomposition due to the higher affinity of iron to GSH in the complex. The discovered reaction may impede S-glutathionylation of the essential enzyme systems in the presence of (I) and is important for metabolism of NIC, connected with its antitumor activity. PMID:24790592

  19. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of Sr-90(2+) from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-01-15

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr2+, 90Sr2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na+, Ca2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr2+ to the water table.

  20. A facile route to synthesize CdZnSe core–shell-like alloyed quantum dots via cation exchange reaction in aqueous system

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Yingzhuo; Wei, Jumeng; Liu, Bitao; Peng, Lingling

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Water-soluble CdZnSe alloyed QDs synthesized by cation exchange reaction. • The as-prepared CdZnSe QDs have fairly good luminescence properties. • The surface defects of obtained QDs were removed due to the alloyed structure. - Abstract: Water-soluble CdZnSe alloyed nanocrystals have been successfully prepared via “green” cation exchange reaction in aqueous system. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicate that the as-prepared nanocrystals had high crystallinity and small particle size of 4–5 nm. The absorption spectra of CdZnSe show red shift of 100 nm from 375 to 475 nm. Moreover, the band-gap photoluminescent (PL) emission has a red shift of 50 nm from 430 to 480 nm with the increase of the reaction time. On the basis of the PL properties and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, one kind of core–shell-like structure model was proposed, which resulted from the different cation exchange reaction rates. This structure could greatly improve the luminescence properties by the removal of surface defect of quantum dots. This work would support potential applications in optoelectronic devices, and biomedical tags fields.

  1. Formation of gypsum and bassanite by cation exchange reactions in the absence of free-liquid H2O: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Siobhan A.; Bish, David L.

    2011-09-01

    Smectites and hydrated Mg sulfate minerals have been identified in close association at various locations on the Martian surface. The hydration states of sulfates and smectites are dependent on temperature and relative humidity (RH), and therefore these minerals have the potential to affect cycling and bioavailability of H2O on Mars. We have conducted X-ray powder diffraction experiments to investigate cycling of H2O within mixtures of Ca-bearing smectites and hydrated Mg sulfate minerals under conditions of varying RH similar to those that exist at or just beneath the Martian surface. Our experiments show that under conditions of varying RH, cation-exchange reactions occur between these two potential components of the Martian regolith, producing gypsum [CaSO4·2H2O] and bassanite [CaSO4·˜0.5H2O] in the absence of free-liquid H2O. Cation-exchange reactions were accompanied by significant loss of porosity, warping of the sample surface and, in some cases, volume expansion. The formation of Ca sulfate minerals in these experiments provides evidence for the development of thin films of H2O at mineral surfaces and suggests that similar processes may operate at the arid surface of Mars. Humidity-driven cation-exchange reactions between smectites and hydrated Mg sulfate minerals may therefore play a role in shaping the present-day Martian surface and could have provided a transient source of H2O and nutrients (e.g., major and trace elements and possibly organic micro/macronutrients) for putative microorganisms.

  2. Metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel networks: Their formation mechanism and application for novel material generation and heavy metal water remediation via cation exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palhares, Leticia F.

    The dissertation research is focused on (1) uncovering the mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation; (2) extending the cation exchange reaction protocol to zinc sulfide gel networks, with the goal of accessing new aerogel chemistries and understanding the factors that drive the process; and (3) conducting a quantitative analysis of the ability of ZnS aerogels to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The mechanism of metal chalcogenide nanoparticle gel formation was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to probe the chemical changes that occur during the gelation process. These techniques suggest that the bonding between the particles in the CdSe nanoparticle gels is due to the oxidation of surface selenide species, forming covalent Se--Se bonds. Treating the gel networks with a suitable reducing agent, such as a thiol, breaks the covalent bond and disperses the gel network. The addition of sodium borohydride, a "pure" reducing agent, also breaks down the gel network, strengthening the hypothesis that the reducing character of the thiols, not their ligation ability, is responsible for the gel network breakdown. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Powder X-ray Diffraction were used to analyze the particles after successive gelation-dispersion cycles. The primary particle size decreases after repeated oxidation-reduction cycles, due to nanoparticle surface etching. This trend is observed for CdSe and CdS gel networks, allowing for the proposition that the oxidative-reductive mechanism responsible for the formation-dispersion of the gels is general, applying to other metal chalcogenide nanocrystals as well. The cation exchange reaction previously demonstrated for CdSe gels was extended to ZnS gel networks. The exchange occurs under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, methanol solvent) with exchanging ions of different size, charge and mobility (Ag+, Pb2+, Cd2+ , Cu2+). The

  3. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  4. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  5. A facile route to violet- to orange-emitting CdxZn1-xSe alloy nanocrystals via cation exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xinhua; Feng, Yaoyu; Zhang, Yuliang; Gu, Zhenyu; Zou, Lei

    2007-09-01

    The most advanced CdSe-based binary semiconductor system does not work well for emission in the short wavelength spectral region from 420 to 500 nm, which is of special interest for the preparation of nanocrystal-based blue LEDs and white light generation. CdxZn1-xSe alloy nanocrystals are proven to be an attractive alternative as their emission color can be tuned from the UV spectral region (ZnSe) to the red region (CdSe) by changing the composition of the Zn/Cd ratio in the alloy. Herein we report a facile and 'green' alloying approach for the preparation of highly luminescent CdxZn1-xSe nanocrystals via cation exchange reaction of the pre-prepared ZnSe nanocrystals with Cd2+ at intermediate temperatures. Through this new synthetic strategy, high-quality alloy QDs with different desired emission wavelengths or colors (ranging from 370 to 600 nm) can be made reproducibly and precisely by varying the predetermined amounts of the reaction precursors.

  6. Determination of the cation-exchange capacity of muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.A.; Suter, U.W.

    2000-04-01

    High cation-exchange capacity (CEC) muscovite mica with a homoionic surface was prepared by replacing the Li{sup +} surface ions of partially delaminated Li-mica with K{sup +}. The CEC of this K-mica was determined by exchanging its surface cations with Cs{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, methylene blue (MB{sup +}), and copper triethylenetetramine [Cu(trien){sup 2+}]. The kinetics of these exchange reactions were studied and showed large differences depending on their relative affinities to mica. The NH{sub 4}{sup +}/K{sup +} exchange was slow, while the Cs{sup +} and Cu(trien){sup 2+}/K{sup +} exchange was fast. The MB{sup +}/K{sup +} exchange was quite slow and was not completed even after 99 h. Insufficient reaction time is one of the main reasons for the contradictory results reported in the literature for the CEC of aluminosilicates obtained by different methods. The CEC of mica can be photometrically measured by exchanging its surface cations with Cu(trien){sup 2+}.

  7. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  8. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  9. Real-time monitoring of in situ gas-phase H/D exchange reactions of cations by atmospheric pressure helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS).

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Athula B; Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius

    2014-01-01

    An enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI-MS) source avoids, or minimizes, undesired back-exchange reactions usually encountered during deuterium incorporation experiments under ambient-pressure open-source conditions. A simple adaptation of an ESI source provides an economical way of conducting gas phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions (HDX) in real time without the need for complicated hardware modifications. For example, the spectrum of [(2)H8]toluene recorded under exposed ambient conditions showed the base peak at m/z 96 due to fast leaching of ring hydrogens because of interactions with H2O vapor present in the open source. Such D/H exchanges are rapidly reversed if the deuterium-depleted [(2)H8]toluene is exposed to D2O vapor. In addition to the enumeration of labile protons, our procedure enables the identification of protonation sites in molecules unambiguously, by the number of H/D exchanges observed in real time. For example, molecules such as tetrahydrofuran and pyridine protonate at the heteroatom and consequently undergo only one H/D exchange, whereas ethylbenzene, which protonates at a ring position of the aromatic ring, undergoes six H/D exchanges. In addition, carbocations generated in situ by in-source fragmentation of precursor protonated species, such as benzyl alcohol, do not undergo any rapid H/D exchanges. Because radical cations, second-generation cations (ions formed by losing a small molecule from a precursor ion), or those formed by hydride abstraction do not undergo rapid H/D exchanges, our technique provides a way to distinguish these ions from protonated molecules. PMID:24325360

  10. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-05-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core-shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core-shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals.

  11. Permeation of Water through Cation Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanaiah, N.

    1967-01-01

    Water permeabilities as well as other membrane parameters, such as exchange capacity, water content, and specific conductance, have been measured for two cation exchange membranes in the H form. The conductance of membrane with low water content was less than that of the membrane with high water content. These data have been discussed in the light of an existing theory and found inadequate to explain the results in a quantitative way. Water permeability of the membranes subject to mechanical pressure was found to be higher than their isotopic water permeability, according to expectation. These data have been examined from the standpoint of thermodynamic and kinetic theories of water flow in membranes and used to estimate the average size of membrane pores. PMID:6048874

  12. CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1959-07-14

    A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

  13. Cation-cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO2)3(WO6)(H2O)5 (1), Ag(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3 (2), K(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)4 (3), Rb(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3.5 (4), and Cs(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)3 (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1-5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation-cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2-5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO2)2+ uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO6 octahedra. Chains are linked through cation-cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [-1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C.

  14. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media. PMID:25569300

  15. Electron exchange involving a sulfur-stabilized ruthenium radical cation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anthony P; Ryland, Bradford L; Norton, Jack R; Buccella, Daniela; Moscatelli, Alberto

    2007-07-01

    Half-sandwich Ru(II) amine, thiol, and thiolate complexes were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The thiol and amine complexes react slowly with acetonitrile to give free thiol or amine and the acetonitrile complex. With the thiol complex, the reaction is dissociative. The thiolate complex has been oxidized to its Ru(III) radical cation and the solution EPR spectrum of that radical cation recorded. Cobaltocene reduces the thiol complex to the thiolate complex. The 1H and 31P NMR signals of the thiolate complex in acetonitrile become very broad whenever the thiolate and thiol complexes are present simultaneously. The line broadening is primarily due to electron exchange between the thiolate complex and its radical cation; the latter is generated by an unfavorable redox equilibrium between the thiol and thiolate complexes. Pyramidal inversion of sulfur in the thiol complex is fast at room temperature but slow at lower temperatures; major and minor conformers of the thiol complex were observed by 31P NMR at -98 degrees C in CD2Cl2. PMID:17569530

  16. Absorbable microparticulate cation exchanger for immunotherapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Waleed S W; Yeh, Heidi; Woo, Edward; Corbett, Joel T; Gray, Heidi; June, Carl H; Shalaby, Shalaby W

    2004-05-15

    An absorbable microparticulate cation exchanger was synthesized as a versatile carrier for biologically active proteins. In this work, acid-terminated polyglycolide (or polyglycolic acid) microparticulates (PG-MP) were surface modified for either sustained release of cytokines or as a platform for immunomodulation. The intended goal was to achieve in situ recruitment/maturation of dendritic cells and activation of T cells for tumor immunotherapy. PG-MP were prepared with a volume weighted mean diameter of 7.02 micro (range: 2.09-14.58 micro). Accessible carboxylic acid groups were determined to be 0.3 mmol/g with a corresponding zeta potential of -21.87 mV in phosphate-buffered saline. Under low magnification, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a highly textured surface due to processing from repetitive jet milling. However, a moderately porous architecture was noted at higher magnification. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to characterize the PG-MP surface before and after adsorption of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Adsorption of GM-CSF on PG-MP (PG-GMCSF) resulted in a modest increase in the surface atomic concentration of nitrogen (0.97%). Pretreating the surface with poly-L-lysine (PG/Lys-GMCSF) prior to adding GM-CSF produced a nearly threefold increase in the surface nitrogen concentration (4.20% compared to 1.47%). This manipulation not only increased loading content, but also prolonged the release of GM-CSF released from 6 days to 26 days. ESCA on the post-release PG-MP samples (PG-GMCSF and PG/Lys-GMCSF) revealed a similar residual surface nitrogen concentration (2.26% vs. 2.35%). The observation was consistent with irreversibly adsorbed GM-CSF. It is postulated that irreversibly bound GM-CSF is released over time as a function of microparticulate degradation. Biological activity of released GM-CSF was confirmed by the proliferation of a GM-CSF-dependent cell line (TF-1) in the presence of

  17. Modeling cation exchange using EQ3/6

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.; Bruton, C.; Bourcier, B.

    1992-08-01

    Geochemical modeling codes must be able to predict solid-solution and ion-exchange behavior of zeolites and smectites in order to design and assess strategies for containing and cleaning up toxic and/or radioactive wastes. Cation-exchange and solid-solution models have been implemented in the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package and used to predict the composition of clinoptilolite under a variety of conditions. Published free energies of cation exchange on clinoptilolite at 25{degrees}C were combined with the calorimetric data for clinoptilolite to derive free energies of formation of the component end members of a solid solution in which mixing is allowed only on the exchange site. The solid-solution model and component end-member data were incorporated into EQ3/6 and its data base. An option to treat cation exchange independently of the solid-solution model was also developed and implemented in EQ3/6. This option allows the user to model mixed-phase exchangers, multisite exchangers, and systems in which the exchanger is not in overall equilibrium with the solution. Two {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} cation-exchange conventions [Vanselow (mole fraction) and Gapon (equivalent fraction)] are currently implemented in the code. A description of the cation-exchange models and their implementation into EQ3/6 is presented, and the relationship between the exchange formalisms and the solid-solution models is discussed. The advantages and limitations of the models and currently available thermodynamic data are addressed by comparing cation-exchange compositions of clinoptilolites with (1) published binary exchange data; (2) compositions of coexisting clinoptilolites and formation waters at Yucca Mountain; and (3) experimental sorption isotherms of Cs and Sr on zeolitized tuff.

  18. Iridium containing honeycomb Delafossites by topotactic cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Roudebush, John H; Ross, K A; Cava, R J

    2016-06-01

    We report the structure and magnetic properties of two new iridium-based honeycomb Delafossite compounds, Cu3NaIr2O6 and Cu3LiIr2O6, formed by a topotactic cation exchange reaction. The starting materials Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3, which are based on layers of IrO6 octahedra in a honeycomb lattice separated by layers of alkali ions, are transformed to the title compounds by a topotactic exchange reaction through heating with CuCl below 450 °C; higher temperature reactions cause decomposition. The new compounds display dramatically different magnetic behavior from their parent compounds - Cu3NaIr2O6 has a ferromagnetic like magnetic transition at 10 K, while Cu3LiIr2O6 retains the antiferromagnetic transition temperature of its parent compound but displays significantly stronger dominance of antiferromagnetic coupling between spins. These results reveal that a surprising difference in the magnetic interactions between the magnetic Ir ions has been induced by a change in the non-magnetic interlayer species. A combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction is used for the structure refinement of Cu3NaIr2O6 and both compounds are compared to their parent materials. PMID:27147423

  19. A Scale Model of Cation Exchange for Classroom Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guertal, E. A.; Hattey, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project that developed a scale model of cation exchange that can be used for a classroom demonstration. The model uses kaolinite clay, nails, plywood, and foam balls to enable students to gain a better understanding of the exchange complex of soil clays. (DDR)

  20. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  1. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications. PMID:26796765

  2. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-01-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core–shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core–shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals. PMID:27160371

  3. The hammerhead cleavage reaction in monovalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, E A; Bartel, D P

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Murray et al. (Chem Biol, 1998, 5:587-595) found that the hammerhead ribozyme does not require divalent metal ions for activity if incubated in high (> or =1 M) concentrations of monovalent ions. We further characterized the hammerhead cleavage reaction in the absence of divalent metal. The hammerhead is active in a wide range of monovalent ions, and the rate enhancement in 4 M Li+ is only 20-fold less than that in 10 mM Mg2+. Among the Group I monovalent metals, rate correlates in a log-linear manner with ionic radius. The pH dependence of the reaction is similar in 10 mM Mg2+, 4 M Li+, and 4 M Na+. The exchange-inert metal complex Co(NH3)3+ also supports substantial hammerhead activity. These results suggest that a metal ion does not act as a base in the reaction, and that the effects of different metal ions on hammerhead cleavage rates primarily reflect structural contributions to catalysis. PMID:11345433

  4. Porous Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    This document is a slide presentation that examines the use of a simple templating process to produce hollow ceramic spheres with a pore size of 1 to 10 microns. Using ion exchange process it was determined that the method produces porous ceramic spheres with a unique structure: (i.e., inner sphere surrounded by an outer sphere.)

  5. Revealing controllable nanowire transformation through cationic exchange for RRAM application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Chiu, Chung-Hua; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-05-14

    One dimensional metal oxide nanostructures have attracted much attention owing to their fascinating functional properties. Among them, piezoelectricity and photocatalysts along with their related materials have stirred significant interests and widespread studies in recent years. In this work, we successfully transformed piezoelectric ZnO into photocatalytic TiO2 and formed TiO2/ZnO axial heterostructure nanowires with flat interfaces by solid to solid cationic exchange reactions in high vacuum (approximately 10(-8) Torr) transmission electron microscope (TEM). Kinetic behavior of the single crystalline TiO2 was systematically analyzed. The nanoscale growth rate of TiO2 has been measured using in situ TEM videos. On the basis of the rate, we can control the dimensions of the axial-nanoheterostructure. In addition, the unique Pt/ ZnO / TiO2/ ZnO /Pt heterostructures with complementary resistive switching (CRS) characteristics were designed to solve the important issue of sneak-peak current. The resistive switching behavior was attributed to the migration of oxygen and TiO2 layer served as reservoir, which was confirmed by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis. This study not only supplied a distinct method to explore the transformation mechanisms but also exhibited the potential application of ZnO/TiO2 heterostructure in nanoscale crossbar array resistive random-access memory (RRAM). PMID:24742102

  6. Cu₂Se and Cu Nanocrystals as Local Sources of Copper in Thermally Activated In Situ Cation Exchange.

    PubMed

    Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Manna, Liberato; Longo, Paolo; Buha, Joka; Botton, Gianluigi A; Lazar, Sorin; Kahaly, Mousumi Upadhyay; Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Prato, Mirko; Li, Hongbo; Ghosh, Sandeep; Palazon, Francisco; De Donato, Francesco; Mozo, Sergio Lentijo; Zuddas, Efisio; Falqui, Andrea

    2016-02-23

    Among the different synthesis approaches to colloidal nanocrystals, a recently developed toolkit is represented by cation exchange reactions, where the use of template nanocrystals gives access to materials that would be hardly attainable via direct synthesis. Besides, postsynthetic treatments, such as thermally activated solid-state reactions, represent a further flourishing route to promote finely controlled cation exchange. Here, we report that, upon in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, Cu2Se or Cu nanocrystals deposited on an amorphous solid substrate undergo partial loss of Cu atoms, which are then engaged in local cation exchange reactions with Cu "acceptor" phases represented by rod- and wire-shaped CdSe nanocrystals. This thermal treatment slowly transforms the initial CdSe nanocrystals into Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals, through the complete sublimation of Cd and the partial sublimation of Se atoms. Both Cu "donor" and "acceptor" particles were not always in direct contact with each other; hence, the gradual transfer of Cu species from Cu2Se or metallic Cu to CdSe nanocrystals was mediated by the substrate and depended on the distance between the donor and acceptor nanostructures. Differently from what happens in the comparably faster cation exchange reactions performed in liquid solution, this study shows that slow cation exchange reactions can be performed at the solid state and helps to shed light on the intermediate steps involved in such reactions. PMID:26816347

  7. Cu2Se and Cu Nanocrystals as Local Sources of Copper in Thermally Activated In Situ Cation Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Among the different synthesis approaches to colloidal nanocrystals, a recently developed toolkit is represented by cation exchange reactions, where the use of template nanocrystals gives access to materials that would be hardly attainable via direct synthesis. Besides, postsynthetic treatments, such as thermally activated solid-state reactions, represent a further flourishing route to promote finely controlled cation exchange. Here, we report that, upon in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, Cu2Se or Cu nanocrystals deposited on an amorphous solid substrate undergo partial loss of Cu atoms, which are then engaged in local cation exchange reactions with Cu “acceptor” phases represented by rod- and wire-shaped CdSe nanocrystals. This thermal treatment slowly transforms the initial CdSe nanocrystals into Cu2–xSe nanocrystals, through the complete sublimation of Cd and the partial sublimation of Se atoms. Both Cu “donor” and “acceptor” particles were not always in direct contact with each other; hence, the gradual transfer of Cu species from Cu2Se or metallic Cu to CdSe nanocrystals was mediated by the substrate and depended on the distance between the donor and acceptor nanostructures. Differently from what happens in the comparably faster cation exchange reactions performed in liquid solution, this study shows that slow cation exchange reactions can be performed at the solid state and helps to shed light on the intermediate steps involved in such reactions. PMID:26816347

  8. Effects of exchanged cation on the microporosity of montmorillonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, D.W.; Chiou, C.T.; Eberl, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    The micropore volumes of 2 montmorillonites (SAz- 1 and SWy-1), each exchanged with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) ions, were calculated from the measured vapor adsorption data of N2 and neo-hexane by use of t- and ??s-plots. The corresponding surface areas of the exchanged clays were determined from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) plots of N2 adsorption data. Micropore volumes and surface areas of the samples increased with the size of exchanged cation: TMA > Cs > K> Ca > Na. The SAz-1 exchanged clays showed generally greater micropore volumes and surface areas than the corresponding SWy-1 clays. The vapor adsorption data and d(001) measurements for dry clay samples were used together to evaluate the likely locations and accessibility of clay micropores, especially the relative accessibility of their interlayer spacing. For both source clays exchanged with Na, Ca and K ions, the interlayer spacing appeared to be too small to admit nonpolar gases and the accessible micropores appeared to have dimensions greater than 5.0 A??, the limiting molecular dimension of neo -hexane. In these systems, there was a good consistency of micropore volumes detected by N2 and neo-hexane. When the clays were intercalated with relatively large cations (TMA and possibly Cs), the large layer expansion created additional microporosity, which was more readily accessible to small N2 than to relatively large neo-hexane. Hence, the micropore volume as detected by N2 was greater than that detected by neo-hexane. The micropore volumes with pore dimensions greater than 5 A?? determined for clays exchanged with Na, Ca and K likely resulted from the pores on particle edges and void created by overlap regions of layers. The increase in micropore volumes with pore dimensions less than 5 A?? determined for clays exchanged with TMA and possibly Cs could be caused by opening of the interlayer region by the intercalation of these large cations.

  9. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  10. Chromatographic behaviors of proteins on cation-exchange column.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Guo-Liang; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2004-12-01

    A weak cation-exchanger (XIDACE-WCX) has been synthesized by the indirect method. The chromatographic characteristics of the synthesized packing was studied in detail. The standard protein mixture and lysozyme from egg white were separated with the prepared chromatographic column. The chromatographic thermodynamics of proteins was studied in a wide temperature range. Thermodynamic parameters standard enthalpy change (deltaH0) and standard entropy change (deltaS0) and compensation temperature (beta) at protein denaturation were determined in the chromatographic system. By using obtained deltaS0, the conformational change of proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationship between deltaH0 and deltaS0 can be used to identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in the weak cation-exchange chromatography. The interaction between weak cation-exchanger and metal ions was investigated. Several metal chelate columns were prepared. The effects of introducing metal ion into the naked column on protein retention and the retention mechanism of proteins in the metal chalet affinity chromatography were discussed. PMID:15689030

  11. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopic Studies of Radical Cation Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra in this work is derived by using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schrodinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between beta-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations is derived through the use of a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and syn-sesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl_3 matrix at low temperature. The ESR spectra of the former radical cation exhibit a novel alternating linewidth effect arising from an internal relation between the coupling constants for the four equivalent pairs of hydrogens. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is shown to be the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical) resulting from a symmetry-allowed 1,2-hydrogen shift in the parent radical cation. The nucleophilic endocyclization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran -3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexadiyne have resulted in the first spectroscopic characterization of the radical cation Cope rearrangement, the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5 -hexatetraene radical cation. ESR studies show that the symmetric(C_{rm 2v}) bicyclo (3.3.0) -octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4 -bishomobenzene species) radical cation is

  12. DNA strand exchange stimulated by spontaneous complex formation with cationic comb-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Jong; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2002-10-30

    Cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) composed of a polycation backbone and water-soluble side chains accelerate by 4-5 orders the DNA strand exchange reaction (SER) between double helical DNA and its homologous single-strand DNA. The accelerating effect is considered due to alleviation of counterion association during transitional intermediate formation in sequential displacement pathway. CCCs stabilize not only matured hybrids but also the nucleation complex to accelerate hybridization. PMID:12392411

  13. Exchangeable cation composition of the smectite-rich plate boundary fault at the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Jun; Inaoi, Chisaki; Conin, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    To better understand physicochemical processes in smectite-rich fault zones, we examined exchangeable cation composition of samples from the slip zone of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0) recovered by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343. Our chemical analyses revealed that the exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ are enriched in the slip zone, while Na+ is depleted. K+ shows a complicated depth profile probably due to K fixation. Based on fluid chemistry data, we estimated apparent selectivity coefficients of exchange reactions in the ternary Ca2+-Mg2+-Na+ system. The results suggest that the Na+ to Mg2+ exchange reaction on smectite might have progressed in the slip zone. One explanation for this feature is local progress of the reaction triggered by coseismic thermogenesis during the earthquake. Considering that the frictional property of smectite gouge is dependent on the exchangeable cation composition, chemical processes as observed in this study are intimately linked to physical aspect of smectite-bearing faults.

  14. Fast doping of Cu into ZnSe NCs by hydrazine promoted cation exchange in aqueous solution at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haibao; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Yin, Haihong; Cui, Yiping

    2015-03-01

    Controllable doping is an effective way of tuning the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). In this work, a simple strategy of fast doping Cu ions into ZnSe NCs under ambient conditions was proposed. The principle of doping is based on hydrazine (N2H4) promoted cation exchange reaction. By direct addition of Cu ion stock solution into the preformed ZnSe NCs, Cu doped ZnSe NCs can be obtained. Furthermore, the emission of doped NCs can be tuned by changing the amount of impurity ion addition. The cation exchange reaction is facilitated by three factors: 1) N2H4 addition, 2) fast impurity ions, and 3) partial stabilizer removal. The proposed cation exchange reaction in aqueous solution could be an alternate route for NC doping as well as synthesis of ionic NCs. PMID:25605441

  15. Using reactive artificial muscles to determine water exchange during reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, T. F.; Martínez, J. G.; Zaifoglu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Artificial muscles based on films of conducting polymers translate film volume variations, driven by electrochemical reactions (Faradaic motors), into macroscopic movements with generation of mechanical energy. The reaction promotes exchange of counterions (anions here) and solvent molecules with the electrolyte. Attributing here both the film volume variation and the movement originated by these exchanges of ions and solvent, the described angles can be used to quantify the exchanged solvent. Different angles described by bending muscles consuming equal driving charges in electrolytes having the same cation and different anions were measured. The number of exchanged counterions is given by the consumed charge and the ion valence: this is a Faradaic reaction. The described angle fraction due to the exchanged anions is given by the number of anions and the crystallographic radius. Taking as reference the anion giving the shorter angle, whatever the consumed charge, the relative number of solvent molecules exchanged by the polymeric membrane during a reversible reaction was determined. Actuators and artificial muscles can be used as useful tools for, at least, an initial study of the solvent exchange during reactions in reactive gels.

  16. Solubility and cation exchange in phosphate rock and saturated clinoptilolite mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Mixtures of zeolite and phosphate rock (PR) have the potential to provide slow-release fertilization of plants in synthetic soils by dissolution and ion-exchange reactions. This study was conducted to examine solubility and cation-exchange relationships in mixtures of PR and NH4- and K-saturated clinoptilolite (Cp). Batch-equilibration experiments were designed to investigate the effect of PR source, the proportion of exchangeable K and NH4, and the Cp to PR ratio on solution N, P, K, and Ca concentrations. The dissolution and cation-exchange reactions that occurred after mixing NH4- and K-saturated Cp with PR increased the solubility of the PR and simultaneously released NH4 and K into solution. The more reactive North Carolina (NC) PR rendered higher solution concentrations of NH4 and K when mixed with Cp than did Tennessee (TN) PR. Solution P concentrations for the Cp-NC PR mixture and the Cp-TN PR mixture were similar. Solution concentrations of N, P, K, and Ca and the ratios of these nutrients in solution varied predictably with the type of PR, the Cp/PR ratio, and the proportions of exchangeable K and NH4 on the Cp. Our research indicated that slow-release fertilization using Cp/PR media may provide adequate levels of N, P, and K to support plant growth. Solution Ca concentrations were lower than optimum for plant growth.

  17. The Kinetics of Isotopic Exchange Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the kinetic interactions of these chemical processes and the determination of the actual order of such reactions. Included are multiple exchange, catalytic exchange with deuterium, and depletion of the original substrate. (CW)

  18. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  19. CATIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Choppin, G.R.; Thompson, S.G.; Harvey, B.G.

    1960-02-16

    A process for separating mixtures of elements in the lanthanum and actinium series of the periodic table is described. The mixture of elements is dissolved in 0.05 M HCI, wherein the elements exist as tripositive ions. The resulting solution is then transferred to a column of cationic exchange resin and the column eluted with 0.1 to 0.6 M aqueous ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate solution of pH 3.8 to 5.0. The use of ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate as an eluting agent results in sharper and more rapid separations than previously obtainable with eluants such as citric, tartaric, glycolic, and lactic acids.

  20. The Ziegler—Natta olefin insertion reaction for cationic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Vidar R.; Siegban, Per E. M.

    1993-09-01

    The catalytic Ziegler—Natta polymerization reaction has been studied for a set of metal cations, in order to identify the role of the positive charge on this process. Geometry optimizations have been performed for the reactant metal—methyl systems, the π-coordinated olefin systems, the transition states for the olefin insertion and finally for the product metal—propyl systems. All valence electrons are correlated. The cations selected for this study are the transition metals Zr + and Ti +, the non-transition metals Be +, Mg +, Al + and finally also Si +. The transition metal cations are found to have very low barriers for the insertion, but the lowest barrier is actually found for Be +. The results are discussed in terms of the ionization energies and the accessibility to valence p and d orbitals. Comparisons are made to previous theoretical work on cationic model systems.

  1. Chemistry of alkali cation exchanged faujasite and mesoporous NaX using alkyl halides and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Hong

    The purpose of this work was to increase the reactivity of Faujasite X (NaX) zeolite toward the reactive decontamination of materials subject to nucleophilic attack by means of zeolite cation optimization and by means of the synthesis of mesoporous Faujasite X. Primary alkyl halides and trialkyl phosphates have been the test materials on which the cation-optimized and mesoporous zeolites have been tested. In the alkali cation optimization work, reactions of methyl iodide and 1-chloropropane with alkali metal cation exchanged Faujasite zeolite X were investigated at room temperature. The reactivity of the framework and the product formation were shown to depend on zeolite framework counter-cation. A quantitative study of zeolite product formation has been carried out, primarily using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Large alkali cations showed preference toward substitution chemistry. In contrast, alkyl halide exposed LiX and NaX zeolites underwent both substitution and elimination. Subsequently introduced water molecules led to hydrolysis of framework species that was sensitive to framework counter-cation. The mesoporous NaX zeolites work undertakes to test whether an improvement in surface chemical reactivity can be achieved by introducing mesopores into the already reactive nucleophilic microporous NaX zeolite. Incorporation of the polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) template and the formation of mesopores in Faujasite X zeolite (NaX) were successful and well-characterized. The mesopores are proposed to have occurred from incorporation of the cationic PDADMAC polymer into the zeolite by compensating zeolite framework charge. Subsequent sodium cation exchange of calcined mesoporous NaX was shown to restore the chemical reactivity characteristic of as-synthesized NaX. Trialkyl organophosphorous compounds underwent substitution reactions. The reactivity of both microporous and mesoporous Faujasite zeolite X and the product formation was shown to depend on

  2. The cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily: phylogenetic analysis and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinjiang; Lytton, Jonathan

    2004-09-01

    Cation/Ca(2+) exchangers are an essential component of Ca(2+) signaling pathways and function to transport cytosolic Ca(2+) across membranes against its electrochemical gradient by utilizing the downhill gradients of other cation species such as H(+), Na(+), or K(+). The cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily is composed of H(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, which have been investigated extensively in both plant cells and animal cells. Recently, information from completely sequenced genomes of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes has revealed the presence of genes that encode homologues of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers in many organisms in which the role of these exchangers has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, we report a comprehensive sequence alignment and the first phylogenetic analysis of the cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily of 147 sequences. The results present a framework for structure-function relationships of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers, suggesting unique signature motifs of conserved residues that may underlie divergent functional properties. Construction of a phylogenetic tree with inclusion of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers with known functional properties defines five protein families and the evolutionary relationships between the members. Based on this analysis, the cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily is classified into the YRBG, CAX, NCX, and NCKX families and a newly recognized family, designated CCX. These findings will provide guides for future studies concerning structures, functions, and evolutionary origins of the cation/Ca(2+) exchangers. PMID:15163769

  3. Assessing the role of cation exchange in controlling groundwater chemistry during fluid mixing in fractured granite at Aspo, Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    Geochemical modeling was used to simulate the mixing of dilute shallow groundwater with deeper more saline groundwater in the fractured granite of the Redox Zone at the Aespoe underground Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Fluid mixing simulations were designed to assess the role that cation exchange plays in controlling the composition of fluids entering the HRL via fracture flow. Mixing simulations included provision for the effects of mineral precipitation and cation exchange on fluid composition. Because the predominant clay mineral observed in fractures in the Redox Zone has been identified as illite or mixed layer illite smectite, an exchanger with the properties of illite was used to simulate cation exchange. Cation exchange on illite was modeled using three exchange sites, a planar or basal plane site with properties similar to smectite, and two edge sites that have very high affinities for K, Rb, and Cs. Each site was assumed to obey an ideal Vanselow exchange model, and exchange energies for each site were taken from the literature. The predicted behaviors of Na, Ca, and Mg during mixing were similar to those reported in a previous study in which smectite was used as the model for the exchanger. The trace elements Cs and Rb were predicted to be strongly associated with the illite exchanger, and the predicted concentrations of Cs in fracture fill were in reasonable agreement with reported chemical analyses of exchangeable Cs in fracture fill. The results of the geochemical modeling suggest that Na, Ca, and Sr concentrations in the fluid phase may be controlled by cation exchange reactions that occur during mixing, but that Mg appears to behave conservatively. There is currently not enough data to make conclusions regarding the behavior of Cs and Rb.

  4. Cationic Covalent Organic Frameworks: A Simple Platform of Anionic Exchange for Porosity Tuning and Proton Conduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heping; Liu, Bailing; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yang-Guang; Tan, Hua-Qiao; Zang, Hong-Ying; Zhu, Guangshan

    2016-05-11

    Mimicking proton conduction mechanism of Nafion to construct novel proton-conducting materials with low cost and high proton conductivity is of wide interest. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a cationic covalent organic framework with high thermal and chemical stability by combining a cationic monomer, ethidium bromide (EB) (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide), with 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol (TFP) in Schiff base reactions. This is the first time that the stable cationic crystalline frameworks allowed for the fabrication of a series of charged COFs (EB-COF:X, X = F, Cl, Br, I) through ion exchange processes. Exchange of the extra framework ions can finely modulate the COFs' porosity and pore sizes at nanoscale. More importantly, by introducing PW12O40(3-) into this porous cationic framework, we can greatly enhance the proton conductivity of ionic COF-based material. To the best of our knowledge, EB-COF:PW12 shows the best proton conductivity at room temperature among ever reported porous organic materials. PMID:27094048

  5. Mobilization of Roadside Soil Cation Pools by Exchange with Road Deicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past sixty years, road deicers (i.e., road salt) have been applied to roadways in high latitudes to improve traffic conditions in winter weather. However, the dissolution of road deicers in highway runoff create waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS), specifically high concentrations of sodium, which can mobilize soil metals via soil cation exchange reactions. While several studies have detailed the interactions of high TDS solutions and surface and ground waters, limited attention is paid to the impacts of high TDS solutions on near-road soils. Between 2013 and 2014, soil water samples were collected from a roadside transect of lysimeter nests in Pittsburgh, PA. Soil water samples were analyzed for metal concentrations and resulting data used to examine cation dynamics. Patterns in soil water calcium and magnesium concentrations follow patterns in soil water sodium concentrations. In our samples, the highest major cation concentrations are found at the deepest lysimeters, suggesting major cations are mobilized to, and potentially accumulate in, deeper soil horizons. Concentration peaks in the downslope soil waters lag concentration peaks at the near-road nest by two months, indicating that road salt plumes persist and migrate following the road salting season. Characterizing the interactions of high TDS solutions and roadside soil cation pools clarifies our understanding of metal dynamics in the roadside environment. A deeper understanding of these processes is necessary to effectively restore and manage watersheds as high TDS solutions (i.e., road deicing, hydraulic fracturing, and marginal irrigation water) increasingly influence ecosystem function.

  6. Insights into cation exchange selectivity of a natural clinoptilolite by means of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gerardo; Devautour-Vinot, Sabine; Diaby, Sekou; Henn, François

    2011-09-01

    Purified natural clinoptilolite from the Tasajeras deposit, Cuba, and some of its metal exchanged forms are studied, at the dehydrated state, by means of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) using two different modus operandi: complex impedance spectroscopy and dielectric dynamic thermal analysis. Data analysis yields the determination of the extra-framework cation (EFC) population into the various possible crystallographic sites of the zeolitic framework as well as of the activation energy characterizing the localized hopping mechanism of EFC. First, it is shown that the DRS responses obtained here match well with the previous reported data, which were previously localized EFCs in positions close to M1 and M2 sites when the clinoptilolite is modified to almost homoionic form. From this outcome, it can be concluded that all EFCs are in the same crystallographic situation regarding solvation or, in other terms, that no steric effect can be taken into account to explain cationic selectivity. Second, based on the assumption that the activation energy for EFC hopping is directly connected to the EFC/framework interaction and on simple thermodynamics consideration, we show this interaction does not govern the EFC exchange reaction. So, it is emphasized that EFC/H2O interaction is the key factor for cation exchange selectivity.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Cotton Textile Graft Copolymers as Cation Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Kh. M.

    2005-03-01

    Acrylic Acid (AA) was graft copolymerized with cotton cellulose in fabric form to prepare poly (AA)-cotton graft copolymer cation exchanger using Fe2+/BrO3- redox system in aqueous medium under a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of Fe2+, BrO3- and monomer concentrations, pH as well as time and temperature of polymerization were studied by determining the grafting parameters gravimetrically, like Graft Yield (GY %) and Graft Reaction Efficiency (GRE %). On the other hand, the newly prepared poly (AA)-cotton graft copolymers were characterized for different heavy metals ions removal to determined their suitability as cation exchanger. On the basis of a detailed investigation of the above factors, the appropriate conditions for grafting were as follows: Fe2+, 0.005 mol L-1; BrO3-, 0.001 mol L-1; pH, 2; monomer, (50% based on weight of substrate); time, 90 min and temperature, 35°C. On the other hand, the potential value of the newly prepared poly (AA)-cotton graft copolymer to serve as cation exchanger was assessed through measurements of critical properties such as removal of different heavy metal ions from their solutions as well as durability.

  8. Several textural properties of compacted and cation-exchanged bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Hernandez, G.; Duplay, J.; Géraud, Y.; Martinez, L.

    2006-08-01

    One of the principal applications for bentonite is in drilling muds. Moreover it is widely used as a suspending and stabilizing agent, and as an adsorbent or clarifying agent, in many industries. Recently the bentonites have been proposed as engineered barriers for radioactive waste repository because these materials are supposed to build up a better impermeable zone around wastes by swelling. For these reasons, a textural characterization of bentonites in the laboratory is very important. The aim in this study was to estimate several textural properties of compacted and cation-exchanged bentonite by using Hg-porosimetry, N2-adsorption, water vapour adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and environmental scanning electron microscopy-digital images analysis measurements. For that, bulk samples were mechanically compressed at atmospheric conditions by using a uniaxial system at four different pressures (21, 35, 49, and 63 MPa) in order to obtain four physical densities. On the other hand, the bulk samples of bentonite were treated separately with four concentrated solutions (1N concentration) of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides in order to obtain a homoionic interlayer cation in the clay phase. The results showed that the macro-porosity (porous size>50 nm) and eventually the mesoporosity (porous size 2 50 nm) are affected by the uniaxial compaction. In this case, a transformation of the shape of the macro-pores network from tube to crack was observed. On the other hand, the swelling potential and water content are governed by the relative humidity and by the nature of interlayer cation.

  9. Monoclonal antibody capture and viral clearance by cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, G R; Lute, S; Strauss, D M; Read, E K; Venkiteshwaran, A; Kreuzman, A; Shah, R; Shamlou, P; Chen, D; Brorson, K

    2012-08-01

    Traditionally, post-production culture harvest capture of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is performed using Protein A chromatography. We investigated the efficiency and robustness of cation exchange chromatography (CEX) in an effort to evaluate alternative capture methodologies. Up to five commercially available CEX resins were systematically evaluated using an experimentally optimized buffer platform and a design-of-experiment (DoE) approach for their ability to (a) capture a model mAb with a neutral isoelectric point, (b) clear three model viruses (porcine parvovirus, CHO type-C particles, and a bacteriophage). This approach identified a narrow operating space where yield, purity, and viral clearance were optimal under a CEX capture platform, and revealed trends between viral clearance of PPV and product purity (but not yield). Our results suggest that after unit operation optimization, CEX can serve as a suitable capture step. PMID:22488719

  10. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Sopher, David W.

    1984-01-01

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100.degree. C. and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  11. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Sopher, D.W.

    1983-05-09

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100/sup 0/C and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  12. Solid-solid phase transformations induced through cation exchange and strain in 2D heterostructured copper sulfide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ha, Don-Hyung; Caldwell, Andrew H; Ward, Matthew J; Honrao, Shreyas; Mathew, Kiran; Hovden, Robert; Koker, Margaret K A; Muller, David A; Hennig, Richard G; Robinson, Richard D

    2014-12-10

    We demonstrate dual interface formation in nanocrystals (NCs) through cation exchange, creating epitaxial heterostructures within spherical NCs. The thickness of the inner-disk layer can be tuned to form two-dimensional (2D), single atomic layers (<1 nm). During the cation exchange reaction from copper sulfide to zinc sulfide (ZnS), we observe a solid-solid phase transformation of the copper sulfide phase in heterostructured NCs. As the cation exchange reaction is initiated, Cu ions replaced by Zn ions at the interfaces are accommodated in intrinsic Cu vacancy sites present in the initial roxbyite (Cu1.81S) phase of copper sulfide, inducing a full phase transition to djurleite (Cu1.94S)/low chalcocite (Cu2S), a more thermodynamically stable phase than roxbyite. As the reaction proceeds and reduces the size of the copper sulfide layer, the epitaxial strain at the interfaces between copper sulfide and ZnS increases and is maximized for a copper sulfide disk ∼ 5 nm thick. To minimize this strain energy, a second phase transformation occurs back to the roxbyite phase, which shares a similar sulfur sublattice to wurtzite ZnS. The observation of a solid-solid phase transformation in our unique heterostructured NCs provides a new pathway to control desired phases and an insight into the influence of cation exchange on nanoscale phase transitions in heterostructured materials. PMID:25337657

  13. Electron transfer reactions within zeolites: Radical cation from benzonorbornadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchumani, K.; Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R.

    1996-08-28

    Zeolites are being used as solid acid catalysts in a number of commercial processes. Occasionally zeolites are also reported to perform as electron transfer agents. Recently, we observed that radical cations of certain olefins and thiophene oligomers can be generated spontaneously within ZSM-5 zeolites. We noticed that these radical cations generated from diphenyl polyenes and thiophene oligomers were remarkably stable (at room temperature) within ZSM-5 and can be characterized spectroscopically at leisure. We have initiated a program on electron transfer processes within large pore zeolites. The basis of this approach is that once a cation radical is generated within a large pore zeolite, it will have sufficient room to undergo a molecular transformation. Our aim is to identify a condition under which electron transfer can be routinely and reliably carried out within large pore zeolites such as faujasites. To our great surprise, when benzonorbornadiene A and a number of olefins were included in divalent cation exchanged faujasites. they were transformed into products very quickly (<15 min). This observation allowed us to explore the use of zeolites as oxidants. Results of our studies on benzonorbornadiene are presented in this communication. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The kinetics of cation exchange of amorphized terskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Kazakov, A. I.; Pekov, I. V.; Grigor'eva, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The kinetics of cation exchange between natural amorphized microporous zirconosilicate terskite Na4ZrSi6O15(OH)2 · H2O and aqueous solutions of cesium fluoride was studied calorimetrically under isothermal conditions, in the temperature range of 27.5 to 55.2°C, at CsF concentrations of 0.6-2.2 mol/l. The rate of the process was described by the first-order kinetic equation with the rate constant k, h-1 = 3.1 × 103 C {CsF/0.92} exp(-(21 ± 8) × 103/ RT). Upon replacing Na+ with Cs+, the first-order equilibrium was observed to shift abruptly toward the Cs-substituted sorbent form, where Cs2O content after saturation was 25.5-29.1 wt %. The average heat of ion exchange Q 0 over the temperature range 27.5-32.4°C was shown to be ˜3.4 kJ per 1 mol of Na+ ions. We conclude that sorbents based on A-terskite are of practical interest for the processes of extracting 137Cs isotope from water.

  15. Cation exchange pretreatment studies for high recovery - Yuma desalting plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kaakinen, J.W.; Laverty, P.E.

    1983-10-01

    The main purpose of the High Recovery Test Program was to obtain feasibility design data for cation exchange softening to allow a greater fractional recovery of desalted product water at the YDP(Yuma Desalting Plant). Compared to the original YDP design with 70-percent desalting recovery, additional removal of calcium in the desalting feed would allow recoveries over 90 percent. Pilot plant equipment to test this process was operated at the YDTF(Yuma Desalting Test Facility) and consisted of an IX unit and an electrodialyzer to supply reject-brine regenerant for the IX experiments. Gypsum scale buildup in the resin bed could be avoided by regeneration with a high upward flow rate causing a fluidized bed. Reuse of regenerant was also beneficial. Results show that the ion exchange high recovery pretreatment process is highly feasible, and that it is technically possible to achieve high recovery in the YDP. Numerous recommendations for a plant design are given and future studies are noted.

  16. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. PMID:26624231

  17. Multinucleon exchange in quasifission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayik, S.; Yilmaz, B.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-12-01

    The nucleon exchange mechanism is investigated in the central collisions of 40Ca+238U and 48Ca+238U systems near the quasifission regime in the framework of the stochastic mean-field (SMF) approach. Sufficiently below the fusion barrier, a dinuclear structure in the collisions is maintained to a large extent. Consequently, it is possible to describe nucleon exchange as a diffusion process familiar from deep-inelastic collisions. Diffusion coefficients for proton and neutron exchange are determined from the microscopic basis of the SMF approach in the semiclassical framework. Calculations show that after a fast charge equilibration the system drifts toward symmetry over a very long interaction time. Large dispersions of proton and neutron distributions of the produced fragments indicate that the diffusion mechanism may help to populate heavy transuranium elements near the quasifission regime in these collisions.

  18. Nucleon exchange in damped nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.

    1986-04-01

    Starting from the general context of one-body nuclear dynamics, the nucleon-exchange mechanism in damped nuclear reactions is discussed. Some of its characteristic effects on various dinuclear observables are highlighted and a few recent advances are described.

  19. Influence of pine bark particle size and pH on cation exchange capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) describes the maximum quantity of cations a soil or substrate can hold while being exchangeable with the soil solution. While CEC has been studied for peat-based substrates, relatively little work has documented factors that affect CEC of pine bark substrates. The ob...

  20. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo L.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2012-05-01

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Ni2+ in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH4) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 °C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200-600 °C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 °C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 °C reached a plateau or steady-state within the first 24 h increasing only marginally up 120 h

  1. Cationic zinc organyls as precatalysts for hydroamination reactions.

    PubMed

    Chilleck, Maren A; Hartenstein, Larissa; Braun, Thomas; Roesky, Peter W; Braun, Beatrice

    2015-02-01

    The cationic zinc triple-decker complex [Zn2 Cp*3 ](+) [BAr(F) 4 ](-) (BAr(F) 4 =B(3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 )4 ) exhibits catalytic activity in intra- and intermolecular hydroamination reactions in the absence of a cocatalyst. These hydroaminations presumably proceed through the activation of the C-C multiple bond of the alkene or alkyne by a highly electrophilic zinc species, which is formed upon elimination of the Cp* ligands. The reaction of [Zn2 Cp*3 ](+) [BAr(F) 4 ](-) with henylacetylene gives the hydrocarbonation product (Cp*)(Ph)CCH2 , which might be formed via a similar reaction pathway. Additionally, several other structurally well-defined cationic zinc organyls have been examined as precatalysts for intermolecular hydroamination reactions without the addition of a cocatalyst. These studies reveal that the highest activity is achieved in the absence of any donor ligands. The neutral complex [ZnCp(2S) 2 ] (Cp(2S) =C5 Me4 (CH2 )2 SMe) shows a remarkably high catalytic activity in the presence of a Brønsted acid. PMID:25522205

  2. Using satellite data for soil cation exchange capacity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, M.; Astaraei, A. R.; Sanaeinejad, S. H.; Zare, H.

    2013-12-01

    This study was planned to examine the use of LandSat ETM+ images to develop a model for monitoring spatial variability of soil cation exchange capacity in a semi-arid area of Neyshaboor. 300 field data were collected from specific GPS registered points, 277 of which were error free, to be analysed in the soil laboratory.The statistical analysis showed that therewas a small R-Squared value, 0.17, when we used the whole data set. Visual interpretation of the graphs showed a trend among some of the data in the data set. Forty points were filtered based on the trends, and the statistical analysis was repeated for those data. It was discovered that the 40 series were more or less in the same environmental conditions; most of them were located in disturbed soils or abandoned lands with sparse vegetation cover. The soil was classified into high and medium salinity, with variable carbon (1.0 to 1.6%), heavy textured and with high silt and clay. Finally it was concluded that two different models could be fitted in the data based on their spatial dependency. The current models are able to explain spatial variability in almost 45 to 65% of the cases.

  3. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange complex. Adsorption to the clays was essentially immediate and was correlated with the cation-exchange capacity of the clays, indicating that adsorption was primarily to negatively charged sites on the clays. Adsorption was greater with low concentrations of clays in estuarine water than in distilled water, as the higher ionic strength of the estuarine water reduced the electrokinetic potential of both clay and virus particles. The addition of cations (as chloride salts) to distilled water enhanced adsorption, with divalent cations being more effective than monovalent cations and 10(-2) M resulting in more adsorption than 10(-3) M. Potassium ions suppressed reovirus adsorption to montmorillonite, probably by collapsing the clay lattices and preventing the expression of the interlayer-derived cation-exchange capacity. More virus was adsorbed by montmorillonite made homoionic to various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations (except by montmorillonite homoionic to potassium) than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite homoionic to the same cations. The sequence of the amount of adsorption to homoionic montmorillonite was Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than Na greater than K; the sequence of adsorption to kaolinite was Na greater than Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than K. The constant partition-type adsorption isotherms obtained when the clay concentration was maintained constant and the virus concentration was varied indicated that a fixed proportion of the

  4. Mechanistic views on aromatic substitution reactions by gaseous cations.

    PubMed

    Fornarini, S

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the gas-phase reaction of aromatics with cationic electrophiles in a thermally equilibrated domain are described. The overall substitution reaction is analyzed in terms of its elementary steps. Their contribution to the overall reactivity pattern is dissected by the use of selected systems, which allowed one to highlight the kinetic role of single elementary events. Mechanistic studies have focused on the structure and reactivity of covalent and non-covalent ionic intermediates, which display a rich chemistry and provide benchmark reactivity models. Particular interest has been devoted to proton transfer reactions, which may occur in either an intra- or intermolecular fashion in arenium intermediates. A quantitative study of their rates and associated kinetic isotope effects is reported. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Mass Spectrom Rev 15(6), 365-389, 1997. PMID:27082944

  5. Controlled methyl-esterification of pectin catalyzed by cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaoxia; Yang, Guang; Fan, Xingchen; Bai, Yeming; Ren, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yifa

    2016-02-10

    This study developed a new method to methyl-esterify pectin using a cation exchange resin. Homogalacturonan (HG)-type pectin (WGPA-3-HG) and rhamnogalacturonan (RG)-I-type pectin (AHP-RG) obtained from the roots of Panax ginseng and sunflower heads, respectively, were used as models. Compared to commonly used methyl-esterification methods that use either methyl iodide or acidified methanol, the developed method can methyl-esterify both HG- and RG-I-type pectins without degrading their structures via β-elimination or acid hydrolysis. In addition, by modifying reaction conditions, including the mass ratio of resin to pectin, reaction time, and temperature, the degree of esterification can be controlled. Moreover, the resin and methanol can be recycled to conserve resources, lower costs, and reduce environmental pollution. This new methodology will be highly useful for industrial esterification of pectin. PMID:26686175

  6. Determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeva, N. M.; Bocharnikova, Yu. I.; Belousov, P. E.; Zhigarev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    A way of determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis is developed using as an example the bentonites of the 10th Khutor deposit (Republic of Khakassia) and the Vodopadnyi area (Sakhalin Island). A correlation is established between the cation exchange capacity of smectite and its weight loss upon heating in the range of dehydration; the enthalpy of dehydration of montmorillonite; and the weight loss and the enthalpy of thermal dissociation of ethylene glycol contained in the interlayer space of the mineral's crystal structure. These data open up new possibilities for determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite, the most important technological indicator of the natural clay nanomineral.

  7. Preparation of poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) weak acid cation exchange stationary phases with succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junwei; Wang, Yong; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) microspheres were prepared and applied for the preparation of weak acid cation exchange stationary phases. Succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride were selected as carboxylation reagents to prepare three weak acid cation exchangers by direct chemical derivatization reaction without solvent or catalyst. The diameters and dispersity of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; the amount of accessible epoxy groups and mechanical stability were also measured. The weak acid cation exchangers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; the content of carboxyl groups was measured by traditional acid base titration method. The chromatographic properties were characterized and compared by separating alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium and polar amines. The separation properties enhanced in the order of succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride modified poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) cation exchangers. PMID:27288092

  8. Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capcity in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Liang,B.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Kinyangi, J.; Grossman, J.; ONeill, B.; Skjemstad, J.; Thies, J.; Luizao, F.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Black Carbon (BC) may significantly affect nutrient retention and play a key role in a wide range of biogeochemical processes in soils, especially for nutrient cycling. Anthrosols from the Brazilian Amazon (ages between 600 and 8700 yr BP) with high contents of biomass-derived BC had greater potential cation exchange capacity (CEC measured at pH 7) per unit organic C than adjacent soils with low BC contents. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques explained the source of the higher surface charge of BC compared with non-BC by mapping cross-sectional areas of BC particles with diameters of 10 to 50 {micro}m for C forms. The largest cross-sectional areas consisted of highly aromatic or only slightly oxidized organic C most likely originating from the BC itself with a characteristic peak at 286.1 eV, which could not be found in humic substance extracts, bacteria or fungi. Oxidation significantly increased from the core of BC particles to their surfaces as shown by the ratio of carboxyl-C/aromatic-C. Spotted and non-continuous distribution patterns of highly oxidized C functional groups with distinctly different chemical signatures on BC particle surfaces (peak shift at 286.1 eV to a higher energy of 286.7 eV) indicated that non-BC may be adsorbed on the surfaces of BC particles creating highly oxidized surface. As a consequence of both oxidation of the BC particles themselves and adsorption of organic matter to BC surfaces, the charge density (potential CEC per unit surface area) was greater in BC-rich Anthrosols than adjacent soils. Additionally, a high specific surface area was attributable to the presence of BC, which may contribute to the high CEC found in soils that are rich in BC.

  9. Cation Exchange Synthesis and Unusual Resistive Switching Behaviors of Ag2Se Nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng; Li, Min-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2015-12-16

    Ag2Se nanobelts are prepared through employing ZnSe nanobelts as templates via a facile cation exchange approach. The templates are derived from precursor ZnSe·0.5N2 H4 nanobelts, which are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. As-synthesized precursor nanobelts are with 200 nm in width and several hundreds of micrometers in length. Annealed in N2 , they are transformed into ZnSe nanobelts with preserving their initial morphology. Following with a complete replacement of Zn(2+) by Ag(+), Ag2Se nanobelts with single crystalline are obtained via a cation-exchange reaction. Combined with the Langmuir-Blodgett assembly technique, regular films of ZnSe nanobelts can be achieved on transparent glass substrates and Si wafers with interdigital Au electrode arrays. Further, the optical and electrical evolutions are investigated from ZnSe nanobelts to Ag2 Se nanobelts. Finally, the resistive switching characteristic are carefully explored for Ag2Se nanobelts regularly arranged on interdigital Au microelectrodes. The results indicate that it is analogous to complementary resistive switching behaviors, which is different from that of traditional two terminal devices about previously reported Ag2Se. In order to clarify this phenomenon, a possible mechanism has been proposed and indirectly demonstrated through in situ SEM (scanning electron microscropy) observation. PMID:26509434

  10. Light-induced cation exchange for copper sulfide based CO2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Aurora; Simon, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Clemens; Döblinger, Markus; Wyrwich, Regina; Stern, Omar; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-11-11

    Copper(I)-based catalysts, such as Cu2S, are considered to be very promising materials for photocatalytic CO2 reduction. A common synthesis route for Cu2S via cation exchange from CdS nanocrystals requires Cu(I) precursors, organic solvents, and neutral atmosphere, but these conditions are not compatible with in situ applications in photocatalysis. Here we propose a novel cation exchange reaction that takes advantage of the reducing potential of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band of CdS and proceeds with Cu(II) precursors in an aqueous environment and under aerobic conditions. We show that the synthesized Cu2S photocatalyst can be efficiently used for the reduction of CO2 to carbon monoxide and methane, achieving formation rates of 3.02 and 0.13 μmol h(-1) g(-1), respectively, and suppressing competing water reduction. The process opens new pathways for the preparation of new efficient photocatalysts from readily available nanostructured templates. PMID:26479775

  11. NUTRIENT LEACHING FROM CONIFER NEEDLES IN RELATION TO FOLIAR APOPLAST CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limited evidence to date suggests that acidic precipitation promotes leaching of nutrient cations from conifer foliage. n order to evaluate the relative contribution of the apoplast cation exchange complex and symplast nutrient pools to the leached ions, the magnitude of potentia...

  12. Calcium Solubility and Cation Exchange Properties in Zeoponic Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, Raymond E.

    1999-01-01

    An important aspect of a regenerative life support system at a Lunar or Martian outpost is the ability to produce food. Essential plant nutrients, as well as a solid support substrate, can be provided by: (1) treated Lunar or Martian regolith; (2) a synthetic soil or (3) some combination of both. A synthetic soil composed of ammonium- and potassium-saturated chinoptlolite (a zeolite mineral) and apatite, can provide slow-release fertilization of plants via dissolution and ion-exchange reactions. Previous equilibrium studies (Beiersdorfer, 1997) on mixtures of synthetic hydroxyapatite and saturated-clinoptilolite indicate that the concentrations of macro-nutrients such as ammonium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, and calcium are a function of the ratio of chinoptilolite to apatite in the sample and to the ratio of potassium to ammonium on the exchange sites in the clinoptilolite. Potassium, ammonium, phosphorous, and magnesium are available to plants at sufficient levels. However, calcium is deficient, due to the high degree of calcium adsorption by the clinoptilolite. Based on a series of batch-equilibration experiments, this calcium deficiency can be reduced by (1) treating the clinoptilolite with CaNO3 or (2) adding a second Ca-bearing mineral (calcite, dolomite or wollastonite) to the soil. Treating the Cp with CaNO3 results in increased Ca in solution, decreased P in solution and decreased NH4 in solution. Concentrations of K were not effected by the CaNO3 treatment. Additions of Cal, Dol and Wol changed the concentrations of Ca and P in solution in a systematic fashion. Cal has the greatest effect, Dol the least and Wol is intermediate. The changes are consistent with changes expected for a common ion effect with Ca. Higher concentrations of Ca in solution with added Cal, Dol or Wol do not result in changes in K or NH4 concentrations.

  13. Aspects of the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, O. N.; Khokhlov, V. Yu.; Trunaeva, E. S.; Nechaeva, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    The structure formed in a sorbent during the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8 is optimized via quantum chemical simulation. The differential thermodynamic characteristics of ion exchange and super-equivalent sorption in the studied system are calculated using a thermodynamic approach that allows us to describe the simultaneous exchange and super-equivalent sorption of compounds by ion-exchangers.

  14. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. PMID:27130093

  15. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T.

    2012-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for 12C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  16. The load and release characteristics on a strong cationic ion-exchange fiber: kinetics, thermodynamics, and influences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Che, Xin; Xu, Lu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-01-01

    Ion-exchange fibers were different from conventional ion-exchange resins in their non-cross-linked structure. The exchange was located on the surface of the framework, and the transport resistance reduced significantly, which might mean that the exchange is controlled by an ionic reaction instead of diffusion. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the load and release characteristics of five model drugs with the strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1. Drugs were loaded using a batch process and released in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) dissolution apparatus 2. Opposing exchange kinetics, suitable for the special structure of the fiber, were developed for describing the exchange process with the help of thermodynamics, which illustrated that the load was controlled by an ionic reaction. The molecular weight was the most important factor to influence the drug load and release rate. Strong alkalinity and rings in the molecular structures made the affinity between the drug and fiber strong, while logP did not cause any profound differences. The drug–fiber complexes exhibited sustained release. Different kinds and concentrations of counter ions or different amounts of drug–fiber complexes in the release medium affected the release behavior, while the pH value was independent of it. The groundwork for in-depth exploration and further application of ion-exchange fibers has been laid. PMID:25114504

  17. Selective Cation Exchange in the Core Region of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We studied cation exchange (CE) in core/shell Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS nanorods with two cations, Ag+ and Hg2+, which are known to induce rapid exchange within metal chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) at room temperature. At the initial stage of the reaction, the guest ions diffused through the Cu2–xS shell and reached the Cu2–xSe core, replacing first Cu+ ions within the latter region. These experiments prove that CE in copper chalcogenide NCs is facilitated by the high diffusivity of guest cations in the lattice, such that they can probe the whole host structure and identify the preferred regions where to initiate the exchange. For both guest ions, CE is thermodynamically driven as it aims for the formation of the chalcogen phase characterized by the lower solubility under the specific reaction conditions. PMID:26360611

  18. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Metal Oxide Nanocrystal Heterostructures by Cation Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For three types of colloidal magnetic nanocrystals, we demonstrate that postsynthetic cation exchange enables tuning of the nanocrystal’s magnetic properties and achieving characteristics not obtainable by conventional synthetic routes. While the cation exchange procedure, performed in solution phase approach, was restricted so far to chalcogenide based semiconductor nanocrystals, here ferrite-based nanocrystals were subjected to a Fe2+ to Co2+ cation exchange procedure. This allows tracing of the compositional modifications by systematic and detailed magnetic characterization. In homogeneous magnetite nanocrystals and in gold/magnetite core shell nanocrystals the cation exchange increases the coercivity field, the remanence magnetization, as well as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. For core/shell nanoheterostructures a selective doping of either the shell or predominantly of the core with Co2+ is demonstrated. By applying the cation exchange to FeO/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanocrystals the Neél temperature of the core material is increased and exchange-bias effects are enhanced so that vertical shifts of the hysteresis loops are obtained which are superior to those in any other system. PMID:23362940

  19. Kinetic Analyses of Cation Exchange Rates in Synthetic Birnessite Measured by Time- Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Bandstra, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    Birnessite is the most abundant and chemically important layer-structure Mn-oxide phase found in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules. It also is industrially important for use in battery technology and octahedral sieves. Due to the poorly crystalline nature of natural birnessite, synthetic analogues typically have been employed in studies that explore the structural response of birnessite to variations in interlayer composition. For this work, we measured changes in unit-cell parameters over time to quantify the degree of cation exchange as a function of concentration. Aqueous K+, Cs+, and Ba2+ cations at varying concentrations at pH 7 were exchanged for interlayer Na+ in synthetic birnessite (Na0.58(Mn4+1.42,Mn3+0.58)O4·1.5H2O) using a simple flow- through cell, and the exchange products were monitored via time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every 2-3 minutes. Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns for K- and Ba-exchanged birnessite revealed a decrease in unit- cell volume over time. In contrast, Cs+ substitution increased cell volume. For all three cations, the crystallographic data indicate that exchange occurred in two stages. A rapid and dramatic change in unit-cell volume was followed by a modest adjustment over longer timescales. Fourier electron difference syntheses revealed that the rapid, initial stage of exchange was marked by re-configuration of the interlayer species, whereas the second, protracted phase of substitution represented ordering into the newly established interlayer positions. For the first time, we have modeled the kinetics of interlayer substitution in Na-birnessite. For purposes of comparison, we have employed a simple one-stage reaction (i.e., Na-birnessite → K-birnessite) and a two stage reaction (i.e,. Na-birnessite → K-birnessitedisordered → K- birnessiteordered). For exchange with 0.01 M KCl solutions, the single

  20. Charge exchange of a polar molecule at its cation

    SciTech Connect

    Buslov, E. Yu. Zon, B. A.

    2011-01-15

    The Landau-Herring method is used to derive an analytic expression for the one-electron exchange interaction of a polar molecule with its positively charged ion, induced by a {sigma}-electron. Analogously to the classical Van der Pole method, the exchange interaction potential is averaged over the rotational states of colliding particles. The resonant charge-transfer cross section is calculated, and the effect of the dipole moments of the core on the cross section is analyzed. It is shown that allowance for the dependence of the exchange potential on the orientation of the dipole moments relative to the molecular axis may change the dependence of the cross section on the velocity of colliding particles, which is typical of the resonant charge exchange, from the resonance to the quasi-resonance dependence.

  1. Hypercrosslinked strong cation-exchange polymers for selective extraction of serum purine metabolites associated with gout.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yating; Liu, Ju; Zhang, Hongyang; Jiang, Min; Cao, Lingling; Zhang, Min; Sun, Wei; Ruan, Shengli; Hu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    In this study, hypercrosslinked strong cation-exchange polymer resins (HXLPP-SCX) were synthesized and employed as selective sorbents for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of basic purine metabolites associated with gout. The HXLPP-SCX material was prepared based on hypercrosslinking reactions and sulfonated with concentrated H2SO4. This synthetic procedure is facile and efficient without using highly toxic reagent. The resulting resins were characterized in the form of monodisperse microspheres (mean diameters of 3‒5μm) with narrow pore size (2.1nm) and relatively high specific surface areas (801m(2)/g). The polymers also possess high ion-exchange capacity (IEC, 2.22mmol/g) and good adsorption and selectivity performances for basic compounds. The resins used as SPE sorbents permit the selective enrichment of three pivotal purine metabolites (hypoxanthine, xanthine and inosine) in human serum followed by HPLC analysis. Method validation including linearity range, sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility were evaluated. This method was exemplarily applied in the analysis of serum purines in gout patients and healthy controls. The present results demonstrate a promising potential of this HXLPP-SCX material for the clinical sample pretreatment. PMID:26946024

  2. Synthesis and adsorption properties of the cation exchange forms of OFF-type zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshunova, K. K.; Travkina, O. S.; Kustov, L. M.; Kutepov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of the ion-exchange of Na+ and K+ cations contained in OFF-type zeolite for H+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Co2+, and La3+ cations is investigated. Chemical and phase compositions, the morphology of crystals, and the adsorption properties of synthesized samples are studied via X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and adsorption measurements.

  3. Cation exchange in a glacial till drumlin at a road salt storage facility.

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, David W; Xing, Baoshan; Kallergis, Niki

    2009-05-12

    We use laboratory and field data to calibrate existing geochemical and transport models of cation exchange induced by contamination of an unconfined aquifer at a road salt storage facility built upon a glacial till drumlin in eastern Massachusetts. A Gaines and Thomas selectivity coefficient K models the equilibrium sodium and divalent cation distribution in the groundwater and solid matrix, while an existing method of characteristics model describes the advective transport of total dissolved cations and sorbed sodium. Laboratory isotherms of split spoon soil samples from the drumlin calibrate K with an average value of 0.0048 (L/g)(1/2) for a measured cation exchange capacity of 0.057 meq/g dry soil. Ten years of monitoring well data document groundwater flow and the advection of conservative chloride due to outdoor storage and handling of road salt at the site. The monitoring well cation data and retarded transport model offer an independent K calibration of 0.0040 to 0.0047 (L/g)(1/2): the consistency of the field and laboratory selectivity coefficient calibrations endorse this application of the Gaines and Thomas and method of characteristics models. The advancing deicing agent plume releases divalent cations from the till into the groundwater, so that monitoring well samples do not reflect the chemical composition of the road salt. In this regard, dissolved divalent cation milliequivalent concentrations are as high as 80% of the total dissolved cationic concentrations in the salt contaminated monitoring well samples, far greater than their 2.5% level in the road salt stored at the site. Cation exchange can thus obscure attempts to hindcast stored road salt sodium water table concentration from monitoring well sample stoichiometry, or to predict sodium impacts on groundwater or receiving stream quality downgradient of the well. PMID:19272668

  4. Cation exchange in a glacial till drumlin at a road salt storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, David W.; Xing, Baoshan; Kallergis, Niki

    2009-05-01

    We use laboratory and field data to calibrate existing geochemical and transport models of cation exchange induced by contamination of an unconfined aquifer at a road salt storage facility built upon a glacial till drumlin in eastern Massachusetts. A Gaines and Thomas selectivity coefficient K models the equilibrium sodium and divalent cation distribution in the groundwater and solid matrix, while an existing method of characteristics model describes the advective transport of total dissolved cations and sorbed sodium. Laboratory isotherms of split spoon soil samples from the drumlin calibrate K with an average value of 0.0048 (L/g) 1/2 for a measured cation exchange capacity of 0.057 meq/g dry soil. Ten years of monitoring well data document groundwater flow and the advection of conservative chloride due to outdoor storage and handling of road salt at the site. The monitoring well cation data and retarded transport model offer an independent K calibration of 0.0040 to 0.0047 (L/g) 1/2: the consistency of the field and laboratory selectivity coefficient calibrations endorse this application of the Gaines and Thomas and method of characteristics models. The advancing deicing agent plume releases divalent cations from the till into the groundwater, so that monitoring well samples do not reflect the chemical composition of the road salt. In this regard, dissolved divalent cation milliequivalent concentrations are as high as 80% of the total dissolved cationic concentrations in the salt contaminated monitoring well samples, far greater than their 2.5% level in the road salt stored at the site. Cation exchange can thus obscure attempts to hindcast stored road salt sodium water table concentration from monitoring well sample stoichiometry, or to predict sodium impacts on groundwater or receiving stream quality downgradient of the well.

  5. Exchangeable cations-mediated photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on smectite surface under visible light.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Li; Chen, Hongxia; Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiyou; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-04-28

    Clay minerals saturated with different exchangeable cations are expected to play various roles in photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via direct and/or indirect pathways on clay surfaces. In the present study, anthracene and phenanthrene were selected as molecule probes to investigate the roles of exchangeable cations on their photodegradation under visible light irradiation. For five types of cation-modified smectite clays, the photodegradation rate of anthracene and phenanthrene follows the order: Fe(3+)>Al(3+)>Cu(2+)>Ca(2+)>K(+)>Na(+), which is consistent with the binding energy of cation-π interactions between PAHs and exchangeable cations. The result suggests that PAHs photolysis rate depends on cation-π interactions on clay surfaces. Meanwhile, the deposition of anthracene at the Na(+)-smectite and K(+)-smectite surface favors solar light absorption, resulting in enhanced direct photodecomposition of PAHs. On the other hand, smectite clays saturated with Fe(3+), Al(3+), and Cu(2+) are highly photoreactive and can act as potential catalysts giving rise to oxidative radicals such as O2(-) , which initiate the transformation of PAHs. The present work provides valuable insights into understanding the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and sheds light on the development of technologies for contaminated land remediation. PMID:25621830

  6. Conformations of cationized linear oligosaccharides revealed by FTMS combined with in-ESI H/D exchange.

    PubMed

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Previously (Kostyukevich et al. Anal Chem 2014, 86, 2595), we have reported that oligosaccharides anions are produced in the electrospray in two different conformations, which differ by the rate of gas phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reaction. In the present paper, we apply the in-electrospray ionization (ESI) source H/D exchange approach for the investigation of the oligosaccharides cations formed by attaching of metal ions (Na, K) to the molecule. It was observed that the formation of different conformers can be manipulated by varying the temperature of the desolvating capillary of the ESI interphase. Separation of the conformers was performed using gas phase H/D approach. Because the conformers have different rates of the H/D exchange reaction, the deuterium distribution spectrum becomes bimodal. It was found that the conformation corresponding to the slow H/D exchange rate dominates in the spectrum when the capillary temperature is low (~200 °C), and the conformation corresponding to the fast H/D exchange rate dominates at high (~400 °C) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature region, two conformers are present simultaneously. It was also observed that large oligosaccharide requires higher temperature for the formation of another conformer. It was found that the presence of the conformers considerably depends on the solvent used for ESI and the pH. We have compared these results with the previously performed in-ESI source H/D exchange experiments with peptides and proteins. PMID:26456784

  7. Glutathione-based zwitterionic stationary phase for hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aijin; Li, Xiuling; Dong, Xuefang; Wei, Jie; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-11-01

    As a naturally hydrophilic peptide, glutathione was facilely immobilized onto silica surface to obtain a novel hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatographic stationary phase (Click TE-GSH) via copper-free "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The resulting material was characterized by solid state (13)C/CP MAS NMR and elemental analysis. The measurement of ζ-potential indicated the cation-exchange characteristics and adjustable surface charge density of Click TE-GSH material. The influence of acetonitrile content and pH value on the retention of ionic compounds was investigated for understanding the chromatographic behaviors. The results demonstrated that Click TE-GSH column could provide both hydrophilic and cation-exchange interaction. Taking advantage of the good hydrophilicity and inherent cation-exchange characteristics of Click TE-GSH material, the resolution of neutral fructosan with high degree of polymerization (DP), basic chitooligosaccharides and strongly acidic carrageenan oligosaccharides was successfully realized in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange mixed-mode chromatography (HILIC/CEX), cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) and electrostatic repulsion/hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC). On the other hand, the separation of standard peptides varying in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and charge was achieved in both CEX and HILIC/CEX mode with high efficiency and distinct selectivity. To further demonstrate the versatility and applicability of Click TE-GSH stationary phase, the separation of a human serum albumin (HSA) tryptic digest was performed in HILIC/CEX mode. Peptides were adequately resolved and up to 86 HSA peptides were identified with sequence coverage of 85%. The results indicated the good potential of Click TE-GSH material in glycomics and proteomics. PMID:24075460

  8. Formation of ZnSe/Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} QDs by surface cation exchange and high photothermal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guozhi; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Yanbang; Wu, Zengna; Li, Qiang; Yao, Jianghong; Chang, Kai

    2015-08-15

    Water-dispersed core/shell structure ZnSe/Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} quantum dots were synthesized by ultrasonicwave-assisted cation exchange reaction. Only surface Zn ion can be replaced by Bi ion in ZnSe quantum dots, which lead to the ultrathin Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} shell layer formed. It is significance to find to change the crystal of QDs due to the acting of ultrasonicwave. Cation exchange mechanism and excellent photothermal conversion properties are discussed in detail.

  9. Analysis of Amadori compounds by high-performance cation exchange chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davidek, Tomas; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Devaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Fabien; Blank, Imre

    2005-01-01

    High-performance cation exchange chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry or electrochemical detection was found to be an efficient tool for analyzing Amadori compounds derived from hexose and pentose sugars. The method allows rapid separation and identification of Amadori compounds, while benefiting from the well-known advantages of mass spectrometry, such as specificity and sensitivity. Glucose- and xylose-derived Amadori compounds of several amino acids, such as glycine, alanine, valine, leucine/isoleucine, methionine, proline, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid, were separated or discriminated using this new method. The method is suitable for the analysis of both model reaction mixtures and food products. Fructosylglutamate was found to be the major Amadori compound in dried tomatoes (approximately 1.5 g/100 g) and fructosylproline in dried apricots (approximately 0.2 g/100 g). Reaction of xylose and glycine at 90 degrees C (pH 6) for 2 h showed rapid formation of xylulosylglycine (approximately 12 mol %, 15 min) followed by slow decrease over time. Analysis of pentose-derived Amadori compounds is shown for the first time, which represents a major breakthrough in studying occurrence, formation, and decomposition of these labile Maillard intermediates. PMID:15623289

  10. Cation exchange resin immobilized bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles to facilitate their application in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Yang, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) usually suffers from reduction of reactivity by aggregation, difficulty of assembling, environmental release and health concerns. Furthermore, data are lacking on the effect of cheap nickel on debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) by immobilized nZVI in aqueous system. In this study, strong acid polystyrene cation-exchange resins with particle diameter from 0.4 to 0.6 mm were utilized as matrices to immobilize bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles in order to minimize aggregation and environmental leakage risks of nZVI and to enhance their reactivity. Elemental distribution mapping showed that iron particles distributed uniformly on the surface of the resin and nickel particles were dispersed homogeneously into Fe phase. The reaction rate of resin-bound nZVI is about 55% higher than that of dispersed nZVI. The immobilized bimetallic nanoparticles with 9.69% Ni had the highest debromination percent (96%) and reaction rate (0.493 1/h). The existence of Ni significantly improved the debromination rate, due to the surface coverage of catalytic metal on the reductive metal and the formation of a galvanic cell. The environmental dominant congeners, such as BDE 154, 153, 100, 99 and 47, were produced during the process. Outstanding reactive performance, along with magnetic separation assured that resin-bound bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles are promising material that can be utilized to remediate a wide variety of pollutants contaminated sites including polybrominated diphenyl ethers. PMID:24559714

  11. REMOVING BARIUM AND RADIUM THROUGH CALCIUM CATION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of barium (Ba) and radium (Ra), which are found in many groundwater sources, was achieved in laboratory studies with an ion exchange process. In the studies, a strong acid resin in the calcium form effectively removed Ba(+2) and Ra (+2) to meet standards. The resin wa...

  12. Absorption of artificial piggery effluent by soils: Inverse optimisation of hydraulic, solute transport, and cation exchange parameters using HP1 and UCODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Smith, Chris; Simunek, Jirka; Smiles, David

    2010-05-01

    Smiles and Smith (2004) performed controlled laboratory experiments on the transport of major cations (Na, K, Mg, Ca) during water absorption in horizontal soil columns for three different times. Experimental data consists of profiles of water contents, Cl concentrations, total aqueous and sorbed concentrations of the major cations. Numerical simulation of the experimental dataset requires a coupled code that can consider variably-saturated water flow, multi-component solute transport, and geochemical reactions (aqueous complexation and cation exchange). The HP1 code, based on coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC, is used to simulate this data set. The sorption of the major cations is described as a competitive cation exchange process. The objective of the study is to calibrate hydraulic, transport, and geochemical parameters using HP1, the universal optimization code UCODE_2005 (Poeter et al., 2005), and the experimental dataset of Smiles and Smith (2004). The dataset was used to calibrate three types of parameters: soil hydraulic parameters (the parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem model for the soil hydraulic functions), solute transport parameters (dispersivity), and geochemical parameters (exchange coefficients for the major cations and the cation exchange capacity). Different calibration runs were performed with different sets of input data, different sets of optimized parameters, and different formulations of the cation exchange process (i.e., Gapon, Rothmund-Kornfeld). Overall, the description of the dataset with the coupled code is satisfactory. Estimated parameters are within expected ranges for the type of material used. References Poeter, E.P., M.C. Hill, E.R. Banta, S. Mehl, and C. Steen, 2005. UCODE_2005 and six other computer codes for universal sensitivity analysis, calibration and uncertainty evaluation. U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 6-A11. Smiles, D.E., and C.J. Smith, 2004. Absorption of artificial piggery effluent by soil: A

  13. Study on cationic photopolymerization reaction of epoxy polysiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F.; Jiang, S. L.; Liu, J.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of epoxy monomers, concentration of photoinitiator and radical photoinitiators on the photosensitive properties of cationic phopolymerization system with a novel epoxy polysiloxane oligomer (CEPS) were investigated via a gel yield method. The results showed that among the tested epoxy monomers, the reactivity of ERL-4221 with cycloaliphatic epoxy groups was the highest. The optimum concentration of diaryldiodonium salt (SR-1012) was determined as 4-5 wt.%. Increasing the amounts of ERL-4221 in the CEPS cationic photopolymerization system, UV-curing rate increased. Radical photoinitiators with ArC dbnd O structure possessed sensitization capacity to the cationic photoinitiator SR-1012. The photosensitivity of the CEPS system could be up to 165 mJ/cm 2. Adding a small amount of IPA and BP could greatly improve the photosensitivity of CEPS cationic photosensitive system. The optimal quantity of isopropanol added to the system was not more than 2 wt.%.

  14. PEP Carboxykinase Exchange Reaction in Photosynthetic Bacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, T. G.; Benedict, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    This paper describes some new characteristics of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in purified preparations of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzymatic activity has been purified 169-fold. Nucleotide diphosphates substitute for nucleotide triphosphates in the exchange reaction. Nucleotide diphosphates will not support the synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate from oxaloacetate. This reaction differs significantly from the CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in higher plants and animals. PMID:5661493

  15. Ultrafine Na-4-mica: uptake of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations by ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Ueda, Masahito; Nakamuro, Yumiko; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2004-06-01

    The cation exchange properties of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations at room temperature were investigated on an ultrafine, highly charged Na-4-mica (with the ideal mica composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4.xH2O). Ultrafine mica crystallites of 200 nm in size led to faster Sr2+ uptake kinetics in comparison to larger mica crystallites. The alkali metal ion (K+, Cs+, and Li+) exchange uptake was rapid, and complete exchange occurred within 30 min. For the alkaline earth metal ions Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, however, the exchange uptake required lengthy periods from 3 days to 4 weeks to be completed, similar to its Sr uptake, as previously reported. Kinetic models of the modified Freundlich and parabolic diffusion were examined for the experimental data on the Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ uptakes. The modified Freundlich model described well the Ba2+ ion uptake kinetics as well as that for the Sr2+ ion, while for the Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions the parabolic diffusion model showed better fitting. The alkali and alkaline earth ion exchange isotherms were also determined in comparison to the Sr2+ exchange isotherm. The thermodynamic equilibria for these cations were compared by using Kielland plots evaluated from the isotherms. PMID:15984251

  16. Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Piotr; Mulder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. The slope of the regression of CECt to Ct increased in the order hornbeam≈oak

  17. Impact of sediment-seawater cation exchange on Himalayan chemical weathering fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; France-Lanord, Christian; Lartiges, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Continental-scale chemical weathering budgets are commonly assessed based on the flux of dissolved elements carried by large rivers to the oceans. However, the interaction between sediments and seawater in estuaries can lead to additional cation exchange fluxes that have been very poorly constrained so far. We constrained the magnitude of cation exchange fluxes from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system based on cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements of riverine sediments. CEC values of sediments are variable throughout the river water column as a result of hydrological sorting of minerals with depth that control grain sizes and surface area. The average CEC of the integrated sediment load of the Ganga-Brahmaputra is estimated ca. 6.5 meq 100 g-1. The cationic charge of sediments in the river is dominated by bivalent ions Ca2+ (76 %) and Mg2+ (16 %) followed by monovalent K+ (6 %) and Na+ (2 %), and the relative proportion of these ions is constant among all samples and both rivers. Assuming a total exchange of exchangeable Ca2+ for marine Na+ yields a maximal additional Ca2+ flux of 28 × 109 mol yr-1 of calcium to the ocean, which represents an increase of ca. 6 % of the actual river dissolved Ca2+ flux. In the more likely event that only a fraction of the adsorbed riverine Ca2+ is exchanged, not only for marine Na+ but also Mg2+ and K+, estuarine cation exchange for the Ganga-Brahmaputra is responsible for an additional Ca2+ flux of 23 × 109 mol yr-1, while ca. 27 × 109 mol yr-1 of Na+, 8 × 109 mol yr-1 of Mg2+ and 4 × 109 mol yr-1 of K+ are re-absorbed in the estuaries. This represents an additional riverine Ca2+ flux to the ocean of 5 % compared to the measured dissolved flux. About 15 % of the dissolved Na+ flux, 8 % of the dissolved K+ flux and 4 % of the Mg2+ are reabsorbed by the sediments in the estuaries. The impact of estuarine sediment-seawater cation exchange appears to be limited when evaluated in the context of the long-term carbon cycle and

  18. Exchangeable Cation Hydration Properties Strongly Influence Soil Sorption of Nitroaromatic Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are commonly found as soil contaminants in military training sites and manufacturing facilities, and may adversely affect human and ecosystem health. Exchangeable cation effects on p-nitrocyanobenzene (p-NCB) and 1,4-dinitrobenzene (1,4-DNB) sorption by the Webster soi...

  19. Enhanced Cd[2+]-selective root-tonoplast-transport in tobaccos expressing Arabidopsis cation exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several "Arabidopsis" CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) encode tonoplast-localized transporters that appear to be major contributors to vacuolar accumulation/sequestration of cadmium (Cd[2+]), an undesirable pollutant ion that occurs in man largely as a result of dietary consumption of aerial tissues of food...

  20. DEMINERALIZER BUILDING, TRA608. CATION AND ANION EXCHANGERS LINE UP ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DEMINERALIZER BUILDING, TRA-608. CATION AND ANION EXCHANGERS LINE UP ALONG NORTH WALL ON CONCRETE PLATFORMS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2527. Unknown Photographer, 6/12/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Local reactivity descriptors to predict the strength of Lewis acid sites in alkali cation-exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Ramesh Ch.; Kinkar Roy, Ram; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2004-05-01

    Lewis acidity of alkali cation-exchanged zeolite is studied using local reactivity descriptors based on hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) concept. The local softness for nucleophilic attack ( sx+), local softness for electrophilic attack ( sx-) and their ratio, which is called `relative electrophilicity' ( sx+/ sx-), are calculated for the exchanged cations and Lewis acidity of the cations is found to decrease in the order: Li + > Na + > K + > Rb + > Cs +. Calculated blue shift of CO vibrational frequency (Δ ν) and interaction energy of CO molecule with alkali cation-exchanged zeolite clusters vary linearly with sx+/ sx- values.

  2. Effect of ultrasound on the kinetics of cation exchange in NaX zeolite.

    PubMed

    Erten-Kaya, Yasemin; Cakicioglu-Ozkan, Fehime

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of ultrasound on ion exchange kinetics to obtain the Li-, Ca- and Ce-rich NaX zeolite. The results were compared to those obtained from the traditional batch exchange method under similar conditions. Contact time and initial cation concentration (fold equivalent excess) were studied. Ultrasound enhanced the replacement of Na(+) ion with Li(+), Ca(2+) and Ce(3+) ions in the extra-framework of zeolite up to 76%, 72% and 66%, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion is the rate limiting step in the ion exchange for both exchange methods. As compared to the traditional exchange method, the ultrasonic method applied in this study was found to be very effective on the exchange amount at equilibrium. PMID:22079806

  3. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  4. Exchangeable Cations in the Soils of Quercus Dominated Forests in Northeastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shuai; Bruckman, Viktor J.; Glatzel, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    In northeastern Austria there is a growing interest in increased utilisation of forest biomass for energy. This study focuses on soil properties and nutrient pool characteristics in deciduous forests in order to provide advice for forest management. We (i) quantified selected exchangeable cations in the soils of our study area and (ii) identified the effects of stand age, soil type, soil depth and soil pH on exchangeable cations and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Nine permanent Quercus petraea dominated plots on sandy, clayey cambisols and calcic chernozem were selected for our study. From each plot 18 soil samples were collected in a systematic grid by means of a soil corer with 70 mm diameter to a maximum depth of 60 cm. Soil pH, exchangeable mineral elements K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Al, and Fe were determined in five geometric soil horizons. Statistical analysis showed that (i) forest age did not influence the exchangeable K content of the sandy soils; (ii) the exchangeable K content decreased with increasing stand age in clayey cambisols; (iii) exchangeable K, Na and Mg were higher in calcic chernozems and clayey cambisols (iv) exchangeable Fe was significantly higher in sandy forest soils except in the 60-80 years old stand; (v) exchangeable Fe was below detection limit in calcic chernozem soils. A comparison of exchangeable cations revealed that (i) Ca is the key element of base cations (ii) the content of base cations is strongly significantly higher in calcic chernozem soils (iii) calcic chernozem soils have the highest CEC. CEC ranged from 38 to 190 μmol/g in the entire research area. Base cations, acid cations and CEC differ with soil depth as followed (i) in sandy and clayey cambisols, CEC had a minimum in 20 cm depth and then increased with soil depth to 50 cm; (ii) CEC decreased steadily with soil depth in calcic chernozems. As expected, CEC is significantly positively correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.661, P<0.01) with the pH of the soil. The

  5. Surface-orientation-dependent distribution of subsurface cation-exchange defects in olivine-phosphate nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Seongsu

    2015-01-27

    Atomic-scale exchange between two different cations of similar size in crystalline oxides is one of the major types of point defects when multiple cations in oxygen interstitials are arrayed in an ordered manner. Although a number of studies have been performed on a variety of Li-intercalation olivine phosphates to determine the distribution of exchange defects in bulk, understanding of the thermodynamic stability of the defects in subsurface regions and its dependency on the crystallographic orientation at the surface has remained elusive. Through a combination of small-angle neutron scattering, atomic-scale direct probing with scanning transmission electron microscopy, and theoretical ab initio calculations, we directly demonstrate that the antisite exchange defects are distributed in a highly anisotropic manner near the surfaces of LiFePO4 crystals. Moreover, a substantial amount of cation exchanges between Li and Fe sites is identified as an energetically favorable configuration in some surface regions, showing excellent agreement with the calculation results of negative defect formation energies. The findings in this study provide insight into developing better ways to avoid degradation of lithium mobility through the surface as well as scientifically notable features regarding the distribution of exchange defects in olivine phosphates. PMID:25565086

  6. Structure-Property Relationships in Hydroxide-Exchange Membranes with Cation Strings and High Ion-Exchange Capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Gu, Shuang; Xiong, Ruichang; Zhang, Bingzi; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2015-12-21

    A series of poly(2,4-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) hydroxide-exchange membranes (HEMs) with cation strings containing a well-defined number of cations (CS-n) and similar, high ion-exchange capacities are synthesized to investigate the effect of cation distribution on key HEM properties. As the number of cations on each string grows, the size of the ionic clusters increases from 10 to 55 nm. Well-connected ion pathways and a hydrophobic framework are observed for n≥4. The enhanced phase segregation increases the hydroxide conductivity from CS-1 to CS-6 (30 to 65 mS cm(-1) ) and suppresses the water uptake (from 143 % to 62 %). Moreover, molar hydroxide conductivities for CS-n membranes show two distinctive stages as n increases: ∼23 S cm(2)  mol(-1) for n≤3; and ∼34 cm(2)  mol(-1) for n≥4. PMID:26630241

  7. Structure and reactions of cation-radicals of esters in freon matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Belevskii, V.N.; Belopushkin, S.I.; Fel'dman, V.I.

    1987-11-01

    In CFCl/sub 3/ matrices the cation-radicals of methyl and ethyl formates, formed in ..gamma..-irradiated solutions, at 77 K efficiently undergo intramolecular H atom transfer to form the secondary cation-radicals HC(OH)OCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/ and DC(OH)OCD/sub 2/CH/sub 2/. This process does not occur in the deuteroformate cation-radical DCOOCH/sub 2/CD/sub 3//sup +./, which is observed in the ESR spectra in different conformations, depending on the temperature. Ion-molecule reactions involving cation-radicals are indicated

  8. A rice tonoplastic calcium exchanger, OsCCX2 mediates Ca2+/cation transport in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Akhilesh K.; Shankar, Alka; Jha, Saroj K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    In plant cell, cations gradient in cellular compartments is maintained by synergistic action of various exchangers, pumps and channels. The Arabidopsis exchanger family members (AtCCX3 and AtCCX5) were previously studied and belong to CaCA (calcium cation exchangers) superfamily while none of the rice CCXs has been functionally characterized for their cation transport activities till date. Rice genome encode four CCXs and only OsCCX2 transcript showed differential expression under abiotic stresses and Ca2+ starvation conditions. The OsCCX2 localized to tonoplast and suppresses the Ca2+ sensitivity of K667 (low affinity Ca2+ uptake deficient) yeast mutant under excess CaCl2 conditions. In contrast to AtCCXs, OsCCX2 expressing K667 yeast cells show tolerance towards excess Na+, Li+, Fe2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ and suggest its ability to transport both mono as well as divalent cations in yeast. Additionally, in contrast to previously characterized AtCCXs, OsCCX2 is unable to complement yeast trk1trk2 double mutant suggesting inability to transport K+ in yeast system. These finding suggest that OsCCX2 having distinct metal transport properties than previously characterized plant CCXs. OsCCX2 can be used as potential candidate for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance in plants as well as for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26607171

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Cation Contamination in a Proton-exchange Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam; Delacourt, Charles

    2008-09-11

    Transport phenomena in an ion-exchange membrane containing both H+ and K+ are described using multicomponent diffusion equations (Stefan-Maxwell). A model is developed for transport through a Nafion 112 membrane in a hydrogen-pump setup. The model results are analyzed to quantify the impact of cation contamination on cell potential. It is shown that limiting current densities can result due to a decrease in proton concentration caused by the build-up of contaminant ions. An average cation concentration of 30 to 40 percent is required for appreciable effects to be noticed under typical steady-state operating conditions.

  10. Ion-exchange selectivities of periderm and cuticular membranes toward alkali cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoz, M.; Duncan, H.J.

    1994-08-01

    The ion-exchange selectivities of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium on isolated potato periderm (Solanum tuberosum) and pear fruit cuticular membranes were investigated; the general order of preference both for cation selectivities and ion-exchange capacities was lithium > sodium > potassium > cesium. The potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes exhibited a behavior typical of ion-exchange resins of the weak acid type. At constant pH 7, the ion-exchange capacities of periderm and cuticular membranes increased with hydrated ionic radius, and also with increasing pH and neutral salt concentration, and decreased with crystal ionic radius. Counterion selectivities also exhibited the same behavior. The ion-exchange properties are discussed in terms of the structure and function of potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes.

  11. Composite membranes prepared from cation exchange membranes and polyaniline and their transport properties in electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sata, Tshikatsu; Ishii, Yuuko; Kawamura, Kohei; Matsusaki, Koji

    1999-02-01

    A cation exchange membrane was modified with polyaniline by polymerizing aniline with ammonium peroxodisulfate on the membrane surfaces, producing a membrane with polyaniline layers on both surfaces or a membrane with a single polyaniline layer on the surface. The modified membranes, composite membranes, showed sodium ion permselectivity in electrodialysis compared with divalent cations at an optimum polymerization time. The electronic conductivity of dry membranes showed a maximum (ca. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm) at the same polymerization time as the time to attain a maximum value of the sodium ion permselectivity. Because emeraldine-based polyaniline is conductive and has a cationic charge, the sodium ion permselectivity is based on the difference in the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cationic charge on the membrane surface of a desalting side to divalent cations and sodium ions. In fact, the selective permeation of sodium ions appeared only when the layer faced the desalting side of the membrane, and was affected by dissociation of polyaniline. Further oxidized polyaniline, pernigraniline-based polyaniline, did not affect the permselectivity between cations, and the diffusion coefficient of neutral molecules, urea, increased with increasing polymerization time. Sodium ion permselectivity was maintained with repeated electrodialysis.

  12. Preparation of cationized pine sawdust for nitrate removal: Optimization of reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Keränen, Anni; Leiviskä, Tiina; Hormi, Osmo; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-09-01

    Anion exchange materials were prepared from pine sawdust (Pinus sylvestris, PSD) through cationizing treatment with N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride (CHMAC) in the presence of NaOH. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to find the optimal reaction conditions. Three factors were chosen: reaction temperature (26-94 °C), reaction time (0.32-3.7 h) and NaOH/CHMAC molar ratio (0.19-2.2). Product yield (%) was used as a response. A quadratic model was fitted to the experimental data. The optimal conditions were: a reaction temperature of 57 °C, a reaction time of 1.8 h and a NaOH/CHMAC molar ratio of 1.32. A maximum nitrogen content of 2.6% was obtained at 60 °C, 3.7 h and a molar ratio of 1.2. The molar ratio had the greatest impact on the response. Regression analysis revealed that over 95% of the variance can be explained by the model. A maximum nitrate sorption capacity of 15.3 ± 1.4 mg N/g was achieved. The effect of CHMAC dose was also studied (a NaOH/CHMAC molar ratio of 1.2): 0.064 mol/g PSD was found to be near the optimum. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater (27.5 mg/l NO3) was treated with CPSD. Doses of 3-6 g/l resulted in 59-71% nitrate reduction. PMID:26093104

  13. Sorption of REE and TPE from HNO{sub 3} solutions on strong-acid sulfonated cation exchanger KU-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.

    1995-05-01

    Sorption of rare earths (REE) on the strong-acid sulfonated cation exchanger KU-2 is studied as a function of the solution acidity (0.1-2.0 M HNO{sub 3}) and REE concentration. In concentrated nitrate solutions where M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +} and M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +} can form and be sorbed by the cation exchanger, the capacity of the exchanger seems to increase by 20%.

  14. Formation of pseudomorphic nanocages from Cu2O nanocrystals through anion exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Lun; Sato, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kimura, Masato; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2016-03-18

    The crystal structure of ionic nanocrystals (NCs) is usually controlled through reaction temperature, according to their phase diagram. We show that when ionic NCs with different shapes, but identical crystal structures, were subjected to anion exchange reactions under ambient conditions, pseudomorphic products with different crystal systems were obtained. The shape-dependent anionic framework (surface anion sublattice and stacking pattern) of Cu2O NCs determined the crystal system of anion-exchanged products of CuxS nanocages. This method enabled us to convert a body-centered cubic lattice into either a face-centered cubic or a hexagonally close-packed lattice to form crystallographically unusual, multiply twinned structures. Subsequent cation exchange reactions produced CdS nanocages while preserving the multiply-twinned structures. A high-temperature stable phase such as wurtzite ZnS was also obtained with this method at ambient conditions. PMID:26989249

  15. Chromatographic evaluation of reversed-phase/anion-exchange/cation-exchange trimodal stationary phases prepared by electrostatically driven self-assembly process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Pohl, Christopher; Woodruff, Andrew; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-06-01

    This work describes chromatographic properties of reversed-phase/cation-exchange/anion-exchange trimodal stationary phases. These stationary phases were based on high-purity porous spherical silica particles coated with nano-polymer beads using an electrostatically driven self-assembly process. The inner-pore area of the material was modified covalently with an organic layer that provided both reversed-phase and anion-exchange properties while the outer surface was coated with nano-sized polymer beads with strong cation-exchange characteristics. This design ensured spatial separation of the anion-exchange and the cation-exchange regions, and allowed reversed-phase, anion-exchange and cation-exchange retention mechanisms to function simultaneously. Chromatographic evaluation of ions and small molecules suggested that retention of ionic analytes was influenced by the ionic strength, pH, and mobile phase organic solvent content, and governed by both ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions. Meanwhile, neutral analytes were retained by hydrophobic interaction and was mainly affected by mobile phase organic solvent content. Depending on the specific application, selectivity could be optimized by adjusting the anion-exchange/cation-exchange capacity ratio (selectivity), which was achieved experimentally by using porous silica particles with different surface areas. PMID:21530974

  16. Study by XPS of different conditioning processes to improve the cation exchange in clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Serrano, D.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Conde-Barajas, E.; Ramírez-Rosales, D.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.

    2010-09-01

    We report the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of natural clinoptilolite from a mine in Sonora, México. From these measurements we determined the chemical state and binding energy of the elements in the zeolite framework and of those in the extra framework sites. The analysis was done on natural clinoptilolite and on cation-exchanged clinoptilolites with Na + and NH4+ ions. Complementary analysis by several experimental techniques was performed to determine the structural, chemical composition and chemical state modifications experimented by clinoptilolite samples processed by the two types of cation exchange. The clinoptilolite samples were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine their structural composition, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) to measure the chemical composition and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the chemical state of iron inside the natural zeolites.

  17. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  18. Log-derived cation exchange capacity of shaly sands: Application to hydrocarbon detection and drilling optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Gamze

    Researchers at Louisiana State University, LSU, have introduced several petrophysical models expressing the electric properties of shaly sands. These models, to be used for hydrocarbon detection, are based on the Waxman and Smits concept of supplementing the water conductivity with a clay counterions conductivity. The LSU models also utilize the Dual Water theory, which relates each conductivity term to a particular type of water, free and bound, each occupying a specific volume of the total pore space. The main difference between these models and the other shaly sand models is that the counterion conductivity is represented by a hypothetical sodium chloride electrolyte. This study introduces a modified version of early LSU models. This modified model eliminates a questionable assumption incorporated in all previous shaly sand models. Previous models use same formation resistivity factor for all terms in the model. The proposed model considers that the electric current follows the effective porosity path in the term representing the free electrolyte and follows the clay porosity path in the term representing bound water. The differentiation between the two paths is accomplished by using two different formation factors one in the free water and another in the bound water term of the model. It also used two different cementation exponents to express formation factors in terms of porosity. The validity of the new model was checked using cation exchange capacities measured on core samples and drill cuttings. Calculated cation exchange capacities display good agreement with the measured cation exchange capacities. The water saturation calculated using the new model are more representative of hydrocarbon potential of the zones of interest. In addition, cation exchange capacity calculated using this modified model and log data acquired during drilling has shown potential for diagnosis of pending bit balling of PDC bits drilled with water based mud in overpressured shale.

  19. Some investigations on the radiation stability of a strongly acidic cation exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessouki, A. M.; Zahran, A. H.; Rabie, A. M.; Amer, S. I.

    The radiation-chemical stability of Merck Cation Exchanger I, a strongly acidic sulphonated cation exchanger of the polymerization type based on styrene-divinylbenze (DVB) copolymers was investigated. The radiation stability of the resin was assessed from the change in exchange capacity, loss in weight, change in swelling behaviour and formation of new exchange groups. The loss in capacity was 44 and 32% for resin specimens in the H +-form irradiated to 1000 Mrad in air and in vacuum, respectively. The Na +-form of the exchanger showed high resistance to radiation and the loss in capacity did not exceed 7% at a dose of 1000 Mrad. The loss in capacity was accompanied by a loss in weight and a decrease in the degree of swelling of the irradiated resin. The formation of new functional groups of the carboxylic and phenolic types was confirmed. The amount of these group increases with the increase in the integral dose. The amount of sulphuric acid formed as a result of irradiating the resin in the dry and moist states was determined. An increase in the moisture content of the resin resulted in a marked decrease in its radiation stability.

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  1. Cation Exchange in Dynamic 3D Porous Magnets: Improvement of the Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Acosta, Alvaro; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Seoane, Beatriz; Gascon, Jorge; Pasán, Jorge; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-11-16

    We report two novel three-dimensional porous coordination polymers (PCPs) of formulas Li4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·68H2O (2) and K4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·69H2O (3) obtained-via alkali cation exchange in a single-crystal to single-crystal process-from the earlier reported anionic manganese(II)-copper(II) PCP of formula Na4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·60H2O (1) [Me3mpba(4-) = N,N'-2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate)]. This postsynthetic process succeeds where the direct synthesis in solution from the corresponding building blocks fails and affords significantly more robust PCPs with enhanced magnetic properties [long-range 3D magnetic ordering temperatures for the dehydrated phases (1'-3') of 2.0 (1'), 12.0 (2'), and 20.0 K (3')]. Changes in the adsorptive properties upon postsynthetic exchange suggest that the nature, electrostatic properties, mobility, and location of the cations within the framework are crucial for the enhanced structural stability. Overall, these results further confirm the potential of postsynthetic methods (including cation exchange) to obtain PCPs with novel or enhanced physical properties while maintaining unaltered their open-framework structures. PMID:26492551

  2. Declines in Soil pH due to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs Alter Buffering and Exchange Reactions in Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs may alter tropical soil buffering and exchange reactions that have important implications for nutrient cycling, forest productivity, and downstream ecosystems. In contrast to relatively young temperate soils that are typically buffered from N inputs by base cation reactions, aluminum reactions may serve to buffer highly weathered tropical soils and result in immediate increases in aluminum mobility and toxicity. Increased nitrate losses due to chronic N inputs may also deplete residual base cations in already weathered base cation-poor soils, further acidify soils, and thereby reduce nitrate mobility through pH-dependent anion exchange reactions. To test these hypotheses, I determined soil pH and cation and anion exchange capacity (CEC and AEC) and measured base cation and aluminum soil solution losses following first-time and long-term experimental N additions from two Hawaiian tropical forest soils, a 300 year old Andisol and a 4.1 million year old Oxisol. I found that elevated base cation losses accompanied increased nitrate losses after first time N additions to the young Andisol whereas immediate and large aluminum losses were associated with increased nitrate losses from the Oxisol. In the long-term, base cation and aluminum losses increased in proportion to nitrate losses. Long-term N additions at both sites resulted in significant declines in soil pH, decreased CEC and increased AEC. These results suggest that even chronic N inputs resulting in small but elevated nitrate losses may deplete residual base cations, increase mobility and toxicity of aluminum, and potentially lead to declines in forest productivity and acidification of downstream ecosystems. These findings also suggest that AEC may provide a long-term mechanism to delay nitrate losses in tropical forests with significant variable charge that are experiencing chronic anthropogenic N inputs.

  3. Effect of cation exchange on surfactant-enhanced solubilization of trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. A.; Sawyer, T. E.; Schroth, M. H.; Humphrey, M. D.; Istok, J. D.

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop the single-well push-pull test as a diagnostic tool for assessing the potential for cation exchange to adversely affect the phase behavior of sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate surfactant (Aerosol MA 80-I) and its solubilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in the subsurface. Laboratory push-pull tests were conducted on a model natural aquifer sediment collected from a TCE-contaminated field site and a test solution consisting of 36,800 mg/l (3.7 wt.%) sulfosuccinate, 100,000 mg/l (10 wt.%) isopropanol, and 3200 mg/l (0.32 wt.%) KBr. Laboratory experiments were designed to simulate conditions occurring during single-well, "push-pull" tests. In batch experiments conducted in the presence of excess TCE, the test solution gave a Winsor Type I system with an enhanced aqueous TCE solubility of 26,700 mg/l and a solution density of 1.000 g/cm 3. The sulfosuccinate surfactant was transported conservatively in sediment packs containing no TCE. However, increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ resulting from cation exchange caused the TCE solubilization potential of the injected surfactant to exceed values predicted from the solubilization isotherm. Sulfosuccinate surfactant transport was strongly retarded in sediment packs containing 5 vol.% residual TCE because cation exchange resulted in the formation of a Winsor Type II system, which resulted in the partitioning of the sulfosuccinate surfactant into the residual TCE phase. Conservative sulfosuccinate transport was observed in a separate sediment pack containing 5 vol.% residual TCE when a 130 meq/l Na + pre-flush was used to reduce quantities of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ in the sediment pack prior to sulfosuccinate injection. The results of this study emphasize the importance of cation exchange on the performance of surfactant-enhanced TCE solubilization and demonstrate the utility of the push-pull test for predicting the potentially deleterious effects of cation exchange on surfactant phase

  4. Reactions and structural investigation of chlorpromazine radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Ghanty, Tapan K.; Mukherjee, T.

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to understand pro-oxidant behaviour of chlorpromazine radical cation (CPZ rad + ). Pulse radiolysis studies have shown that CPZ rad + oxidizes physiological antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), and biomolecules like, tyrosine and proteins (bovine serum albumin and casein), thereby acting as a pro-oxidant. Ab-initio quantum chemical calculations suggest structural and electronic changes on oxidation of CPZ. The calculations with Hartree-Fock and density functional methods show that ring nitrogen atom is the site of electron removal from CPZ and sulfur atom is the site of maximum spin in CPZ rad + . The calculations also suggest that oxidation of CPZ leads to increase in planarity of the tricyclic ring as well as tilting of alkyl side chain towards chlorine containing ring. The structural changes on oxidation of CPZ and spin delocalization in CPZ rad + fairly explain the pro-oxidant activity of CPZ.

  5. Transport of copper ammines through a cation-exchange membrane during electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kireeva, L.D.; Shaposhnik, V.A.; Sorokina, V.I.

    1987-09-10

    Extraction of copper ammine complexes from waste waters in electroplating technology and in production of cuprammonium fibers is an important problem and electrodialysis with ion-exchange membranes is the most promising method of solving it. The authors aim was to study transport of copper(II) ammines through a commercial cation-exchange membrane of the MK-40 type. The electrodialyzer consisted of five Plexiglas compartments separated in alternating order by MK-40 cation-exchange and MA-40 anion-exchange membranes. The authors studied the dependence of the transport of copper(II) ammine complexes on the current density at copper concentration 0.025 M in the desalination compartment and 0.15 M ammonia concentration. The experiments lead to the conclusion that electrodialysis of copper(II) ammine complexes is possible only at current densities below the limiting values and that the transport is accompanied by decrease of the formation function of the complexes both in the membrane and in the solution of the concentrate receiving compartment.

  6. Extra-framework cation release from heulandite-type rich tuffs on exchange with NH(4)(+).

    PubMed

    Kantiranis, N; Sikalidis, K; Godelitsas, A; Squires, C; Papastergios, G; Filippidis, A

    2011-06-01

    The outgoing cations of Greek heulandite-rich tuff samples (heulandite type-III, 91wt.%, mica 4wt.%, feldspar 5wt. %, CEC 2.22meq/g) were analysed upon exchange with ammonium acetate using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The kinetic curves of each cation were investigated over a total time of contact of 720h with sampling at frequent intervals. The materials were examined by powder X-ray diffraction, SEM-EDS, and AAS. The sorption ability was measured using the ammonium acetate saturation method. It was found that Ca(2+) presents an unexpected extra-framework release and a surprisingly high degree of exchange (90%). The exchange of Mg (57%) is also worthy of note whereas the behavior of K(+) showed an expected rapid initial release. The behavior of Na(+) must be similar. However, its lower concentration in the zeolitic material minimizes its overall significance somewhat. On the other hand, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release is kinetically much slower, compared to that of alkali metal ions, and this phenomenon indicates that different exchange energies are needed till final equilibrium. PMID:21296480

  7. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  8. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  9. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126470

  10. Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids: preparation and applications in organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingying; Cheng, Chen; Jing, Huanwang

    2014-09-26

    Aza-crown ether complex cation ionic liquids (aCECILs) were devised, fabricated, and characterized by using NMR spectroscopy, MS, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), elemental analysis and physical properties. These new and room-temperature ILs were utilized as catalysts in various organic reactions, such as the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 to epoxides, esterification of acetic acid and alcohols, the condensation reaction of aniline and propylene carbonate, and Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indole with aldehydes were investigated carefully. In these reactions, the ionic liquid exhibited cooperative catalytic activity between the anion and cation. In addition, the aza-[18-C-6HK][HSO4]2 was the best acidic catalyst in the reactions of esterification and Friedel-Crafts alkylation under mild reaction conditions. PMID:25154312

  11. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs) before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+). Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement) and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag) cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  12. Erionite-Na upon heating: dehydration dynamics and exchangeable cations mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballirano, Paolo; Pacella, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Erionite is a fibrous zeolite significantly more tumorigenic than crocidolite asbestos upon inhalation. In recent years, several papers have been published aimed at characterizing from the crystal-chemical point of view erionite fibres. As their toxicity has been ascribed to Fe acquired within the human body, studies aimed at characterizing the iron topochemistry have also been published, suggesting a possible important role played by the ionic exchange properties and cations mobility of this zeolite on developing carcinogenicity. Here we report the analysis results of the thermal behaviour of erionite-Na, which has been found to deviate significantly from that of erionite-K. This result is in contrast with the current scientific view that differences in weighted ionic potential, Si/Al ratio and size of exchangeable cations result in significantly different thermal behaviours, all those parameters being nearly identical or very similar in both species. The different mobility of the extraframework cations observed in erionite samples with dissimilar chemistry is of particular interest within the frame of the hypothesis that their biological activity could depend, apart from surface interactions, also on bulk effects.

  13. Incorporation of phthalocyanines by cationic and anionic clays via ion exchange and direct synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K.A.; Botto, R.E.; Winans, R.E. ); Forman, J.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pc) and metallophthalocyanines were incorporated into the galleries of anionic and cationic clays via ion exchange and in situ crystallization of the synthetic clay layers. Intercalation compounds between the layered magnesium silicate clay hectorite and cationic phthalocyanines were directly prepared by refluxing for 2 days aqueous solutions of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide, lithium flouride, and either alcian blue dyes (Cu(II)Pc) or 15-crown-5 tetra-substituted phthalocyanine (15C5Pc). The CuPc dyes are tetrapositively charged through peripheral quaternary ammonium groups, whereas the 15C5Pc is electrically neutral. Anionic clays prepared by hydrolysis of mixed solutions of aluminum nitrate, magnesium nitrate, and copper(II) phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid, tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs) in sodium hydroxide resulted in crystallization of an intercalation compound between a layered double hydroxide (LDH) and this anionic Pc. The material prepared by ion exchange of CuPcTs into a wet, freshly prepared LDH was superior in crystallinity. The phthalocyanines are oriented parallel to cationic hectorite clay layers (gallery heights 4.5-6.5[angstrom]) and perpendicular to anionic layered double hydroxide clay layers (gallery height 18,2[angstrom]) in correlation with their hosts' respective layer charge densities. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Erionite-Na upon heating: dehydration dynamics and exchangeable cations mobility

    PubMed Central

    Ballirano, Paolo; Pacella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Erionite is a fibrous zeolite significantly more tumorigenic than crocidolite asbestos upon inhalation. In recent years, several papers have been published aimed at characterizing from the crystal-chemical point of view erionite fibres. As their toxicity has been ascribed to Fe acquired within the human body, studies aimed at characterizing the iron topochemistry have also been published, suggesting a possible important role played by the ionic exchange properties and cations mobility of this zeolite on developing carcinogenicity. Here we report the analysis results of the thermal behaviour of erionite-Na, which has been found to deviate significantly from that of erionite-K. This result is in contrast with the current scientific view that differences in weighted ionic potential, Si/Al ratio and size of exchangeable cations result in significantly different thermal behaviours, all those parameters being nearly identical or very similar in both species. The different mobility of the extraframework cations observed in erionite samples with dissimilar chemistry is of particular interest within the frame of the hypothesis that their biological activity could depend, apart from surface interactions, also on bulk effects. PMID:26948139

  15. Emerging roles of alkali cation/proton exchangers in organellar homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, John; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of monovalent cations such as H+, Li+, Na+ and K+ across biological membranes influences a myriad of cellular processes and is fundamental to all living organisms. This is accomplished by a multiplicity of ion channels, pumps and transporters. Our insight into their molecular, cellular and physiological diversity has increased greatly in the past few years with the advent of genome sequencing, genetic manipulation and sophisticated imaging techniques. One of the revelations from these studies is the emergence of novel alkali cation/protons exchangers that are present in endomembranes, where they function to regulate not only intraorganellar pH but also vesicular biogenesis, trafficking and other aspects of cellular homeostasis. PMID:17646094

  16. Structure and Properties of a Semi-crystalline Cationic Polymer for Anion Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Frederick; Price, Samuel; Savage, Alice; Ren, Xiaoming; Insane Membranes Collaboration

    Nafion has long been studied in order to understand its combination of good mechanical properties, chemical resistance, and excellent charge transport characteristics. In the past decade, uncertainty regarding the morphological behavior of Nafion has largely been resolved, allowing researchers to mimic and improve on the structure of this material. In this presentation, work to incorporate key characteristics of Nafion into a model cation-containing polymer will be described. In these new materials, semi-crystalline atactic poly(norbornene) is used to introduce good mechanical properties to anion-exchange membranes, analogous to the PTFE crystallites in Nafion. The ether linkages between the charged species and backbone are also utilized to place the cationic species (trimethylamine) in our materials into a mechanically soft environment. The resulting polymer shows some characteristics that are similar to those of Nafion. In this presentation, the synthesis, alkaline stability, mechanical properties, morphological behavior and charge transport properties will all be described.

  17. Comparison of reversed-phase/cation-exchange/anion-exchange trimodal stationary phases and their use in active pharmaceutical ingredient and counterion determinations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Pohl, Christopher A

    2012-04-01

    This study involved three commercial reversed-phase (RP)/anion-exchange (AEX)/cation-exchange (CEX) trimodal columns, namely Acclaim Trinity P1 (Thermo Fisher Scientific), Obelisc R (SIELC Technologies) and Scherzo SM-C18 (Imtakt). Their chromatographic properties were compared in details with respect to hydrophobicity, anion-exchange capacity, cation-exchange capacity, and selectivity, by studying retention behavior dependency on organic solvent, buffer concentration and pH. It was found that their remarkably different column chemistries resulted in distinctive chromatography properties. Trinity P1 exhibited strong anion-exchange and cation-exchange interactions but low RP retention while Scherzo SM-C18 showed strong reversed-phase retention with little cation-exchange and anion-exchange capacities. For Obelisc R, its reversed-phase capacity was weaker than Scherzo SM-C18 but slightly higher than Trinity P1, and its ion-exchange retentions were between Trinity P1 and Scherzo SM-C18. In addition, their difference in selectivity was demonstrated by examples of determining the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and counterion of drug products. PMID:22209548

  18. Electrodialysis of Sulfuric Acid with Cation-Exchange Membranes Prepared by Electron-Beam-Induced Graft Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asari, Yuki; Shoji, Nobuyoshi; Miyoshi, Kazuyoshi; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi

    Strongly acidic cation-exchange membranes were prepared by the electron-beam-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate onto a high-density polyethylene film with a thickness of 35 μm and the subsequent conversion of the resulting epoxy group into a sulfonic acid group. The resulting cation-exchange membranes with various ion-exchange capacities or sulfonic acid group densities ranging from 1.9 to 2.7 mmol/g were applied to the enrichment of 0.50 mol/L sulfuric acid by electrodialysis. Concentrated sulfuric acids at concentrations of 1.4 to 2.9 mol/L were obtained in the concentrate chamber during the electrodialysis operated at 30 mA/cm2 and 298 K, using a pair of this cation-exchange membrane and a commercially available anion-exchange membrane.

  19. Effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapors on montmorillonite clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) vapors on montmorillonite have been studied on SAz-1 and SWy-1 source clays, each exchanged respectively with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) cations. The corresponding lattice expansions were also determined, and the corresponding N2 adsorption data were provided for comparison. For clays exchanged with cations of low hydrating powers (such as K, Cs and TMA), water shows a notably lower uptake than does N2 at low relative pressures (P/P0). By contrast, EGME shows higher uptakes than N2 on all exchanged clays at all P/P0. The anomaly for water is attributed to its relatively low attraction for siloxane surfaces of montmorillonite because of its high cohesive energy density. In addition to solvating cations and expanding interlayers, water and EGME vapors condense into small clay pores and interlayer voids created by interlayer expansion. The initial (dry) interlayer separation varies more significantly with cation type than with layer charge; the water-saturated interlayer separation varies more with cation type than the EGME-saturated interlayer separation. Because of the differences in surface adsorption and interlayer expansion for water and EGME, no general correspondence is found between the isotherms of water and EGME on exchanged clays, nor is a simple relation observed between the overall uptake of either vapor and the cation solvating power. The excess interlayer capacities of water and of EGME that result from lattice expansion of the exchanged clays are estimated by correcting for amounts of vapor adsorption on planar clay surfaces and of vapor condensation into intrinsic clay pores. The resulting data follow more closely the relative solvating powers of the exchanged cations.

  20. Cation exchange resin nanocomposites based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Awad Allah, Ahmed Elsayed; Alblehy, AbdElhamid

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interest due to their potential applications in different fields such as water treatment and desalination. The increasing exploitation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into many industrial processes has raised considerable concerns for environmental applications. The interactions of soluble salt with MWNCTs influence in the total salt content in saline water. In this work, we synthesized two cation exchange resins nano composites from polystyrene divinylbenzene copolymer (PSDVB) and pristine MWNCTs. The prepared compounds were characterized using infra red spectroscopy, thermal stability, X-ray diffraction, and electro scan microscope. Also, the ion capacities of prepared cation exchange resins were determined by titration. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the thermal stability of prepared nanocomposites in the presence of MWNCTs increased up to 617 °C. The X-ray of PSDVB and its sulfonated form exhibits amorphous pattern texture structure, whereas the nano composite exhibits amorphous structure with indication peak at 20° and 26° for the PSDVB and MWCNTs, respectively. The ion-exchange capacity increased from 225.6 meq/100 g to 466 mg/100 g for sulfonated PSDVB and sulfonated PSDVB MWNCTs-pristine, respectively.

  1. Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have exhibited superior strength and thermo- oxidative properties as compared to pure polymers for use in air and space craft; however, there has often been difficulty completely dispersing the clay within the matrices of the polymer. In order to improve this process, the cation exchange capacity of lithium clay is first lowered using twenty-four hour heat treatments of no heat, 130 C, 150 C, or 170 C to fixate the lithium ions within the clay layers so that they are unexchangeable. Generally, higher temperatures have generated lower cation exchange capacities. An ion exchange involving dodecylamine, octadecylamine, or dimethyl benzidine (DMBZ) is then employed to actually expand the clay galleries. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy can be used to determine whether the clay has been successfully exfoliated. Finally, resins of DMBZ with clay are then pressed into disks for characterization using dynamic mechanical analyzer and oven- aging techniques in order to evaluate their glass transition, modulus strength, and thermal-oxidative stability in comparison to neat DMBZ. In the future, they may also be tested as composites for flexural and laminar shear strength.

  2. Cesium migration in Hanford sediment: a multisite cation exchange model based on laboratory transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steefel, Carl I.; Carroll, Susan; Zhao, Pihong; Roberts, Sarah

    2003-12-01

    Cs + transport experiments carried out in columns packed with uncontaminated Hanford formation sediment from the SX tank farm provide strong support for the use of a multisite, multicomponent cation exchange model to describe Cs + migration in the Hanford vadose zone. The experimental results indicate a strong dependence of the effective Cs +Kd on the concentrations of other cations, including Na + that is present at high to extremely high concentrations in fluids leaking from the Hanford SX tanks. A strong dependence of the Cs +Kd on the aqueous Cs + concentration is also apparent, with retardation of Cs + increasing from a value of 41 at a Cs + concentration of 10 -4 M in the feed solution to as much as 282 at a Cs + concentration of 5×10 -7 M, all in a background of 1 M NaNO 3. The total cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the Hanford sediment was determined using 22Na isotopic equilibrium exchange in a flow-through column experiment. The value for the CEC of 120 μeq/g determined with this method is compatible with a value of 121.9 μeq/g determined by multi-cation elution. While two distinct exchange sites were proposed by Zachara et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66 (2002) 193] based on binary batch exchange experiments, a third site is proposed in this study to improve the fit of the Cs +-Na + and Cs +-Ca + exchange data and to capture self-sharpened Cs + breakthrough curves at low concentrations of Cs +. Two of the proposed exchange sites represent frayed edge sites (FES) on weathered micas and constitute 0.02% and 0.22% of the total CEC. Both of the FES show a very strong selectivity for Cs + over Na + ( KNa-Cs=10 7.22 and 10 4.93, respectively). The third site, accounting for over 99% of the total CEC, is associated with planar sites on expansible clays and shows a smaller Na +-Cs + selectivity coefficient of 10 1.99. Parameters derived from a fit of binary batch experiments alone tend to under predict Cs + retardation in the column experiments. The

  3. Cesium migration in Hanford sediment: a multisite cation exchange model based on laboratory transport experiments.

    PubMed

    Steefel, Carl I; Carroll, Susan; Zhao, Pihong; Roberts, Sarah

    2003-12-01

    Cs+ transport experiments carried out in columns packed with uncontaminated Hanford formation sediment from the SX tank farm provide strong support for the use of a multisite, multicomponent cation exchange model to describe Cs+ migration in the Hanford vadose zone. The experimental results indicate a strong dependence of the effective Cs+ Kd on the concentrations of other cations, including Na+ that is present at high to extremely high concentrations in fluids leaking from the Hanford SX tanks. A strong dependence of the Cs+ Kd on the aqueous Cs+ concentration is also apparent, with retardation of Cs+ increasing from a value of 41 at a Cs+ concentration of 10(-4) M in the feed solution to as much as 282 at a Cs+ concentration of 5x10(-7) M, all in a background of 1 M NaNO3. The total cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the Hanford sediment was determined using 22Na isotopic equilibrium exchange in a flow-through column experiment. The value for the CEC of 120 microeq/g determined with this method is compatible with a value of 121.9 microeq/g determined by multi-cation elution. While two distinct exchange sites were proposed by Zachara et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66 (2002) 193] based on binary batch exchange experiments, a third site is proposed in this study to improve the fit of the Cs+-Na+ and Cs+-Ca+ exchange data and to capture self-sharpened Cs+ breakthrough curves at low concentrations of Cs+. Two of the proposed exchange sites represent frayed edge sites (FES) on weathered micas and constitute 0.02% and 0.22% of the total CEC. Both of the FES show a very strong selectivity for Cs+ over Na+ (K(Na-Cs)=10(7.22) and 10(4.93), respectively). The third site, accounting for over 99% of the total CEC, is associated with planar sites on expansible clays and shows a smaller Na+-Cs+ selectivity coefficient of 10(1.99). Parameters derived from a fit of binary batch experiments alone tend to under predict Cs+ retardation in the column experiments. The transport

  4. The transfer behavior of different ions across anion and cation exchange membranes under vanadium flow battery medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiawei; Li, Xianfeng; Xi, Xiaoli; Lai, Qinzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    The transfer behavior of different ions (V2+, V3+, VO2+, VO2+, H+, SO42-) across ion exchange membranes is investigated under vanadium flow battery (VFB) operating condition. VX-20 anion exchange membrane (AEM) and Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane (CEM) are selected to investigate the influence of fixed charged groups on the transfer behavior of different ions. The interaction between different ions and water is discussed in detail aiming to ascertain the variation of different ions in the charge-discharge process. Under the VFB medium, the transfer behavior and function of different ions are very different for the AEM and CEM. V2+ ions at the negative side accumulate when VFB is assembled with Nafion 115, while the VO2+ ions at the positive side accumulate for VX-20. The SO42- ions will transfer across Nafion 115 to balance the charges and the protons can balance the charges of VX-20. Finally the capacity fade mechanism of different membranes is investigated, showing that the capacity decay of VFB assembled with Nafion 115 mainly results from the cross mix of vanadium ions across the membrane, however, for VX-20, the side reactions can be the major reason. This paper provides important information about electrolyte for the application of VFB.

  5. Stability and isomerization reactions of phenyl cation C6H5+ isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dandan; Yang, Xue; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shan, Shimin; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-03-01

    As a key polyatomic molecular cation that plays a pivotal role in growth of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenyl cation C6H5+ exhibits various isomers and isomerization reactions. Investigation on the structure and stability of the isomers as well as the isomerization is important for better understanding the chemical reactions involving C6H5+ cations. In this work, we have performed a theoretical study on the stability and isomerization reactions of C6H5+ isomers at density functional theory B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) level. We have obtained a total of 60 isomers of C6H5+ cations, most of which are reported for the first time. The geometries, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic properties and stability of 28 out of 60 isomers have been summarized in detail. Different ring-to-ring and ring-to-chain isomerization pathways, which are connected via 28 transition states, have been investigated using the intrinsic reaction coordinate method. The results show that the isomerization reactions occur via hydrogen migration followed by bond-breaking and reconstruction.

  6. Neutral and Cationic Alkyl Tantalum Imido Complexes: Synthesis and Migratory Insertion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Laura L.; Schmidt, Joseph A. R.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of dibenzyl cationic tantalum imido complexes is described. The trialkyl tantalum imido compounds Bn3Ta=NCMe3 (1) and Np3Ta=NCMe3 (2) were synthesized as starting materials for the study of dialkyl cationic tantalum imido complexes. Compound 1 undergoes insertion reactions with diisopropylcarbodiimide and 2,6-dimethylphenylisocyanide to give (bisamidinate)imido complex 5 and (bisimino-acyl)imido complex 6, respectively. Treatment of compound 1 with B(C6F5)3 gives the zwitterionic tantalum complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][BnB(C6F5)3] (7) which is stabilized by η6-coordination of the benzyl triaryl borate anion. Coordination of the aryl anion can be displaced by three equivalents of pyridine to give the Lewis base complex 8. Treatment of compound 1 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] gives the cationic tantalum imido complex [Bn2Ta=NCMe3][B(C6F5)4] (3). This salt forms insoluble aggregates unless trapped by THF coordination or an insertion reaction with an alkyne or an alkene. Cation 3 undergoes migratory insertion reactions with diphenylacetylene, phenylacetylene, norbornene, and cis-cyclooctene to give the corresponding alkenyl or modified alkyl imido complexes. The characterization of these products and the significance of these insertion reactions with respect to Ziegler-Natta polymerizations and hydroamination reactions are described. PMID:19079787

  7. [Cation exchanges during the process of Cd(2+) absorption by Alfalfa in aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-Peng; Yin, Hua; Ye, Jin-Shao; Peng, Hua; Qin, Hua-Ming; Long, Yan; He, Bao-Yan; Zhang, Na; Tong, Yao; Peng, Su-Fen

    2011-11-01

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the cation exchanges during the process of Cd2+ absorption by Alfalfa in aqueous solution. The absorption efficiency of Alfalfa plants with 0-10 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ treatments, changes of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and NH4(+) concentration, and the variation of pH values at different absorption time (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 72 h) were studied separately. The multiple linear regressions between Cd2+ absorption and cation variation were analyzed. The results indicated that when Cd2+ concentrations were 0.1, 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1), the absorption efficiencies of Cd2+ by Alfalfa after 72 h were 85.86%, 52.14%, 15.97% and 7.81%. Cation exchange was involved in the removal of Cd2+ by Alfalfa in aqueous solution. Except for NH4(+), the concentrations of cationic metals Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ in aqueous solution increased over time, which increased 11.30% - 61.72%, 21.44% - 98.73%, 24.09% - 8.90% and 37.04% - 191.96%, respectively. Kinetic studies illuminated that the release of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ by Alfalfa in Cd2+ solution with initial concentrations of 0, 0. 1, 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1) best fitted pseudo-second-order equation,while the NH4(+) release fitted this model when Cd2+ concentrations were 1, 5, 10 mg x L(-1). The gradual decrease of pH during adsorption of Cd2+ by Alfalfa was observed. As the competition ion of Cd2+, H+ might affect the capacity of Alfalfa root system to absorb Cd2+. The ternary linear equation results demonstrated that the content of Cd2+ absorption by Alfalfa strongly related with the release of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+. And this exchange mainly occurred among Cd2+ and divalent cations. PMID:22295633

  8. On the real performance of cation exchange resins in wastewater treatment under conditions of cation competition: the case of heavy metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Prelot, Benedicte; Ayed, Imen; Marchandeau, Franck; Zajac, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sorption performance of cation-exchange resins Amberlite® IRN77 and Amberlite™ IRN9652 toward Cs(I) and Sr(II) has been tested in single-component aqueous solutions and simulated waste effluents containing other monovalent (Effluent 1) or divalent (Effluent 2) metal cations, as well as nitrate, borate, or carbonate anions. The individual sorption isotherms of each main component were measured by the solution depletion method. The differential molar enthalpy changes accompanying the ion-exchange between Cs+ or Sr2+ ions and protons at the resin surface from single-component nitrate solutions were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and they showed a higher specificity of the two resins toward cesium. Compared to the retention limits of both resins under such idealized conditions, an important depression in the maximum adsorption capacity toward each main component was observed in multication systems. The overall effect of ion exchange process appeared to be an unpredictable outcome of the individual sorption capacities of the two resins toward various cations as a function of the cation charge, size, and concentration. The cesium retention capacity of the resins was diminished to about 25% of the "ideal" value in Effluent 1 and 50% in Effluent 2; a further decrease to about 15% was observed upon concomitant strontium addition. The uptake of strontium by the resins was found to be less sensitive to the addition of other metal components: the greatest decrease in the amount adsorbed was 60% of the ideal value in the two effluents for Amberlite® IRN77 and 75% for Amberlite™ IRN9652. It was therefore demonstrated that any performance tests carried out under idealized conditions should be exploited with much caution to predict the real performance of cation exchange resins under conditions of cation competition. PMID:24728575

  9. The use of some ion-exchange sorbing tracer cations in in-situ experiments in high saline groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1995-12-31

    The possibility to use alkali metals and alkaline earth metals as slightly sorbing tracers in in-situ sorption experiments in high saline groundwaters has been investigated. The cation exchange characteristics of granite and some fracture minerals (chlorite and calcite) have been studied using the proposed cations as tracers. The results show low Kd`s for Na, Ca and Sr ({approximately}0.1 ml/g), while the sorption is higher for the more electropositive cations (Rb, Cs and Ba). A higher contribution of irreversible sorption can also be observed for the latter group of cations. For calcite the sorption of all the tracers, except Ca, is lower compared to the corresponding sorption to granite and chlorite. Differences in selectivity coefficients and cation exchange capacity are obtained when using different size fractions of crushed granite. The difference is even more pronounced when comparing crushed granite to intact granite.

  10. Comparison of commercial cation exchange media for performing marine Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, J.B.; Burgess, R.M.; Kuhn, A.; Ho, K.T.

    1995-12-31

    In the environment, adverse effects of metals resulting from anthropogenic activity can be manifested as effluent, receiving water, and sediment toxicity to aquatic organisms. In TIEs, the chelator EDTA is commonly used to discriminate metal toxicity from other possible sources of toxicity present in an environmental sample. EDTA is extremely effective at reducing the aqueous bioavailability of toxic divalent transition metals (e.g., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) but, unlike C{sub 18} solid phase extraction (SPE), EDTA does not allow for retrieval of toxicity or toxicants for further identification. In this presentation, the authors report the results of comparisons of five commercially available cation exchange media for use in TIEs. Cation exchange media included three pre-packed SPE columns (Alltech, Supelco, Waters) and two loose packing materials evaluated with both metal spiked seawater and deionized water. Preliminary comparisons demonstrated that Alltech and Supelco SPE columns functioned most effectively. Blank toxicity to two marine species was not observed. Extensive studies of Alltech and Supelco columns using seawater spiked with a range of metal concentrations (e.g., 600 to 10 {micro}g/L) illustrated good precision and quality. both columns removed, on average, {ge} 90% of five metals from seawater. Furthermore, when eluted with small volumes of acid, {ge} 85% of original metal levels were recovered. Evaluations performed with a metal plating industry effluent demonstrated effective removal and subsequent elution of several toxic metals. This study shows the utility of commercial cation exchange columns for removing metals from seawater, and freshwater, for TIE applications.

  11. Effect of pH on protein adsorption capacity of strong cation exchangers with grafted layer.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Katarzyna; Polakovič, Milan

    2011-09-28

    The effect of pH on the static adsorption capacity of immunoglobulin G, human serum albumin, and equine myoglobin was investigated for a set of five strong cation exchangers with the grafted tentacle layer having a different ligand density. A sharp maximum of adsorption capacity with pH was observed for adsorbents with a high ligand density. The results were elucidated using the protein structure and calculations of pK(a) of ionizable groups of surface basic residues. Inverse size-exclusion experiments were carried out to understand the relation between the adsorption capacity and pore accessibility of the investigated proteins. PMID:21855072

  12. Improved Proteome and Phosphoproteome Analysis on a Cation Exchanger by a Combined Acid and Salt Gradient.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Jun; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Nagano, Maiko; Sato, Misako; Sato, Ayako; Fukamizu, Kazuna; Ishihama, Yasushi; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-08-16

    Currently used elution methods for strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography are based on two principles: salt and pH gradient. In this paper, we report the first observation of peptide elution by acid gradient. The degree of peptide separation using C18-SCX StageTip was greatly improved by our acid and salt-based elution method compared with a salt-based elution method. This development enabled us to identify over 22 000 phosphopeptides from 2 mg of protein without labor-intensive sample preparation. Our method is simple, robust, scalable, and low-cost and can be easily implemented without any special equipment or techniques. PMID:27436111

  13. In vitro adsorption removal of paraquat by activated carbon and cation exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Kitakouji, M.; Miyoshi, T.; Tanada, M.S.; Nakamura, T. )

    1989-06-01

    With the modernization of agriculture, environmental pollution and accidental poisoning by agricultural chemicals have become a great social problem. With the remarkable increase in the amount of paraquat used, the number of deaths by swallowing of paraquat has also increased in recent years. Presently, an effective antidote and treatment for paraquat poisoning is not available. For primary treatment, administration of an adsorbent is done at the same time as gastrointestinal lavage. As an adsorbent for paraquat poisoning, the efficacy of activated carbon, Fuller's Earth, bentonite, and a cation exchange resin have been reported. In this work, the authors discuss the adsorption characteristics of paraquat in artificial gastric juice and normal saline solution.

  14. N-heterocyclic phosphenium cations: syntheses and cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Christine A; Price, Jacquelyn T; Jennings, Michael C; McDonald, Robert; Jones, Nathan D

    2008-07-14

    A series of trifluoromethanesulfonate (OTf) salts of N-heterocyclic phospheniums (NHP) bearing phenyl (1a), para-methoxyphenyl (1b), 2,6-diisopropylphenyl (1c) and mesityl (1d) substituents is reported. The compounds are made by a modification to a literature procedure that improves the overall yields for and by 15 and 23%, respectively. Two unwanted side-products in the synthesis of , the diammonium salt, [(2,6-iPr-C6H3)N(H)2CH2CH2N(H)2(2,6-iPr-C6H3)]Cl2 (4) and the bisphosphine (2,6-iPr-C6H3)N(PCl2)CH2CH2N(PCl2)(2,6-iPr-C6H3) (5), are crystallographically characterized, as is the intermediate cyclic chlorophosphine, C1PN(4-OMe-C6H4)CH2CH2N(4-OMe-C6H4) (3b). The phenyl-substituted NHP is fully characterized, including by X-ray crystallography, for the first time; this compound contains a short P-O contact of 2.1850(14) A. Cycloaddition reactions of with 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene give the expected spirocyclic phospholeniums, 7,8-dimethyl-1,4-diaryl-1,4-diaza-5-phopshoniaspiro[4.4]non-7-ene, as their OTf salts (6a-d), while reactions with N,N'-dimesityl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene give, except in the case of , which is too bulky to react, the aza analogues, 1,4-dimesityl-6,9-diaryl-1,4,6,9-tetraaza-5-phosphoniaspiro[4.4]non-2-ene (7a, 7b and 7d). The sterically congested is in thermal equilibrium with and free diazadiene, and undergoes a substitution reaction with 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene to give . PMID:18580983

  15. Pullulan Production by Aureobasidium pullulans ATCC 201253 Cells Adsorbed onto Cellulose Anion and Cation Exchangers

    PubMed Central

    West, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The anion exchanger phosphocellulose and the cation exchanger triethylaminoethyl cellulose were used to immobilize cells of the fungus Aureobasidium pullulans ATCC 201253 and the adsorbed cells were subsequently investigated for their ability to produce the polysaccharide pullulan using batch fermentation. The cells adsorbed on the triethylaminoethyl cellulose at pH 7.5 produced higher pullulan levels than those cells immobilized on phosphocellulose at pH 4.0 for 2 cycles of 168 h at 30 °C. Relative to the initial cycle of 168 h, pullulan production by the cells immobilized on the triethylaminoethyl cellulose decreased slightly after 168 h of the second production cycle while pullulan production by the phosphocellulose-immobilized cells remained about the same after 168 h of the second production cycle. PMID:23762749

  16. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluents. Batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 h (2 h to load the feed and 3 h for the elution), with two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution. The separations achieved in the column are preserved by routing the column effluent through an alpha detector and using the response from the detector to select appropriate product fractions. The high-pressure ion exchange process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate; therefore it will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU. 3 figures, 1 table.

  17. Phospholipid exchange reactions within the liver cell

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, W. C.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isolated rat liver mitochondria do not synthesize labelled phosphatidylcholine from CDP-[14C]choline or any phospholipid other than phosphatidic acid from [32P]phosphate. The minimal labelling of phosphatidylcholine and other phosphoglycerides can be attributed to microsomal contamination. However, when mitochondria and microsomes are incubated together with [32P]phosphate, the phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine of the reisolated mitochondria become labelled, suggesting a transfer of phospholipids between the two fractions. 2. When liver microsomes or mitochondria containing labelled phosphatidylcholine are independently incubated with the opposite un-labelled fraction, there is a substantial and rapid exchange of the phospholipid between the two membranes. Exchange of phosphatidylinositol also occurs rapidly, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid exchange only slowly. There is no corresponding transfer of marker enzymes. The transfer of phosphatidylcholine does not occur at 0°, and there is no requirement for added substrate, ATP or Mg2+, but the omission of a heat-labile supernatant fraction markedly decreases the exchange. 3. After intravenous injection of [32P]phosphate, short-period labelling experiments of the individual phospholipids of rat liver microsomes and mitochondria in vivo give no evidence for a similar exchange process. However, the incubation of isolated microsomes and mitochondria with [32P]phosphate also fails on reisolation of the fractions to demonstrate a precursor–product relationship between the individual phospholipids of the two membranes. 4. The intraperitoneal injection of [32P]phosphate results in a far greater proportion of the dose entering the liver than does intravenous administration. After intraperitoneal administration of [32P]phosphate the specific radioactivities of the individual phospholipids are in the order microsomes > outer mitochondrial membrane > inner

  18. Tubulin exchanges divalent cations at both guanine nucleotide-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correia, J J; Beth, A H; Williams, R C

    1988-08-01

    The tubulin heterodimer binds a molecule of GTP at the nonexchangeable nucleotide-binding site (N-site) and either GDP or GTP at the exchangeable nucleotide-binding site (E-site). Mg2+ is known to be tightly linked to the binding of GTP at the E-site (Correia, J. J., Baty, L. T., and Williams, R. C., Jr. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17278-17284). Measurements of the exchange of Mn2+ for bound Mg2+ (as monitored by atomic absorption and EPR) demonstrate that tubulin which has GDP at the E-site possesses one high affinity metal-binding site and that tubulin which has GTP at the E-site possesses two such sites. The apparent association constants are 0.7-1.1 x 10(6) M-1 for Mg2+ and approximately 4.1-4.9 x 10(7) M-1 for Mn2+. Divalent cations do bind to GDP at the E-site, but with much lower affinity (2.0-2.3 x 10(3) M-1 for Mg2+ and 3.9-6.6 x 10(3) M-1 for Mn2+). These data suggest that divalent cations are involved in GTP binding to both the N- and E-sites of tubulin. The N-site metal exchanges slowly (kapp = 0.020 min-1), suggesting a mechanism involving protein "breathing" or heterodimer dissociation. The N-site metal exchange rate is independent of the concentration of protein and metal, an observation consistent with the possibility that a dynamic breathing process is the rate-limiting step. The exchange of Mn2+ for Mg2+ has no effect on the secondary structure of tubulin at 4 degrees C or on the ability of tubulin to form microtubules. These results have important consequences for the interpretation of distance measurements within the tubulin dimer using paramagnetic ions. They are also relevant to the detailed mechanism of divalent cation release from microtubules after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:3392036

  19. Effects of biofouling on ion transport through cation exchange membranes and microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Jin; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Ajayi, Folusho F; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Yu, Hye-Weon; Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, In S

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of biofouling on the electrochemical properties of cation exchange membranes (CEMs), such as membrane electrical resistance (MER), specific proton conductivity (SC), and ion transport number (t(+)), in addition to on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. CEM biofouling using a 15.5 ± 4.6 μm biofilm was found to slightly increase the MER from 15.65 Ω cm(2) (fresh Nafion) to 19.1 Ω cm(2), whereas an increase of almost two times was achieved when the electrolyte was changed from deionized water to an anolyte containing a high cation concentration supporting bacterial growth. The simple physical cleaning of CEMs had little effect on the Coulombic efficiency (CE), whereas replacing a biofouled CEM with new one resulted in considerable increase of up to 59.3%, compared to 45.1% for a biofouled membrane. These results clearly suggest the internal resistance increase of MFC was mainly caused by the sulfonate functional groups of CEM being occupied with cations contained in the anolyte, rather than biofouling itself. PMID:20659795

  20. Cation-exchange chromatography of peptides on poly(2-sulfoethyl aspartamide)-silica.

    PubMed

    Alpert, A J; Andrews, P C

    1988-06-29

    A strong cation-exchange material, poly(2-sulfoethyl aspartamide)-silica (PolySULFOETHYL Aspartamide) was developed for purification and analysis of peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography. All peptides examined were retained at pH 3, even when the amino terminus was the only basic group. Peptides were eluted in order of increasing number of basic residues with a salt gradient. Capacity was high, as was selectivity and column efficiency. This new column material displays modest mixed-mode effects, allowing the resolution of peptides having identical charges at a given pH. The selectivity can be manipulated by the addition of organic solvent to the mobile phases; this increases the retention of some peptides and decreases the retention of others. The retention in any given case may reflect a combination of steric factors and non-electrostatic interactions. Selectivity was complementary to that of reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) materials. Excellent purifications were obtained by sequential use of PolySULFOETHYL Aspartamide and RPC columns for purification of peptides from crude tissue extracts. The new cation exchanger is quite promising as a supplement to RPC for general peptide chromatography. PMID:2844843

  1. First Cationic Uranyl-Organic Framework with Anion-Exchange Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhuanling; Wang, Yanlong; Li, Yuxiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2016-07-01

    By controlling the extent of hydrolysis during the self-assembly process of a zwitterionic-based ligand with uranyl cations, we observed a structural evolution from the neutral uranyl-organic framework [(UO2)2(TTTPC)(OH)O(COOH)]·1.5DMF·7H2O (SCU-6) to the first cationic uranyl-organic framework with the formula of [(UO2)(HTTTPC)(OH)]Br·1.5DMF·4H2O (SCU-7). The crystal structures of SCU-6 and SCU-7 are layers built with tetranuclear and dinuclear uranyl clusters, respectively. Exchangeable halide anions are present in the interlaminar spaces balancing the positive charge of layers in SCU-7. Therefore, SCU-7 is able to effectively remove perrhenate anions from aqueous solution. Meanwhile, the H2PO4(-)-exchanged SCU-7 material exhibits a moderate proton conductivity of 8.70 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 50 °C and 90% relative humidity, representing nearly 80 times enhancement compared to the original material. PMID:27310580

  2. Preparation and characterization of high capacity, strong cation-exchange fiber based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Schwellenbach, Jan; Taft, Florian; Villain, Louis; Strube, Jochen

    2016-05-20

    Motivated by the demand for more economical capture and polishing steps in downstream processing of protein therapeutics, a novel strong cation-exchange chromatography stationary phase based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) high surface area short-cut fibers is presented. The fiber surface is modified by grafting glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and a subsequent derivatization leading to sulfonic acid groups. The obtained cation-exchange fibers have been characterized and compared to commercially available resin and membrane based adsorbers. High volumetric static binding capacities for lysozyme (90mg/mL) and polyclonal human IgG (hIgG, 92mg/mL) were found, suggesting an efficient multi-layer binding within the grafted hydrogel layer. A packed bed of randomly orientated fibers has been tested for packing efficiency, permeability and chromatographic performance. High dynamic binding capacities for lysozyme (50mg/mL) and hIgG (54mg/mL) were found nearly independent of the bed-residence time, revealing a fast mass-transport mechanism. Height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) values in the order of 0.1 cm and a peak asymmetry factor (AF) of 1.8 have been determined by tracer experiments. Additionally inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) revealed a bimodal structure within the fiber bed, consisting of larger transport channels, formed by the voidage between the fibers, and a hydrogel layer with porous properties. PMID:27106396

  3. Purification of urokinase by combined cation exchanger and affinity chromatographic cartridges.

    PubMed

    Hou, K C; Zaniewski, R

    1990-02-23

    Crude urokinase from human urine processed through foam flotation and ammonium sulfate precipitation containing 720 National Health Institute Committee on Thrombolytic Agents U/mg activity was purified by an SP cation exchanger followed by a zinc-chelated affinity chromatographic cartridge. The cartridges were of a radial-flow type formed by using acrylic and cellulose composite matrices. The high rigidity of the matrix structure permits fast flow of protein solutions (liters per minute) and thus allows processing of a large volume of crude urokinase under low operating pressures. A greater than six-fold increase in specific enzyme activity of urokinase was achieved by adsorbing and eluting 1 l of a 3 mg/ml crude urokinase solution on an SP cartridge. The eluent was further purified by passing through a zinc-chelated affinity cartridge to achieve greater than a eighteen-fold increase in urokinase specific activity. This report demonstrates the combined use of a cation exchanger with zinc-chelated chromatographic cartridges in purifying urokinase on a relatively large scale. The relationship between the amount of zinc chelated in the matrix to its effect on urokinase purification is also discussed. PMID:2329161

  4. New cation-exchange material based on a sulfonated 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene monomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphan, O.; Schottland, P.; Le Gall, P.-Y.; Chevrot, C.

    1998-06-01

    The electrochemical oxidation, in aqueous medium, of a 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene monomer functionalized by a sulfonate group exhibiting cation-exchange properties, allows the synthesis of a new type of water-soluble material. In order to synthesize in water, by oxidative electropolymerization, polymer films of controlled thickness containing attached sulfonate groups, we have investigated the polymerization of the functionalized monomer in the presence of the unsubstituted one without supporting electrolyte. Using an equimolar mixture (0.01 mol/l) of both monomers, copolymers exhibiting cation exchange abilities have been synthesized. As an example, th easy incorporation of hexaamine-ruthenium(III) into one of these copolymers is briefly reported. L'oxydation électrochimique en milieu aqueux d'un monomère de type 3,4- éthylènedioxythiophène fonctionnalisé par un groupement sulfonate permet d'envisager la synthèse d'un nouveau type de polymère hydrosoluble. Afin d'obtenir électrochimiquement en milieu aqueux, un film de polymère d'épaisseur contrôlée contenant des groupements sulfonates, nous avons evisagé de polymériser ce monomère en présence de son homologue non substitué. En partant d'un mélange équimolaire (0.01 mol/l) des deux monomères et en l'absence d'électrolyte support, nous avons synthétisé un matériau possédant des propriétés d'échange de cations. A titre d'exemple, nous présentons brièvement l'incorporation d'un complexe hexaaminé du ruthénium(III) dans un de ces copolymères.

  5. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  6. Morphologically Aligned Cation-Exchange Membranes by a Pulsed Electric Field for Reverse Electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ju-Hyuk; Kim, Seok; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2015-07-21

    A low-resistance ion-exchange membrane is essential to achieve the high-performance energy conversion or storage systems. The formation methods for low-resistance membranes are various; one of the methods is the ion channel alignment of an ion-exchange membrane under a direct current (DC) electric field. In this study, we suggest a more effective alignment method than the process with the DC electric field. First, an ion-exchange membrane was prepared under a pulsed electric field [alternating current (AC) mode] to enhance the effectiveness of the alignment. The membrane properties and the performance in reverse electrodialysis (RED) were then examined to assess the membrane resistance and ion selectivity. The results show that the membrane electrical resistance (MER) had a lower value of 0.86 Ω cm(2) for the AC membrane than 2.13 Ω cm(2) observed for the DC membrane and 4.30 Ω cm(2) observed for the pristine membrane. Furthermore, RED achieved 1.34 W/m(2) of maximum power density for the AC membrane, whereas that for the DC membrane was found to be 1.14 W/m(2) [a RED stack assembled with CMX, used as a commercial cation-exchange membrane (CEM), showed 1.07 W/m(2)]. Thereby, the novel preparation process for a remarkable low-resistance membrane with high ion selectivity was demonstrated. PMID:26114376

  7. Evolution of hollow TiO2 nanostructures via the Kirkendall effect driven by cation exchange with enhanced photoelectrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanhao; Yin, Xin; Kvit, Alexander; Wang, Xudong

    2014-05-14

    Hollow nanostructures are promising building blocks for electrode scaffolds and catalyst carriers in energy-related systems. In this paper, we report a discovery of hollow TiO2 nanostructure evolution in a vapor-solid deposition system. By introducing TiCl4 vapor pulses to ZnO nanowire templates, we obtained TiO2 tubular nanostructures with well-preserved dimensions and morphology. This process involved the cation exchange reaction between TiCl4 vapor and ZnO solid and the diffusion of reactants and products in their vapor or solid phases, which was likely a manifestation of the Kirkendall effect. The characteristic morphologies and the evolution phenomena of the hollow nanostructures from this vapor-solid system were in a good agreement with the Kirkendall effect discovered in solution systems. Complex hollow TiO2 nanostructures were successfully acquired by replicating various ZnO nanomorphologies, suggesting that this unique cation exchange process could also be a versatile tool for nanostructure replication in vapor-solid growth systems. The evolution of TiO2 nanotubes from ZnO NW scaffolds was seamlessly integrated with TiO2 NR branch growth and thus realized a pure TiO2-phased 3D NW architecture. Because of the significantly enlarged surface area and the trace amount of Zn left in the TiO2 crystals, such 3D TiO2 nanoforests demonstrated enhanced photoelectrochemical performance particularly under AM (air mass) 1.5G illumination, offering a new route for hierarchical functional nanomaterial assembly and application. PMID:24679077

  8. Solubility and Cation Exchange Properties of Synthetic Hydroxyapatite and Clinoptilolite Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, Raymond E.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    A zeoponic plant growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component. These systems: 1) can serve as a controllable and renewable fertilization system to provide plant growth nutrients; 2) can mitigate the adverse effects of contamination due to leaching of highly soluble and concentrated fertilizers; and 3) are being considered as substrates for plant growth in regenerative life-support systems for long-duration space missions. Batch-equilibrium studies of the dissolution and ion-exchange properties of mixtures of naturally-occurring Wyoming clinoptilolite (a zeolite) exchanged with K(+) or NH4(+); and synthetic hydroxyapatite were conducted to determine: 1) the plant availability of the macro-nutrients NH4-N, P, K, Ca, and Mg and 2) the effects of varying the clinoptilolite to hydroxyapatite ratio and the ratio of exchangeable cations (K(+) vs. NH4(+)) on clinoptilolite extraframework sites. The nutrients NH4-N (19.7 to 73.6 mg L(sup -1), P (0.57 to 14.99 mg L(sup- 1), K (14.8 to 104.9 mg L(sup -1), and Mg (0.11 to 6.68mg L(sup -1) are available to plants at sufficient levels. Solution Ca concentrations (0.47 to 3.40 mg L(sup -1) are less than optimal. Solution concentrations of NH4(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) all decreased with increasing clinoptilolite to hydroxyapatite ratio in the sample. Solution concentrations of phosphorous initially increased, reached a maximum value and then decreased with increasing clinoptilolite to hydroxyapatite ratio in the sample. The NH4(+) -exchanged clinoptilolite is more efficient in dissolving synthetic hydroxyapatite than the K(+) -exchanged clinoptilolite. This suggests that NH4(+), which is less selective at clinoptilolite extraframework sites than K(+) is exchanged more readily by Ca(2+) and thereby enhances the dissolution of the synthetic hydroxyapatite.

  9. A systematic study of functionalized oxiranes as initiating groups for cationic polycyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Rajendar, Goreti; Corey, E J

    2015-05-01

    Three different methods have been developed that effectively utilize chiral oxiranes derived from Katsuki-Sharpless epoxidation of allylic alcohols as initiating groups for cationic cyclization of unsaturated substrates to form chiral polycycles. This type of transformation has previously been problematic. These employ either epoxy-methoximes, vinyl-substituted oxiranes, or hydroxymethyl oxiranes. All three approaches are described in detail. In addition, this research has led to possible explanations for previously encountered difficulties in this area and provided two new insights into the Lewis acid activation of oxiranes. The methodology described herein constitutes a valuable link between two powerful synthetic constructions, enantioselective Katsuki-Sharpless epoxidation and cationic polycyclization reactions. PMID:25871500

  10. Oxygen exchange reactions catalyzed by vacuolar H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase. Evidence for reversible formation of enzyme-bound pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Baykov, A A; Kasho, V N; Bakuleva, N P; Rea, P A

    1994-08-22

    Vacuolar membrane-derived vesicles isolated from Vigna radiata catalyze oxygen exchange between medium phosphate and water. On the basis of the inhibitor sensitivity and cation requirements of the exchange activity, it is almost exclusively attributable to the vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase). The invariance of the partition coefficient and the results of kinetic modeling indicate that exchange proceeds via a single reaction pathway and results from the reversal of enzyme-bound pyrophosphate synthesis. Comparison of the exchange reactions catalyzed by V-PPase and soluble PPases suggests that the two classes of enzyme mediate P(i)-HOH exchange by the same mechanism and that the intrinsic reversibility of the V-PPase is no greater than that of soluble PPases. PMID:8070586

  11. Effects of exchangeable cation composition on the thermal expansion/contraction of clinoptilolite

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1984-12-31

    To understand and predict the effects of a thermal pulse induced by a radioactive waste repository on clinoptilolite-bearing rocks, the lattice parameters of 6 natural and 3 cation-exchanged (Ca, K, Na) clinoptilolites were studied as a function of temperature. The samples were examined at room temperature, under vacuum, and at 50{sup 0}C increments to 300{sup 0}C using a high-temperature x-ray powder diffractometer. The unit cell of all samples decreased in volume between 20 and 300{sup 0}C; Na-saturated clinoptilolite underwent the greatest volume decrease (8.4%) and K-saturated clinoptilolite the smallest (1.6%), of the clinoptilolites studied. The volume decrease for the Ca-saturated clinoptilolite was 3.6%. The highest percentage decrease for each sample was along the b axis, generally 80 to 90% of the total volume decrease. The change in the a axis was the smallest and was usually <5%, although 26.5% of the contraction of the Na-exchanged clinoptilolite was along a. The bulk of the volume contraction of many samples occurred on evacuation at room temperature, demonstrating that the observed changes were due to water loss and not to temperature-induced structural changes. Low-angle scattering was significantly reduced upon evacuation for every sample, and the 110 reflection of clinoptilolite at 7.35{sup 0}2 {theta} became obvious, whereas it was not in the untreated samples. These data show that the effects of heating on the unit-cell volume of clinoptilolite depend strongly on the exchangeable cation content. Significant reductions in the unit-cell volumes of natural, mixed Na-K-Ca clinoptilolites could take place in rocks in a repository environment, particularly if the clinoptilolites occurred in unsaturated, dehydrated rock. The unit-cell volumes of clinoptilolites in partially saturated rocks at temperatures below 100{sup 0}C, however, should not decrease significantly.

  12. Permethyl Cobaltocenium (Cp*2Co+) as an Ultra-Stable Cation for Polymer Hydroxide-Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuang; Wang, Junhua; Kaspar, Robert B.; Fang, Qianrong; Zhang, Bingzi; Bryan Coughlin, E.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxide (OH−)-exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer electrolytes enabling the use of affordable and earth-abundant electrocatalysts for electrochemical energy-conversion devices such as HEM fuel cells, HEM electrolyzers, and HEM solar hydrogen generators. Many HEM cations exist, featuring desirable properties, but new cations are still needed to increase chemical stability at elevated temperatures. Here we introduce the permethyl cobaltocenium [(C5Me5)2Co(III)+ or Cp*2Co+] as an ultra-stable organic cation for polymer HEMs. Compared with the parent cobaltocenium [(C5H5)2Co(III)+ or Cp2Co+], Cp*2Co+ has substantially higher stability and basicity. With polysulfone as an example, we demonstrated the feasibility of covalently linking Cp*2Co+ cation to polymer backbone and prepared Cp*2Co+-functionalized membranes as well. The new cation may be useful in designing more durable HEM electrochemical devices. PMID:26119573

  13. Permethyl Cobaltocenium (Cp*2Co+) as an Ultra-Stable Cation for Polymer Hydroxide-Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shuang; Wang, Junhua; Kaspar, Robert B.; Fang, Qianrong; Zhang, Bingzi; Bryan Coughlin, E.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxide (OH-)-exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer electrolytes enabling the use of affordable and earth-abundant electrocatalysts for electrochemical energy-conversion devices such as HEM fuel cells, HEM electrolyzers, and HEM solar hydrogen generators. Many HEM cations exist, featuring desirable properties, but new cations are still needed to increase chemical stability at elevated temperatures. Here we introduce the permethyl cobaltocenium [(C5Me5)2Co(III)+ or Cp*2Co+] as an ultra-stable organic cation for polymer HEMs. Compared with the parent cobaltocenium [(C5H5)2Co(III)+ or Cp2Co+], Cp*2Co+ has substantially higher stability and basicity. With polysulfone as an example, we demonstrated the feasibility of covalently linking Cp*2Co+ cation to polymer backbone and prepared Cp*2Co+-functionalized membranes as well. The new cation may be useful in designing more durable HEM electrochemical devices.

  14. Salbutamol versus cation-exchange resin (kayexalate) for the treatment of nonoliguric hyperkalemia in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Hakam; Khalaf, Mona; Dana, Ahmed; Yaseen, Noha; Darwich, Maha

    2008-03-01

    Our objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of rectal cation-exchange resin (Kayexalate) versus salbutamol infusion for the treatment of nonoliguric hyperkalemia (NOHK) in preterm infants. Data of all neonates born with NOHK during the study period of 6 years and 8 months were recorded. Diagnostic criteria of NOHK included serum potassium (SK) concentration > or = 7 mmol/L during the first 72 hours of life with urine output > or = 1 mL/kg/hour. This before-after study was divided according to the date of admission; the first 15 patients were treated with Kayexalate enema 1 g/kg every 4 hours, and the remaining 30 patients were treated with intravenous salbutamol infusion as 4 mug/kg every 4 hours. Treatment discontinued when SK became < 6 mmol/L. SK was measured every 4 hours. Daily urine was collected. Fluid intake and output, serum electrolytes, urea, creatinine, and glucose concentrations were obtained in all infants every 12 hours. All infants were observed with a cardiorespiratory monitor and oxygen saturation and blood pressure measurements. Perinatal characteristics in both groups were comparable. Mean gestational age was 26 and 28 weeks for salbutamol and Kayexalate, respectively. The peak of SK ranged between 7 and 9.3 mmol/L in the Kayexalate group and between 7 and 8.7 mmol/L in the salbutamol group ( P = 0.64). At 12 hours of treatment, SK became normal in only 4 patients (26%) in the Kayexalate group compared with 18 patients (60%) in the salbutamol group ( P = 0.003). The number of doses of Kayexalate administration was significantly higher than the doses of salbutamol ( P = 0.003). No significant side effects were detected in the salbutamol-treated infants. In contrast, there were two cases of severe ventricular tachycardia and one case of intestinal obstruction in the cation-exchange resin group. We concluded that salbutamol infusion is more effective with faster action and safer than cation-exchange resin (Kayexalate) for the treatment of

  15. Characterization of perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC surface modified with halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A.; Afonin, D.; Kononenko, N.; Shkirskaya, S.

    2015-10-01

    The electrical conductivity and diffusion permeability through perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC (Russian analog of the Nafion-type membrane), whose surface is modified by nanotubes of halloysite using short exposures of low temperature microwave plasma, are theoretically investigated using the Nernst-Planck approach. The method of quantitative evaluation of physicochemical parameters (individual and averaged diffusion coefficients and averaged distribution coefficients of ion pairs in the membrane) of the systems `electrolyte solution - bi-layer ion-exchange membrane - water/electrolyte solution', which was proposed by us earlier, is further developed. The aforementioned parameters of modified MF-4SC/halloysite membranes were found using the least squares method. For this purpose we used electrical conductivity as well as diffusion permeability data experimentally obtained for NaCl and HCl solutions of different concentration. A new model of bi-layer membrane system can be used for refining the calculated results by taking into account the difference between co- and counter-ion diffusivities inside the membrane layers. We showed that grafting the layer of halloysite nanotubes onto the membrane surface noticeably affects the exchange capacity as well as the structural and transport characteristics of the original perfluorinated membrane. In particular, such a membrane may show weak asymmetry of diffusion permeability when its position inside a measuring cell is changed. Hybrid MF-4SC/halloysite membranes can thus be productively used in fuel cells and catalysis.

  16. Heat exchanger development at Reaction Engines Ltd.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varvill, Richard

    2010-05-01

    The SABRE engine for SKYLON has a sophisticated thermodynamic cycle with heat transfer between the fluid streams. The intake airflow is cooled in an efficient counterflow precooler, consisting of many thousand small bore thin wall tubes. Precooler manufacturing technology has been under investigation at REL for a number of years with the result that flightweight matrix modules can now be produced. A major difficulty with cooling the airflow to sub-zero temperatures at low altitude is the problem of frost formation. Frost control technology has been developed which enables steady state operation. The helium loop requires a top cycle heat exchanger (HX3) to deliver a constant inlet temperature to the main turbine. This is constructed in silicon carbide and the feasibility of manufacturing various matrix geometries has been investigated along with suitable joining techniques. A demonstration precooler will be made to run in front of a Viper jet engine at REL's B9 test facility in 2011. This precooler will incorporate full frost control and be built from full size SABRE engine modules. The facility will incorporate a high pressure helium loop that rejects the absorbed heat to a bath of liquid nitrogen.

  17. Continuous process of preparation of n-butyl(meth)acrylate by esterification of (meth)acrylic acid by butanol on thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznaya, L.L.; Karakhanov, R.A.; Lunin, A.F.; Magadov, R.S.; Meshcheryakov, S.V.; Mkrtychan, V.R.; Fomin, V.A.

    1987-11-10

    The authors propose an effective thermostable sulfo-cation exchanger based on polymers with a system of conjugated bonds, sulfopolyphenylene ketone (SPP) differing from the known cation exchangers by the high thermostability (up to 250/sup 0/C), and also having the effect of the stabilization of the double bond in unsaturated monomers. The combination of inhibiting and cation exchange properties makes it also possible to use these sulfo-cation exchangers in the processes of esterification of (meth)acrylic acids by alcohols without addition of special inhibitors. The SPP catalyst was tested in esterification processes of acrylic an methacrylic acid by butanol at a pilot plant.

  18. A continuous process for biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with cation-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaohui; Zhang, Aiqing; Li, Jianxin; He, Benqiao

    2011-02-01

    Continuous esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) from acidified oil with methanol was carried out with NKC-9 cation-exchange resin in a fixed bed reactor with an internal diameter of 25 mm and a height of 450 mm to produce biodiesel. The results showed that the FFA conversion increased with increases in methanol/oil mass ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst bed height, whereas decreased with increases in initial water content in feedstock and feed flow rate. The FFA conversion kept over 98.0% during 500 h of continuous esterification processes under 2.8:1 methanol to oleic acid mass ratio, 44.0 cm catalyst bed height, 0.62 ml/min feed flow rate and 65°C reaction temperature, showing a much high conversion and operational stability. Furthermore, the loss of sulfonic acid groups from NKC-9 resin into the production was not found during continuous esterification. In sum, NKC-9 resin shows the potential commercial applications to esterification of FFA. PMID:21078550

  19. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, Martha A.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  20. Kaolins: sources of differences in cation-exchange capacities and cesium retention

    SciTech Connect

    Lim. C.H.; Jackson, M.L.; Koons, R.D.; Helmke, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    Seven kaolins from Georgia (southeastern USA), ranging from high to low commercial grade, were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction and chemical techniques to establish that the variation in quality was caused by impurities. The Ca and Cs cation-exchange capacities (CEC) varied from 2.67 to 8.17 and from 3.29 to 8.77 meq/100 g, respectively. The external surface CEC of kaolinite ranged from 0 to 1 meq/100 g. The Cs-retention capacity (0.19 to 1.14 meq/100 g) was closely related to Cs-measured vermiculite content and this content plus specific surface mica content. The Cs retention appeared to be primarily related to the presence of interlayer wedges at mica/vermiculite XY interfaces.

  1. A New Cation-Exchange Method for Accurate Field Speciation of Hexavalent Chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, James W.; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2003-01-01

    A new cation-exchange method for field speciation of Cr(VI) has been developed to meet present stringent regulatory standards and to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The new method allows measurement of Cr(VI) concentrations as low as 0.05 micrograms per liter, storage of samples for at least several weeks prior to analysis, and use of readily available analytical instrumentation. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the determination in waters over the pH range of 2 to 11 and Fe concentrations up to 1 milligram per liter are equal to or better than existing methods such as USEPA method 218.6. Time stability of preserved samples is a significant advantage over the 24-hour time constraint specified for USEPA method 218.6.

  2. Bioaccessibility of metal cations in soil is linearly related to its water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Laird, Brian D; Peak, Derek; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-05-01

    Site-specific risk assessments often incorporate the concepts of bioaccessibility (i.e., contaminant fraction released into gastrointestinal fluids) or bioavailability (i.e., contaminant fraction absorbed into systemic circulation) into the calculation of ingestion exposure. We evaluated total and bioaccessible metal concentrations for 19 soil samples under simulated stomach and duodenal conditions using an in vitro gastrointestinal model. We demonstrated that the median bioaccessibility of 23 metals ranged between <1 and 41% under simulated stomach conditions and < 1 and 63% under simulated duodenal conditions. Notably, these large differences in metal bioaccessibility were independent of equilibrium solubility and stability constants. Instead, the relationship (stomach phase R = 0.927; duodenum phase R = 0.891) between bioaccessibility and water exchange rates of metal cations (k(H₂O)) indicated that desorption kinetics may influence if not control metal bioaccessibility. PMID:21466150

  3. Quantitative separation of gallium from other elements by cation-exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    van der Walt, T.N.; Strelow, F.W.E.

    1983-02-01

    Trace amounts and up to 1.5 mg of gallium can be separated from up to gram amounts of Al, Cd, Cu, In, Mn, Ni, Pb, U(VI), and many other elements by eluting these elements with 8.0 M hydrochloric acid from a column containing 13.0 mL (3.0 g) of AG 50W-X4 cation-exchange resin of 100-200 mesh particle size in the H-form. Gallium can be separated from up to 2 g of iron(II) and up to 10 mg of scandium by eluting the iron with 8.0 M hydrochloric acid containing 0.30% titanium(III) chloride and eluting the scandium with 7.0 M hydrochloric acid. The retained gallium is effectively eluted with 2.5 M hydrochloric acid. Separations are sharp and quantitative. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluent. By using two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution, batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 hours (2 hours to load the feed and 3 hours for the elution). The number of effluent product fractions and the amount of actinides that must be collected in intermediate fractions are minimized by monitoring response from a flow-through alpha-detector. This process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate, and will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU.

  5. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  6. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium

  7. Pion double charge exchange reactions leading to double pionic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.; Oset, E.; Vincente-Vacas, M.J. ); Hirenzaki, S.; Toki, H. )

    1992-10-20

    In this paper, the authors study theoretically pion double charge exchange reactions leading to double pionic atoms. The reaction cross-sections with two pions in the deeper bound pionic orbits in [sup 208]Pb are calculated with realistic pionic atom wave functions and distortion effects. The cross-sections are found to be d[sup 2] [sigma]/dEd[Omega] [approx] 10[sup [minus] 3] [minus] 10[sup [minus] 4] [mu]b/srMeV, which are only a small fraction of the double charge exchange.

  8. Individual breathing reactions measured in hemoglobin by hydrogen exchange methods

    SciTech Connect

    Englander, S.W.; Calhoun, D.B.; Englander, J.J.; Kallenbach, N.R.; Liem, R.K.H.; Malin, E.L.; Mandal, C.; Rogero, J.R.

    1980-10-01

    Protein hydrogen exchange is generally believed to register some aspect of internal protein dynamics, but the kind of motion at work is not clear. Experiments are being done to identify the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange and to distinguish between local unfolding and accessibility-penetration mechanisms. Results with small molecules, polynucleotides, and proteins demonstrate that solvent accessibility is by no means sufficient for fast exchange. H-exchange slowing is quite generally connected with intramolecular H-bonding, and the exchange process depends pivotally on transient H-bond cleavage. At least in ..cap alpha..-helical structures, the cooperative aspect of H-bond cleavage mut be expressed in local unfolding reactions. Results obtained by use of a difference hydrogen exchange method appear to provide a direct measurement of transient, cooperative, local unfolding reactions in hemoglobin. The reality of these supposed coherent breathing units is being tested by using the difference H-exchange approach to tritium label the units one at a time and then attempting to locate the tritium by fragmenting the protein, separating the fragments, and testing them for label. Early results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  9. Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of thermally treated and. gamma. -irradiated phases of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger: separation of Al(III) from some metal ions and removal of cations from water

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate (ZAP) has been studied systematically after thermal and irradiation treatments. As a result, an increase in the ion-exchange capacity and a complete reversal in the selectivity sequence for some common metal ions has been observed on heating. The modified phase of ZAP has been utilized successfully for the quantitative separation of aluminum from numerous metal ions and for the removal of cations from water. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Transport of a reactive tracer in saturated alluvium described using a three-component cation-exchange model.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Enid J; Reimus, Paul W; Counce, Dale A

    2003-01-01

    A weakly sorbing cation, lithium, will be used as a reactive tracer in upcoming field tracer tests in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One objective of the field tests is to determine how well field-scale reactive transport can be predicted using transport parameters derived from laboratory experiments. This paper describes several laboratory lithium batch sorption and column transport experiments that were conducted using ground water and alluvium obtained from the site of the planned field tests. In the batch experiments, isotherms were determined over 2.5 orders of magnitude of lithium concentrations, corresponding to the range expected in the field tests. In addition to measuring equilibrium lithium concentrations, concentrations of other cations, namely Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+), were measured in the batch tests to determine Li(+)-exchangeable equilibria. This information was used in conjunction with alluvium cation exchange capacity measurements to parameterize a three-component cation-exchange model (EQUIL) that describes lithium sorption in the alluvium system. This model was then applied to interpret the transport behavior of lithium ion in saturated alluvium column tests conducted at three different lithium bromide injection concentrations. The concentrations were selected such that lithium ion either dominated, accounted for a little over half, or accounted for only a small fraction of the total cation equivalents in the injection solution. Although tracer breakthrough curves differed significantly under each of these conditions, with highly asymmetric responses occurring at the highest injection concentrations, the three-component cation-exchange model reproduced the observed transport behavior of lithium and the other cations in each case with a similar set of model parameters. In contrast, a linear K(d)-type sorption model could only match the lithium responses at the lowest injection concentration. The three-component model will

  11. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  12. Enhanced Cd2+ -selective root-tonoplast-transport in tobaccos expressing Arabidopsis cation exchangers.

    PubMed

    Koren'kov, V; Park, S; Cheng, N-H; Sreevidya, C; Lachmansingh, J; Morris, J; Hirschi, K; Wagner, G J

    2007-01-01

    Several Arabidopsis CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) encode tonoplast-localized transporters that appear to be major contributors to vacuolar accumulation/sequestration of cadmium (Cd(2+)), an undesirable pollutant ion that occurs in man largely as a result of dietary consumption of aerial tissues of food plants. But, ion-selectivity of individual CAX transporter types remains largely unknown. Here, we transformed Nicotiana tabacum with several CAX genes driven by the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and monitored divalent cation transport in root-tonoplast vesicles from these plants in order to select particular CAX genes directing high Cd(2+) antiporter activity in root tonoplast. Comparison of seven different CAX genes indicated that all transported Cd(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Mn(2+) to varying degrees, but that CAX4 and CAX2 had high Cd(2+) transport and selectivity in tonoplast vesicles. CAX4 driven by the CaMV 35S and FS3 [figwort mosaic virus (FMV)] promoters increased the magnitude and initial rate of Cd(2+)/H(+) exchange in root-tonoplast vesicles. Ion selectivity of transport in root-tonoplast vesicles isolated from FS3::CAX4-expressing plant lines having a range of gene expression was Cd(2+)>Zn(2+)>Ca(2+)>Mn(2+) and the ratios of maximal Cd(2+) (and Zn(2+)) versus maximal Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) transport were correlated with the levels of CAX4 expression. Root Cd accumulation in high CAX4 and CAX2 expressing lines was increased in seedlings grown with 0.02 muM Cd. These observations are consistent with a model in which expression of an Arabidopsis-gene-encoded, Cd(2+)-efficient antiporter in host plant roots results in greater root vacuole Cd(2+) transport activity, increased root Cd accumulation, and a shift in overall root tonoplast ion transport selectivity towards higher Cd(2+) selectivity. Results support a model in which certain CAX antiporters are somewhat more selective for particular divalent cations. PMID:16845524

  13. Dielectric phenomena in the cation exchanged/intercalation compounds of MPS[sub 3] materials

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The dielectric properties of CdPS[sub 3] and its cation exchanged/intercalation compounds were studied using ac impedance, dc resistance and dc photoconductivity measurements from [minus]130[degrees]C to 400[degrees]C. Cation-vacancy interactions were studied using infrared spectroscopy. Debye relaxation of dipolar motion is observed for the intercalated dipoles in these compounds. Pyridine molecules in the CdPS[sub 3]/Pyridine. H[sup +]/Pyridine compounds give activation energies of 15 to 45 KJ/mole. The activation energy is found to depend on the ratio of pyridine to pyridine [center dot] H[sup +]. CdPS[sub 3] and its cation exchanged/intercalation compounds show activated resistance and capacitance behaviors from 30[degrees]C to 400[degrees]C. The magnitude of the resistance decreases as the activation energy for this behavior increases. The magnitude of the capacitance increases as the activation energy increases. Both behaviors result from holes hopping among vacancy sites in the CdPS[sub 3] lattice. The trends in the activation energies result from vacancy-vacancy interactions that affect the energies of vacancies in the crystal. The wavelength dependent photoconductivity of CdPS[sub 3] shows peaks at 2.94 eV and 3.14 eV. The peaks are interpreted as arising from the excitation of electrons out of two types of vacancy sites in the crystal. The photoconductivity of a de-intercalated CdPS[sub 3]/Pyridine [center dot] H[sup +] crystal gives peaks at 2.95 eV and 3.45 eV. The photoconductivity is found to decrease on cooling and increase with the amount of water absorbed on the surfaces and edges of the crystal. The IR spectra of CdPS[sub 3]/Pyridine [center dot] H[sup +] compounds show consistent splittings in the NH[sup +] band. These splittings are interpreted as arising from the coupling between the fundamental NH[sup +] vibration in pyridine [center dot] H[sup +] and the vibrations of the vacancy site to which it is bound.

  14. Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water

    SciTech Connect

    B. Widman

    2003-01-01

    Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

  15. Laboratory Experiments on the Reactions of PAH Cations with Molecules and Atoms of Interstellar Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LePage, V.; Lee, H. S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    The C10H8(+) cation and its dehydrogenated derivatives, C10H7(+) and C10H6(+), have been studied using a selected ion flow tube (SIFT). Reactions with molecules and atoms of interstellar interest show that C10H8(+) reacts with N md O to give neutral products HCN and CO, respectively. C10H6(+) and C10H6(+) are moderately reactive and reactions proceed through association with molecules. The implications of these results for the depletion of C10H(n)(+) in the interstellar medium are briefly discussed.

  16. Bimolecular Coupling Reactions through Oxidatively Generated Aromatic Cations: Scope and Stereocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yubo; Villafane, Louis A.; Clausen, Dane J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromenes, isochromenes, and benzoxathioles react with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone to form stable aromatic cations that react with a range of nucleophiles. These oxidative fragment coupling reactions provide rapid access to structurally diverse heterocycles. Conducting the reactions in the presence of a chiral Brønsted acid results in the formation of an asymmetric ion pair that can provide enantiomerically enriched products in a rare example of a stereoselective process resulting from the generation of a chiral electrophile through oxidative carbon–hydrogen bond cleavage. PMID:23913987

  17. Quantification of unsaturated-zone alteration and cation exchange in zeolitized tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Bish, David L.; Carey, J. William; Levy, Schön S.

    2001-10-01

    Zeolitized horizons in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, are an important component in concepts for a high-level nuclear waste repository at this site. The use of combined quantitative X-ray diffraction and geochemical analysis allows measurement of the chemical changes that accompanied open-system zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. This approach also provides measures of the extent of chemical migration that has occurred in these horizons as a result of subsequent cation exchange. Mass-balance analysis of zeolitized horizons with extensive cation exchange (drill hole UZ-16) and with only minimal cation exchange (drill hole SD-9) shows that Al is essentially immobile. Although zeolitization occurred in an open system, the mass transfer of constituents other than water is relatively small in initial zeolitization, in contrast to the larger scales of cation exchange that can occur after zeolites have formed. Cation exchange in the clinoptilolite ± mordenite zeolitized horizons is seen in downward-diminishing concentration gradients of Ca, Mg, and Sr exchanged for Na and (to lesser extent) K. Comparison with data from drill hole SD-7, which has multiple zeolitized horizons above the water table, shows that the upper horizons accumulate Ca, Mg, and Sr to such an extent that transport of these elements to the deepest UZ zeolitized horizon can be blocked. Quantitative analysis of zeolite formation yields insight into processes that are implied from laboratory studies and modeling efforts but are otherwise unverified at the site. Such analysis also yields information not provided by or contradicted by some models of flow and transport. The results include the following: (1) evidence of effective downward flow through zeolitic horizons despite the low permeability of these horizons, (2) evidence that alkaline-earth elements accumulated by zeolites are mostly derived from eolian materials in surface soils, (3) validation of the very effective

  18. Estimating Soil Cation Exchange Capacity from Soil Physical and Chemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, S. M.; Emamgholizadeh, S.; Shahsavani, D.

    2014-12-01

    The soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) is an important soil characteristic that has many applications in soil science and environmental studies. For example, CEC influences soil fertility by controlling the exchange of ions in the soil. Measurement of CEC is costly and difficult. Consequently, several studies attempted to obtain CEC from readily measurable soil physical and chemical properties such as soil pH, organic matter, soil texture, bulk density, and particle size distribution. These studies have often used multiple regression or artificial neural network models. Regression-based models cannot capture the intricate relationship between CEC and soil physical and chemical attributes and provide inaccurate CEC estimates. Although neural network models perform better than regression methods, they act like a black-box and cannot generate an explicit expression for retrieval of CEC from soil properties. In a departure with regression and neural network models, this study uses Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) to estimate CEC from easily measurable soil variables such as clay, pH, and OM. CEC estimates from GEP and MARS are compared with measurements at two field sites in Iran. Results show that GEP and MARS can estimate CEC accurately. Also, the MARS model performs slightly better than GEP. Finally, a sensitivity test indicates that organic matter and pH have respectively the least and the most significant impact on CEC.

  19. Identification of a crucial histidine involved in metal transport activity in the Arabidopsis cation/H(+) exchanger CAX1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, yeast and bacteria, cation/H(+) exchangers (CAXs), have been shown to translocate Ca(2+) and other metals. The best characterized of these related transporters is the plant vacuolar-localized CAX1. We used site-directed mutagenesis to assess the impact of altering the seven histidine re...

  20. Synthesis and properties of a cation exchange resin prepared by the pyrolysis of starch in the presence of phytic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrfeld, J.

    1995-12-01

    A material having cation exchange and adsorption properties was prepared by the controlled pyrolysis of starch in the presence of a commercial phytic acid solution. Resins can be prepared with binding capacities of 0.7-5.7 meq/g. These resins also have the ability to remove atrazine from aqueous solutions.

  1. Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Using Macroporous Sulfonate Cation Exchange Resins in the Bead Form

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-08-16

    The use of cation exchange resin to product U{sub 3}O{sub 8} suitable for powder metallurgy fabrication of reactor fuel tubes with Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cores is being investigated. This report presents the results of those studies.

  2. Synthesis of Mesostructured Copper Sulfide by Cation Exchange and Liquid Crystal Templating

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeck, C R; Doyle, F M; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Han, T Y

    2005-08-01

    describe for the first time, the successful synthesis of highly ordered, mesostructured Cu{sub x}S, by combining the templating of the supramolecular assemblies of non-ionic amphiphilic polymer method with the cation exchange method to transform mesostructured cadmium sulfide (CdS) into mesostructured copper sulfides (CuS, Cu{sub 2}S).

  3. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  5. Near-Infrared Emitting CuInSe₂/CuInS₂ Dot Core/Rod Shell Heteronanorods by Sequential Cation Exchange.

    PubMed

    van der Stam, Ward; Bladt, Eva; Rabouw, Freddy T; Bals, Sara; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2015-11-24

    The direct synthesis of heteronanocrystals (HNCs) combining different ternary semiconductors is challenging and has not yet been successful. Here, we report a sequential topotactic cation exchange (CE) pathway that yields CuInSe2/CuInS2 dot core/rod shell nanorods with near-infrared luminescence. In our approach, the Cu(+) extraction rate is coupled to the In(3+) incorporation rate by the use of a stoichiometric trioctylphosphine-InCl3 complex, which fulfills the roles of both In-source and Cu-extracting agent. In this way, Cu(+) ions can be extracted by trioctylphosphine ligands only when the In-P bond is broken. This results in readily available In(3+) ions at the same surface site from which the Cu(+) is extracted, making the process a direct place exchange reaction and shifting the overall energy balance in favor of the CE. Consequently, controlled cation exchange can occur even in large and anisotropic heterostructured nanocrystals with preservation of the size, shape, and heterostructuring of the template NCs into the product NCs. The cation exchange is self-limited, stopping when the ternary core/shell CuInSe2/CuInS2 composition is reached. The method is very versatile, successfully yielding a variety of luminescent CuInX2 (X = S, Se, and Te) quantum dots, nanorods, and HNCs, by using Cd-chalcogenide NCs and HNCs as templates. The approach reported here thus opens up routes toward materials with unprecedented properties, which would otherwise remain inaccessible. PMID:26449673

  6. Near-Infrared Emitting CuInSe2/CuInS2 Dot Core/Rod Shell Heteronanorods by Sequential Cation Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The direct synthesis of heteronanocrystals (HNCs) combining different ternary semiconductors is challenging and has not yet been successful. Here, we report a sequential topotactic cation exchange (CE) pathway that yields CuInSe2/CuInS2 dot core/rod shell nanorods with near-infrared luminescence. In our approach, the Cu+ extraction rate is coupled to the In3+ incorporation rate by the use of a stoichiometric trioctylphosphine-InCl3 complex, which fulfills the roles of both In-source and Cu-extracting agent. In this way, Cu+ ions can be extracted by trioctylphosphine ligands only when the In–P bond is broken. This results in readily available In3+ ions at the same surface site from which the Cu+ is extracted, making the process a direct place exchange reaction and shifting the overall energy balance in favor of the CE. Consequently, controlled cation exchange can occur even in large and anisotropic heterostructured nanocrystals with preservation of the size, shape, and heterostructuring of the template NCs into the product NCs. The cation exchange is self-limited, stopping when the ternary core/shell CuInSe2/CuInS2 composition is reached. The method is very versatile, successfully yielding a variety of luminescent CuInX2 (X = S, Se, and Te) quantum dots, nanorods, and HNCs, by using Cd-chalcogenide NCs and HNCs as templates. The approach reported here thus opens up routes toward materials with unprecedented properties, which would otherwise remain inaccessible. PMID:26449673

  7. Bandgap tunable colloidal Cu-based ternary and quaternary chalcogenide nanosheets via partial cation exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Kim, Miri; Ra, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Jinkwon; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Copper based ternary and quaternary semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest for the fabrication of low cost photovoltaics. Although well-developed syntheses are available for zero dimensional (0D) nanoparticles, colloidal synthesis of two dimensional (2D) nanosheets remains a big challenge. Here we report, for the first time, a simple and reproducible cation exchange approach for 2D colloidal Cu2GeSe3, Cu2ZnGeSe4 and their alloyed Cu2GeSxSe3-x, Cu2ZnGeSxSe4-x nanosheets using pre-synthesized Cu2xSe nanosheets as a template. A mechanism for the formation of Cu2-xSe nanosheets has been studied in detail. In situ oxidation of Cu+ ions to form a CuSe secondary phase facilitates the formation of Cu2-xSe NSs. The obtained ternary and quaternary nanosheets have average lateral size in micrometers and thickness less than 5 nm. This method is general and can be extended to produce other important ternary semiconductor nanosheets such as CuIn1-xGaxSe2. The optical band gap of these nanosheets is tuned from 1 to 1.48 eV, depending on their composition.Copper based ternary and quaternary semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest for the fabrication of low cost photovoltaics. Although well-developed syntheses are available for zero dimensional (0D) nanoparticles, colloidal synthesis of two dimensional (2D) nanosheets remains a big challenge. Here we report, for the first time, a simple and reproducible cation exchange approach for 2D colloidal Cu2GeSe3, Cu2ZnGeSe4 and their alloyed Cu2GeSxSe3-x, Cu2ZnGeSxSe4-x nanosheets using pre-synthesized Cu2xSe nanosheets as a template. A mechanism for the formation of Cu2-xSe nanosheets has been studied in detail. In situ oxidation of Cu+ ions to form a CuSe secondary phase facilitates the formation of Cu2-xSe NSs. The obtained ternary and quaternary nanosheets have average lateral size in micrometers and thickness less than 5 nm. This method is general and can be extended to produce other important ternary

  8. Plant cation/H(+) exchangers (CAXs): biological functions and genetic manipulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic cations play decisive roles in many cellular and physiological processes and are essential components of plant nutrition. Therefore, the uptake of cations and their redistribution must be precisely controlled. Vacuolar antiporters are important elements in mediating the intracellular seque...

  9. Fabrication, characterization and photocatalytic properties of Ag/AgI/BiOI heteronanostructures supported on rectorite via a cation-exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yunfang; Fang, Jianzhang; Lu, Shaoyou; Wu, Yan; Chen, Dazhi; Huang, Liyan; Xu, Weicheng; Zhu, Ximiao; Fang, Zhanqiang

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Ag/AgI/BiOI-rectorite was prepared by twice cation-exchange process. • Ag/AgI/BiOI-rectorite photocatalyst possessed SPR and adsorption capacity. • Ag/AgI/BiOI-rectorite exhibited highly photocatalytic activity. • Trapped holes and ·O{sub 2}{sup −} were formed active species in the photocatalytic system. - Abstract: In this work, a new plasmonic photocatalyst Ag/AgI/BiOI-rectorite was prepared via a cation exchange process. The photocatalyst had been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, nitrogen sorption (BET), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The photocatalytic activity, which was evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and bisphenol A (BPA) under visible light irradiation, was enhanced significantly by loading Ag/AgI/BiOI nanoparticles onto rectorite. The photogenerated holes and superoxide radical (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) were both formed as active species for the photocatalytic reactions under visible light irradiation. The existence of metallic Ag particles, which possess the surface plasmon resonance effect, acted as an indispensable role in the photocatalytic reaction.

  10. Sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on montmorillonite clays: effects of exchangeable cations, pH, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenjie; Teng, Ying; Zhou, Qixing; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-10-01

    Sorption interaction of chlorimuron-ethyl with montmorillonite clays was investigated under varied types of exchangeable cation, pH, and ionic strength conditions. Chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on bentonites exhibited pronounced cation dependency, and the sorption ability increased as the sequence Ca(2+)- < Na(+)- < Al(3+)- < Fe(3+)-bentonite, due to different sorption mechanisms, whereas the cation dependency was influenced by the clay type and much weaker for montmorillonites. The decrease of pH at the range of 4.0-6.0 prominently increased sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on all cation-exchanged montmorillonite clays, and nearly a neglected sorption (about 2 %) can be observed at pH over 7.0. In the presence of CaCl2, sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on Fe(3+)-bentonite was promoted because of complexion of Ca(2+) and the surface of Fe(3+)-bentonite. However, as the concentration of CaCl2 increased, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on Ca(2+)- and Fe(3+)-exchanged bentonite decreased, suggesting that Ca bridging was not the prevailing mechanism for sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on these clays. Furthermore, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption was relatively sensitive to pH, and the change of pH may obscure effect of other factors on the sorption, so it was quite necessary to control pH at a constant value when the effect of other factor was being studied. PMID:25028319

  11. Analyzing freely dissolved concentrations of cationic surfactant utilizing ion-exchange capability of polyacrylate coated solid-phase microextraction fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Droge, Steven T J; Hermens, Joop L M

    2012-08-24

    A 7-μm polyacrylate (PA) coated fiber was successfully employed to determine freely dissolved concentrations of cationic surfactants by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and utilizing the capability of the PA-coating to sorb organic cations via ion-exchange at carboxylic groups. Measured fiber-water partitioning coefficients (K(fw)) were constant below a fiber loading of 2mmol per liter polyacrylate, allowing for simple and accurate analysis in a concentration range that is relevant from a risk assessment point of view. Ion-exchange was confirmed to be the main sorption mechanism because of a decreasing K(fw) with either higher CaCl(2) concentrations or lower pH, and maximum fiber uptake at the polyacrylate cation-exchange capacity (CEC, at 30mmol/L PA). Fiber-water sorption isotherms were established in various aqueous media in toxicological relevant concentrations. The developed SPME method has a high potential for application in ecotoxicological studies, as demonstrated in sorption studies with humic acid in different electrolyte solutions at aqueous concentrations down to the sub nM range. Cationic surfactant sorption affinities for humic acid also depend on medium composition but are orders of magnitude higher than to the PA fiber on a sorbent weight basis. PMID:22818738

  12. Ion/molecule reactions of 2-chloro- and 2-bromopropene radical cations with methanol and ethanol--FT-ICR spectrometry and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Büchner, Michael; Zipse, Hendrik

    2005-02-01

    Continuing the studies of ion/molecule reactions of haloalkene radical cations with nucleophiles, the reactions of the radical cations of 2-chloropropene, 1+, and 2-bromopropene. 2+, with methanol and ethanol, respectively, have been investigated by FT-ICR spectrometry and by computational analysis using DFT calculation (BHLYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//BHLYP/6-31 + G(d) level). Only slow reactions (reaction efficiency <1%) are observed for 1+/methanol and 2+/methanol. Slow proton transfer is the main process for 1+/methanol besides minor addition of methanol to 1+ followed by loss of HCl or Cl. Addition of methanol accompanied by loss of Br is the exclusive process observed for 2+/methanol. In contrast, both 1+ and 2+ react efficiently with ethanol yielding protonated acetaldehyde as the exclusive (1+) or by far dominant (2+) primary reaction product. The computational analysis of these ion/molecule reactions shows that in the case of 1+/methanol and 2+/methanol all processes are either endothermic or blocked by large activation energies. Nonetheless, addition of methanol to the ionized CC double bond of 1+ or 2+ is exothermic, yielding in each case a pair of isomeric [beta]-distonic methoxonium ions. A new reaction mechanism has been found for the HX (X = Cl, Br) elimination from the less stable isomer of the distonic intermediates. Further, an energetically favorable transition state has been detected for hydrogen atom transfer from the [alpha]-CH2 group of alcohol to the halogenoalkene radical cations. These findings lead to a revised mechanism of the oxidation process and provide a plausible explanation for the excessive H/D exchange between 1+ and CD3OH during their slow reaction.

  13. Hydrazine-promoted sequential cation exchange: a novel synthesis method for doped ternary semiconductor nanocrystals with tunable emission.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haibao; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Shuhong; Jiang, Yuan; Shao, Yujie; Bo, Fan; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-17

    Using ZnSe nanocrystals (NCs) as starting material, Ag-doped or Cu-doped ZnCdSe ternary NCs were prepared by hydrazine-promoted sequential cation exchange in aqueous media. The composition of the NCs can be flexibly controlled by varying the amount of intermediate Ag or Cu cation addition, thus changing the emission of the ternary NCs while preserving the NC size. According to Vegard's law, the as-prepared ternary NCs possess an alloyed structure. In addition, the ternary NCs obtained have a high quantum yield, strong stability and a broad optical tuning range. PMID:24334495

  14. Tuning Equilibrium Compositions in Colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe Nanocrystals Using Diffusion Doping and Cation Exchange.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Charles J; Chakraborty, Pradip; Kornowske, Lindsey M; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-01-26

    The physical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals can be tuned dramatically via composition control. Here, we report a detailed investigation of the synthesis of high-quality colloidal Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals by diffusion doping of preformed CdSe nanocrystals. Until recently, Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals proved elusive because of kinetic incompatibilities between Mn(2+) and Cd(2+) chemistries. Diffusion doping allows Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals to be prepared under thermodynamic rather than kinetic control, allowing access to broader composition ranges. We now investigate this chemistry as a model system for understanding the characteristics of nanocrystal diffusion doping more deeply. From the present work, a Se(2-)-limited reaction regime is identified, in which Mn(2+) diffusion into CdSe nanocrystals is gated by added Se(2-), and equilibrium compositions are proportional to the amount of added Se(2-). At large added Se(2-) concentrations, a solubility-limited regime is also identified, in which x = xmax = ∼0.31, independent of the amount of added Se(2-). We further demonstrate that Mn(2+) in-diffusion can be reversed by cation exchange with Cd(2+) under exactly the same reaction conditions, purifying Cd1-xMnxSe nanocrystals back to CdSe nanocrystals with fine tunability. These chemistries offer exceptional composition control in Cd1-xMnxSe NCs, providing opportunities for fundamental studies of impurity diffusion in nanocrystals and for development of compositionally tuned nanocrystals with diverse applications ranging from solar energy conversion to spin-based photonics. PMID:26643033

  15. Cross-ligation and exchange reactions catalyzed by hairpin ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Y; Koizumi, M; Sekiguchi, A; Ohtsuka, E

    1993-01-01

    The negative strand of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus (sTobRV(-)) contains a hairpin catalytic domain that shows self-cleavage and self-ligation activities in the presence of magnesium ions. We describe here that the minimal catalytic domain can catalyze a cross-ligation reaction between two kinds of substrates in trans. The cross-ligated product increased when the reaction temperature was decreased during the reaction from 37 degrees C to 4 degrees C. A two-stranded hairpin ribozyme, divided into two fragments between G45 and U46 in a hairpin loop, showed higher ligation activity than the nondivided ribozyme. The two stranded ribozyme also catalyzed an exchange reaction of the 3'-portion of the cleavage site. Images PMID:8441626

  16. Bond-forming reactions of small triply charged cations with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, James D; Parkes, Michael A; Price, Stephen D

    2013-08-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals that atomic and small molecular triply charged cations exhibit extensive bond-forming chemistry, following gas-phase collisions with neutral molecules. These experiments show that at collision energies of a few eV, I(3+) reacts with a variety of small molecules to generate molecular monocations and molecular dications containing iodine. Xe(3+) and CS2(3+) react in a similar manner to I(3+), undergoing bond-forming reactions with neutrals. A simple model, involving relative product energetics and electrostatic interaction potentials, is used to account for the observed reactivity. PMID:23843367

  17. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  18. Nitrogen removal from wastewater through microbial electrolysis cells and cation exchange membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vulnerability of water resources to nutrients led to progressively stricter standards for wastewater effluents. Modification of the conventional procedures to meet the new standards is inevitable. New technologies should give a priority to nitrogen removal. In this paper, ammonium chloride and urine as nitrogen sources were used to investigate the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) configured by cation exchange membrane (CEM) for electrochemical removal of nitrogen over open-and closed-circuit potentials (OCP and CCP) during biodegradation of organic matter. Results obtained from this study indicated that CEM was permeable to both organic and ammonium nitrogen over OCP. Power substantially mediated ammonium migration from anodic wastewater to the cathode, as well. With a urine rich wastewater in the anode, the maximum rate of ammonium intake into the cathode varied from 34.2 to 40.6 mg/L.h over CCP compared to 10.5-14.9 mg/L.h over OCP. Ammonium separation over CCP was directly related to current. For 1.46-2.12 mmol electron produced, 20.5-29.7 mg-N ammonium was removed. Current also increased cathodic pH up to 12, a desirable pH for changing ammonium ion to ammonia gas. Results emphasized the potential for MEC in control of ammonium through ammonium separation and ammonia volatilization provided that membrane characteristic is considered in their development. PMID:24533446

  19. Bandgap tunable colloidal Cu-based ternary and quaternary chalcogenide nanosheets via partial cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Kim, Miri; Ra, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Jinkwon; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-04-14

    Copper based ternary and quaternary semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest for the fabrication of low cost photovoltaics. Although well-developed syntheses are available for zero dimensional (0D) nanoparticles, colloidal synthesis of two dimensional (2D) nanosheets remains a big challenge. Here we report, for the first time, a simple and reproducible cation exchange approach for 2D colloidal Cu2GeSe3, Cu2ZnGeSe4 and their alloyed Cu2GeSxSe3-x, Cu2ZnGeSxSe4-x nanosheets using pre-synthesized Cu2xSe nanosheets as a template. A mechanism for the formation of Cu2-xSe nanosheets has been studied in detail. In situ oxidation of Cu(+) ions to form a CuSe secondary phase facilitates the formation of Cu2-xSe NSs. The obtained ternary and quaternary nanosheets have average lateral size in micrometers and thickness less than 5 nm. This method is general and can be extended to produce other important ternary semiconductor nanosheets such as CuIn1-xGaxSe2. The optical band gap of these nanosheets is tuned from 1 to 1.48 eV, depending on their composition. PMID:26744188

  20. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  1. [Preparation of highly hydrophilic strong cation exchangers and their applications in protein analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jizhong; Huang, Yanyan; Yang, Bo; Chang, Jianhua; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2013-04-01

    Based on the needs of new packing materials for rapid and efficient separation, purification and analysis of biomacromolecules, a novel sulfonic acid-type strong cation exchange resin (SP-G-PGMA SCX resin) was prepared. The porous poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres (PGMA) were selected as the matrix and glucose was used as the hydrophilic modifier to block the hydrophobic domains of PGMA beads. Glucose modification on PGMA beads improved the biocompatibility and reduced the non-specific adsorption so as to increase the recoveries of protein. The PGMA beads possess the porous structure and the relatively high specific surface area, which make the PGMA-based resins good permeability and high loading capacity. The application of such SP-G-PGMA SCX resin for the chromatographic separation of biomacromolecules was explored. Four basic proteins were baseline separated within 6 min with the column size of 100 mm x 4.6 mm. The adsorption capacity of lysozyme on SP-G-PGMA SCX resin was determined as 39.5 g/L. The results make the material promising for the separation and purification of biomacromolecules. PMID:23898627

  2. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements. PMID:26028510

  3. Effects of experimental conditions on extraction yield of extracellular polymeric substances by cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jinwoo; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W; Hur, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Effects of experimental conditions on the yield of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) extraction by cation exchange resin (CER) were investigated using activated sludge flocs. The experimental variables included resin dose, extraction time, sample dilution, and storage time. An empirical model was proposed to describe the kinetics of extraction process. The extraction yield increases with the extraction time and CER dose until it reached the maximum amount of EPS extraction. The maximum yield of EPS was affected as well by the sample dilution, exhibiting a decreasing trend with increasing dilution factor. It was also found that the amount of EPS extracted from a raw sample depends on the storage time. Once EPS was extracted from the sample, however, the EPS keeps its original quantity under storage at 4°C. Based on the model, the maximum amount of EPS extraction and yield rate could be estimated for different conditions. Comparing the model parameters allows one to quantitatively compare the extraction efficiencies under various extracting conditions. Based on the results, we recommend the original sample should be diluted with the volume ratio of above 1:2 and a raw sample should be treated quickly to prevent the reduction of sample homogeneity and original integrity. PMID:22919352

  4. Solvent modulation strategy for superior antibody monomer/aggregate separation in cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kluters, Simon; Frech, Christian; von Hirschheydt, Thomas; Schaubmar, Andreas; Neumann, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Cation exchange chromatography (CEX) is an integral part of many downstream processes for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, in some cases CEX methods with standard mobile phase conditions do not lead to a sufficient removal of soluble antibody aggregates. The addition of neutral polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the mobile phase can improve the separation of proteins in IEC remarkably. The applicability of this solvent modulation technique is limited by protein precipitation at higher PEG concentrations. To overcome this limitation solubility enhancers like polyols and amino acids can be added to the mobile phase. These additives are known to inhibit PEG-induced protein precipitation in solution. This new solvent modulation strategy was tested with three different mAbs on two different CEX resins in the presence of PEG in combination with various solubility enhancers. In order to assess the general applicability of this method, mAbs were selected that show major differences with respect to their sensitivity to PEG-induced precipitation and monomer/aggregate resolution performance that is achieved by CEX under standard conditions. For all three mAbs precipitation could be prevented without elimination of the positive PEG-effect. The addition of solubility enhancers gives access to improved separation at elevated PEG concentrations and high protein loadings without running into precipitation issues. Our data indicate that this method is generically applicable and leads to a superior antibody monomer/aggregate separation. PMID:26520020

  5. Sorption of (226)Ra from oil effluents onto synthetic cation exchangers.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Safia, Bassam

    2013-07-30

    Increasing environmental awareness is being urged for the safe disposal of (226)Ra-contaminated production water generated in the oil industry. Birnessite, antimony silicate and their cationic derivatives were studied for the take-up of (226)Ra using the batch-type method under experimentally determined parameters, viz. contact time, solution-solid ratio and (226)Ra concentration. Data was expressed in terms of distribution coefficients. Sorption experiments were performed in different concentrations of nitric acid in order to speculate the mechanism of (226)Ra uptake. Variation in the magnitude of sorption efficiency of the materials in the presence of the major components of waste streams, i.e. Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+), revealed that K(+) was the greatest competitor and Na(+) the least. The application of the materials to sorb (226)Ra from actual oil co-production water samples, collected from Der Ezzor and Al Fourat petroleum companies (DEZPC and AFPC), was interpreted in terms of the exchange properties of the materials and water characterisation. Of the parameters studied, the selectivity of materials was shown to be greatly dependent on the pH of wastewater to be treated. PMID:23623032

  6. [Exchange reactions in brain tissue under chronic ethanol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Gil'miiarova, F N; Radomskaia, V M; Vinogradova, L N

    1982-01-01

    The paper deals with characterization of systems utilizing ethanol and reactions conjugated with its exchange in the brain tissue under chronic alcohol intoxication. The following is established: the absence of the alcoholdehydrogenase pathway of ethanol oxidation in rabbits, unbalanced splitting of carbohydrates under two-months ethanol load, disturbance of oxidative processes in the tricarboxylic acids cycle, a decrease in the pool of oxidized nicotin amide coenzymes. PMID:7036487

  7. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, F.P.; Herbst, R.S.

    1995-05-30

    The isotopes of boron, {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF{sub 3} and a liquid BF{sub 3} donor molecular addition complex formed between BF{sub 3} gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone. 1 Fig.

  8. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  9. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  10. Separation of the isotopes of boron by chemical exchange reactions

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, Frank P.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    The isotopes of boron, .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B, are separated by means of a gas-liquid chemical exchange reaction involving the isotopic equilibrium between gaseous BF.sub.3 and a liquid BF.sub.3 . donor molecular addition complex formed between BF.sub.3 gas and a donor chosen from the group consisting of: nitromethane, acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or diisobutyl ketone.

  11. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  12. Simultaneous determination of cation exchange capacity and surface area of acid activated bentonite powders by methylene blue sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yener, Nilgün; Biçer, Cengiz; Önal, Müşerref; Sarıkaya, Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    To distinguish the ion exchanged and physically adsorbed methylene blue cations (MB+) on ionic surfaces, acid activated bentonite samples were used as porous adsorbents. A natural calcium bentonite (CaB) sample from Enez/Edirne, Turkey, was acid activated at 90 °C for 16 h with various HCl/CaB ratios. The irreversible exchange and physical adsorption of MB+ cations on the ionic solids have simultaneously occurred. The ion exchanged (mex) and physically adsorbed (mad) MB+ contents were obtained as the values of sorption capacity at c = 0 and the increase to a plateaus of adsorption isotherms, respectively. The mad value was taken to be monolayer adsorption capacity. Cation exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SMB) for each sample were calculated from the mex and mad values, respectively. Also, the BET specific surface areas (SBET) and pore size distribution were determined from low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption data. A linear correlation between the SMB and SBET values was found.

  13. Role of encapsulated metal cation in the reactivity and regioselectivity of the C₆₀ Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng-Xing; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-03-26

    Endohedral metallofullerene has novel properties because of the interaction between the encapsulated metal atom or cation and fullerene. Experiments have demonstrated that the insertion of Li(+) into C60 can greatly promote the reactivity of the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene (CpH) to C60. However, the reaction is sufficiently fast that its quantitative kinetic data cannot be obtained experimentally. In addition, knowledge regarding the effects of other alkali metal cations and metal cations with more charges on the reactivity and regioselectivity of C60 is almost nonexistent. In the current study, DA cycloadditions of CpH to M(+)@C60 (where M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and Ca(2+)@C60 were investigated via density functional theory in the gas phase and in solvent. Via careful discussion and comparison with the results of C60, we concluded the following for the DA reaction of CpH to C60 and, more generally, for DA reactions of other fullerenes: (1) the encapsulated metal cations enhance the reactivity; (2) among alkali metal cations, Na(+) could be the best catalyst; (3) Ca(2+) is more favorable in promoting the reactivity than any alkali metal cation; (4) encapsulated metal cations with more positive charges enhance the reactivity of the 6-5 bond in C60, which is significant when the 6-5 adduct is the target product. PMID:25714730

  14. Ionic polymer-metal composite actuators obtained from radiation-grafted cation- and anion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hyuk; Han, Man Jae; Song, Dae Seock; Jho, Jae Young

    2014-12-24

    Two series of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs), one cationic and one anionic, are designed and prepared from radiation-grafted ion-exchange membranes. Through examination of the properties of the membranes synthesized from the two grafting monomers and the two base polymers, acrylic acid-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) and quarternized 4-vinylpyridine-grafted poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) with the appropriate amount of ionic groups are employed for the fabrication of cation and anion IPMCs, respectively. The bending displacement of the cation IPMC is comparable to Nafion-based IPMC under direct- and alternating-current voltage, but back-relaxation is not observed. The actuation performance of the anion IPMC is highly improved over those reported earlier in the literature for the other anion IPMCs. PMID:25420910

  15. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions demonstrated for the acetylene cation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Fowe, Emmanuel P; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Spanner, Michael; Bandrauk, André D; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging, we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations. PMID:25034613

  16. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions demonstrated for the acetylene cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Fowe, Emmanuel P.; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T.; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Spanner, Michael; Bandrauk, André D.; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S.; Légaré, François

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging, we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  17. A cation exchange model to describe Cs+ sorption at high ionic strength in subsurface sediments at Hanford site, USA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Smith, Steve C

    2004-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of cation exchange in high ionic strength electrolytes was performed using pristine subsurface sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. These sediments are representative of the site contaminated sediments impacted by release of high level waste (HLW) solutions containing 137Cs+ in NaNO3 brine. The binary exchange behavior of Cs+-Na+, Cs+-K+, and Na+-K+ was measured over a range in electrolyte concentration. Vanselow selectivity coefficients (Kv) that were calculated from the experimental data using Pitzer model ion activity corrections for aqueous species showed monotonic increases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. The influence of electrolyte concentration was greater on the exchange of Na+-Cs+ than K+-Cs+, an observation consistent with the differences in ion hydration energy of the exchanging cations. A previously developed two-site ion exchange model [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (2002) 193] was modified to include solvent (water) activity changes in the exchanger phase through application of the Gibbs-Duhem equation. This water activity-corrected model well described the ionic strength effect on binary Cs+ exchange, and was extended to the ternary exchange system of Cs+-Na+-K+ on the pristine sediment. The model was also used to predict 137Cs+ distribution between sediment and aqueous phase (Kd) beneath a leaked HLW tank in Hanfordd's S-SX tank using the analytical aqueous data from the field and the binary ion exchange coefficients for the pristine sediment. The Kd predictions closely followed the trend in the field data and were improved by consideration of water activity effects that were considerable in certain regions of the vadose zone plume. PMID:14734247

  18. A cation exchange model to describe Cs + sorption at high ionic strength in subsurface sediments at Hanford site, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steve C.

    2004-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of cation exchange in high ionic strength electrolytes was performed using pristine subsurface sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. These sediments are representative of the site contaminated sediments impacted by release of high level waste (HLW) solutions containing 137Cs + in NaNO 3 brine. The binary exchange behavior of Cs +-Na +, Cs +-K +, and Na +-K + was measured over a range in electrolyte concentration. Vanselow selectivity coefficients ( Kv) that were calculated from the experimental data using Pitzer model ion activity corrections for aqueous species showed monotonic increases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. The influence of electrolyte concentration was greater on the exchange of Na +-Cs + than K +-Cs +, an observation consistent with the differences in ion hydration energy of the exchanging cations. A previously developed two-site ion exchange model [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (2002) 193] was modified to include solvent (water) activity changes in the exchanger phase through application of the Gibbs-Duhem equation. This water activity-corrected model well described the ionic strength effect on binary Cs + exchange, and was extended to the ternary exchange system of Cs +-Na +-K + on the pristine sediment. The model was also used to predict 137Cs + distribution between sediment and aqueous phase ( Kd) beneath a leaked HLW tank in Hanfordd's S-SX tank using the analytical aqueous data from the field and the binary ion exchange coefficients for the pristine sediment. The Kd predictions closely followed the trend in the field data and were improved by consideration of water activity effects that were considerable in certain regions of the vadose zone plume.

  19. Review of the thermal stability and cation exchange properties of the zeolite minerals clinoptilolite, mordenite, and analcime; applications to radioactive waste isolation in silicic tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.R.; Caporuscio, F.A.

    1981-06-01

    Silicic tuffs of the southern Great Basin and basalts of the Columbia River Plateau are under investigation as potential host rocks for high- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Nonwelded and partially welded tuffs may contain major amounts (> 50%) of the zeolite minerals clinoptilolite, mordenite, and analcime. Densely welded tuffs and some basalt flows may contain clinoptilolite as fracture filling that limits the permeability of these rocks. The cation exchange properties of these zeolite minerals allow them to pose a formidable natural barrier to the migration of cationic species of various radionuclides in aqueous solutions. However, these minerals are unstable at elevated temperatures and at low water-vapor pressures and may break down either by reversible dehydration or by irreversible mineralogical reactions. All the breakdown reactions occurring at increased temperature involve a net volume reduction and evolution of fluids. Thus, they may provide a pathway (shrinkage fractures) and a driving force (fluid pressure) for release of radionuclides to the biosphere. These reactions may be avoided by keeping zeolite-bearing horizons saturated with water and below about 85{sup 0}C. This may restrict allowable gross thermal loadings in waste repositories in volcanic rocks.

  20. Oxygen-18 tracer studies of enzyme reactions with radical/cation diagnostic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Luke A.; Fox, Brian G. . E-mail: bgfox@biochem.wisc.edu

    2005-12-09

    This review considers reactions of enzymes with the cyclopropanoid radical/cation diagnostic probes norcarane, 1,1-dimethylcyclopropane, and 1,1-diethylcyclopropane as elaborated by the use of {sup 18}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}OH{sub 2} to trace the origin of O-atoms incorporated during catalysis. The reactions of soluble and integral membrane diiron enzymes are summarized and compared to results obtained from cytochrome P450 studies. Norcarane proved to be an excellent substrate for the diiron enzyme toluene 4-monooxygenase and its engineered isoforms, with k {sub cat} and coupling between NADH utilization and total hydroxylated products comparable to that determined for toluene, the natural substrate. Results obtained with toluene 4-monooxygenase show that the un-rearranged and radical-rearranged alcohol products have a high percentage of O-atom incorporation (>80-95%) from O{sub 2}, while the cation-derived ring-expansion products have O-atom incorporation primarily derived from solvent water. Mechanistic possibilities accounting for this difference are discussed.

  1. Synthesis of Capsule-like Porous Hollow Nanonickel Cobalt Sulfides via Cation Exchange Based on the Kirkendall Effect for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongfu; Chen, Shunji; Mu, Shichun; Chen, Teng; Qiao, Yuqing; Yu, Shengxue; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-20

    To construct a suitable three-dimensional structure for ionic transport on the surface of the active materials for a supercapacitor, porous hollow nickel cobalt sulfides are successfully synthesized via a facile and efficient cation-exchange reaction in a hydrothermal process involving the Kirkendall effect with γ-MnS nanorods as a sacrificial template. The formation mechanism of the hollow nickel cobalt sulfides is carefully illustrated via the tuning reaction time and reaction temperature during the cation-exchange process. Due to the ingenious porous hollow structure that offers a high surface area for electrochemical reaction and suitable paths for ionic transport, porous hollow nickel cobalt sulfide electrodes exhibit high electrochemical performance. The Ni1.77Co1.23S4 electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 224.5 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.25 A g(-1) and a high capacity retention of 87.0% at 10 A g(-1). An all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor, assembled with a Ni1.77Co1.23S4 electrode as the positive electrode and a homemade activated carbon electrode as the negative electrode (denoted as NCS//HMC), exhibits a high energy density of 42.7 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 190.8 W kg(-1) and even 29.4 Wh kg(-1) at 3.6 kW kg(-1). The fully charged as-prepared asymmetric supercapacitor can light up a light emitting diode (LED) indicator for more than 1 h, indicating promising practical applications of the hollow nickel cobalt sulfides and the NCS//HMC asymmetric supercapacitor. PMID:27031254

  2. Anion- or Cation-Exchange Membranes for NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cells?

    PubMed

    Sljukić, Biljana; Morais, Ana L; Santos, Diogo M F; Sequeira, César A C

    2012-01-01

    Direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFC), which operate on sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the fuel, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant, are receiving increasing attention. This is due to their promising use as power sources for space and underwater applications, where air is not available and gas storage poses obvious problems. One key factor to improve the performance of DBFCs concerns the type of separator used. Both anion- and cation-exchange membranes may be considered as potential separators for DBFC. In the present paper, the effect of the membrane type on the performance of laboratory NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells using Pt electrodes is studied at room temperature. Two commercial ion-exchange membranes from Membranes International Inc., an anion-exchange membrane (AMI-7001S) and a cation-exchange membrane (CMI-7000S), are tested as ionic separators for the DBFC. The membranes are compared directly by the observation and analysis of the corresponding DBFC's performance. Cell polarization, power density, stability, and durability tests are used in the membranes' evaluation. Energy densities and specific capacities are estimated. Most tests conducted, clearly indicate a superior performance of the cation-exchange membranes over the anion-exchange membrane. The two membranes are also compared with several other previously tested commercial membranes. For long term cell operation, these membranes seem to outperform the stability of the benchmark Nafion membranes but further studies are still required to improve their instantaneous power load. PMID:24958292

  3. Anion- or Cation-Exchange Membranes for NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Šljukić, Biljana; Morais, Ana L.; Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFC), which operate on sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the fuel, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant, are receiving increasing attention. This is due to their promising use as power sources for space and underwater applications, where air is not available and gas storage poses obvious problems. One key factor to improve the performance of DBFCs concerns the type of separator used. Both anion- and cation-exchange membranes may be considered as potential separators for DBFC. In the present paper, the effect of the membrane type on the performance of laboratory NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells using Pt electrodes is studied at room temperature. Two commercial ion-exchange membranes from Membranes International Inc., an anion-exchange membrane (AMI-7001S) and a cation-exchange membrane (CMI-7000S), are tested as ionic separators for the DBFC. The membranes are compared directly by the observation and analysis of the corresponding DBFC’s performance. Cell polarization, power density, stability, and durability tests are used in the membranes’ evaluation. Energy densities and specific capacities are estimated. Most tests conducted, clearly indicate a superior performance of the cation-exchange membranes over the anion-exchange membrane. The two membranes are also compared with several other previously tested commercial membranes. For long term cell operation, these membranes seem to outperform the stability of the benchmark Nafion membranes but further studies are still required to improve their instantaneous power load. PMID:24958292

  4. Effect of temperature on REE and TPE sorption by sulfonated cation exchangers from HNO{sub 3} solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.

    1995-05-01

    Numerical and experimental data are presented for sorption from HNO{sub 3} solutions on KU-2 sulfonated cation exchanger as a function of temperature. The capacity for Eu at 70{degrees}C for solutions with [H{sup +}] > 1.0 M in the range [Eu] = 0.023-0.0428 M increases by 20-30%. The width of the sorption front significantly decreases at elevated temperature. The calculations are consistent with the observed experimental sorption process.

  5. Utilization of cation exchange resins for the isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from others in aqueous and non aqueous-alcohol solutions of hydrochloric and nitric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the sorption of several transplutonium and fission elements on cation exchange resins in relation to the acid concentration and content of alcohol in solution. They observe a significant increase in sorption of the TPE on the cation exchanges from nitric acid solutions containing more than 50% of alcohol. On the basis of the experimental results they determine the optimum conditions for the concentration of TPE on cation exchangers with their subsequent separation from certain fission and other elements by means of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid solutions.

  6. Probing the Complementarity of FAIMS and Strong Cation Exchange Chromatography in Shotgun Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creese, Andrew J.; Shimwell, Neil J.; Larkins, Katherine P. B.; Heath, John K.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-03-01

    High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility spectrometry, coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers benefits for the analysis of complex proteomics samples. Advantages include increased dynamic range, increased signal-to-noise, and reduced interference from ions of similar m/ z. FAIMS also separates isomers and positional variants. An alternative, and more established, method of reducing sample complexity is prefractionation by use of strong cation exchange chromatography. Here, we have compared SCX-LC-MS/MS with LC-FAIMS-MS/MS for the identification of peptides and proteins from whole cell lysates from the breast carcinoma SUM52 cell line. Two FAIMS approaches are considered: (1) multiple compensation voltages within a single LC-MS/MS analysis (internal stepping) and (2) repeat LC-MS/MS analyses at different and fixed compensation voltages (external stepping). We also consider the consequence of the fragmentation method (electron transfer dissociation or collision-induced dissociation) on the workflow performance. The external stepping approach resulted in a greater number of protein and peptide identifications than the internal stepping approach for both ETD and CID MS/MS, suggesting that this should be the method of choice for FAIMS proteomics experiments. The overlap in protein identifications from the SCX method and the external FAIMS method was ~25 % for both ETD and CID, and for peptides was less than 20 %. The lack of overlap between FAIMS and SCX highlights the complementarity of the two techniques. Charge state analysis of the peptide assignments showed that the FAIMS approach identified a much greater proportion of triply-charged ions.

  7. A new cation-exchange method for accurate field speciation of hexavalent chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for field speciation of Cr(VI) has been developed to meet present stringent regulatory standards and to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The method consists of passing a water sample through strong acid cation-exchange resin at the field site, where Cr(III) is retained while Cr(VI) passes into the effluent and is preserved for later determination. The method is simple, rapid, portable, and accurate, and makes use of readily available, inexpensive materials. Cr(VI) concentrations are determined later in the laboratory using any elemental analysis instrument sufficiently sensitive to measure the Cr(VI) concentrations of interest. The new method allows measurement of Cr(VI) concentrations as low as 0.05 ??g 1-1, storage of samples for at least several weeks prior to analysis, and use of readily available analytical instrumentation. Cr(VI) can be separated from Cr(III) between pH 2 and 11 at Cr(III)/Cr(VI) concentration ratios as high as 1000. The new method has demonstrated excellent comparability with two commonly used methods, the Hach Company direct colorimetric method and USEPA method 218.6. The new method is superior to the Hach direct colorimetric method owing to its relative sensitivity and simplicity. The new method is superior to USEPA method 218.6 in the presence of Fe(II) concentrations up to 1 mg 1-1 and Fe(III) concentrations up to 10 mg 1-1. Time stability of preserved samples is a significant advantage over the 24-h time constraint specified for USEPA method 218.6.

  8. Separation of proteins by cation-exchange sequential injection chromatography using a polymeric monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2016-02-01

    Since sequential injection chromatography (SIC) emerged in 2003, it has been used for separation of small molecules in diverse samples, but separations of high molar mass compounds such as proteins have not yet been described. In the present work a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (GMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column was prepared by free radical polymerization inside a 2.1-mm-i.d. activated fused silica-lined stainless steel tubing and modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). The column was prepared from a mixture of 24% GMA, 16% EDMA, 20% cyclohexanol, and 40% 1-dodecanol (all% as w/w) containing 1% of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) (in relation to monomers). Polymerization was done at 60 °C for 24 h. The polymer was modified with 1.0 M IDA (in 2 M Na2CO3, pH 10.5) at 80 °C for 16 h. Separation of myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was achieved at pH 7.0 (20 mM KH2PO4/K2HPO4) using a salt gradient (NaCl). Myoglobin was not retained, and the other proteins were separated by a gradient of NaCl created inside the holding coil (4 m of 0.8-mm-i.d. PTFE tubing) by sequential aspiration of 750 and 700 μL of 0.2 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. As the flow was reversed toward the column (5 μL s(-1)) the interdispersion of these solutions created a reproducible gradient which separated the proteins in 10 min, with the following order of retention: ribonuclease A < cytochrome C < lysozyme. The elution order was consistent with a cation-exchange mechanism as the retention increased with the isoelectric points. PMID:26677024

  9. Cation exchange capacity of loess and overlying soil in the non-carbonate loess sections, North-Western Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomašić, Nenad; Kampić, Štefica; Cindrić, Iva Juranović; Pikelj, Kristina; Lučić, Mavro; Mavrić, Danijela; Vučetić, Tajana

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption properties in terms of cation exchange capacity and their relation to the soil and sediment constituents (clay minerals, Fe-, Mn-, and Al-oxyhydroxides, organic matter) were investigated in loess, soil-loess transition zone, and soil at four loess-soil sections in North-Western Croatia. Cation exchange capacity of the bulk samples, the samples after oxalate extraction of Fe, Mn and Al, and after removal of organic matter, as well as of the separated clay fraction, was determined using copper ethylenediamine. Cation exchange capacity (pH˜7) of the bulk samples ranges from 5 to 12 cmol c /kg in soil, from 7 to 15 cmol c /kg in the soil-loess transition zone, and from 12 to 20 cmol c /kg in loess. Generally, CEC values increase with depth. Oxalate extraction of Fe, Mn, and Al, and removal of organic matter cause a CEC decrease of 3-38% and 8-55%, respectively, proving a considerable influence of these constituents to the bulk CEC values. In the separated clay fraction (<2 μm) CEC values are up to several times higher relative to those in the bulk samples. The measured CEC values of the bulk samples generally correspond to the clay mineral content identified. Also, a slight increase in muscovite/illite content with depth and the vermiculite occurrence in the loess horizon are concomitant with the CEC increase in deeper horizons, irrespective of the sample pretreatment.

  10. Cation exchange capacity of loess and overlying soil in the non-carbonate loess sections, North-Western Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomašić, Nenad; Kampić, Štefica; Cindrić, Iva; Pikelj, Kristina; Lučić, Mavro; Mavrić, Danijela; Vučetić, Tajana

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption properties in terms of cation exchange capacity and their relation to the soil and sediment constituents (clay minerals, Fe-, Mn-, and Al-oxyhydroxides, organic matter) were investigated in loess, soil-loess transition zone, and soil at four loess-soil sections in North-Western Croatia. Cation exchange capacity of the bulk samples, the samples after oxalate extraction of Fe, Mn and Al, and after removal of organic matter, as well as of the separated clay fraction, was determined using copper ethylenediamine. Cation exchange capacity (pH˜7) of the bulk samples ranges from 5 to 12 cmolc/kg in soil, from 7 to 15 cmolc/kg in the soil-loess transition zone, and from 12 to 20 cmolc/kg in loess. Generally, CEC values increase with depth. Oxalate extraction of Fe, Mn, and Al, and removal of organic matter cause a CEC decrease of 3-38% and 8-55%, respectively, proving a considerable influence of these constituents to the bulk CEC values. In the separated clay fraction (<2 μm) CEC values are up to several times higher relative to those in the bulk samples. The measured CEC values of the bulk samples generally correspond to the clay mineral content identified. Also, a slight increase in muscovite/illite content with depth and the vermiculite occurrence in the loess horizon are concomitant with the CEC increase in deeper horizons, irrespective of the sample pretreatment.

  11. Retardation of ammonium and potassium transport through a contaminated sand and gravel aquifer: The Role of cation exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ceazan, M.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Smith, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The role of cation exchange in the retardation of ammonium (NH4+) and potassium (K+) transport in a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was evaluated by use of observed distributions of NH4+ and K+ within a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater, small-scale tracer injection tests, and batch sorption experiments on aquifer material. Both NH4+ and K+ were transported ???2 km in the 4-km-long contaminant plume (retardation factor, Rf = 2.0). Sediments from the NH4+-containing zone of the plume contained significant quantities of KCl-extractable NH4+ (extraction distribution coefficient, Kd,extr = 0.59-0.87 mL/g of dry sediment), and when added to uncontaminated sediments, NH4+ sorption followed a linear isotherm. Small-scale tracer tests demonstrated that NH4+ and K+ were retarded (Rf =3.5) relative to a nonreactive tracer (Br-). Sorption of dissolved NH4+ was accompanied by concomitant release of calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and sodium (Na+) from aquifer sediments, suggesting involvement of cation exchange. In contrast, nitrate (NO3-) was not retarded and cleanly separated from NH4+ and K+ in the small-scale tracer tests. This study demonstrates that transport of NH4+ and K+ through a sand and gravel aquifer can be markedly affected by cation-exchange processes even at a clay content less than 0.1%.

  12. Gas-Phase Reactions of Atomic Gold Cations with Linear Alkanes (C2-C9).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-06-30

    To develop proper ionization methods for alkanes, the reactivity of bare or ligated transition metal ions toward alkanes has attracted increasing interests. In this study, the reactions of the gold cations with linear alkanes from ethane up to nonane (CnH2n+2, n = 2-9) under mild conditions have been characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. When reacting with Au(+), small alkanes (n = 2-6) were confirmed to follow specific reaction channels of dehydrogenation for ethane and hydride transfer for others to generate product ions characteristic of the original alkanes, which indicates that Au(+) can act as a reagent ion to ionize alkanes from ethane to n-hexane. Strong dependence of the chain length of alkanes was observed for the rate constants and reaction efficiencies. Extensive fragmentation took place for larger alkanes (n > 6). Theoretical results show that the fragmentation induced by the hydride transfer occurs after the release of AuH. Moreover, the fragmentation of n-heptane was successfully avoided when the reaction took place in a high-pressure reactor. This implies that Au(+) is a potential reagent ion to ionize linear and even the branched alkanes. PMID:27266670

  13. Cation Exchange Combined with Kirkendall Effect in the Preparation of SnTe/CdTe and CdTe/SnTe Core/Shell Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youngjin; Yanover, Diana; Čapek, Richard Karel; Shapiro, Arthur; Grumbach, Nathan; Kauffmann, Yaron; Sashchiuk, Aldona; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2016-07-01

    Controlling the synthesis of narrow band gap semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with a high-quality surface is of prime importance for scientific and technological interests. This Letter presents facile solution-phase syntheses of SnTe NCs and their corresponding core/shell heterostructures. Here, we synthesized monodisperse and highly crystalline SnTe NCs by employing an inexpensive, nontoxic precursor, SnCl2, the reactivity of which was enhanced by adding a reducing agent, 1,2-hexadecanediol. Moreover, we developed a synthesis procedure for the formation of SnTe-based core/shell NCs by combining the cation exchange and the Kirkendall effect. The cation exchange of Sn(2+) by Cd(2+) at the surface allowed primarily the formation of SnTe/CdTe core/shell NCs. Further continuation of the reaction promoted an intensive diffusion of the Cd(2+) ions, which via the Kirkendall effect led to the formation of the inverted CdTe/SnTe core/shell NCs. PMID:27331900

  14. Charge-exchange reactions with a radioactive triton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenecke, J.

    1998-12-21

    A high-resolution (t, {sup 3}He) test experiment has been performed recently by making use of a secondary triton beam produced by fragmentation of {alpha}-particles. The purpose of this charge-exchange experiment was to achieve good energy resolution in an (n,p)-type reaction at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out with the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the A1200 beam-analysis system and the S800 magnetic spectrometer. The beam-analysis system was used to transport the energy-dispersed radioactive triton beam from the production target to the target position, and the magnetic spectrometer was used to focus the dispersion-matched {sup 3}He particles from the (t, {sup 3}He) reaction at 0 degree sign onto the focal plane of the spectrometer. An energy resolution of 200-250 keV was achieved.

  15. Maleic acid-styrene encapsulated silica cation exchanger in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Jiang, S; Chen, L

    2001-12-24

    The use of poly(maleic acid-styrene)-encapsulated silica for the determination of monovalent and divalent cations is well accepted in ion chromatography. The separation of Mn(2+), alkali and alkaline earth metal cations is obtained under the same chromatographic conditions. The influences of pH and the concentration of eluent on the retention of cations have been studied. The preparation conditions of packings were studied. The metal ions in the boiler water samples from a thermal power plant were quantitatively determined using this column. The results are in agreement with those determined by ICP and Volumetric analysis methods. PMID:18968461

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of the reactions between vanadium oxide cluster cations and water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui; Ding, Xun-Lei

    2012-03-01

    Vanadium oxide cluster cations V(x)O(y)(+) (x = 2-6) are prepared by laser ablation and are reacted with D(2)O in a fast flow reactor under room temperature conditions. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to detect the cluster distribution before and after the reactions. Observation of the products (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(+) indicates the deuterium atom abstraction reaction (V(2)O(5))(1-3)(+) + D(2)O → (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(+) + OD. In addition, significant association products (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(2)O(+) are also observed in the experiments. Density functional theory calculations are performed to study the reaction mechanisms of V(4)O(10)(+) with H(2)O. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental observations and indicate that H(2)O is dissociatively rather than molecularly adsorbed in V(4)O(10)H(2)O(+) complex. PMID:22315964

  17. The mechanism of the retro-Diels-Alder reaction in 4-vinylcyclohexene cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancíř, J.; Tureček, F.

    1984-06-01

    Butadiene cation radicals are produced symmetrically from the ring and side-chain of the vinylcyclohexene cation radical near the onset of the fragmentation. The appearance energies of C 4H 6+- and C 4H 2D 4+- from (3,3,6,6-D 4)vinylcyclohex ene were measured as 11.07 ± 0.05 and 11.06 ± 0.06 eV, respectively. This sets the barrier to retro-Diels-Alder decomposition at 1140 kJ mol -1 above the energy of 1 and 44 kJ mol -1 above the thermochemical threshold corresponding to C 4H 6+- + C 4H 6. Topological molecular orbital calculations indicate that this lowest-energy path involves a sequential rupture of the C 3C 4 and C 5C 6 bonds, with a calculated barrier of 211 kJ mol -1. The second, two-step reaction channel proceeds by subsequent fission of the C 5C 6 and C 3C 4 bonds with a barrier of 299 kJ mol -1. This channel is found experimentally as a break on the ionization efficiency curve at 12.1 eV. Both the supra-supra and the supra-antara pericyclic reactions go through energy maxima and are therefore forbidden. The supra-supra process is the most favorable route for decomposition from the first excited state, the activation energy being 333 kJ mol -1. The preference for the two-step mechanism is due to hyperconjugative stabilization of intermediate molecular configurations.

  18. Reactive Resonances in N+N2 Exchange Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Stallcop, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Rich reactive resonances are found in a 3D quantum dynamics study of the N + N2 exchange reaction using a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface. This surface is characterized by a feature in the interaction region called Lake Eyring , that is, two symmetric transition states with a shallow minimum between them. An L2 analysis of the quasibound states associated with the shallow minimum confirms that the quasibound states associated with oscillations in all three degrees of freedom in Lake Eyring are responsible for the reactive resonances in the state-to-state reaction probabilities. The quasibound states, mostly the bending motions, give rise to strong reasonance peaks, whereas other motions contribute to the bumps and shoulders in the resonance structure. The initial state reaction probability further proves that the bending motions are the dominating factors of the reaction probability and have longer life times than the stretching motions. This is the first observation of reactive resonances from a "Lake Eyring" feature in a potential energy surface.

  19. Use of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate columns for cation exchange separation of metal ions interfering in the spectrophotometric determination of uranium with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Anwar, S.; Varshney, K.

    1985-01-01

    A simple cation exchange method has been developed for the quantitative separation of uranium from some metal ions which generally interfere in its spectrophotometric determination using sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate as a reagent. The method requires only a single bed operation and enables a satisfactory (Error + or - separation of uranium (UO/sub 2/ (II)) up to 1080 ..mu..g from ten metal ions on a 2 g column of zirconium (IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger in H(I) form.

  20. Epitactic ion-exchange reactions into vanadyl(IV) arsenate

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Lara, M.; Bruque, S.; Moreno, L.; Aranda, M.A.G. )

    1991-03-01

    The synthesis, structural characterization, thermal stability, and spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis-diffuse reflectance) properties of three vanadyl arsenates are described. Vanadyl(IV) bis(dihydrogenarsenate), (VO(H{sub 2}AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}) (1), lithium vanadyl arsenate, (Li{sub 4}VO(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O) (2), and nickel(II) and lithium vanadyl arsenate, ((Li{sub 2.4}Ni){sub 0.8}VO(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center dot}4H{sub 2}O) (3), have been prepared. (1) Tetragonal ({alpha} = 9.128 {angstrom}; c = 8.128 {angstrom}) is prepared by reduction with isobutanol or ethanol from vanadyl(V) arsenate. (2) Cubic (a = 9.024 {angstrom}) is obtained from (1) by lithium ion-exchange, and (3) tetragonal (a = 9.106 {angstrom}; c = 8.454 {angstrom}) is made from (2) by Ni{sup 2+} ion-exchange. These exchange reactions are epitactic and the overall result is a topotactic transformation.

  1. Mechanism of the Exchange Reaction in HRAS from Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-01-01

    HRAS regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Understanding the transition mechanism is central for the design of small molecules to inhibit the formation of RAS-driven tumors. Using a multiscale approach involving coarse-grained (CG) simulations, all-atom classical molecular dynamics (CMD; total of 3.02 µs), and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we identified the structural features that determine the nucleotide (GDP) exchange reaction. We show that weakening the coupling between the SwitchI (residues 25–40) and SwitchII (residues 59–75) accelerates the opening of SwitchI; however, an open conformation of SwitchI is unstable in the absence of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and rises up towards the bound nucleotide to close the nucleotide pocket. Both I21 and Y32, play a crucial role in SwitchI transition. We show that an open SwitchI conformation is not necessary for GDP destabilization but is required for GDP/Mg escape from the HRAS. Further, we present the first simulation study showing displacement of GDP/Mg away from the nucleotide pocket. Both SwitchI and SwitchII, delays the escape of displaced GDP/Mg in the absence of GEF. Based on these results, a model for the mechanism of GEF in accelerating the exchange process is hypothesized. PMID:25272152

  2. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy reveals cation-triggered backbone degradation in polysulfone-based anion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-02-12

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) find widespread applications as an electrolyte and/or electrode binder in fuel cells, electrodialysis stacks, flow and metal-air batteries, and electrolyzers. AEMs exhibit poor stability in alkaline media; their degradation is induced by the hydroxide ion, a potent nucleophile. We have used 2D NMR techniques to investigate polymer backbone stability (as opposed to cation stability) of the AEM in alkaline media. We report the mechanism behind a peculiar, often-observed phenomenon, wherein a demonstrably stable polysulfone backbone degrades rapidly in alkaline solutions upon derivatization with alkaline stable fixed cation groups. Using COSY and heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D NMR), we unequivocally demonstrate that the added cation group triggers degradation of the polymer backbone in alkaline via quaternary carbon hydrolysis and ether hydrolysis, leading to rapid failure. This finding challenges the existing perception that having a stable cation moiety is sufficient to yield a stable AEM and emphasizes the importance of the often ignored issue of backbone stability. PMID:23335629

  3. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy reveals cation-triggered backbone degradation in polysulfone-based anion exchange membranes

    PubMed Central

    Arges, Christopher G.; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) find widespread applications as an electrolyte and/or electrode binder in fuel cells, electrodialysis stacks, flow and metal-air batteries, and electrolyzers. AEMs exhibit poor stability in alkaline media; their degradation is induced by the hydroxide ion, a potent nucleophile. We have used 2D NMR techniques to investigate polymer backbone stability (as opposed to cation stability) of the AEM in alkaline media. We report the mechanism behind a peculiar, often-observed phenomenon, wherein a demonstrably stable polysulfone backbone degrades rapidly in alkaline solutions upon derivatization with alkaline stable fixed cation groups. Using COSY and heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D NMR), we unequivocally demonstrate that the added cation group triggers degradation of the polymer backbone in alkaline via quaternary carbon hydrolysis and ether hydrolysis, leading to rapid failure. This finding challenges the existing perception that having a stable cation moiety is sufficient to yield a stable AEM and emphasizes the importance of the often ignored issue of backbone stability. PMID:23335629

  4. Effects of divalent cations on the formation of 4(5)-methylimidazole in fructose/ammonium hydroxide caramel model reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinlan; Yu, Di; Kong, Fansheng; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-06-15

    The objective of the present study was to detail the changes of 4(5)-methylimidazole (4-MI) and its precursors in the presence of divalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) in a fructose/ammonium hydroxide caramel model system. The content of 4-MI and its precursor methylglyoxal (MGO) was inhibited by divalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)). The possible explanation might be that fructose and its Heyns product glucosamine interact with divalent cations to form complexes and inhibit the degradation of glucosamine into MGO. Moreover, the changes of fructose, NH4(+) and brown intensity in the presence of divalent cations indicated that fructose and glucosamine underwent intra-intermolecular polymerisation into melanoidins rather than the degradation reaction into aldehydes and ketones. PMID:26868573

  5. The investigation on cationic exchange capacity of zeolites: the use as selective ion trappers in the electrokinetic soil technique.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Ornella; Lilla, Edo; Montanari, Roberta

    2006-09-21

    The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of porous zeolites allows to adsorb in the framework cavities the cations as pollutant heavy metal ions. We investigate the CEC behaviour of different zeolites in different experimental conditions; in solution where the ion's mobility is spontaneous and free and in the electrokinetic system where the ion's mobility is driven by the electric field. The aim of this study is to investigate if the CEC is an useful property to create a special interface region of zeolites, that if placed in the electrokinetic cell, just before the cathode, could allow to capture and concentrate the heavy metallic ions, during their migrating process. The zeolite 13X investigated in the electrokinetic proofs, retains a good high ions adsorption, even if quite smaller than the relevant free solution condition and well acts as confined trap for the heavy metal ions. In fact no trace of metallic deposition are present on the electrode's surface. PMID:16716501

  6. Charge-exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W{sup +}W{sup −}-fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2015-04-10

    Charge-exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp → n + Δ{sup ++} taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge-exchange reaction induced by W{sup ±}-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  7. In-situ graft-polymerization preparation of cation-exchange supermacroporous cryogel with sulfo groups in glass columns.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kejian; Yun, Junxian; Shen, Shaochuan; Chen, Fang

    2007-07-20

    Graft polymerization of monomer chains with expected functional groups onto the matrix pore surfaces by initiator is an effective approach for introducing ion-exchange groups to cryogel matrix to get anion- or cation-exchange supermacroporous cryogels. In this work, a novel cation-exchange cryogel with sulfo binding groups was prepared by grafting of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPSA) onto polyacrylamide-based cryogels in glass columns. The grafting polymerization was achieved in an in-situ manner which was performed by pumping the initiator and the reactive solution of graft monomer with sulfo binding groups directly through a cryogel bed pre-produced in a glass column under frozen condition. The axial liquid dispersion characteristics within the monolithic cryogel beds before and after the in-situ polymerization were compared by measuring residence time distributions (RTDs) at various liquid flow rates using tracer pulse-response method. Microstructure morphology of pores within cryogels was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chromatography of lysozyme was carried out to reveal the protein breakthrough and elution characteristics in the obtained cryogel beds. PMID:17517417

  8. Gas-phase reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P. E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu

    2014-03-20

    We have studied the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube. We have implemented the laser induced acoustic desorption technique to allow the study of large, non-volatile species in the gas phase. The extension of this work from previous studies shows that the reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with H atoms reaches a constant value for large cations. There is a small difference in reactivity when comparing molecules of different size and geometry; however, no difference in reactivity was found when nitrogen was incorporated into the ring.

  9. Consistent effects of canopy vs. understory nitrogen addition on the soil exchangeable cations and microbial community in two contrasting forests.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Ha, Denglong; Li, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Chuangmao; Cai, Xi-an; Rao, Xingquan; Lin, Yongbiao; Zhou, Lixia; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Zou, Xiaoming; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-05-15

    Anthropogenic N deposition has been well documented to cause substantial impacts on the chemical and biological properties of forest soils. In most studies, however, atmospheric N deposition has been simulated by directly adding N to the forest floor. Such studies thus ignored the potentially significant effect of some key processes occurring in forest canopy (i.e., nitrogen retention) and may therefore have incorrectly assessed the effects of N deposition on soils. Here, we conducted an experiment that included both understory addition of N (UAN) and canopy addition of N (CAN) in two contrasting forests (temperate deciduous forest vs. subtropical evergreen forest). The goal was to determine whether the effects on soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass differed between CAN and UAN. We found that N addition reduced pH, BS (base saturation) and exchangeable Ca and increased exchangeable Al significantly only at the temperate JGS site, and reduced the biomass of most soil microbial groups only at the subtropical SMT site. Except for soil exchangeable Mn, however, effects on soil chemical properties and soil microbial community did not significantly differ between CAN and UAN. Although biotic and abiotic soil characteristics differ significantly and the responses of both soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass were different between the two study sites, we found no significant interactive effects between study site and N treatment approach on almost all soil properties involved in this study. In addition, N addition rate (25 vs. 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) did not show different effects on soil properties under both N addition approaches. These findings did not support previous prediction which expected that, by bypassing canopy effects (i.e., canopy retention and foliage fertilization), understory addition of N would overestimate the effects of N deposition on forest soil properties, at least for short time scale. PMID:26930308

  10. Ion chromatographic separation of inorganic ions using a combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic column and cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kaori; Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    A combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) column and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (WCX) column was used for simultaneous separation of inorganic anions and cations by ion chromatography (IC). Firstly, the capability of HILIC column for the separation of analyte ions was evaluated under acidic eluent conditions. The columns used were SeQuant ZIC-HILIC (ZIC-HILIC) with a sulfobetaine-zwitterion stationary phase (ZIC-HILIC) and Acclaim HILIC-10 with a diol stationary phase (HILIC-10). When using tartaric acid as the eluent, the HILIC columns indicated strong retentions for anions, based on ion-pair interaction. Especially, HILIC-10 could strongly retain anions compared with ZIC-HILIC. The selectivity for analyte anions of HILIC-10 with 5 mmol/L tartaric acid eluent was in the order of I(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > H2PO4(-). However, since HILIC-10 could not separate analyte cations, a WCX column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was connected after the HILIC column in series. The combination column system of HILIC and WCX columns could successfully separate ten ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, H2PO4(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO3(-) and I(-)) with elution of 4 mmol/L tartaric acid plus 8 mmol/L 18-crown-6. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of analyte ions by the system were in the ranges of 0.02% - 0.05% in retention times and 0.18% - 5.3% in peak areas through three-time successive injections. The limits of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.24 - 0.30 micromol/L for the cations and 0.31 - 1.2 micromol/L for the anions. This system was applied for the simultaneous determination of the cations and the anions in a vegetable juice sample with satisfactory results. PMID:22799200

  11. Vinyl polymer agglomerate based transition metal cation chelating ion-exchange resin containing the 8-hydroxyquinoline functional group

    SciTech Connect

    Landing, W.M.; Haraldsson, C.; Paxeus, N.

    1986-12-01

    A simple synthetic route has been developed for the immobilization of 8-hydroxyquinoline onto Fractogel TSK, a highly porous, mechanically and chemically stable, hydrophilic organic resin gel. The product exhibits an exchange capacity comparable to the highest values reported for silica-immobilized 8-hydroxyquinoline but is more stable at high pH. The resin's selectivity and efficiency of collection of cationic metal species from freshwater and seawater were investigated. The resin was used in a column sequence to obtain concentration and speciation data for Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Cd in an organic-rich freshwater sample.

  12. Atomic Resolution Monitoring of Cation Exchange in CdSe-PbSe Heteronanocrystals during Epitaxial Solid–Solid–Vapor Growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Here, we show a novel solid–solid–vapor (SSV) growth mechanism whereby epitaxial growth of heterogeneous semiconductor nanowires takes place by evaporation-induced cation exchange. During heating of PbSe-CdSe nanodumbbells inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we observed that PbSe nanocrystals grew epitaxially at the expense of CdSe nanodomains driven by evaporation of Cd. Analysis of atomic-resolution TEM observations and detailed atomistic simulations reveals that the growth process is mediated by vacancies. PMID:24844280

  13. Swelling and electro-osmotic properties of cation-exchange membranes with different structures in methanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, V. M.; Villaluenga, J. P. G.; Godino, M. P.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Ruiz-Bauzá, C.; Seoane, B.

    Electro-osmosis experiments through three cation-exchange membranes with different morphology and similar electric properties have been performed using methanol-water solutions under different experimental conditions. The influence on the electro-osmotic transport of the percentage of methanol on solvent with two different electrolytes, NaCl and LiCl, has been studied. The experimental results show that the presence of methanol in the solutions affects strongly the electro-osmotic flow, and this influence is different depending on the membrane morphology. Correlations among electro-osmotic permeability, swelling behavior, and cell resistance are studied for these membrane systems at different percentages of methanol in solvent.

  14. Geometric Phase Appears in the Ultracold Hydrogen Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum reactive scattering calculations for the hydrogen exchange reaction H +H2 (v =4 ,j =0 )→H +H2 (v', j') and its isotopic analogues are reported for ultracold collision energies. Because of the unique properties associated with ultracold collisions, it is shown that the geometric phase effectively controls the reactivity. The rotationally resolved rate coefficients computed with and without the geometric phase are shown to differ by up to 4 orders of magnitude. The effect is also significant in the vibrationally resolved and total rate coefficients. The dynamical origin of the effect is discussed and the large geometric phase effect reported here might be exploited to control the reactivity through the application of external fields or by the selection of a particular nuclear spin state.

  15. Population of 13Be with a Nucleon-Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Bradon; Deyoung, Paul; Smith, Jenna; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-unbound nuclei are traditionally formed by the removal of one or more nucleons from a fast beam of ions. This method often results in a background, which is difficult to separate from the particle of interest. Nucleon-removal entrance-channels also require the ion beam to be more massive than the particle of interest, which presents the additional challenges of the beam being difficult to make. The present work was done with a nucleon-exchange entrance channel. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, a 71 MeV/u 13B beam impinged on a 47 mg/cm2 thick target of 9Be. As a result numerous reactions occurred, including the population of 13Be through the nucleon-exchange entrance-channel. The 13Be nuclei decayed to 12Be and one neutron in approximately 10-21 seconds. The resulting neutrons were detected by either the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) or the Large multi-Institution Scintillator Array (LISA), while the 12Be nuclei were directed through an array of charged particle detectors by a 4T superconducting sweeper magnet. The four-momentum vectors of the fragment nucleus and the neutron were calculated to determine the decay energy of 13Be. Monte-Carlo simulations consistent with results from previous analyses of 13Be were satisfactorily fit to the decay-energy spectrum. Additionally, the cross-section for the nucleon-exchange entrance-channel is consistent with a theoretical prediction. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1306074.

  16. A quantum chemical topological analysis of the C-C bond formation in organic reactions involving cationic species.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia

    2014-07-21

    ELF topological analysis of the ionic Diels-Alder (I-DA) reaction between the N,N-dimethyliminium cation and cyclopentadiene (Cp) has been performed in order to characterise the C-C single bond formation. The C-C bond formation begins in the short range of 2.00-1.96 Åvia a C-to-C pseudoradical coupling between the most electrophilic center of the iminium cation and one of the two most nucleophilic centers of Cp. The electron density of the pseudoradical center generated at the most electrophilic carbon of the iminium cation comes mainly from the global charge transfer which takes place along the reaction. Analysis of the global reactivity indices indicates that the very high electrophilic character of the iminium cation is responsible for the negative activation energy found in the gas phase. On the other hand, the analysis of the radical P(k)(o) Parr functions of the iminium cation, and the nucleophilic P(k)(-) Parr functions of Cp makes the characterisation of the most favourable two-center interaction along the formation of the C-C single bond possible. PMID:24901220

  17. Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, Susumu

    2012-11-12

    Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

  18. Diverse functions and molecular properties emerging for CAX Cation/H+ exchangers in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Steep concentration gradients of many ions are actively maintained, with lower concentrations typically located in the cytosol, and higher concentrations in organelles and outside the cell. The vacuole is an important storage organelle for many ions. The concentration gradient of cations is establis...

  19. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  20. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  1. Effect of cationic molecules on the oxygen reduction reaction on fuel cell grade Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst in potassium hydroxide (aq, 1 mol dm(-3)).

    PubMed

    Ong, Ai Lien; Inglis, Kenneth K; Whelligan, Daniel K; Murphy, Sam; Varcoe, John R

    2015-05-14

    This study investigates the effect of 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of a selection of small cationic molecules on the performance of a fuel cell grade oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst (Johnson Matthey HiSPEC 3000, 20 mass% Pt/C) in aqueous KOH (1 mol dm(-3)). The cationic molecules studied include quaternary ammonium (including those based on bicyclic systems) and imidazolium types as well as a phosphonium example: these serve as fully solubilised models for the commonly encountered head-groups in alkaline anion-exchange membranes (AAEM) and anion-exchange ionomers (AEI) that are being developed for application in alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs), batteries and electrolysers. Both cyclic and hydrodynamic linear sweep rotating disk electrode voltammetry techniques were used. The resulting voltammograms and subsequently derived data (e.g. apparent electrochemical active surface areas, Tafel plots, and number of [reduction] electrons transferred per O2) were compared. The results show that the imidazolium examples produced the highest level of interference towards the ORR on the Pt/C catalyst under the experimental conditions used. PMID:25877304

  2. Suitability of the methylene blue test for determination of cation exchange capacity of clay minerals related to ammonium acetate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Dojčinović, Biljana; Erić, Suzana

    2015-04-01

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) represents one of the most important parameters of clay minerals which reflects their ability to exchange cations with liquid phases in near contact. Measurement of CEC is used for characterizing sample plasticity, adsorbing and swelling properties which later define their usage in industrial purposes. Several methods have been developed over the years for determination of layer charge, charge density, charge distribution, etc. and have been published in numerous papers (Czimerova et al., 2006; Yukselen and Kaya, 2008). The main goal of present study is comparison of suitability of more recent method - methylene blue test in regard to older method - ammonium acetate for determination of CEC. For this study, we selected one montmorillonite clay (Bogovina, Serbia) and two mainly kaolinite clays (Miličinica, Serbia). Chemicals used for CEC determinations were solution of methylene blue (MB)(14*10-6M/ml) and ammonium acetate (AA) solution (1M). The obtained results are showing generally lower values in case of MB method. The main difference is due to molecular aggregation of MB on the clay surface. AA method is highly sensitive to the presence of CaO. Release of Ca ion from the sample into the solution can limit the saturation of exchange sites by the ammonium ion. This is clearly visible in case of montmorillonite clay. Fe2+ and Mg ions are difficult to move by the ammonium ion because of their ion radius, but in case of MB molecule there is no such restriction in removing them from the exchange sites. MB solution, even in a low concentration (2*10-6M/ml), is showing preferable results in moving the ions from their positions which is already visible after adding a small quantity of solution (25cm3). Both MB-titration and MB-spot test yield similar results and are much simpler methods than AA and they also give other information such as specific surface area (external and internal) whereas AA method only provides information about

  3. On-line cation exchange for suppression of adduct formation in negative-ion electrospray mass spectrometry of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Buchmeiser, M R

    1998-12-15

    One major difficulty in the analysis of nucleic acids by electrospray mass spectrometry is represented by the affinity of the polyanionic sugar-phosphate backbone for nonvolatile cations, especially ubiquitous sodium and potassium ions. A simple on-line sample preparation system comprising a microflow pumping system and 45 x 0.8-mm-i.d. microcolumns packed with weak or strong cation-exchange resins is described for the efficient removal of cations from nucleic acid samples. Samples were analyzed by flow injection analysis at a 3-5 microL/min flow of 10 mM triethylamine in 50% water-50% acetonitrile. After on-line desalting, mass spectra of oligonucleotides revealed no significant sodium adduct peaks. Moreover, signal-to-noise ratios were greatly enhanced compared to direct injection of the samples. Electrospray mass spectrometry with on-line sample preparation allowed accurate molecular mass determinations of picomole amounts of crude oligonucleotide preparations ranging in size from 8 to 80 nucleotides within a few minutes. The good linearity of the calibration plot (R2 = 0.9988) over at least 2 orders of magnitude and a relative standard deviation in peak areas of less than 9% permitted the sensitive quantitative measurement of oligonucleotides in a concentration range of 0.2-20 microM with selected-ion monitoring. Finally, the on-line sample preparation system was evaluated for the mass spectrometric analysis of complex oligonucleotide mixtures. PMID:9868919

  4. Toward Separating Alpha-lactalbumin and Beta-lactoglobulin Proteins from Whey through Cation-exchange Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Mayyada; Chase, Howard

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the cation-exchange adsorption of the two major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) with the purpose of establishing a process for isolating them from cow's milk whey. The single- and two-component adsorption of 1.5 mg/ml ALA and 3 mg/ml BLG to the cation-exchanger SP Sepharose FF at 20° C using 0.1 M acetate buffer of pH 3.7 was studied. Langmuir isotherm parameters were determined for the pure proteins. In two-component systems, BLG breakthrough curve exhibited an overshoot phenomenon that gave evidence for the presence of a competitive adsorption between the two proteins. Complete separation occurred and it was possible to obtain each of the two proteins in a pure form. The process was then applied to a whey concentrate mixture where incomplete separation took place. However, BLG was produced with 95% purity and a recovery of 80%, while ALA showed an 84% recovery with low purity.

  5. Effects of monovalent, exchangeable cations and electrolytes on the relation between swelling pressure and interlayer distance in montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Low, P.F.; Roth, C.B.

    1995-07-01

    An oriented gel of homoionic montmorillonite was supported on a porous filter in a metal environmental chamber fitted with beryllium windows for the transmission of X-rays. Beneath the filter was a shallow reservoir connected to the outside atmosphere. Solution was expressed from the gel into the reservoir by admitting nitrogen gas to the environmental chamber at successively higher pressures. At each pressure the expressed solution in the reservoir was allowed to equilibrate through the filter with the gel and then the distance between the superimposed layers of montmorillonite in the gel was measured by X-ray diffraction. The swelling pressure of the montmorillonite equals the applied pressure at equilibrium. Thus, the relation between the swelling pressure and interlayer distance of the montmorillonite was determined when it was saturated with different exchangeable cations and equilibrated with electrolyte solutions of different concentration. The experimental results showed that, at relatively low concentrations of electrolyte, neither the species of exchangeable cation nor the electrolyte concentration had any effect on the relation between the swelling pressure and the interlayer distance. However, at relatively high concentrations of electrolyte, both of these factors affected this relation. Since the effect of the electrolyte concentration was not described quantitatively by electric double-layer theory, it was assumed that this theory was not applicable and that the added electrolyte reduced swelling by disrupting the hydration shells surrounding the montmorillonite particles.

  6. Uncertainties of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Measurements Using KCl-Coated Denuders, Cation-Exchange Membranes, and Nylon Membranes: Humidity Influences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-05-19

    Quantifying the concentration of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and identifying the chemical compounds in the atmosphere are important for developing accurate local, regional, and global biogeochemical cycles. The major hypothesis driving this work was that relative humidity affects collection of GOM on KCl-coated denuders and nylon membranes, both currently being applied to measure GOM. Using a laboratory manifold system and ambient air, GOM capture efficiency on 3 different collection surfaces, including KCl-coated denuders, nylon membranes, and cation-exchange membranes, was investigated at relative humidity ranging from 25 to 75%. Recovery of permeated HgBr2 on KCl-coated denuders declined by 4-60% during spikes of relative humidity (25 to 75%). When spikes were turned off GOM recoveries returned to 60 ± 19% of permeated levels. In some cases, KCl-coated denuders were gradually passivated over time after additional humidity was applied. In this study, GOM recovery on nylon membranes decreased with high humidity and ozone concentrations. However, additional humidity enhanced GOM recovery on cation-exchange membranes. In addition, reduction and oxidation of elemental mercury during experiments was observed. The findings in this study can help to explain field observations in previous studies. PMID:25877790

  7. DC conductivity, cationic exchange capacity, and specific surface area related to chemical composition of pore lining chlorites.

    PubMed

    Henn, François; Durand, Claudine; Cerepi, Adrian; Brosse, Etienne; Giuntini, J C

    2007-07-15

    Low resistivity in argillaceous sandstone reservoirs may be attributed either to the effect of microporosity, or to specific effects due to intrinsic clays' conducting properties or to other conducting minerals. In order to distinguish these effects, cation exchange capacity, specific surface areas, and dc conductivity of various pore lining chlorite-bearing sandstones from different hydrocarbon reservoir measurements are investigated. Cation exchange capacity and specific surface area are measured on whole rocks as well as on size-separated fractions. Both sets of values are low, in agreement with the structural and textural observations. The conductivity of these chlorites, measured in air conditions and after dehydration, is investigated by means of complex impedance spectroscopy on size-separated fractions as a function of temperature and compared to that of reference clays. The results show a large influence of moisture, applied electric field frequency, and temperature on the electrical properties. The magnitude of the dehydrated clays' conductivity is such that its influence on the conductivity of argillaceous sandstone is lower than that related to the presence of water or brine by several orders of magnitude. The dc conductivity and the related activation energy of the dehydrated samples appear to be related to the chemical composition of the clays. More specifically, a clear correlation occurs with the electrical charges of the clay network, that is to say with the location, i.e., tetrahedral or octahedral sites, of the substituting trivalent elements. PMID:17433348

  8. [Enhanced Performance of Rolled Membrane Electrode Assembly by Adding Cation Exchange Resin to Anode in Microbial Fuel Cells].

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhuo; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an anode-membrane-cathode structure ban reduce the distance between anode and cathode to improve the power of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here in order to further promote the performance of MFCs, a novel MEA was constructed by rolling-press method without noble metal material, and the Ohmic resistance decreased to 3-5 Ω. The maximum power density was 446 mW x m(-2) when acetate was used as the substrate. Solid spheres (like polystyrene balls and glass microspheres) were added into anode to enhance the transportation of electrolyte to cathode, resulting in a 10% increase in power density by producing macropores on and in the anode during rolling process. Cation exchange resin was added to accelerate the transportation of proton through the anode so that the power density further increased to 543 mW x m(-2). Meanwhile, the stability of cell voltage and Coulomb efficiency of MFC were both enhanced after the addition of cation exchange resin. PMID:26911023

  9. Analytical cation-exchange chromatography to assess the identity, purity, and N-terminal integrity of human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-10-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLF) is an iron-binding glycoprotein involved in the innate host defense. The positively charged N-terminal domain of hLF mediates several of its activities by interacting with ligands such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), specific receptors, and other proteins. This cationic domain is highly susceptible to limited proteolysis, which impacts on the affinity of hLF for the ligand. An analytical method, employing cation-exchange chromatography on Mono S, was developed to assess the N-terminal integrity of hLF preparations. The method, which separates N-terminally intact hLF from hLF species lacking two (Gly(1)-Arg(2)) or three (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)) residues, showed that 5-58% of total hLF in commercially obtained preparations was N-terminally degraded. The elution profile of hLF on Mono S unequivocally differed from lactoferrins from other species as well as homologous and other whey proteins. Analysis of fresh human whey samples revealed two variants of N-terminally intact hLF, but not limitedly proteolyzed hLF. Mono S chromatography of 2 out of 26 individual human whey samples showed a rare polymorphic hLF variant with three N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Ser(5)-) instead of the usual variant with four N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Arg(5)-Ser(6)-). In conclusion, Mono S cation-exchange chromatography appeared a robust method to assess the identity, purity, N-terminal integrity, and the presence of polymorphic and intact hLF variants. PMID:12381362

  10. Cuboctahedron-based indium-organic frameworks for gas sorption and selective cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Yu, Panpan; Li, Qipeng; Hu, Yue; Liu, Nannan; Zhang, Lijie; Su, Kongzhao; Qian, Jinjie; Huang, Shaoming; Hong, Maochun

    2016-06-28

    [Me2NH2]3[In3(BTB)4]·2DMF·2DMA·28H2O (InOF-9) is an anionic indium-organic framework based on nanosized cuboctahedrons, which is sustained by tetrahedral [In(COO)4] nodes and 3-connected tricarboxylates. Although InOF-9 is structurally unstable when exposed to air, it exhibits excellent gas sorption capacity through a supercritical carbon dioxide activation process and selectively encapsulates guest methylene blue cations. PMID:27254101

  11. Studies in the reaction-separation method for the preparation of barium chloride from barite using ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, A.N.; Gaikwad, A.G.; Phalak, C.A.; Bhandari, V.M.

    1999-06-01

    The authors report the application of an ion-exchange process as a reaction-separation strategy for the preparation of barium chloride from barite ore and sodium chloride. Experimental studies were carried out to evaluate the process efficiency and purity/yield of barium chloride using a strong acid cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T-42. The effects of various process parameters such as concentration of barium sulfide and concentration of sodium chloride were investigated, and optimization of the experimental variables was attempted. The results indicate the developed strategy to be attractive and an alternative route to existing processes. The methodology developed has large potential for the inorganic chemical process industry in general.

  12. Reactions of heteroatom and carbon nucleophiles with the cationic bridging methylidyne complex

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.; Crocker, M.; Vosejpka, P.C.; Fagan, P.J.; Marder, S.R.; Gohdes, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    The reaction of the ..mu..-methylidyne complex /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (1) with NMe/sub 3/ and (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C=NH gave the cationic 1:1 adducts /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHNMe/sub 3/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (3) and /((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CHNH=C(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/)//sup +/PF/sub 6//sup -/ (9), respectively, arising from attack of nitrogen on the methylidyne carbon. The reaction of 1 with KOC(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ gave the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHOC(CH/sub 3/)P/sub 3/) (4). Reaction of 1 with water afforded a 1:1 mixture of ..mu..methylene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CH/sub 2/) (2) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)/sub 2/; these products are proposed to arise from disproportionation of an initially formed hydroxy carbene species. Reaction of 1 with Et/sub 4/N/sup +/Br/sup -/ gave the unstable /sup +/-carbene complex ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHBr) (6). Reaction of 1 with the carbon nucleophiles CH/sub 3/Li and Li(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CuCN) gave the ..mu..-carbene complexes ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 3/) (11) and ((C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHC/sub 6/H/sub 5/ (12), while reaction of 1 with HFe(CO)/sub 4//sup -/ afforded 2. 1 reacted with acetone via nucleophilic addition of the enol affording the neutral ..mu..-carbene complex (C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)-(CO)Fe)/sub 2/(..mu..-CO)(..mu..-CHCH/sub 2/COCH/sub 3/)) (13). 1 also reacted with cyclohexanone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2,4-pentanedione, 5,5-dimethyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione, ethyl acetoacetate, and the sodium salt of diethyl malonate to give similar ..mu..-carbene products.

  13. Fibrous polymer grafted magnetic chitosan beads with strong poly(cation-exchange) groups for single step purification of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Tekinay, Turgay; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-05-15

    Lysozyme is an important polypetide used in medical and food applications. We report a novel magnetic strong cation exchange beads for efficient purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white. Magnetic chitosan (MCHT) beads were synthesized via phase inversion method, and then grafted with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (p(GMA)) via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Epoxy groups of the grafted polymer, were modified into strong cation-exchange groups (i.e., sulfonate groups) in the presence of sodium sulfite. The MCTH and MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were characterized by ATR-FTIR, SEM, and VSM. The sulphonate groups content of the modified MCTH-g-p(GMA)-4 beads was found to be 0.53mmolg(-1) of beads by the potentiometric titration method. The MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads were first used as an ion-exchange support for adsorption of lysozyme from aqueous solution. The influence of different experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption process was evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 208.7mgg(-1) beads. Adsorption of lysozyme on the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and followed the pseudo second-order kinetic. More than 93% of the adsorbed lysozyme was desorbed using Na2CO3 solution (pH 11.0). The purity of the lysozyme was checked by HPLC and SDS gel electrophoresis. In addition, the MCTH-g-p(GMA)-SO3H beads prepared in this work showed promising potential for separation of various anionic molecules. PMID:25864009

  14. Differential divalent cation requirements uncouple the assembly and catalytic reactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Hazuda, D J; Felock, P J; Hastings, J C; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A L

    1997-01-01

    Previous in vitro analyses have shown that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase uses either manganese or magnesium to assemble as a stable complex on the donor substrate and to catalyze strand transfer. We now demonstrate that subsequent to assembly, catalysis of both 3' end processing and strand transfer requires a divalent cation cofactor and that the divalent cation requirements for assembly and catalysis can be functionally distinguished based on the ability to utilize calcium and cobalt, respectively. The different divalent cation requirements manifest by these processes are exploited to uncouple assembly and catalysis, thus staging the reaction. Staged 3' end processing and strand transfer assays are then used in conjunction with exonuclease III protection analysis to investigate the effects of integrase inhibitors on each step in the reaction. Analysis of a series of related inhibitors demonstrates that these types of compounds affect assembly and not either catalytic process, therefore reconciling the apparent disparate results obtained for such inhibitors in assays using isolated preintegration complexes. These studies provide evidence for a distinct role of the divalent cation cofactor in assembly and catalysis and have implications for both the identification and characterization of integrase inhibitors. PMID:9261430

  15. Mechanism of cation exchange process for epitaxy of superconducting mercury barium calcium copper oxide films and passive microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua

    The record high superconducting transition temperature (T c) in Hg-based High temperature superconducting (HTS) cuprates make them very promising for both fundamental physics and practical applications. The high volatile nature of Hg presents a major challenge in epitaxy of high quality Hg-based HTS films. In a novel cation exchange process developed by our group recently, epitaxial HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta (Hg-1212) films can be obtained by diffusing volatile Tl cations out of, and simultaneously diffusing Hg cations into, the lattice of epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 (Tl-2212) or TlBa 2CaCu2O7 (Tl-1212) precursor films. Aiming at the remained issues in understanding the mechanism of the cation exchange (CE) process, this thesis work has studied the reversibility of CE. We have found that the CE process is completely reversible between Hg-1212 and Tl-2212, confirming further the thermal perturbation diffusion model. One of the experimental works unveiled that the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 involves two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 via CE followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl--O plans in each unit cell. Two improvements have been made in raising the quality of the Hg-1212 films. First, by successfully introducing micro-channels in Tl-1212 precursor with reversible CE, purer HTS Hg-1212 thin films have been obtained. Secondly, by pinning lattice with nonvolatile Re atoms, the surface morphology of Hg-1212 films have been improved. In addition to making the high quality Hg-1212 films, we have fabricated a two-pole X-band Hg-1212 microstrip filter and then investigated its nonlinearity by measuring the third-order intermodulation (IM3) signals since the major limitation for real application still comes from the nonlinearity. By a comparison between different structural materials of Hg-1212, Tl-2212 and YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO), the third-order intercept (IP3) of the Hg-1212 filter is consistently higher than that in the YBCO and Tl-2212. The surprising

  16. Cyclopropane reactions over Bronsted, cation, and metal sites in Ni/NaX zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.W.; Suib, S.L.; Bennett, C.O. )

    1994-07-01

    The reactions of cyclopropane in helium and hydrogen were investigated over two different loadings (10.7 and 6.0 wt%) of ion-exchanged Ni/NaX zeolites. The effects of reduction temperatures and hydrogen treatment times on catalytic activity and acidity were studied. Apparent activation energies ranged from 35.5 to 95.4 kJ/mol for isomerization reactions over two loadings of Ni/NaX zeolite reduced under different conditions. Rates of isomerization, hydrogenation, and hydrogenolysis are also reported. Deactivation and regeneration of catalysts are discussed. Particle sizes of 8.9 and 17.3 nm were observed in highly reduced Ni zeolites. Sintering of Ni was observed on the surfaces of the zeolite crystallites. Temperature programmed reduction studies show that stoichiometric amounts of H[sub 2] were used to completely reduce reduce all Ni in the samples. Infrared analysis of chemisorbed pyridine on these materials show that higher loadings of Ni result in higher initial acidities. Increased amounts of reduced Ni significantly increase the number of Bronsted sites on the surface of the catalyst. Electron paramagnetic resonance revealed that Ni[sup +] was present in low loaded Ni/NaX samples upon reduction at low temperatures (350[degrees]C), while higher reduction temperatures (450[degrees]C) resulted in a broad EPR signal corresponding to Ni[sup 0] only. Na vapor deposition experiments, designed to selectively poison Bronsted sites on the catalyst, reveal that Ni[sup +] ions are active in cyclopropane isomerization reactions at high temperatures. 59 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  18. The formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro; Hut, Piet; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kinoshita, Daisuke

    2004-02-01

    Recent observations have revealed that an unexpectedly high fraction--a few per cent--of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) that inhabit the Kuiper belt are binaries. The components have roughly equal masses, with very eccentric orbits that are wider than a hundred times the radius of the primary. Standard theories of binary asteroid formation tend to produce close binaries with circular orbits, so two models have been proposed to explain the unique characteristics of the TNOs. Both models, however, require extreme assumptions regarding the size distribution of the TNOs. Here we report a mechanism that is capable of producing binary TNOs with the observed properties during the early stages of their formation and growth. The only required assumption is that the TNOs were initially formed through gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary dust disk. The basis of the mechanism is an exchange reaction in which a binary whose primary component is much more massive than the secondary interacts with a third body, whose mass is comparable to that of the primary. The low-mass secondary component is ejected and replaced by the third body in a wide but eccentric orbit. PMID:14765188

  19. Boron protected cobalt dicarbollide anions and their use in polymer supported cation exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Miller, R.L.; Abney, K.D.

    1995-12-01

    The cobalt dicarbollide anion, [CO(C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11}){sub 2}]{sup -}, is unique in its ability to separate Cs{sup +} from other cations, an important property in the remediation of nuclear waste. Substitution of B10, in the carborane clusters imparts increased stability in harsh environments. Substitution also provides a handle. which may be useful in attaching this important anion to polymeric structures. Various routes to boron substitution will be discussed along with the possible uses of these boron substituted compounds in polymer synthesis.

  20. Coordinatively saturated cationic ruthenium(II) complexes. Preparation, characterization, and reaction with potassium superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, N.; Suzuki, H.; Moro-oka, Y.

    1986-09-10

    Coordinatively saturated cationic ruthenium(II) complexes, (eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)Ru/sup II/)(BF/sub 4/) (1), (eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 66/)Ru/sup II/)(BF/sub 4/) (2), ((1-5-eta/sup 5/-C/sub 6/H/sub 7/)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)Ru/sup II/)(BF/sub 4/) (3), ((1-5-eta/sup 5/-C/sub 7/H/sub 9/)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 7/)Ru/sup II/)(BF/sub 4/) (4), ((1-3:5,6-eta/sup 5/-C/sub 8/H/sub 1/exclamation)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)Ru/sup II/)(BG/sub 4/)(5), and ((6-EtO-1-5-eta /sup 5/-C/sub 7/H/sub 8/)(eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)Ru/sup II/)(BF/sub 4/) (7), are prepared by the reaction of (eta/sup 6/-C/sub 6/H/sub 6/)RuCl/sub 2/)/sub 2/ with cyclopentadiene, pentamethylcyclopentadiene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, 1,3-cycloheptadiene, 1,5-cyclooctadiene, and 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene, respectively, in ethanol in the presence of AgBF/sub 4/. Superoxide anion attacks at the terminal position of the dienyl moiety of 3-5 to yield ruthenium(0) complexes 8-10, containing cyclic dienone ligand. 25 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Ae4 (Slc4a9) is an electroneutral monovalent cation-dependent Cl-/HCO3- exchanger.

    PubMed

    Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; George, Alvin T; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E; Catalán, Marcelo A

    2016-05-01

    Ae4 (Slc4a9) belongs to the Slc4a family of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchangers and Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransporters, but its ion transport cycle is poorly understood. In this study, we find that native Ae4 activity in mouse salivary gland acinar cells supports Na(+)-dependent Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange that is comparable with that obtained upon heterologous expression of mouse Ae4 and human AE4 in CHO-K1 cells. Additionally, whole cell recordings and ion concentration measurements demonstrate that Na(+) is transported by Ae4 in the same direction as HCO3 (-) (and opposite to that of Cl(-)) and that ion transport is not associated with changes in membrane potential. We also find that Ae4 can mediate Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransport-like activity under Cl(-)-free conditions. However, whole cell recordings show that this apparent Na(+)-HCO3 (-) cotransport activity is in fact electroneutral HCO3 (-)/Na(+)-HCO3 (-) exchange. Although the Ae4 anion exchanger is thought to regulate intracellular Cl(-) concentration in exocrine gland acinar cells, our thermodynamic calculations predict that the intracellular Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-) concentrations required for Ae4-mediated Cl(-) influx differ markedly from those reported for acinar secretory cells at rest or under sustained stimulation. Given that K(+) ions share many properties with Na(+) ions and reach intracellular concentrations of 140-150 mM (essentially the same as extracellular [Na(+)]), we hypothesize that Ae4 could mediate K(+)-dependent Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange. Indeed, we find that Ae4 mediates Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange activity in the presence of K(+) as well as Cs(+), Li(+), and Rb(+) In summary, our results strongly suggest that Ae4 is an electroneutral Cl(-)/nonselective cation-HCO3 (-) exchanger. We postulate that the physiological role of Ae4 in secretory cells is to promote Cl(-) influx in exchange for K(+)(Na(+)) and HCO3 (-) ions. PMID:27114614

  2. Proton-sensitive cation channels and ion exchangers in ischemic brain injury: new therapeutic targets for stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Tiandong; Shi, Yejie; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury results from complicated cellular mechanisms. The present therapy for acute ischemic stroke is limited to thrombolysis with the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) and mechanical recanalization. Therefore, a better understanding of ischemic brain injury is needed for the development of more effective therapies. Disruption of ionic homeostasis plays an important role in cell death following cerebral ischemia. Glutamate receptor-mediated ionic imbalance and neurotoxicity have been well established in cerebral ischemia after stroke. However, non-NMDA receptor-dependent mechanisms, involving acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a), transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), and Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1), have recently emerged as important players in the dysregulation of ionic homeostasis in the CNS under ischemic conditions. These H+-sensitive channels and/or exchangers are expressed in the majority of cell types of the neurovascular unit. Sustained activation of these proteins causes excessive influx of cations, such as Ca2+, Na+, and Zn2+, and leads to ischemic reperfusion brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent pre-clinical experimental research findings on how these channels/exchangers are regulated in both in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia. The blockade or transgenic knockdown of these proteins was shown to be neuroprotective in these ischemia models. Taken together, these non-NMDA receptor-dependent mechanisms may serve as novel therapeutic targets for stroke intervention. PMID:24467911

  3. Colorimetric Humidity and Solvent Recognition Based on a Cation-Exchange Clay Mineral Incorporating Nickel(II)-Chelate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Solvatochromic nickel(II) complexes with diketonato and diamine ligands were incorporated into a saponite clay by ion exchange, and their colorimetric humidity- and solvent-recognition properties were investigated. These powders exhibit color change from red to blue-green depending on humidity, and the detection range can be controlled by modifying the metal complex. The humidity response takes advantage of the humidity-dependent water content in clay and the coordination of water molecules to the metal complex in equilibrium. The addition of organic solvents to the powders causes a color change to occur, varying from red to blue-green depending on the donor number of the solvent, thereby enabling solvent recognition. In the clay, the affinity of less sterically hindered complexes to water or solvent molecules is decreased compared with that in solution because the cationic complexes interact with the anionic layers in the clay. Incorporating diethylene glycol into the materials produced thermochromic powders. PMID:26542108

  4. Preparation and evaluation of rigid porous polyacrylamide-based strong cation-exchange monolithic columns for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Ou, Junjie; Dong, Xiaoli; Wu, Renan; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2007-11-01

    A CEC monolithic column with strong cation-exchange (SCX) stationary phase based on hydrophilic monomers was prepared by in situ polymerization of acrylamide, methylenebisacrylamide, and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) in a complete organic binary porogenic solvent consisting of DMSO and dodecanol. The sulfonic groups provided by the monomer AMPS on the surface of the stationary phase generate an EOF from anode to cathode, and serve as an SCX stationary phase at the same time. The monolithic stationary phase exhibited normal-phase chromatographic behavior for neutral analytes. For charged analytes, electrostatic interaction/repulsion with the monolith was observed. The strong SCX monolithic column has been successfully employed in the electrochromatographic separation of basic drugs, peptides, and alkaloids extracted from natural products. PMID:17924588

  5. Selective separation and purification of highly polar basic compounds using a silica-based strong cation exchange stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhen; Guo, Zhimou; Xue, Xingya; Zhang, Xiuli; Nordahl, Lilly; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-12-01

    Compared to moderately and weakly hydrophilic bases, highly polar basic compounds are even more difficult to separate due to their poor retention in reversed phase (RP) mode. This study described the successful applications of a strong cation exchange (SCX) stationary phase to achieve symmetric peak shape, adequate retention and selectivity in the separation of very polar basic compounds. Salt and acetonitrile concentrations were adjusted to optimize the separation. Good correlations (R(2)=0.998-1.000) between the logarithm of the retention factor and the logarithm of salt or acetonitrile concentration were obtained. Gradients generated by changing salt or acetonitrile concentration were compared for the analysis of different highly polar bases. Although all of the analytes were eluted more quickly with an acetonitrile gradient, the effect of the gradients tested on peak width and peak shape varied with respect to analyte. In addition, the effects of different types of cation and anion additives were also investigated. After separation parameters were acquired, the SCX-based method was utilized to analyze highly hydrophilic alkaloids from Scopolia tangutica Maxim with high separation efficiency (plate numbers>32,000 m(-1)). Concurrently, one very polar alkaloid fraction was purified with symmetric peak shape using the current method. Our results suggest that SCX stationary phase can be used as an alternative to RP stationary phase in the analysis and purification of highly hydrophilic basic compounds. PMID:24267097

  6. Cation exchange and CaCO 3 dissolution during artificial recharge of effluent to a calcareous sandstone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, Orly; Gavrieli, Ittai; Burg, Avihu; Lazar, Boaz

    2011-03-01

    SummaryThis research describes a field study and laboratory simulations of the geochemical evolution of groundwater following a recharge of effluent into aquifers. The study was conducted in the soil aquifer treatment (SAT) system of the Shafdan sewage reclamation plant, Israel. The SAT system recharges secondary effluent into the calcareous sandstone sediments of the Israeli Coastal Aquifer as a tertiary treatment. The reclaimed effluent is recovered ca. 500 m off the recharge basin and is used for unlimited irrigation. The laboratory simulations in which effluent was pumped through experimental columns packed with pristine Shafdan sediment showed that the chemical composition of the outflowing water was controlled mainly by cation exchange and CaCO 3 dissolution. Na +, K + and Mg 2+ were adsorbed and Ca 2+ was desorbed during the initial stage of recharge. The equilibrium distribution of the adsorbed cations was: Ca 2+ ˜ 60%, Mg 2+ ˜ 20%, and Na + and K + ˜ 10% each. The Ca 2+ in the Shafdan production wells and in the experimental columns outflow (˜5 meq L -1) was always higher than the Ca 2+ in the recharged effluent (˜3.5 meq L -1), indicating continuous CaCO 3 dissolution. This study demonstrates that besides mixing, a suite of geochemical processes should be considered when assessing groundwater quality following artificial recharge of aquifers.

  7. Cation Exchange Strategy for the Encapsulation of a Photoactive CO-Releasing Organometallic Molecule into Anionic Porous Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Francisco J; Rojas, Sara; Sánchez, Purificación; Jeremias, Hélia; Marques, Ana R; Romão, Carlos C; Choquesillo-Lazarte, Duane; Navarro, Jorge A R; Maldonado, Carmen R; Barea, Elisa

    2016-07-01

    The encapsulation of the photoactive, nontoxic, water-soluble, and air-stable cationic CORM [Mn(tacn)(CO)3]Br (tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane) in different inorganic porous matrixes, namely, the metalorganic framework bio-MOF-1, (NH2(CH3)2)2[Zn8(adeninate)4(BPDC)6]·8DMF·11H2O (BPDC = 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate), and the functionalized mesoporous silicas MCM-41-SO3H and SBA-15-SO3H, is achieved by a cation exchange strategy. The CO release from these loaded materials, under simulated physiological conditions, is triggered by visible light. The results show that the silica matrixes, which are unaltered under physiological conditions, slow the kinetics of CO release, allowing a more controlled CO supply. In contrast, bio-MOF-1 instability leads to the complete leaching of the CORM. Nevertheless, the degradation of the MOF matrix gives rise to an enhanced CO release rate, which is related to the presence of free adenine in the solution. PMID:27291890

  8. Oxygen exchange reaction kinetics for cerium(IV) oxide at 1000 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Christofer E. Douglas, John M.; Cremeans, Bethany M.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    2014-10-15

    Bulk oxygen exchange rate kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C were observed to have a first order dependence on the fraction of reaction remaining and to be independent of oxygen partial pressure, total pressure, particle size, and specific surface area. This suggests that the exchange reaction is dominated by an internal chemical reaction that is occurring throughout the bulk of the material, and not at the material surface. Oxygen exchange rates were limited by this internal chemical reaction for all CeO{sub 2} powders studied (15 nm to −325 mesh), and had a rate constant of 1.19×10{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a time to completion of 617 s. These results are similar to the exchange rates observed previously on PuO{sub 2}, suggesting that oxygen exchange on PuO{sub 2} may also be dominated by an internal chemical reaction under similar conditions. This work will help guide future experiments on {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} oxygen exchange reactions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen exchange kinetics on CeO{sub 2} at 1000 °C are independent of a wide range of experimental conditions and exhibit first-order chemical reaction kinetics. - Highlights: • Stable oxygen exchange rates obtained on a variety of CeO{sub 2} powders at 1000 °C. • Exchange rates are independent of atmospheric composition and specific surface area. • Exchange rates are limited by an internal chemical reaction, not a surface reaction. • CeO{sub 2} exchange rates appear similar to the rates observed on PuO{sub 2} at 1000 °C.

  9. Effects of monovalent, exchangeable cations and electrolytes on the infrared vibrations of smectite layers and interlayer water

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, L.; Roth, C.B.; Low, P.F.

    1996-12-25

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate how {nu}{sub Si-O}, the frequency of Si-O stretching, in layers of Li- and Na-montmorillonite and {nu}{sub 2}, the frequency of H-O-H bending, in the interlayer water were affected by increasing the concentration, C, of LiCl and NaCl, respectively. Oriented gels of Li and Na-montmorillonite equilibrated with solutions having various values of C were obtained by using a miniature pressure membrane apparatus. One part of each gel was used for the gravimetric determination of m{sub w}/m{sub c}, the water content. The other part was transferred to an FTIR spectrometer where the spectrum of the gel was measured by attenuated total reflectance. Thus, the dependence of both {nu}{sub Si-O} and {nu}{sub 2} on m{sub w}/m{sub c} was determined in the same samples. The results showed that increasing C had little or no effect on the relation between {nu}{sub Si-O} and m{sub w}/m{sub c}, or on the relation between {nu}{sub 2} and m{sub w}/m{sub c}. The vibrational coupling of Si-O stretching in the montmorillonite layers and H{minus}O{minus}H bending in the interlayer water was demonstrated. It was essentially independent of the species of exchangeable cation and C. Thus neither the species of exchangeable cation nor C had any specific effect on the structure of the clay layers or the structure of the interlayer water.

  10. The group separation of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geologic materials by cation-exchange chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Wildeman, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Demand is increasing for the determination of the rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geologic materials. Due to their low natural abundance in many materials and the interferences that occur in many methods of determination, a separation procedure utilizing gradient strong-acid cation-exchange chromatography is often used to preconcentrate and isolate these elements from the host-rock matrix. Two separate gradient strong-acid cation-exchange procedures were characterized and the major elements as well as those elements thought to provide the greatest interference for the determination of the REE in geologic materials were tested for separation from the REE. Simultaneous inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICAP-AES) measurements were used to construct the chromatograms for the elution studies, allowing the elution patterns of all the elements of interest to be determined in a single fraction of eluent. As a rock matrix, U.S. Geological Survey standard reference BCR-1 basalt was digested using both an acid decomposition procedure and a lithium metaborate fusion. Hydrochloric and nitric acids were tested as eluents and chromatograms were plotted using the ICAP-AES data; and we observed substantial differences in the elution patterns of the REE and as well as in the solution patterns of Ba, Ca, Fe and Sr. The nitric acid elution required substantially less eluent to elute the REE and Y as a group when compared to the hydrochloric acid elution, and provided a clearer separation of the REE from interfering and matrix elements. ?? 1984.

  11. Common Ion Effects In Zeoponic Substrates: Dissolution And Cation Exchange Variations Due to Additions of Calcite, Dolomite and Wollastonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, R. E.; Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    c1inoptilolite-rich tuff-hydroxyapatite mixture (zeoponic substrate) has the potential to serve as a synthetic soil-additive for plant growth. Essential plant macro-nutrients such as calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, ammonium and potassium are released into solution via dissolution of the hydroxyapatite and cation exchange on zeolite charged sites. Plant growth experiments resulting in low yield for wheat have been attributed to a Ca deficiency caused by a high degree of cation exchange by the zeolite. Batch-equilibration experiments were performed in order to determine if the Ca deficiency can be remedied by the addition of a second Ca-bearing, soluble, mineral such as calcite, dolomite or wollastonite. Variations in the amount of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite resulted in systematic changes in the concentrations of Ca and P. The addition of calcite, dolomite or wollastonite to the zeoponic substrate resulted in an exponential decrease in the phosphorous concentration in solution. The exponential rate of decay was greatest for calcite (5.60 wt. % -I), intermediate for wollastonite (2.85 wt.% -I) and least for dolomite (1.58 wt.% -I). Additions of the three minerals resulted in linear increases in the calcium concentration in solution. The rate of increase was greatest for calcite (3.64), intermediate for wollastonite (2.41) and least for dolomite (0.61). The observed changes in P and Ca concentration are consistent with the solubilities of calcite, dolomite and wollastonite and with changes expected from a common ion effect with Ca. Keywords: zeolite, zeoponics, common-ion effect, clinoptilolite, hydroxyapatite

  12. Comparison of Reactive Mercury Concentrations Measured Simultaneously Using KCl-coated Denuders, Nylon Membranes, and Cation Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    There is much debate about the chemistry of reactive gaseous and particle bound mercury (Hg) in the atmosphere, and the processes associated with formation. In addition, there are concerns regarding the interferences and calibration of the widely used Tekran® 2537/1130/1135 Hg measurement system. To investigate these we developed simple laboratory and field sampling systems designed to collect and analyze reactive Hg (Hg (II), Hg (I) and/or particle bound). A manifold system was applied in the laboratory, and in the field, in-series and -parallel membranes, flow controllers and pumps were utilized. Both systems actively collected reactive Hg using nylon membranes and cation exchange membranes alongside measurements made using the Tekran® system. The analytical system consisted of step wise 2.5 minute thermo-desorption and Hg quantification by cold vapor atomic fluorescence. In the laboratory, we compared the efficiency of these surfaces for collection of HgO, HgCl2, and HgBr2 when permeated into Hg and oxidant free air, and ambient filtered air. Other tests are ongoing. Thus far, results show concentrations measured by the cation exchange membrane were two-to-three fold greater than that measured by the nylon membranes, and three-to -four fold greater than that measured by the KCl-coated annual denuder. Thermo-desorption profiles obtained using nylon membranes show slightly different patterns associated with the reactive Hg compounds as permeated and tested. Field measurements were made at two locations in Reno, Nevada (a high traffic site and an agricultural area) and at Elkhorn Slough, California (marine site). Desorption profiles from nylon membrane differed by site and by time of year. Although the influence of aerosol on this measurement has not been explored, field results suggest different forms of reactive Hg were present in the atmosphere as a function of season and location.

  13. Advance chromatin extraction enhances performance and productivity of cation exchange chromatography-based capture of Immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-07-01

    The impact of host cell-derived chromatin was investigated on the performance and productivity of cation exchange chromatography as a method for capture-purification of an IgG monoclonal antibody. Cell culture supernatant was prepared for loading by titration to pH 6.0, dilution with water to a conductivity of 4mS/cm, then microfiltration to remove solids. DNA content was reduced 99% to 30ppm, histone host cell protein content by 76% to 6300ppm, non-histone host cell protein content by 15% to 321,000ppm, and aggregates from 33% to 15%. IgG recovery was 83%. An alternative preparation was performed, adding octanoic acid, allantoin, and electropositive particles to the harvest at pH 5.3, then removing solids. DNA content was reduced to<1 ppb, histones became undetectable, non-histones were reduced to 24,000ppm, and aggregates were reduced to 2.4%. IgG recovery was 95%. This treatment increased dynamic capacity (DBC) of cation exchange capture to 173g/L and enabled the column to reduce non-histone host proteins to 671ppm. Step recovery was 99%. A single multimodal polishing step further reduced them to 15ppm and aggregates to <0.1%. Overall process recovery was 89%. Productivity at feed stream IgG concentrations of 5-10g/L was roughly double the productivity of a same-size protein A column with a DBC of 55g/L. PMID:27247214

  14. Quantification of melamine in human urine using cation-exchange based high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Panuwet, Parinya; Nguyen, Johnny V; Wade, Erin L; D'Souza, Priya E; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2012-03-01

    Melamine and cyanuric acid have been implicated as adulterants in baby formula in China and pet foods in North America. In China, the effect of melamine or melamine-cyanuric acid adulteration lead to kidney stone development and acute renal failure in thousands of Chinese infants. A selective and sensitive analytical method was developed to measure melamine in human urine in order to evaluate the extent of potential health implications resulting from the consumption of these types of adulterated products in the general US population. This method involves extracting melamine from human urine using cation-exchange solid-phase extraction, chromatographically separating it from its urinary matrix co-extractants on a silica-based, strong-cation exchange analytical column using high performance liquid chromatography, and analysis using positive mode electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Quantification was performed using modified, matrix-based isotope dilution calibration covering the concentration range of 0.50-100 ng/mL. The limit of detection, calculated using replicates of blank and low level spiked samples, was 0.66 ng/mL and the relative standard deviations were between 6.89 and 14.9%. The relative recovery of melamine was 101-106%. This method was tested for viability by analyzing samples collected from the general US population. Melamine was detected in 76% of the samples tested, with a geometric mean of 2.37 ng/mL, indicating that this method is suitable for reliably detecting background exposures to melamine or other chemicals from which it can be derived. PMID:22309774

  15. Physical characterization of the state of motion of the phenalenyl spin probe in cation-exchanged faujasite zeolite supercages with pulsed EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetschman, D. C.; Dwyer, D. W.; Fox, J. D.; Frederick, C. K.; Scull, S.; Thomas, G. D.; Utterback, S. G.; Wei, J.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular motion of the phenalenyl (PNL) spin probe in the supercages of cation-exchanged X and Y zeolites (faujasites) has been physically characterized by pulsed and continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Both X and Y zeolites, whose cation sites were exchanged with the alkali metal ions, Li +, Na +, K +, Rb + and Cs + were examined. There is a good correspondence between the temperature dependences of the PNL electron spin phase memory time and the CW EPR spectra. Both display evidence of a thermal activation from a stationary, non-rotating molecular state to a low-temperature state of in-plane rotation (Das et al., Chem Phys. 143 (1990) 253). The rate of in-plane rotation is an activated process, with E* | / R=1289 |+- 35 K and 1462 ± 47 K in NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The rotation appears to be about an axis along which the half-filled, non-bonding π orbital interacts with the exchanged cation in the supercage. Both CW and pulsed EPR also show a higher temperature activation from the in-plane rotating state to an effectively isoptropic state of rotation of PNL in which the PNL-cation bond is thought to be broken, with E* ⊥ / R=2050 ± 110 K, 1956 ± 46K, 1335 ± 97 K in LiX, NaX and KX zeolites, respectively. The strength of the PNL-cation bonding decreases with increasing cation atomic number as indicated by E* ⊥ and the peripheral repulsion (crowding) of PNL increases with cation size as indicated E* |. There are qualitative indications that the binding of PNL to the cations in the Y zeolite is stronger than in the X zeolite.

  16. 2-Acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic Acid Grafted Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)-Based Acid-/Oxidative-Resistant Cation Exchange for Membrane Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi P; Das, Arindam K; Shahi, Vinod K

    2015-12-30

    For developing acid-/oxidative-resistant aliphatic-polymer-based cation-exchange membrane (CEM), macromolecular modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-co-HFP) was carried out by controlled chemical grafting of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS). To introduce the unsaturation suitable for chemical grafting, dehydrofluorination of commercially available PVDF-co-HFP was achieved under alkaline medium. Sulfonated copolymer (SCP) was prepared by the free radical copolymerization of dehydofluorinated PVDF-co-HFP (DHPVDF-co-HFP) and AMPS in the presence of free radical initiator. Prepared SCP-based CEMs were analyzed for their morphological characteristics, ion-exchange capacity (IEC), water uptake, conductivity, and stabilities (mechanical, chemical, and thermal) in comparison with state-of-art Nafion117 membrane. High bound water content avoids the membrane dehydration, and most optimal (SCP-1.33) membrane exhibited about ∼2.5-fold high bound water content in comparison with that of Nafion117 membrane. Bunsen reaction of iodine-sulfur (I-S) was successfully performed by direct-contact-mode membrane electrolysis in a two-compartment electrolytic cell using different SCP membranes. High current efficiency (83-99%) confirmed absence of any side reaction and 328.05 kJ mol-H2(-1) energy was required for to produce 1 mol of H2 by electrolytic cell with SCP-1.33 membrane. In spite of low conductivity for reported SCP membrane in comparison with that of Nafion117 membrane, SCP-1.33 membrane was assessed as suitable candidate for electrolysis because of its low-cost nature and excellent stabilities in highly acidic environment may be due to partial fluorinated segments in the membrane structure. PMID:26642107

  17. Functionalized Mesoporous Silica via an Aminosilane Surfactant Ion Exchange Reaction: Controlled Scaffold Design and Nitric Oxide Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide-releasing mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were prepared using an aminosilane-template surfactant ion exchange reaction. Initially, bare silica particles were synthesized under basic conditions in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). These particles were functionalized with nitric oxide (NO) donor precursors (i.e., secondary amines) via the addition of aminosilane directly to the particle sol and a commensurate ion exchange reaction between the cationic aminosilanes and CTAB. N-Diazeniumdiolate NO donors were formed at the secondary amines to yield NO-releasing MSNs. Tuning of the ion exchange-based MSN modification approach allowed for the preparation of monodisperse particles ranging from 30 to 1100 nm. Regardless of size, the MSNs stored appreciable levels of NO (0.4–1.5 μmol mg–1) with tunable NO release durations (1–33 h) dependent on the aminosilane modification. Independent control of NO release properties and particle size was achieved, demonstrating the flexibility of this novel MSN synthesis over conventional co-condensation and surface grafting strategies. PMID:26717238

  18. Non-photochemical Fluorescence Quenching in Photosystem II Antenna Complexes by the Reaction Center Cation Radical.

    PubMed

    Paschenko, V Z; Gorokhov, V V; Grishanova, N P; Korvatovskii, B N; Ivanov, M V; Maksimov, E G; Mamedov, M D

    2016-06-01

    In direct experiments, rate constants of photochemical (kP) and non-photochemical (kP(+)) fluorescence quenching were determined in membrane fragments of photosystem II (PSII), in oxygen-evolving PSII core particles, as well as in core particles deprived of the oxygen-evolving complex. For this purpose, a new approach to the pulse fluorometry method was implemented. In the "dark" reaction center (RC) state, antenna fluorescence decay kinetics were measured under low-intensity excitation (532 nm, pulse repetition rate 1 Hz), and the emission was registered by a streak camera. To create a "closed" [P680(+)QA(-)] RC state, a high-intensity pre-excitation pulse (pump pulse, 532 nm) of the sample was used. The time advance of the pump pulse against the measuring pulse was 8 ns. In this experimental configuration, under the pump pulse, the [P680(+)QA(-)] state was formed in RC, whereupon antenna fluorescence kinetics was measured using a weak testing picosecond pulsed excitation light applied to the sample 8 ns after the pump pulse. The data were fitted by a two-exponential approximation. Efficiency of antenna fluorescence quenching by the photoactive RC pigment in its oxidized (P680(+)) state was found to be ~1.5 times higher than that of the neutral (P680) RC state. To verify the data obtained with a streak camera, control measurements of PSII complex fluorescence decay kinetics by the single-photon counting technique were carried out. The results support the conclusions drawn from the measurements registered with the streak camera. In this case, the fitting of fluorescence kinetics was performed in three-exponential approximation, using the value of τ1 obtained by analyzing data registered by the streak camera. An additional third component obtained by modeling the data of single photon counting describes the P680(+)Pheo(-) charge recombination. Thus, for the first time the ratio of kP(+)/kP = 1.5 was determined in a direct experiment. The mechanisms of higher

  19. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in

  20. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  1. Simultaneous determinations of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography with an unmodified silica-gel column.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shizuko; Kozaki, Daisuke; Sakanishi, Kinya; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    In order to characterize the ion-exclusion and cation-exchange properties of an unmodified silica-gel column, the retention behaviors of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) ions were investigated using a Develosil 30-5 (150 x 4.6 mm i.d.) in the acidic region. Cr(VI) was separated from other anions by an ion-exclusion and ion-adsorption mechanism, and Cr(III) was separated from other cations with a cation-exchange mechanism. When using 2.0 mM oxalic acid (pH 2.6) as an eluent, a good separation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was obtained using conductimetric detection in 12 min. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determinations of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) added into tap-water and river-water samples. PMID:20215693

  2. NOVEL CONTINUOUS PH/SALT GRADIENT AND PEPTIDE SCORE FOR STRONG CATION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY IN 2D-NANO-LC/MSMS PEPTIDE IDENTIFICATION FOR PROTEOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tryptic digests of human serum albumin (HSA) and human lung epithelial cell lysates were used as test samples in a novel proteomics study. Peptides were separated and analyzed using 2D-nano-LC/MSMS with strong cation exchange (SCX) and reverse phase (RP) chromatography and contin...

  3. Knockout of multiple arabidopsis Cation/H+ exchangers suggest isoform-specific roles in metal stress response, germinatin and seed mineral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation/H(+) exchangers encoded by CAX genes play an important role in the vacuolar accumulation of metals including Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Arabidopsis thaliana CAX1 and CAX3 have been previously shown to differ phylogenetically from CAX2 but the physiological roles of these different transporters are st...

  4. A novel alpha-arylation of ketones, aldehydes, and esters via a photoinduced SN1 reaction through 4-aminophenyl cations.

    PubMed

    Fraboni, Andrea; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Albini, Angelo

    2003-06-13

    4-Aminophenyl cations (expediently generated by photolysis of 4-chloroaniline and its N,N-dimethyl derivative by photolysis in MeCN) added to enamines and gave the corresponding alpha-(4-aminophenyl) ketones in satisfactory yields. The yields of the same ketones were increased when silyl enol ethers were used in the place of enamines. The alpha-arylation of silyl enol ethers of aldehydes occurred with lower yields and only with the N,N-dimethyl derivative. The procedure was successful with ketene silyl acetals giving in a single step a good yield of alpha-(4-aminophenyl)propionic(acetic) esters, known intermediates for the preparation of analgesic compounds. The reaction of the aryl cation with Danishefsky's diene gave the arylated beta-methoxy enone. The method is complementary to the recently developed palladium-catalyzed alpha-arylation and occurs under neutral conditions. PMID:12790595

  5. Combined cation-exchange and extraction chromatographic method of pre-concentration and concomitant separation of Cu(II) with high molecular mass liquid cation exchanger after its online detection.

    PubMed

    Mandal, B; Roy, U S; Datta, D; Ghosh, N

    2011-08-19

    A selective method has been developed for the extraction chromatographic trace level separation of Cu(II) with Versatic 10 (liquid cation exchanger) coated on silanised silica gel (SSG-V10). Cu(II) has been extracted from 0.1M acetate buffer at the range of pH 4.0-5.5. The effects of foreign ions, pH, flow-rate, stripping agents on extraction and elution have been investigated. Exchange capacity of the prepared exchanger at different temperatures with respect to Cu(II) has been determined. The extraction equilibrium constant (K(ex)) and different standard thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated by temperature variation method. Positive value of ΔH (7.98 kJ mol⁻¹) and ΔS (0.1916 kJ mol⁻¹) and negative value of ΔG (-49.16 kJ mol⁻¹) indicated that the process was endothermic, entropy gaining and spontaneous. Preconcentration factor was optimized at 74.7 ± 0.2 and the desorption constants K(desorption)¹(1.4 × 10⁻²) and K(desorption)²(9.8 × 10⁻²) were determined. The effect of pH on R(f) values in ion exchange paper chromatography has been investigated. In order to investigate the sorption isotherm, two equilibrium models, the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, were analyzed. Cu(II) has been separated from synthetic binary and multi-component mixtures containing various metal ions associated with it in ores and alloy samples. The method effectively permits sequential separation of Cu(II) from synthetic quaternary mixture containing its congeners Bi(III), Sn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) of same analytical group. The method was found effective for the selective detection, removal and recovery of Cu(II) from industrial waste and standard alloy samples following its preconcentration on the column. A plausible mechanism for the extraction of Cu(II) has been suggested. PMID:21764063

  6. Design of a fixed-bed ion-exchange process for the treatment of rinse waters generated in the galvanization process using Laminaria hyperborea as natural cation exchanger.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Luciana P; Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Mayer, Diego A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the removal of zinc from galvanization wastewaters was performed in a fixed bed column packed with brown macro-algae Laminaria hyperborea, acting as a natural cation exchanger (resin). The rinse wastewater presents a zinc concentration between 9 and 22 mg/L, a high concentration of light metals (mainly Na and Ca), a high conductivity (0.5-1.5 mS/cm) and a low organic content (DOC = 7-15 mg C/L). The zinc speciation diagram showed that approximately 80% of zinc is in the form of Zn(2+) and ≅20% as ZnSO4, considering the effluent matrix. From all operational conditions tested for zinc uptake (17 < bed height<27 cm, 4.5 < flow rate<18.2 BV/h, 0.8 < particle equivalent diameter<2.0 mm), the highest useful capacity (7.1 mg Zn/g algae) was obtained for D/dp = 31, L/D = 11, 9.1 BV/h, τ = 6.4 min, corresponding to a service capacity of 124 BV (endpoint of 2 mg Zn/L). Elution was faster and near to 100% effective using 10 BV of HCl (1 M, 3.0%, 363 g HCl/L of resin), for flow rates higher than 4.5 BV/h. Calcium chloride solution (0.1 M) was selected as the best regenerant, allowing the reuse of the natural resin for more than 3 saturation/elution/regeneration cycles. The best operation conditions were scaled-up and tested in a pre-pilot plant. The scale-up design of the cation exchange process was proposed for the treatment of 2.4 m(3)/day of galvanization wastewater, resulting in an estimated reactants cost of 2.44 €/m(3). PMID:26766159

  7. Separation of Cinchona alkaloids on a novel strong cation-exchange-type chiral stationary phase-comparison with commercially available strong cation exchanger and reversed-phase packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christian V; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    A recently reported chiral strong cation exchanger (cSCX) type stationary phase was investigated for the LC separation of a series of Cinchona alkaloids and synthetic derivatives thereof to test its usefulness as alternative methodology for the separation of those important pharmaceuticals. The cSCX column-packing material was qualitatively compared on the one hand against a commercially available non-enantioselective SCX-material, PolySulfoethyl-A, and, on the other hand, against a modern C18 reversed-phase stationary phase which is commonly employed for Cinchona alkaloid analysis. Both SCX columns showed no pronounced peak-tailing phenomena which typically hamper Cinchona alkaloid RP analysis and require specific optimization. Thus, the cSCX-based assay provided new feasibilities for the separation of the Cinchona alkaloids in polar organic mode as opposed to conventional reversed-phase methodologies. In particular, a method for the simultaneous determination of eight Cinchona alkaloids (quinine, quinidine, cinchonine, cinchonidine, and their corresponding dihydro analogs) using the cSCX column in HPLC has been developed and exemplarily applied to impurity profiling of a commercial alkaloid sample. Furthermore, both SCX materials allowed successful separation of C9-epi and 10,11-didehydro derivatives from their respective educts in an application in synthetic Cinchona alkaloid chemistry. PMID:19107468

  8. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  9. The Influence of Hydrogen Bonding on Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reactions of Dehydropyridinium Cations in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Adeuya, Anthony; Nash, John J.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    The reactions of several substituted, positively-charged dehydropyridinium cations with cyclohexane, methanol and tetrahydrofuran have been examined in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. All of the charged monoradicals react with the neutral reagents exclusively via hydrogen atom abstraction. For cyclohexane, there is a good correlation between the reaction efficiencies and the calculated electron affinities at the radical sites; that is, the greater the electron affinity of the charged monoradical at the radical site, the faster the reaction. The reaction efficiencies with methanol and tetrahydrofuran, however, do not correlate with the calculated electron affinities. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that for these reagents a stabilizing hydrogen bonding interaction exists in the hydrogen atom abstraction transition states for some of the charged monoradicals but not for others. At both the MPW1K and G3MP2B3 levels of theory, there is a good correlation between the calculated activation enthalpies and the observed reaction efficiencies although the G3MP2B3 method provides a slightly better correlation than the MPW1K method. The extent of enhancement in the reaction efficiencies caused by the hydrogen bonding interactions parallels the calculated hydrogen bond lengths in the transition states. PMID:21080694

  10. On the time behaviour of the concentration of pyrazinium radical cations in the early stage of the Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoesser, Reinhard; Klein, Jeannette; Peschke, Simone; Zehl, Andrea; Cämmerer, Bettina; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-08-01

    During the early stage of the Maillard reaction pyrazinium radical cations were detected by ESR within the reaction system D-glucose/glycine. The spectra were characterized by completely resolved hyperfine structure. The partial pressure of oxygen and the radical concentrations were measured directly in the reaction mixture by ESR using solutions of the spin probe TEMPOL and of DPPH, respectively. There are quantitative and qualitative relations of the actual concentration of the radical ions to the partial pressure of oxygen, the temperature-time regime and the mechanical mixing of the reaction system. These macroscopic parameters significantly affect both the induction period and the velocity of the time-dependent formation of free radicals. From in situ variations of p(O 2) and p(Ar) including the connected mixing effects caused by the passing the gases through the reaction mixture, steric and chemical effects of the stabilization of the radical ions were established. The determination of suitable and relevant conditions for stabilization and subsequent radical reactions contributes to the elucidation of the macroscopically known antioxidant activity of Maillard products.

  11. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom. PMID:26647158

  12. Cation exchange synthesis of uniform PbSe/PbS core/shell tetra-pods and their use as near-infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, N; Mukherjee, B; Xing, G; Chakrabortty, S; Guchhait, A; Lim, J Y

    2016-08-01

    In this work we explore the preparation of complex-shaped semiconductor nanostructures composed of different materials via a cationic exchange process in which the cations of the original semiconductor nanostructure are replaced by cations of different metals with preservation of the shape and the anionic framework of the nanocrystals. Utilizing this cation exchange method, we synthesized two new tetrapods for the first time: Cu2-xSe/Cu2-xS and PbSe/PbS, both prepared from CdSe/CdS tetrapods as 'templates'. We also fabricated near-infrared (NIR) photodetectors with a very simple architecture comprising a PbSe/PbS tetrapod layer between two Au electrodes on a glass substrate. When illuminated by a NIR laser, these devices are capable of achieving a responsivity of 11.9 A W(-1) without the use of ligand-exchange processes, thermal annealing or hybrid device architecture. Transient absorption spectroscopy was carried out on these PbSe/PbS tetrapods, the results of which suggest that the branched morphology contributes in part to device performance. Investigation of the charge dynamics of the PbSe/PbS tetrapods revealed an extremely long-lived exciton recombination lifetime of ∼17 ms, which can result in enhanced photoconductive gain. Overall, these heterostructured tetrapods showcase simultaneously the importance of nanoparticle shape, band structure, and surface chemistry in the attainment of NIR photodetection. PMID:27387963

  13. Development of high-productivity, strong cation-exchange adsorbers for protein capture by graft polymerization from membranes with different pore sizes

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Robinson, Julie R.; Hobley, Eboni; Husson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the surface modification of macroporous membranes using ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) to create cation-exchange adsorbers with high protein binding capacity at high product throughput. The work is motivated by the need for a more economical and rapid capture step in downstream processing of protein therapeutics. Membranes with three reported nominal pore sizes (0.2, 0.45, 1.0 μm) were modified with poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) tentacles, to create a high density of protein binding sites. A special formulation was used in which the monomer was protected by a crown ether to enable surface-initiated ATRP of this cationic polyelectrolyte. Success with modification was supported by chemical analysis using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and indirectly by measurement of pure water flux as a function of polymerization time. Uniformity of modification within the membranes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Static and dynamic binding capacities were measured using lysozyme protein to allow comparisons with reported performance data for commercial cation-exchange materials. Dynamic binding capacities were measured for flow rates ranging from 13 to 109 column volumes (CV)/min. Results show that this unique ATRP formulation can be used to fabricate cation-exchange membrane adsorbers with dynamic binding capacities as high as 70 mg/mL at a throughput of 100 CV/min and unprecedented productivity of 300 mg/mL/min. PMID:23175597

  14. Iron-copper cooperative catalysis in the reactions of alkyl Grignard reagents: exchange reaction with alkenes and carbometalation of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Eiji; Ikeda, Daiji; Masui, Seiji; Yoshida, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Tamio

    2012-01-11

    Iron-copper cooperative catalysis is shown to be effective for an alkene-Grignard exchange reaction and alkylmagnesiation of alkynes. The Grignard exchange between terminal alkenes (RCH═CH(2)) and cyclopentylmagnesium bromide was catalyzed by FeCl(3) (2.5 mol %) and CuBr (5 mol %) in combination with PBu(3) (10 mol %) to give RCH(2)CH(2)MgBr in high yields. 1-Alkyl Grignard reagents add to alkynes in the presence of a catalyst system consisting of Fe(acac)(3), CuBr, PBu(3), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine to give β-alkylvinyl Grignard reagents. The exchange reaction and carbometalation take place on iron, whereas copper assists with the exchange of organic groups between organoiron and organomagnesium species through transmetalation with these species. Sequential reactions consisting of the alkene-Grignard exchange and the alkylmagnesiation of alkynes were successfully conducted by adding an alkyne to a mixture of the first reaction. Isomerization of Grignard reagents from 2-alkyl to 1-alkyl catalyzed by Fe-Cu also is applicable as the first 1-alkyl Grignard formation step. PMID:22128888

  15. Participation of Endomembrane Cation/H+ Exchanger AtCHX20 in Osmoregulation of Guard Cells1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Chanroj, Salil; Kwak, June M.; Li, Xiyan; Ward, John M.; Sze, Heven

    2007-01-01

    Guard cell movement is induced by environmental and hormonal signals that cause changes in turgor through changes in uptake or release of solutes and water. Several transporters mediating these fluxes at the plasma membrane have been characterized; however, less is known about transport at endomembranes. CHX20, a member of a poorly understood cation/H+ exchanger gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is preferentially and highly expressed in guard cells as shown by promoter∷β-glucuronidase activity and by whole-genome microarray. Interestingly, three independent homozygous mutants carrying T-DNA insertions in CHX20 showed 35% reduction in light-induced stomatal opening compared to wild-type plants. To test the biochemical function of CHX20, cDNA was expressed in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant that lacks Na+(K+)/H+ antiporters (Δnhx1 Δnha1 Δkha1) and plasma membrane Na+ pumps (Δena1-4). Curiously, CHX20 did not enhance tolerance of mutants to moderate Na+ or high K+ stress. Instead, it restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K+ at slightly alkaline pH, but had no effect on growth at acidic pH. Green fluorescent protein-tagged CHX20 expressed in mesophyll protoplasts was localized mainly to membranes of the endosomal system. Furthermore, light-induced stomatal opening of the Arabidopsis mutants was insensitive to external pH and was impaired at high KCl. The results are consistent with the idea that, in exchanging K+ for H+, CHX20 maintains K+ homeostasis and influences pH under certain conditions. Together, these results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that one CHX protein plays a critical role in osmoregulation through K+ fluxes and possibly pH modulation of an active endomembrane system in guard cells. PMID:17337534

  16. A DFT study on the mechanisms for the cycloaddition reactions between 1-aza-2-azoniaallene cations and acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-mei; Li, Zhi-ming; Wang, Quan-rui; Tao, Feng-gang

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of cycloaddition reactions between 1-aza-2-azoniaallene cations 1 and acetylenes 2 have been investigated using the global electrophilicity and nucleophilicity of the corresponding reactants as global reactivity indexes defined within the conceptual density functional theory. The reactivity and regioselectivity of these reactions were predicted by analysis of the energies, geometries, and electronic nature of the transition state structures. The theoretical results revealed that the reaction features a tandem process: an ionic 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to produce the cycloadducts 3 H-pyrazolium salts 3 followed by a [1,2]-shift affording the thermodynamically more stable adducts 4 or 5. The mechanism of the cycloaddition reactions can be described as an asynchronous concerted pathway with reverse electron demand. The model reaction has also been investigated at the QCISD/6-31++G(d,p) and CCSD(T)/6-31++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) levels as well as by the DFT. The polarizable continuum model, at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory, was used to study solvent effects on all the studied reactions. In solvent dichloromethane, all the initial cycloadducts 3 were obtained via direct ionic process as the result of the solvent effect. The consecutive [1,2]-shift reaction, in which intermediates 3 are rearranged to the five-membered heterocycles 4/5, is proved to be a kinetically controlled reaction, and the regioselectivity can be modulated by varying the migrant. The LOL function and RDG function based on localized electron analysis were used to analysis the covalent bond and noncovalent interactions in order to unravel the mechanism of the title reactions. PMID:22810049

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a novel hybrid nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate: Its analytical applications as ion-selective electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif Ali; Shaheen, Shakeeba

    2013-02-01

    A novel organic-inorganic nano composite cation exchanger poly-o-toluidine Sn(IV) tungstate has been synthesized by incorporation of a polymer material into inorganic precipitate. The material is a class of hybrid ion-exchanger with good ion-exchange properties, reproducibility, stability and good selectivity for heavy metals. The physico-chemical properties of this nano composite material were characterized by using XRD, TGA, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, elution behavior and chemical stability were also carried out to study ion-exchange properties of the material. Distribution studies for various metal ions revealed that the nano composite is highly selective for Cd(II). An ion-selective membrane electrode was fabricated using this material for the determination of Cd(II) ions in solutions. The analytical utility of this electrode was established by employing it as an indicator electrode in electrometric titrations.

  18. A two-layer ONIOM study of thiophene cracking catalyzed by proton- and cation-exchanged FAU zeolite.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Mao, Xinfeng; Pei, Supeng

    2016-02-01

    A two-layer ONIOM study on the hydrodesulfurization mechanism of thiophene in H-FAU and M-FAU (M = Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) has been carried out. The calculated results reveal that in H-FAU, for a unimolecular mechanism, the rate-determining step is hydrogenation of alkoxide intermediate. The assistance of H2O and H2S molecules does not reduce the difficulty of the C-S bond cracking step more effectively. A bimolecular hydrodesulfurization mechanism is more favorable due to the lower activation barriers. The rate-determining step is the formation of 2-methylthiophene, not the C-S bond cracking of thiophene. Moreover, the ring opening of thiophene is much easier to occur than the desulfurization step. A careful analysis of energetics indicates that H2S, propene, and methyl thiophene are the major products for the hydrodesulfurization process of thiophene over H-FAU zeolite, in good agreement with experimental findings. In M-FAU zeolites, both unimolecular and bimolecular cracking processes are difficult to occur because of the high energy barriers. Compared to the case on H-FAU, the metal cations on M-FAU increase the difficulty of occurrence of bimolecular polymerization and subsequent C-S bond cracking steps. Graphical abstract Hydrodesulfurization process of thiophene can take place in H-FAU zeolite. Two different mechanisms, unimolecular and bimolecular ones, have been proposed and evaluated in detail. The bimolecular mechanism is more favorable due to lower activation barrier as described in the picture above. Our calculated data indicate that H2S, propene, and methylthiophene are the major products, in good agreement with experimental observations. The effect of metal cations on the reaction mechanism is also investigated in this work. PMID:26841976

  19. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hung-Te; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Tang, Yi-Fang; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2013-03-15

    A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron-hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO2 dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4mA/cm(2) with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged TiOH2(+), and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO2 loading of 1g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. PMID:23380448

  20. Cation exchange capacity (Qv) estimation in shaly sand reservoirs: case studies in the Junggar Basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Mao, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Zhong-Chun; Luo, Xing-Ping; Deng, Ren-Shuang; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Ren, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Cation exchange capacity (Qv) is a key parameter in resistivity-based water saturation models of shaly sand reservoirs, and the accuracy of Qv calculation is crucial to the prediction of saturations of oil and gas. In this study, a theoretical expression of Qv in terms of shaly sand permeability (Kshaly-sand), total porosity (ϕt), and salinity of formation water (S) is deduced based on the capillary tube model and the physics volume model. Meanwhile, the classical Schlumberger-Doll research (SDR) model has been introduced to estimate Kshaly-sand. On this basis, a novel technique to estimate Qv from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs is proposed, and the corresponding model is also established, whose model parameters are calibrated by laboratory Qv and NMR measurements of 15 core samples from the Toutunhe formation of the Junggar Basin, northwest China. Based on the experimental data sets, this technique can be extended to reservoir conditions to estimate continuous Qv along the intervals. The processing results of field examples illustrate that the Qv calculated from field NMR logs are consistent with the analyzed results, with the absolute errors within the scope of  ±0.1 mmol cm-3 for the majority of core samples.

  1. Nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand removal from septic tank wastewater in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: substrate (cation exchange capacity) effects.

    PubMed

    Collison, Robert S; Grismer, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    The current article focuses on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen (ammonium and nitrate) removal performance from synthetic human wastewater as affected by different substrate rocks having a range of porosities and cation exchange capacities (CECs). The aggregates included lava rock, lightweight expanded shale, meta-basalt (control), and zeolite. The first three had CECs of 1 to 4 mequiv/100 gm, whereas the zeolite CEC was much greater (-80 mequiv/100 gm). Synthetic wastewater was gravity fed to each constructed wetland system, resulting in a 4-day retention time. Effluent samples were collected, and COD and nitrogen species concentrations measured regularly during four time periods from November 2008 through June 2009. Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal fractions were not significantly different between the field and laboratory constructed wetland systems when corrected for temperature. Similarly, overall COD and nitrogen removal fractions were practically the same for the aggregate substrates. The important difference between aggregate effects was the zeolite's ammonia removal process, which was primarily by adsorption. The resulting single-stage nitrogen removal process may be an alternative to nitrification and denitrification that may realize significant cost savings in practice. PMID:24851327

  2. Solution-Membrane Equilibrium at Metal-Deposited Cation-Exchange Membranes: Chronopotentiometric Characterization of Metal-Modified Membranes.

    PubMed

    Shahi; Prakash; Ramachandraiah; Rangarajan; Vasudevan

    1999-08-01

    Copper- and lead-deposited interpolymer cationic membranes have been prepared by electroless plating by an ion-exchange method and characterized by chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry. The parameters such as transition time (tau), Itau1/2, the potential drop (E0) across these membranes immediately after the application of constant current (I), and the height of the potential jump (DeltaE) across the membrane at tau have been measured by chronopotentiometry and compared with those of plain membranes. The approximate percentage of metal coverage and the number of ionic sites masked by the deposited metal in terms of NaCl concentration have been estimated from the differences in Itau1/2 values of plain and metal-deposited membranes. The quantity of metal deposited in a unit area of the membrane surface was measured by differential pulse polarography. The oxidation and reduction peak potentials corresponding to Cu(0)/Cu(II) and Pb(0)/Pb(II) couples were identified by cyclic voltammetry at pH 2.8 and 4.5 of 0.2 M CH3COONa-H2SO4. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10395776

  3. The use of native cation-exchange chromatography to study aggregation and phase separation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuang; Lau, Hollis; Brodsky, Yan; Kleemann, Gerd R; Latypov, Ramil F

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces a novel analytical approach for studying aggregation and phase separation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The approach is based on using analytical scale cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) for measuring the loss of soluble monomer in the case of individual and mixed protein solutions. Native CEX outperforms traditional size-exclusion chromatography in separating complex protein mixtures, offering an easy way to assess mAb aggregation propensity. Different IgG1 and IgG2 molecules were tested individually and in mixtures consisting of up to four protein molecules. Antibody aggregation was induced by four different stress factors: high temperature, low pH, addition of fatty acids, and rigorous agitation. The extent of aggregation was determined from the amount of monomeric protein remaining in solution after stress. Consequently, it was possible to address the role of specific mAb regions in antibody aggregation by co-incubating Fab and Fc fragments with their respective full-length molecules. Our results revealed that the relative contribution of Fab and Fc regions in mAb aggregation is strongly dependent on pH and the stress factor applied. In addition, the CEX-based approach was used to study reversible protein precipitation due to phase separation, which demonstrated its use for a broader range of protein–protein association phenomena. In all cases, the role of Fab and Fc was clearly dissected, providing important information for engineering more stable mAb-based therapeutics. PMID:20512972

  4. Analyte-Size-Dependent Ionization and Quantification of Monosaccharides in Human Plasma Using Cation-Exchanged Smectite Layers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuqi; Kawakita, Kento; Xu, Jiawei; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2015-08-01

    Smectite, a synthetic inorganic polymer with a saponite structure, was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Typical organic matrix molecules 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) were intercalated into the layer spacing of cation-exchanged smectite, and the complex was used as a new matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Because of layer spacing limitations, only a small analyte that could enter the layer and bind to THAP or DHBA could be ionized. This was confirmed by examining different analyte/matrix preparation methods and by measuring saccharides with different molecular sizes. Because of the homogeneous distribution of THAP molecules in the smectite layer spacing, high reproducibility of the analyte peak intensity was achieved. By using isotope-labeled (13)C6-d-glucose as the internal standard, quantitative analysis of monosaccharides in pretreated human plasma sample was performed, and the value of 8.6 ± 0.3 μg/mg was estimated. PMID:26151728

  5. Heavy water reactions with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: gas phase room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ping; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2007-09-01

    Reactions of heavy water, D(2)O, have been measured with 46 atomic metal cations at room temperature in a helium bath gas at 0.35 Torr using an inductively coupled plasma/selected ion flow tube tandem mass spectrometer. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and were allowed to decay radiatively and thermalize by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction. Rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions of fourth-row atomic cations from K+ to Se+, of fifth-row atomic cations from Rb+ to Te+ (excluding Tc+), and of sixth-row atomic cations from Cs+ to Bi+. Primary reaction channels were observed leading to O-atom transfer, OD transfer, and D2O addition. O-Atom transfer occurs almost exclusively (>or=90%) in the reactions with most early transition-metal cations (Sc+, Ti+, V+, Y+, Zr+, Nb+, Mo+, Hf+, Ta+, and W+) and to a minor extent (10%) with one main-group cation (As+). OD transfer is observed to occur only with three cations (Sr+, Ba+, and La+). Other cations, including most late transition and main-group cations, were observed to react with D2O exclusively and slowly by D2O addition or not at all. O-Atom transfer proceeds with rate coefficients in the range of 8.1 x 10(-13) (As+) to 9.5 x 10(-10) (Y+) cm3 molecule(-1)(s-1) and with efficiencies below 0.1 and even below 0.01 for the fourth-row atomic cations V+ (0.0032) and As+ (0.0036). These low efficiencies can be understood in terms of the change in spin required to proceed from the reactant to the product potential energy surfaces. Higher order reactions are also measured. The primary products, NbO+, TaO+, MoO+, and WO+, are observed to react further with D(2)O by O-atom transfer, and ZrO+ and HfO+ react further through OD group abstraction. Up to five D(2)O molecules were observed to add sequentially to selected M+ and MO+ as well as MO2+ cations and four to MO(2)D+. Equilibrium measurements for sequential D(2)O addition to M+ are also reported

  6. Invited Parallel Talk: Forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction and Regge constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-12-01

    We present our recent study of pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV. We analyze the forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction data in a Regge model and compare the resulting amplitudes with those from the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses. We explore possible high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2 GeV. Our results show that for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction, the appropriate energy region for matching meson-nucleon dynamics to diffractive scattering should be around 3 GeV for the helicity flip amplitude.

  7. An index of the literature for bimolecular gas phase cation-molecule reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.

    2003-01-01

    This is an index to the literature for gas phase bimolecular positive ionmolecule reactions. Over 2300 references are cited. Reaction rate coefficients and product distributions of the reactions are abstracted out of the original citations where available. This index is intended to cover the literature from 1936 to 2003. This is a continuation of several surveys: the original (Huntress Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser., 33, 495 (1977)), an expansion (Anicich and Huntress, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 62, 553 (1986)), a supplement (Anicich, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 84, 215 (1993)), and an evaluation (Anicich, V. G. J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 22,1469 (1993b). The Table of reactions is listed by reactant ion.

  8. Effects of Forest Succession on Exchangeable Cation Concentrations and Nitrogen Mineralization Rates in Soils Following Logging of Eastern Hemlock Forest, Whately, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, A. L.; Sweezy, T.; Zukswert, J. M.; Dwyer, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Ecological forest successions associated with invasive species and human disturbance may alter biogeochemical cycles within New England forests. Spread of the invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) to eastern North America is causing mortality of the eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), prompting salvage logging. Regrowth by deciduous hardwood trees is often observed. To evaluate whether changes in nutrient cycling could be altered by forest succession, we investigated exchangeable cation chemistry and nitrogen mineralization rates for soil in a mature, eastern hemlock forest and in a juvenile black birch (Betula lenta) forest in western MA. Eastern hemlock on this property was selectively logged 20 years ago, with black birch regrowth succeeding hemlock. We measured soil pH, exchangeable acidity (Al3+ and H+), exchangeable base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+), and nitrogen mineralization rates of organic and mineral horizons for 7 incubation periods between May 2011 - July 2012. We also measured the cation exchange capacity and nitrogen mineralization rates of soils from May - July 2012 (2 incubations) in a mature deciduous forest composed primarily of black birch. At each field site, 7 soil cores were collected. Soil horizons (organic and mineral) were separated and homogenized, and 3 replicates of each composite sample were analyzed for soil geochemistry. Organic soils within the juvenile black birch plot (BB) exhibit a low pH (4.3) similar to hemlock organic soils (HEM, pH=4.2). Surprisingly, exchangeable Al3+—the dominant cation in both plots—is significantly greater in organic soils at BB than at HEM (p<.001), and base saturation is less at BB (29%) than at HEM (46%, p<0.001) due to less Ca2+. There are no significant differences in the exchangeable cation chemistry of the mineral horizons at both sites, suggesting that the acidity difference of organic matter is not due to different soil mineralogy. In comparison, organic soil at the

  9. Electron and energy transfer as probes of interparticle ion-exchange reactions in zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, E.S.; Snowden, P.T.; Kim, Y.I.; Mallouk, T.E. )

    1993-08-19

    Photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer reactions of tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) with methylviologen (MV[sup 2+]) and tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)osmium(II) (Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) ion-exchanged onto/into separate zeolite Y particles were studied by emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of interparticle exchange were probed by observing the quenching of the MLCT excited state of-Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] by mobile MV[sup 2+] or OS(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions. The exchange reactions occur on time scales of seconds to hours, depending on the ionic strength of the surrounding medium. The time-dependent luminescence data were fitted to a dispersed kinetics model, from which average rate constants for the exchange reactions could be extracted. Time constants for interparticle exchange of MV[sup 2+] and Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions, in the range 10[sup 3]-10[sup 5] s at electrolyte concentrations of 0.1-3 mM, are significantly longer than the time scales (10[sup [minus]7]-10[sup 1] s) of most electrochemical and photochemical intrazeolitic reactions involving these and similar electroactive ions. These results argue for reaction mechanisms that invoke intrazeolite electron transfer, rather than exchange of electroactive ions followed by solution-phase electron transfer, in these systems. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Kiviaho, Jenny K; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications. PMID:27219684

  11. A global meta-analysis of soil exchangeable cations, pH, carbon, and nitrogen with afforestation.

    PubMed

    Berthrong, Sean T; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-12-01

    Afforestation, the conversion of non-forested lands to forest plantations, can sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide, but the rapid growth and harvesting of biomass may deplete nutrients and degrade soils if managed improperly. The goal of this study is to evaluate how afforestation affects mineral soil quality, including pH, sodium, exchangeable cations, organic carbon, and nitrogen, and to examine the magnitude of these changes regionally where afforestation rates are high. We also examine potential mechanisms to reduce the impacts of afforestation on soils and to maintain long-term productivity. Across diverse plantation types (153 sites) to a depth of 30 cm of mineral soil, we observed significant decreases in nutrient cations (Ca, K, Mg), increases in sodium (Na), or both with afforestation. Across the data set, afforestation reduced soil concentrations of the macronutrient Ca by 29% on average (P < 0.05). Afforestation by Pinus alone decreased soil K by 23% (P < 0.05). Overall, plantations of all genera also led to a mean 71% increase of soil Na (P < 0.05). Mean pH decreased 0.3 units (P < 0.05) with afforestation. Afforestation caused a 6.7% and 15% (P < 0.05) decrease in soil C and N content respectively, though the effect was driven principally by Pinus plantations (15% and 20% decrease, P < 0.05). Carbon to nitrogen ratios in soils under plantations were 5.7-11.6% higher (P < 0.05). In several regions with high rates of afforestation, cumulative losses of N, Ca, and Mg are likely in the range of tens of millions of metric tons. The decreases indicate that trees take up considerable amounts of nutrients from soils; harvesting this biomass repeatedly could impair long-term soil fertility and productivity in some locations. Based on this study and a review of other literature, we suggest that proper site preparation and sustainable harvest practices, such as avoiding the removal or burning of harvest residue, could minimize the impact of afforestation on

  12. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  13. Impact of 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of small molecules containing nitrogen-based cationic groups on the oxygen reduction reaction on polycrystalline platinum in aqueous KOH (1 mol dm(-3)).

    PubMed

    Ong, Ai Lien; Whelligan, Daniel K; Fox, Michael L; Varcoe, John R

    2013-11-21

    Alkaline anion-exchange membranes (AAEMs) containing cationic head-groups (e.g. involving quaternary ammonium and imidazolium groups) are of interest with regard to application in alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells (APEFCs). This initial ex situ study evaluated the effect of 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of model molecules containing (AAEM-relevant) cationic groups on the oxygen reduction reaction on a polycrystalline platinum disk (Ptpc) electrode in aqueous KOH (1 mol dm(-3)). The cationic molecules studied were tetramethylammonium (TMA), benzyltrimethylammonium (BTMA), 1-benzyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMI), 1-benzyl-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (BAABCO) and 6-(benzyloxy)-N,N,N-trimethylhexan-1-aminium (BOTMHA). Both cyclic and hydrodynamic linear sweep rotating disk electrode voltammetry techniques were used. The resulting voltammograms, derived estimates of apparent electrochemically active surface areas, Tafel slopes, apparent exchange-current densities and the number of electrons transferred (per O2 molecule) were compared. The results strongly suggest that 1 mmol dm(-3) concentrations of BTMA, BAABCO, and (especially) BMI seriously inhibit the catalytic activities of Ptpc in an aqueous KOH electrolyte at 25 °C. The negative influence of (benzene-ring-free) TMA and Cl(-) anions (KCl control experiment) appeared to be less severe. The separation of the trimethylammonium group from the benzene ring via a hexyloxy spacer chain (in BOTMHA) also produced a milder negative effect. PMID:24100347

  14. Chiral propargylic cations as intermediates in SN1-type reactions: substitution pattern, nuclear magnetic resonance studies, and origin of the diastereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Nitsch, Dominik; Huber, Stefan M; Pöthig, Alexander; Narayanan, Arjun; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Bach, Thorsten

    2014-02-19

    Nine propargylic acetates, bearing a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) adjacent to the electrophilic carbon atom, were prepared and subjected to SN1-type substitution reactions with various silyl nucleophiles employing bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate [Bi(OTf)3] as the Lewis acid. The diastereoselectivity of the reactions was high when the alkyl group R(2) was tertiary (tert-butyl), irrespective of the substituent X. Products were formed consistently with a diastereomeric ratio larger than 95:5 in favor of the anti-diastereoisomer. If the alkyl substitutent R(2) was secondary, the diastereoselectivity decreased to 80:20. The reaction was shown to proceed stereoconvergently, and the relative product configuration was elucidated. The reaction outcome is explained by invoking a chiral propargylic cation as an intermediate, which is preferentially attacked by the nucleophile from one of its two diastereotopic faces. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest a preferred conformation in which the group R(2) is almost perpendicular to the plane defined by the three substituents at the cationic center, with the nucleophile approaching the electrophilic center opposite to R(2). Transition states calculated for the reaction of allyltrimethylsilane with two representative cations support this hypothesis. Tertiary propargylic cations with a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) in the α position were generated by ionization of the respective alcohol precursors with FSO3H in SO2ClF at -80 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained for five cations, and the chemical shifts could be unambiguously assigned. The preferred conformation of the cations as extracted from nuclear Overhauser experiments is in line with the preferred conformation responsible for the reaction of the secondary propargylic cations. PMID:24494822

  15. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  16. Determining Clumped Isotope (Δ47) Signatures of CO2 During Ion-Molecule Isotopic Exchange Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarna, J.; Priyadarshi, A.; Pourmorady, P.; Tripati, A.; Estaris, J.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of multiply-substituted isotopologues such as 13C16O18O can be used to understand fundamental mechanisms that controls isotopic fractionation in chemical reactions. Knowledge of the energy-dependent ion-molecule isotopic exchange rate for 13C16O18O may also provide important insights into the CO2 ion-molecular exchange that occurs in the source of the mass spectrometer. It may offer an explanation for the recently observed nonlinearities associated with clumped isotope measurements. We designed a controlled set of laboratory experiments to investigate variations in the abundance of 13C16O18O associated with different ion-molecular isotopic exchange reactions. In our experiments, we characterize the effects of changing ionization energy, reaction time, CO2 amount, the presence of different compounds, and reaction chamber temperature on the clumped isotopic composition of CO2.

  17. Acetic anhydride: an intermediate analogue in the acyl-exchange reaction of citramalate lyase.

    PubMed

    Buckel, W

    1976-04-15

    1. Reactivation of deacetyl citramalate lyase by acetic anhydride proceeds through an enzyme-anhydride complex prior to actual acetylation. The reaction is inhibited by citramalate which is competitive with acetic anhydride. 2. A corresponding complex is an intermediate in the carboxymethylation of deacetyl enzyme by iodoacetate. However, the inhibition of this reaction by S-citramalate appears to be non-competitive with iodoacetate. 3. The results lead to the conclusion that acetic anhydride can be regarded as a structural analogue of citramalic acetic anhydride, the proposed intermediate in the acyl exchange reaction on citramalate lyase. 4. The formation of 6-citryl thiolester from the 1-thiolester via the cyclic citric anhydride provides a chemicla model for enzymic acyl exchange. 5. The data suggest that anhydrides are of general importance in acyl exchange reactions of thiolesters. PMID:1278157

  18. Why Seemingly Trivial Events Sometimes Evoke Strong Emotional Reactions: The Role of Social Exchange Rule Violations

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Mark R.; Diebels, Kate J.; Jongman-Sereno, Katrina P.; Fernandez, Xuan Duong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT People sometimes display strong emotional reactions to events that appear disproportionate to the tangible magnitude of the event. Although previous work has addressed the role that perceived disrespect and unfairness have on such reactions, this study examined the role of perceived social exchange rule violations more broadly. Participants (N = 179) rated the effects of another person’s behavior on important personal outcomes, the degree to which the other person had violated fundamental rules of social exchange, and their reactions to the event. Results showed that perceptions of social exchange rule violations accounted for more variance in participants’ reactions than the tangible consequences of the event. The findings support the hypothesis that responses that appear disproportionate to the seriousness of the eliciting event are often fueled by perceived rule violations that may not be obvious to others. PMID:26331429

  19. Application of mixed-mode, solid-phase extraction in environmental and clinical chemistry. Combining hydrogen-bonding, cation-exchange and Van der Waals interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pedersen, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Silica- and styrene-divinylbenzene-based mixed-mode resins that contain C8, C18 and sulphonated cation-exchange groups were compared for their efficiency in isolation of neutral triazine compounds from water and of the basic drug, benzoylecgonine, from urine. The triazine compounds were isolated by a combination of Van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and benzoylecgonine was isolated by Van der Waals interactions and cation exchange. All analytes were eluted with a polar organic solvent contaning 2% ammonium hydroxide. Larger recoveries (95%) were achieved on copolymerized mixed-mode resins where C18 and sulfonic acid are in closer proximity than on 'blended' mixed-mode resins (60-70% recovery).

  20. Selectivity Control in Synergistic Liquid-Liquid Anion Exchange of Univalent Anions via Structure-Specific Cooperativity between Quaternary Ammonium Cations and Anion Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, Christopher J; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Two anion receptors enhance liquid-liquid anion exchange when added to quaternary alkylammonium chloride anion exchangers, but with a striking dependence upon the structure of the alkylammonium cation. Two anion receptors were investigated, meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (C4P) and the bisthiourea tweezer 1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(3-(4-sec-butylphenyl)thiourea (BTU). C4P has the unique ability in its cone anion-binding conformation to accept an appropriately sized electropositive species in the resulting cup formed by its four electron-rich pyrrole groups, while BTU is not expected to be predisposed for a specific host-guest interaction with the quaternary ammonium cations. It was therefore hypothesized that synergism between C4P and methyltri(C8,10)alkylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) would be uniquely pronounced owing to insertion of the methyl group of the Aliquat cation into the C4P cup, and we present herein data supporting this expectation. While synergism is comparatively weak for both exchangers with the BTU receptor, synergism between C4P and Aliquat 336 is indeed so strong that anion exchange prefers chloride over more extractable nitrate and trifluoroacetate, effectively overcoming the ubiquitous Hofmeister bias. A thermochemical analysis of synergistic anion exchange has been provided for the first time, unraveling the observed selectivity behavior and resulting in the estimation of binding constants for C4P with the ion pairs of A336+ with Cl , Br , OAcF3 , NO3 , and I . The uniquely strong positive cooperativity between A336 and C4P underscores the advantage of a supramolecular approach in the design of synergistic anion exchange systems.

  1. The role of monovalent cations in the ATPase reaction of DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Hearnshaw, Stephen James; Chung, Terence Tsz-Hong; Stevenson, Clare Elizabeth Mary; Maxwell, Anthony; Lawson, David Mark

    2015-04-01

    Four new crystal structures of the ATPase domain of the GyrB subunit of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase have been determined. One of these, solved in the presence of K(+), is the highest resolution structure reported so far for this domain and, in conjunction with the three other structures, reveals new insights into the function of this domain. Evidence is provided for the existence of two monovalent cation-binding sites: site 1, which preferentially binds a K(+) ion that interacts directly with the α-phosphate of ATP, and site 2, which preferentially binds an Na(+) ion and the functional significance of which is not clear. The crystallographic data are corroborated by ATPase data, and the structures are compared with those of homologues to investigate the broader conservation of these sites. PMID:25849408

  2. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, Affc; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The

  3. Enzyme-substrate complementarity governs access to a cationic reaction manifold in the P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cryle, Max J; Hayes, Patricia Y; De Voss, James J

    2012-12-01

    The products of cytochrome P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl-containing dodecanoic acids are consistent with the presence of a cationic reaction intermediate, which results in efficient dehydrogenation of the rearranged probes by the enzyme. These results highlight the importance of enzyme-substrate complementarity, with a cationic intermediate occurring only when the probes used begin to diverge from ideal substrates for this enzyme. This also aids in reconciling literature reports supporting the presence of cationic intermediates with certain cytochrome P450 enzyme/substrate pairs. PMID:23109039

  4. Novel Ultra Stable Silica-Based Stationary Phases for Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography-Study of a Hydrophobically Assisted Weak Acid Cation Exchange Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Carr, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    A mixed-mode reversed-phase/weak cation exchange (RP/WCX) phase has been developed by introducing a small amount of carboxylate functionality into a hydrophobic hyper-crosslinked (HC) platform. This silica based HC-platform was designed to form an extensive polystyrene network completely confined to the particle's surface. The fully connected polymer network prevents the loss of bonded phase, which leads to superior hydrolytic stability of the new phase when compared to conventional silica based phases. Compared to previously introduced HC phases the added carboxylic groups impart a new weak cation exchange selectivity to the base hydrophobic HC platform. The phase thus prepared shows a mixed-mode retention mechanism, allowing for both neutral organic compounds and bases of a wide polarity range to be simultaneously separated on the same phase under the same conditions. In addition, the new phase offers the flexibility that gradients in organic modifier, pH or ionic competitors can be used to affect the separation of a wide range of solutes. Moreover, the inherent weak acid cation exchange groups allow formic and acetic acid buffers to be used as eluents thereby avoiding the mass spectrometric ionization suppression problems concomitant to the use of non-volatile additives such as strong amine modifiers (e.g. triethylamine) or salts (e.g. NaCl) to elute basic solutes from the strong cation exchange phase which was previously developed in this lab. The use of the new phase for achieving strong retention of rather hydrophilic neurotransmitters and drugs of abuse without the need for ion pairing agents is demonstrated. PMID:21227426

  5. Novel interactions of the charge-balancing cations with framework defects and trapped hydrogen atoms in holmium-exchanged Y zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Iton, L.E.

    1983-04-01

    The indirect superhyperfine interaction (ISHFI) between impurity electrons and host nuclei in Van Vleck paramagnets is induced by the large magnetic polarizability of the ground singlet electronic state of the Van Vleck cation. ISHFI effects were observed on neutral, spin S = 1/2 impurities for the first time. They appear in the EPR spectrum of Na-Y zeolite, partially ion-exchanged with /sup 165/Ho/sup 3 +/, which has been dehydrated and ..gamma..-irradiated.

  6. Hydrogen exchange in some coal-related reactions at 400C

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, B.M.; Michalczyk, M.J.; Woody, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The source of hydrogen in cleavage reactions and the paths of internal hydrogen transfer reactions (''hydrogen shuttling'') during solvent refining of coal were studied with deuterium-labeled model compounds. The reactions of 1,2-diphenylethane (bibenzyl, BB) and diphenylmethane (DPM), in which the dimethylene and methylene linkages, respectively, were completely deuterated with tetralin showed that BB formed toluene by C-C cleavage and hydrogen abstraction from tetralin, that DPM was relatively stable to fragmentation, but that both underwent extensive hydrogen exchange at 400C. The kinetics and possible reaction paths were determined for the reactions BB and DPM with tetralin. Reactions of labeled DPM, which exchanged deuterium readily but was otherwise stable, with Illinois No. 6 coal and North Dakota lignite showed that deuterium exchange was much more rapid with coal than in the tetralin system, probably owing to the larger number of radicals present; and that the deuterium was mainly in the benzylic portions of the products. Separate tests with model compounds showed that some aromatic hydrogen, mainly from polynuclear compounds, also underwent exchange. Reaction paths are discussed.

  7. Imidazole C-2 Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Reaction at Histidine for Probing Protein Structure and Function with MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Naoka; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nakajima, Chihiro; Kawahara, Kazuki; Miyagi, Masaru; Nishimura, Osamu; Matsuo, Hisayuki; Nakazawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We present a mass spectrometric method for analyzing protein structure and function, based on the imidazole C-2 or histidine Cε1 hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reaction, which is intrinsically second order with respect to the concentrations of the imidazolium cation and OD− in D2O. The second-order rate constant (k2) of this reaction was calculated from the pH-dependency of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kφ) obtained from the change of average mass ΔMr (0 ≤ ΔMr < 1) of a peptide fragment containing a defined histidine residue at incubation time (t) such that kφ = − [ln(1−ΔMr)]/t. We preferred using k2 rather than kφ because k2max (maximal value of k2) was empirically related to pKa as illustrated with a Brønsted plot: logk2max=-0.7pKa+α (α is an arbitrary constant), so that we could analyze the effect of structure on the H/D-exchange rate in terms of log(k2max/k2) representing the deviation of k2 from k2max. In the catalytic site of bovine ribonuclease A, His12 showed much larger change in log(k2max/k2) compared with His119 upon binding with cytidine 3′-monophosphate, as anticipated from the X-ray structures and the possible change in solvent accessibility. However, there is a need of considering the hydrogen bonds of the imidazole group with non-dissociable groups to interpret an extremely slow H/D exchange rate of His48 in partially solvent-exposed situation. PMID:24606199

  8. The effect of geometrical presentation of multimodal cation-exchange ligands on selective recognition of hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Brown, Matthew R; Heden, Ryan; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-09-18

    The effects of spatial organization of hydrophobic and charged moieties on multimodal (MM) cation-exchange ligands were examined by studying protein retention behavior on two commercial chromatographic media, Capto™ MMC and Nuvia™ cPrime™. Proteins with extended regions of surface-exposed aliphatic residues were found to have enhanced retention on the Capto MMC system as compared to the Nuvia cPrime resin. The results further indicated that while the Nuvia cPrime ligand had a strong preference for interactions with aromatic groups, the Capto MMC ligand appeared to interact with both aliphatic and aromatic clusters on the protein surfaces. These observations were formalized into a new set of protein surface property descriptors, which quantified the local distribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic potentials as well as distinguishing between aromatic and aliphatic properties. Using these descriptors, high-performing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models (R(2)>0.88) were generated for both the Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime datasets at pH 5 and pH 6. Descriptors of electrostatic properties were generally common across the four models; however both Capto MMC models included descriptors that quantified regions of aliphatic-based hydrophobicity in addition to aromatic descriptors. Retention was generally reduced by lowering the ligand densities on both MM resins. Notably, elution order was largely unaffected by the change in surface density, but smaller and more aliphatic proteins tended to be more affected by this drop in ligand density. This suggests that modulating the exposure, shape and density of the hydrophobic moieties in multimodal chromatographic systems can alter the preference for surface exposed aliphatic or aromatic residues, thus providing an additional dimension for modulating the selectivity of MM protein separation systems. PMID:26292626

  9. Estimation of soil cation exchange capacity using Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamgolizadeh, S.; Bateni, S. M.; Shahsavani, D.; Ashrafi, T.; Ghorbani, H.

    2015-10-01

    The soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) is one of the main soil chemical properties, which is required in various fields such as environmental and agricultural engineering as well as soil science. In situ measurement of CEC is time consuming and costly. Hence, numerous studies have used traditional regression-based techniques to estimate CEC from more easily measurable soil parameters (e.g., soil texture, organic matter (OM), and pH). However, these models may not be able to adequately capture the complex and highly nonlinear relationship between CEC and its influential soil variables. In this study, Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) were employed to estimate CEC from more readily measurable soil physical and chemical variables (e.g., OM, clay, and pH) by developing functional relations. The GEP- and MARS-based functional relations were tested at two field sites in Iran. Results showed that GEP and MARS can provide reliable estimates of CEC. Also, it was found that the MARS model (with root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of 0.318 Cmol+ kg-1 and correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.864) generated slightly better results than the GEP model (with RMSE of 0.270 Cmol+ kg-1 and R2 of 0.807). The performance of GEP and MARS models was compared with two existing approaches, namely artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The comparison indicated that MARS and GEP outperformed the MLP model, but they did not perform as good as ANN. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the most and the least influential variables affecting CEC. It was found that OM and pH have the most and least significant effect on CEC, respectively.

  10. Unfolding and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies on cation exchange columns: effects of resin type, load buffer, and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The chromatographic behavior of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that exhibits a pronounced two-peak elution behavior is studied for a range of strong cation exchange resins and with varying load buffer pH and composition. Six stationary phases are considered, including two tentacle-type resins (Fractogel EMD SO3-(M) and Eshmuno S), a resin with grafted polymeric surface extenders (Nuvia S), a resin with a bimodal pore size distribution (POROS HS 50), and two macroporous resins without polymer grafts (Source 30S and UNOsphere Rapid S). The two-peak elution behavior is very pronounced for the tentacle and polymer-grafted resins and for POROS HS 50, but is essentially absent for the two macroporous resins. The extent of this behavior decreases as the buffer pH and concentration increase and, consequently, mAb binding becomes weaker. Replacing sodium with arginine as the buffer counterion, which is expected to decrease the mAb binding strength, nearly completely eliminates the two-peak behavior, while replacing sodium with tetra-n-butylammonium hydroxide, which is expected to increase the mAb binding strength, dramatically exacerbate the effect. As shown by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS), the two-peak elution behavior is related to conformational changes that occur when the mAb binds. These changes result in increased solvent exposure of specific peptides in the Fc-region for either the Fractogel or the Nuvia resin. No significant conformational changes were seen by HX-MS when the mAb was bound to the UNOsphere resin or on the Fractogel resin when arginine was used in lieu of sodium as the load buffer counterion. Experiments with two additional mAbs on the Fractogel resin show that the two-peak elution behavior is dependent on the particular antibody. Circular dichroism suggests that the propensity of different mAbs to either precipitate directly or to form stabilizing intermolecular structures upon exposure to thermal stress can be related to their

  11. Excitation of Δ and N* resonances in isobaric charge-exchange reactions of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, I.; Benlliure, J.; Geissel, H.; Lenske, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vargas, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for the study of the excitation of Δ(1232) and N*(1440) resonances in isobaric charge-exchange (AZ, A(Z ± 1)) reactions of heavy nuclei. Quasi-elastic and inelastic elementary processes contributing to the double differential cross sections of the reactions are described in terms of the exchange of virtual pions. The inelastic channel includes processes where the resonances are excited both in the target and in the projectile nucleus. We present results for reactions of 112Sn and 124Sn on different targets. Our results confirm that the position of the Δ peak is insensitive to targets with mass number A ≥ 12, and show that the origin of the Δ peak shift towards low excitation energies, with respect to its position in reactions with a proton target, can be easily explained in terms of the superposition of the different excitation mechanisms contributing to the reaction.

  12. Role of the aerosol phase state in ammonia/amines exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap P; Chan, Chak K

    2013-06-01

    The exchange reaction of ammonia in (NH4)2SO4 with an amine and the corresponding reverse reaction of amines in aminium sulfates with ammonia were investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with a Raman spectrometer. The temporal changes in particle mass, chemical composition, and phase state were simultaneously monitored. When the salt particles were in an aqueous state at elevated relative humidities (RHs), the exchange of ammonia/amine vapors in the particle phase was reversible. The exchange rates of aqueous particles were in general higher than those of their corresponding solid counterparts. An aqueous phase was essential for the effective displacement of ammonia and amines. Aminium salts in different phase states and with different evaporation characteristics showed remarkably different reaction behaviors in ammonia vapor. The less compact amorphous aminium sulfate solids were more susceptible to ammonia exchange than the crystalline solids. The aminium salts in a liquid state exhibited substantial amine evaporation at <3% RH and formed acidic bisulfate. Under ammonia exposure, these acidic aminium droplets underwent both neutralization and displacement reactions. Stable solid salts containing ammonium, aminium, sulfate, and bisulfate were formed and hindered further reactions. The result suggests that ambient aminium sulfates may be acidic. Overall, the phase states of the ammonium and aminium salt particles crucially determine the heterogeneous reaction rates and final product properties and identities. PMID:23668831

  13. NN-->NNπ reaction near threshold in a covariant one-boson-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, R.; Mosel, U.

    1998-04-01

    We calculate the cross sections for the p(p,nπ+)p and p(p,pπ0)p reactions for proton beam energies near threshold in a covariant one-boson-exchange model, which incorporates the exchange of π, ρ, σ and ω mesons, treats both nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. The final state interaction effects are included within the Watson's theory. Within this model the ω and σ meson exchange terms contribute significantly at these energies, which, along with other meson exchanges, make it possible to reproduce the available experimental data for the total as well as differential cross sections for both the reactions. The cross sections at beam energies <=300 MeV are found to be almost free from the contributions of the Δ isobar excitation.

  14. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  15. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  16. Cation exchange synthesis of uniform PbSe/PbS core/shell tetra-pods and their use as near-infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, N.; Mukherjee, B.; Xing, G.; Chakrabortty, S.; Guchhait, A.; Lim, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we explore the preparation of complex-shaped semiconductor nanostructures composed of different materials via a cationic exchange process in which the cations of the original semiconductor nanostructure are replaced by cations of different metals with preservation of the shape and the anionic framework of the nanocrystals. Utilizing this cation exchange method, we synthesized two new tetrapods for the first time: Cu2-xSe/Cu2-xS and PbSe/PbS, both prepared from CdSe/CdS tetrapods as `templates'. We also fabricated near-infrared (NIR) photodetectors with a very simple architecture comprising a PbSe/PbS tetrapod layer between two Au electrodes on a glass substrate. When illuminated by a NIR laser, these devices are capable of achieving a responsivity of 11.9 A W-1 without the use of ligand-exchange processes, thermal annealing or hybrid device architecture. Transient absorption spectroscopy was carried out on these PbSe/PbS tetrapods, the results of which suggest that the branched morphology contributes in part to device performance. Investigation of the charge dynamics of the PbSe/PbS tetrapods revealed an extremely long-lived exciton recombination lifetime of ~17 ms, which can result in enhanced photoconductive gain. Overall, these heterostructured tetrapods showcase simultaneously the importance of nanoparticle shape, band structure, and surface chemistry in the attainment of NIR photodetection.In this work we explore the preparation of complex-shaped semiconductor nanostructures composed of different materials via a cationic exchange process in which the cations of the original semiconductor nanostructure are replaced by cations of different metals with preservation of the shape and the anionic framework of the nanocrystals. Utilizing this cation exchange method, we synthesized two new tetrapods for the first time: Cu2-xSe/Cu2-xS and PbSe/PbS, both prepared from CdSe/CdS tetrapods as `templates'. We also fabricated near-infrared (NIR) photodetectors

  17. Effect of cation-exchange pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts on the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsunoda, N; Ohta, H; Tsuge, K; Takesako, H; Seto, Y

    1998-10-23

    The efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts using a cation-exchange resin has been investigated by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. An aqueous solution containing methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and its monoalkyl esters, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid, was dried, and these phosphonic acids were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoro-acetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were significantly decreased by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions to an aqueous solution (approximately 0.5 mM) before derivatization. The extent of lowered yields was related to the hydrophilicity of phosphonic acids. MPA and its monoalkyl esters were spiked into soil samples (sand, alluvial soil and volcanic ash soil), extracted with distilled water, dried, silylated and applied to GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters from soil samples were low (3-42%) and MPA derivative was scarcely detected (yield: < 0.7%). By desalting the aqueous soil extract by passage through a strong cation-exchange resin, the yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters were significantly improved (12-69%) and MPA derivative was detected (yield: 2-36%). The extent of improved yields was related to the concentrations of divalent metal cations in aqueous soil extracts. In combination with desalting by the cation-exchange resin, GC-MS after TBDMS derivatization enables detection of nerve agent hydrolysis products in soils at sub-ppm (0.2 microgram/g) concentrations. PMID:9818434

  18. Arrhenius' law in turbulent media and an equivalent tunnel effect. [in binary exchange chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuge, S.; Sagara, K.

    1978-01-01

    The indeterminacy inherent to the formal extension of Arrhenius' law to reactions in turbulent flows is shown to be surmountable in the case of a binary exchange reaction with a sufficiently high activation energy. A preliminary calculation predicts that the turbulent reaction rate is invariant in the Arrhenius form except for an equivalently lowered activation energy. This is a reflection of turbulence-augmented molecular vigor, and causes an appreciable increase in the reaction rate. A similarity to the tunnel effect in quantum mechanics is indicated. The anomaly associated with the mild ignition of oxy-hydrogen mixtures is discussed in this light.

  19. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  20. Scaling Hydrologic Exchange Flows and Biogeochemical Reactions from Bedforms to Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    River water moves in and out of the main channel along pathways that are perpendicular to the channel's main axis that flow across or beneath the ground surface. These hydrologic exchange flows (HEFs) are difficult to measure, yet no less important than a river's downstream flow, or exchanges with the atmosphere and deeper groundwater (Harvey and Gooseff, 2015, WRR). There are very few comprehensive investigations of exchange fluxes to understand patterns with river size and relative importance of specific types of exchanges. We used the physically based model NEXSS to simulate multiple scales of hyporheic flow and their cumulative effects on solute reaction in large basins (on the order of Chesapeake Bay basin or larger). Our goal was to explain where and when particular types of hyporheic flow are important in enhancing key biogeochemical reactions, such as organic carbon respiration and denitrification. Results demonstrate that hyporheic flux (expressed per unit area of streambed) varies surprisingly little across the continuum of first-order streams to eighth-order rivers, and vertical exchange beneath small bedforms dominates in comparison with lateral flow beneath gravel bars and meanders. Also, the river's entire volume is exchanged many times with hyporheic flow within a basin, and the turnover length (after one entire river volume is exchanged) is strongly influenced by hydrogeomorphic differences between physiographic regions as well as by river size. The cumulative effects on biogeochemical reactions were assessed using a the reaction significance factor, RSF, which computes the cumulative potential for hyporheic reactions using a dimensionless index that balances reaction progress in a single hyporheic flow path against overall processing efficiency of river turnover through hyporheic flow paths of that type. Reaction significance appears to be strongly dominated by hydrologic factors rather than biogeochemical factors, and seems to be dominated by

  1. Effect of nickel hexaaluminate mirror cation on structure-sensitive reactions during n-tetradecane partial oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T H; Shekhawat, D; Berry, D A; Smith, M W; Salazar, M; Kugler, E L

    2007-04-30

    Reforming studies were conducted on nickel-substituted hexaaluminate catalysts, ANi0.4Al11.6O19-δ (A = La, Sr and Ba), to reform liquid hydrocarbon fuels into H2-rich synthesis gas for fuel cell applications. The reaction conditions studied were the partial oxidation of n-tetradecane (I) and n-tetradecane with 50 ppmw sulfur as dibenzothiophene (II). Hexaaluminate catalyst activity toward reaction conditions (I) and (II) as well as the surface Ni concentration and dispersion was shown to correlate with the type of mirror cation substituted into the lattice. The Ni surface concentration was determined by XPS to be 5.3, <0.1 and 0.7 wt.% for LaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ, BaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ and SrNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ, respectively. SrNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ and BaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ catalysts exhibited stable performance for reaction condition (I), while the loss in activity exhibited over time by LaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ suggested site blocking by carbon deposition. Under reaction condition (II), additional activity loss was experienced by both LaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ and Al11.6O19-δ catalysts due to the presence of dibenzothiophene. However, LaNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ experienced more severe and partially reversible site blocking where SrNi0.4Al11.6O19-δ experienced a less severe loss of activity, selectivity and irreversible site blocking. The behavior observed in nickel-substituted hexaaluminate catalysts suggests that the different mirror cations influenced the coordination of Ni sites within the lattice and adsorption of hydrocarbons to the surface of the catalysts.

  2. Stabilized borata-alkene formation: structural features, reactions and the role of the counter cation.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Sonja; Dachwitz, Steffen; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard

    2015-12-28

    Dimethylbenzofulvene adds Piers' borane [HB(C6F5)2] at the indene double bond to give a mixture of regioisomeric boranes 8a,b. Subsequent isomerization under equilibrium conditions gives the isopropyl substituted 1H and 3H borylindenes 10a,b. Their treatment with the bulky LiTMP base under frustrated Lewis pair conditions resulted in a clean deprotonation reaction to give the borata-alkene 14. Its X-ray crystal structure analysis indicated a pronounced B[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond character and thus a borata-benzofulvene description. The borata-alkene underwent (probably stepwise) [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with chalcone derivatives and a formal [6 + 2] cycloaddition with phenylmethylketene. Many products and derivatives were characterized by X-ray diffraction. PMID:26584629

  3. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  4. Catalysis in a Cage: Condition-Dependent Speciation and Dynamics of Exchanged Cu Cations in SSZ-13 Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Christopher; Parekh, Atish A; Khurana, Ishant; Di Iorio, John R; Li, Hui; Albarracin Caballero, Jonatan D; Shih, Arthur J; Anggara, Trunojoyo; Delgass, W Nicholas; Miller, Jeffrey T; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Gounder, Rajamani; Schneider, William F

    2016-05-11

    The relationships among the macroscopic compositional parameters of a Cu-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite catalyst, the types and numbers of Cu active sites, and activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 are established through experimental interrogation and computational analysis of materials across the catalyst composition space. Density functional theory, stochastic models, and experimental characterizations demonstrate that within the synthesis protocols applied here and across Si:Al ratios, the volumetric density of six-membered-rings (6MR) containing two Al (2Al sites) is consistent with a random Al siting in the SSZ-13 lattice subject to Löwenstein's rule. Further, exchanged Cu(II) ions first populate these 2Al sites before populating remaining unpaired, or 1Al, sites as Cu(II)OH. These sites are distinguished and enumerated ex situ through vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS) and chemical titrations. In situ and operando XAS follow Cu oxidation state and coordination environment as a function of environmental conditions including low-temperature (473 K) SCR catalysis and are rationalized through first-principles thermodynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Experiment and theory together reveal that the Cu sites respond sensitively to exposure conditions, and in particular that Cu species are solvated and mobilized by NH3 under SCR conditions. While Cu sites are spectroscopically and chemically distinct away from these conditions, they exhibit similar turnover rates, apparent activation energies and apparent reaction orders at the SCR conditions, even on zeolite frameworks other than SSZ13. PMID:27070199

  5. Charge exchange and chemical reactions with trapped Th{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, L. R.; DePalatis, M. V.; Chapman, M. S.

    2011-01-15

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th{sup 3+} and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th{sup 3+} make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th{sup 3+} with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th{sup 3+} with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th{sup 3+} and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th{sup 3+} in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th{sup 3+} with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th{sup 3+}.

  6. A theoretical study of three gas-phase reactions involving the production or loss of methane cations.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Leonardo; da Silveira, Enio F

    2014-10-21

    Hydrocarbon ions are important species in flames, spectroscopy and the interstellar medium. Their importance is reflected in the extensive body of literature on the structure and reactivity of carbocations. However, the geometry, electronic structure and reactivity of carbocations are difficult to assess. This study aims to contribute to the current knowledge of this subject by presenting a quantum mechanics description of methane cation dissociation using multiconfigurational methods. The geometric and electronic parameters of the minimum structure were determined for three main reaction paths: the dissociation CH4(+)→ CH2(+) + H2 and the dissociation-recombination processes CH4(+)↔ CH3(+) + H. The electronic and energetic effects of these reactions were analyzed, and it was found that each reaction path has a strong dependence on the methodology used as well as a strong multiconfigurational character during dissociation. The first doublet excited states are inner-shell excited states and may correspond to the ions that are expected to be formed after electron detachment. The rate coefficient for each reaction path was determined using variational transition state theory and RRKM/master equation calculations. The major dissociation paths, with their rate coefficients at the high-pressure limit, are CH4(+)(X(~)(2)B1) → CH3(+)(A(2)A1') + H((2)S) (k∞(T) = 1.42 × 10(+14) s(-1) exp(-37.12/RT)) and CH4(+)(X(~)(2)B1) → CH2(+)(A(2)A1) + H2((2)Σg(+)) (k∞(T) = 9.18 × 10(+14) s(-1) exp(-55.77/RT)). Our findings help to explain the abundance of ions formed from CH4 in the interstellar medium and to build models of chemical evolution. PMID:25200833

  7. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products.

  8. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products. PMID:26296115

  9. Insights in understanding aggregate formation and dissociation in cation exchange chromatography for a structurally unstable Fc-fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Chao; Chennamsetty, Naresh; Xu, Xuankuo; Li, Zheng Jian

    2016-08-19

    Cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) of a structurally unstable Fc-fusion protein exhibited multi-peak elution profile upon a salt-step elution due to protein aggregation during intra-column buffer transition where low pH and high salt coexisted. The protein exhibited a single-peak elution behavior during a pH-step elution; nevertheless, the levels of soluble aggregates (i.e. high molecular weight species, HMW) in the CEX eluate were still found up to 12-fold higher than that for the load material. The amount of the aggregates formed upon the pH-step elution was dependent on column loading with maximum HMW achieved at intermediate loading levels, supporting the hypothesis that the aggregation was the result of both the conformational changes of the bound protein and the solution concentration of the aggregation-susceptible proteins during elution. Factors such as high load pH, short protein/resin contact time, hydrophilic resin surface, and weak ionizable ligand were effective, to some extent, to reduce aggregate formation by improving the structural integrity of the bound protein. An orthogonal technique, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) using Sypro Orange dye confirmed that the bound protein exposed more hydrophobic area than the native molecule in free solution, especially in the pH 4-5 range. The Sypro Orange dye study of resin surface property also demonstrated that the poly[styrene-divinylbenzene]-based Poros XS with polyhydroxyl surface coating is more hydrophobic compared to the agarose-based CM Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF. The hydrophobic property of Poros XS contributed to stronger interactions with the partially unfolded bound protein and consequently to the higher aggregate levels seen in Poros XS eluate. This work also investigates the aggregation reversibility in CEX eluate where up to 66% of the aggregates were observed to dissociate into native monomers over a period of 120h, and links the aggregate stability to such conditions as resin

  10. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  11. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  12. Medium Modi cation on Vector Mesons Observed in 12 GeV p + A Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruki, M.; En'yo, H.; Muto, R.; Tabaru, T.; Yokkaichi, S.; Fukao, Y.; Funahashi, H.; Ishino, M.; Kanda, H.; Kitaguchi, M.; Mihara, S.; Miwa, K.; Miyashita, T.; Murakami, T.; Nakura, T.; Sakuma, F.; Togawa, M.; Yamada, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Chiba, J.; Ieiri, M.; Sasaki, O.; Sekimoto, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Hamagaki, H.; Kek-Ps E325 Collaboration

    2006-11-01

    The invariant mass spectra of e+e- pairs produced in 12 GeV p+A reactions are measured at the KEK-PS. We observed a significant enhancement over the known hadronic sources on the low-mass side of the ω meson peak. The 95 % C.L. allowed parameter regions for ρ/ω ratio are obtained as ρ/ω < 0.15 and ρ/ω < 0.31 for C and Cu targets, respectively. As for the φ meson, the data obtained with a Cu target revealed a significant excess on the low-mass side of the φ meson peak mainly in the βγφ < 1.25 region.

  13. An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a Moravia network for organic dye absorption through cation-exchange.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Fan, Cong-Cong; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Du, Jie; Zhu, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Yue

    2016-07-01

    An anionic zeolite-like metal-organic framework (AZMOF) with a twisted partially augmented the net, known as the "Moravia" net, [(CH3)2NH2]6[Sr13(O)3()8(OH)2(H2O)16]·xS (, where S represents non-coordinated solvent molecules, and is the abbreviation of benzo-(1,2;3,4;5,6)-tris-(thiophene-2'-carboxylic acid)), has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized, which possesses an anionic framework and nano-sized sodalite cage. Through cation-exchange, is capable of uptaking large organic cationic dyes including Rhodamine B (RB), Basic Red 2 (BR2), Crystal Violet (CV) and Methylene Blue (MB), amongst which the adsorption capability for RB (up to 545 mg g(-1)), and BR2 (up to 675 mg g(-1)) is the highest for reported absorbants to date. PMID:27301344

  14. (4B-3H) NADH-H2O exchange reaction of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Guillory, R.J.

    1985-06-14

    The purified mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase enzyme has been shown to catalyze a rapid (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange reaction. When the enzyme is subjected to a single freeze-thaw cycle there is a complete loss of NADH dehydrogenation without a measurable decrease in the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Complete loss of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange follows brief exposure to ultraviolet photoirradiation. The differential sensitivity of the water exchange reaction and the dehydrogenase activity suggests a direct involvement of the enzymes flavin cofactor in the catalysis of the (4B-/sup 3/H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange. Arylazido-beta-alanyl NAD+ (A3'-0-(3-(N-4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino) propionyl)NAD+) is shown to be a potent photodependent inhibitor of the (4B-3H) NADH-H/sub 2/O exchange activity following photoirradiation with visible light. This is consistent with the observed photodependent inhibition of the dehydrogenase activity by this photoprobe.

  15. Gas-phase reactions of carbon dioxide with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2006-02-01

    The chemistry of carbon dioxide has been surveyed systematically with 46 atomic cations at room temperature using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and allowed to cool radiatively and to thermalize by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction downstream in a flow tube in helium buffer gas at 0.35 +/- 0.01 Torr and 295 +/- 2 K. Rate coefficients and products were measured for the reactions of first-row atomic ions from K(+) to Se(+), of second-row atomic ions from Rb(+) to Te(+) (excluding Tc(+)), and of third-row atomic ions from Cs(+) to Bi(+). CO(2) was found to react in a bimolecular fashion by O atom transfer only with 9 early transition-metal cations: the group 3 cations Sc(+), Y(+), and La(+), the group 4 cations Ti(+), Zr(+), and Hf(+), the group 5 cations Nb(+) and Ta(+), and the group 6 cation W(+). Electron spin conservation was observed to control the kinetics of O atom transfer. Addition of CO(2) was observed for the remaining 37 cations. While the rate of addition was not measurable some insight was obtained into the standard free energy change, DeltaG(o), for CO(2) ligation from equilibrium constant measurements. A periodic variation in DeltaG(o) was observed for first row cations that is consistent with previous calculations of bond energies D(0)(M(+)-CO(2)). The observed trends in D(0) and DeltaG(o) are expected from the variation in electrostatic attraction between M(+) and CO(2) which follows the trend in atomic-ion size and the trend in repulsion between the orbitals of the atomic cations and the occupied orbitals of CO(2). Higher-order CO(2) cluster ions with up to four CO(2) ligands also were observed for 24 of the atomic cations while MO(2)(+) dioxide formation by sequential O atom transfer was seen only with Hf(+), Nb(+), Ta(+), and W(+). PMID:16435784

  16. Distinct reaction pathway promoted by non-divalent-metal cations in a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2007-01-01

    Divalent ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozymes is significantly reduced when the RNA structure includes appropriate tertiary stabilization. Therefore, we investigated the activity of the tertiary stabilized “RzB” hammerhead ribozyme in several nondivalent ions. Ribozyme RzB is active in spermidine and Na+ alone, although the cleavage rates are reduced by more than 1,000-fold relative to the rates observed in Mg2+ and in transition metal ions. The trivalent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ion is often used as an exchange-inert analog of hydrated magnesium ion. Trans-cleavage rates exceeded 8 min−1 in 20 mM CoHex, which promoted cleavage through outersphere interactions. The stimulation of catalysis afforded by the tertiary structural interactions within RzB does not require Mg2+, unlike other extended hammerhead ribozymes. Site-specific interaction with at least one Mg2+ ion is suggested by CoHex competition experiments. In the presence of a constant, low concentration of Mg2+, low concentrations of CoHex decreased the rate by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the rate in Mg2+ alone. Cleavage rates increased as CoHex concentrations were raised further, but the final fraction cleaved was lower than what was observed in CoHex or Mg2+ alone. These observations suggest that Mg2+ and CoHex compete for binding and that they cause misfolded structures when they are together. The results of this study support the existence of an alternate catalytic mechanism used by nondivalent ions (especially CoHex) that is distinct from the one promoted by divalent metal ions, and they imply that divalent metals influence catalysis through a specific nonstructural role. PMID:17456566

  17. Asymmetric ligand-exchange reaction of biphenol derivatives and chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium complex.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroko; Ito, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nishiyama, Hisao

    2008-09-01

    Chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium acetate complex can enantioselectively capture 1,1'-binaphthol derivatives by ligand-exchange reaction. The structure of the bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium biphenol and binaphthol complexes were confirmed by X-ray analysis. PMID:18496824

  18. Further studies on vinamidinium salt amine exchange reactions, borohydride reductions and subsequent transformations

    PubMed Central

    Gupton, John T.; Telang, Nakul; Jia, Xin; Giglio, Benjamin C.; Eaton, James E.; Barelli, Peter J.; Hovaizi, Mona; Hall, Kayleigh E.; Welden, R. Scott; Keough, Matthew J.; Worrall, Eric F.; Finzel, Kara L.; Kluball, Emily J.; Kanters, Rene P.F.; Smith, Timothy M.; Smith, Stanton Q.; Nunes, Shane R.; Wright, Mathew T.; Birnstihl, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies directed at the amine exchange reaction of vinamidinium salts followed by sodium borohydride reduction to secondary and tertiary allylic amines are described. The tertiary allylic amines were alkylated and subjected to base mediated rearrangement to yield a variety of highly functionalized tertiary homoallylic amines. PMID:21113324

  19. Use of a new tandem cation/anion exchange system with clinical-scale generators provides high specific volume solutions of technetium-99m and rhenium-188

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.R. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Guhlke, S. |

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the authors describe the first application of a simple and inexpensive post elution tandem cation-anion exchange column system which is based on generator elution with salts of weak acids such as ammonium acetate instead of saline solution to provide very high specific volume solutions of technetium-99m and rhenium-188 from clinical scale molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator prepared from low specific activity (n,y) molybdenum-99, and tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generators, respectively. Initial passage of the bolus through a strong cation exchange cartridge converts the ammonium acetate to acetic acid which is essentially not ionized at the acidic pH, allowing specific subsequent amine type (QMA SepPak{trademark}) anion exchange cartridge column trapping of the microscopic levels of the pertechnetate or perrhenate. Subsequent elution of the anion cartridge with a small volume (< 1 mL) of saline then provides high specific volume solutions of technetium-99m by concentration of the high eluant volumes obtained by elution of clinical-scale (1 Ci) generators. This new approach also works very effectively to obtain high specific volume solutions of rhenium-188 (> 500 mCi/mL) from the alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator.

  20. Enrichment and low-level determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water after cleanup by cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Küsters, Markus; Gerhartz, Michael

    2010-04-01

    For the determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water, different procedures of enrichment and cleanup were examined using anion exchange or SPE. In many cases interactions of, e.g. alkaline earth metal ions especially calcium could be observed during enrichment and cleanup resulting in loss of analytes. For that reason, a novel cleanup and enrichment procedure for the determination of these phosphonic acid herbicides has been developed in drinking water using cation-exchange resin. In summary, the cleanup procedure with cation-exchange resin developed in this study avoids interactions as described above and is applicable to calcium-rich drinking water samples. After derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate followed by LC with fluorescence detection, LOD of 12, 14 and 12 ng/L and mean recoveries from real-world drinking water samples of 98+/-9, 100+/-16 and 101+/-11% were obtained for glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate, respectively. The low LODs and the high precision permit the analysis of these phosphonic acid herbicides according to the guidelines of the European Commission. PMID:20183819

  1. Immunoassay principle based on exchange reactions: investigations on agarose gel and silanized quartz.

    PubMed

    Weber, A; Ogendal, L H

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary studies of a new immunoassay principle based on exchange reactions is reported. Exchange of 125I-labelled insulin with unlabelled insulin from immobilized monoclonal antibodies was investigated. From antibody immobilized on a gel substrate the tagged insulin was exchanged according to a first-order process. With antibody immobilized on a quartz substrate by two different methods, the kinetics was changed dramatically, probably because of the non-specific interaction between the ligand and the surface. The recorded adsorption isotherms could not be described by the Langmuir adsorption equation, and a model allowing for non-specific adsorption of the ligand was developed. This model gave a satisfactory fit to the experimental data, allowing computation of adsorption parameters. It is concluded that even the best method used to immobilize receptors on quartz is not adequate for an exchange assay to be made. However, this coating method may lead to more sensitive receptor-based assays of more conventional type. PMID:1379052

  2. Competition between charge exchange and chemical reaction - The D2/+/ + H system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. K.; Cross, R. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the special features of molecular charge exchange and its competition with chemical reaction in the case of the D2(+) + H system. The trajectory surface hopping (TSH) model proposed by Tully and Preston (1971) is used to study this competition for a number of reactions involving the above system. The diatomics-in-molecules zero-overlap approximation is used to calculate the three adiabatic surfaces - one triplet and two singlet - which are needed to describe this system. One of the significant results of this study is that the chemical reaction and charge exchange are strongly coupled. It is also found that the number of trajectories passing into the chemical regions of the three surfaces depends very strongly on the surface crossings.-

  3. Hydraulic controls of in-stream gravel bar hyporheic exchange and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Oswald, Sascha E.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange transports solutes into the subsurface where they can undergo biogeochemical transformations, affecting fluvial water quality and ecology. A three-dimensional numerical model of a natural in-stream gravel bar (20 m × 6 m) is presented. Multiple steady state streamflow is simulated with a computational fluid dynamics code that is sequentially coupled to a reactive transport groundwater model via the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. Ambient groundwater flow is considered by scenarios of neutral, gaining, and losing conditions. The transformation of oxygen, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon by aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone are modeled, as is the denitrification of groundwater-borne nitrate when mixed with stream-sourced carbon. In contrast to fully submerged structures, hyporheic exchange flux decreases with increasing stream discharge, due to decreasing hydraulic head gradients across the partially submerged structure. Hyporheic residence time distributions are skewed in the log-space with medians of up to 8 h and shift to symmetric distributions with increasing level of submergence. Solute turnover is mainly controlled by residence times and the extent of the hyporheic exchange flow, which defines the potential reaction area. Although streamflow is the primary driver of hyporheic exchange, its impact on hyporheic exchange flux, residence times, and solute turnover is small, as these quantities exponentially decrease under losing and gaining conditions. Hence, highest reaction potential exists under neutral conditions, when the capacity for denitrification in the partially submerged structure can be orders of magnitude higher than in fully submerged structures.

  4. Flexibility of the zeolite RHO framework. In situ X-ray and neutron powder structural characterization of cation-exchanged BePO and BeAsORHO analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, T.M.; Parise, J.B.; Jones, G.A.; Galya, L.G.; Corbin, D.R.; Stucky, G.D.

    1996-08-15

    This is an extensive study of the non-aluminosilicate analogs of the zeolite RHO. This molecular sieve is of great interest commercially because of its catalytic properties. In the absence of rigid supporting structural subunits (smaller cages or channels), the aluminosilicate RHO exhibits atypical framework flexibility with large displacivere arrangements. The beryllophosphate and beryalloarsenate analogs are easily synthesized under very mild reaction conditions and therefore maybe of interest for inexpensive and rapid commercial production. However,t hey have decreased thermal stability. In an effort to increase thermal stability and explore framework flexibility, we have synthesized and characterized a series of analogs of the non-aluminosilicate RHO framework. All materials crystallize in the space group I23, ranging from a = 13.584-(2) A for Li-BePO RHO to a = 14.224(4) A for Ba-RbBeAsO RHO for hydrated phases. The extra framework cations are distributed over the double 8-ring, single 8-ring, and two single 6-ring sites. Partially and fully dehydrated phases were also studied for changes in framework stability. Predictive trends based on the type of cation exchanged into the framework were determined by {sup 9}Be and {sup 31}P MAS NMR. 50 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Tandem anion and cation exchange solid phase extraction for the enrichment of micropollutants and their transformation products from ozonation in a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Ahmad A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-06-01

    The presence of organic micropollutants and their transformation products (TPs) from biotic and abiotic processes in aquatic environments is receiving intense public and scientific attention. Yet a suitable sample preparation method that would enable extraction and enrichment of a wide range of such compounds from water is missing. The focus of this paper was to develop an enhanced solid phase extraction (SPE) protocol which enabled isolation of parent compounds and low molecular weight transformation products (that are produced after treatment of water with ozone) from different water matrices. Ten SPE sorbents were evaluated with regard to their ability to extract acidic, neutral, and basic compounds from water at several pH values. Highest recoveries (91-99 %) for all analytes in pure water were obtained by combining strong anion and cation exchangers of two manufacturers in a tandem mode without pH adjustment. Tandem Oasis (MAX+MCX) was finally applied to extract the spiked analytes from tap water, surface water, and several wastewater samples. The efficiency of the used SPE procedure was examined using an optimized liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The occurrence of some of the investigated TPs in environmental water matrices was proven for the first time in this study. Method quantification limits (MQLs) for all compounds ranged from 3.7 to 15.3 ng/L in all matrices. Recoveries (%RE) were between 90 and 110 %. Intraday and interday precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, varied from 0.7 to 5.9 % and 1.8 to 10.3 %, respectively. Matrix effect (%ME) evaluation demonstrated that even complex sample matrices did not show significant ion suppression or enhancement. The applicability of the method was shown during two sampling campaigns at Ruhr river and a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) equipped with an ozonation step after regular

  6. Electron-transfer reactions between the diamagnetic cation of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying Shan; Webster, Richard D

    2011-04-14

    β-Carotene (β-Car) was chemically oxidized in a -2e(-) process using 2 mol equiv of NOSbF(6) in a 4:1 ratio (v/v) of dichloromethane:acetonitrile to form the β-carotene dication (β-Car(2+)). Voltammetric monitoring of the chemical oxidation experiments over a range of temperatures indicated that the half-life of β-Car(2+) was approximately 20 min at -60 °C, and approximately 1 min at -30 °C. α-Tocopherol (α-TOH) was chemically oxidized in a -2e(-)/-H(+) process using 2 mol equiv of NOSbF(6) to form the diamagnetic cation (α-TO(+)) which survives indefinitely at -60 °C in a 4:1 ratio (v/v) of dichloromethane:acetonitrile. Cyclic voltammetry experiments indicated that the oxidative peak potential for α-TOH was approximately +0.4 V more positive than the oxidative peak potential of β-Car. When solutions of α-TO(+)/H(+) (prepared by chemical oxidation of α-TOH with 2 NO(+)) were reacted with solutions containing equal molar amounts of β-Car, voltammetric monitoring indicated that α-TOH was quantitatively regenerated and β-Car(2+) was formed in high yield in a homogeneous two-electron transfer, according to the reaction α-TO(+) + H(+) + β-Car → α-TOH + β-Car(2+). PMID:21417292

  7. Ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin by elution with benzoic acid-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Helaleh, Murad I H; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Fritz, James S; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    In this study, an aqueous solution consisting of benzoic acid with low background conductivity and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) of hydrophilic nature and the inclusion effect to benzoic acid were used as eluent for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with different pKa values and hydrophobicity on a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form. With increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in the eluent, the retention times of the carboxylic acids decreased due to the increased hydrophilicity of the polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resin surface from the adsorption of OH groups of beta-cyclodextrin. Moreover, the eluent background conductivity decreased with increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in 1 mM benzoic acid, which could result in higher sensitivity for conductimetric detection. The ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids with high resolution and sensitivity was accomplished successfully by elution with a 1 mM benzoic acid-10 mM cyclodextrin solution without chemical suppression. PMID:12830884

  8. Determination of some aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Takayama, Yohichi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    The determination of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids, formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, n-butyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acids in anaerobic digestion process waters was examined using ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection. The analysis of these biologically important carboxylic acids is necessary as a measure for evaluating and controlling the process. The ion-exclusion chromatography system employed consisted of polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin columns (TSKgel OApak-A or TSKgel Super IC-A/C). weakly acidic eluent (benzoic acid), and conductimetric detection. Particle size and cation-exchange capacity were 5 microm and 0.1 meq./ml for TSKgel OApak-A and 3 microm and 0.2 meq./ml for TSKgel Super IC-A/C, respectively. A dilute eluent (1.0-2.0 mM) of benzoic acid was effective for the high resolution and highly conductimetric detection of the carboxylic acids. The good separation of isobutyric and n-butyric acids was performed using the TSKgel Super IC-A/C column (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d. x 2). The simple and good chromatograms were obtained by the optimized ion-exclusion chromatography conditions for real samples from mesophilic anaerobic digestors, thus the aliphatic carboxylic acids were successfully determined without any interferences. PMID:15250416

  9. Quantification of Site-Specific Cation Exchange in Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Multi-Wavelength Anomalous X-ray Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brozek, Carl K.; Cozzolino, Anthony F.; Teat, Simon J.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Dinc,; #259; Mircea,

    2013-09-23

    We employed multiwavelength anomalous X-ray dispersion to determine the relative cation occupation at two crystallographically distinct metal sites in Fe2+-, Cu2+-, and Zn2+-exchanged versions of the microporous metal–organic framework (MOF) known as MnMnBTT (BTT = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate). By exploiting the dispersive differences between Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn, the extent and location of cation exchange were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data sets collected near the K edges of Mn2+ and of the substituting metal, and at a wavelength remote from either edge as a reference. Comparing the anomalous dispersion between these measurements indicated that the extent of Mn2+ replacement depends on the identity of the substituting metal. We contrasted two unique methods to analyze this data with a conventional approach and evaluated their limitations with emphasis on the general application of this method to other heterometallic MOFs, where site-specific metal identification is fundamental to tuning catalytic and physical properties.

  10. Adsorption of PolyCarboxylate Poly(ethylene glycol) (PCP) esters on Montmorillonite (Mmt): effect of exchangeable cations (Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) and PCP molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ait-Akbour, Rachid; Boustingorry, Pascal; Leroux, Fabrice; Leising, Frédéric; Taviot-Guého, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the adsorption of PolyCarboxylate Poly(ethylene glycol) esters (PCP) superplasticizers on Na-, Mg- and Ca-saturated Montmorillonite (Mmt) clays. The interactions have been examined through different experimental methods: adsorption isotherms, zeta potential measurements and sedimentation experiments. It was found that PCP adsorption depends both on the architecture of PCP molecules and the nature of cation located on the interlayer exchange sites of the Montmorillonite. Whatever the PCP, a larger amount was adsorbed on Na-Mont than on Mg-Mont or Ca-Mont. This indicates the occurrence of two adsorption mechanisms: (i) a superficial adsorption via electrostatic interactions between the carboxylate groups of PCP and positively charged sites on clay surfaces, (ii) intercalation of ether units of the PCP grafts in the interlayer space by displacement of water molecules coordinated to the exchangeable cations. Furthermore, despite the weak negative values of the zeta potential, the addition of PCP promotes the stability of the suspensions which is attributed to steric repulsion acting between particles. PMID:25313488

  11. Many-body exchange-repulsion in polarizable molecular mechanics. I. Orbital-based approximations and applications to hydrated metal cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Parisel, Olivier; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2011-11-15

    We have quantified the extent of the nonadditivity of the short-range exchange-repulsion energy, E(exch-rep), in several polycoordinated complexes of alkali, alkaline-earth, transition, and metal cations. This was done by performing ab initio energy decomposition analyses of interaction energies in these complexes. The magnitude of E(exch-rep(n-body, n > 2)) was found to be strongly cation-dependent, ranging from close to zero for some alkali metal complexes to about 6 kcal/mol for the hexahydrated Zn(2+) complex. In all cases, the cation-water molecules, E(exch-rep(three-body)), has been found to be the dominant contribution to many-body exchange-repulsion effects, higher order terms being negligible. As the physical basis of this effect is discussed, a three-center exponential term was introduced in the SIBFA (Sum of Interactions Between Fragments Ab initio computed) polarizable molecular mechanics procedure to model such effects. The three-body correction is added to the two-center (two-body) overlap-like formulation of the short-range repulsion contribution, E(rep), which is grounded on simplified integrals obtained from localized molecular orbital theory. The present term is computed on using mostly precomputed two-body terms and, therefore, does not increase significantly the computational cost of the method. It was shown to match closely E(three-body) in a series of test cases bearing on the complexes of Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+). For example, its introduction enabled to restore the correct tetrahedral versus square planar preference found from quantum chemistry calculations on the tetrahydrate of Hg(2+) and [Hg(H(2)O)(4)](2+). PMID:21793002

  12. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric tests and other experiments with nuclear materials were conducted on the Frenchman Flat playa at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; residual radionuclides are known to exist in Frenchman Flat playa soils. Although the playa is typically dry, extended periods of winter precipitation or large single-event rainstorms can inundate the playa. When Frenchman Flat playa is inundated, residual radionuclides on the typically dry playa surface may become submerged, allowing water-soil interactions that could provide a mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from known areas of contamination. The potential for radionuclide transport by occasional inundation of the Frenchman Flat playa was examined using geographic information systems and satellite imagery to delineate the timing and areal extent of inundation; collecting water samples during inundation and analyzing them for chemical and isotopic content; characterizing suspended/precipitated materials and archived soil samples; modeling water-soil geochemical reactions; and modeling the mobility of select radionuclides under aqueous conditions. The physical transport of radionuclides by water was not evaluated in this study. Frenchman Flat playa was inundated with precipitation during two consecutive winters in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Inundation allowed for collection of multiple water samples through time as the areal extent of inundation changed and ultimately receded. During these two winters, precipitation records from a weather station in Frenchman Flat (Well 5b) provided information that was used in combination with geographic information systems, Landsat imagery, and image processing techniques to identify and quantify the areal extent of inundation. After inundation, water on the playa disappeared quickly, for example, between January 25, 2011 and February 10, 2011, a period of 16 days, 92 percent of the areal extent of inundation receded (2,062,800 m2). Water sampling provided

  13. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  14. Isolation of carboxyl-termini and blocked amino-termini of viral proteins by high-performance cation-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gorman, J J; Shiell, B J

    1993-08-27

    The strong cation-exchanger, PolySulfoethyl Aspartamide, has been assessed as a medium for isolation of carboxyl-terminal and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of small quantities of viral proteins. Peptides with a single positive charge, the blocked amino-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix protein and carboxyl-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the NDV nucleocapsid protein, eluted in early ion-exchange fractions and were readily isolated in homogeneous form by subsequent reversed-phase HPLC. Some early ion-exchange fractions also contained singly charged peptides derived by "chymotryptic-like" cleavage, whilst other peptides eluted in these fractions due to their highly acidic character. Terminal sequences with additional basic residues were isolated from later eluting ion-exchange fractions. Peptides with this property included the blocked amino-terminus of the NDV nucleocapsid protein and a portion of the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein. Hitherto undescribed polymorphism in the amino-terminal region of ovalbumin was revealed in this study. Truncated peptides from the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein were also detected. The presence of these peptides could be a reflection of carboxyl-terminal processing of the matrix protein. The strategy described herein should be of general utility for selective microisolation of carboxyl-terminal peptides and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of proteins. PMID:8408428

  15. A comparative study on textural characterization: cation-exchange and sorption properties of crystalline alpha-zirconium(IV), tin(IV), and titanium(IV) phosphates.

    PubMed

    Parida, K M; Sahu, B B; Das, D P

    2004-02-15

    Tetravalent metal phosphates (M=Zr, Ti, and Sn) were prepared and characterized by XRD, surface properties, and TG-DTA. The cation exchange and sorption behavior of these metal phosphates toward transition metal ions such as Cu(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) have been studied comparatively as a function of temperature and concentration. The adsorption process was found to increases with increase in temperature and concentration. The selectivity order for alpha-titanium and alpha-tin phosphates is Cu(2+)>Co(2+)>Ni(2+), whereas for alpha-zirconium phosphate it is Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Co(2+). The ion exchange capacity of alpha-titanium phosphate is greater than those of other phosphates, which is explained on the basis of the surface behavior, disorderness of the system, degree of hydrolysis of incoming guest adsorbate metal ions, and structural steric hindrance of the exchangers during adsorption and sorption. The distribution coefficient, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy values indicate that the ion-exchange processes are spontaneous. PMID:14697711

  16. Selectivity control in synergistic liquid-liquid anion exchange of univalent anions via structure-specific cooperativity between quaternary ammonium cations and anion receptors.

    PubMed

    Borman, Christopher J; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-10-01

    Two anion receptors enhance liquid-liquid anion exchange when added to quaternary alkylammonium chloride anion exchangers, but with a striking dependence on the structure of the alkylammonium cation that suggests a supramolecular cooperative effect. Two anion receptors were investigated, meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (C4P) and the bisthiourea tweezer 1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(3-(4-sec-butylphenyl)thiourea (BTU). Whereas synergism is comparatively weak when either methyltri(C(8,10))alkylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or tetraheptylammonium chloride is used with the BTU receptor, synergism between C4P and Aliquat 336 is so pronounced that anion exchange prefers chloride over more extractable nitrate and trifluoroacetate, effectively overcoming the ubiquitous Hofmeister bias. A thermochemical analysis of synergistic anion exchange has been provided for the first time, resulting in the estimation of binding constants for C4P with the ion pairs of A336(+) with Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(F3)(-), NO(3)(-), and I(-). PMID:22931168

  17. Tuning the Optical Properties of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals by Anion Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that, via controlled anion exchange reactions using a range of different halide precursors, we can finely tune the chemical composition and the optical properties of presynthesized colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), from green emitting CsPbBr3 to bright emitters in any other region of the visible spectrum, and back, by displacement of Cl– or I– ions and reinsertion of Br– ions. This approach gives access to perovskite semiconductor NCs with both structural and optical qualities comparable to those of directly synthesized NCs. We also show that anion exchange is a dynamic process that takes place in solution between NCs. Therefore, by mixing solutions containing perovskite NCs emitting in different spectral ranges (due to different halide compositions) their mutual fast exchange dynamics leads to homogenization in their composition, resulting in NCs emitting in a narrow spectral region that is intermediate between those of the parent nanoparticles. PMID:26214734

  18. Tuning the Optical Properties of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals by Anion Exchange Reactions.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, Quinten A; D'Innocenzo, Valerio; Accornero, Sara; Scarpellini, Alice; Petrozza, Annamaria; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2015-08-19

    We demonstrate that, via controlled anion exchange reactions using a range of different halide precursors, we can finely tune the chemical composition and the optical properties of presynthesized colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), from green emitting CsPbBr3 to bright emitters in any other region of the visible spectrum, and back, by displacement of Cl(-) or I(-) ions and reinsertion of Br(-) ions. This approach gives access to perovskite semiconductor NCs with both structural and optical qualities comparable to those of directly synthesized NCs. We also show that anion exchange is a dynamic process that takes place in solution between NCs. Therefore, by mixing solutions containing perovskite NCs emitting in different spectral ranges (due to different halide compositions) their mutual fast exchange dynamics leads to homogenization in their composition, resulting in NCs emitting in a narrow spectral region that is intermediate between those of the parent nanoparticles. PMID:26214734

  19. Scaling hyporheic exchange and its influence on biogeochemical reactions in aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, B.L.; Harvey, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical reactions are difficult to quantify because of the range in fluid-flow and sediment conditions inherent to streams, wetlands, and nearshore marine ecosystems. Field measurements of biogeochemical reactions in aquatic systems are impeded by the difficulty of measuring hyporheic flow simultaneously with chemical gradients in sediments. Simplified models of hyporheic exchange have been developed using Darcy's law generated by flow and bed topography at the sediment-water interface. However, many modes of transport are potentially involved (molecular diffusion, bioturbation, advection, shear, bed mobility, and turbulence) with even simple models being difficult to apply in complex natural systems characterized by variable sediment sizes and irregular bed geometries. In this study, we synthesize information from published hyporheic exchange investigations to develop a scaling relationship for estimating mass transfer in near-surface sediments across a range in fluid-flow and sediment conditions. Net hyporheic exchange was quantified using an effective diffusion coefficient (De) that integrates all of the various transport processes that occur simultaneously in sediments, and dimensional analysis was used to scale De to shear stress velocity, roughness height, and permeability that describe fluid-flow and sediment characteristics. We demonstrated the value of the derived scaling relationship by using it to quantify dissolved oxygen (DO) uptake rates on the basis of DO profiles in sediments and compared them to independent flux measurements. The results support a broad application of the De scaling relationship for quantifying coupled hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical reaction rates in streams and other aquatic ecosystems characterized by complex fluid-flow and sediment conditions.

  20. Selective removal of alkali metal cations from multiply-charged ions via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using weakly coordinating anions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Carl A; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L; Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 (-)). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations. PMID:25560986

  1. Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.

  2. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Con+ (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CHx (x=0-3) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citir, Murat; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Con+ (n =2-16) with CD4 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, ConD+, dehydrogenation to form ConCD2+, and double dehydrogenation yielding ConC+. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, ConCD+, Con-1D+, Con-1C+, Con-1CD+, and Con-1CD2+ at higher energies. Adduct formation of ConCD4+ is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n ≥10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD2, and CD3 are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD2, and CD3 molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  3. Modeling dune-induced hyporheic exchange and nutrient reactions in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardini, L.; Boano, F.; Cardenas, M. B.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of water across the streambed plays an important role in the ecology of fluvial environments, since it assures the connections of surface and subsurface waters, which have very different peculiarities. Water-borne chemicals are also involved in the process: they enter the sediments with the water and they are transformed into oxidized or reduced substances by biogeochemical reactions, mediated by the hyporheic microbiota. In particular, organic substances can be used as electron donors in a series of redox reactions, with different electron acceptors, e.g., oxygen and nitrate. Nitrification and other secondary reactions also occur as soon as water enters the streambed. These pore-scale transformations concur to affect subsurface solute concentrations and, consequently, the chemistry of upwelling water and the quality of the stream environment. The exchange with the hyporheic zone occurs in response to variations in bed topography, with a very wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For instance, small-scale exchanges are mainly induced by river bed forms, like ripples and dunes, while large-scale exchanges depend on larger geomorphological features. In this work we focus on small-scale exchange induced by the presence of dunes on the streambed, investigating the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes and their effects on solute spatial distribution in the sediments. We numerically simulate the turbulent water flow and the pressure distribution on the streambed and then we evaluate the coupled flow field and biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone in steady-state conditions. Four representative reactive compounds are taken into account: dissolved organic carbon (DOC), oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Sensitivity analyses are also performed to analyze the influence of hydrological and chemical properties of the system on solute reaction rates. The results demonstrate that the stream water quality can strongly

  4. Hydrogen Isotope Exchange of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Aqueous Solution: Possibly a Termolecular Liquid Phase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gabričević, Mario; Lente, Gábor; Fábián, István

    2015-12-24

    This work reports an experimental study of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange in the basic aqueous solutions of trichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene using (1)H NMR as a monitoring method. 1,1-Dichlorethylene was also investigated but found not to exchange hydrogen isotopes with water. The kinetics of isotope exchange features two different pathways, the first is first order with respect to hydroxide ion, whereas the second is second order. The first pathway is interpreted as a straightforward bimolecular reaction between chloroethylene and hydroxide ion, which leads to the deprotonation of chloroethylene. The second pathway involves a transition state with the association of one molecule of the chloroethylene and two hydroxide ions. It is shown that the second pathway could involve the formation of a precursor complex composed of one chloroethylene molecule and one hydroxide ion, but a direct termolecular elementary reaction is also feasible, which is shown by deriving a theoretical highest limit for the rate constants of termolecular reactions in solution. PMID:26618984

  5. Understanding chemical reactions of CO2 and its isoelectronic molecules with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate by changing the nature of the cation: The case of CS2 in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate studied by NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaço, M. Isabel; Besnard, Marcel; Chávez, Fabián Vaca; Pinaud, Noël; Sebastião, Pedro J.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Danten, Yann

    2014-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, 15N) shows that carbon disulfide reacts spontaneously with 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate ([BmPyrro][Ac]) in the liquid phase. It is found that the acetate anions play an important role in conditioning chemical reactions with CS2 leading, via coupled complex reactions, to the degradation of this molecule to form thioacetate anion (CH3COS-), CO2, OCS, and trithiocarbonate (CS32-). In marked contrast, the cation does not lead to the formation of any adducts allowing to conclude that, at most, its role consists in assisting indirectly these reactions. The choice of the [BmPyrro]+ cation in the present study allows disentangling the role of the anion and the cation in the reactions. As a consequence, the ensemble of results already reported on CS2-[Bmim][Ac] (1), OCS-[Bmim][Ac] (2), and CO2-[Bmim][Ac] (3) systems can be consistently rationalized. It is argued that in system (1) both anion and cation play a role. The CS2 reacts with the acetate anion leading to the formation of CH3COS-, CO2, and OCS. After these reactions have proceeded the nascent CO2 and OCS interact with the cation to form imidazolium-carboxylate ([Bmim] CO2) and imidazolium-thiocarboxylate ([Bmim] COS). The same scenario also applies to system (2). In contrast, in the CO2-[Bmim] [Ac] system a concerted cooperative process between the cation, the anion, and the CO2 molecule takes place. A carbene issued from the cation reacts to form the [Bmim] CO2, whereas the proton released by the ring interacts with the anion to produce acetic acid. In all these systems, the formation of adduct resulting from the reaction between the solute molecule and the carbene species originating from the cation is expected. However, this species was only observed in systems (2) and (3). The absence of such an adduct in system (1) has been theoretically investigated using DFT calculations. The values of the energetic barrier of the reactions show that the formation of [Bmim] CS2 is

  6. Understanding chemical reactions of CO{sub 2} and its isoelectronic molecules with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate by changing the nature of the cation: The case of CS{sub 2} in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate studied by NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cabaço, M. Isabel; Besnard, Marcel; Danten, Yann; Chávez, Fabián Vaca; Pinaud, Noël; Sebastião, Pedro J.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-06-28

    NMR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) shows that carbon disulfide reacts spontaneously with 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium acetate ([BmPyrro][Ac]) in the liquid phase. It is found that the acetate anions play an important role in conditioning chemical reactions with CS{sub 2} leading, via coupled complex reactions, to the degradation of this molecule to form thioacetate anion (CH{sub 3}COS{sup −}), CO{sub 2}, OCS, and trithiocarbonate (CS{sub 3}{sup 2−}). In marked contrast, the cation does not lead to the formation of any adducts allowing to conclude that, at most, its role consists in assisting indirectly these reactions. The choice of the [BmPyrro]{sup +} cation in the present study allows disentangling the role of the anion and the cation in the reactions. As a consequence, the ensemble of results already reported on CS{sub 2}-[Bmim][Ac] (1), OCS-[Bmim][Ac] (2), and CO{sub 2}-[Bmim][Ac] (3) systems can be consistently rationalized. It is argued that in system (1) both anion and cation play a role. The CS{sub 2} reacts with the acetate anion leading to the formation of CH{sub 3}COS{sup −}, CO{sub 2}, and OCS. After these reactions have proceeded the nascent CO{sub 2} and OCS interact with the cation to form imidazolium-carboxylate ([Bmim] CO{sub 2}) and imidazolium-thiocarboxylate ([Bmim] COS). The same scenario also applies to system (2). In contrast, in the CO{sub 2}-[Bmim] [Ac] system a concerted cooperative process between the cation, the anion, and the CO{sub 2} molecule takes place. A carbene issued from the cation reacts to form the [Bmim] CO{sub 2}, whereas the proton released by the ring interacts with the anion to produce acetic acid. In all these systems, the formation of adduct resulting from the reaction between the solute molecule and the carbene species originating from the cation is expected. However, this species was only observed in systems (2) and (3). The absence of such an adduct in system (1) has been theoretically

  7. Gas-phase reactions of aryl radicals with 2-butyne: experimental and theoretical investigation employing the N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl radical cation.

    PubMed

    Lam, A K Y; Li, C; Khairallah, G; Kirk, B B; Blanksby, S J; Trevitt, A J; Wille, U; O'Hair, R A J; da Silva, G

    2012-02-21

    Aromatic radicals form in a variety of reacting gas-phase systems, where their molecular weight growth reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of considerable importance. We have investigated the ion-molecule reaction of the aromatic distonic N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl (NMP) radical cation with 2-butyne (CH(3)C≡CCH(3)) using ion trap mass spectrometry. Comparison is made to high-level ab initio energy surfaces for the reaction of NMP and for the neutral phenyl radical system. The NMP radical cation reacts rapidly with 2-butyne at ambient temperature, due to the apparent absence of any barrier. The activated vinyl radical adduct predominantly dissociates via loss of a H atom, with lesser amounts of CH(3) loss. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry allows us to identify small quantities of the collisionally deactivated reaction adduct. Statistical reaction rate theory calculations (master equation/RRKM theory) on the NMP+2-butyne system support our experimental findings, and indicate a mechanism that predominantly involves an allylic resonance-stabilized radical formed via H atom shuttling between the aromatic ring and the C(4) side-chain, followed by cyclization and/or low-energy H atom β-scission reactions. A similar mechanism is demonstrated for the neutral phenyl radical (Ph˙)+2-butyne reaction, forming products that include 3-methylindene. The collisionally deactivated reaction adduct is predicted to be quenched in the form of a resonance-stabilized methylphenylallyl radical. Experiments using a 2,5-dichloro substituted methyl-pyridiniumyl radical cation revealed that in this case CH(3) loss from the 2-butyne adduct is favoured over H atom loss, verifying the key role of ortho H atoms, and the shuttling mechanism, in the reactions of aromatic radicals with alkynes. As well as being useful phenyl radical analogues, pyridiniumyl radical cations may form in the ionosphere of Titan, where they could undergo rapid

  8. Magnetic graphene - polystyrene sulfonic acid nano composite: A dispersive cation exchange sorbent for the enrichment of aminoalcohols and ethanolamines from environmental aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2015-12-01

    Present study aimed at graphene surface modification to achieve selective analyte binding in dispersive solid phase extraction. Magnetic graphene - polystyrene sulfonic acid (MG-PSS) cation exchange nano-composite was prepared by non-covalent wrapping method. Composite was characterized by FT-IR and zeta potential. Material exhibited good dispersion in water and high exchange capacity of 1.97±0.16mMg(-1). Prepared nano-sorbent was then exploited for the cation exchange extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of Chemical Weapons Convention relevant aminoalcohols and ethanolamines from aqueous samples. Extraction parameters such as sorbent amount, extraction time, desorption conditions and sample pH were optimized and effect of common matrix interferences such as polyethylene glycol and metal salts was also studied. Three milligram of sorbent per mL of sample with 20min of extraction time at room temperature afforded 70-81% recoveries of the selected analytes spiked at concentration level of 1μgmL(-1). Method showed good linearity in the studied range with r(2)≥0.993. The limits of detection and limits of quantification ranged from 23 to 54ngmL(-1) and 72 to 147ngmL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation for intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 4.6 to 10.2% and 7.4 to 14.8% respectively. Applicability of the method to different environmental samples as well as the proficiency tests conducted by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) was also ascertained. PMID:26554296

  9. Folding of Protein Ions in the Gas Phase after Cation-to-Anion Proton-Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Kenneth J; Munger, Eleanor B; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-08-01

    The structure and folding of a protein in solution depends on noncovalent interactions within the protein and those with surrounding ions and molecules. Decoupling these interactions in solution is challenging, which has hindered the development of accurate physics-based models for structure prediction. Investigations of proteins in the gas phase can be used to selectively decouple factors affecting the structures of proteins. Here, we use cation-to-anion proton-transfer reactions (CAPTR) to reduce the charge states of denatured ubiquitin ions in the gas phase, and ion mobility to probe their structures. In CAPTR, a precursor charge state is selected (P) and reacted with monoanions to generate charge-reduced product ions (C). Following each CAPTR event, denatured ubiquitin ions (13+ to 6+) yield products that rapidly isomerize to structures that have smaller collision cross sections (Ω). The Ω values of CAPTR product ions depend strongly on C and very weakly on P. Pre- and post-CAPTR activation was then used to probe the potential-energy surfaces of the precursor and product ions, respectively. Post-CAPTR activation showed that ions of different P fold differently and populate different regions of the potential-energy surface of that ion. Finally, pre-CAPTR activation showed that the structures of protein ions can be indirectly investigated using ion mobility of their CAPTR product ions, even for subtle structural differences that are not apparent from ion mobility characterization of the activated precursor ions. More generally, these results show that CAPTR strongly complements existing techniques for characterizing the structures and dynamics of biological molecules in the gas phase. PMID:27399988

  10. EXFOR basics: A short guide to the nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.

    1996-07-01

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its` bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear data compilation centers. This format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center`s own sphere of responsibility. The exchange format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  11. Further studies on cation clock reactions in glycosylation: observation of a configuration specific intramolecular sulfenyl transfer and isolation and characterization of a tricyclic acetal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Furukawa, Takayuki; Retailleau, Pascal; Crich, David; Bohé, Luis

    2016-06-01

    The use of the 2-O-(2-trimethylsilylmethallyl) group as intramolecular nucleophile and cation clock reaction in the glucopyranose series depends on the nature of the glycosyl donor. As previously reported, with trichloroacetimidates the anticipated intramolecular Sakurai reaction proceeds efficiently and is an effective clock, whereas with sulfoxides complications arise. The source of these complications is now shown to be an intramolecular sulfenyl transfer reaction between the tethered allylsilane and the activated sulfoxide. These results illustrate how a different unimolecular clock reaction may be required for a given cation when it is generated from different donors in order to avoid side reactions. The synthesis and cyclization of a 2-O-(3-hydroxypropyl) glucopyranosyl sulfoxide leading on activation to the formation of a trans-fused acetal is also described. The formation of this crystallographically-established trans-fused acetal is discussed in terms of the high effective concentration of the intramolecular nucleophile which leads to a high degree of a SN2 character in the displacement of the α-glucosyl triflate or at the level of the corresponding α-CIP. The possible use of such intramolecular alcohols as clock reactions and their limitations is discussed. PMID:27085740

  12. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value <5.6. The volume-weighted mean (vwm) pH was 4.62 and higher in the dry (Oct.-Mar.) than in the wet (Apr.-Sep.) seasons. The major acidic anion was sulfate with vwm concentration of 140 μeq l-1 and annual deposition flux of 110.3 kg ha-1 yr-1. The major neutralizing cations were calcium (94.8 μeq l-1 and 28 kg ha-1 yr-1) and ammonium (41.2 μeq l-1 and 11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1). Over 95% of these major acidic anions and neutralizing cations were derived from anthropogenic and terrestrial sources as a result of industrial, agricultural and forestry activities. Plantation canopy had marked impacts on rainwater chemistry, with the measured anion and cation concentrations being significantly enriched in throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) rainwater by 1.4 (for NO) to 20-fold (for K+) compared to those in bulk precipitation (BP). Dry deposition generally contributed about 13-22% of the total deposition while canopy leaching mainly occurred for K+ (>88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  13. Applying reactive models to column experiments to assess the hydrogeochemistry of seawater intrusion: Optimising ACUAINTRUSION and selecting cation exchange coefficients with PHREEQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluda-Botella, N.; Valdes-Abellan, J.; Pedraza, R.

    2014-03-01

    Three sets of laboratory column experimental results concerning the hydrogeochemistry of seawater intrusion have been modelled using two codes: ACUAINTRUSION (Chemical Engineering Department, University of Alicante) and PHREEQC (U.S.G.S.). These reactive models utilise the hydrodynamic parameters determined using the ACUAINTRUSION TRANSPORT software and fit the chloride breakthrough curves perfectly. The ACUAINTRUSION code was improved, and the instabilities were studied relative to the discretisation. The relative square errors were obtained using different combinations of the spatial and temporal steps: the global error for the total experimental data and the partial error for each element. Good simulations for the three experiments were obtained using the ACUAINTRUSION software with slight variations in the selectivity coefficients for both sediments determined in batch experiments with fresh water. The cation exchange parameters included in ACUAINTRUSION are those reported by the Gapon convention with modified exponents for the Ca/Mg exchange. PHREEQC simulations performed using the Gains-Thomas convention were unsatisfactory, with the exchange coefficients from the database of PHREEQC (or range), but those determined with fresh water - natural sediment allowed only an approximation to be obtained. For the treated sediment, the adjusted exchange coefficients were determined to improve the simulation and are vastly different from those from the database of PHREEQC or batch experiment values; however, these values fall in an order similar to the others determined under dynamic conditions. Different cation concentrations were simulated using two different software packages; this disparity could be attributed to the defined selectivity coefficients that affect the gypsum equilibrium. Consequently, different calculated sulphate concentrations are obtained using each type of software; a smaller mismatch was predicted using ACUAINTRUSION. In general, the presented

  14. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H[sub 2] [yields] H[sub 2] + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a 'perfect experiment', measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H[sub 2] reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H[sub 2] molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H[sub 2] reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10[sup 3] molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H[sub 2] reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  15. Towards rotationally state-resolved differential cross sections for the hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vrakking, M.J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The hydrogen exchange reaction H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H (and its isotopic variants) plays a pivotal role in chemical reaction dynamics. It is the only chemical reaction for which fully converged quantum scattering calculations have been carried out using a potential energy surface which is considered to be chemically accurate. To improve our ability to test the theory, a `perfect experiment`, measuring differential cross sections with complete specification of the reactant and product states, is called for. In this thesis, the design of an experiment is described that aims at achieving this goal for the D + H{sub 2} reaction. A crossed molecular beam arrangement is used, in which a photolytic D atom beam is crossed by a pulsed beam of H{sub 2} molecules. DH molecules formed in the D + H{sub 2} reaction are state-specifically ionized using Doppler-free (2+1) Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) and detected using a Position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detection technique has an unprecedented single shot detection sensitivity of 6.8 10{sup 3} molecules/cc. This thesis does not contain experimental results for the D + H{sub 2} reaction yet, but progress that has been made towards achieving this goal is reported. In addition, results are reported for a study of the Rydberg spectroscopy of the water molecule.

  16. Ion-neutral reaction of the C2H2N+ cation with C2H2: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, P.; Geppert, W. D.; Kaiser, A.; Ascenzi, D.

    2016-03-01

    The ion-neutral reactions of the C2H2N+ cation with C2H2 have been investigated using a Guided Ion Beam Mass Spectrometer (GIB-MS). The following ionic products were observed: CH3+, C2H2+, C2H3+, HNC+ /HCN+ , HCNH+, C3H+ , C2N+ , C3H3+, HCCN+ and C4H2N+ . Theoretical calculations have been carried out to propose reaction pathways leading to the observed products. These processes are of relevance for the generation of long chain nitrogen-containing species and they may be of interest for the chemistry of Titan's ionosphere or circumstellar envelopes.

  17. Double-Regge exchange limit for the γ p →K+K-p reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, M.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We apply the generalized Veneziano model (B5 model) in the double-Regge exchange limit to the γ p →K+K-p reaction. Four different cases defined by the possible combinations of the signature factors of leading Regge exchanges [(K*,a2/f2 ) , (K*,ρ /ω ) , (K2*,a2/f2) , and (K2*,ρ /ω ) ] have been simulated through the Monte Carlo method. Suitable event candidates for the double-Regge exchange high-energy limit were selected employing Van Hove plots as a better alternative to kinematical cuts in the K+K-p Dalitz plot. In this way we predict and analyze the double-Regge contribution to the K+K-p Dalitz plot, which constitutes one of the major backgrounds in the search for strangeonia, hybrids and exotics using γ p →K+K-p reaction. We expect that data currently under analysis, and those to come in the future, will allow verification of the double-Regge behavior and a better assessment of this component of the amplitude.

  18. Double-regge exchange limit for the γp→ K⁺K⁻p reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, M.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We apply the generalized Veneziano model (B₅ model) in the double-Regge exchange limit to the γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. Four different cases defined by the possible combinations of the signature factors of leading Regge exchanges ((K*,a₂/f₂), (K*,ρ/ω), (K*₂,a₂/f₂), and (K*₂,ρ/ω)) have been simulated through the Monte Carlo method. Suitable event candidates for the double-Regge exchange high-energy limit were selected employing Van Hove plots as a better alternative to kinematical cuts in the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot. In this way we predict and analyze the double-Regge contribution to the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot, which constitutes one of the major backgrounds in the search for strangeonia,more » hybrids and exotics using γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. We expect that data currently under analysis, and that to come in the future, will allow verification of the double-Regge behavior and a better assessment of this component of the amplitude.« less

  19. Double-regge exchange limit for the γp→ K⁺K⁻p reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, M.; Danilkin, I. V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Pennington, M. R.; Schott, D.; Szczepaniak, A. P.

    2015-02-01

    We apply the generalized Veneziano model (B₅ model) in the double-Regge exchange limit to the γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. Four different cases defined by the possible combinations of the signature factors of leading Regge exchanges ((K*,a₂/f₂), (K*,ρ/ω), (K*₂,a₂/f₂), and (K*₂,ρ/ω)) have been simulated through the Monte Carlo method. Suitable event candidates for the double-Regge exchange high-energy limit were selected employing Van Hove plots as a better alternative to kinematical cuts in the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot. In this way we predict and analyze the double-Regge contribution to the K⁺K⁻p Dalitz plot, which constitutes one of the major backgrounds in the search for strangeonia, hybrids and exotics using γp→K⁺K⁻p reaction. We expect that data currently under analysis, and that to come in the future, will allow verification of the double-Regge behavior and a better assessment of this component of the amplitude.

  20. A method to buffer the concentrations of free Zn and Cd ions using a cation exchange resin in bacterial toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, B.; McGrath, S.P.

    1995-12-01

    The chemical form or species of metal present in a growth system is crucial to the toxicity of that metal. A growth medium is described in which the free metal concentration of either Zn or Cd is known. A method using a cation exchange resin as a buffer to maintain free metal ion concentrations during microbial growth is discussed. Using a buffered system, free concentrations of 3.4 {micro}g Cd L{sup {minus}1} and 57 {micro}g Zn L{sup {minus}1} reduced the growth rate of a sensitive isolate of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. The results demonstrate that to assess the true toxicity of Cd and Zn, the free ion concentration must be considered and that small free concentrations must be buffered.

  1. Investigation of the swelling behavior of cationic exchange resins saturated with Na{sup +} ions in a C{sub 3}S paste

    SciTech Connect

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2015-03-15

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Spent products are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste form can exhibit strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking, if the appropriate binder is not used. In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na{sup +} form and tricalcium silicate are investigated during the early stages of hydration in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process. It is shown that the IERs exhibit a transient swelling of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the external solution. This expansion, which occurs just after setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: low degree of hydration, precipitation of poorly cohesive sodium-bearing C–S–H, and very heterogeneous microstructure with zones of high porosity.

  2. High pH reversed-phase chromatography with fraction concatenation as an alternative to strong-cation exchange chromatography for two-dimensional proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Orthogonal high-resolution separations are critical for attaining improved analytical dynamic range and protein coverage in proteomic measurements. High pH reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) followed by fraction concatenation affords better peptide analysis than conventional strong-cation exchange (SCX) chromatography applied for the two-dimensional proteomic analysis. For example, concatenated high pH reversed-phase liquid chromatography increased identification for peptides (1.8-fold) and proteins (1.6-fold) in shotgun proteomics analyses of a digested human protein sample. Additional advantages of high pH RPLC with fraction concatenation include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses, making this an attractive alternative to SCX chromatography in conjunction with the second dimension low pH RPLC for two-dimensional proteomics analyses. PMID:22462785

  3. Fluctuational opening-closing reactions in DNA and mononucleosome cores of chromatin probed by H-exchange and ligand binding reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, C.; Englander, S.W.; Young, P.R.; Kallenbach, N.R.

    1980-10-01

    The DNA double helix represents a dynamic structure in solution that undergoes a spectrum of conformational opening and closing reactions under conditions remote from onset of denaturation. Two kinds of opening reactions of the double helix are manifested by: (a) the ability of base and solvent protons to exchange; and (b) the access of the duplex interior to intercalating agents such as ethidium bromide.

  4. The analysis of reactions {pi}N {yields} two mesons + N within reggeon exchanges. Basic formulas for fit

    SciTech Connect

    Anisovich, V. V. Sarantsev, A. V.

    2009-11-15

    We present technical aspects of the fitting procedure given in the paper by V.V. Anisovich and A.V. Sarantsev 'The analysis of reactions {pi}N {yields} two mesons + N within reggeon exchanges. Fit and results.'

  5. Effect of bore fluid composition on microstructure and performance of a microporous hollow fibre membrane as a cation-exchange substrate.

    PubMed

    Lazar, R A; Mandal, I; Slater, N K H

    2015-05-15

    Micro-capillary film (MCF) membranes are effective platforms for bioseparations and viable alternatives to established packed bed and membrane substrates at the analytical and preparative chromatography scales. Single hollow fibre (HF) MCF membranes with varied microstructures were produced in order to evaluate the effect of the bore fluid composition used during hollow fibre extrusion on their structure and performance as cation-exchange adsorbers. Hollow fibres were fabricated from ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymer through solution extrusion followed by nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) using bore fluids of differing composition (100wt.% N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 100wt.% glycerol, 100wt.% water). All HFs displayed highly microporous and mesoporous microstructures, with distinct regions of pore size <1μm, 5-15μm and up to 50μm in diameter, depending upon proximity to the bore fluid. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed skins of pore size <1μm at the inner surface of HFs produced with water and glycerol, while NMP bore fluid resulted in a skinless inner HF surface. The HFs were modified for chromatography by functionalising the polymer surface hydroxyl groups with sulphonic acid (SP) groups to produce cation-exchange adsorbers. The maximum binding capacities of the HFs were determined by frontal analysis using lysozyme solutions (0.05-100mgml(-1)) for a flow rate of 1.0mlmin(-1). The NMP-HF-SP module displayed the largest maximum lysozyme binding capacity of all the fibres produced (40.3mg lysozyme/ml adsorbent volume), a nearly 2-fold increase over the glycerol and 10-fold increase over the water variants at the same sample flow rate. The importance of NMP as a bore fluid to hollow fibre membrane performance as a result of inner surface porosity was established with a view to applying this parameter for the optimisation of multi-capillary MCF performance in future studies. PMID:25840664

  6. LA-ICP-MS of rare earth elements concentrated in cation-exchange resin particles for origin attribution of uranium ore concentrate.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shiho; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) concentrated on cation-exchange resin particles were measured with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to obtain chondrite-normalized REE plots. The sensitivity of REE increased in ascending order of the atomic number, according to the sensitivity trend in pneumatic nebulization ICP-MS (PN-ICP-MS). The signal intensities of REE were nearly proportional to the concentrations of REE in the immersion solution used for particle-preparation. Minimum measurable concentration calculated from the net signals of REE was approximately 1 ng/g corresponding to 0.1 ng in the particle-preparation solution. In LA analysis, formation of oxide and hydroxide of the light REE and Ba which causes spectral interferences in the heavy REE measurement was effectively attenuated due to the solvent-free measurement capability, compared to conventional PN-ICP-MS. To evaluate the applicability of the proposed method, the REE-adsorbed particles prepared by immersing them in a U-bearing solution (commercially available U standard solution) were measured with LA-ICP-MS. Aside from the LA analysis, each concentration of REE in the same U standard solution was determined with conventional PN-ICP-MS after separating REE by cation-exchange chromatography. The concentrations of REE were ranging from 0.04 (Pr) to 1.08 (Dy) μg/g-U. The chondrite-normalized plot obtained through LA-ICP-MS analysis of the U standard sample exhibited close agreement with that obtained through the PN-ICP-MS of the REE-separated solution within the uncertainties. PMID:25640124

  7. Development of Online pH Gradient-Eluted Strong Cation Exchange Nanoelectrospray-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic Analysis Facilitating Basic and Histidine-Containing Peptides Identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Gao, Jing; Yu, Chengli; He, Han; Yang, Yiming; Figeys, Daniel; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A novel one-dimensional online pH gradient-eluted strong cation exchange-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (SCX-nano-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for protein identification and tested with a mixture of six standard proteins, total lysate of HuH7 and N2a cells, as well as membrane fraction of N2a cells. This method utilized an online nanoflow SCX column in a nano-LC system coupled with a nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protein digests were separated on a nanoflow SCX column with a pH gradient and directly introduced into a mass spectrometer through nanoelectrospray ionization. More than five thousand unique peptides were identified in each 90 min LC-MS/MS run using 500 nanogram of protein digest either from total cell lysate or from membrane fraction. The unique peptide overlap between online strong cation exchange nano-ESI-MS/MS (SCXLC-MS/MS) and reverse phase nano-ESI-MS/MS (RPLC-MS/MS) is only ≤30%, which indicated these two methods were complementary to each other. The correlation coefficient of retention time and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of identified peptides in SCXLC-MS/MS was higher than 0.4, which showed that peptides elution in SCXLC-MS/MS was dependent on their charge states. Furthermore, SCXLC-MS/MS showed identification capability for a higher proportion of basic peptides compared to the RPLC-MS/MS method, especially for histidine-containing peptides. Our SCXLC-MS/MS method is an excellent alternative method to the RPLC-MS/MS method for analysis of standard proteins, total cell and membrane proteomes. PMID:26646553

  8. Barrier Height for the Exchange Reaction F + HF → FH + F

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Stephen V.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Bender, Charles F.

    1974-01-01

    There exists a body of conflicting data as to the existence or nonexistence of FHF, ClHCl, BrHBr, and IHI as chemically bound molecular species. Ab initio quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations are presented which predict linear symmetric FHF to be unstable. The barrier height for the F + HF exchange reaction is suggested to be no less than 18 kcal/mol, much larger than expected either intuitively or on the basis of certain experiments on related systems. The expected reliability of the calculations is based upon comparable results for diatomic molecules and the F + H2 and H + F2 potential energy surfaces. PMID:16592128

  9. Experimental and theoretical study on gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of silver trimer cation, Ag{sub 3}{sup +}, with 12-crown-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kumondai, Kousuke; Toyoda, Michisato; Ishihara, Morio; Katakuse, Itsuo; Takeuchi, Takae; Ikeda, Mai; Iwamoto, Kenichi

    2005-07-08

    The reaction mechanisms of silver trimer cation, Ag{sub 3}{sup +}, with 12-crown-4 (12C4) were studied experimentally and theoretically. Using a cylindrical ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer, gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of Ag{sub 3}{sup +} with 12C4 were observed. Metal-ligand complexes of [Ag(12C4)]{sup +}, [Ag{sub 3}(12C4)]{sup +} and [Ag{sub 3}(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +}, and of [Ag(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +} and [Ag{sub 3}(12C4){sub 3}]{sup +}, were observed as the reaction intermediates and terminal products, respectively. The formations of the [Ag(12C4)]{sup +} and [Ag(12C4){sub 2}]{sup +} complexes indicated that the neutral dimer (Ag{sub 2}) had been eliminated from the trimer cation. From the results of ab initio calculations at the HF/LanL2DZ level of theory and the experiments, it is suggested that three 12C4 molecules can attach to Ag{sub 3}{sup +} through consecutive reactions and that neutral Ag{sub 2} can be easily eliminated from [Ag{sub 3}(12C4)]{sup +}.

  10. Activation of C-H Bonds in Pt(+) + x CH4 Reactions, where x = 1-4: Identification of the Platinum Dimethyl Cation.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Oscar W; Salem, Michelle; Gao, Amanda; Bakker, Joost M; Armentrout, P B

    2016-08-11

    Activation of C-H bonds in the sequential reactions of Pt(+) + x(CH4/CD4), where x = 1-4, have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Pt(+) cations are formed by laser ablation and exposed to controlled amounts of CH4/CD4 leading to [Pt,xC,(4x-2)H/D](+) dehydrogenation products. Irradiation of these products in the 400-2100 cm(-1) range leads to CH4/CD4 loss from the x = 3 and 4 products, whereas PtCH2(+)/PtCD2(+) products do not decompose at all, and x = 2 products dissociate only when formed from a higher order product. The structures of these complexes were explored theoretically at several levels of theory with three different basis sets. Comparison of the experimental and theoretical results indicate that the species formed have a Pt(CH3)2(+)(CH4)x-2/Pt(CD3)2(+)(CD4)x-2 binding motif for x = 2-4. Thus, reaction of Pt(+) with methane occurs by C-H bond activation to form PtCH2(+), which reacts with an additional methane molecule by C-H bond activation to form the platinum dimethyl cation. This proposed reaction mechanism is consistent with theoretical explorations of the potential energy surface for reactions of Pt(+) with one and two methane molecules. PMID:27438025

  11. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  12. Gas-Phase Reactions of Cationic Vanadium-Phosphorus Oxide Clusters with C2Hx (x=4, 6): A DFT-Based Analysis of Reactivity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dietl, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinhao; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The reactivities of the adamantane-like heteronuclear vanadium-phosphorus oxygen cluster ions [VxP4−xO10].+ (x=0, 2–4) towards hydrocarbons strongly depend on the V/P ratio of the clusters. Possible mechanisms for the gas-phase reactions of these heteronuclear cations with ethene and ethane have been elucidated by means of DFT-based calculations; homolytic C–H bond activation constitutes the initial step, and for all systems the P–O. unit of the clusters serves as the reactive site. More complex oxidation processes, such as oxygen-atom transfer to, or oxidative dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbons require the presence of a vanadium atom to provide the electronic prerequisites which are necessary to bring about the 2e− reduction of the cationic clusters. PMID:23322620

  13. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  14. Mixed-mode anion-cation exchange/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry as an alternative to reversed phase for small molecule drug discovery

    PubMed

    Strege; Stevenson; Lawrence

    2000-10-01

    Within pharmaceutical drug discovery, significant needs currently exist for the analysis and purification of structurally diverse samples prior to or immediately following high-throughput screening. These processes are required to facilitate rapid and accurate biological profiling, structural determination, and resupply of new drug candidates. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for both analytical and preparative applications has become the small molecule separation/detection tool of choice for meeting many of these needs. However, the separation selectivity provided by RP-HPLC has been limited to the hydrophobicity-based resolution of relatively nonpolar sample components, and for high-throughput drug discovery applications, no sufficient alternative procedures have been identified. In this investigation, a mixed-mode anion-cation exchange/hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ACE-HILIC) method has been developed to provide both direct compatibility with ESI-MS and evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD) and separation selectivity highly orthogonal to RP-HPLC. The technique employed silica-based small-pore weak ion exchange resins eluted with a combined aqueous and pH gradient. A diverse set of dipeptide probes was employed for the elucidation of the relative contributions of three retention mechanisms. ACE-HILIC-ESI-MS-ELSD should prove useful for the analysis and purification of compounds from both biological (e.g., natural products) and synthetic (e.g., combinatorial chemistry) sources of molecular diversity. PMID:11028621

  15. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  16. Selective sorption of lead, cadmium and zinc ions by a polymeric cation exchanger containing nano-Zr(HPO3S)2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingrui; Pan, Bingcai; Pan, Bingjun; Zhang, Weiming; Jia, Kun; Zhang, Quanxing

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymeric hybrid sorbent, namely ZrPS-001, was fabricated for enhanced sorption of heavy metal ions by impregnating Zr(HPO3S)2 (i.e., ZrPS) nanoparticles within a porous polymeric cation exchanger D-001. The immobilized negatively charged groups bound to the polymeric matrix D-001 would result in preconcentration and permeation enhancement of target metal ions prior to sequestration, and ZrPS nanoparticles are expected to sequester heavy metals selectively through an ion-exchange process. Highly effective sequestration of lead, cadmium, and zinc ions from aqueous solution can be achieved by ZrPS-001 even in the presence of competing calcium ion at concentration several orders of magnitude greater than the target species. The exhausted ZrPS-001 beads are amenable to regeneration with 6 M HCI solution for repeated use without any significant capacity loss. Fixed-bed column treatment of simulated waters containing heavy metals at high or trace levels was also performed. The content of heavy metals in treated effluent approached or met the WHO drinking water standard. PMID:18589978

  17. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  18. Evolution with time of hydrophobicity and microrelief of a cation-exchange membrane surface and its impact on overlimiting mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pismenskaya, Natalia D; Nikonenko, Victor V; Melnik, Nadezhda A; Shevtsova, Kseniya A; Belova, Elena I; Pourcelly, Gérald; Cot, Didier; Dammak, Lasâad; Larchet, Christian

    2012-02-23

    Surface properties were measured together with electrochemical characteristics of a CMX (Neosepta, Tokuyama Corp.) cation-exchange membrane. Relative hydrophobicity was controlled by the contact angle; XPS and SEM were used for characterizing chemical composition and microrelief of the surface, respectively. Voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and mass transfer rate measurements were made as well. A "fresh" membrane and samples after 10, 25, 100, and 150 h of operation in an electrodialysis cell at an overlimiting current equal to 3 theoretical limiting currents, in a 0.02 M NaCl solution, were characterized. Some electrochemical properties were also measured for a Neosepta cation-exchange membrane, aged 2 years, in an industrial food process. It was found that the hydrophobicity of the CMX membrane has increased after the first 10 h of operation; more and more cavities of the dimension of the order of 1 μm have appeared with time testifying electrochemical erosion of the surface. The limiting current density (i(lim)) and the overlimiting transfer rate through the CMX membrane increased with time of its operation under overlimiting current. In the case of new CMX, i(lim) was very close to the theoretical value i(lim)(theor) calculated by the Lévêque equation. After 10 h of operation, i(lim) increased by 5%, and after 25, 100, and 150 h, the increase was by 30%, 70%, and 100%, respectively. Similarly, the mass transfer rate was found to increase up to 5 times (when desalting 0.005 M NaCl under 3 V) in comparison with the theoretical value. The ensemble of data was explained by the hypothesis that the passage of intensive current produces erosion of the ion-exchange polymer forming a continuous phase in CMX. This erosion results in exposure at the surface of the other constituent of CMX: small (about 100 nm) particles of relatively hydrophobic polyvinylchloride. Increasing surface hydrophobicity facilitates the slip of electroconvective vortexes along the surface

  19. Does Size Really Matter? The Steric Isotope Effect in a Supramolecular Host?Guest Exchange Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-01-29

    Isotope effects (IEs), which arise from differences in zero point energies (ZPEs) between a parent and isotopically substituted bond, have been used extensively by chemists to probe molecular interactions and reactivity. Due to the anharmonicity of the C-H/D vibrational potential energy function and the lower ZPE of a C-D bond, the average C-D bond length is typically {approx}0.005 {angstrom} shorter than an equivalent C-H bond. It is this difference in size that is often invoked to explain the observation of secondary, inverse kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in chemical processes which proceed through a sterically strained transition state. This so-called 'steric isotope effect' (SIE) has been observed in processes such as the racemization of ortho-substituted biphenyls[6] and phenanthrenes, ring flipping of cyclophanes, and more recently in the deslipping of rotaxanes, where substitution of the sterically less demanding deuterium for protium results in rate accelerations for these processes. Herein, we use deuterium substitution in a cationic guest molecule to probe the sensitivity limits of the guest exchange process from a highly-charged supramolecular host.

  20. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  1. The neutron-proton charge-exchange amplitudes measured in the dp → ppn reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Barsov, S.; Carbonell, J.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Engels, R.; Gebel, R.; Glagolev, V.; Grigoryev, K.; Goslawski, P.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Komarov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Macharashvili, G.; Maier, R.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Seyfarth, H.; Stein, H. J.; Steffens, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Trusov, S.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.

    2013-04-01

    The unpolarised differential cross section and the two deuteron tensor analysing powers A xx and A yy of the ěc dp to \\{ pp\\} _s n charge-exchange reaction have been measured with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring. Using deuteron beams with energies 1.2, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27GeV, data were obtained for small momentum transfers to a { pp} s system with low excitation energy. The results at the three lower energies are consistent with impulse approximation predictions based upon the current knowledge of the neutron-proton amplitudes. However, at 2.27GeV, where these amplitudes are far more uncertain, agreement requires a reduction in the overall double-spin-flip contribution, with an especially significant effect in the longitudinal direction. These conclusions are supported by measurements of the deuteron-proton spin-correlation parameters C x,x and C y,y that were carried out in the ěc děc p to \\{ pp\\} _s n reaction at 1.2 and 2.27GeV. The values obtained for the proton analysing power A {/y p } also suggest the need for a radical re-evaluation of the neutron-proton elastic scattering amplitudes at the higher energy. It is therefore clear that such measurements can provide a valuable addition to the neutron-proton database in the charge-exchange region.

  2. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  3. Two reaction regimes in the oxidation of larger cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) under multi-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, D; Eckhard, J F; Visser, B R; Tschurl, M; Heiz, U

    2016-03-21

    The reaction of cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) with molecular oxygen is studied under multi-collision conditions and at different temperatures. Consecutive reaction proceeds in several steps upon subsequent attachment of O2. All cluster sizes exhibit fast reaction with oxygen and form a characteristic final reaction product. The time-dependent product analysis enables the fitting to a kinetic model with the extraction of all the rate constants. Determined rate constants reveal the existence of two different regimes, which are interpreted as a change in the reaction mechanism. Based on the temperature-dependent reaction behavior, it is proposed that the reaction changes from a dissociative to a molecular adsorption of oxygen on the clusters. It is found that both regimes appear for all cluster sizes, but the transition takes place at different intermediate oxides TanOx(+). In general it is observed that transition occurs later for larger clusters, which is attributed to an increased cluster surface. PMID:26924176

  4. Hydrogen exchange in some coal-related reactions at 400/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, B.M.; Michalczyk, M.J.; Woody, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Data are available for kinetics of the transfer of hydrogen from tetralin and other hydrogen-rich solvents, but not much is known about the detailed mechanism involving individual linkages or groups in coal. In order to obtain some of this information, we have chosen to work with the pure compounds, 1,2-diphenylethane (bibenzyl), and diphenylmethane as models for certain linkages in coal. Because the thermolysis of the compound gives some different products when heated alone or when heated in the presence of a good hydrogen donor, such as tetralin, it was of interest to know where the cleavage fragments derive their hydrogen to give the final product. While the source of hydrogen needed to cap off the thermolysis fragments is obvious when bibenzyl is heated alone, its origin is ambiguous when tetralin is present. In order to resolve this aspect of the reaction, we prepared bibenzyl completely deuterated (99.8%) in the dimethylene linkage, and pyrolyzed it in the presence of ordinary tetralin. The products were isolated and their hydrogen and deuterium content were determined. From the data we conclude that the benzyl radical, formed by cleavage of bibenzyl, gives toluene by abstracting hydrogen from tetralin. The product after 1 percent conversion was PhCD/sub 2/H. Further, it was observed that, upon heating the mixture for eight hours, deuterium appeared in all the compounds. A considerable amount of deuterium exchange had taken place. In fact, in this mixture, tetralin-bibenzyl-d/sub 4/ at 400/sup 0/C, deuterium is lost from bibenzyl by exchange 3 to 4 times faster than it undergoes carbon-carbon bond scission. Thus, the chemistry of bibenzyl at 400/sup 0/ is dominated by hydrogen exchange reactions.

  5. Communication: Transfer ionization in a thermal reaction of a cation and anion: Ar{sup +} with Br{sup −} and I{sup −}

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-11-07

    We present experimental evidence that reactions of argon cations Ar{sup +} with the halogen anions Br{sup −} and I{sup −} do not occur exclusively by mutual neutralization, but also produce the cations Br{sup +} or I{sup +} ions by transfer ionization (TI). The experiments were carried out in flowing-afterglow plasmas at gas temperatures between and 300 and 500 K, and employed a variant of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The measured TI rate coefficients are 1.9 ± 0.6 × 10{sup −9} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} and 1.1 ± {sub 0.3}{sup 0.8}× 10{sup −9} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for the Br{sup −} and I{sup −} reactions, respectively. We find that the TI rate coefficients decline with temperature as T{sup −0.5} to T{sup −1}. No indication of TI was found in the reaction with Cl{sup −}, where it is endoergic.

  6. Squalamine, a novel cationic steroid, specifically inhibits the brush-border Na+/H+ exchanger isoform NHE3.

    PubMed

    Akhter, S; Nath, S K; Tse, C M; Williams, J; Zasloff, M; Donowitz, M

    1999-01-01

    Squalamine, an endogenous molecule found in the liver and other tissues of Squalus acanthias, has antibiotic properties and causes changes in endothelial cell shape. The latter suggested that its potential targets might include transport proteins that control cell volume or cell shape. The effect of purified squalamine was examined on cloned Na+/H+ exchanger isoforms NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 stably transfected in PS120 fibroblasts. Squalamine (1-h pretreatment) decreased the maximal velocity of rabbit NHE3 in a concentration-dependent manner (13, 47, and 57% inhibition with 3, 5, and 7 micrograms/ml, respectively) and also increased K'[H+]i. Squalamine did not affect rabbit NHE1 or NHE2 function. The inhibitory effect of squalamine was 1) time dependent, with no effect of immediate addition and maximum effect with 1 h of exposure, and 2) fully reversible. Squalamine pretreatment of the ileum for 60 min inhibited brush-border membrane vesicle Na+/H+ activity by 51%. Further investigation into the mechanism of squalamine's effects showed that squalamine required the COOH-terminal 76 amino acids of NHE3. Squalamine had no cytotoxic effect at the concentrations studied, as indicated by monitoring lactate dehydrogenase release. These results indicate that squalamine 1) is a specific inhibitor of the brush-border NHE isoform NHE3 and not NHE1 or NHE2, 2) acts in a nontoxic and fully reversible manner, and 3) has a delayed effect, indicating that it may influence brush-border Na+/H+ exchanger function indirectly, through an intracellular signaling pathway or by acting as an intracellular modulator. PMID:9886929

  7. Influence of cation substitution and activator site exchange on the photoluminescence properties of Eu3+-doped quaternary pyrochlore oxides.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, S K; Rao, P Prabhakar; Thomas, Mariyam; Francis, T Linda; Koshy, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Stannate-based pyrochlore-type red phosphors CaGd(1-x)SnNbO7:xEu(3+), Ca(1-y)Sr(y)Gd(1-x)SnNbO7:xEu(3+), and Ca(0.8-x)Sr0.2GdSnNbO(7+δ): xEu(3+) were prepared via conventional solid-state method. Influence of cation substitution and activator site control on the photoluminescence properties of these phosphors are elucidated using powder X-ray diffraction, Rietveld analysis, Raman spectrum analysis, and photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra. The Eu(3+) luminescence in quaternary pyrochlore lattice exemplifies as a very good structural probe for the detection of short-range disorder in the lattice, which otherwise is not detected by normal powder X-ray diffraction technique. The Eu(3+) emission due to magnetic dipole transition ((5)D0-(7)F1 MD) is modified with the increase in europium concentration in the quaternary pyrochlore red phosphors. (5)D0-(7)F1 MD transition splitting is not observable for low Eu(3+) doping because of the short-range disorder in the pyrochlore lattice. Appearance of narrow peaks in Raman spectra confirms that short-range disorder in the crystal lattice disappears with progressive europium doping. By using Sr as a network modifier ion in place of Ca we were able to increase the f-f transition intensities and europium quenching concentration. The influence of effective positive charge of the central Eu(3+) ions when it replaces a metal ion having lower oxidation state such as Ca(2+) was also investigated. The relative intensities of A1g (∼500 cm(-1)) and F2g (∼330 cm(-1)) Raman vibrational modes get inverted when Eu(3+) ions replaces Ca(2+) ions instead of Gd(3+) as trivalent europium ions can attract the electron cloud of oxygen ions strongly in comparison with divalent calcium ions. The influence of positive charge effect of Eu(3+) in Ca0.7Sr0.2GdSnNbO7+δ:0.1Eu(3+) phosphor is greatly strengthened the charge transfer band and (7)F0-(5)L6 transition intensities than that of the Ca0.8Sr0.2Gd0.9SnNbO7:0.1Eu(3+) phosphor. Our

  8. Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for Olefin Polymerization Enabled by Cation Exchange in a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Comito, Robert J; Fritzsching, Keith J; Sundell, Benjamin J; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-08-17

    The manufacture of advanced polyolefins has been critically enabled by the development of single-site heterogeneous catalysts. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great potential as heterogeneous catalysts that may be designed and tuned on the molecular level. In this work, exchange of zinc ions in Zn5Cl4(BTDD)3, H2BTDD = bis(1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b],[4',5'-i])dibenzo[1,4]dioxin) (MFU-4l) with reactive metals serves to establish a general platform for selective olefin polymerization in a high surface area solid promising for industrial catalysis. Characterization of polyethylene produced by these materials demonstrates both molecular and morphological control. Notably, reactivity approaches single-site catalysis, as evidenced by low polydispersity indices, and good molecular weight control. We further show that these new catalysts copolymerize ethylene and propylene. Uniform growth of the polymer around the catalyst particles provides a mechanism for controlling the polymer morphology, a relevant metric for continuous flow processes. PMID:27443860

  9. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  10. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  11. Modeling cesium retention onto Na-, K- and Ca-smectite: Effects of ionic strength, exchange and competing cations on the determination of selectivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, Tiziana; Benedicto, Ana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Cesium (137Cs) retention onto three homoionic smectites (Na-, K- and Ca-smectite), obtained from natural Spanish FEBEX bentonite, was studied. Special emphasis was given to the analysis of non-linear sorption behaviour and the dependence of selectivity on the ionic strength. A very large set of experimental sorption data was generated from sorption tests under a wide range of pHs (2-11), ionic strengths (10-3 to 100 M), and radionuclide concentrations (10-10 to 10-3 M). The aqueous phase, in contact with the clay, was analysed to quantify the effects of the presence of trace aqueous ions on Cs retention. For all the exchanged clays, Cs sorption was non-linear and a two-site exchange model approach was adopted to interpret and model sorption data. Highly selective sites for Cs sorption (Type 1 sites, T1), resembling those present in micaceous materials, with very low capacity but controlling uptake of Cs at low concentration, were observed. The logarithm value of selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ in respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ in these sites is: LogNaCsK(T1)=7.59±0.15,LogKCsK(T1)=5.15±0.15 and LogCaCsK(T1)=14.41±0.17, respectively. The exchange sites at the surface of smectite sheets (planar sites), with a capacity approximately equivalent to the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay, constitute the second type of sorption sites (Type 2 sites, T2). The logarithm of the selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ with respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ is: LogNaCsK(T2)=1.68±0.15,LogKCsK(T2)=1.16±0.15LogCaCsK(T2)=3.02± 0.15, respectively. The analysis of the dependence of sorption values on the ionic strength clearly indicated that for a correct interpretation of data, competition effects of trace ions in solution must be always accounted for. Data obtained in this work and performed analyses are basic to explain the behaviour of raw FEBEX bentonite, and other smectite-based clay materials, under more complex experimental conditions.

  12. Effect of chelate dynamics on water exchange reactions of paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes.

    PubMed

    Maigut, Joachim; Meier, Roland; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2008-07-01

    Because of our interest in evaluating a possible relationship between complex dynamics and water exchange reactivity, we performed (1)H NMR studies on the paramagnetic aminopolycarboxylate complexes Fe (II)-TMDTA and Fe (II)-CyDTA and their diamagnetic analogues Zn (II)-TMDTA and Zn (II)-CyDTA. Whereas a fast Delta-Lambda isomerization was observed for the TMDTA species, no acetate scrambling between in-plane and out-of-plane positions is accessible for any of the CyDTA complexes because the rigid ligand backbone prevents any configurational changes in the chelate system. In variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies, no evidence of spectral coalescence due to nitrogen inversion was found for any of the complexes in the available temperature range. The TMDTA complexes exhibit the known solution behavior of EDTA, whereas the CyDTA complexes adopt static solution structures. Comparing the exchange kinetics of flexible EDTA-type complexes and static CyDTA complexes appears to be a suitable method for evaluating the effect of ligand dynamics on the overall reactivity. In order to assess information concerning the rates and mechanism of water exchange, we performed variable-temperature and -pressure (17)O NMR studies of Ni (II)-CyDTA, Fe (II)-CyDTA, and Mn (II)-CyDTA. For Ni (II)-CyDTA, no significant effects on line widths or chemical shifts were apparent, indicating either the absence of any chemical exchange or the existence of a very small amount of the water-coordinated complex in solution. For [Fe (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-) and [Mn (II)(CyDTA)(H 2O)] (2-), exchange rate constant values of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 (6) and (1.4 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) s (-1), respectively, at 298 K were determined from fits to resonance-shift and line-broadening data. A relationship between chelate dynamics and reactivity seems to be operative, since the CyDTA complexes exhibited significantly slower reactions than their EDTA counterparts. The variable-pressure (17)O NMR measurements for [Mn (II

  13. Pion nucleus single charge exchange reactions above the. delta. (1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    Forward-angle differential cross sections for the (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup 0/) reaction leading to the Isobaric Analog State in the residual nuclei at 300, 425, 500 and 550 MeV have been measured. Targets ranged in mass from /sup 7/Li to /sup 208/Pb. A description of the experimental setup and the analysis is presented. The 0/sup 0/ cross sections are found to rise markedly between 300 and 425 MeV, contrary to the extrapolation from the lower energy data and to the behavior of the free pion-nucleon single charge exchange process. The angular distributions are sharply forward peaked. Systematics of the data indicate increased volume penetration with increasing pion beam energy. The cross sections are compared with the results of Glauber model calculations indicating the significance of higher order processes even at these energies. 67 refs., 40 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Pion-induced double-charge exchange reactions in the {delta} resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, O.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Larionov, A. B.; Mosel, U.

    2006-10-15

    We have applied the Giessen BUU (GiBUU) transport model to the description of the double-charge exchange (DCX) reaction of pions with different nuclear targets at incident kinetic energies of 120-180 MeV. The DCX process is highly sensitive to details of the interactions of pions with the nuclear medium and, therefore, represents a major benchmark for any model of pion scattering off nuclei at low and intermediate energies. The impact of surface effects, such as the neutron skins of heavy nuclei, is investigated. The dependence of the total cross section on the nuclear mass number is also discussed. We achieve a good quantitative agreement with the extensive data set obtained at LAMPF. Furthermore, we compare the solutions of the transport equations obtained in the test-particle ansatz using two different schemes: the full and the parallel ensemble methods.

  15. Ligand Exchange Reaction of Au(I) R-N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes with Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, H F; Vieira, M A; Sánchez Delgado, G Y; Paschoal, D

    2016-04-14

    The chemotherapy with gold complexes has been attempted since the 90s after the clinical success of auranofin, a gold(I) coordination complex. Currently, the organometallics compounds have shown promise in cancer therapy, mainly in those complexes containing N-heterocylic carbenes (NHC) as a ligand. The present study shows a kinetic analysis of the reaction of six alkyl-substituted NHC with cysteine (Cys), which is taken as an important bionucleophile representative. The first and second ligand exchange processes were analyzed with the complete description of the mechanism and energy profiles. For the first reaction step, which is the rate-limiting step of the whole substitution reaction, the activation enthalpy follows the order 1/Me2 < 2/Me,Et < 4/n-Bu2 < 3/i-Pr2 < 6/Cy2 < 5/t-Bu2, which is fully explained by steric and electronic features. From a steric point of view, the previous reactivity order is correlated with the r(Au-S) calculated for the transition state structures where S is the sulfur ligand from the Cys entering group. This means that longer r(Au-S) leads to higher activation enthalpy and is consistent with the effectiveness of gold shielding from nucleophile attack by bulkier alkyl-substituted NHC ligand. When electronic effect was addressed we found that higher activation barrier was predicted for strongly electron-donating NHC ligand, represented by the eigenvalue of σ-HOMO orbital of the free ligands. The molecular interpretation of the electronic effects is that strong donating NHC forms strong metal-ligand bond. For the second reaction step, similar structure-reactivity relationships were obtained, however the activation energies are less sensitive to the structure. PMID:27010796

  16. Effect of ADP on Na+-Na+ Exchange Reaction Kinetics of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, R. Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used in rat cardiac myocytes to investigate the kinetics of ADP binding to phosphorylated states of Na,K-ATPase and its effects on presteady-state Na+-dependent charge movements by this enzyme. Ouabain-sensitive transient currents generated by Na,K-ATPase functi