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Sample records for cattle feedlot waste

  1. Precision Management of Cattle Feedlot Waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle feedlot nutrient waste management is a topic of increasing environmental, sociological, and regulatory concern. This report investigates methods adapted from the management of saline soils for application to feedlot surface management as well operation of a vegetative treatment area (VTA) ut...

  2. Subsurface Sensors to Manage Cattle Feedlot Waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface sensing tools were used to aid collection of biosolids from feedlot surfaces to be utilized by crops, for control and utilization of nutrient laden liquid runoff, and to enhance feedlot surface management to reduce nutrient losses and gaseous emissions. The work described here was all co...

  3. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: BEEF CATTLE FEEDLOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a study of atmospheric emissions of fugitive dusts and volatile products from beef cattle feedlots. Total particulate emissions are affected by feedlot area, cattle density in pens, wind speed, and the regional precipitation-evaporation index. The predominant...

  4. Heat stress in feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress in feedlot cattle is a common summer time occurrence in cattle-producing parts of the world (United States, Australia, Brazil, etc.). The impact of heat stress on feedlot animals is quite varied--from little to no effect in a brief exposure, to causing reductions in feed intake, growth,...

  5. Chapter 9.5: Electromagnetic induction to manage cattle feedlot waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter summarizes results of waste management research that utilized electromagnetic induction (EMI) tools for the purposes of: 1) collection of solid waste from feedlot surfaces to be utilized by crops 2) control and utilization of nutrient laden liquid runoff, and 3) feedlot surface man...

  6. Co-composting of Beef Cattle Feedlot Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiying; Hill, Brett; Caffyn, Pam; Travis, Greg; Olson, Andrew F; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim; Alexander, Trevor

    2014-09-01

    With increased availability of dried distillers' grains with solubles (DDGS) as cattle feed and the need to recycle organic wastes, this research investigated the feasibility of co-composting DDGS cattle feedlot manure with construction and demolition (C&D) waste. Manure was collected from cattle fed a typical western Canadian finishing diet (CK) of 860 g rolled barley ( L.) grain, 100 g barley silage, and 40 g vitamin and mineral supplement kg dry matter (DM) and from cattle fed the same diet but (DG manure) with 300 g kg DM barley grain being replaced by DDGS. The CK and DG manures were co-composted with and without C&D waste in 13 m bins. Compost materials were turned on Days 14, 37, and 64, and terminated on Day 99. Adding C&D waste led to higher compost temperatures (0.4 to 16.3°C, average 7.2°C) than manure alone. Final composts had similar total C, total N, C/N ratios, and water-extractable K, Mg, and NO content across all treatments. However, adding C&D waste increased δC, δN, water-extractable SO, and Ca contents and decreased pH, total P (TP), water-extractable C, N, and P and most volatile fatty acids (VFA). The higher C&D compost temperatures should reduce pathogens while reduced VFA content should reduce odors. When using the final compost product, the increased SO and reduced TP and available N and P content in C&D waste compost should be taken into consideration. Increased S content in C&D compost may be beneficial for some crops grown on S-deficient soils. PMID:25603264

  7. Incorporation of thymol into corncob granules for reduction of odor and pathogens in feedlot cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Varel, V H; Miller, D N; Berry, E D

    2006-02-01

    Confined animal feeding operations can be a source of odor emissions, global warming gases, water pollution, and food contamination. Laboratory studies have indicated that plant oils with antimicrobial activity can be used to control pathogens and odor emissions from cattle and swine wastes. However, these oils are aromatic and may volatilize when applied topically. Our objectives were to evaluate the volatility of thymol from a feedlot surface and the effectiveness of topically applying thyme oil (2.5% thymol), incorporated into corncob granules and added once per week, to control odor emissions and total coliforms in feedlot manure. In the first study, thymol either volatilized or was degraded within 28 d after topical application. In a second study, thyme oil (2.5% thymol) was incorporated into corncobs and applied to pen surfaces weekly. Manure samples from 6 locations in each pen were collected from 3 untreated and 3 thymol-corncob-treated pens (15 x 150 m; fifty 400-kg cattle/pen), 3 times per week for 8 wk. Samples were analyzed for thymol concentration, total VFA, branched-chain VFA, aromatic compounds, and the number of Escherichia coli and total coliform bacteria. Over the 8 wk, with the exception of wk 7, the desired thymol concentration of 15 to 20 micromol/g DM was maintained in the manure. Concentrations of VFA and branched chain-VFA increased over time in untreated and treated pens. However, the rate of VFA accumulation in treated pens (7.5 +/- 1.3 micromol.g DM(-1).wk(-1)) was less (P < 0.01) than the rate of accumulation in untreated pens (18.0 +/- 2.1 micromol.g DM(-1).wk(-1)). Likewise, the rate of branched-chain VFA accumulation in treated pens (0.31 +/- 0.04 micromol.g DM(-1).wk(-1)) was less (P < 0.01) than in untreated pens (0.55 +/- 0.06 micromol.g DM(-1).wk(1)). The concentrations of E. coli in treated pens (2.9 +/- 1.2 x 10(5) cfu.g DM(-1)) were 91% less (P < 0.04) than in untreated pens (31.1 +/- 4.0 x 10(5) cfu.g DM(-1)). Similarly

  8. The modern feedlot for finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John J; Archibeque, Shawn L; Feuz, Dillon M

    2014-02-01

    The modern beef feedlot has evolved into a complex system that is very dependent upon technology. Modern feedlots are organized into departments, often including the office, cattle, yard, feed milling, and feed departments, that allow for improvements in production efficiency through the specialization of management and labor. Regardless of size, feedlots must succeed at the following tasks: cattle procurement, cattle receiving, cattle processing, daily cattle observations, health treatments, cattle marketing, feed procurement, feed commodity receiving, feed commodity storage, diet formulation, diet delivery, bunk management, and environmental management. Apart from cattle ownership, feedlots create most of their gross income from feed sales, yardage, inventory gain on flaked grain, and combinations of these sources. The future of the industry is filled with economic and political challenges, including high grain prices owing to competition from the ethanol industry, environmental regulations, excess feedlot capacity, and a diminishing labor pool owing to declining rural populations. PMID:25384155

  9. Sudden death of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Glock, R D; DeGroot, B D

    1998-01-01

    Sudden deaths or the sudden death syndrome are perceived as major concerns in cattle feedlots because most of these deaths occur in cattle near market weight. Etiology and preventive measures are poorly defined. The current literature indicates that sudden deaths are associated most commonly with digestive upsets. Death is thought to be the result of interactions between factors including acidosis, bloat, and endotoxemia. Trauma, peracute interstitial pneumonia, and other identifiable events are specifically defined but relatively uncommon. Enterotoxemia is of questionable significance as a cause of sudden deaths. PMID:9464913

  10. Nitrification in Beef Cattle Feedlot Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims: Ammonia volatilization is the primary route for nitrogen loss from cattle feedlots. An additional, but poorly studied mechanism in feedlots is aerobic nitrification. The aim of this study is to characterize nitrifier activity, abundance, and diversity for a cattle production ...

  11. Influence of feedlot pen surface layers and distillers' grain diets on microbial community structure associated with beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle feedlots on the Southern High Plains annually produce approximately 7 million beef cattle accounting for 30% of the total U.S. fed beef cattle production. The high density of beef cattle results in concentration of nutrients (C, N, and P) in manure wastes and may create an environment favorab...

  12. A review of bloat in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K J; McAllister, T A; Popp, J D; Hristov, A N; Mir, Z; Shin, H T

    1998-01-01

    Improvements in feedlot management practices and the use of various feed additives have reduced, but not eliminated, the occurrence of bloat in feedlot cattle. Feedlot bloat reduces the profitability of production by compromising animal performance and more directly by causing fatalities. In feedlots, bloat is associated with the ingestion of large amounts of rapidly fermented cereal grain and destabilization of the microbial populations of the rumen. An abundance of rapidly fermented carbohydrate allows acid-tolerant bacteria (e.g., Streptococcus bovis and Lactobacillus spp.) to proliferate and produce excessive quantities of fermentation acids. As a result, ruminal pH becomes exceedingly low, and this impairs rumen motility. Further, the excessive production of mucopolysaccharide or "slime" increases the viscosity of ruminal fluid and stabilizes the foam implicated in frothy feedlot bloat. Although protocols have been developed to treat feedlot bloat, the most profitable approach is to use management strategies to reduce its likelihood. Amount of roughage, grain processing techniques, selection of cereal grain (e.g., corn, barley, and wheat), dietary adaptation periods, and various additives (e.g., ionophores) can influence the occurrence of bloat in feedlot cattle. Successful management of these factors depends on a thorough understanding of the behavioral, dietary, and microbial events that precipitate bloat in feedlot cattle. PMID:9464911

  13. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Devin B.; Timsit, Edouard; Alexander, Trevor W.

    2015-01-01

    The bovine nasopharyngeal tract plays an important role in animal health and welfare by acting as a site for the carriage of pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease, a condition which results in significant morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. We characterized the bacterial nasopharyngeal microbiota in cattle at feedlot entry (day 0) and day 60 using 454 pyrosequencing. We also identified the most frequently isolated aerobic bacteria from nasopharyngeal swabs after plating onto three types of media. The cattle nasopharyngeal microbiota was composed primarily of Proteobacteria (68.9%) and Firmicutes (19.2%). At the genus-level, there was more inter-individual variability and a total of 55 genera were identified. The genera Pseudomonas (23.7%), Shewanella (23.5%), Acinetobacter (17.5%), and Carnobacterium (12.2%) were most prevalent at entry, while after 60 days in the feedlot, Staphylococcus (20.8%), Mycoplasma (14.9%), Mannheimia (10.4%), and Moraxella (9.4%) were dominant. The nasopharyngeal microbiota also became more homogenous after 60 days in the feedlot and differed in structure at day 0 and 60. Using culture-based methods, the most frequently isolated bacteria from nasopharyngeal swabs were Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Moraxella, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia. These results provide insight into the nasopharyngeal microbiota of cattle and demonstrate that specific changes take place during feedlot production. PMID:26497574

  14. Reactive N emissions from beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) are fed to meet the nutritional needs of beef cattle in feedlots. However, only from 10 to 15% of fed N is retained in animals. Most N is excreted. Chemical and biological processes transform manure N into ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrate. These reactive forms of ...

  15. Feedlot cattle susceptibility to heat stress: an animal specific model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  16. Diseases of yearling feedlot cattle in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R; Pierson, R E; Braddy, P M; Saari, D A; Lauerman, L H; England, J J; Horton, D P; McChesney, A E

    1976-09-01

    During all of 1974 we surveyed, for illnesses and deaths, about 407,000 yearling feedlot cattle. The morbidity was 5.1%, with a case mortality of 18.9% and a population mortality of 1.0%. Both morbidity and mortality were higher during fall and winter than during spring and summer. Of the 3,943 dead cattle, 1,988 were necropsied. The most prevalent diseases were: pneumonia, 48%; diphtheria, 6%; brisket disease, 6%; hemorrhagic colitis, 5%; riding injury, 4%; bloat, 3%; calculosis, 2%; endocarditis, 2%; abomasal ulcers, 2%; bovine viral diarrhea, 2%; embolic pulmonary aneurysm, 1%; and pulmonary edema, 1%. PMID:956027

  17. Sudden deaths in yearling feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Pierson, R E; Jensen, R; Lauerman, L H; Saari, D A; Braddy, P M; McChesney, A E; Horton, D P

    1976-09-01

    A survey of the causes for fatal diseases of yearling feedlot cattle was conducted on more than 407,000 cattle during a 14-month period. Of the 4,260 (1%) cattle that died during this period, 1,358 (32%) were categorized as cases of "sudden death syndrome." Of the 11 most frequent causes of the syndrome, as determined at necropsy, only 4--bloat, pulmonary aneurysms, riding injury, and hemopericardium--were considered as short-course problems and true causes of sudden death. The largest number of cases of sudden death were attributed to pneumonia (113 animals). Consequently, the sudden death syndrome is a misnomer for many long-course diseases and, in some instances, a mask for neglect because, as clinically used, the name frequently includes cattle that have been sick, often with pneumonia, for several days. PMID:956032

  18. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commerical cattle feedlot in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), from open beef cattle feedlots is becoming a concern. Research measuring emission rates of N2O from open beef cattle feedlots, however, has been limited. This study was conducted to quantify the N2O emission rate from pen surfaces in a com...

  19. An outbreak of cysticercosis in feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bundza, Adam; Finley, Gordon G.; Easton, Kenneth L.

    1988-01-01

    An outbreak of cysticercosis (infestation with the larvae of Taenia saginata) occurred in feedlot cattle in Ontario in 1986. Two hundred and thirty-three of 271 steers were confirmed histologically to be positive for cysticerci. Nineteen (8.2%) animals had viable cysticerci, 87 (37.3%) had degenerated cysticerci, 77 (33.0%) had mineralized cysticerci, and 50 (21.5%) steers had lymphoid granulomas consistent with cysticercosis. Three viable cysticerci were partly evaginated and one degenerate cysticercus was fully evaginated. ImagesFigure 1., Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4., Figure 5., Figure 6., Figure 7., Figure 8., Figure 9., F PMID:17423200

  20. Bacterial Community Structure of a Cattle Feedlot Pen Surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization is the primary route for nitrogen loss from cattle feedlots. An additional, but poorly studied mechanism in feedlots is aerobic nitrification. The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-o...

  1. BEEF CATTLE FEEDLOT RUNOFF AND CONTROL IN EASTERN NEBRASKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was initiated to determine operational characteristics of runoff control facility components for beef cattle feedlots. A runoff control facility was designed and constructed for a 3,000 head capacity feedlot in eastern Nebraska. Components of the runoff control facilit...

  2. A Snapshot of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a Cattle Feedlot.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mei; Flesch, Thomas K; McGinn, Sean M; Chen, Deli

    2015-11-01

    Beef cattle feedlots emit large amounts of the greenhouse gases (GHG) methane (CH) and nitrous oxide (NO), as well as ammonia (NH), which contributes to NO emission when NH is deposited to land. However, there is a lack of simultaneous, in situ, and nondisturbed measurements of the major GHG gas components from beef cattle feedlots, or measurements from different feedlot sources. A short-term campaign at a beef cattle feedlot in Victoria, Australia, quantified CH, NO, and NH emissions from the feedlot pens, manure stockpiles, and surface run-off pond. Open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers and open-path lasers (OP-Laser) were used with an inverse-dispersion technique to estimate emissions. Daily average emissions of CH, NO, and NH were 132 (± 2.3 SE), 0, and 117 (± 4.5 SE) g animal d from the pens and 22 (± 0.7 SE), 2 (± 0.2 SE), and 9 (± 0.6 SE) g animal d from the manure stockpiles. Emissions of CH and NH from the run-off pond were less than 0.5 g animal d. Extrapolating these results to the feedlot population of cattle across Australia would mean that feedlots contribute approximately 2% of the agricultural GHG emissions and 2.7% of livestock sector emissions, lower than a previous estimate of 3.5%. PMID:26641350

  3. Microbial Population of Feedlot Waste and Associated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, R. A.; Hrubant, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative determination was made every 2 months for a year of the microflora of beef cattle waste and runoff at a medium-sized midwestern feedlot. Counts were obtained for selected groups of organisms in waste taken from paved areas of pens cleaned daily and, therefore, reflect the flora of raw waste. Overall, in terms of viable count per gram dry weight, the feedlot waste contained 1010 total organisms, 109 anaerobes, 108 gram-negative bacteria, 107 coliforms, 106 sporeformers, and 105 yeasts, fungi, and streptomycetes. The specific numbers and pattern of these groups of organisms varied only slightly during the study in spite of a wide variation in weather. Data indicate that little microbial growth occurs in the waste as it exists in the feedlot. Runoff from the pens contained the same general population pattern but with greater variation attributable to volume of liquid. Comparable determinations of an associated field disposal area (before and after cropping), stockpiled waste, and elevated dirt areas in the pens indicate that fungi, and especially streptomycetes, are the aerobic organisms most associated with final stabilization of the waste. Yeasts, which are the dominant type of organism in the ensiled corn fed the cattle, do not occur in large numbers in the animal waste. Large ditches receiving runoff and subsurface water from the fields have a population similar to the runoff but with fewer coliforms. PMID:16349931

  4. Identifying and tracking key odorants from cattle feedlots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; McConnell, Laura; Maghirang, Ronaldo; Razote, Edna; Hatfield, Jerry

    2011-08-01

    Odors from cattle feedlots can negatively affect air quality in local communities. Our objectives were the following: 1) identify key odor-causing compounds using odor activity values (OAVs) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) techniques; 2) compare odor threshold values from published databases; and 3) track the movement of odors from a cattle feedlot to receptor community. Odorous compounds emitted from a cattle feedlot were sampled on-site, 250 m downwind and 3.2 km downwind using both sorbent tubes and denuders. Sorbent tubes were analyzed by both GC-MS and GC-MS-O and key odorants determined using both OAV and GC-Surface Nasal Impact Frequency (SNIF) analysis, while denuders were analyzed by ion chromatography. Odorant concentrations had a diurnal pattern with peak concentrations during early morning and late evening periods. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were the most abundant of the major odorants. Odorants with concentrations above their odor threshold values at the feedlot included amines, VFAs, phenol compounds, and indole compounds. Key odorants at the feedlot were VFAs and phenol compounds, but their relative importance diminished with downwind distance. Indole compounds, while not the key odorants at the feedlot, increased in relative importance downwind of the feedlot. In general, the odorous compounds identified by GC-SNIF and OAV as having fecal/manure nature were similar. GC-SNIF was the more sensitive analytical technique; it identified several compounds that may have contributed to the unpleasantness of the cattle feedlot odor, but its throughput was extremely low thereby limiting its usefulness. There is a need to improve field sampling devices and odor threshold databases to enhance understanding and confidence in evaluating odors.

  5. Energy production from biosolids: A cattle feedlot demonstration system

    SciTech Connect

    Fedler, C.B.; Parker, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    About 5 million head of cattle are produced annually from about 200 feedlots in the Texas High Plains with about 3.5 million head standing. Annually, the 3.5 million head of cattle produce about 28 millions metric tons of were manure (88% water). If anaerobically digested, the manure would yield about 1.4 million m{sup 3} of biogas, or about 4.4 million kWh daily. With cogeneration and nutrient recovery, the sum of the revenue sources in over $500 million annually and does no include the value of water or other byproducts such as fish and plants that could be produced from an integrated system. A demonstration unit to treat the waste from a 1000-head cattle and a 280 sow farrow-to-finish swine operation is constructed. This system employs a 6 m deep anaerobic pit for production and capture of biogas integrated with a facultative pond, a shallow pond for production of aquatic plants, and a pond for production of fish or other aquatic species. The resulting related agribusinesses would not only produce additional revenues, but would also produce energy, improve the environment though extraction of nitrogen compounds, capture of gaseous emissions, reduction of odor, and creation of wildlife habitat in consturcted wetlants.

  6. Performance of four stabilization bioprocesses of beef cattle feedlot manure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mônica Sarolli Silva de Mendonça; Lorin, Higor E Francisconi; Costa, Luiz Antonio de Mendonça; Cestonaro, Taiana; Pereira, Dercio C; Bernardi, Francieli H

    2016-10-01

    The biological stabilization of beef cattle manure is crucial for promoting sanitation in feedlot pens. This study compared the performance of composting, vermicomposting, static windrows, and anaerobic digestion for stabilization of beef cattle feedlot manure based on the degradation of organic matter, nutrient retention, and stability of the final product in each process using uni- and multivariate analysis. The cluster analysis showed that composting and vermicomposting were the most similar processes. The principal component analysis showed that the more oxidative processes (composting and vermicomposting) degraded beef cattle feedlot manure more effectively (up to 45%) than static windrows and anaerobic digestion. Stabilization processes did not affect the amount of phosphorus, whereas potassium losses ranged from 3% (anaerobic digestion) to 30% (static windrow) and differed significantly across processes. Electrical conductivity decreased only in static windrow (30%). A decrease in the C/N ratio were observed in all processes, but the reduction was smaller in static windrow (5%). Larger reductions in C/N ratio were associated with greater increases in the humic to fulvic acid ratio. Composting and vermicomposting processes more effectively degraded beef cattle manure and produced stable organic fertilizers. Anaerobic digestion more effectively retained macronutrients (N and K) and converted organic N to ammonium. The use of static windrows is the least effective bioprocess for the stabilization of beef cattle feedlot manure. PMID:27415410

  7. PREDICTING CATTLE FEEDLOT RUNOFF AND RETENTION BASIN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure was devised to predict the quantity and quality of cattle feedlot runoff entering a runoff retention basin whenever precipitation occurs in excess of the surface holding capacity of the lot or whenever accumulated snow would melt. These predictions are based upon size...

  8. Identifying and tracking key odorants from cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odors from cattle feedlots negatively affect air quality in local communities. The purpose of this study was to identifying key odorants using both analytical (odor activity values, OAV) and gas chromatrography GC-O (olfactometry) techniques, compare odor threshold databases, and track the movement ...

  9. Water spray cooling during handling of feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities involved in receiving or working (e.g., sorting, dehorning, castration, weighing, implanting, etc.) of feedlot cattle cause an increase in body temperature. During hot weather the increased body temperature may disrupt normal behaviors including eating, which can be especially detrimenta...

  10. Water Spray Cooling During Handling of Feedlot Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activities involved in receiving or working (e.g. sorting, dehorning, castration, weighing, implanting, etc.) of feedlot cattle cause an increase in body temperature. During hot weather the increased body temperature may disrupt normal behaviors including eating, which can be especially detrimental...

  11. Benefits of Providing Shade to Feedlot Cattle of Different Breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress in cattle causes a decrease in feed intake and growth and, in extreme cases, can cause death of vulnerable animals. A simple shade can reduce the animal's radiant heat load by 30% or more. However, for most feedlots, adding shade structures to all pens is cost prohibitive. The objecti...

  12. Benefits of providing shade to feedlot cattle of different breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress in cattle causes decreases in feed intake, growth, and efficiency. In extreme cases, heat stress can cause death of vulnerable animals. A simple shade can reduce the animal's radiant heat load by 30% or more. However, for most feedlots, adding shade structures to all pens is cost prohibi...

  13. Characterizing odors from cattle feedlots with different odor techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odors from cattle feedlots negatively affect local communities. The purpose of this study was to characterize odors and odorants using different odor sampling techniques. Odors were characterized with field olfactometers (Nasal Ranger®), sensory techniques (GC-O) and analytical techniques (sorbent t...

  14. Chemical contaminants in feedlot wastes: concentrations, effects and attenuation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S J; Roser, D J; Davies, C M; Peters, G M; Stuetz, R M; Tucker, R; Ashbolt, N J

    2008-08-01

    Commercial feedlots for beef cattle finishing are potential sources of a range of trace chemicals which have human health or environmental significance. To ensure adequate protection of human and environmental health from exposure to these chemicals, the application of effective manure and effluent management practices is warranted. The Australian meat and livestock industry has adopted a proactive approach to the identification of best management practices. Accordingly, this review was undertaken to identify key chemical species that may require consideration in the development of guidelines for feedlot manure and effluent management practices in Australia. Important classes of trace chemicals identified include steroidal hormones, antibiotics, ectoparasiticides, mycotoxins, heavy metals and dioxins. These are described in terms of their likely sources, expected concentrations and public health or environmental significance based on international data and research. Androgenic hormones such as testosterone and trenbolone are significantly active in feedlot wastes, but they are poorly understood in terms of fate and environmental implications. The careful management of residues of antibiotics including virginiamycin, tylosin and oxytetracycline appears prudent in terms of minimising the risk of potential public health impacts from resistant strains of bacteria. Good management of ectoparasiticides including synthetic pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones, fluazuron, and amitraz is important for the prevention of potential ecological implications, particularly towards dung beetles. Very few of these individual chemical contaminants have been thoroughly investigated in terms of concentrations, effects and attenuation in Australian feedlot wastes. PMID:18055014

  15. Associations between feedlot management practices and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2016-06-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the major cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in a population of Australian feedlot cattle to assess associations between factors related to feedlot management and risk of BRD. In total, 35,131 animals in 170 pens (cohorts) inducted into 14 feedlots were included in statistical analyses. Causal diagrams were used to inform model building to allow separate estimation of total and direct effects. Multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models were fitted within the Bayesian framework. The placement of pen water troughs such that they could be accessed by animals in adjoining pens was associated with markedly increased risk of BRD (OR 4.3, 95% credible interval: 1.4-10.3). Adding animals to pens over multiple days was associated with increased risk of BRD across all animals in those pens compared to placing all animals in the pen on a single day (total effect: OR 1.9, 95% credible interval: 1.2-2.8). The much attenuated direct effect indicated that this was primarily mediated via factors on indirect pathways so it may be possible to ameliorate the adverse effects of adding animals to pens over multiple days by altering exposure to these intervening factors (e.g. mixing history). In pens in which animals were added to the pen over multiple days, animals added ≥7 days (OR: 0.7, credible interval: 0.5-0.9) or 1-6 days (OR: 0.8, credible interval: 0.7-1.0) before the last animal was added were at modestly reduced risk of BRD compared to the animals that were added to the pen on the latest day. Further research is required to disentangle effects of cohort formation patterns at animal-level and higher levels on animal-level risk of BRD. Vaccination against Bovine herpesvirus 1 at feedlot entry was investigated but results were inconclusive and further research is required to evaluate vaccine efficacy. We conclude that there are practical interventions available to

  16. Nuisance flies on Australian cattle feedlots: immature populations.

    PubMed

    Hogsette, J A; Urech, R; Green, P E; Skerman, A; Elson-Harris, M M; Bright, R L; Brown, G W

    2012-03-01

    Species composition, seasonality and distribution of immature fly populations on a southern Queensland feedlot during 2001-2003 were determined. Similar data were collected on feedlots in central New South Wales and central Queensland. The fly species recovered in the highest numbers were Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: Muscidae) and Physiphora clausa Macquart (Diptera: Ulidiidae). Houseflies were the dominant species at all feedlots. Houseflies preferred the warmer months from October to June, but stable flies preferred the cooler months and peaked in spring (September-November) and autumn (March-May). Larval abundance ratings recorded in the feedlot and numbers of larvae extracted in the laboratory from corresponding samples followed similar trends. Larvae of M. domestica were most abundant in the hospital and induction area and least abundant in horse stables and yards. Pupae of M. domestica were abundant in the hospital and induction area and drains, but least abundant in horse stables and yards. Larvae of S. calcitrans were most abundant in drains and least abundant in horse stables and yards. Pupae of S. calcitrans were most numerous in drains and least numerous in old cattle pens. Feedlot design and management had little effect on fly reduction. PMID:22035065

  17. Using Experts to Validate an Animal Specific Heat Stress Model for Feedlot Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  18. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness. PMID:26210765

  19. Associations between prior management of cattle and risk of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Schibrowski, M L; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the major cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot populations worldwide. A longitudinal study was conducted to assess associations between risk factors related to on-farm management prior to transport to the feedlot and risk of BRD in a population of feedlot beef cattle sourced from throughout the cattle producing regions of Australia. Exposure variables were derived from questionnaire data provided by farmers supplying cattle (N=10,721) that were a subset of the population included in a nationwide prospective study investigating numerous putative risk factors for BRD. Causal diagrams were used to inform model building to allow estimation of effects of interest. Multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models were fitted within the Bayesian framework. Animals that were yard weaned were at reduced risk (OR: 0.7, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.0) of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals immediately returned to pasture after weaning. Animals that had previously been fed grain (OR: 0.6, 95% credible interval: 0.3-1.1) were probably at reduced risk of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals not previously fed grain. Animals that received prior vaccinations against Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.1) or Mannheimia haemolytica (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.6-1.0) were also probably at reduced risk compared to non-vaccinated animals. The results of this study confirm that on-farm management before feedlot entry can alter risk of BRD after beef cattle enter feedlots. PMID:27094138

  20. Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

  1. Evaluation of objective and subjective mobility variables in feedlot cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on mobility in feedlot cattle. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech University Beef Center in New Deal, TX. Cattle were weighed and scan...

  2. Nitrous oxide fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), from open beef cattle feedlots is becoming an environmental concern; however, research measuring emission rates of N2O from open beef cattle feedlots has been limited. This study was conducted to quantify N2O emission fluxes as affected by...

  3. Accidental monensin sodium intoxication of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, D; Kimberling, C; Spraker, T; Sterner, F E; McChesney, A E

    1984-05-15

    Of 1,994 yearling and 2-year-old cattle in a winter feeding program, 117 died within 42 days of being fed toxic amounts of monensin sodium in a liquid protein supplement. Death losses commenced on the third day after ingestion of a toxic amount in the feed. Clinical signs in cattle that died in less than 9 days included anorexia, pica, diarrhea, depression, mild hindlimb ataxia, and dyspnea. Gross necropsy findings in cattle dying in the acute phase of the illness included hydrothorax, ascites, and pulmonary edema, as well as petechial hemorrhages, edema, and yellow streaking in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Cattle dying after 9 days had gray streaks in heart and skeletal muscle, generalized ventral edema, enlarged, firm, bluish discolored liver, and enlarged heart. Microscopic changes in cattle dying in the acute phase (less than 9 days) consisted of pulmonary edema, congestion, and hemorrhage. Cardiac and skeletal muscle had localized areas of edema, hemorrhage, and coagulative necrosis. In cattle dying after 9 days of illness, the changes included lymphocytic infiltration, sarcolemmal nuclear proliferation, and fibrosis in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Lungs contained increased alveolar macrophages and a few neutrophils. Centrilobular necrosis and mild fibrosis were found in the liver. Changes varied somewhat according to the area of heart or skeletal muscle that was affected. Active muscles, eg, those in the heart ventricles and diaphragm, were altered most severely. Intoxication appeared to be a result of sedimentation of monensin in the molasses carrier to give remarkable concentrations of the substance at the bottom of the holding tank. PMID:6735846

  4. Energy and nutrient recovery from cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective harvesting of manure can benefit cattle producers by creating a product of value. A tool that identifies locations of manure accumulation has been developed using a sub-surface sensor (Dualem-1S, Milton, ON) and software designed for salt mapping (ESAP, Riverside, CA). The combination al...

  5. Energy and nutrient recovery from cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective harvesting of manure can benefit cattle producers by creating a product of value. A tool that identifies locations of manure accumulation has been developed and demonstrated. A dual geometry sub-surface sensor (Dualem-1S, Milton, ON) was used with software designed for salt mapping (ESAP...

  6. Microbial Community Structure of Feedlot Cattle Feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cattle feces are a reservoir of Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157), an important food-borne pathogen. Although STEC O157 is often studied in isolation, the STEC O157 fecal habitat consists of many different kinds of bacteria, and STEC O157 is part of a complex microbia...

  7. Fermentation of Feedlot Waste Filtrate by Fungi and Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B. A.; Rhodes, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The soluble and dispersed nitrogen and carbon components in the filtrate fraction of cattle feedlot waste are a potential nutrient source from which single-cell protein could be produced for animal feeds. The ability of more than 200 fungi and streptomycetes to grow in this liquid was determined; these included isolates from the waste and associated sources, as well as organisms maintained in the Culture Collection of the Agricultural Research Service in Peoria, Ill. Utilization of waste nutrients was measured by changes in nitrogen content and chemical oxygen demand. Only 20% of the organisms were able to grow appreciably in the filtrate. Of these, dry-weight yields varied from 0.6 to 2.7 g of mycelium per liter; from 21 to 50% of the nitrogen in the filtrates was used during growth, whereas chemical oxygen demand levels diminished from 4 to 60%. In general, streptomycetes isolated from the feedlot used nutrients from the filtrates better than fungi did. Addition of readily available carbon sources such as glucose or whey significantly increased (as much as sixfold) cell yields of selected organisms and promoted better utilization of nitrogen (from two- to threefold); the effect on chemical oxygen demand varied (0 to 33% increase). PMID:4474833

  8. Methane emissions from feedlot cattle fed barley or corn diets.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K A; McGinn, S M

    2005-03-01

    Methane emitted from the livestock sector contributes to greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Understanding the variability in enteric methane production related to diet is essential to decreasing uncertainty in greenhouse gas emission inventories and to identifying viable greenhouse gas reduction strategies. Our study focused on measuring methane in growing beef cattle fed corn- or barley-based diets typical of those fed to cattle in North American feedlots. The experiment was designed as a randomized complete block (group) design with two treatments, barley and corn. Angus heifer calves (initial BW = 328 kg) were allocated to two groups (eight per group), with four cattle in each group fed a corn or barley diet. The experiment was conducted over a 42-d backgrounding phase, a 35-d transition phase and a 32-d finishing phase. Backgrounding diets consisted of 70% barley silage or corn silage and 30% concentrate containing steam-rolled barley or dry-rolled corn (DM basis). Finishing diets consisted of 9% barley silage and 91% concentrate containing barley or corn (DM basis). All diets contained monensin (33 mg/kg of DM). Cattle were placed into four large environmental chambers (two heifers per chamber) during each phase to measure enteric methane production for 3 d. During the backgrounding phase, DMI was greater by cattle fed corn than for those fed barley (10.2 vs. 7.6 kg/d, P < 0.01), but during the finishing phase, DMI was similar for both diets (8.3 kg/d). The DMI was decreased to 6.3 kg/d with no effect of diet or phase while the cattle were in the chambers; thus, methane emissions (g/d) reported may underestimate those of the feedlot industry. Methane emissions per kilogram of DMI and as a percentage of GE intake were not affected by grain source during the backgrounding phase (24.6 g/kg of DMI; 7.42% of GE), but were less (P < 0.05) for corn than for barley during the finishing phase (9.2 vs. 13.1 g/kg of DMI; 2.81 vs. 4.03% of GE). The results indicate the

  9. Bacterial community analysis of beef cattle feedlots reveals that pen surface is distinct from feces.

    PubMed

    Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Gregory P; Smith, Timothy P L; Bono, James L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Clawson, Michael L

    2011-05-01

    The surface of beef cattle feedlot pens is commonly conceptualized as being packed uncomposted manure. Despite the important role that the feedlot pen may play in the transmission of veterinary and zoonotic pathogens, the bacterial ecology of feedlot surface material is not well understood. Our present study characterized the bacterial communities of the beef cattle feedlot pen surface material using 3647 full-length 16S rDNA sequences, and we compared the community composition of feedlot pens to the fecal source material. The feedlot surface composite was represented by members of the phylum Actinobacteria (42%), followed by Firmicutes (24%), Bacteroidetes (24%), and Proteobacteria (9%). The feedlot pen surface material bacterial communities were clearly distinct from those of the feces from animals in the same pen. Comparisons with previously published results of feces from the animals in the same pen reveal that, of 139 genera identified, only 25 were present in both habitats. These results indicate that, microbiologically, the feedlot pen surface material is separate and distinct from the fecal source material, suggesting that bacteria that originate in cattle feces face different selection pressures and survival challenges during their tenure in the feedlot pen, as compared to their residence in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21214381

  10. Carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii pasture-finished cattle and Hawaii-originated, mainland feedlot-finished cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Soo; Fukumoto, Glen Kazumi; Kim, Sunae

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture with those of mainland US feedlot-finished cattle that were shipped from Hawaii after weaning. Rib-eye steak samples were collected from 30 feedlot-finished cattle harvested at a slaughter house in Washington State, USA and from 13 subtropical pasture-finished cattle harvested at a local slaughter house in Hawaii, then shipped to meat science laboratory at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Samples were aged for 2 weeks at 4°C and frozen for later proximate analysis and meat tenderness measurement. Feedlot-finished cattle had significantly heavier carcass weight (353 vs 290 kg) and thicker backfat (13.5 vs 6.6 mm), but no significant difference was observed in rib-eye area between the two groups. Marbling score (Small) and United States Department of Agriculture quality grade (Choice) of the pasture-finished beef were not significantly (P < 0.05) different from those of feedlot-finished beef. The shear force value of pasture-finished beef (5.18 kg) was not statistically different (P < 0.05) from that of feedlot-finished beef (4.40 kg). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture produced as tender beef as mainland feedlot-finished cattle with less intramuscular fat. PMID:22274716

  11. Soil nutrient dynamics in small beef cattle backgrounding feedlot on karst environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle backgrounding feedlot systems that grow out weaned calves for feedlot finishing can become potential diffuse sources of manure derived soil nutrients. Better understanding of these nutrient concentrations and their distribution will aid in development of effective nutrient management gui...

  12. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on blood gas, electrolyte balance, and pH in feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood gas, electrolyte balance and pH in feedlot cattle. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech University Beef Center in New Deal, TX. C...

  13. The impact of stress level on fecal bacteria and pathogen shedding in feedlot cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle increases during the warmer months of the year and during transportation. This study was conducted to determine whether stress contributes to this increase. Feedlot heifers of four breeds (hide colors: red, black, tan, and white) were selected on ...

  14. Analysis of risk factors associated with Salmonella spp. isolated from U.S. feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined risk factors for detection of Salmonella from cattle in U.S. feedlots. During each of 2 visits to 73 feedlots, for each of three pens, 25 fresh fecal samples were collected off pen floors. Associations between factors and culture status were evaluated. Variables were considered...

  15. Persistence of erythromycin resistance gene erm(B) in cattle feedlot pens over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance was evaluated in cattle feedlot surface soil samples collected prior to and after a 13-month feedlot trial of two common diets, a 0% wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) corn-based ration versus a 35% WDGS ration. Soil samples were collected from the mo...

  16. Ammonia Emission from a Beef Cattle Feedlot and Its Local Dry Deposition and Re-Emission.

    PubMed

    McGinn, S M; Janzen, H H; Coates, T W; Beauchemin, K A; Flesch, T K

    2016-07-01

    Ammonia (NH) volatized from livestock manure is affiliated with ecosystem and human health concerns and decreased fertilizer value of manure and can also be an indirect source of greenhouse gas. Beef cattle feedlots, where thousands of cattle are grouped together to enable greater control of feed management and production, are hot spots in the agricultural landscape for NH emissions. Quantifying the feedlot NH emissions is a difficult task, partly due to the reactive nature of NH within and surrounding the feedlot. Our study used a dispersion model coupled to field measurements to derive NH emissions from a feedlot in southern Alberta, Canada. The average feedlot NH emission was 50 μg m s (85 g animal d), which coincides with a low dietary crude protein content. At a location 165 m east of the feedlot, a flux gradient (FG) technique measured an average NH deposition of 12.0 μg m s (west wind) and 5.3 μg m s (east wind). Ammonia FG emission averaged 1 μg m s with east winds, whereas no NH emission was found for west wind. Using soil-captured NH, there was a decrease in deposition with distance from the feedlot (50% over 200 m). Collectively, the results of this study provide insight into the dynamics of NH in the agricultural landscape and illustrate the need for NH mitigation to improve the environmental and economic sustainability of cattle feedlots. PMID:27380065

  17. Particulate matter emission rates from beef cattle feedlots in Kansas-reverse dispersion modeling.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Henry F; Maghirang, Ronaldo G; Auvermann, Brent W; Razote, Edna B; Murphy, James P; Harner, Joseph P

    2012-03-01

    Open beef cattle feedlots emit various air pollutants, including particulate matter (PM) with equivalent aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm or less (PM10); however limited research has quantified PM10 emission rates from feedlots. This research was conducted to determine emission rates of PM10 from large cattle feedlots in Kansas. Concentrations of PM10 at the downwind and upwind edges of two large cattle feedlots (KS1 and KS2) in Kansas were measured with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM10 monitors from January 2007 to December 2008. Weather conditions at the feedlots were also monitored. From measured PM10 concentrations and weather conditions, PM10 emission rates were determined using reverse modeling with the American Meteorological Society/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD). The two feedlots differed significantly in median PM10 emission flux (1.60 g/m2-day for KS1 vs. 1.10 g/m2-day for KS2) but not in PM10 emission factor (27 kg/1000 head-day for KS1 and 30 kg/1000 head-day KS2). These emission factors were smaller than published U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission factor for cattle feedlots. PMID:22482292

  18. Feedlot cattle with calm temperaments have higher average daily gains than cattle with excitable temperaments.

    PubMed

    Voisinet, B D; Grandin, T; Tatum, J D; O'Connor, S F; Struthers, J J

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of temperament on the average daily gains of feedlot cattle. Cattle (292 steers and 144 heifers) were transported to Colorado feedlot facilities. Breeds studied included Braford (n = 177), Simmental x Red Angus (n = 92), Red Brangus (n = 70), Simbrah (n = 65), Angus (n = 18), and Tarentaise x Angus (n = 14). Cattle were temperament rated on a numerical scale (chute score) during routine weighing and processing. Data were separated into two groups based on breed, Brahman cross (> or = 25% Brahman) and nonBrahman breeding. Animals that had Brahman breeding had a higher mean temperament rating (3.45 +/- .09) or were more excitable than animals that had no Brahman influence (1.80 +/- .10); (P < .001). These data also show that heifers have a higher mean temperament rating than steers (P < .05). Temperament scores evaluated for each breed group also showed that increased temperament score resulted in decreased average daily gains (P < .05). These data show that cattle that were quieter and calmer during handling had greater average daily gains than cattle that became agitated during routine handling. PMID:9110198

  19. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle that develop bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; McAllister, Tim A; Topp, Edward; Wright, André-Denis G; Alexander, Trevor W

    2015-10-22

    Bovine respiratory disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. The objective of this study was to compare the nasopharyngeal bacterial microbiota of healthy cattle and cattle treated for BRD in a commercial feedlot setting using a high-density 16S rRNA gene microarray (Phylochip). Samples were taken from both groups of animals (n=5) at feedlot entry (day 0) and ≥60 days after placement. Cattle diagnosed with BRD had significantly less bacterial diversity and fewer OTUs in their nasopharynx at both sampling times. The predominant phyla in both groups were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria was lower in cattle treated for BRD. At the family-level there was a greater relative abundance (P<0.05) of Micrococcaceae (day 0 only), Lachnospiraceae (≥60 days), Lactobacillaceae (day 0), and Bacillaceae (day 0) in healthy cattle compared to BRD-affected cattle. The community structure of the BRD-affected and healthy cattle were also significantly different from each other at both sampling times as measured using unweighted UniFrac distances. All entry samples of cattle diagnosed with BRD had 16S rRNA gene sequences representative of the BRD-associated bacteria Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, although 3/5 healthy cattle were also positive for M. haemolytica at this time point. The results also indicate that the bovine nasopharyngeal microbiota is relatively unstable during the first 60 days in the feedlot. PMID:26249828

  20. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    MacVean, D W; Franzen, D K; Keefe, T J; Bennett, B W

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring. PMID:3800131

  1. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    MacVean, D.W.; Franzen, D.K.; Keefe, T.J.; Bennett, B.W.

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring.

  2. A Retrospective Survey of Diseases of Feedlot Cattle in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Church, T. L.; Radostits, O. M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of feedlot managers was used to obtain information on disease occurrence, management practices and preventive techniques employed in feedlots in Alberta. Respiratory diseases were reported to be the most frequent causes of sickness and death. Costs associated with disease occurrence were estimated to be C $15.6 million in feedlots in Alberta annually during the period under study. PMID:7225993

  3. Fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Crickenberger, R.G.; Henderson, H.E.; Reddy, C.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four feeding trials were conducted to evaluate fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein supplement for finishing cattle fed corn silage or corn - corn silage diets. Feed efficiencies and daily gains with protein treatments were noted. The trials indicate that fermented ammoniated condensed whey is comparable to soybean meal as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle. (Refs. 18).

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions during cattle feedlot manure composting.

    PubMed

    Hao, X; Chang, C; Larney, F J; Travis, G R

    2001-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) during feedlot manure composting reduces the agronomic value of the final compost and increases the greenhouse effect. A study was conducted to determine whether GHG emissions are affected by composting method. Feedlot cattle manure was composted with two aeration methods--passive (no turning) and active (turned six times). Carbon lost in the forms of CO2 and CH4 was 73.8 and 6.3 kg C Mg-1 manure for the passive aeration treatment and 168.0 and 8.1 kg C Mg-1 manure for the active treatment. The N loss in the form of N2O was 0.11 and 0.19 kg N Mg-1 manure for the passive and active treatments. Fuel consumption to turn and maintain the windrow added a further 4.4 kg C Mg-1 manure for the active aeration treatment. Since CH4 and N2O are 21 and 310 times more harmful than CO2 in their global warming effect, the total GHG emission expressed as CO2-C equivalent was 240.2 and 401.4 kg C Mg-1 manure for passive and active aeration. The lower emission associated with the passive treatment was mainly due to the incomplete decomposition of manure and a lower gas diffusion rate. In addition, turning affected N transformation and transport in the window profile, which contributed to higher N2O emissions for the active aeration treatment. Gas diffusion is an important factor controlling GHG emissions. Higher GHG concentrations in compost windrows do not necessarily mean higher production or emission rates. PMID:11285897

  5. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentr...

  6. Managing thermal stress in feedlot cattle: environment, animal susceptibility and management options from a U.S. perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme summer time conditions can have a devastating impact on livestock, especially those animals who are typically housed outdoors without shelter, such as feedlot cattle. The effect of heat stress on feedlot cattle can vary from little to no effect in a brief exposure, to causing reductions in ...

  7. Increasing Prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni in Feedlot Cattle through the Feeding Period

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Thomas E.; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.; Rice, Daniel H.; Berg, Janice; Stilborn, R. P.; Kaya, Katherine; Bae, Wonki; Hancock, Dale D.

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni in commercial feedlot cattle was monitored throughout the feeding period by repeated bacteriologic culture of feces. Fecal pats (n = 10) in 20 feedlot pens were sampled at 2-weeks interval beginning at entry into the feedlot and continuing until slaughter. The least-squares mean C. jejuni prevalence increased from 1.6% at the first sampling to 61.3% at the final sampling just prior to slaughter. Diverse C. jejuni pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction profiles (MRP) were identified among the cattle isolates, but five prevalent MRP and minor variants accounted for >80% of all typed isolates. Chlorination of the water supplied to the water troughs of half of the pens did not affect C. jejuni prevalence in the cattle. Overall, the least-squares mean C. jejuni prevalences were 45.6 and 43.6% in chlorinated and nonchlorinated feedlot pens, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate apparent transmission of C. jejuni among feedlot cattle during the feeding period, unaffected by water chlorination, resulting in a high prevalence of C. jejuni excretion by cattle approaching slaughter. PMID:16204484

  8. Associations between animal characteristic and environmental risk factors and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Mahony, T J; Clements, A C A; Barnes, T S

    2016-03-01

    A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in a population of Australian feedlot cattle to assess associations between animal characteristic and environmental risk factors and risk of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Animal characteristics were recorded at induction, when animals were individually identified and enrolled into study cohorts (comprising animals in a feedlot pen). Environmental risk factors included the year and season of induction, source region and feedlot region and summary variables describing weather during the first week of follow-up. In total, 35,131 animals inducted into 170 cohorts within 14 feedlots were included in statistical analyses. Causal diagrams were used to inform model building and multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models were fitted within the Bayesian framework. Breed, induction weight and season of induction were significantly and strongly associated with risk of BRD. Compared to Angus cattle, Herefords were at markedly increased risk (OR: 2.0, 95% credible interval: 1.5-2.6) and tropically adapted breeds and their crosses were at markedly reduced risk (OR: 0.5, 95% credible interval: 0.3-0.7) of developing BRD. Risk of BRD declined with increased induction weight, with cattle in the heaviest weight category (≥480kg) at moderately reduced risk compared to cattle weighing <400kg at induction (OR: 0.6, 95% credible interval: 0.5-0.7). Animals inducted into feedlots during summer (OR: 2.4, 95% credible interval: 1.4-3.8) and autumn (OR: 2.1, 95% credible interval: 1.2-3.2) were at markedly increased risk compared to animals inducted during spring. Knowledge of these risk factors may be useful in predicting BRD risk for incoming groups of cattle in Australian feedlots. This would then provide the opportunity for feedlot managers to tailor management strategies for specific subsets of animals according to predicted BRD risk. PMID:26830058

  9. Potential use of feedlot cattle manure for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Vancov, T; Schneider, R C S; Palmer, J; McIntosh, S; Stuetz, R

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports on processing options for the conversion of feedlot cattle manures into composite sugars for ethanol fermentation. Small-scale anaerobic digestion trials revealed that the process significantly reduces the content of glucan and xylan (ca. 70%) without effecting lignin. Moreover, anaerobic digestate (AD) fibres were poor substrates for cellulase (Cellic® CTec 2) saccharification, generating a maximum combined sugar yield of ca. 12% per original dry weight. Dilute acid pretreatment and enzyme saccharification of raw manures significantly improved total sugar recoveries, totalling 264 mg/g (79% theoretical). This was attained when manures were pretreated with 2.5% H2SO4 for 90 min at 121°C and saccharified with 50 FPU CTec 2/g glucan. Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently fermented crude hydrolysates within 6 h, yielding 7.3 g/L ethanol, representing glucose to ethanol conversion rate of 70%. With further developments (i.e., fermentation of xylose), this process could deliver greater yields, reinforcing its potential as a biofuel feedstock. PMID:25727759

  10. The effect of body weight on some welfare indicators in feedlot cattle in a hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, Serdal; Ustuner, Hakan; Orman, Abdulkadir

    2012-03-01

    Heat stress has important effects on the welfare of livestock. The effects of heat stress in cattle include changes in biological functions and behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavioral differences between light and heavy feedlot cattle reared in a hot environment. Sixteen male Holstein feedlot cattle were allocated to light (353.8 ± 15.5 kg, n = 8) and heavy (737.1 ± 15.8 kg, n = 8) groups according to their live weight and were kept in a semi-open feedlot barn. The individual behavioral response variables measured were standing, lying, feeding, drinking, ruminating, locomotor activity and elimination (urinating and defecating). The effects of group, day, observation time, replicate and all interactions were included in an explanatory statistical (GLM) model. The data were analyzed using the PROC GLM procedure of SAS. Overall, the heavy cattle spent more time standing ( P < 0.001), lying ( P < 0.001), and eliminating ( P < 0.05) compared to the light group. In contrast, the light group spent more time eating, drinking and ruminating ( P < 0.001). Locomotor activity did not differ significantly between groups ( P > 0.05). During the day, heavy cattle spent more time standing (at 1600 hours) and less time eating in comparison with the light cattle ( P < 0.001) (at 1300 and 1600 hours). Light and heavy feedlot cattle behaved differently in a hot environment. The findings of the study indicate that the welfare of the heavy Holstein feedlot cattle was impacted negatively when the ambient temperature was high (at 1300 hours).

  11. Nuisance flies on Australian cattle feedlots: immature populations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like the US, Australia produces beef on large feedlots. Complaints of fly problems prompted a request for information on biology and management of feedlot flies. Therefore, USDA-CMAVE scientists worked cooperatively for 3 years with Australian scientists to determine species composition, seasonality...

  12. Effect of proximity to a cattle feedlot on Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy greens and evaluation of the potential for airborne transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of proximity to a beef cattle feedlot on E. coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy greens was examined. In each of two years, leafy greens were planted to nine plots located 60, 120, and 180 meters from a cattle feedlot (3 plots each distance). Leafy greens, feedlot manure, and bioaerosol ...

  13. Ammonia deposition in the neighbourhood of an intensive cattle feedlot in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianlin; Chen, Deli; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Coates, Trevor; Lam, Shu Kee; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Intensive cattle feedlots are large emission sources of ammonia (NH3), but NH3 deposition to the landscape downwind of feedlots is not well understood. We conducted the first study in Australia to measure NH3 dry deposition within 1 km of a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Victoria. NH3 concentrations and deposition fluxes decreased exponentially with distance away from the feedlot. The mean NH3 concentrations decreased from 419 μg N m(-3) at 50 m to 36 μg N m(-3) at 1 km, while the mean NH3 dry deposition fluxes decreased from 2.38 μg N m(-2) s(-1) at 50 m to 0.20 μg N m(-2) s(-1) at 1 km downwind from the feedlot. These results extrapolate to NH3 deposition of 53.9 tonne N yr(-1) in the area within 1 km from the feedlot, or 67.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) as an area-weighted mean, accounting for 8.1% of the annual NH3-N emissions from the feedlot. Thus NH3 deposition around feedlots is a significant nitrogen input for surrounding ecosystems. Researches need be conducted to evaluate the impacts of NH3 deposition on the surrounding natural or semi-naturals ecosystems and to reduce N fertilizer application rate for the surrounding crops by considering nitrogen input from NH3 deposition. PMID:27600433

  14. Ammonia deposition in the neighbourhood of an intensive cattle feedlot in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianlin; Chen, Deli; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Coates, Trevor; Lam, Shu Kee; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Intensive cattle feedlots are large emission sources of ammonia (NH3), but NH3 deposition to the landscape downwind of feedlots is not well understood. We conducted the first study in Australia to measure NH3 dry deposition within 1 km of a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Victoria. NH3 concentrations and deposition fluxes decreased exponentially with distance away from the feedlot. The mean NH3 concentrations decreased from 419 μg N m−3 at 50 m to 36 μg N m−3 at 1 km, while the mean NH3 dry deposition fluxes decreased from 2.38 μg N m−2 s−1 at 50 m to 0.20 μg N m−2 s−1 at 1 km downwind from the feedlot. These results extrapolate to NH3 deposition of 53.9 tonne N yr−1 in the area within 1 km from the feedlot, or 67.5 kg N ha−1 yr−1 as an area-weighted mean, accounting for 8.1% of the annual NH3-N emissions from the feedlot. Thus NH3 deposition around feedlots is a significant nitrogen input for surrounding ecosystems. Researches need be conducted to evaluate the impacts of NH3 deposition on the surrounding natural or semi-naturals ecosystems and to reduce N fertilizer application rate for the surrounding crops by considering nitrogen input from NH3 deposition. PMID:27600433

  15. Water spray cooling during handling of feedlot cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Brandl, Tami M.; Eigenberg, Roger A.; Nienaber, John A.

    2010-11-01

    Activities involved in receiving or working (e.g., sorting, dehorning, castration, weighing, implanting, etc.) of feedlot cattle cause an increase in body temperature. During hot weather the increased body temperature may disrupt normal behaviors including eating, which can be especially detrimental to the well-being and performance of the animals. Sprinkle cooling of animals has been successfully employed within the pen; however, added moisture to the pens' surface increases odor generation from the pen. A study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a single instance of wetting an animal within the working facility instead of in the pen, which could potentially provide extra evaporative cooling to offset the added heat produced by activity. Sixty-four cross-bred heifers were assigned to one of eight pens on the basis of weight. On four separate occasions during hot conditions (average temperature 28.2 ± 1.9°C, 29.1 ± 2.0°C, 28.9 ± 3.0°C, and 26.8 ± 1.6°C; with the temperature ranging from 22.6 to 32.5°C during the trials), the heifers were moved from their pens to and from the working facility (a building with a scale and squeeze chute located 160-200 m away). While in the squeeze chute, four of the pens of heifers were sprinkle cooled and the remaining four pens were worked as normal. The heifers that were treated had a body temperature that peaked sooner (31.9 ± 0.63 min compared to 37.6 ± 0.62) with a lower peak body temperature (39.55 ± 0.03°C compared to 39.74 ± 0.03°C), and recovered sooner (70.5 ± 2.4 min compared to 83.2 ± 2.4 min). The treated animals also had a lower panting score, a visual assessment of level of cattle heat stress (1.1 ± 0.2 compared to 1.16 ± 0.2). The behavior measurements that were taken did not indicate a change in behavior. It was concluded that while a single instance of wetting an animal within the working facility did not completely offset the increase in body temperature, it was beneficial to the

  16. Metaphylactic antimicrobial therapy for bovine respiratory disease in stocker and feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Jason S; White, Brad J

    2010-07-01

    This article provides an overview of implementing metaphylactic antimicrobial protocols to certain classes of cattle on arrival to stocker and feedlot production systems. The goal of this management practice is to reduce the negative health and performance effects induced by bovine respiratory disease (BRD). This article emphasizes the multiple factors that influence the decision for mass medication, including weight (age) of the cattle, distance traveled, environmental conditions, previous health history, visual inspection of the cattle at arrival, and prediction of the risk of disease. Current data suggest that metaphylactic programs significantly reduce negative health effects and improve feed performance that can be observed in cattle stricken with BRD. PMID:20619185

  17. Chromium supplementation alters the performance, metabolism, and immune response of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 180; 507 +/- 13 lb) were fed during a 56-d receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACEbrandChromiumPropionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would improve feedlot performance and health of newly received cattle. A completely randomized block design (36 pens...

  18. TOWARDS A VERIFIABLE AMMONIA EMISSIONS INVENTORY FOR CATTLE FEEDLOTS IN THE GREAT PLAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collectively, beef cattle feedlots in the Great Plains may be the nation’s single largest source of atmospheric ammonia. Unfortunately, the large uncertainty around these emissions not only affects the U.S. ammonia inventory, but also undermines attempts to understand and miti...

  19. Runoff, erosion, and size distribution of sediment from beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The size distribution of sediment affects erosion rates, settling velocity, and the transport of chemical constituents. Little information is currently available concerning the size distribution of materials transported in runoff from beef cattle feedlots. The objectives of this study were to: a) me...

  20. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Soils at the feedlot pen surface are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for control measures to reduce this pathogen in cattle. Soil solarization is a preplanting technique used in food and ornamental crop production, which utilizes solar en...

  1. Emission factors for cattle feedlots in Texas based on particle size using ISCST3 and AERMOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle feedlots in Texas are often assumed to be large sources for particulate matter (PM) emissions. Previously, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) used the Industrial Source Complex – Short Term version 3 dispersion model (ISCST3) to estimate downwind concentrations for permittin...

  2. Emission factors for cattle feedlots in Texas based on particle size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle feedlots in Texas are often assumed to be large sources for particulate matter (PM) emissions. Previously, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) used the Industrial Source Complex – Short Term version 3 dispersion model (ISCST3) to estimate downwind concentrations for permittin...

  3. Laboratory evaluation of surface amendments for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle feedlots.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pen surface amendments for mitigating emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2), from beef cattle feedlots, were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. Amendments were organic residues (i.e., sorghum straw, prairie grass, wo...

  4. Experimental research on the effects of water application on greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of water application (e.g., through rainfall or sprinkler system) on emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2), from pen surfaces of open-lot beef cattle feedlots was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. Soil/ma...

  5. Determining ammonia emissions from a cattle feedlot with an inverse dispersion technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An inverse-dispersion technique is used to calculate ammonia (NH3) gas emissions from a cattle feedlot. The technique relies on a simple backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) dispersion model to relate atmospheric NH3 concentration to the emission rate Qbls. Because the wind and the source configurat...

  6. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot pen soils are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM)....

  7. Laboratory evaluation of dust-control effectiveness of pen surface treatments for cattle feedlots.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Maghirang, Ronaldo G; Razote, Edna B; Auvermann, Brent W

    2011-01-01

    Emission of particulate matter (PM) is one of the major air quality concerns for large beef cattle feedlots. Effective treatments on the uncompacted soil and manure mixture of the pen surface may help in reducing PM emission from feedlots. A laboratory apparatus was developed for measuring dust-emission potential of cattle feedlot surfaces as affected by pen surface treatments. The apparatus was equipped with a simulated pen surface, four mock cattle hooves, and samplers for PM with equivalent aerodynamic diam. ≤ 10 μm (PM(10)). The simulated pen surface had a layer of dry, loose feedlot manure with a compacted soil layer underneath. Mock hooves were moved horizontally on the manure layer to simulate horizontal action of cattle hooves on the pen surface. High-volume PM samplers were used to collect emitted dust. Effects of hoof speed, depth of penetration, and surface treatments with independent candidate materials (i.e., sawdust, wheat straw, hay, rubber mulch, and surface water application) on PM(10) emission potential of the manure layer were investigated. Our laboratory study showed PM(10) emission potential increased with increasing depth of penetration and hoof speed. Of the surface treatments evaluated, application of water (6.4 mm) and hay (723 g m(-2)) exhibited the greatest percentage reduction in PM(10) emission potential (69 and 77%, respectively) compared with the untreated manure layer. This study indicated application of hay or other mulch materials on the pen surface might be good alternative methods to control dust emission from cattle feedlots. PMID:21869512

  8. Susceptibility to tulathromycin in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle over a 3-year period

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Trevor W.; Cook, Shaun; Klima, Cassidy L.; Topp, Ed; McAllister, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle were tested for tulathromycin resistance. Cattle were sampled over a 3-year period, starting 12 months after approval of tulathromycin for prevention and treatment of bovine respiratory disease. Nasopharyngeal samples from approximately 5,814 cattle were collected when cattle entered feedlots (N = 4) and again from the same cattle after ≥60 days on feed. The antimicrobial use history for each animal was recorded. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from 796 (13.7%) entry samples and 1,038 (20.6%) ≥ 60 days samples. Of the cattle positive for M. haemolytica, 18.5, 2.9, and 2.4% were administered therapeutic concentrations of tulathromycin, tilmicosin, or tylosin tartrate, respectively. In addition, 13.2% were administered subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin phosphate in feed. In years one and two, no tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica were detected, whereas five isolates (0.4%) were resistant in year three. These resistant isolates were collected from three cattle originating from a single pen, were all serotype 1, and were genetically related (≥89% similarity) according to pulsed-field gel electrophoreses patterns. The five tulathromycin-resistant isolates were multi-drug resistant also exhibiting resistance to oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, ampicillin, or penicillin. The macrolide resistance genes erm(42), erm(A), erm(B), erm(F), erm(X) and msr(E)-mph(E), were not detected in the tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica. This study showed that tulathromycin resistance in M. haemolytica from a general population of feedlot cattle in western Canada was low and did not change over a 3-year period after tulathromycin was approved for use in cattle. PMID:24130555

  9. Water spray cooling during handling of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Brown-Brandl, Tami M; Eigenberg, Roger A; Nienaber, John A

    2010-11-01

    Activities involved in receiving or working (e.g., sorting, dehorning, castration, weighing, implanting, etc.) of feedlot cattle cause an increase in body temperature. During hot weather the increased body temperature may disrupt normal behaviors including eating, which can be especially detrimental to the well-being and performance of the animals. Sprinkle cooling of animals has been successfully employed within the pen; however, added moisture to the pens' surface increases odor generation from the pen. A study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a single instance of wetting an animal within the working facility instead of in the pen, which could potentially provide extra evaporative cooling to offset the added heat produced by activity. Sixty-four cross-bred heifers were assigned to one of eight pens on the basis of weight. On four separate occasions during hot conditions (average temperature 28.2 ± 1.9°C, 29.1 ± 2.0°C, 28.9 ± 3.0°C, and 26.8 ± 1.6°C; with the temperature ranging from 22.6 to 32.5°C during the trials), the heifers were moved from their pens to and from the working facility (a building with a scale and squeeze chute located 160-200 m away). While in the squeeze chute, four of the pens of heifers were sprinkle cooled and the remaining four pens were worked as normal. The heifers that were treated had a body temperature that peaked sooner (31.9 ± 0.63 min compared to 37.6 ± 0.62) with a lower peak body temperature (39.55 ± 0.03°C compared to 39.74 ± 0.03°C), and recovered sooner (70.5 ± 2.4 min compared to 83.2 ± 2.4 min). The treated animals also had a lower panting score, a visual assessment of level of cattle heat stress (1.1 ± 0.2 compared to 1.16 ± 0.2). The behavior measurements that were taken did not indicate a change in behavior. It was concluded that while a single instance of wetting an animal within the working facility did not completely offset the

  10. Ammonia and methane emissions from cattle and dairy feedlots in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golston, L.; Pan, D.; Stanton, L. G.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are recognized as a major contributor of both methane and ammonia to the atmosphere. Ammonia is released by volatilization of urea and nitrogen containing wastes from the feedlot surface and waste management systems, while methane is produced from enteric fermentation and primarily exhaled into the atmosphere. Our objective was to survey plumes downwind of open lot feedyards near Greeley, Colorado and surrounding areas, to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of agricultural emissions in this area. Research was conducted during the month-long NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign in July-August 2014, with over 4000 km of on-road measurements. Methane and ammonia concentrations were measured using open-path laser spectroscopy, along with water vapor, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide on a roof-mounted, mobile platform. The open-path design enables high resolution measurements of ammonia with minimized sampling issues. Concurrent measurements during the campaign by other groups on stationary and aircraft platforms help characterize the meteorological conditions and atmospheric chemistry. We present measurements from 65 of the 67 registered CAFOs in Weld County, which contain up to 660,000 cattle-equivalent animals units. The ammonia to methane enhancement ratio, ΔNH3:ΔCH4, was positively skewed with a median of 0.14 ± 0.04 ppmv/ppmv, consistent with our previous measurements during DISCOVER-AQ California. Due to the much greater variability of ammonia compared to methane, the emissions ratio is used to provide an estimate of feedyard ammonia emissions, with results divided for cattle, dairy, and sheep. Using the most recent emissions estimates of methane, we calculated a total of ≈28.8 TgNH3/yr released globally from feedlots alone, nearly as large as the IPCC's estimate of 30.4 Tg/yr from all agriculture sources. This discrepancy suggests feedyard ammonia is underrepresented in current inventories and models, and

  11. Prevalence and risk factor investigation of Campylobacter species in beef cattle feces from seven large commercial feedlots in Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Sherry J.; Allan, Brenda; Waldner, Cheryl; Russell, Margaret L.; Potter, Andrew; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Townsend, Hugh G.G.

    2009-01-01

    This fecal prevalence study targeted cattle from 7 large (10 000 to > 40 000 head) commercial feedlots in Alberta as a means of establishing Campylobacter levels in cattle just prior to animals entering the food chain. Overall, 87% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 86–88] of 2776 fresh pen-floor fecal samples were culture positive for Campylobacter species, with prevalences ranging from 76% to 95% among the 7 feedlots. Campylobacter spp. prevalence was 88% (95% CI = 86–90) in the summer (n = 1376) and 86% (95% CI = 85–88) in the winter (n = 1400). In addition, 69% (95% CI = 66–71) of 1486 Campylobacter spp. positive samples were identified as Campylobacter jejuni using hippurate hydrolysis testing. Of those, 64% (95% CI = 58–70) of 277 and 70% (95% CI = 67–72) of 1209 Campylobacter isolates were identified as C. jejuni in winter and summer, respectively. After accounting for clustering within pen and feedlot, feedlot size and the number of days on feed were associated with Campylobacter spp. isolation rates. The high isolation rates of Campylobacter spp. and C. jejuni in feedlot cattle feces in this study suggest a potential role for feedlot cattle in the complex epidemiology of campylobacters in Alberta. PMID:20046629

  12. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Lubbock Strains Isolated from Liver Abscesses of Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Thomas, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequencing of 13 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Lubbock strains isolated from liver abscesses of feedlot cattle is reported here. The availability of these genomes will help to further understand the etiologic role of Salmonella strains in liver abscesses of cattle and will serve as references in microbial trace-back studies to improve food safety. PMID:27151794

  13. Optimized batch fermentation of cheese whey. Supplemented feedlot waste filtrate to produce a nitrogen-rich feed supplement for ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, M.D.; Reddy, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    An optimized batch fermentation process for the conversion of cattle feedlot waste filtrate, supplemented with cheese whey, into a nitrogenous feed supplement for ruminants is described. Feedlot waste filtrate supplemented with cheese whey (5 g of whey per 100 ml) was fermented by the indigenous microbial flora in the feedlot waste filtrate. Ammonium hydroxide was added to the fermentation not only to maintain a constant pH but also to produce ammonium salts of organic acids, which have been shown to be valuable as nitrogenous feed supplements for ruminants. The utilization of substrate carbohydrate at pH 7.0 and 43 degrees C was greater than 94% within 8 h, and the crude protein (total N X 6.25) content of the product was 70 to 78% (dry weight basis). About 66 to 69% of the crude protein was in the form of ammonia nitrogen. Lactate and acetate were the predominant acids during the first 6 to 8 hours of fermentation, but after 24 hours, appreciable levels of propionate and butyrate were also present. The rate of fermentation and the crude protein content of the product were optimal at pH 7.0 and decreased at a lower pH. For example, fermentation did not go to completion even after 24 hours at pH 4.5. Fermentation proceeded optimally at 43 degrees C, less so at 37 degrees C, and considerably more slowly at 23 and 50 degrees C. Concentrations of up to 15 g of cheese whey per 100 ml of feedlot waste filtrate were fermented efficiently. Fermentation of feedlot waste filtrate obtained from animals fed low silage-high grain, high silage-low grain, or dairy rations resulted in similar products in terms of total nitrogen and organic acid composition.

  14. Relationship of various incoming cattle traits with feedlot performance and carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, C D; Busby, W D; Corah, L R

    2009-09-01

    Steers (n = 15,631) and heifers (n = 5,897) fed at 18 feedlots (total confinement, partial confinement, or open lots) in southwest Iowa between 2002 and 2006 as part of the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity sponsored by Iowa State University were used to correlate various phenotypic traits with feedlot performance and carcass traits. Dependent variables [ADG, respiratory morbidity, HCW, fat thickness, calculated yield grade, marbling score, presence or absence of lung damage, loin muscle area (LMA), and LMA x 100/HCW] were evaluated on the basis of various phenotypic traits [initial BW, disposition score (1 = calm, 6 = extremely excitable), muscle score, frame score, BCS, number of treatments for respiratory disease, presence of lung lesions, breed makeup, and percentage Angus genetics]. Subjectively evaluated phenotypic traits were evaluated by Iowa State University or USDA personnel. Cattle with greater disposition score (more excitable) had decreased initial BW, final BW, ADG, HCW, yield grade, quality grade, marbling score, and mortality (P < 0.01). Respiratory morbidity was negatively correlated with initial BW, ADG, yield grade, HCW, and marbling score (P < 0.01). As initial BW increased, final BW and HCW increased and respiratory morbidity decreased (P < 0.01). Cattle with greater BCS on arrival had greater initial BW but were lighter at slaughter (P < 0.01). Increased number of treatments for respiratory disease was associated with decreased ADG, greater mortality rate, and greater incidence of lung lesions (P < 0.01). Body weight gain was similar between English- and Continental-breed cattle (P > 0.05), although final BW and HCW were greater and yield grade and yield grade-adjusted marbling score were less for Continental-breed cattle (P < 0.01). Cattle with a poorer muscling score had reduced HCW and LMA and greater yield grade, marbling score, and quality grade (P < 0.01). Animal disposition, health, breed type, and frame score have dramatic effects on

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Recovered from Feedlot Cattle and Associations with Antimicrobial Use

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Katharine M.; Gow, Sheryl P.; McAllister, Tim A.; Booker, Calvin W.; Hannon, Sherry J.; Checkley, Sylvia L.; Noyes, Noelle R.; Morley, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and to investigate the associations between exposures to antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) and AMR in fecal non-type specific Escherichia coli (NTSEC) recovered from a large population of feedlot cattle. Two-stage random sampling was used to select individually identified cattle for enrollment, which were sampled at arrival and then a second time later in the feeding period. Advanced regression techniques were used to estimate resistance prevalences, and to investigate associations between AMD exposures in enrolled cattle and penmates and AMR identified in NTSEC recovered from the second sample set. Resistance was most commonly detected to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole, and was rarely identified for critically important AMDs. All cattle were exposed to AMDs in feed, and 45% were treated parenterally. While resistance prevalence generally increased during the feeding period, most AMD exposures were not significantly associated with AMR outcomes. Exposures of enrolled cattle to tetracycline were associated with increased resistance to tetracycline and trimethoprim sulfa, while beta-lactam exposures were associated with decreased likelihood of detecting streptomycin resistance. Pen-level AMD exposure measures were not associated with resistance outcomes. These findings suggest that tetracycline treatment of feedlot cattle can be associated with modest increases in risk for recovery of resistant NTSEC, but the numerous treatments with an advanced macrolide (tulathromycin) were not associated with detectable increases in resistance in NTSEC. All cattle were exposed to in-feed treatments of tetracycline and this could limit the ability to identify the full impact of these exposures, but these exposures varied for enrolled cattle varied, providing an opportunity to evaluate a dose response. While AMD exposures were not associated with detectably increased risks for

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Recovered from Feedlot Cattle and Associations with Antimicrobial Use.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Katharine M; Gow, Sheryl P; McAllister, Tim A; Booker, Calvin W; Hannon, Sherry J; Checkley, Sylvia L; Noyes, Noelle R; Morley, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and to investigate the associations between exposures to antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) and AMR in fecal non-type specific Escherichia coli (NTSEC) recovered from a large population of feedlot cattle. Two-stage random sampling was used to select individually identified cattle for enrollment, which were sampled at arrival and then a second time later in the feeding period. Advanced regression techniques were used to estimate resistance prevalences, and to investigate associations between AMD exposures in enrolled cattle and penmates and AMR identified in NTSEC recovered from the second sample set. Resistance was most commonly detected to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole, and was rarely identified for critically important AMDs. All cattle were exposed to AMDs in feed, and 45% were treated parenterally. While resistance prevalence generally increased during the feeding period, most AMD exposures were not significantly associated with AMR outcomes. Exposures of enrolled cattle to tetracycline were associated with increased resistance to tetracycline and trimethoprim sulfa, while beta-lactam exposures were associated with decreased likelihood of detecting streptomycin resistance. Pen-level AMD exposure measures were not associated with resistance outcomes. These findings suggest that tetracycline treatment of feedlot cattle can be associated with modest increases in risk for recovery of resistant NTSEC, but the numerous treatments with an advanced macrolide (tulathromycin) were not associated with detectable increases in resistance in NTSEC. All cattle were exposed to in-feed treatments of tetracycline and this could limit the ability to identify the full impact of these exposures, but these exposures varied for enrolled cattle varied, providing an opportunity to evaluate a dose response. While AMD exposures were not associated with detectably increased risks for

  17. Comparison of WindTrax and flux-gradient technique in determining PM10 emission rates from a beef cattle feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several emission estimation methods can be used to determine emission fluxes from ground-level area sources, including open-lot beef cattle feedlots. This research determined PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial cattle feedlot in Kansas using WindTrax, a backward Lagrangian stochastic-based atmosp...

  18. Longitudinal concentrations of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli in feces do not correspond to the patterns of antibiotic use at a cattle feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Concerns have been raised that therapeutic use of antibiotics at cattle feedlots increases the concentrations of Escherichia coli resistant to antibiotics of critical importance to human medicine. However, the impact of therapeutic use of antibiotics at cattle feedlots on levels of anti...

  19. Influence of beta-agonists (ractopamine HCI and zilpaterol HCI) on fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of two beta-agonists [ractopamine hydrochloride (Optaflexx**R) and zilpaterol hydrochloride (Zilmax**R)], recently approved for use in feedlot cattle to improve performance traits and carcass leanness, were examined on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle. Fecal samples (...

  20. Evolution of the nasopharyngeal microbiota of beef cattle from weaning to 40 days after arrival at a feedlot.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Edouard; Workentine, Matthew; Schryvers, Anthony B; Holman, Devin B; van der Meer, Frank; Alexander, Trevor W

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in beef cattle. There is recent evidence suggesting that the nasopharyngeal microbiota has a key role in respiratory health and disease susceptibility in cattle. However, there is a paucity of knowledge regarding evolution of the nasopharyngeal microbiota when cattle are most likely to develop BRDc (i.e., from weaning to 40days after arrival at a feedlot). The objective was to describe the evolution of the nasopharyngeal microbiota of beef cattle from weaning to 40days after arrival at a feedlot. Deep nasal swabs (DNS) from 30 Angus-cross steers were collected at weaning, on arrival at a feedlot, and at day 40 after arrival. The DNA was extracted from DNS and the hypervariable region V3 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced (Illumina MiSeq platform). Nasopharyngeal microbiota underwent a profound evolution from weaning to arrival at the feedlot and from arrival to day 40, with the abundance of 92 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) significantly changing over time. Mycoplasma (M. dispar and M. bovirhinis) was the most abundant genus in the nasopharynx, accounting for 53% of the total bacterial population. Because an evolving bacterial community may be less capable of resisting colonization by pathogenic bacteria, the instability of the nasopharyngeal microbiota documented in this study might explain why cattle are most likely to be affected with BRDc during the first weeks after weaning and arrival at a feedlot. PMID:27066712

  1. Growth promoting technologies reduce greenhouse gas, alcohol, and ammonia emissions from feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stackhouse-Lawson, K R; Calvo, M S; Place, S E; Armitage, T L; Pan, Y; Zhao, Y; Mitloehner, F M

    2013-11-01

    Increased animal productivity has the potential to reduce the environmental impact per unit of consumable product and is believed to be the most promising and sustainable mitigation technique to meet increasing demand for high quality protein. The feedlot industry uses ionophores, antibiotics, growth implants, and β2-adrenergic agonists to improve health and growth performance of cattle. These technologies not only increase productivity but also alter microbes in the rumen and increase nitrogen retention in the animal, which may lead to changes in greenhouse gas (GHG), volatile organic compound (VOC), and ammonia (NH3) emissions from feedlot cattle. The present study investigated GHG, VOC, and NH3 emissions from 160 Angus crossbred steers. Steers were blocked by weight in a randomized block design and assigned to 16 pens of 10 animals each. Treatments applied were 1) control (CON; no technology application), 2) monensin and tylosin phosphate (MON), 3) monensin, tylosin phosphate, and growth implant (IMP), and 4) monensin, tylosin phosphate, growth implant, and zilpaterol hydrochloride (fed during the last 20 d of the feeding period; BAA). Cattle were on feed for an average of 107 d. Performance variables (DMI, BW, ADG, and G:F) and carcass traits (HCW, dressing percent, KPH, LM area, fat thickness, marbling score, yield grade, and quality grade) were measured. Gaseous emissions were measured during the last 10 d of the feeding period when animals were housed in 4 totally enclosed identical cattle pen enclosures. To quantify gaseous emissions a 4×4 Latin square design (n=4) was used. Gaseous emissions were analyzed using Proc Mixed in SAS and reported in grams per kilogram HCW per day and grams per kilogram per animal per hour. Treatment with IMP and BAA increased (P<0.05) ADG, final BW, and HCW. Cattle on BAA had greater HCW and LM area (P<0.05) and had lower (P<0.05) CH4, methanol, and NH3 emissions per kilogram HCW than cattle on the remaining treatments

  2. Model for estimating enteric methane emissions from United States dairy and feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Kebreab, E; Johnson, K A; Archibeque, S L; Pape, D; Wirth, T

    2008-10-01

    Methane production from enteric fermentation in cattle is one of the major sources of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission in the United States and worldwide. National estimates of methane emissions rely on mathematical models such as the one recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC). Models used for prediction of methane emissions from cattle range from empirical to mechanistic with varying input requirements. Two empirical and 2 mechanistic models (COWPOLL and MOLLY) were evaluated for their prediction ability using individual cattle measurements. Model selection was based on mean square prediction error (MSPE), concordance correlation coefficient, and residuals vs. predicted values analyses. In dairy cattle, COWPOLL had the lowest root MSPE and greatest accuracy and precision of predicting methane emissions (correlation coefficient estimate = 0.75). The model simulated differences in diet more accurately than the other models, and the residuals vs. predicted value analysis showed no mean bias (P = 0.71). In feedlot cattle, MOLLY had the lowest root MSPE with almost all errors from random sources (correlation coefficient estimate = 0.69). The IPCC model also had good agreement with observed values, and no significant mean (P = 0.74) or linear bias (P = 0.11) was detected when residuals were plotted against predicted values. A fixed methane conversion factor (Ym) might be an easier alternative to diet-dependent variable Ym. Based on the results, the 2 mechanistic models were used to simulate methane emissions from representative US diets and were compared with the IPCC model. The average Ym in dairy cows was 5.63% of GE (range 3.78 to 7.43%) compared with 6.5% +/- 1% recommended by IPCC. In feedlot cattle, the average Ym was 3.88% (range 3.36 to 4.56%) compared with 3% +/- 1% recommended by IPCC. Based on our simulations, using IPCC values can result in an overestimate of about 12.5% and underestimate of emissions by about 9.8% for

  3. Effect of sprinkling on feedlot microclimate and cattle behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, T. L.; Davis, M. S.; Gaughan, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate strategies designed to reduce heat stress of cattle. In the first experiment, cattle were sprinkled for 20 min every 1.5 h between 1000 hours and 1750 hours (WET) versus not sprinkled (DRY). In a second experiment, treatments consisted of: (1) control, no water application; (2) water applied to the pen surfaces between 1000 hours and 1200 hours (AM); and (3) water applied to pen surfaces between 1400 hours and 1600 hours (PM). In both experiments, sprinkling lowered ( P < 0.05) mid-afternoon temperatures. In the first experiment, relative humidity (RH) of WET versus DRY pens differed ( P < 0.05) and averaged 72.4 and 68.9%, respectively. The average temperature-humidity index (THI) in WET pens was 0.5 units lower ( P < 0.05), than the THI in DRY pens. In the second experiment, RH in sprinkled pens was also greater ( P < 0.05) than RH in control (CON) pens However, THI differed ( P < 0.05) among treatments, being 81.5, 80.9, and 80.3, respectively for CON, AM, and PM. Pens with sprinklers had a larger percentage of steers in areas where sprinkling took place, even on days when sprinkling had not occurred. Based on differences in percentage of cattle panting in sprinkled and non-sprinkled treatments, sprinkling was found to have a positive effect on cattle feeding area microclimate and to reduce the susceptibility of cattle to hyperthermia. However, cattle acclimatization to being sprinkled can result in slight hyperthermia even during cooler days when sprinkling would normally not be utilized.

  4. Efficiency Analysis of Caspian Cattle Feedlot Farms by Data Envelopment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Ali; Jaafar, Azmi Bin; Lee, Lai Soon

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is an excellent approach for evaluating the performance of decision making units (DMUs) that use multiple inputs to produce multiple outputs. This research utilizes the DEA to analyze the operating efficiency of Caspian cattle feedlot farms in Iran. The inputs utilized by the farms are number of calve, number of labors, total metabolizable energy intake, total crude protein intake and total cost of hygiene-treatment of calve; and the output considered is total live weigh gain of calve. By using two DEA models, the efficiency score for each farm is calculated and the efficient farms are ranked.

  5. The risks and prevention of contamination of beef feedlot cattle: the perspective of the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Griffin, D D; Dargatz, D A

    1997-08-01

    There are currently no scientifically defined critical management points or critical control points to manage foodborne pathogens at the pre-harvest level. Research is ongoing: much of the pre-harvest research is funded by producer organisations. The beef industry has Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) programmes in place and these are dynamic. Groups of cattlemen have made a very strong commitment to reducing foodborne pathogens in beef. Fewer Escherichia coli O157:H7 organisms are shed by feedlot cattle near the end of the feeding period than by newly arrived cattle. Moreover, there is less shedding of the organisms in cattle of slaughter age than in younger cattle. The prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle is similar to that in range cattle. This suggests that concentrating cattle in feedlot dirt pens does not increase the risk of shedding E. coli organisms. Pen maintenance, considered a good management practice, appears to be an adequate means of keeping pathogen levels in pens low. It is not likely that pre-harvest food safety programmes will eliminate the threat of pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella. The management of foodborne pathogens will become part of an integrated programme to enhance food safety which includes the producer, the packer, the distributors, retailers and the consumer. The feedlot industry initiated a residue avoidance programme several years ago. As a result, the risk of chemical residues in beef from feedlots in the United States of America is near zero. Hazard analysis and critical control point-type prevention programmes, using scientifically based critical management points, will help ensure that the risk remains negligible. PMID:9501349

  6. A Review of Morbidity and Mortality Rates and Disease Occurrence in North American Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Andrew P.; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1986-01-01

    A review of veterinary literature on morbidity or mortality rates in feedlot cattle was performed. Incidence (attack) rates were the only types of rates reviewed. Differences in the definition of terms made reports difficult to compare. Case-definitions were often poorly defined and most were based on chemotherapeutic treatment as a criterion. A summary was made of 14 comparable studies containing disease incidence rates in calves in the first few weeks following arrival in feedlots. The incidence of morbidity ranged from 0% to 69% with most reports between 15% and 45%. The mortality rate in the same period ranged from 0% to 15% with most reports between 1% and 5%. The peak incidence of disease was within the first three weeks after the arrival of calves in the feedlots. Few other epidemiological descriptions (season, day of the week, geographical, age, sex, or breed) had been objectively described. The most common clinical and necropsy diagnoses were respiratory infections, often described as shipping fever. PMID:17422726

  7. Acute phase proteins in naturally occurring respiratory disease of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Idoate, Ignacio; Vander Ley, Brian; Schultz, Loren; Heller, Meera

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three acute phase proteins (APP) [haptoglobin (HPT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and transferrin (Tf)] in feedlot cattle with naturally occurring respiratory disease diagnosed by a calf health scoring chart (CHSC). Seventy-seven beef calves were observed for signs of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) during the first 28 days after arrival at the feedlot. Fourteen cases and pen matched controls were selected based on the CHSC. BRD cases were defined as a score of ≥ 5, while controls were defined as a score ≤ 4. The mean CHSC score in cases was 6.9 which was significantly greater than the controls 2.8 (P < 0.01). Mean plasma LBP and HPT concentrations were significantly greater in cases than controls (P < 0.01). Our study results show that measurement of HPT and LBP could be useful in detecting respiratory disease in feedlot conditions. Transferrin concentrations between the two groups were not statistically different. PMID:25599608

  8. Prevalence and Characterization of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella Bacteriophages Recovered from Beef Cattle Feedlots in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yicheng; Savell, Jeffrey W; Arnold, Ashley N; Gehring, Kerri B; Gill, Jason J; Taylor, T Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in beef cattle is a food safety concern, and the beef feedlot environment may function as a reservoir of this pathogen. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate Salmonella and Salmonella bacteriophages from beef cattle feedlot environments in order to better understand the microbial ecology of Salmonella and identify phages that might be useful as anti-Salmonella beef safety interventions. Three feedlots in south Texas were visited, and 27 distinct samples from each source were collected from dropped feces, feed from feed bunks, drinking water from troughs, and soil in cattle pens (n = 108 samples). Preenrichment, selective enrichment, and selective/differential isolation of Salmonella were performed on each sample. A representative subset of presumptive Salmonella isolates was prepared for biochemical identification and serotyping. Samples were pooled by feedlot and sample type to create 36 samples and enriched to recover phages. Recovered phages were tested for host range against two panels of Salmonella hosts. Salmonella bacteria were identified in 20 (18.5%) of 108 samples by biochemical and/or serological testing. The serovars recovered included Salmonella enterica serovars Anatum, Muenchen, Altona, Kralingen, Kentucky, and Montevideo; Salmonella Anatum was the most frequently recovered serotype. Phage-positive samples were distributed evenly over the three feedlots, suggesting that phage prevalence is not strongly correlated with the presence of culturable Salmonella. Phages were found more frequently in soil and feces than in feed and water samples. The recovery of bacteriophages in the Salmonella-free feedlot suggests that phages might play a role in suppressing the Salmonella population in a feedlot environment. PMID:27497120

  9. Prevalence of sucking and chewing lice on cattle entering feedlots in southern Alberta.

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, D D; Clymer, B; Booker, C W; Guichon, P T; Jim, G K; Schunicht, O C; Wildman, B K

    2001-01-01

    Beef calves from 2 sources entering southern Alberta feedlots in the winters of 1997-98 and 1998-99, were surveyed for the presence of lice. A random sample of multiple source (MS), that is, auction market-derived, calves entering commercial feedlots and single source (SS) calves entering a backgrounding feedlot were examined for the presence of lice at entry to the feedlot. A standardized examination, which involved hair-part examination of 8 louse predilection sites, was conducted on each selected calf to determine prevalence and intensity of infestation. The long-nosed sucking louse, Linognathus vituli, was the most commonly encountered species. This species infested from 57.8% to 95.6% of the calves selected from both MS and SS calves during both winters. Louse index values, indicating intensity of infestation, for L. vituli ranged from 1 to 243 lice per animal. The chewing louse, Bovicola bovis, was present on MS and SS calves only in the winter of 1998-99. The louse index values for B. bovis ranged from 1 to 230 lice per animal. Mixed infestations of the L. vituli and B. bovis were common. The little blue cattle louse, Solenopotes capillatus, was present only on the SS calves in the winter of 1997-98. The short-nosed sucking louse, Haematopinus eurysternus, was present at very low intensities, 1-2 lice per animal, on 2.6% to 4.4% of the MS calves during both winters. Comparison of results from the current study with published literature suggests that efforts to determine the economic impact of louse infestations are confounded by the lack of a uniform method to assess louse population levels. PMID:11326630

  10. Associations between exposure to viruses and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Barnes, T S; Morton, J M; Gravel, J L; Commins, M A; Horwood, P F; Ambrose, R C; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. Respiratory viral infections are key components in predisposing cattle to the development of this disease. To quantify the contribution of four viruses commonly associated with BRD, a case-control study was conducted nested within the National Bovine Respiratory Disease Initiative project population in Australian feedlot cattle. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), and to combinations of these viruses, were investigated. Based on weighted seroprevalences at induction (when animals were enrolled and initial samples collected), the percentages of the project population estimated to be seropositive were 24% for BoHV-1, 69% for BVDV-1, 89% for BRSV and 91% for BPIV-3. For each of the four viruses, seropositivity at induction was associated with reduced risk of BRD (OR: 0.6-0.9), and seroincrease from induction to second blood sampling (35-60 days after induction) was associated with increased risk of BRD (OR: 1.3-1.5). Compared to animals that were seropositive for all four viruses at induction, animals were at progressively increased risk with increasing number of viruses for which they were seronegative; those seronegative for all four viruses were at greatest risk (OR: 2.4). Animals that seroincreased for one or more viruses from induction to second blood sampling were at increased risk (OR: 1.4-2.1) of BRD compared to animals that did not seroincrease for any viruses. Collectively these results confirm that prior exposure to these viruses is protective while exposure at or after feedlot entry increases the risk of development of BRD in feedlots. However, the modest increases in risk associated with seroincrease for each virus separately, and the progressive increases in risk with multiple viral exposures highlights

  11. Chemical and physical changes following co-composting of beef cattle feedlot manure with phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Zvomuya, Francis; Larney, Francis J; Nichol, Connie K; Olson, Andrew F; Miller, Jim J; Demaere, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss during beef cattle (Bos taurus) feedlot manure composting may contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and increase ammonia (NH(3)) in the atmosphere while decreasing the fertilizer value of the final compost. Phosphogypsum (PG) is an acidic by-product of phosphorus (P) fertilizer manufacture and large stockpiles currently exist in Alberta. This experiment examined co-composting of PG (at rates of 0, 40, 70, and 140 kg PG Mg(-1) manure plus PG dry weight) with manure from feedlot pens bedded with straw or wood chips. During the 99-d composting period, PG addition reduced total nitrogen (TN) loss by 0.11% for each 1 kg Mg(-1) increment in PG rate. Available N at the end of composting was significantly higher for wood chip-bedded (2180 mg kg(-1)) than straw-bedded manure treatments (1820 mg kg(-1)). Total sulfur (TS) concentration in the final compost increased by 0.19 g kg(-1) for each 1 kg Mg(-1) increment in PG rate from 5.2 g TS kg(-1) without PG addition. Phosphogypsum (1.6 g kg(-1) P) addition had no significant effect on total phosphorus (TP) concentration of the final composts. Results from this study demonstrate the potential of PG addition to reduce overall N losses during composting. The accompanying increase in TS content has implications for use of the end-product on sulfur-deficient soils. Co-composting feedlot manure with PG may provide an inexpensive and technologically straightforward solution for managing and improving the nutrient composition of composted cattle manure. PMID:16275733

  12. Comparison of AERMOD and WindTrax dispersion models in determining PM10 emission rates from beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reverse dispersion modeling has been used to determine air emission fluxes from ground-level area sources, including open-lot beef cattle feedlots. This research compared AERMOD, a Gaussian-based and currently the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) preferred regulatory dispersion model, and ...

  13. Effects of dietary crude protein and supplemental urea concentrations on nitrogen and phosphorus utilization by feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three dietary crude protein (CP) levels (11.5, 13.0, and 14.5% of DM) and 3 supplemental urea levels (100, 50, and 0% of supplemental N) were used in a completely randomized block design experiment conducted at 2 locations to determine N and P balance and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) of feedlot cattle....

  14. Epidemiology of toe tip necrosis syndrome (TTNS) of North American feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray; Fenton, Kent; Perrett, Tye; Paetsch, Chad

    2016-08-01

    Toe Tip Necrosis Syndrome (TTNS) is predominantly a hind limb lameness of feedlot cattle that develops early in the feeding period. Retrospective analyses of feedlot health records were conducted in order to describe the epidemiology of the disease at the level of the individual animal, lot, and feedyard. Analysis of 1904 lots (cohorts of > 100 head) of cattle, from 48 feedyards, found that TTNS occurred sporadically, but clustered by both lots and feedyards. Only 3.8% of lots had ≥ 1 case of TTNS; however, 26.4% of these lots were associated with 1 feedyard. Analysis of 702 cases of TTNS found that the disease clusters early in the feeding period; the mean (median; range) number of days on feed at death was 42.3 d (27.0 d; 4 to 302 d). The disease occurred in all months of the year and affected calves, yearlings, steers, and heifers. It was equivocal as to whether the source of the animals was associated with how quickly they died of TTNS in the feedyard. PMID:27493280

  15. Organic marker compounds for surface soil and fugitive dust from open lot dairies and cattle feedlots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Fugitive dust emissions from cattle feedlots and open lot dairies are substantial. In order to determine the contribution of intensive cattle operations on ambient PM levels, more knowledge besides the elemental composition is necessary in order to distinguish between airborne PM from nearby agricultural fields, barren lands, or dirt roads. Here, as part of the San Joaquin Valley Fugitive Dust Characterization Study, surface soil samples collected from feedlots and open lot dairy farms are investigated for potential source specific molecular marker compounds. More than 100 organic compounds were quantified including: n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanols, n-alkanals, n-alkan-2-ones, steroids, triterpenoids, isoprenoids, and tocopherols (vitamin E) and metabolites. Biohydrogenation of plant lipids and sterols in the rumen results in distinctive alteration products. Animal and plant derived steroids are most abundant. Here, it is shown that 5 β-stigmastanol and epi-5 β-stigmastanol, two biohydrogenation products of sitosterol and stigmasterol, are the most distinctive molecular marker compounds. While stearic (C 18) and palmitic (C 16) acids are as individual compounds not source specific, biohydrogenation of the more abundant C 18 unsaturated fatty acids, causes the ratio of C 18/C 16 fatty acids to shift from below 0.5 for vegetation to an average of 3.0±0.7. Consequently, the C 18/C 16 fatty acid ratio is unique and can be used as well in source apportionment studies.

  16. Escherichia coli O104 in Feedlot Cattle Feces: Prevalence, Isolation and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Pragathi B; Noll, Lance W; Shi, Xiaorong; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Renter, David G; Bai, J; Nagaraja, T G

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O104:H4, an hybrid pathotype of Shiga toxigenic and enteroaggregative E. coli, involved in a major foodborne outbreak in Germany in 2011, has not been detected in cattle feces. Serogroup O104 with H type other than H4 has been reported to cause human illnesses, but their prevalence and characteristics in cattle have not been reported. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of E. coli O104 in feces of feedlot cattle, by culture and PCR detection methods, and characterize the isolated strains. Rectal fecal samples from a total of 757 cattle originating from 29 feedlots were collected at a Midwest commercial slaughter plant. Fecal samples, enriched in E. coli broth, were subjected to culture and PCR methods of detection. The culture method involved immunomagnetic separation with O104-specific beads and plating on a selective chromogenic medium, followed by serogroup confirmation of pooled colonies by PCR. If pooled colonies were positive for the wzxO104 gene, then colonies were tested individually to identify wzxO104-positive serogroup and associated genes of the hybrid strains. Extracted DNA from feces were also tested by a multiplex PCR to detect wzxO104-positive serogroup and associated major genes of the O104 hybrid pathotype. Because wzxO104 has been shown to be present in E. coli O8/O9/O9a, wzxO104-positive isolates and extracted DNA from fecal samples were also tested by a PCR targeting wbdDO8/O9/O9a, a gene specific for E. coli O8/O9/O9a serogroups. Model-adjusted prevalence estimates of E. coli O104 (positive for wzxO104 and negative for wbdDO8/O9/O9a) at the feedlot level were 5.7% and 21.2%, and at the sample level were 0.5% and 25.9% by culture and PCR, respectively. The McNemar's test indicated that there was a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the proportions of samples that tested positive for wzxO104 and samples that were positive for wzxO104, but negative for wbdDO8/O9/O9a by PCR and culture methods. A total of 143

  17. Escherichia coli O104 in Feedlot Cattle Feces: Prevalence, Isolation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Shridhar, Pragathi B.; Noll, Lance W.; Shi, Xiaorong; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Renter, David G.; Bai, J.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O104:H4, an hybrid pathotype of Shiga toxigenic and enteroaggregative E. coli, involved in a major foodborne outbreak in Germany in 2011, has not been detected in cattle feces. Serogroup O104 with H type other than H4 has been reported to cause human illnesses, but their prevalence and characteristics in cattle have not been reported. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of E. coli O104 in feces of feedlot cattle, by culture and PCR detection methods, and characterize the isolated strains. Rectal fecal samples from a total of 757 cattle originating from 29 feedlots were collected at a Midwest commercial slaughter plant. Fecal samples, enriched in E. coli broth, were subjected to culture and PCR methods of detection. The culture method involved immunomagnetic separation with O104-specific beads and plating on a selective chromogenic medium, followed by serogroup confirmation of pooled colonies by PCR. If pooled colonies were positive for the wzxO104 gene, then colonies were tested individually to identify wzxO104-positive serogroup and associated genes of the hybrid strains. Extracted DNA from feces were also tested by a multiplex PCR to detect wzxO104-positive serogroup and associated major genes of the O104 hybrid pathotype. Because wzxO104 has been shown to be present in E. coli O8/O9/O9a, wzxO104-positive isolates and extracted DNA from fecal samples were also tested by a PCR targeting wbdDO8/O9/O9a, a gene specific for E. coli O8/O9/O9a serogroups. Model-adjusted prevalence estimates of E. coli O104 (positive for wzxO104 and negative for wbdDO8/O9/O9a) at the feedlot level were 5.7% and 21.2%, and at the sample level were 0.5% and 25.9% by culture and PCR, respectively. The McNemar’s test indicated that there was a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the proportions of samples that tested positive for wzxO104 and samples that were positive for wzxO104, but negative for wbdDO8/O9/O9a by PCR and culture methods. A total of 143

  18. Prevalence Rates of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella at Different Sampling Sites on Cattle Hides at a Feedlot and Processing Plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distributions of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on cattle hides were mapped at a feedlot and a processing plant. Sponge samples were collected from six hide surface sites at the feedlot (left and right shoulders, left and right ribs, back, and belly) and four sites at the processing pla...

  19. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions from a beef cattle feedlot using the flux-gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Henry F.; Maghirang, Ronaldo G.; Trabue, Steven L.; McConnell, Laura L.; Prueger, John H.; Bonifacio, Edna R.

    2015-01-01

    Emissions data on air pollutants from large open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine emissions of total suspended particulates (TSP) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas (USA). Vertical particulate concentration profiles at the feedlot were measured using gravimetric samplers, and micrometeorological parameters were monitored with eddy covariance instrumentation during the nine 4- to 5-day intensive sampling campaigns from May 2010 through September 2011. Emission fluxes were determined from the measured concentration gradients and meteorological parameters using the flux-gradient technique. PM ratios based on calculated emission fluxes were 0.28 for PM2.5/PM10, 0.12 for PM2.5/TSP, and 0.24 for PM10/TSP, indicating that a large fraction of the PM emitted at the studied feedlot was in the coarse range of aerodynamic diameter, >10 μm. Median daily emission factors were 57, 21, and 11 kg 1000-head (hd)-1 d-1 for TSP (n = 20 days), PM10 (n = 19 days), and PM2.5 (n = 11 days), respectively. Cattle pen surface moisture contents of at least 20-30% significantly reduced both TSP and PM10 emissions, but moisture's effect on PM2.5 emissions was not established due to difficulty in measuring PM2.5 concentrations under low-PM conditions.

  20. Incidence and persistence of zoonotic bacterial and protozoan pathogens in a beef cattle feedlot runoff control vegetative treatment system.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Woodbury, Bryan L; Nienaber, John A; Eigenberg, Roger A; Thurston, Jeanette A; Wells, James E

    2007-01-01

    Determining the survival of zoonotic pathogens in livestock manure and runoff is critical for understanding the environmental and public health risks associated with these wastes. The occurrence and persistence of the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter spp. in a passive beef cattle feedlot runoff control-vegetative treatment system were examined over a 26-mo period. Incidence of the protozoans Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. was also assessed. The control system utilizes a shallow basin to collect liquid runoff and accumulate eroded solids from the pen surfaces; when an adequate liquid volume is attained, the liquid is discharged from the basin onto a 4.5-ha vegetative treatment area (VTA) of bromegrass which is harvested as hay. Basin discharge transported E. coli O157, Campylobacter spp., and generic E. coli into the VTA soil, but without additional discharge from the basin, the pathogen prevalences decreased over time. Similarly, the VTA soil concentrations of generic E. coli initially decreased rapidly, but lower residual populations persisted. Isolation of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts from VTA samples was infrequent, indicating differences in sedimentation and/or transport in comparison to bacteria. Isolation of generic E. coli from freshly cut hay from VTA regions that received basin discharge (12 of 30 vs. 1 of 30 control samples) provided evidence for the risk of contamination; however, neither E. coli O157 or Campylobacter spp. were recovered from the hay following baling. This work indicates that the runoff control system is effective for reducing environmental risk by containing and removing pathogens from feedlot runoff. PMID:17965390

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Rectoanal Mucosal Swab of Feedlot Cattle for Detection and Enumeration of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Schmidt, John W; Wang, Rong; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M

    2016-04-01

    Cattle are noted carriers of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica. The perceived need to decrease the potential human health risk posed by excretion of this pathogen has resulted in numerous studies examining the factors that influence Salmonella shedding in cattle. Fecal grab (FG) samples have been the predominant method used to identify cattle colonized or infected with Salmonella; however, FG sampling can be impractical in certain situations, and rectoanal mucosal swabs (RAMS) are a more convenient sample type to collect. Despite a lack of studies comparing FG and RAMS for the detection and enumeration of Salmonella fecal shedding, RAMS is perceived as less sensitive because a smaller amount of feces is cultured. In a cross-sectional study to address these concerns, paired RAMS and FG samples were collected from 403 adult feedlot cattle approximately 90 days prior to harvest. Samples were processed for Salmonella enumeration (direct plating) and detection (enrichment and immunomagnetic separation). In all, 89.6% of RAMS and 98.8% of FG samples were positive for Salmonella, and concordant prevalence outcomes were observed for 90.8% of samples. Mean enumeration values were 3.01 and 3.12 log CFU/ml for RAMS and FG, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of RAMS were 91% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 87.5 to 93%) and 100% (95% CI: 48 to 100%), respectively, for Salmonella detection. Furthermore, RAMS Salmonella enumeration was substantially concordant (ρc = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.86 to 0.91) with FG values. We conclude that RAMS are a reliable alternative to FG for assessing cattle Salmonella fecal shedding status, especially for cattle shedding high levels of Salmonella. PMID:27052855

  2. Finishing performance of feedlot cattle fed condensed distillers solubles.

    PubMed

    Pesta, A C; Nuttelman, B L; Shreck, A L; Griffin, W A; Klopfenstein, T J; Erickson, G E

    2015-09-01

    Two experiments evaluated the effects of condensed distillers solubles (CDS) on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef cattle. In Exp. 1, 250 crossbred steers (initial BW = 355 ± 18 kg) were fed 0, 9, 18, 27, or 36% CDS (DM basis) which replaced a portion of urea and a 1:1 ratio of dry-rolled corn (DRC) and high-moisture corn (HMC). Steers were divided into 3 BW blocks and were assigned randomly to 25 pens. Dietary fat increased from 3.7 to 9.4% as CDS inclusion increased from 0 to 36%. Intake decreased linearly ( < 0.01) as CDS increased. A quadratic response was observed for ADG ( = 0.01) and G:F ( < 0.01) with maximum gain calculated at 20.8% CDS and maximum G:F at 32.5% CDS inclusion, which was 12% more efficient than those fed 0% CDS. Experiment 2 was designed as a 2 × 4 factorial using 400 crossbred steers (initial BW = 339 ± 15 kg) evaluating 0, 7, 14, or 21% CDS (DM basis) in 2 base byproduct diets containing either 20% modified distillers grains plus solubles (MDGS) or 20% Synergy (a blend of wet corn gluten feed and MDGS). Steers were divided into 2 BW blocks and were assigned randomly to 40 pens. A tendency for a base diet × CDS inclusion interaction was observed for ADG, HCW, and final BW ( < 0.10). Gain increased linearly ( = 0.01) and tended to increase quadratically ( = 0.09) in MDGS diets, with maximum calculated ADG at 16% CDS inclusion. Inclusion of CDS had no effect on ADG in Synergy-based diets. Increasing CDS resulted in a linear increase in G:F ( < 0.01) regardless of basal diet. Condensed distillers solubles may be included in the diet at greater than 30% (DM basis) without other byproducts and improve animal performance. Likewise, CDS can be fed in combination with other byproduct feeds but with less improvement in performance. PMID:26440335

  3. Bedding and seasonal effects on chemical and bacterial properties of feedlot cattle manure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jim J; Beasley, Bruce W; Yanke, L Jay; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim A; Olson, Barry M; Selinger, L Brent; Chanasyk, David S; Hasselback, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients, soluble salts, and pathogenic bacteria in feedlot-pen manure have the potential to cause pollution of the environment. A three-year study (1998-2000) was conducted at a beef cattle (Bos taurus) feedlot in southern Alberta, Canada to determine the effect of bedding material [barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) straw versus wood chips] and season on the chemical and bacterial properties of pen-floor manure. Manure was sampled for chemical content (N, P, soluble salts, electrical conductivity, and pH) and populations of four groups of bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms, and total aerobic heterotrophs at 27 and 39 degrees C). More chemical parameters of manure were significantly (P < or = 0.05) affected by season (SO4, Na, Mg, K, Ca, sodium adsorption ratio [SAR], total C, NO3-N, NH4-N, total P, and available P) than by bedding (K, pH, total C, C to N ratio, NH4-N, and available P). Bedding had no significant (P > 0.05) effect on the four bacterial groups whereas season affected all four groups. Numbers of E. coli and total coliforms (TC) were significantly higher by 1.72 to 2.02 log10 units in the summer than the other three seasons, which was consistent with a strong positive correlation of E. coli and TC with air temperature. The low ratio of bedding to manure in the pens was probably the major cause of the lack of significant bedding effects. Bedding material and seasonal timing of cleaning feedlot pens and land application of manure may be a potential tool to manage nutrients, soluble salts, and pathogens in manure. PMID:14535334

  4. Use of pattern recognition techniques for early detection of morbidity in receiving feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Moya, D; Silasi, R; McAllister, T A; Genswein, B; Crowe, T; Marti, S; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S

    2015-07-01

    Two groups of cattle were used to develop (model data set: 384 heifers, 228 ± 22.7 kg BW, monitored over a 225-d feeding period) and to validate (naïve data set: 384 heifers, 322 ± 34.7 kg BW, monitored over a 142-d feeding period) the use of feeding behavior pattern recognition techniques to predict morbidity in newly arrived feedlot cattle. In the model data set, cattle were defined as morbid (MO) if they were removed from their pen to be treated due to visual observation of clinical signs of bovine respiratory disease and healthy (HL) if they remained within their pen and lacked lung lesions at slaughter. Individual feeding behavior parameters collected with a GrowSafe automated feeding behavior monitoring system were reduced via principal component analysis to 5 components that captured 99% of the variability in the data set. Combinations of clustering and cluster classification strategies applied to those components, along with pattern recognition techniques over different time windows, produced a total of 105 models from which precision, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated by comparing its predictions with the actual health status of individual cattle as determined by visual assessment. When the models with the best specificity (models 79 and 87), sensitivity (models 33 and 66), and accuracy (models 3 and 14) in the model data set were used in a naïve data set, models 79 and 87 were not able to predict any MO heifers (0%), with all animals (100%) being predicted as HL. Model 33 predicted 58.3% of the HL and 66.7% of the MO heifers, with MO heifers identified 3.1 ± 1.64 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 66 predicted 50.0% of the HL and 75.0% of the MO heifers, with MO heifers predicted 3.1 ± 1.76 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 3 predicted 100% of the HL and 50.0% of the MO cattle, with MO cattle predicted 1 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 14 predicted 83.3% of the HL and 58

  5. Effects of a cattle feedlot on ground-water quality in the South Platte River Valley near Greeley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borman, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in water quality in an alluvial aquifer resulting from the operation of a feedlot stocked with 90,000 cattle have been minimal. Monitoring water quality in 19 observation wells from April 1974, prior to the operation of the feedlot, to June 1978, after about 4 years of operation, indicates that chloride concentrations have increased slightly in one well downgradient from a runoff-retention pond. Chemical analyses of water from two lysimeters installed in the unsaturated zone indicate that leachate from the feedlot has percolated to a depth of at least 5 feet but has not percolated to a depth of 20 feet. The small changes in ground-water quality caused by the feedlot are likely the result of the limited available recharge, a relatively impermeable manure pack, soil clogging under the cattle pens resulting in slow vertical movement of leachate through the unsaturated zone, soil clogging under the unlined runoff-retention ponds, and denitrification in the unsaturated zone. (USGS)

  6. Meta-analysis of field trials of antimicrobial mass medication for prophylaxis of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and seven field trials of prophylactic mass medication for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle were reviewed. Meta-analysis is the formal quantitative statistical review process that was used to synthesize the data from randomized field trials and draw conclusions concerning the efficacy of prophylactic mass medication in feedlot calves. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that prophylactic parenteral mass medication of calves with long-acting oxytetracycline or tilmicosin on arrival at the feedlot would reduce BRD morbidity rates (p < 0.001). There were, however, unreliable data on the effects of mass medication on mortality rates and performance, insufficient data on the most effective treatment regimes, and no valid data on the efficacy of feed and water medication for prophylaxis of BRD. This review highlights the gaps in our knowledge and points out the need for additional well-designed randomized controlled field trials of adequate size to assess the efficacy and socioeconomic impact of prophylactic mass medication for BRD in feedlot cattle. PMID:17424131

  7. Liver abscesses in cattle: A review of incidence in Holsteins and of bacteriology and vaccine approaches to control in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, R G; Nagaraja, T G

    2016-04-01

    Liver abscesses are the primary liver abnormality of feedlot cattle at slaughter. The incidence of liver abscesses is highly variable, but generally ranges from 10% to 20%. The incidence of total and the proportion of severely abscessed livers (A+) are greater in Holsteins fed for beef production and culled dairy cows than in beef breeds. The reason for the greater incidence of liver abscesses in Holstein steers is not known, but one of the reasons is likely because of increased days on feed. The high prevalence in cull cows is likely because no specific intervention, such as use of tylosin in the feed, is approved for use in dairy cows. Liver abscesses are generally a sequela to ruminal acidosis and rumenitis in cattle fed diets high in readily-fermentable carbohydrates and low in roughages; thus, the term "acidosis-rumenitis-liver abscess complex." Liver abscesses are almost always polymicrobial infections with Gram negative anaerobes constituting the predominant flora. Almost all studies have concluded that , a ruminal bacterium, is the primary causative agent and (formerly ) is the secondary pathogen. A limited number of studies have been done on the bacterial flora of liver abscesses of culled dairy cows and Holstein feedlot steers. A recent study has reported on isolation of from liver abscesses of Holstein cattle. The control of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle has depended on the use of antibiotics, particularly tylosin, in the feed combined with sound nutritional management to minimize occurrence of acidosis and subsequent rumenitis. Although there is no evidence of resistance development in , the future of tylosin use as a feed additive in feedlot cattle is uncertain. Regardless, beginning January 2017, the use of tylosin in feedlot cattle for the prevention of liver abscesses will be under veterinary oversight. Although tylosin is widely used in the feedlot industry, there is considerable interest in evaluating antibiotic alternatives, such as essential

  8. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle that were healthy or treated for bovine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Alexander, Trevor W.; Hendrick, Steve; McAllister, Tim A.

    2014-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). As an opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica is also frequently isolated from the respiratory tract of healthy cattle. This study examined the characteristics of M. haemolytica collected using deep nasal swabs from healthy cattle (n = 49) and cattle diagnosed with BRD (n = 41). Isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), serotyped, and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen isolates for virulence [leukotoxin C (lktC), putative adhesin (ahs), outer-membrane lipoprotein (gs60), O-sialoglycoprotease (gcp), transferring-binding protein B (tbpB) and UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-2-epimerase (nmaA)] and antimicrobial resistance [tet(H), blaROB-1, erm(X), erm(42), msr(E)-mph(E) and aphA-1] genes. Isolates were genetically diverse but in three instances, M. haemolytica with the same pulsotype, resistance phenotype, and genotype were collected from cattle with BRD. This occurred once between cattle located in two different feedlots, once between cattle in the same feedlot, but in different pens, and once among cattle from the same feedlot in the same pen. Isolates from healthy cattle were primarily serotype 2 (75.5%) while those from individuals with BRD were serotype 1 (70.7%) or 6 (19.5%). Resistance to at least one antibiotic occurred more frequently (P < 0.001) in M. haemolytica collected from cattle with BRD (37%) compared with those that were healthy (2%). Overall, tetracycline resistance (18%) was the most prevalent resistant phenotype. All tetracycline-resistant M. haemolytica encoded tet(H). Ampicillin resistance (6%) and neomycin resistance (15%) were detected and corresponded to the presence of the blaROB-1 and aphA-1 genes, respectively. Tilmicosin resistance (6%) was also detected, but the resistance genes responsible were not identified. The virulence genes lktC, ahs, gs60, and gcp

  9. Cattle feedlot soil moisture and manure content: I. Impacts on greenhouse gases, odor compounds, nitrogen losses, and dust.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel N; Berry, Elaine D

    2005-01-01

    Beef cattle feedlots face serious environmental challenges associated with manure management, including greenhouse gas, odor, NH3, and dust emissions. Conditions affecting emissions are poorly characterized, but likely relate to the variability of feedlot surface moisture and manure contents, which affect microbial processes. Odor compounds, greenhouse gases, nitrogen losses, and dust potential were monitored at six moisture contents (0.11, 0.25, 0.43, 0.67, 1.00, and 1.50 g H2O g(-1) dry matter [DM]) in three artificial feedlot soil mixtures containing 50, 250, and 750 g manure kg(-1) total (manure + soil) DM over a two-week period. Moisture addition produced three microbial metabolisms: inactive, aerobic, and fermentative at low, moderate, and high moisture, respectively. Manure content acted to modulate the effect of moisture and enhanced some microbial processes. Greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O, and CH4) emissions were dynamic at moderate to high moisture. Malodorous volatile fatty acid (VFA) compounds did not accumulate in any treatments, but their persistence and volatility varied depending on pH and aerobic metabolism. Starch was the dominant substrate fueling both aerobic and fermentative metabolism. Nitrogen losses were observed in all metabolically active treatments; however, there was evidence for limited microbial nitrogen uptake. Finally, potential dust production was observed below defined moisture thresholds, which were related to manure content of the soil. Managing feedlot surface moisture within a narrow moisture range (0.2-0.4 g H2O g(-1) DM) and minimizing the accumulation of manure produced the optimum conditions that minimized the environmental impact from cattle feedlot production. PMID:15758117

  10. Bacterial Communities Associated with Shiga-Toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) in Beef Cattle Feedlot Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The life cycle of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) in beef cattle feedlots involves two habitats: the warm, nutrient rich primary habitat of the lower gastrointestinal tract of cattle and the generally cool, nutrient limiting secondary habitat outside of the animal, including...

  11. Distillers By-Product Cattle Diets Enhance Reduced Sulfur Gas Fluxes from Feedlot Soils and Manures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel N; Spiehs, Mindy J; Varel, Vincent H; Woodbury, Bryan L; Wells, James E; Berry, Elaine D

    2016-07-01

    Total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from animal feeding operations are a concern with increased feeding of high-sulfur distillers by-products. Three feeding trials were conducted to evaluate feeding wet distillers grain plus solubles (WDGS) on TRS fluxes. Fresh manure was collected three times during Feeding Trial 1 from cattle fed 0, 20, 40, and 60% WDGS. Fluxes of TRS from 40 and 60% WDGS manures were 3- to 13-fold greater than the 0 and 20% WDGS manures during the first two periods. In the final period, TRS flux from 60% WDGS was 5- to 22-fold greater than other WDGS manures. During Feeding Trial 2, 0 and 40% WDGS diets on four dates were compared in feedlot-scale pens. On two dates, fluxes from mixed manure and soil near the feed bunk were 3.5-fold greater from 40% WDGS pens. After removing animals, soil TRS flux decreased 82% over 19 d but remained 50% greater in 40% WDGS pens, principally from the wetter pen edges (1.9-fold greater than the drier central mound). During two cycles of cattle production in Feeding Trial 3, TRS soil fluxes were 0.3- to 4-fold greater over six dates for pens feeding WDGS compared with dry-rolled corn diet and principally from wetter pen edges. Soil TRS flux correlated with %WDGS, total N, total P, manure pack temperature, and surface temperature. Consistent results among these three trials indicate that TRS fluxes increase by two- to fivefold when cattle were fed greater levels of WDGS, but specific manure management practices may help control TRS fluxes. PMID:27380063

  12. Bacterial flora of liver abscesses in feedlot cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T G; Beharka, A B; Chengappa, M M; Carroll, L H; Raun, A P; Laudert, S B; Parrott, J C

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial flora of liver abscesses from cattle fed tylosin or no tylosin and susceptibilities of the predominant bacterial isolates to tylosin and other antimicrobial compounds were determined. Abscessed livers were collected at slaughter from cattle originating from feedlots that had fed tylosin (n = 36) or no tylosin (n = 41) for at least 2 yr, and segments of livers with one or two intact abscesses were transported to the laboratory. Abscesses were cultured for anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum, either as single culture or mixed with other bacteria, was isolated from all abscesses. The incidence of subsp. necrophorum, as part of the mixed infection, was lower (P < .05) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (33 vs 61%). However, the incidence of Actinomyces pyogenes was higher (P < .01) in the tylosin group than in the no-tylosin group (53 vs 10%). Totals of 119 F. necrophorum and 21 A. pyogenes isolates were used for determinations of susceptibilities to bacitracin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, lasalocid, monensin, tylosin, tilmicosin, and virginiamycin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics were determined with a broth microdilution method. The mean MIC of tylosin for F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes were not different between isolates from tylosin and no-tylosin groups. We concluded that continuous feeding of tylosin did not induce resistance in F. necrophorum or A. pyogenes. Also, the higher incidence of mixed infection of F. necrophorum and A. pyogenes in liver abscesses of tylosin-fed cattle suggests a potential synergistic interaction between the two organisms in causing liver abscesses. PMID:10328365

  13. Effect of Proximity to a Cattle Feedlot on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Contamination of Leafy Greens and Evaluation of the Potential for Airborne Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James E.; Bono, James L.; Woodbury, Bryan L.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Norman, Keri N.; Suslow, Trevor V.; López-Velasco, Gabriela; Millner, Patricia D.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of proximity to a beef cattle feedlot on Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy greens was examined. In each of 2 years, leafy greens were planted in nine plots located 60, 120, and 180 m from a cattle feedlot (3 plots at each distance). Leafy greens (270) and feedlot manure samples (100) were collected six different times from June to September in each year. Both E. coli O157:H7 and total E. coli bacteria were recovered from leafy greens at all plot distances. E. coli O157:H7 was recovered from 3.5% of leafy green samples per plot at 60 m, which was higher (P < 0.05) than the 1.8% of positive samples per plot at 180 m, indicating a decrease in contamination as distance from the feedlot was increased. Although E. coli O157:H7 was not recovered from air samples at any distance, total E. coli was recovered from air samples at the feedlot edge and all plot distances, indicating that airborne transport of the pathogen can occur. Results suggest that risk for airborne transport of E. coli O157:H7 from cattle production is increased when cattle pen surfaces are very dry and when this situation is combined with cattle management or cattle behaviors that generate airborne dust. Current leafy green field distance guidelines of 120 m (400 feet) may not be adequate to limit the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 to produce crops planted near concentrated animal feeding operations. Additional research is needed to determine safe set-back distances between cattle feedlots and crop production that will reduce fresh produce contamination. PMID:25452286

  14. Effect of Direct-Fed Microbial Dosage on the Fecal Concentrations of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Luedtke, Brandon E; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Harhay, Dayna M; Arthur, Terrance M

    2016-04-01

    Contamination of beef products by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli is a concern for food safety with a particular subset, the enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), being the most relevant to human disease. To mitigate food safety risks, preharvest intervention strategies have been implemented with the aim to reduce EHEC in cattle. One class of interventions that has been widely used in feedlots is direct-fed microbials (DFMs), which can contain various dosing rates of probiotic bacteria. Here we compare the use of two different doses of a commercially available DFM on total EHEC load in a commercial feedlot setting. The DFMs used were the standard 10(9) Propionibacterium freudenreichii and 10(6) Lactobacillus acidophilus colony forming units (CFUs)/head/day dose of Bovamine(®) (Nutrition Physiology Company, Guymon, OK) and the higher dose, Bovamine Defend™ (Nutrition Physiology Company), which is dosed at 10(9) P. freudenreichii and 10(9) Lactobacillus acidophilus CFUs/head/day. To analyze the total EHEC fecal concentration, 2200 head of cattle were assigned a DFM feed regimen lasting approximately 5 months. At harvest, 480 head of cattle were sampled using rectoanal mucosal swabs. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay targeting ecf1 was used to enumerate the total EHEC fecal concentration for 240 head fed the low-dose DFM and 240 head fed the high-dose DFM. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in the fecal concentration of total EHEC was observed between the two doses. This suggests that using an increased dosage provides no additional reduction in the total EHEC fecal concentration of feedlot cattle compared to the standard dosage. PMID:26974651

  15. Modelling considerations in the analysis of associations between antimicrobial use and resistance in beef feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Noyes, N R; Benedict, K M; Gow, S P; Waldner, C L; Reid-Smith, R J; Booker, C W; McALLISTER, T A; Morley, P S

    2016-04-01

    A number of sophisticated modelling approaches are available to investigate potential associations between antimicrobial use (AMU) and resistance (AMR) in animal health settings. All have their advantages and disadvantages, making it unclear as to which model is most appropriate. We used advanced regression modelling to investigate AMU-AMR associations in faecal non-type-specific Escherichia coli (NTSEC) isolates recovered from 275 pens of feedlot cattle. Ten modelling strategies were employed to investigate AMU associations with resistance to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline and streptomycin. Goodness-of-fit statistics did not show a consistent advantage for any one model type. Three AMU-AMR associations were significant in all models. Recent parenteral tetracycline use increased the odds of finding tetracycline-resistant NTSEC [odds ratios (OR) 1·1-3·2]; recent parenteral sulfonamide use increased the odds of finding sulfisoxazole-resistant NTSEC (OR 1·4-2·5); and recent parenteral macrolide use decreased the odds of recovering ampicillin-resistant NTSEC (OR 0·03-0·2). Other results varied markedly depending on the modelling approach, emphasizing the importance of exploring and reporting multiple modelling methods based on a balanced consideration of important factors such as study design, mathematical appropriateness, research question and target audience. PMID:26541938

  16. Changes in nitrogen isotopic compositions during composting of cattle feedlot manure: effects of bedding material type.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joo; Choi, Woo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Sun; Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Chang, Scott X; Kim, Han-Yong; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Ro, Hee-Myong

    2008-09-01

    Temporal changes in delta(15)N of cattle feedlot manure during its composting with either rice hull (RHM) or sawdust (SDM) as bedding materials were investigated. Regardless of the bedding material used, the delta(15)N of total N in the manure increased sharply from +7.6 per thousand to +9.9 per thousand and from +11.4 per thousand to +14.3 per thousand, respectively, in RHM or SDM, within 10 days from the commencement of composting. Such increases could be attributed primarily to N loss via NH(3) volatilization and denitrification based on the very high delta(15)N values (greater than +20 per thousand) of NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) in the co-composted manure. The delta(15)N of total N in RHM was substantially lower (by more than 3 per thousand) than that in SDM, suggesting that the delta(15)N of the composted manure was affected not only by N loss but also by the type of bedding material used. Specifically, the higher N concentration in the rice hull than in the saw dust could lead to a greater (15)N isotope dilution. PMID:18077156

  17. Methaphylactic effect of tulathromycin treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Enrico; Armato, Leonardo; Morgante, Massimo; Muraro, Michele; Boso, Matteo; Gianesella, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tulathromycin as a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) metaphylactic treatment on rumen fluid parameters in feedlot cattle in an intensive livestock production farm. One hundred beef cattle, immediately after housing, were divided in 2 equal groups: 50 animals with metaphylactic treatment against BRD (treated group; tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg BW) and 50 animals with placebo treatment (control group). Rumen fluid samples were collected from each animal by rumenocentesis in 3 periods: 1 d (T1), 8 d (T8), and 15 d (T15) after treatment. Rumen pH was determined by ruminal fluid using portable pH meter. Total volatile fatty acids (total VFA) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All animals were singularly weighed at T1 and T15. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine significant effects of treatment (treated group versus control group) and period (T1, T8, and T15) on rumen fluid parameters and body weight. No clinical signs of BRD or other related diseases were recorded during the periods of study from any animal. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between treated group and control group for mean values of ruminal pH (6.02 versus 5.89) and total VFA (5.84 versus 5.13) at 8 d after treatment. The weight gain (Δ) showed an average increase of 8.6 kg in treated group (P < 0.05). The trends of ruminal pH and VFA values suggest an effect of tulathromycin as BRD metaphylactic treatment on the modulation of rumen fermentation, particularly 8 d after administration. PMID:26733733

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Salmonella enterica serotypes recovered from pens of commercial feedlot cattle using different types of composite samples.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Jahangir; Renter, David; Taylor, Ethel; Mina, Diana; Moxley, Rodney; Smith, David

    2009-04-01

    Salmonella enterica in cattle production systems may be associated with important human and animal disease issues. However, tremendous diversity exists among Salmonella recovered, and more information is needed about strains of greatest potential health concern, particularly those that are multidrug resistant (MDR). By characterizing Salmonella isolates from commercial feedlot pens, this study aimed to evaluate the strain diversity and prevalence of MDR Salmonella from different types of composite pen samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, serotype, and presence or absence of the integron-encoded intI1 gene were determined for 530 Salmonella isolates recovered using composite rope (n = 335), feces (n = 59), and water (n = 136) samples from 21 pens in 3 feedlots. The study investigated only pens with available isolates from multiple sample types. Most isolates (83.0%) of the 19 Salmonella serotypes identified were susceptible or intermediately susceptible to all the antimicrobials evaluated. Resistance to sulfisoxazole (14.9%), streptomycin (3.8%), and tetracycline (3.6%) were the most common. None of the isolates tested positive for a class 1 integron, and only 2.5% were resistant to multiple antimicrobials. All the MDR isolates, namely, serotypes Uganda (n = 9), Typhimurium (n = 2), and Give (n = 2), were resistant to at least five antimicrobials. Most MDR isolates (n = 11) were from two pens during 1 week within one feedlot. Overall, many Salmonella isolates collected within a pen were similar in terms of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility regardless of sample type. However, MDR Salmonella and rare serotypes were not recovered frequently enough to suggest a general strategy for appropriate composite sampling of feedlot cattle populations for Salmonella detection and monitoring. PMID:19219500

  19. Bos indicus-cross feedlot cattle with excitable temperaments have tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters.

    PubMed

    Voisinet, B D; Grandin, T; O'Connor, S F; Tatum, J D; Deesing, M J

    1997-08-01

    Temperament ratings based on a numerical scale (chute score) were assessed during weighing and handling of cattle at a feedlot. Breeds studied included Braford, Red Brangus and Simbrah. Cattle were fed to a constant fat thickness of 9 to 13 mm (target = 11 mm) over the 12th rib as determined by periodic ultrasound measurements. Cattle were slaughtered in a commercial slaughter plant and stunned by captive bolt. Temperament rating had a significant effect on the incidence of borderline dark cutters which were downgraded by a USDA grader (P = 0.01). Temperament score also had a significant effect on tenderness (P < 0.001) as evaluated by Warner-Bratzler Shear (WBS) force at day 14 post mortem. The calmest animals which stood still when restrained in a hydraulic squeeze chute had a mean WBS force of 2.86 ± 11 kg and cattle which became highly agitated and struggled violently during restraint averaged 3.63 ± 19 kg. Forty percent of these cattle had WBS force values which were over 3.9 kg which is a threshold value for acceptability in food service establishments. These data show that cattle with the most excitable temperament ratings produce carcasses with tougher meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters than cattle with calm temperament ratings. PMID:22062320

  20. Application of research findings and summary of research needs: Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Galyean, M L; Eng, K S

    1998-01-01

    Updated research findings with acidosis, feedlot bloat, liver abscesses, and sudden death syndromes were presented at the Bud Britton Memorial Symposium on Metabolic Disorders of Feedlot Cattle. Possible industry applications include the need to establish guidelines for use of clostridial vaccines in feedlot cattle, further assessment of the relationship between acidosis and polioencephalomalacia, examination of the effects of various ionophores on the incidence of metabolic disorders, and evaluation of the effects of feed bunk management and limit- and restricted-feeding programs on the incidence of metabolic disorders. A multidisciplinary approach among researchers, consulting nutritionists and veterinarians, and feedlot managers will be required for effective progress in research and in the application of research findings. Areas suggested for further research include 1) assessment of feed consumption patterns and social behavior of cattle in large-pen, feedlot settings; 2) evaluation of the relationship between feed intake management systems (feed bunk management programs, limit- and programmed-feeding) and the incidence of metabolic disorders, including delineation of the role of variability in feed intake in the etiology of such disorders; 3) efforts to improve antemortem and postmortem diagnosis, and to establish standardized regional or national epidemiological databases for various metabolic disorders; 4) ascertaining the accuracy of diagnosis of metabolic disorders and determining the relationship of previous health history of animals to the incidence of metabolic disorders; 5) further defining ruminal and intestinal microbiology as it relates to metabolic disorders and deeper evaluation of metabolic changes that occur with such disorders; 6) continued appraisal of the effects of grain processing and specific feed ingredients and nutrients on metabolic disorders, and development of new feed additives to control or prevent these disorders; and 7

  1. Comparative effects of processing methods on the feeding value of maize in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A; Barreras, A; Corona, L; Owens, F N; Plascencia, A

    2011-12-01

    The primary reason for processing maize is to enhance feeding value. Total tract starch digestion is similar for coarsely processed (dry rolled, cracked) dry maize. Enhancements in starch digestion due to dry rolling maize v. feeding maize whole may be greater in light-weight calves than in yearlings, and when DM intake is restricted ( < 1·5 % of body weight). The net energy (NE) maintain (NEm) and NE gain (NEg) values for whole maize are 8·83 and 6·02 MJ (2·11 and 1·44 Mcal)/kg, respectively. Compared with conventional dry processing (i.e. coarse rolled, cracked), finely processing maize may increase the initial rate of digestion, but does not improve total tract starch digestion. Tempering before rolling (without the addition of steam) may enhance the growth performance response and the NE value of maize. Average total tract starch digestion is similar for high-moisture and steam-flaked maize. However, the proportion of starch digested ruminally is greater (about 8 %) for high-moisture maize. The growth performance response of feedlot cattle to the feeding of high-moisture maize is highly variable. Although the NEm and NEg value of whole high-moisture maize was slightly less than that of dry processed maize (averaging 9·04 and 6·44 MJ (2·16 and 1·54 Mcal)/kg, respectively), grinding or rolling high-moisture maize before ensiling increased (6 %) its NE value. Substituting steam-flaked maize for dry processed maize increases average daily gain (6·3 %) and decreases DM intake (5 %). The comparative NEm and NEg values for steam-flaked maize at optimal processing (density = 0·34 kg/l) are 10·04 and 7·07 MJ (2·40 and 1·69 Mcal)/kg, respectively. These NE values are greater (3 %) than current tabular values (National Research Council, 2000), being more consistent with earlier standards (National Research Council, 1984). When maize is the primary or sole source of starch in the diet, concentration of starch in faeces (faecal starch, % of

  2. Analysis of risk factors associated with Salmonella spp. isolated from U.S. feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Dargatz, David A; Wagner, Bruce A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Ladely, Scott R; Kopral, Chris A

    2010-07-01

    Contamination can occur at a number of stages during farm-to-fork processing. Preharvest intervention is an ongoing area of interest in reduction of risk of foodborne illness. This study examined risk factors associated with detection of Salmonella from cattle in U.S. feedlots. During two visits to 73 feedlots, 25 fresh fecal samples were collected from each of three pen floors. Associations between management and demographic factors and culture status were evaluated using logistic regression. Factors positively associated with culture-positive status included brewers' grains (odds ratio [OR] = 26.35; confidence interval [CI], 10.33-67.20), corn gluten (OR = 10.35; CI, 5.98-17.91), or cottonseed hulls (OR = 8.34; CI, 3.58-19.42) in the ration, and sourcing animals in a pen from multiple herds of origin (OR = 5.17; CI, 2.32-11.51). Factors negatively associated with positive culture status included urea (OR = 0.27; CI, 0.16-0.44), alfalfa, clover, or sorghum silage (OR = 0.31; CI, 0.12-0.79), and antimicrobials of the tetracycline class in the ration (within 2 weeks before sampling, OR = 0.04 and CI, 0.02-0.09; more than 2 weeks before sampling, OR = 0.23 and CI, 0.06-0.80). Since 18.3% of positive samples were on a single operation, a second model was constructed after excluding data from this operation. Three additional variables were retained in the second model, including grain-processing method (OR for dry roll, cracked, or unprocessed grain = 2.99; CI, 1.55-5.75), soybean meal (OR = 2.74; CI, 1.58-4.75), and use of a coccidiostat in the ration (OR for no coccidiostat = 4.50; CI, 2.03-10.01). Considering the increasing use of by-products of the biofuel industry as feeds, further investigation of the association between feeding brewers' grains and corn gluten and Salmonella recovery is warranted. PMID:20230269

  3. Cross-sectional Study Examining Salmonella enterica Carriage in Subiliac Lymph Nodes of Cull and Feedlot Cattle at Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Gragg, Sara E.; Loneragan, Guy H.; Brashears, Mindy M.; Arthur, Terrance M.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Wang, Rong; Schmidt, John W.; Brooks, J. Chance; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Brown, Tyson R.; Edrington, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bovine peripheral lymph nodes (LNs), including subiliac LNs, have been identified as a potential source of human exposure to Salmonella enterica, when adipose trim containing these nodes is incorporated into ground beef. In order to gain a better understanding of the burden of S. enterica in peripheral LNs of feedlot and cull cattle, a cross-sectional study was undertaken in which 3327 subiliac LNs were collected from cattle at harvest in seven plants, located in three geographically distinct regions of the United States. Samples were collected in three seasons: Fall 2010, Winter/Spring 2011, and Summer/Fall 2011. A convenience sample of 76 LNs per day, 2 days per season (approximately 1 month apart), was collected per plant, from carcasses held in the cooler for no less than 24 h. Every 10th carcass half on a rail was sampled, in an attempt to avoid oversampling any single cohort of cattle. Median point estimates of S. enterica contamination were generally low (1.3%); however, median Salmonella prevalence was found to be greater in subiliac LNs of feedlot cattle (11.8%) compared to those of cull cattle (0.65%). Enumeration analysis of a subset of 618 feedlot cattle LNs showed that 67% of those harboring S. enterica (97 of 144) did so at concentrations ranging from <0.1 to 1.8 log10 CFU/g, while 33% carried a higher burden of S. enterica, with levels ranging from 1.9 to >3.8 log10 CFU/g. Serotyping of S. enterica isolated identified 24 serotypes, with the majority being Montevideo (44.0%) and Anatum (24.8%). Antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes were determined for all isolates, and the majority (86.1%) were pansusceptible; however, multidrug-resistant isolates (8.3%) were also occasionally observed. As Salmonella contained within LNs are protected from carcass interventions, research is needed to define opportunities for mitigating the risk of Salmonella contamination in LNs of apparently healthy cattle. PMID:23566273

  4. In vitro study of the biochemical origin and production limits of odorous compounds in cattle feedlots.

    PubMed

    Miller, D N; Varel, V H

    2001-12-01

    suggests a balance between protein consumption and new bacterial biomass production. We conclude that the types of substrates in cattle manure and the feedlot soils where they are deposited are significant factors in the production of odors. PMID:11811446

  5. Flaking corn: processing mechanics, quality standards, and impacts on energy availability and performance of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A; Owens, F N; Ware, R A

    2002-05-01

    Based on performance of feedlot cattle, steam flaking increases the value of corn by 18%, considerably more than is suggested by tabular values. Tabular values underestimate the energy availability of flaked corn by failing to account for digestibility of the nonstarch OM that is increased by flaking by the same magnitude (10%) as starch. Correcting for improvement in digestibility of nonstarch OM increases the NEg value of steam-flaked corn to 1.70 Mcal/kg, a value very close to values calculated from cattle performance trials. Digestibility of starch from corn grain is limited by the protein matrix that encapsulates starch granules, and by the compact nature of the starch itself. Disruption of the protein matrix (by shear forces on hot grain during flaking) is the first limiting step toward optimizing starch digestion. Five critical production factors influence the quality of steam-flaked corn: steam chest temperature, steaming time, roll corrugation, roll gap, and roll tension. For optimal shear, it is important that rolls be hot and that kernels be hot when flaked. Steam chests should be designed to allow a steaming time of at least 30 min at maximum roller mill capacity producing a flake of 0.31 kg/L (24 lb/bushel). As little as 5% moisture uptake during steaming appears adequate. The rate of flaking and distribution of kernels across the rolls also are critical. Quality standards for steam-flaked corn include measurements of flake thickness, flake density, starch solubility, and enzyme reactivity. Flake density, the most common quality standard, closely associated with starch solubility (r2 = 0.87) and enzyme reactivity (r2 = 0.79), still explains only 63% of the variability in percentage fecal starch and 52% of the variability in starch digestibility. Direct determination of fecal starch can explain 91% of the variability in starch digestion. The NEg value of corn can be predicted from fecal starch: NEg= 1.78 - 0.0184FS. Starch digestion is a Kappa Curve

  6. Attenuation of runoff and chemical loads in grass filter strips at two cattle feedlots, Minnesota, 1995-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, Stephen Charles; Hansen, Donald S.

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation of cattle feedlot runoff in two grass-covered filter strips in Minnesota was estimated by measuring chemical loads into and out of the strips. Filter strips of the Bock and Sanborn sites were 60-m long and 20-m wide and received runoff from cattle feedlots that supported 35 and 225 cattle, respectively. Feedlot and filter-strip runoff were measured using flumes with stage sensors. Water samples were collected using automated samplers. Attenuation values were calculated from four storm-runoff events. Ground water sampled beneath and outside the filter strips indicated some infiltration losses of sulfate, chloride, and nitrogen at the Bock site where soil permeability was greater than at the Sanborn site. Chemical constituents in filter-strip runoff, and their corresponding ranges of attenuation were as follows: chemical oxygen demand, 30–81 percent; dissolved chloride, 6–79 percent; dissolved sulfate, -3–82 percent; dissolved ammonia nitrogen, 33–80 percent; suspended ammonia plus organic nitrogen, 29–85 percent; dissolved organic nitrogen, 14–75 percent; suspended phosphorus, 24–82 percent; dissolved phosphorus, 14–72 percent; and fecal coliform bacteria, 18–79 percent. The ranges seem to be affected by barriers of direct contact of the runoff water with the soil. This varies seasonally by coverage of the soil by ice in winter and vegetation in summer months. Greater attenuation values occurred in October and May when mats of wilted, flat-lying grass covered the filter strips; attenuation values were less during the summer when tall growing grass covered the filter strips.

  7. Distribution of Escherichia coli 0157 and Salmonella on hide surfaces, the oral cavity, and in feces of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T P; Loneragan, G H; Thompson, T W; Sridhara, A; Branham, L A; Pitchiah, S; Brashears, M M

    2007-06-01

    To determine the distribution of pathogens on cattle hides at the feedlot, samples were collected from six hide surface locations (back, flank, hock, neck, perineum, and ventrum), the oral cavity, the rectal-anal junction, and the feces of feedlot cattle and subjected to Escherichia coli 0157 detection via culture methods and to Salmonella detection via PCR. E. coli 0157 was isolated from one or more of the sampling locations from 31 (42.5%) of the 73 animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of E. coli 0157 was 5% for back samples, 5% for flank samples, 12% for hock samples, 7% for neck samples, 12% for perineum samples, 8% for ventrum samples, 1% for oral cavity samples, 4% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 23% for fecal grab samples. Salmonella was isolated from one or more of these sample locations from 100% (50 of 50 samples) of all animals sampled. Location-specific prevalence of Salmonella was 76% for back samples, 74% for flank samples, 94% for hock samples, 76% for neck samples, 88% for perineum samples, 86% for ventrum samples, 94% for oral cavity samples, 64% for rectal-anal junction swabs, and 50% for fecal grab samples. The sampling locations that maximized the likelihood of finding E. coli 0157 and Salmonella (84 and 96%, respectively) if the animal was positive at one sampling location or more were the hock, perineum, and fecal grab. These data suggest that the use of multiple sample locations is useful when isolating these pathogens from feedlot cattle. Focusing on one sampling location may underestimate the prevalence. PMID:17612062

  8. Temporal and spatial trends in adult nuisance fly populations on Australian cattle feedlots.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like the US, Australia produces beef on large feedlots. Complaints of fly problems prompted a request for information on biology and management of feedlot flies. Therefore, USDA-CMAVE scientists worked cooperatively for 3 years with Australian scientists to determine species composition, seasonality...

  9. Using Sweet Bran instead of forage during grain adaptation in finishing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Huls, T J; Luebbe, M K; Watson, A K; Meyer, N F; Griffin, W A; Klopfenstein, T J; Stock, R A; Erickson, G E

    2016-03-01

    ). Treatments were applied only during grain adaptation (26 d) and all steers were finished on a common diet containing 35% Sweet Bran for an additional 147 d. Steers adapted using SB had greater ( ≤ 0.01) final BW, ADG, G:F, and HCW compared with steers adapted using CON, even though treatments differed only the first 26 d. Grain adaptation treatment had no effect ( ≥ 0.13) on carcass quality. These results indicate that Sweet Bran can be used to adapt cattle to finishing diets instead of forage and improves ADG and G:F while decreasing the forage needs of feedlots. PMID:27065276

  10. Flint corn grain processing and citrus pulp level in finishing diets for feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Gouvêa, V N; Batistel, F; Souza, J; Chagas, L J; Sitta, C; Campanili, P R B; Galvani, D B; Pires, A V; Owens, F N; Santos, F A P

    2016-02-01

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of flint corn processing and the replacement of corn with citrus pulp (CiP) in diets for Nellore feedlot cattle. In a 103-d finishing trial, 216 Nellore bulls (350 ± 24 kg initial BW) were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors included 2 processing methods, either ground corn (GC) or steam-flaked corn (FC), with CiP replacing each corn type at 4 levels (0, 25, 50, and 75% of DM). All diets contained 12% sugarcane bagasse and 88% concentrate (DM basis). Treatments were also evaluated in metabolism trials, in which 10 ruminally cannulated Nellore steers (389 ± 37 kg) were assigned to 2 independent but simultaneous 5 × 5 Latin squares, each using 1 method of corn processing (GC and FC). Interactions ( < 0.05) between corn processing and CiP inclusion level were observed for final BW, DMI, ADG, G:F, and HCW. With FC-based diets, added CiP linearly decreased final BW ( = 0.04), whereas with GC-based diets, added CiP quadratically increased final BW ( = 0.002). With FC-based diets, the inclusion of CiP linearly increased DMI ( = 0.03) and linearly decreased ADG ( = 0.03) and G:F ( = 0.001). Increasing CiP in GC-based diets quadratically increased DMI ( = 0.001), ADG ( = 0.005), and HCW ( = 0.003). In FC-based diets, CiP inclusion had no effect on HCW ( = 0.21). Dressing percent, LM area, and 12th-rib fat were not affected by diet ( ≥ 0.05). For steers fed GC diets, CiP inclusion in the diet quadratically decreased the molar proportion of isovalerate ( = 0.001) but linearly increased ruminal butyrate ( = 0.006). No differences ( ≥ 0.16) were observed for total VFA concentrations, acetate:propionate ratio, and ruminal NH-N as CiP replaced GC. For steers fed FC diets, the molar proportion of acetate linearly increased ( = 0.002) whereas the proportion of propionate was linearly decreased ( < 0.001), resulting in a linear increase ( = 0.001) in the

  11. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 on risk of bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Ambrose, R C K; Morton, J M; Horwood, P F; Gravel, J L; Waldron, S; Commins, M A; Fowler, E V; Clements, A C A; Barnes, T S; Mahony, T J

    2016-04-01

    Viruses play a key role in the complex aetiology of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) is widespread in Australia and has been shown to contribute to BRD occurrence. As part of a prospective longitudinal study on BRD, effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on risk of BRD in Australian feedlot cattle were investigated. A total of 35,160 animals were enrolled at induction (when animals were identified and characteristics recorded), held in feedlot pens with other cattle (cohorts) and monitored for occurrence of BRD over the first 50days following induction. Biological samples collected from all animals were tested to determine which animals were persistently infected (PI) with BVDV-1. Data obtained from the Australian National Livestock Identification System database were used to determine which groups of animals that were together at the farm of origin and at 28days prior to induction (and were enrolled in the study) contained a PI animal and hence to identify animals that had probably been exposed to a PI animal prior to induction. Multi-level Bayesian logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on the risk of occurrence of BRD. Although only a total of 85 study animals (0.24%) were identified as being PI with BVDV-1, BVDV-1 was detected on quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 59% of cohorts. The PI animals were at moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.9; 95% credible interval 1.0-3.2). Exposure to BVDV-1 in the cohort was also associated with a moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.7; 95% credible interval 1.1-2.5) regardless of whether or not a PI animal was identified within the cohort. Additional analyses indicated that a single quantitative real-time PCR test is useful for distinguishing PI animals from transiently infected animals. The results of the study suggest that removal of PI animals and/or vaccination, both before feedlot entry, would reduce the impact of BVDV-1 on BRD risk

  12. Fresh steam-flaked corn in cattle feedlots is an important site for fecal coliform contamination by house flies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Zurek, Ludek

    2015-03-01

    House flies are a common pest at food animal facilities, including cattle feedlots. Previously, house flies were shown to play an important role in the ecology of Escherichia coli O157:H7; house flies in cattle feedlots carried this zoonotic pathogen and were able to contaminate cattle through direct contact and/or by contamination of drinking water and feed. Because house flies aggregate in large numbers on fresh ( # 6 h) steam-flaked corn (FSFC) used in cattle feed, the aim of this study was to assess FSFC in a cattle feedlot as a potentially important site of fecal coliform contamination by house flies. House flies and FSFC samples were collected, homogenized, and processed for culturing of fecal coliforms on membrane fecal coliform agar. Selected isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and representative isolates from each phylogenetic group were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Fecal coliforms were undetectable in FSFC shortly (0 h) after flaking; however, in summer, after 4 to 6 h, the concentrations of fecal coliforms ranged from 1.9 × 10(3) to 3.7 × 10(4) CFU/g FSFC (mean, 1.1 ± 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/g). House flies from FSFC carried between 7.6 × 10(2) and 4.1 × 10(6) CFU of fecal coliforms per fly (mean, 6.0 ± 2.3 × 10(5) CFU per fly). Fecal coliforms were represented by E. coli (85.1%), Klebsiella spp. (10.6%), and Citrobacter spp. (4.3%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated clonal matches of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. between house flies and FSFC. In contrast, in winter and in the absence of house flies, the contamination of corn by fecal coliforms was significantly (∼10-fold) lower. These results indicate that FSFC is an important site for bacterial contamination by flies and possible exchange of E. coli and other bacteria among house flies. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential use of screens or blowers to limit the access of house flies to FSFC and therefore their effectiveness in preventing

  13. Distribution and characterization of ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli from feedlot cattle fed subtherapeutic antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Feedlot cattle in North America are routinely fed subtherapeutic levels of antimicrobials to prevent disease and improve the efficiency of growth. This practice has been shown to promote antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in subpopulations of intestinal microflora including Escherichia coli. To date, studies of AMR in feedlot production settings have rarely employed selective isolation, therefore yielding too few AMR isolates to enable characterization of the emergence and nature of AMR in E. coli as an indicator bacterium. E. coli isolates (n = 531) were recovered from 140 cattle that were housed (10 animals/pen) in 14 pens and received no dietary antimicrobials (control - 5 pens, CON), or were intermittently administered subtherapeutic levels of chlortetracycline (5 pens-T), chlortetracycline + sulfamethazine (4 pens-TS), or virginiamycin (5 pens-V) for two separate periods over a 9-month feeding period. Phenotype and genotype of the isolates were determined by susceptibility testing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis and distribution of characterized isolates among housed cattle reported. It was hypothesized that the feeding of subtherapeutic antibiotics would increase the isolation of distinct genotypes of AMR E. coli from cattle. Results Overall, patterns of antimicrobial resistance expressed by E. coli isolates did not change among diet groups (CON vs. antibiotic treatments), however; isolates obtained on selective plates (i.e., MA,MT), exhibited multi-resistance to sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol more frequently when obtained from TS-fed steers than from other treatments. Antibiograms and PFGE patterns suggested that AMR E. coli were readily transferred among steers within pens. Most MT isolates possessed the tet(B) efflux gene (58.2, 53.5, 40.8, and 50.6% of isolates from CON, T, TS, and V steers, respectively) whereas among the MA (ampicillin-resistant) isolates, the tem1-like determinant was predominant (occurring in 50, 66.7, 80.3, and 100

  14. Chromium supplementation alters the performance and health of feedlot cattle during the receiving period and enhances their metabolic response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbred steers (n = 180; 230 +/- 6 kg) were fed during a 56-d receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromiumPropionate0.04%, Kemin Industries) would improve feedlot performance and health of newly-received cattle. A completely randomized block design (36 pens; ...

  15. Prevalence of lactose fermenting coliforms resistant to third generation cephalosporins in cattle feedlot throughout a production cycle and molecular characterization of resistant isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Increases in incidence of human infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae resistant to 3rd generation cephalosporins (3GC) have become a public health concern. The 3GC ceftiofur is commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of feedlot cattle but the impact this practice has on public h...

  16. Corn or sorghum wet distiller's grains with solubles in combination with steam-flaked corn: Feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, and apparent total tract digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate corn (CDG) and sorghum (SDG) wet distiller's grains with solubles on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, apparent total tract digestion of nutrients, and marker retention time. In Experiment 1, 224 steers were used in a randomized complete bloc...

  17. Influence of wet distiller's grains on prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in feedlot cattle and antimicrobial susceptibility of generic E. coli isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current research examined the inclusion of 20% wet distiller’s grains (WDG) fed with steam-flaked (SFC) or dry-rolled (DRC) corn in diets fed to feedlot cattle on fecal prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. Crossbred beef heifers (n = 272; average initial body weight (BW) = 354 kg) were...

  18. Effects of graded levels of sorghum wet distiller's grains and degraded intake protein on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle fed steam-flaked corn based diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments evaluated different levels of sorghum wet distiller's grains (SWDG) and effects of increasing levels of degraded intake protein (DIP) in SWDG on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle. In Experiment 1, 200 steers (average BW = 404 kg) were fed increasing levels of...

  19. A new cost-effective method to mitigate ammonia loss from intensive cattle feedlots: application of lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deli; Sun, Jianlei; Bai, Mei; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B.; Denmead, Owen T.; Hill, Julian

    2015-11-01

    In open beef feedlot systems, more than 50% of dietary nitrogen (N) is lost as ammonia (NH3). Here we report an effective and economically-viable method to mitigate NH3 emissions by the application of lignite. We constructed two cattle pens (20 × 20 m) to determine the effectiveness of lignite in reducing NH3 emissions. Twenty-four steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. The treatment pen surface was dressed with 4.5 kg m-2 lignite dry mass while no lignite was applied in the control pen. We measured volatilised NH3 concentrations using Ecotech EC9842 NH3 analysers in conjunction with a mass balance method to calculate NH3 fluxes. Application of lignite decreased NH3 loss from the pen by approximately 66%. The cumulative NH3 losses were 6.26 and 2.13 kg N head-1 in the control and lignite treatment, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits of reduced NH3 losses, the value of retained N nutrient in the lignite treated manure is more than $37 AUD head-1 yr-1, based on the current fertiliser cost and estimated cost of lignite application. We show that lignite application is a cost-effective method to reduce NH3 loss from cattle feedlots.

  20. A new cost-effective method to mitigate ammonia loss from intensive cattle feedlots: application of lignite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deli; Sun, Jianlei; Bai, Mei; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B.; Denmead, Owen T.; Hill, Julian

    2015-01-01

    In open beef feedlot systems, more than 50% of dietary nitrogen (N) is lost as ammonia (NH3). Here we report an effective and economically-viable method to mitigate NH3 emissions by the application of lignite. We constructed two cattle pens (20 × 20 m) to determine the effectiveness of lignite in reducing NH3 emissions. Twenty-four steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. The treatment pen surface was dressed with 4.5 kg m−2 lignite dry mass while no lignite was applied in the control pen. We measured volatilised NH3 concentrations using Ecotech EC9842 NH3 analysers in conjunction with a mass balance method to calculate NH3 fluxes. Application of lignite decreased NH3 loss from the pen by approximately 66%. The cumulative NH3 losses were 6.26 and 2.13 kg N head−1 in the control and lignite treatment, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits of reduced NH3 losses, the value of retained N nutrient in the lignite treated manure is more than $37 AUD head−1 yr−1, based on the current fertiliser cost and estimated cost of lignite application. We show that lignite application is a cost-effective method to reduce NH3 loss from cattle feedlots. PMID:26584639

  1. An in vitro study of manure composition on the biochemical origins, composition, and accumulation of odorous compounds in cattle feedlots.

    PubMed

    Miller, D N; Varel, V H

    2002-09-01

    Very little is known about the biochemical origin of cattle feedlot odors and the environmental factors controlling their production. The tie between diet and manure composition is well established, but the effect of different manure compositions on odorous chemical production is unknown. This study describes the effect of starch, casein, and cellulose substrate additions to slurries of fresh (< 24 h) and aged cattle manure (> 1 d) on the anaerobic production of fermentation products and the consumption of substrates relative to no addition treatments. Aged cattle manure accumulated more VFA (245 to 290 mM) than the fresh manure (91 to 181 mM) irrespective of substrate additions (P < 0.001). In fresh manures, VFA concentrations were increased (P < 0.01) over no addition treatments when carbohydrate (starch or cellulose) was added, whereas starch and protein treatments to aged manure increased VFA content relative to no addition treatments (P < 0.001). Branched-chain VFA and aromatic compounds accumulated only in the aged manure (no addition and protein treatments), indicating that some protein fermentation occurred in those treatments. Based upon substrate loss, starch fermentation was the dominant process in both manures and all treatments with losses exceeding 18.6 g/L. Protein fermentation occurred only in the aged manure, specifically the no addition and protein treatments, when starch was no longer available. The production of odorous compounds from manure was controlled by substrate availability and pH, with pH related to lactate accumulation. We believe that calcareous soil and lactate-consuming microorganisms in the aged manure slurries minimized slurry acidification and resulted in greater accumulations of odorous products. Substrate additions had little effect on the overall accumulation of odor compounds in manure but had profound effects on odor compound composition. We propose that modifying cattle diets to limit starch and protein excretion would

  2. Abundance of six tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater lagoons at cattle feedlots with different antibiotic use strategies.

    PubMed

    Peak, Nicholas; Knapp, Charles W; Yang, Richard K; Hanfelt, Margery M; Smith, Marilyn S; Aga, Diana S; Graham, David W

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of six tetracycline resistance genes tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tet(B) and tet(L), were quantified over time in wastewater lagoons at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) to assess how feedlot operation affects resistance genes in downstream surface waters. Eight lagoons at five cattle feedlots in the Midwestern United States were monitored for 6 months. Resistance and 16S-rRNA gene abundances were quantified using real-time PCR, and physicochemical lagoon conditions, tetracycline levels, and other factors (e.g. feedlot size and weather conditions) were monitored over time. Lagoons were sorted according to antibiotic use practice at each site, and designated as 'no-use', 'mixed-use' or 'high-use' for comparison. High-use lagoons had significantly higher detected resistance gene levels (tet(R); 2.8 x 10(6) copies ml(-1)) relative to no-use lagoons (5.1 x 10(3) copies ml(-1); P < 0.01) and mixed-use lagoons (7.3 x 10(5) copies ml(-1); P = 0.076). Bivariate correlation analysis on pooled data (n = 54) confirmed that tet(R) level strongly correlated with feedlot area (r = 0.67, P < 0.01) and 'total' bacterial 16S-rRNA gene level in each lagoon (r = 0.51, P < 0.01), which are both characteristic of large CAFOs. tet(M) was the most commonly detected gene, both in absolute number and normalized to 16S-rRNA gene level, although tet(O), tet(Q) and tet(W) levels were also high in the mixed and high-use lagoons. Finally, resistance gene levels were highly seasonal with abundances being 10-100 times greater in the autumn versus the summer. Results show that antibiotic use strategy strongly affects both the abundance and seasonal distribution of resistance genes in associated lagoons, which has implications on water quality and feedlot management practices. PMID:17227419

  3. Potential associations between fecal shedding of Salmonella in feedlot cattle treated for apparent respiratory disease and subsequent adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir Alam, Mohammad; Renter, David G.; Ives, Samuel E.; Thomson, Daniel U.; Sanderson, Michael W.; Hollis, Larry C.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2009-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was used to assess whether Salmonella fecal shedding in commercial feedlot cattle treated with antimicrobials for respiratory disease was associated with subsequent adverse health outcomes. Feces were collected per rectum from cattle that were examined for apparent respiratory disease, had a rectal temperature ≥40 °C, and subsequently received antimicrobial treatment. Salmonella were recovered from 918 (73.7%) of 1 245 fecal samples and weekly prevalence estimates ranged from 49 to 100% over the 3-month study. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Salmonella strains in the population were determined. Serogroup E Salmonella were most common (73.3%), followed by C1 (11.0%), C3 (8.6%), and B (1.1%). Predominant serotypes were Orion (46.5%), Anatum (19.8%), Kentucky (8.7%), Montevideo (7.5%), and Senftenberg (4.9%). Few isolates (36/918) were positive for antimicrobial resistance-associated integron gene intI1. Phenotypic susceptibility was associated with isolate intI1 status. Crude re-pull, re-treatment and case fatality risks were higher for cattle that were Salmonella-positive versus -negative at initial treatment, but not statistically different on multivariable analysis. However, case fatality risk was higher for cattle shedding Group B Salmonella than for cattle shedding other serogroups. Lots (groups) with a higher Salmonella prevalence at first treatment had a higher proportion of mortalities occur in a hospital pen, higher overall re-treatment risks, and were more likely to be sampled later in the study. Results indicate a high prevalence of Salmonella in this population of cattle treated for apparent respiratory disease, but that effects associated with clinical outcomes may depend on the Salmonella strain. PMID:18817722

  4. Evaluating the cost implications of a radio frequency identification feeding system for early detection of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Wolfger, Barbara; Manns, Braden J; Barkema, Herman W; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen S; Dorin, Craig; Orsel, Karin

    2015-03-01

    New technologies to identify diseased feedlot cattle in early stages of illness have been developed to reduce costs and welfare impacts associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). However, the economic value of early BRD detection has never been assessed. The objective was to simulate cost differences between two BRD detection methods during the first 61 d on feed (DOF) applied in moderate- to large-sized feedlots using an automated recording system (ARS) for feeding behavior and the current industry standard, pen-checking (visual appraisal confirmed by rectal temperature). Economic impact was assessed with a cost analysis in a simple decision model. Scenarios for Canadian and US feedlots with high- and low-risk cattle were modeled, and uncertainty was estimated using extensive sensitivity analyses. Input costs and probabilities were mainly extracted from publicly accessible market observations and a large-scale US feedlot study. In the baseline scenario, we modeled high-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 20% within the first 61 DOF in a feedlot of >8000 cattle in Canada. Early BRD detection was estimated to result in a relative risk of 0.60 in retreatment and 0.66 in mortality compared to pen-checking (based on previously published estimates). The additional cost of monitoring health with ARS in Canadian dollar (CAD) was 13.68 per steer. Scenario analysis for similar sized US feedlots and low-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 8% were included to account for variability in costs and probabilities in various cattle populations. Considering the cost of monitoring, all relevant treatment costs and sale price, ARS was more costly than visual appraisal during the first 61 DOF by CAD 9.61 and CAD 9.69 per steer in Canada and the US, respectively. This cost difference increased in low-risk cattle in Canada to CAD 12.45. Early BRD detection with ARS became less expensive if the costs for the system decreased to less than CAD 4.06/steer, or if the underlying true

  5. Evaluation of an IgG Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay as a Serological Assay for Detection of Mycoplasma bovis Infection in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wawegama, Nadeeka K; Markham, Philip F; Kanci, Anna; Schibrowski, Meghan; Oswin, Sally; Barnes, Tamsin S; Firestone, Simon M; Mahony, Timothy J; Browning, Glenn F

    2016-05-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen of emerging significance in cattle throughout the world that is causing a range of diseases, including mastitis, arthritis, and pneumonia. The limited availability and efficacy of current diagnostic and prophylactic tools for its control and its increasing antimicrobial resistance are contributing to its increasing importance in beef and dairy cattle. We have developed an indirect IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a recombinant fragment of the MilA protein and have shown its potential as an effective diagnostic tool. To more comprehensively estimate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this IgG ELISA for detection of infection with M. bovis in cattle and to define a suitable cutoff for use in the field, we further assessed its performance in experimentally infected calves in a closed beef herd and by applying Bayesian latent class modeling to laboratory testing results from 7,448 cattle entering Australian feedlots. The most effective cutoff points were estimated to be 68.6 antibody units (AU) for experimentally infected calves and to be 58.7 AU for a closed adult herd. Under field conditions, in feedlot cattle the globally optimal cutoff was estimated to be 105 AU. At this cutoff, the diagnostic sensitivity was 94.3% (95% probability interval [PI], 89.9% to 99.6%) with a diagnostic specificity of 94.4% (95% PI, 90.3% to 99.6%). Applying this 105 AU cutoff, 13.1% of cattle were seropositive for infection with M. bovis on entry into feedlots, and 73.5% were seropositive when followed up approximately 6 weeks later suggesting a high risk of infection shortly after entry into feedlots. PMID:26912757

  6. Acyl-Homoserine-Lactone Autoinducer in the Gastrointesinal Tract of Feedlot Cattle and Correlation to Season, E. Coli O157:H7 Prevalence, and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, R. L.; Sperandio, V.; Hughes, D. T.; Lawrence, T. E.; Callaway, T. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Nisbet, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-homoserine-lactone autoinducer (AHL) produced by nonenterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli species in cattle appears to be required for enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) colonization of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The current research aimed to examine the effect of season, diet, EHEC shedding, and location within the GIT on AHL prevalence in the ruminant. Luminal content samples were collected from the rumen and rectum of feedlot cattle at slaughter in the spring, summer, fall, and winter for culture of E. coli O157:H7 and AHL determination. During the spring collection, samples were additionally collected from the cecum and small intestine, but these samples all were AHL negative and therefore not examined again. To assess the influence of diet on AHL prevalence, 14 lambs were fed either 100% forage or 80% concentrate diets and experimentally inoculated with EHEC. At 8 days after infection, all the lambs were killed, and necropsies were taken, with luminal contents collected from the GIT. The collections from the feedlot cattle had AHL in 100% of the rumen content samples from the spring, summer, and fall, but not in any of the winter samples. No other GIT samples from feedlot cattle were AHL positive, and all the samples from the sheep study were AHL negative. The cattle seemed to show a weak correlation between ruminal AHL and EHEC prevalence. This research found AHL only in the rumen and not in the lower GIT of feedlot cattle. However, it is unclear whether this is because the pH of the lower gut destroys the AHL or because a lack of certain bacteria in the lower gut producing AHL. PMID:18982388

  7. Physical and chemical changes during composting of wood chip-bedded and straw-bedded beef cattle feedlot manure.

    PubMed

    Larney, Francis J; Olson, Andrew F; Miller, Jim J; DeMaere, Paul R; Zvomuya, Francis; McAllister, Tim A

    2008-01-01

    In the 1990s, restrictions on incineration encouraged the forest industry in western Canada to develop new uses for their wood residuals by product. One such use was as a replacement for cereal straw bedding in southern Alberta's beef cattle (Bos taurus) feedlot industry. However, use of carbon (C)-rich bedding, such as wood chips, had implications for subsequent composting of the feedlot manure, a practice that was being increasingly adopted. In a 3-yr study, we compared composting of wood chip-bedded manure (WBM) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) straw-bedded manure (SBM). There were no significant differences in temperature regimes of SBM and WBM, indicating similar rates of successful composting. Of 17 physical and chemical parameters, five showed significant (P < 0.10) differences due to bedding at the outset of composting (Day 0), and 11 showed significant differences at final sampling (Day 124). During composting (10 sampling times), seven parameters showed significant bedding effects, 16 showed significant time effects, and four showed a Bedding x Time interaction. Significantly lower (P < 0.10) losses of nitrogen (N) occurred with WBM (19%) compared with SBM (34%), which has positive implications for air quality and use as a soil amendment. Other advantages of WBM compost included significantly higher total C (333 vs. 210 kg Mg(-1) for SBM) and inorganic N (1.3 vs. 1.0 kg Mg(-1) for SBM) and significantly lower total phosphorus (4.5 vs. 5.3 kg Mg(-1) for SBM). Our results showed that wood chip bedding should not be a problem for subsequent composting of the manure after pen cleaning. In combination with other benefits, our findings should encourage the adoption of wood chips over straw as a bedding choice for southern Alberta feedlots. PMID:18396561

  8. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  9. Comparison of tulathromycin and tilmicosin on the prevalence and severity of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle in association with feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and economic factors.

    PubMed

    Tennant, T C; Ives, S E; Harper, L B; Renter, D G; Lawrence, T E

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to 1) quantify effects of metaphylactic treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and lung lesion prevalence and severity; 2) evaluate the association of lung lesion prevalence and severity with carcass characteristics; and 3) evaluate effects of therapeutic treatment on carcass characteristics and lung lesion prevalence and severity. The study was conducted at a commercial feedlot in the Texas Panhandle in which steers (n = 2,336) initially weighing 312.1 ± 9.6 kg were sourced from auction markets and allocated in a randomized complete block design to 1 of 3 treatments (no metaphylactic [no antimicrobial drug {ND}] treatment, tilmicosin at 10 mg/kg BW [TIL], and tulathromycin at 2.5 mg/kg BW [TUL]). Lungs of all steers were evaluated during harvest to assess presence and severity of pneumonic lesions in the anteroventral lobes and the presence and severity of pleural adherences. Compared to the ND treatment, steers treated via metaphylactic therapy had greater (P < 0.05) metaphylactic cost, ADG, shrunk final BW, dressed carcass yield, HCW, 12th rib fat, calculated empty body fat (EBF), and gross revenue, concurrent with reduced (P < 0.05) BRD treatment costs and financial losses from BRD death and railed cattle, cumulatively resulting in greater financial returns. Lung lesions were present in 64.3% of lungs and were distributed similarly between metaphylactic treatments (63.9%) and ND (65.1%) cattle. Steers with advanced lung lesions present at harvest were associated with reduced (P < 0.05) HCW, KPH, 12th rib fat, calculated yield grades, marbling scores, and calculated EBF as compared to steers without lung lesions. Steers pulled for BRD had increased (P < 0.01) incidence of advanced lung lesions, mortality, and railers with decreased (P < 0.05) HCW, 12th rib fat, KPH, marbling score, calculated EBF, and percentage choice carcasses when compared to non-BRD event steers. From

  10. Are E. coli infecting bacteriophage more prevalent in feedlot cattle than we initially thought?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the prevalence of both Escherichia coli O157 and O157:H7-infecting bacteriophages within a 50,000 head commercial beef feedlot. E. coli O157 was detected in 25% of the individual samples distributed across 7 of the 10 pens screened. In a simple primary screen to detect O157:H7-infecti...

  11. Subsurface Sensing Methods Applied to Vegetative Treatment Areas Used to Manage Cattle Feedlot Runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring alternative feedlot runoff control technology effectiveness, especially vegetative treatment systems (VTS), is of interest to both cattlemen and regulatory agencies. Producers have constructed VTS in several mid-western states under an agreement with the Iowa Cattlemen Association and th...

  12. Examination of predictors of Salmonella enterica contamination in cattle feedlot environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To identify a “predictor” or “environmental marker” that can be used to estimate Salmonella prevalence in a given feedlot environment. Further, to examine the correlation between environmental Salmonella contamination, Salmonella fecal shedding status, and prevalence of Salmonella in per...

  13. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  14. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2012-01-01

    Feedlot pen soil is a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM). A feedlot pen was identified in which naturally occurring E. coli O157:H7 was prevalent and evenly distributed in the FSM. Forty plots 3 by 3 m were randomly assigned such that five plots of each of the solarization times of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks were examined. Temperature loggers were placed 7.5 cm below the surface of each plot, and plots to be solarized were covered with clear 6-mil polyethylene. At each sampling time, five FSM samples were collected from each of five solarized and five unsolarized plots. E. coli concentrations and E. coli O157:H7 presence by immunomagnetic separation and plating were determined for each FSM sample. Initial percentages of E. coli O157:H7-positive samples in control and solarized FSM were 84 and 80%, respectively, and did not differ (P > 0.05). E. coli O157:H7 was no longer detectable by 8 weeks of solarization, but was still detected in unsolarized FSM at 10 weeks. The average initial concentration of E. coli in FSM was 5.56 log CFU/g and did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). There was a 2.0-log decrease of E. coli after 1 week of solarization, and a >3.0-log reduction of E. coli by week 6 of solarization (P, 0.05). E. coli levels remained unchanged in unsolarized FSM (P > 0.05). Daily peak FSM temperatures were on average 8.7°C higher for solarized FSM compared with unsolarized FSM, and reached temperatures as high as 57°C. Because soil solarization reduces E. coli O157:H7, this technique may be useful for reduction of persistence and transmission of this pathogen in cattle production, in addition to remediation of E. coli O157:H7-contaminated soil used to grow food crops. PMID:22221349

  15. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride on performance, rate and variation in feed intake, and acid-base balance in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Abney, C S; Vasconcelos, J T; McMeniman, J P; Keyser, S A; Wilson, K R; Vogel, G J; Galyean, M L

    2007-11-01

    Two experiments evaluated effects of ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on performance, intake patterns, and acid-base balance of feedlot cattle. In Exp. 1, 360 crossbred steers (Brangus, British, and British x Continental breeding; initial BW = 545 kg) were used in a study with a 3 x 3 factorial design to study the effects of dose [0, 100, or 200 mg/(steer x d) of RAC] and duration (28, 35, or 42 d) of feeding of RAC in a randomized complete block design (9 treatments, 8 pens/treatment). No dose x duration interactions were detected (P > 0.10). As RAC dose increased, final BW (FBW; P = 0.01), ADG (P < 0.01), and G:F (P < 0.01) increased linearly. As duration of feeding increased, ADG increased quadratically (P = 0.04), with tendencies for quadratic effects for FBW (P = 0.06), DMI (P = 0.07), and G:F (P = 0.09). Hot carcass weight increased linearly (P = 0.02) as dose of RAC increased. Thus, increasing the dose of RAC from 0 to 200 mg/(steer x d) and the duration of feeding from 28 to 42 d improved feedlot performance, although quadratic responses for duration of feeding indicated little improvement as the duration was extended from 35 to 42 d. In Exp. 2, 12 crossbred beef steers (BW = 593 kg) were used in a completely random design to evaluate the effects of RAC [0 or 200 mg/(steer x d) for 30 d; 6 steers/treatment] on rate of intake, daily variation in intake patterns, and acid-base balance. To assess intake patterns, absolute values of daily deviations in feed delivered to each steer relative to the total quantity of feed delivered were analyzed as repeated measures. There were no differences (P > 0.10) in feedlot performance, urine pH, blood gas measurements, or variation in intake patterns between RAC and control cattle, but steers fed RAC had increased (P = 0.04) LM area, decreased (P = 0.03) yield grade, and increased (P < 0.10) time to consume 50 and 75% of daily intake relative to control steers. Our results suggest that feeding RAC for 35 d at 200 mg

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Shiga Toxin-Negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain C1-057, Isolated from Feedlot Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brandon; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale; Sofos, John; Belk, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the major foodborne pathogens in the United States. We isolated a variant Shiga toxin-negative E. coli O157:H7 strain from feedlot cattle. We report here the draft genome sequence of this isolate, consisting of a chromosome of ~4.8 Mb and two plasmids of ~96 kb and ~14 kb. PMID:26941140

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Shiga Toxin-Negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain C1-057, Isolated from Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Carlson, Brandon; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale; Sofos, John; Belk, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the major foodborne pathogens in the United States. We isolated a variant Shiga toxin-negative E. coli O157:H7 strain from feedlot cattle. We report here the draft genome sequence of this isolate, consisting of a chromosome of ~4.8 Mb and two plasmids of ~96 kb and ~14 kb. PMID:26941140

  18. Prevalence and Quinolone Susceptibilities of Salmonella Isolated from the Feces of Preharvest Cattle Within Feedlots that Used a Fluoroquinolone to Treat Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ashley B; Renter, David G; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Shi, Xiaorong; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen and antimicrobial resistance can be a human health concern. The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to (1) determine the prevalence and quinolone susceptibility of Salmonella in feces of preharvest commercial feedlot cattle and (2) determine if the prevalence and susceptibility of Salmonella isolates were associated with previous fluoroquinolone use within pens. Five feedlots in western Kansas and Texas were selected based on their use of a commercially licensed fluoroquinolone for initial treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Twenty pen floor fecal samples were collected from each of 10 pens from each feedlot during early summer of 2012. Salmonella isolation was performed and microbroth dilution was used to determine susceptibility of isolates to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Prior antimicrobial treatment data were retrieved from feedlots' operational data. Generalized linear mixed models were used to assess associations between Salmonella prevalence and the number of fluoroquinolone treatments within pens while taking into consideration cattle demographic and management factors, as well as the hierarchical structure of the data. Overall, cumulative fecal prevalence of Salmonella was 38.0% (380/1000), but prevalence varied significantly (p < 0.01) among the five feedlots: 0.5% (1/200), 17.5% (35/200), 37.0% (74/200), 58.5% (117/200), and 76.5% (153/200). Salmonella serogroups included C1 (49.3%), E (36.4%), C2 (13.8%), and D (0.6%). There was no significant association (p = 0.52) between Salmonella prevalence and the frequency of fluoroquinolone treatments within a pen. All Salmonella isolates (n = 380) were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, while one isolate exceeded the human breakpoint (≥32 μg/mL) for nalidixic acid. In conclusion, Salmonella fecal prevalence in preharvest cattle was highly variable among feedlots. Nearly all Salmonella isolates were susceptible to quinolones

  19. Comparison of enrofloxacin and ceftiofur sodium for the treatment of relapse of undifferentiated fever/bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M.; Schunicht, Oliver C.; Wildman, Brian K.; Hannon, Sherry J.; Jim, G. Kee; Ward, Tracy I.; Booker, Calvin W.

    2012-01-01

    This commercial field trial compared the efficacy of enrofloxacin and ceftiofur sodium in beef cattle at high risk of developing undifferentiated fever (UF), also known as bovine respiratory disease (BRD) that received tilmicosin at feedlot arrival, were diagnosed and initially treated for UF with tilmicosin, and subsequently required a second UF treatment (first relapse). Feedlot cattle (n = 463) were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups: ENRO or CEF. Second UF relapse, 3rd UF relapse, overall case fatality and BRD case fatality rates were lower in the ENRO group than in the CEF group (P < 0.05). There were no differences in average daily gain (allocation to re-implant date), chronicity, histophilosis case fatality or miscellaneous case fatality rates between the groups (P ≥ 0.05). A per-animal economic advantage of Can$57.08 was calculated for the ENRO group versus the CEF group. In feedlot cattle in western Canada at high risk of developing UF, it was more cost effective to administer enrofloxacin than ceftiofur sodium for treatment of UF relapse. PMID:22753964

  20. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and performance by beef feedlot cattle given Lactobacillus direct-fed microbials.

    PubMed

    Brashears, M M; Galyean, M L; Loneragan, G H; Mann, J E; Killinger-Mann, K

    2003-05-01

    Fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7, the prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in pens and on carcasses and hides, and cattle performance as a result of daily dietary supplementation with Lactobacillus-based direct-fed microbials (DFMs) were evaluated in a feeding trial involving 180 beef steers. Steers were evaluated for shedding of E. coli O157:H7 by an immunomagnetic separation technique on arrival at the feedlot, just before treatment with the DFMs, and every 14 days thereafter until slaughter. Composite pen fecal samples were collected every 14 days (alternating weeks with animal testing), and prevalence on hides and carcasses at slaughter was also evaluated. Feedlot performance (body weight gain and feed intake) was measured for the period during which the DFMs were fed. Gain efficiency was calculated as the ratio of weight gain to feed intake. Lactobacillus acidophilus NPC 747 decreased (P < 0.01) the shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in the feces of individual cattle during the feeding period. E. coli O157:H7 was approximately twice as likely to be detected in control animal samples as in samples from animals receiving L. acidophilus NPC 747. In addition, DFM supplementation decreased (P < 0.05) the number of E. coli O157:H7-positive hide samples at harvest and the number of pens testing positive for the pathogen. Body weight gains (on a live or carcass basis) and feed intakes during the DFM supplementation period did not differ among treatments. Gain efficiencies on a live-weight basis did not differ among treatments, but carcass-based gain/feed ratios tended (P < 0.06) to be better for animals receiving the two DFM treatments than for control animals. The results of this study suggest that the feeding of a Lactobacillus-based DFM to cattle will decrease, but not eliminate, fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7, as well as contamination on hides, without detrimental effects on performance. PMID:12747680

  1. A Systematic Review of Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis Focused on Diagnostic Confirmation, Early Detection, and Prediction of Unfavorable Outcomes in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wolfger, Barbara; Timsit, Edouard; White, Brad J; Orsel, Karin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of newly arrived feedlot cattle are affected with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Economic losses could be reduced by accurate, early detection. This review evaluates the available literature regarding BRD confirmatory diagnostic tests, early detection methods, and modalities to estimate post-therapeutic prognosis or predict unfavorable or fatal outcomes. Scientific evidence promotes the use of haptoglobin to confirm BRD status. Feeding behavior, infrared thermography, and reticulorumen boluses are promising methods. Retrospective analyses of routinely collected treatment and cohort data can be used to identify cattle at risk of unfavorable outcome. Other methods have been reviewed but require further study. PMID:26210764

  2. Effect of proximity to a cattle feedlot on Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy greens and evaluation of the potential for bioaerosol and pest fly transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent foodborne outbreaks linked to spinach and lettuce emphasize the need for information regarding E. coli O157:H7 dissemination from cattle production. Project objectives were to evaluate the impact of proximity to a cattle feedlot on E. coli O157:H7 contamination of leafy greens and to examine...

  3. Transient fecal shedding and limited animal-to-animal transmission of Clostridium difficile by naturally infected finishing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Pickworth, Carrie; Loerch, Steve; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2011-05-01

    To longitudinally assess fecal shedding and animal-to-animal transmission of Clostridium difficile among finishing feedlot cattle as a risk for beef carcass contamination, we tested 186 ± 12 steers (mean ± standard deviation; 1,369 samples) in an experimental feedlot facility during the finishing period and at harvest. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12.9% of steers on arrival (24/186; 0 to 33% among five suppliers). Shedding decreased to undetectable levels a week later (0%; P < 0.001), and remained low (< 3.6%) until immediately prior to shipment for harvest (1.2%). Antimicrobial use did not increase fecal shedding, despite treatment of 53% of animals for signs of respiratory disease. Animals shedding C. difficile on arrival, however, had 4.6 times higher odds of receiving antimicrobials for respiratory signs than nonshedders (95% confidence interval for the odds ratio, 1.4 to 14.8; P = 0.01). Neither the toxin genes nor toxin A or B was detected in most (39/42) isolates based on two complementary multiplex PCRs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing, respectively. Two linezolid- and clindamycin-resistant PCR ribotype 078 (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/39-bp-type deletion in tcdC) isolates were identified from two steers (at arrival and week 20), but these ribotypes did not become endemic. The other toxigenic isolate (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/classic tcdC; PCR ribotype 078-like) was identified in the cecum of one steer at harvest. Spatio-temporal analysis indicated transient shedding with no evidence of animal-to-animal transmission. The association between C. difficile shedding upon arrival and the subsequent need for antimicrobials for respiratory disease might indicate common predisposing factors. The isolation of toxigenic C. difficile from bovine intestines at harvest highlights the potential for food contamination in meat processing plants. PMID:21441320

  4. Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild European starlings at a Kansas cattle feedlot.

    PubMed

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Linz, George M; Sherwood, Julie S; Dyer, Neil W; Bleier, William J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolated from the feces of wild European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) humanely trapped at a feedlot in central Kansas was assessed. All E. coli and Salmonella isolates recovered were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System panels and the E. coli isolates were classified as to their content of genes associated with pathogenic E. coli of birds and cattle, including cvaC, iroN2, ompTp, hlyF2, eitC, iss, iutA, ireA, papC, stxI, stxII, sta, K99, F41, and eae. Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were not detected and Salmonella was isolated from only three samples, two of which displayed antimicrobial resistance. Approximately half of the E. coli isolates were resistant to antimicrobial agents with 96% showing resistance to tetracycline. Only one isolate was positive for a single gene associated with bovine pathogenic E. coli. An interesting finding of this study was that 5% of the E. coli isolates tested met the criteria established for identification as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Thus these findings suggest that starlings are not a significant source of Salmonella spp., Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, E. coli O157, or other shiga toxin-producing E. coli in this feedlot. However, they may have the potential to spread APEC, an important pathogen of poultry and a potential pathogen to human beings. PMID:20095155

  5. Effect of subtherapeutic administration of antibiotics on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Alexander, T W; Yanke, L J; Topp, E; Olson, M E; Read, R R; Morck, D W; McAllister, T A

    2008-07-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in 300 feedlot steers receiving subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics was investigated through the collection of 3,300 fecal samples over a 314-day period. Antibiotics were selected based on the commonality of use in the industry and included chlortetracycline plus sulfamethazine (TET-SUL), chlortetracycline (TET), virginiamycin, monensin, tylosin, or no antibiotic supplementation (control). Steers were initially fed a barley silage-based diet, followed by transition to a barley grain-based diet. Despite not being administered antibiotics prior to arrival at the feedlot, the prevalences of steers shedding TET- and ampicillin (AMP)-resistant E. coli were >40 and <30%, respectively. Inclusion of TET-SUL in the diet increased the prevalence of steers shedding TET- and AMP-resistant E. coli and the percentage of TET- and AMP-resistant E. coli in the total generic E. coli population. Irrespective of treatment, the prevalence of steers shedding TET-resistant E. coli was higher in animals fed grain-based compared to silage-based diets. All steers shed TET-resistant E. coli at least once during the experiment. A total of 7,184 isolates were analyzed for MIC of antibiotics. Across antibiotic treatments, 1,009 (13.9%), 7 (0.1%), and 3,413 (47.1%) E. coli isolates were resistant to AMP, gentamicin, or TET, respectively. In addition, 131 (1.8%) and 143 (2.0%) isolates exhibited potential resistance to extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, as indicated by either ceftazidime or cefpodoxime resistance. No isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. The findings of the present study indicated that subtherapeutic administration of tetracycline in combination with sulfamethazine increased the prevalence of tetracycline- and AMP-resistant E. coli in cattle. However, resistance to antibiotics may be related to additional environmental factors such as diet. PMID:18502931

  6. Management and nutritional factors associated with the detection of Salmonella sp. from cattle fecal specimens from feedlot operations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Losinger, W C; Garber, L P; Smith, M A; Hurd, H S; Biehl, L G; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Thomas, L A; Ferris, K

    1997-08-01

    In a convenience sample of 100 feedlot operations (included in the United States Department of Agriculture: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 1994 Cattle on Feed Evaluation), up to 25 cattle fecal samples were collected and tested for the presence of Salmonella from each of two pens (the pen which contained the most-recent arrivals, and the pen with cattle that had been on feed the longest). One or more Salmonella spp. were recovered from 38 (38.0%) of the 100 feedlots, 52 (26.0%) of the 200 pens and 273 (5.5%) of the 4977 fecal samples collected. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that feeding tallow and feeding whole cottonseed or cottonseed hulls within seven days prior to fecal sample collection was associated with an increased risk of finding Salmonella in a pen. Variables not found to be significantly associated with the detection of Salmonella in a pen included region, operation size, use of sprinklers, time on feed, type of cattle in the pen, number and concentration of cattle in a pen, feeding probiotics, and various other feeds. PMID:9234447

  7. Use of zilpaterol hydrochloride to reduce odor and gas production from the feedlot surface when beef cattle are fed diets with or without ethanol byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many malodorous compounds emitted from the feedlot surface of beef finishing facilities result from protein degradation. The inclusion of wet distillers grain with solubles (WDGS) in beef finishing diets has been shown to increase odorous compounds in waste due to excess nitrogen excretion. Zilpater...

  8. Use of zilpaterol hydrochloride to reduce odors and gas production from the feedlot surface when beef cattle are fed diets with or without ethanol byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many malodorous compounds emitted from the feedlot surface of beef finishing facilities result from protein degradation. The inclusion of wet distillers grain with solubles (WDGS) in beef finishing diets has been shown to increase odorous compounds in waste due to excess nitrogen excretion. Zilpater...

  9. Bacterial community analysis of beef cattle feedlots reveals that pen surface is distinct from feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of beef is an important food safety concern. Cattle are a natural reservoir of this pathogen, and the life-cycle of E. coli O157:H7 involves cycling between the warm, nutrient-rich cattle large intestine and the generally cool, nutrient-limiting f...

  10. Nutritional management of feedlot cattle to optimize performance and minimize environmental impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle feeding industry is a new but rapidly growing industry in Brazil and other parts of South America. This presentation/ manuscript provides a brief overview of potential environmental issues faced by concentrated cattle feeding operations, and methods to minimize adverse effects on the envi...

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of rectoanal mucosal swab of feedlot cattle for detection and enumeration of Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle are noted carriers of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica. The perceived need to decrease the potential human health risk posed by excretion of this pathogen has resulted in numerous studies examining the factors that influence cattle shedding of Salmonella. Fecal grab (FG) samples hav...

  12. Net greenhouse gas emissions from manure management using anaerobic digestion technology in a beef cattle feedlot in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa Junior, Ciniro; Cerri, Carlos E P; Pires, Alexandre V; Cerri, Carlos C

    2015-02-01

    As part of an agreement during the COP15, the Brazilian government is fostering several activities intended to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. One of them is the adoption of anaerobic digester (AD) for treating animal manure. Due to a lack of information, we developed a case study in order to evaluate the effect of such initiative for beef cattle feedlots. We considered the net GHG emissions (CH4 and N2O) from the manure generated from 140 beef heifers confined for 90 days in the scope "housing to field application" by including field measurements, literature values, and the offset generated by the AD system through the replacement of conventional sources of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and electricity, respectively. Results showed that direct GHG emissions accounted for 0.14 ± 0.06 kg of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO₂eq) per kg of animal live weight gain (lwg), with ~80% originating from field application, suggesting that this emission does not differ from the conventional manure management (without AD) typically done in Brazil (0.19 ± 0.07 kg of CO₂eq per kg lwg(-1)). However, 2.4 MWh and 658.0 kg of N-manure were estimated to be generated as a consequence of the AD utilization, potentially offsetting 0.13 ± 0.01 kg of CO₂eq kg lwg(-1) or 95% (±45%) of total direct emissions from the manure management. Although, by replacing fossil fuel sources, i.e. diesel oil, this offset could be increased to 169% (±47%). In summary, the AD has the potential to significantly mitigate GHG emissions from manure management in beef cattle feedlots, but the effect is indirect and highly dependent on the source to be replaced. In spite of the promising results, more and continuous field measurements for decreasing uncertainties and improving assumptions are required. Identifying shortcomings would be useful not only for the effectiveness of the Brazilian government, but also for worldwide plans in mitigating GHG emissions from beef production systems. PMID:25461102

  13. Efficacy of a feed-additive antibacterial combination for improving feedlot cattle performance and health.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, G F; Berg, J L

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of a feed-additive antimicrobial combination for improving feedlot performance and health was tested using 4325 high-risk feeder calves randomly allocated to a control group or an experimental group. The experimental group received the conventional ration plus a feed additive containing 700 mg per head/day of chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine from arrival at the feedlot to day 56 of the feeding period. The inclusion of the feed additive to the ration significantly improved average daily gain for days 0-28 (P = 0.0163) and 0-56 (P = 0.0001), and the feed conversion for days 0-28 (P = 0.0061) and 0-56 (P = 0.0004). Additionally, the use of the feed additive significantly reduced the rate of bovine respiratory disease morbidity for days 0-28 (P = 0.0014) and 0-56 (P = 0.0001), the rate of relapses and mortality for days 0-56 (P = 0.0151 and P = 0.0209, respectively), and the rate of animals diagnosed with chronic respiratory disease for days 0-28 and 0-56 (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.0002, respectively). Performance and health improvements produced by the use of the feed additive were cost-effective. PMID:7600512

  14. Rectoanal Junction Colonization of Feedlot Cattle by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Its Association with Supershedders and Excretion Dynamics▿

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Rowland N.; Hancock, Dale D.; Rice, Daniel H.; Berg, Janice; Stilborn, Robert; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Besser, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Feedlot cattle were observed for fecal excretion of and rectoanal junction (RAJ) colonization with Escherichia coli O157:H7 to identify potential “supershedders.” RAJ colonization and fecal excretion prevalences were correlated, and E. coli O157:H7 prevalences and counts were significantly greater for RAJ samples. Based on a comparison of RAJ and fecal ratios of E. coli O157:H7/E. coli counts, the RAJ appears to be preferentially colonized by the O157:H7 serotype. Five supershedders were identified based on persistent colonization with high concentrations of E. coli O157:H7. Cattle copenned with supershedders had significantly greater mean pen E. coli O157:H7 RAJ and fecal prevalences than noncopenned cattle. Cumulative fecal E. coli O157:H7 excretion was also significantly higher for pens housing a supershedder. E. coli O157:H7/E. coli count ratios were higher for supershedders than for other cattle, indicating greater proportional colonization. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that isolates from supershedders and copenned cattle were highly related. Cattle that remained negative for E. coli O157:H7 throughout sampling were five times more likely to have been in a pen that did not house a supershedder. The data from this study support an association between levels of fecal excretion of E. coli O157:H7 and RAJ colonization in pens of feedlot cattle and suggest that the presence of supershedders influences group-level excretion parameters. An improved understanding of individual and population transmission dynamics of E. coli O157:H7 can be used to develop preslaughter- and slaughter-level interventions that reduce contamination of the food chain. PMID:17220263

  15. Evaluation of biochemical parameters and genetic markers for association with meat tenderness in South African feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Frylinck, L; van Wyk, G L; Smith, T P L; Strydom, P E; van Marle-Köster, E; Webb, E C; Koohmaraie, M; Smith, M F

    2009-12-01

    A large proportion of South African feedlot cattle are crossbreds of Brahman (BrX, Bos indicus), and Simmental (SiX, Bos taurus). A sample of 20 grain fed bulls from each of these crossbreeds was used to compare meat quality with that of the small frame indigenous Nguni (NgX, Sanga) by evaluating a variety of biochemical and genetic parameters previously shown to be associated with meat tenderness. Shear force values were generally high (5.6kg average at 14days post mortem), with SiX animals higher than BrX or NgX (P=0.051) despite higher calpastatin:calpain ratio in BrX (P<0.05). Calpain activity and cold shortening were both correlated with tenderness for all classes. The sample size was too small to accurately estimate genotypic effects of previously published markers in the CAST and CAPN1 genes, but the allele frequencies suggest that only modest progress would be possible in these South African crossbreds using these markers. PMID:20416642

  16. Hierarchal clustering yields insight into multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated from a cattle feedlot wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Jahne, Michael A; Rogers, Shane W; Ramler, Ivan P; Holder, Edith; Hayes, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Forty-two percent of Escherichia coli and 58% of Enterococcus spp. isolated from cattle feedlot runoff and associated infiltration basin and constructed wetland treatment system were resistant to at least one antibiotic of clinical importance; a high level of multidrug resistance (22% of E. coli and 37% of Enterococcus spp.) was observed. Hierarchical clustering revealed a closely associated resistance cluster among drug-resistant E. coli isolates that included cephalosporins (ceftiofur, cefoxitin, and ceftriaxone), aminoglycosides (gentamycin, kanamycin, and amikacin), and quinolone nalidixic acid; antibiotics from these classes were used at the study site, and cross-resistance may be associated with transferrable multiple-resistance elements. For Enterococcus spp., co-resistance among vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin was common; these antibiotics are reserved for complicated clinical infections and have not been approved for animal use. Vancomycin resistance (n = 49) only occurred when isolates were resistant to linezolid, daptomycin, and all four of the MLSB (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B) antibiotics tested (tylosin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and quinipristin/dalfopristin). This suggests that developing co-resistance to MLSB antibiotics along with cyclic lipopeptides and oxazolidinones may result in resistance to vancomycin as well. Effects of the treatment system on antibiotic resistance were pronounced during periods of no rainfall and low flow (long residence time). Increased hydraulic loading (short residence time) under the influence of rain caused antibiotic-resistant bacteria to be flushed through the treatment system. This presents concern for environmental discharge of multidrug-resistant organisms relevant to public health. PMID:25504186

  17. Runoff losses of excreted chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and tylosin from surface-applied and soil-incorporated beef cattle feedlot manure.

    PubMed

    Amarakoon, Inoka D; Zvomuya, Francis; Cessna, Allan J; Degenhardt, Dani; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim A

    2014-03-01

    Veterinary antimicrobials in land-applied manure can move to surface waters via rain or snowmelt runoff, thus increasing their dispersion in agro-environments. This study quantified losses of excreted chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and tylosin in simulated rain runoff from surface-applied and soil-incorporated beef cattle ( L.) feedlot manure (60 Mg ha, wet wt.). Antimicrobial concentrations in runoff generally reflected the corresponding concentrations in the manure. Soil incorporation of manure reduced the concentrations of chlortetracycline (from 75 to 12 μg L for a 1:1 mixture of chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine and from 43 to 17 μg L for chlortetracycline alone) and sulfamethazine (from 3.9 to 2.6 μg L) in runoff compared with surface application. However, there was no significant effect of manure application method on tylosin concentration (range, 0.02-0.06 μg L) in runoff. Mass losses, as a percent of the amount applied, for chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine appeared to be independent of their respective soil sorption coefficients. Mass losses of chlortetracycline were significantly reduced with soil incorporation of manure (from 6.5 to 1.7% when applied with sulfamethazine and from 6.5 to 3.5% when applied alone). Mass losses of sulfamethazine (4.8%) and tylosin (0.24%) in runoff were not affected by manure incorporation. Although our results confirm that cattle-excreted veterinary antimicrobials can be removed via surface runoff after field application, the magnitudes of chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine losses were reduced by soil incorporation of manure immediately after application. PMID:25602656

  18. Influence of ardacin supplementation on feedlot performance and digestive function of cattle.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A; Song, M K; Lindsey, T O

    1991-04-01

    A feedlot growth-performance trial and a metabolism trial were conducted to evaluate a dose response to ardacin (a glycopeptide antibiotic). Treatments consisted of an 88% concentrate finishing diet supplemented to contain (DM basis) 0, 8.25, 16.5., or 33 mg ardacin/kg. The growth-performance trial (129 d) involved 120 heifers and 120 steers in a randomized complete block design. There were no interactions (P less than .10) between sex and response to ardacin. Average daily gain increased (P less than .05) and DM conversion decreased (P less than .01) with increasing levels of ardacin supplementation. At the 33 mg/kg level of supplementation, ADG and DM conversion were improved 10.6 and 5.6%, respectively. Four Holstein steers (344 kg) with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used to evaluate treatment effects on characteristics of digestion. There were cubic effects of ardacin on ruminal starch digestion (P less than .05), microbial N synthesis (MNS, P less than .10), and microbial efficiency (MNEFF, grams of MNS/kilogram of OM fermented). For the 16.5 and 33 mg/kg levels of supplementation, ruminal starch digestion was increased 4.9%, and MNS and MNEFF were decreased 12.9 and 15.6%, respectively. Postruminal and total tract digestion of N increased linearly (P less than .10) with ardacin supplementation. Total tract digestion of OM, ADF, and starch were not affected (P greater than .10). Ardacin did not influence (P greater than .10) ruminal pH or molar VFA proportions. It is concluded that supplementation of a finishing diet with 33 mg ardacin/kg will enhance ADG and DM conversion of feedlot steers and heifers. PMID:2071503

  19. REPRODUCTIVE, GROWTH, FEEDLOT, AND CARCASS TRAITS OF TWIN VERSUS SINGLE BIRTHS IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual frequency of fraternal twins increased 3.1% per year to 50 to 55% in a selected herd of cattle at the U. S. Meat Animal Research Center. Because twin ovulations are the first prerequisite for fraternal twins, breeding value for twinning was predicted by repeated measures of ovulation rate in ...

  20. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  1. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  2. Effect of distillers feedstuffs and lasolocid on Campylobacter carriage in feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter are foodborne pathogens that can colonize the gut of food animals. Limited in their ability to ferment sugars, Campylobacter can derive energy for growth via amino acid catabolism. In cattle, dietary amino acids can be extensively catabolized in the rumen and cattlemen often suppleme...

  3. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING EXTENDS THE DURATION OF FECAL SHEDDING OF E. COLI O157 IN FEEDLOT CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal shedding of E. coli O157 in cattle in the United States is well documented however reasons for this phenomenon are unknown. Fecal prevalence is typically highest in the summer and early fall, decreasing to low or undetectable levels in the winter months. Ambient temperature has been sugge...

  4. Investigations into the beneficial uses of ash from the combustion of manure from beef cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for beneficial uses or co-products from the combustion of beef cattle manure were investigated. Phosphate concentrations indicate some potential for use as an agronomic soil amendment, but the phosphate is not freely released. Greenhouse studies suggest that neither good nor harm occur...

  5. Influence of canola and sunflower diet amendments on cattle feedlot manure.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiying; Mir, Priya S; Shah, Mohammad A; Travis, Greg R

    2005-01-01

    Cattle (Bos taurus) producers can replace a part of the traditional diet of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grain/silage with sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) seeds or canola meal (Brassica napus L.)/oil to enhance conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) content in milk and meat for its positive health benefits. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of feeding sunflower or canola to finishing steers on cattle manure chemical properties and volatile fatty acid (VFA) content. The control diet contained 84% rolled barley and 15% barley silage, which provided only 2.6% lipid. The other six treatments had 6.6 to 8.6% lipid delivered from sources such as hay, sunflower seed (SS), canola meal/oil, and SS forage pellets. Manure samples (a mixture of cattle urine, feces, and woodchip bedding materials) were collected and analyzed after cattle had been on these diets for 113 d. The dietary source and level of lipid had no effect on organic N and nitrate N content in manure, but significantly affected ammonia N and VFA. Inclusion of SS forage pellets, hay, or canola meal/oil in cattle diets had no significant impact on manure characteristics, but SS significantly reduced the pH and increased propionic, isobutyric, and isovaleric content. In addition, N loss after excretion (mainly from urine N) increases with the pH and N levels in both feed and manure. The combination of SS with barley silage resulted in a lower VFA and NH3 content in manure and should be a more attractive option. To better manage N nutrient cycles and reduce NH3 related odor problems, feed and manure pH should be one of the factors to consider when determining feed mix rations. PMID:15998867

  6. Measuring and modeling nitrous oxide and methane emissions from beef cattle feedlot manure management: First assessments under Brazilian condition.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ciniro; Li, Changsheng; Cerri, Carlos E P; Cerri, Carlos C

    2014-01-01

    Intensive beef production has increased during recent decades in Brazil and may substantially increase both methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from manure management. However, the quantification of these gases and methods for extrapolating them are scarce in Brazil. A case study examines CH(4) and N(2)O emissions from one typical beef cattle feedlot manure management continuum in Brazil and the applicability of Manure-DNDC model in predicting these emissions for better understand fluxes and mitigation options. Measurements track CH(4) and N(2)O emissions from manure excreted in one housing floor holding 21 animals for 78 days, stockpiled for 73 days and field spread (360 kg N ha(-1)). We found total emissions (CH(4) + N(2)O) of 0.19 ± 0.10 kg CO(2)eq per kg of animal live weight gain; mostly coming from field application (73%), followed housing (25%) and storage (2%). The Manure-DNDC simulations were generally within the statistical deviation ranges of the field data, differing in -28% in total emission. Large uncertainties in measurements showed the model was more accurate estimating the magnitude of gases emissions than replicate results at daily basis. Modeled results suggested increasing the frequency of manure removal from housing, splitting the field application and adopting no-tillage system is the most efficient management for reducing emissions from manure (up to about 75%). Since this work consists in the first assessment under Brazilian conditions, more and continuous field measurements are required for decreasing uncertainties and improving model validations. However, this paper reports promising results and scientific perceptions for the design of further integrated work on farm-scale measurements and Manure-DNDC model development for Brazilian conditions. PMID:25035919

  7. Oral delivery systems for encapsulated bacteriophages targeted at Escherichia coli O157:H7 in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stanford, K; McAllister, T A; Niu, Y D; Stephens, T P; Mazzocco, A; Waddell, T E; Johnson, R P

    2010-07-01

    Bacteriophages are natural predators of bacteria and may mitigate Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle and their environment. As bacteriophages targeted to E. coli O157:H7 (phages) lose activity at low pH, protection from gastric acidity may enhance efficacy of orally administered phages. Polymer encapsulation of four phages, wV8, rV5, wV7, and wV11, and exposure to pH 3.0 for 20 min resulted in an average 13.6% recovery of phages after release from encapsulation at pH 7.2. In contrast, untreated phages under similar conditions had a complete loss of activity. Steers (n = 24) received 10(11) CFU of naladixic acid-resistant E. coli O157:H7 on day 0 and were housed in six pens of four steers. Two pens were control (naladixic acid-resistant E. coli O157:H7 only), and the remaining pens received polymer-encapsulated phages (Ephage) on days -1, 1, 3, 6, and 8. Two pens received Ephage orally in gelatin capsules (bolus; 10(10) PFU per steer per day), and the remaining two pens received Ephage top-dressed on their feed (feed; estimated 10(11) PFU per steer per day). Shedding of E. coli O157:H7 was monitored for 10 weeks by collecting fecal grab and hide swab samples. Acceptable activity of mixed phages at delivery to steers was found for bolus and feed, averaging 1.82 and 1.13 x 10(9) PFU/g, respectively. However, Ephage did not reduce shedding of naladixic acid-resistant E. coli O157:H7, although duration of shedding was reduced by 14 days (P < 0.1) in bolus-fed steers as compared with control steers. Two successful systems for delivery of Ephage were developed, but a better understanding of phage-E. coli O157:H7 ecology is required to make phage therapy a viable strategy for mitigation of this organism in feedlot cattle. PMID:20615343

  8. The effect of grain source and grain processing on performance of feedlot cattle: a review.

    PubMed

    Owens, F N; Secrist, D S; Hill, W J; Gill, D R

    1997-03-01

    Effects of grain species and grain processing method on DMI, rate and efficiency of gain, and feeding value for cattle fed high concentrate diets were appraised by statistically compiling results from 605 comparisons from feeding trials published in North American journals and experiment station bulletins since 1974. Metabolizable energy (ME) values for each grain and processing method were calculated by quadratic procedures from DMI and animal performance. Averaged across processing methods, ME values for corn, milo, and wheat grain (3.40, 3.22, and 3.46 Mcal/kg DM) fell within 9% of ME estimates from NRC (1996) for beef cattle. In contrast, ME values for barley and oats grain (3.55 and 3.46 Mcal/kg DM) were 24% and 17% greater than NRC (1996) estimates. Compared with the dry rolled forms, high moisture corn and milo resulted in lower ADG and DMI. Compared with dry rolling, either steam rolling or flaking of corn, milo, and wheat decreased DMI without decreasing ADG and improved feed efficiency by 10, 15, and 10%, respectively. Compared with dry rolled grain, steam flaking increased (P < .05) body weight-adjusted ME of corn and milo grain by 15 and 21%, respectively; body weight-adjusted ME for whole corn was 9% greater (P < .05) than for rolled corn grain. Steam flaking was surprisingly effective (13%) at increasing (P < .05) the body weight-adjusted ME of wheat, but steam flaking failed to increase the ME of barley and oats. Higher moisture content of high-moisture corn decreased dry matter intake without depressing ADG and improved efficiency and increased ME of the grain. Compared with steam flakes of moderate thinness, processing milo or barley to a very thin flake tended to reduce ADG and failed to improve feed efficiency. The ideal roughage source and roughage moisture content for maximum ME and ADG varied with grain processing method. Feeding corn silage rather than alfalfa and wet rather than dry roughage depressed (P < .01) ADG of cattle and reduced (P

  9. Fate of chlorate present in cattle wastes and its impact on Salmonella typhimurium and E. coli 0157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorate salts are being developed as a feed additive to reduce the numbers of pathogens in feedlot cattle. A series of studies was conducted to determine whether chlorate, at concentrations expected to be excreted in urine of dosed cattle, would also reduce the populations of pathogens in cattle wa...

  10. Dissipation of Three Veterinary Antimicrobials in Beef Cattle Feedlot Manure Stockpiled over Winter.

    PubMed

    Sura, Srinivas; Degenhardt, Dani; Cessna, Allan J; Larney, Francis J; Olson, Andrew F; McAllister, Tim A

    2014-05-01

    Dissipation of veterinary antimicrobials is known to occur during aerated windrow composting of beef cattle manure. However, it is unclear if a similar dissipation occurs during stockpiling. Chlortetracycline, tylosin, and sulfamethazine are three of the most commonly used veterinary antimicrobials in beef cattle production in western Canada. Their dissipation in stockpiled manure was investigated over 140 d during winter in Alberta, Canada. Beef cattle housed in pens were administered 44 mg of chlortetracycline kg feed (dry weight), 44 mg of chlortetracycline + 44 mg sulfamethazine kg feed, 11 mg of tylosin kg feed, or feed without antimicrobials (control). Manure samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction, and the extracts were analyzed for chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and tylosin by LC-MS-MS. Dissipation of all three antimicrobials in the manure was explained by exponential decay kinetics. Times for 50% dissipation (DT) were 1.8 ± 0.1 d for chlortetracycline alone or 6.0 ± 0.8 d when mixed with sulfamethazine, 20.8 ± 3.8 d for sulfamethazine, and 4.7 ± 1.2 d for tylosin. After 77 d, <1% of initial chlortetracycline and <2% of sulfamethazine remained. Tylosin residues were more variable, decreasing to approximately 12% of initial levels after 28 d, with 20% present after 77 d and 13% after 140 d. Temperatures within stockpiles reached maximum values within 6 d of establishment and varied with location (bottom, 62.5°C; middle, 63.8°C; and top, 42.9°C). Antimicrobials in the manure did not inhibit microbial activity, as indicated by temperature and mass losses of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). The C/N ratio in the manure decreased over the stockpiling period, indicating decomposition of manure to a more stable state. Dissipation of excreted residues with DT values 1.8 to 20.8 d showed that stockpiling can be as effective as windrow composting in mitigating the transfer of these three veterinary antimicrobials into the environment during

  11. Detection of Known and Novel Adenoviruses in Cattle Wastes via Broad-Spectrum Primers ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Samuel D.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    The critical assessment of bovine adenoviruses (BAdV) as indicators of environmental fecal contamination requires improved knowledge of their prevalence, shedding dynamics, and genetic diversity. We examined DNA extracted from bovine and other animal waste samples collected in Wisconsin for atadenoviruses and mastadenoviruses using novel, broad-spectrum PCR primer sets. BAdV were detected in 13% of cattle fecal samples, 90% of cattle urine samples, and 100% of cattle manure samples; 44 percent of BAdV-positive samples contained both Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus DNA. Additionally, BAdV were detected in soil, runoff water from a cattle feedlot, and residential well water. Overall, we detected 8 of 11 prototype BAdV, plus bovine, rabbit, and porcine mastadenoviruses that diverged significantly from previously reported genotypes. The prevalence of BAdV shedding by cattle supports targeting AdV broadly as indicators of the presence of fecal contamination in aqueous environments. Conversely, several factors complicate the use of AdV for fecal source attribution. Animal AdV infecting a given livestock host were not monophyletic, recombination among livestock mastadenoviruses was detected, and the genetic diversity of animal AdV is still underreported. These caveats highlight the need for continuing genetic surveillance for animal AdV and for supporting data when BAdV detection is invoked for fecal source attribution in environmental samples. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report natural BAdV excretion in urine, BAdV detection in groundwater, and recombination in AdV of livestock origin. PMID:21622778

  12. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  13. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes

  14. Comparison of Techniques to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Time-Averaged and Instantaneous Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Williams, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) that volatilizes from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) can form aerosols that travel long distances where such aerosols can deposit in sensitive regions, potentially causing harm to local ecosystems. However, quantifying the emissions of ammonia from CAFOs through direct measurement is very difficult and costly to perform. A system was therefore developed at Colorado State University for conditionally sampling NH3 concentrations based on weather parameters measured using inexpensive equipment. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a two-week deployment period. The samplers are exposed by a robotic mechanism so they are only deployed when wind is from the direction of the CAFO at 1.4 m/s or greater. These concentration data, along with other weather variables measured during each sampler deployment period, can then be used in a simple inverse model (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, Thiverval-Grignon, France) to estimate emissions. There are not yet any direct comparisons of the modeled emissions derived from time-averaged concentration data to modeled emissions from more sophisticated backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) techniques that utilize instantaneous measurements of NH3 concentration. In the summer and autumn of 2013, a suite of robotic passive sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot at the same time as an open-path infrared (IR) diode laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) which continuously measured ammonia concentrations instantaneously over a 225-m path. This particular laser is utilized in agricultural settings, and in combination with a bLs model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Scientific, Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), has become a common method for estimating NH3 emissions from a variety of agricultural and industrial operations. This study will first

  15. Occurrence of the transferable copper resistance gene tcrB among fecal enterococci of U.S. feedlot cattle fed copper-supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Amachawadi, R G; Scott, H M; Alvarado, C A; Mainini, T R; Vinasco, J; Drouillard, J S; Nagaraja, T G

    2013-07-01

    Copper, an essential micronutrient, is supplemented in the diet at elevated levels to reduce morbidity and mortality and to promote growth in feedlot cattle. Gut bacteria exposed to copper can acquire resistance, which among enterococci is conferred by a transferable copper resistance gene (tcrB) borne on a plasmid. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the feeding of copper at levels sufficient to promote growth increases the prevalence of the tcrB gene among the fecal enterococci of feedlot cattle. The study was performed with 261 crossbred yearling heifers housed in 24 pens, with pens assigned randomly to a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments consisting of dietary copper and a commercial linseed meal-based energy protein supplement. A total of 22 isolates, each identified as Enterococcus faecium, were positive for tcrB with an overall prevalence of 3.8% (22/576). The prevalence was higher among the cattle fed diets supplemented with copper (6.9%) compared to normal copper levels (0.7%). The tcrB-positive isolates always contained both erm(B) and tet(M) genes. Median copper MICs for tcrB-positive and tcrB-negative enterococci were 22 and 4 mM, respectively. The transferability of the tcrB gene was demonstrated via a filter-mating assay. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis revealed a genetically diverse population of enterococci. The finding of a strong association between the copper resistance gene and other antibiotic (tetracycline and tylosin) resistance determinants is significant because enterococci remain potential pathogens and have the propensity to transfer resistance genes to other bacteria in the gut. PMID:23666328

  16. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains That Persist in Feedlot Cattle Are Genetically Related and Demonstrate an Enhanced Ability To Adhere to Intestinal Epithelial Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brandon A.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Mason, Gary L.; Ruby, John R.; Choat, W. Travis; Loneragan, Guy H.; Smith, Gary C.; Sofos, John N.; Belk, Keith E.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to investigate the nature of Escherichia coli O157:H7 colonization of feedlot cattle over the final 100 to 110 days of finishing. Rectal fecal grab samples were collected from an initial sample population of 788 steers every 20 to 22 days and microbiologically analyzed to detect E. coli O157:H7. The identities of presumptive colonies were confirmed using a multiplex PCR assay that screened for gene fragments unique to E. coli O157:H7 (rfbE and fliCh7) and other key virulence genes (eae, stx1, and stx2). Animals were classified as having persistent shedding (PS), transient shedding (TS), or nonshedding (NS) status if they consecutively shed the same E. coli O157:H7 genotype (based on the multiplex PCR profile), exhibited variable E. coli O157 shedding, or never shed morphologically typical E. coli O157, respectively. Overall, 1.0% and 1.4% of steers were classified as PS and NS animals, respectively. Characterization of 132 E. coli O157:H7 isolates from PS and TS animals by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing yielded 32 unique PFGE types. One predominant PFGE type accounted for 53% of all isolates characterized and persisted in cattle throughout the study. Isolates belonging to this predominant and persistent PFGE type demonstrated an enhanced (P < 0.0001) ability to adhere to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells compared to isolates belonging to less common PFGE types but exhibited equal virulence expression. Interestingly, the attachment efficacy decreased as the genetic divergence from the predominant and persistent subtype increased. Our data support the hypothesis that certain E. coli O157:H7 strains persist in feedlot cattle, which may be partially explained by an enhanced ability to colonize the intestinal epithelium. PMID:19617387

  17. Occurrence of the Transferable Copper Resistance Gene tcrB among Fecal Enterococci of U.S. Feedlot Cattle Fed Copper-Supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, R. G.; Alvarado, C. A.; Mainini, T. R.; Vinasco, J.; Drouillard, J. S.; Nagaraja, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential micronutrient, is supplemented in the diet at elevated levels to reduce morbidity and mortality and to promote growth in feedlot cattle. Gut bacteria exposed to copper can acquire resistance, which among enterococci is conferred by a transferable copper resistance gene (tcrB) borne on a plasmid. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the feeding of copper at levels sufficient to promote growth increases the prevalence of the tcrB gene among the fecal enterococci of feedlot cattle. The study was performed with 261 crossbred yearling heifers housed in 24 pens, with pens assigned randomly to a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments consisting of dietary copper and a commercial linseed meal-based energy protein supplement. A total of 22 isolates, each identified as Enterococcus faecium, were positive for tcrB with an overall prevalence of 3.8% (22/576). The prevalence was higher among the cattle fed diets supplemented with copper (6.9%) compared to normal copper levels (0.7%). The tcrB-positive isolates always contained both erm(B) and tet(M) genes. Median copper MICs for tcrB-positive and tcrB-negative enterococci were 22 and 4 mM, respectively. The transferability of the tcrB gene was demonstrated via a filter-mating assay. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis revealed a genetically diverse population of enterococci. The finding of a strong association between the copper resistance gene and other antibiotic (tetracycline and tylosin) resistance determinants is significant because enterococci remain potential pathogens and have the propensity to transfer resistance genes to other bacteria in the gut. PMID:23666328

  18. Dissemination of veterinary antibiotics and corresponding resistance genes from a concentrated swine feedlot along the waste treatment paths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Ben, Weiwei; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu; Qiang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Swine feedlots are an important pollution source of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to the environment. This study investigated the dissemination of two classes of commonly-used veterinary antibiotics, namely, tetracyclines (TCs) and sulfonamides (SAs), and their corresponding ARGs along the waste treatment paths from a concentrated swine feedlot located in Beijing, China. The highest total TC and total SA concentrations detected were 166.7mgkg(-1) and 64.5μgkg(-1) in swine manure as well as 388.7 and 7.56μgL(-1) in swine wastewater, respectively. Fourteen tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPP), efflux proteins (EFP) and enzymatic inactivation proteins, three sulfonamide resistance genes (SRGs), and two integrase genes were detected along the waste treatment paths with detection frequencies of 33.3-75.0%. The relative abundances of target ARGs ranged from 2.74×10(-6) to 1.19. The antibiotics and ARGs generally declined along both waste treatment paths, but their degree of reduction was more significant along the manure treatment path. The RPP TRGs dominated in the upstream samples and then decreased continuously along both waste treatment paths, whilst the EFP TRGs and SRGs maintained relatively stable. Strong correlations between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs were observed among both manure and wastewater samples. In addition, seasonal temperature, and integrase genes, moisture content and nutrient level of tested samples could all impact the relative abundances of ARGs along the swine waste treatment paths. This study helps understand the evolution and spread of ARGs from swine feedlots to the environment as well as assess the environmental risk arising from swine waste treatment. PMID:27128716

  19. Effect of distillers feedstuffs and lasalocid on Campylobacter carriage in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Harvey, Roger B; Wickersham, Tryon A; MacDonald, Jim C; Ponce, Christian H; Brown, Mike; Pinchak, William E; Osterstock, Jason B; Krueger, Nathan; Nisbet, David J

    2014-11-01

    Campylobacter bacteria are foodborne pathogens that can colonize the gut of food animals. Limited in their ability to ferment sugars, Campylobacter can derive energy for growth via amino acid catabolism. The objectives of the present studies were to test whether supplemental distillers grains containing high amounts of rumen-undegradable intake protein or supplemental lasalocid may, by promoting amino acid flow to the lower bovine gut, increase intestinal carriage of Campylobacter. In study one, 10 steers (5 per treatment) were adapted to diets formulated to achieve 0 or 30% dried distillers grains. After an initial 14-day adaptation to the basal diet, control and treated steers were fed their respective diets for 23 days, after which time they were fed supplemental lasalocid for an additional 8 days, followed by a 5-day withdrawal. In study two, 24 steers preacclimated to a basal diet were adapted via 3-day periodic increases to dietary treatments formulated to achieve 0, 30, or 60% wet corn distillers grains with solubles. Analysis of Campylobacter bacteria cultured from duodenal and fecal samples in study one and from fecal samples in study two revealed no effect of dried distillers grains or wet corn distillers grains with solubles on the prevalence or concentrations of duodenal or fecal Campylobacter. The results from study one indicated that colonized steers, regardless of treatment, harbored higher Campylobacter concentrations when transitioned to the basal diet than when coming off pasture. Campylobacter carriage was unaffected by lasalocid. These results provide no evidence that feeding distillers grains high in rumen-undegradable intake protein or supplemental lasalocid contributes to increased intestinal carriage of Campylobacter in fed cattle. PMID:25364932

  20. Prevalence of Taenia saginata Larvae (Cysticercus bovis) in Feedlot Cattle Slaughtered in a Federal Inspection Type Abattoir in Northwest México.

    PubMed

    Cueto González, Sergio Arturo; Rodríguez Castillo, José Luis; López Valencia, Gilberto; Bermúdez Hurtado, Rosa María; Hernández Robles, Erika Selene; Monge Navarro, Francisco Javier

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of bovine cysticercosis was established using routine postmortem inspection of 52,322 feedlot cattle slaughtered at 1 Federal Inspection Type abattoir (TIF 301) located in the Mexicali Valley in Baja California, México. The study included 31,393 animals (60.0%) purchased and transported to Baja California from stocker operations located in 17 states of México and 20,929 animals (40.0%) native to Baja California. A total of 208 carcasses showed lesions suggestive of cysticercosis, and 109 were confirmed as positive for the parasite with a prevalence of 0.21%, equivalent to 2.1 cases/1000 carcasses inspected, 2.8 cases/1000 carcasses for cattle purchased in other states, and 1.0 cases/1000 carcasses for cattle native from Baja California. The sensitivity of the postmortem inspection, when compared to a gold standard of stereoscopic microscopy, was 52.4%. The prevalence of cysticercosis was 2.8 times higher in cattle from other states compared with those native to Baja California. Cysticerci were most frequently found in the heart, followed by liver and masseter muscles. In cattle from other states, 96.6% of cysticerci were classified as calcified and <4% as viable; in cattle native to Baja California, 29% of cysticerci were classified as calcified and 71% as viable. The prevalence of bovine cysticercosis established at TIF 301 was found to be 28% lower than a previous report for Baja California. However, given the sensitivity of the postmortem inspection calculated between 10% and 50%, it is possible that an undetermined number of carcasses pass as being free of cysticerci and that the meat reached both domestic and international wholesale markets, increasing the possibility of human infection and causing substantial economic loss through condemnation of infected meat and trade restrictions for endemic regions. PMID:25803448

  1. Effect of lasalocid on feedlot performance and energy partitioning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Delfino, J; Mathison, G W; Smith, M W

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to quantify the effects of lasalocid on the performance and energy partitioning of cattle fed a 90% concentrate, barley-based diet. Experiment 1 utilized 100 Hereford heifers (initial weight 308 kg) fed diets containing no added ionophore, lasalocid added at 24, 36 or 54 mg/kg dry matter (DM), or monensin added at 33 mg/kg DM. In the 98-d trial, lasalocid-fed heifers gained an average of 1.35 kg daily, whereas control heifers gained 1.24 kg (P = .12). Heifers fed lasalocid (36 or 54 mg/kg DM), monensin, and the control diet required 6.2, 6.5 and 6.9 kg DM/kg gain, respectively (P greater than .1). Ionophores had no influence on carcass quality. In Exp. 2, four steers (616 kg) were fed the control or lasalocid diet (36 mg/kg DM) at daily feeding levels of 21, 44, 67 and 89 g DM/kg body weight.75; fecal, urinary, methane and heat losses were measured by total collection and indirect calorimetry methods. The proportion of digestible energy lost as methane averaged 7.5% for steers fed the control diet and 7.1% for the steers fed lasalocid (P less than .1). Lasalocid improved (P less than .05) the metabolizable energy (ME) density of the diet by 8, 8 and 5% at the 21, 44 and 67 g DM feeding levels. There was no difference (P greater than .1) between diets in ME density at the 89 g DM feeding level. The net energy for maintenance (NEm) value of the diet was increased (P less than .05) by 10 to 21% with lasalocid, whereas the net energy for gain (NEg) value was not affected. Average heat productions of the steers were increased (P less than .05) by 7% with lasalocid. The ME requirement for maintenance was estimated at 84 and 81 kcal/kg body weight.75 from linear regressions of energy retention and ME intake above maintenance for the control and lasalocid diets, respectively. Corresponding estimates using a semilog-linear method were 90 and 92. No differences (P greater than .1) in blood concentrations of insulin, glucagon or growth hormone

  2. Influence of Feeding Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Yeast Cell Wall on Growth Performance and Digestive Function of Feedlot Cattle during Periods of Elevated Ambient Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Chavira, J.; Arzola, C.; González-Vizcarra, V.; Manríquez-Núñez, O. M.; Montaño-Gómez, M. F.; Navarrete-Reyes, J. D.; Raymundo, C.; Zinn, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    In experiment 1, eighty crossbred steers (239±15 kg) were used in a 229-d experiment to evaluate the effects of increasing levels of enzymatically hydrolyzed yeast (EHY) cell wall in diets on growth performance feedlot cattle during periods of elevated ambient temperature. Treatments consisted of steam-flaked corn-based diets supplemented to provide 0, 1, 2, or 3 g EHY/hd/d. There were no effects on growth performance during the initial 139-d period. However, from d 139 to harvest, when 24-h temperature humidity index averaged 80, EHY increased dry matter intake (DMI) (linear effect, p<0.01) and average daily gain (ADG) (linear effect, p = 0.01). There were no treatment effects (p>0.10) on carcass characteristics. In experiment 2, four Holstein steers (292±5 kg) with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4×4 Latin Square design experiment to evaluate treatments effects on characteristics of ruminal and total tract digestion in steers. There were no treatment effects (p>0.10) on ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acid, molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, or estimated methane production. Supplemental EHY decreased ruminal molar proportion of acetate (p = 0.08), increased molar proportion of propionate (p = 0.09), and decreased acetate:propionate molar ratio (p = 0.07) and estimated ruminal methane production (p = 0.09). It is concluded that supplemental EHY may enhance DMI and ADG of feedlot steers during periods of high ambient temperature. Supplemental EHY may also enhance ruminal fiber digestion and decrease ruminal acetate:propionate molar ratios in feedlot steers fed steam-flaked corn-based finishing diets. PMID:26194225

  3. Retrospective serosurveillance of bovine norovirus (GIII.2) and nebovirus in cattle from selected feedlots and a veal calf farm in 1999 to 2001 in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher; Jung, Kwonil; Han, Myung-Guk; Hoet, Armando; Scheuer, Kelly; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    There is a dearth of information on the seroprevalence of bovine norovirus (BoNoV) and nebovirus in cattle of the US. In this retrospective study, serum IgG antibodies to two bovine enteric caliciviruses, GIII.2 BoNoV (Bo/CV186-OH/00/US) and genetically and antigenically distinct nebovirus (Bo/NB/80/US), were evaluated in feedlot and veal calves from different regions of the US during 1999-2001. Three groups of 6- to 7-month-old feedlot calves from New Mexico (NM) (n=103), Arkansas (AR) (n=100) and Ohio (OH) (n=140) and a group of 7- to 10-day-old Ohio veal calves (n=47) were studied. Serum samples were collected pre-arrival or at arrival to the farms for the NM, AR and OH calves and 35 days after arrival for all groups for monitoring seroconversion rates during the period. Virus-like particles of Bo/CV186-OH/00/US and Bo/NB/80/US were expressed using the baculovirus expression system and were used in ELISA to measure antibodies. A high seroprevalence of 94-100 % and 78-100 % was observed for antibodies to GIII.2 BoNoV and nebovirus, respectively, in the feedlot calves tested. In the Ohio veal farm, an antibody seroprevalence of 94-100 % and 40-66 % was found for GIII.2 BoNoV and nebovirus, respectively. Increased seropositive rates of 38-85 % for GIII.2 BoNoV and 26-83 % for nebovirus were observed at 35 days after arrival and commingling on farms for all groups. Infection of calves with either GIII.2 BoNoV or nebovirus, or both viruses, appeared to be common in the regions studied in the US during 1999-2001. These two viruses likely remain endemic because no commercial vaccines are available. PMID:23884635

  4. Vaccination of feedlot cattle with extracts and membrane fractions from two Mycoplasma bovis isolates results in strong humoral immune responses but does not protect against an experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Mulongo, Musa; Prysliak, Tracy; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2013-02-27

    Mycoplasma bovis is one of the most significant contributors to the bovine respiratory syndrome (BRD) that causes major losses in feedlot and dairy farms. Current experimental vaccines against M. bovis are ineffective and in some cases seem to enhance disease. Experimental infection with M. bovis induces a predominantly Th2 response and high levels of IgG1, which is an inferior opsonin and hence lacks protective capacity. In an attempt to induce a balanced (Th1/Th2) immune response, we have used CpG ODN 2007 as an adjuvant in a trial involving vaccination of cattle with M. bovis total extracts and/or membrane fractions and subsequent intranasal inoculation with an infective dose of M. bovis prepared from two different clinical isolates. Significant IgG1 serum responses were observed against both, extracts and fractions while IgG2 responses were significant against the extracts only. Proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after incubation with M. bovis cells was only observed in post-challenge samples of cattle vaccinated with both extracts and fractions but not in samples of cattle immunized with the membrane fractions alone. All groups showed transient weight losses and increased temperatures however, there were no significant differences in clinical parameters and survival rates between the groups. PMID:23340004

  5. Thermophilic methane production from cattle waste.

    PubMed Central

    Varel, V H; Isaacson, H R; Bryant, M P

    1977-01-01

    Methane production from waste of cattle fed a finishing diet was investigated, using four 3-liter-working volume anaerobic digestors at 60 degrees C. At 55 degrees C a start-up culture, in which waste was the only source of bacteria, was generated within 8 days and readily adapted to 60 degrees C, where efficiency of methanogenesis was greater. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 65 degrees C tended to drastically lower efficiency. When feed concentrations of volatile solids (VS, organic matter) were increased in steps of 2% after holding for 1 months at a given concentration, the maximum concentrations for efficient fermentation were 8.2, 10.0, 11.6, and 11.6% for the retention times (RT) of 3, 6, 9, and 12 days, respectively. The VS destructions for these and lower feed concentrations were 31 to 37, 36 to 40, 47 to 49 and 51 to 53% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-day RT digestors, respectively, and the corresponding methane production rates were about 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22 liters/day per g of VS in the feed. Gas contained 52 to 57% methane. At the above RT and feed concentrations, alkalinity rose to 5,000 to 7,700 mg of CaCo3 per liter (pH to 7.5 to 7.8), NH3 plus NH4+ to 64 to 90 mM, and total volatile acids to 850 to 2,050 mg/liter as acetate. The 3-day RT digestor was quite stable up to 8.2% feed VS and at this feed concentration produced methane at the very high rate of 4.5 liters/day per liter of digestor. Increasing the percentage of feed VS beyond those values indicated above resulted in greatly decreased organic matter destruction and methane production, variable decrease in pH, and increased alkalinity, ammonia, and total volatile acid concentrations, with propionate being the first to accumulate in large amounts. In a second experiment with another lot of waste, the results were similar. These studies indicate that loading rates can be much higher than those previously thought useful for maximizing methanogenesis from cattle waste. PMID:557954

  6. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected fro...

  7. Bovine Respiratory Disease in Feedlot Cattle: Phenotypic, Environmental, and Genetic Correlations with Growth, Carcass, and Palatability Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly feedlot disease in the United States. Selection for disease resistance is one of several possible interventions to prevent or reduce economic loss associated with animal disease and to improve animal welfare. Undesirable genetic relationships, how...

  8. FRUIT CANNERY WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE AS A CATTLE FEED INGREDIENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of sludge disposal, from a fruit processing waste activated sludge treatment system, by dewatering and using the dewatered biological sludge solids as cattle feed was evaluated by Snokist Growers at Yakima, Washington. Dewatering of the biological sludge utilizing...

  9. Mobile mapping and eddy covariance flux measurements of NH3 emissions from cattle feedlots with a portable laser-based open-path sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Stanton, L. G.; Ham, J. M.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Nash, C.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant alkaline species in the atmosphere and an important compound in the global nitrogen cycle. There is a large uncertainty in NH3 emission inventory from agriculture, which is the largest source of NH3, including livestock farming and fertilizer applications. In recent years, a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based open-path sensor has been developed to provide high-resolution, fast-response and high-sensitivity NH3 measurements. It has a detection limit of 150 pptv with a sample rate up to 20 Hz. This sensor has been integrated into a mobile platform mounted on the roof of a car to perform measurement of multiple trace gases. We have also used the sensor for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. The mobile sensing method provides high spatial resolution and fast mapping of measured gases. Meanwhile, the EC flux method offers accurate flux measurements and resolves the diurnal variability of NH3emissions. During the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPÉ field campaigns in 2014, this mobile platform was used to study NH3 emissions from cattle feedlot near Fort Morgan, Colorado. This specific feedlot was mapped multiple times in different days to study the variability of its plume characteristics. At the same time, we set up another open-path NH3 sensor with LICOR open-path sensors to perform EC flux measurements of NH3, CH4 and CO2 simultaneously in the same cattle feedlot as shown in Fig. 1. NH3/CH4 emission flux ratio show a strong temperature dependence from EC flux measurements. The median value of measured NH3 and CH4 emission flux ratio is 0.60 ppmv/ppmv. In contrast, the median value of ΔNH3/ΔCH4 ratios measured from mobile platform is 0.53 ppmv/ppmv for the same farm. The combination of mobile mapping and EC flux measurements with the same open-path sensors greatly improves understanding of NH3 emissions both spatially and temporally.

  10. Diversity and Distribution of Commensal Fecal Escherichia coli Bacteria in Beef Cattle Administered Selected Subtherapeutic Antimicrobials in a Feedlot Setting▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ranjana; Munns, Krysty; Alexander, Trevor; Entz, Toby; Mirzaagha, Parasto; Yanke, L. Jay; Mulvey, Michael; Topp, Edward; McAllister, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains isolated from fecal samples were screened to examine changes in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics including antimicrobial susceptibility, clonal type, and carriage of resistance determinants. The goal of this 197-day study was to investigate the influence of administration of chlortetracycline alone (T) or in combination with sulfamethazine (TS) on the development of resistance, dissemination of defined strain types, and prevalence of resistance determinants in feedlot cattle. Inherent tetracycline resistance was detected in cattle with no prior antimicrobial exposure. Antimicrobial administration was not found to be essential for the maintenance of inherently ampicillin-resistant and tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) E. coli in control animals; however, higher Tetr E. coli shedding was observed in animals subjected to the two treatments. At day 0, high tetracycline (26.7%), lower sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (19.2%), and several other resistances were detected, which by the finishing phase (day 197) were restricted to ampicillin-tetracycline (47.5%), tetracycline (31.7%), and ampicillin-tetracycline-sulfamethoxazole (20.8%) from both treated and untreated cattle. Among the determinants, blaTEM1, tet(A), and sul2 were prevalent at days 0 and 197. Further, E. coli from day 0 showed diverse antibiogram profiles and strain types, which by the finishing phase were limited to up to three, irrespective of the treatment. Some genetically identical strains expressed different phenotypes and harbored diverse determinants, indicating that mobile genetic elements contribute to resistance dissemination. This was supported by an increased linked inheritance of ampicillin and tetracycline resistance genes and prevalence of specific strains at day 197. Animals in the cohort shed increasingly similar genotypes by the finishing phase due to animal-to-animal strain transmission. Thus, characterizing inherent resistance and propagation of cohort

  11. Escherichia coli O26 in feedlot cattle: fecal prevalence, isolation, characterization, and effects of an E. coli O157 vaccine and a direct-fed microbial.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Zac D; Renter, David G; Cull, Charley A; Shi, Xiarong; Bai, Jianfa; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G

    2014-03-01

    Escherichia coli O26 is second only to O157 in causing foodborne, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infections. Our objectives were to determine fecal prevalence and characteristics of E. coli O26 in commercial feedlot cattle (17,148) that were enrolled in a study to evaluate an E. coli O157:H7 siderophore receptor and porin (SRP(®)) vaccine (VAC) and a direct-fed microbial (DFM; 10(6) colony-forming units [CFU]/animal/day of Lactobacillus acidophilus and 10(9) CFU/animal/day of Propionibacterium freudenreichii). Cattle were randomly allocated to 40 pens within 10 complete blocks; pens were randomly assigned to control, VAC, DFM, or VAC+DFM treatments. Vaccine was administered on days 0 and 21, and DFM was fed throughout the study. Pen-floor fecal samples (30/pen) were collected weekly for the last 4 study weeks. Samples were enriched in E. coli broth and subjected to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) designed to detect O26-specific wzx gene and four major virulence genes (stx1, stx2, eae, and ehxA) and to a culture-based procedure that involved immunomagnetic separation and plating on MacConkey agar. Ten presumptive E. coli colonies were randomly picked, pooled, and tested by the multiplex PCR. Pooled colonies positive for O26 serogroup were streaked on sorbose MacConkey agar, and 10 randomly picked colonies per sample were tested individually by the multiplex PCR. The overall prevalence of E. coli O26 was higher (p<0.001) by the culture-based method compared to the PCR assay (22.7 versus 10.5%). The interventions (VAC and or DFM) had no impact on fecal shedding of O26. Serogroup O26 was recovered in pure culture from 23.9% (260 of 1089) of O26 PCR-positive pooled colonies. Only 7 of the 260 isolates were positive for the stx gene and 90.1% of the isolates possessed an eaeβ gene that codes for intimin subtype β, but not the bfpA gene, which codes for bundle-forming pilus. Therefore, the majority of the O26 recovered from feedlot cattle feces was

  12. Soil nutrients, bacteria populations, and veterinary pharmaceuticals across a backgrounding beef feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle backgrounding feedlot systems that grow out weaned calves for feedlot finishing can become potential diffuse sources of environmentally significant contaminants. Better understanding of these contaminants and their distribution will aid in development of effective contaminant management...

  13. Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 prevalence in cattle and on carcasses in a vertically integrated feedlot and harvest plant in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Narvaez-Bravo, C; Miller, M F; Jackson, T; Jackson, S; Rodas-Gonzalez, A; Pond, K; Echeverry, A; Brashears, M M

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle feedlots and the impact of subsequent contamination on carcasses in a Mexican Federal Inspection Type Standards harvest facility, 250 animals were tagged and sampled in each step of the slaughter process. Samples were taken from hides and fecal grabs, and composite samples were taken from three anatomical carcass sites (hindshank, foreshank, and inside round) during the slaughter process, at preevisceration (PE), prior to entering the hot box (PHB), and after 24 h of dry chilling (DC). Additionally, 250 fecal samples were collected from the feedlot (FL), holding pens (HP), and intestinal feces (IF), and water samples were taken from the HP area. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella detection were carried out with the BAX System, immunomagnetic separation, and conventional methods. Overall Salmonella prevalence was 52.5%. The highest prevalence (92.4%) was found on hides, followed by feces from the HP (91.0%), FL (55.56%), PE (49.0%), IF (46.8%), and PHB (24.8%), for all sampling periods combined. The lowest prevalence of 6.0% was found after DC. The overall prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 was as follows: 11.7% for hides, 5.2% for IF, 2.7% for FL, 2.0% for HP, 0.8% for PE, 0.4% for PHB, and 0.4% for the cooler. High prevalence of Salmonella in IF and on hides present a significant risk factor for contamination by Salmonella at the different processing steps. These results serve as a warning as to the risks of contamination in meats for these pathogens and the importance of following good manufacturing practices during beef production processes. PMID:23643120

  14. Influence of lasalocid and monensin plus tylosin on comparative feeding value of steam-flaked versus dry-rolled corn in diets for feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A

    1987-07-01

    Two trials were conducted to characterize the differences in utilization of dry-rolled and steam-flaked corn in a growing-finishing diet for feedlot cattle supplemented with and without ionophores. Ionophore treatments were: 1) no ionophore, 2) 33 mg/kg monensin sodium plus 11 mg/kg tylosin and 3) 33 mg/kg lasalocid sodium. In trial 1, treatment effects on feedlot performance were evaluated in a 239-d growing-finishing trial involving 180 crossbred steers (approximately 25% Brahman with the remainder represented by Hereford, Angus, Shorthorn and Charolais breeds in various proportions) with an average initial weight of 153 kg. In trial 2, treatment effects on characteristics of digestion were evaluated using six steers of similar breeding and background to those used in trial 1, with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum. There were no interactions between corn processing and ionophore supplementation (P greater than .20). Average daily gain was not affected by steam-flaking as opposed to dry-rolling, however, feed intake was decreased 5.4% and feed conversion was improved 6.8% (P less than .01). Steam-flaking increased the estimated net energy value of the diet 7.7% and 8.5% for maintenance and gain, respectively (P less than .01). Steam-flaking increased the digestibility of starch 6.6% (P less than .01). Steam-flaking increased ruminal molar concentrations of propionate and decreased acetate:propionate ratio and estimated methane production (P less than .10). Both monensin-tylosin and lasalocid resulted in reduced feed intake (12.3 and 6.5%, respectively, P less than .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3610873

  15. Prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter in rumen contents and feces in pasture and feedlot-fed cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter is currently one of the leading foodborne pathogens that are known to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of cattle. The incidence of Campylobacter spp. in cattle has been reported to be seasonal, to vary among age groups, and type (beef versus dairy). However, less is known about ot...

  16. Influence of Season and Feedlot Location on Prevalence and Virulence Factors of Seven Serogroups of Escherichia coli in Feces of Western-Canadian Slaughter Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roger P.; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.; Reuter, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pooled feces collected over two years from 1749 transport trailers hauling western-Canadian slaughter cattle were analysed by PCR for detection of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157. Sequential immunomagnetic separation was then used to collect bacterial isolates (n = 1035) from feces positive for target serogroups. Isolated bacteria were tested by PCR to confirm serogroup and the presence of eae, ehxA, stx1, and stx2 virulence genes. Based on PCR screening, serogroup prevalence in feces ranged from 7.0% (O145) to 94.4% (O103) with at least 3 serogroups present in 79.5% of samples. Origin of cattle affected serogroup PCR prevalence and O157 was most prevalent in feces from south-west Alberta (P < 0.001). All serogroups demonstrated seasonal variations in PCR prevalence, with O26, O45, O103, O121, and O157 least prevalent (P < 0.001) in cooler winter months, while uncommon serogroups O111 and O145 increased in prevalence during winter (P < 0.001). However, isolates collected during winter were predominantly from serogroups O103 and O45. No seasonal variation was noted in proportion of isolates which were Shiga toxin containing E. coli (STEC; P = 0.18) or positive for Shiga toxin and eae (enterohemorrhagic E. coli; EHEC; P = 0.29). Isolates of serogroups O111, O145, and O157 were more frequently EHEC than were others, although 37.6–54.3% of isolates from other serogroups were also EHEC. Shiga-toxin genes present also varied by geographic origin of cattle (P < 0.05) in all serogroups except O157. As cattle within feedlots are sourced from multiple regions, locational differences in serogroup prevalence and virulence genes imply existence of selection pressures for E. coli and their virulence in western-Canadian cattle. Factors which reduce carriage or expression of virulence genes, particularly in non-O157 serogroups, should be investigated. PMID:27482711

  17. Interactive effects of bulk density of steam-flaked corn and concentration of Sweet Bran on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, and apparent total tract nutrient digestibility.

    PubMed

    Domby, E M; Anele, U Y; Gautam, K K; Hergenreder, J E; Pepper-Yowell, A R; Galyean, M L

    2014-03-01

    Two hundred twenty-four steers (initial BW = 363 ± 1.57 kg) were used in a 2 × 3 + 1 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate the interactive effects of concentration of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) and bulk density (BD) of steam-flaked corn (SFC) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and apparent total tract digestibility. Diets consisted of 0, 15, or 30% WCGF (DM basis) with a BD of SFC at 283 or 360 g/L. The additional treatment consisted of 15% WCGF, SFC at 283 g/L, and a 6% inclusion of alfalfa hay vs. 9% for all other treatments. Steers were fed once daily for an average of 163 d. During a 5-d digestion period, DMI was measured, and fecal samples were collected for measurement of nutrient digestibility using dietary acid insoluble ash as a marker. There were few WCGF × BD interactions for feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and digestibility. Similarly, contrasts between the treatment containing 15% WCGF/360 g/L SFC and 15% WCGF/360 g/L with 6% hay yielded few differences for performance and carcass data. Final BW responded quadratically (P ≤ 0.02) to WCGF inclusion and showed increased (P ≤ 0.007) BW for greater BD. As WCGF inclusion increased, G:F and calculated NE values (P ≤ 0.03) decreased quadratically. Steers consuming 360 g/L SFC had greater (P < 0.05) G:F than those fed 283 g/L SFC. Marbling score, HCW, 12th-rib fat thickness, and calculated yield grade increased quadratically (P ≤ 0.04) with increased inclusion of WCGF. Percentage of cattle grading premium Choice or greater responded quadratically (P = 0.04) to WCGF concentration. Increasing BD increased (P ≤ 0.01) HCW, dressing percent, marbling score, and 12th-rib fat thickness and decreased calculated yield grade and percentage of cattle grading Select; however, lower BD tended (P = 0.09) to increase LM area. Intake of DM, OM, CP, and NDF and fecal output during the digestibility period increased linearly (P ≤ 0.01) with increasing WCGF, and greater BD

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Zilpaterol and Ractopamine Effects on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Traits and Shear Strength of Meat in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Ian J.; Thompson, John M.; Dunshea, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    This study is a meta-analysis of the effects of the beta-agonists zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) and ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on feedlot performance, carcase characteristics of cattle and Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of muscles. It was conducted to evaluate the effect of the use of these agents on beef production and meat quality and to provide data that would be useful in considerations on the effect of these agents on meat quality in Meat Standards Australia evaluations. We conducted a comprehensive literature search and study assessment using PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scirus, and CAB and identification of other studies from reference lists in papers and searches. Searches were based on the key words: zilpaterol, zilmax, ractopamine, optaflexx, cattle and beef. Studies from theses obtained were included. Data were extracted from more than 50 comparisons for both agents and analysed using meta-analysis and meta-regression. Both agents markedly increased weight gain, hot carcase weight and longissimus muscle area and increased the efficiency of gain:feed. These effects were particularly large for ZH, however, fat thickness was decreased by ZH, but not RAC. Zilpaterol also markedly increased WBSF by 1.2 standard deviations and more than 0.8 kg, while RAC increased WBSF by 0.43 standard deviations and 0.2 kg. There is evidence in the ZH studies, in particular, of profound re-partitioning of nutrients from fat to protein depots. This work has provided critically needed information on the effects of ZH and RAC on production, efficiency and meat quality. PMID:25548908

  19. Longitudinal Study of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a Beef Cattle Feedlot and Role of High-Level Shedders in Hide Contamination▿

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Terrance M.; Keen, James E.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Nou, Xiangwu; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study described here were (i) to investigate the dynamics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 fecal and hide prevalence over a 9-month period in a feedlot setting and (ii) to determine how animals shedding E. coli O157:H7 at high levels affect the prevalence and levels of E. coli O157:H7 on the hides of other animals in the same pen. Cattle (n = 319) were distributed in 10 adjacent pens, and fecal and hide levels of E. coli O157:H7 were monitored. When the fecal pen prevalence exceeded 20%, the hide pen prevalence was usually (25 of 27 pens) greater than 80%. Sixteen of 19 (84.2%) supershedder (>104 CFU/g) pens had a fecal prevalence greater than 20%. Significant associations with hide and high-level hide (≥40 CFU/100 cm2) contamination were identified for (i) a fecal prevalence greater than 20%, (ii) the presence of one or more high-density shedders (≥200 CFU/g) in a pen, and (iii) the presence of one or more supershedders in a pen. The results presented here suggest that the E. coli O157:H7 fecal prevalence should be reduced below 20% and the levels of shedding should be kept below 200 CFU/g to minimize the contamination of cattle hides. Also, large and unpredictable fluctuations within and between pens in both fecal and hide prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 were detected and should be used as a guide when preharvest studies, particularly preharvest intervention studies, are designed. PMID:19684164

  20. Growth performance and shedding of some pathogenic bacteria in feedlot cattle treated with different growth-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brigitte; Malouin, François; Roy, Gabriel; Giguère, Karine; Diarra, Moussa S

    2006-06-01

    Eighty steers with a mean body weight of 319 kg were used in a study to evaluate the effect of a growth-promoting implant (trenbolone acetate plus estradiol benzoate), monensin, and oxytetracycline on the steer performance and shedding of some foodborne pathogens. The steers were allotted to one of eight treatment combinations according to a randomized complete block design with 16 pens of five animals. Rectal fecal samples were collected before treatment commenced and over a period of more than 24 weeks to study the influence of treatments on the intestinal microbiology of the animals. Results supported the beneficial effect of the hormonal implant on the performance of feedlot steers (average daily gain, feed efficiency, and fat thickness), on carcass characteristics (hot carcass weight, lean yield), and economic value of the carcasses (P < 0.01). The levels of Escherichia coli in feces were not affected by treatments but remained high throughout the study period. Antibiotic-resistant isolates of E. coli were more frequently found as the study progressed but were not associated with any specific treatment. Also independently of treatment, we observed a reduction over time in the shedding of Campylobacter and Yersinia during the feeding period, whereas the shedding of Enterococcus was increased. The results of this study confirmed the beneficial economic effect of growth-promoting agents in beef production and showed that the agents tested did not specifically affect the overall microbial evolution of the animal gut. However, the study also showed, independently of the growth promoter used, the shedding of Campylobacter, Yersinia, and antibiotic-resistant E. coli in the feedlot environment. These bacteria also may be found in the colonic tissue of steers at slaughter and might be a source of carcasses contamination. PMID:16786843

  1. Effects of feeding a return chewing gum/packaging material mixture on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B W; Berger, L L; Fahey, G C

    1996-11-01

    Seventy-two Simmental-cross growing steers (219 +/- 2.4 kg initial BW) were used in a randomized complete block design to evaluate the effects of feeding a return chewing gum/packaging material mixture (G/P) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, sensory attributes of meat, and mineral content of beef liver and muscle. Animals were allotted by weight to 12 pens (six/pen). Each pen was assigned one of three dietary treatments: 1) 0% G/P (control), 2) 20% G/P, or 3) 30% G/P (% G/P on a DM basis). Steers were fed their respective diets for an 84-d growing phase and a 112-d finishing phase. The G/P replaced corn silage and corn in the growing and finishing phases, respectively. Eighteen steers (six/treatment) were randomly selected for slaughter at the end of the finishing phase, and carcass measurements, sensory attributes of meat, and mineral content of liver and longissimus muscle were measured. During the growing phase, steers fed G/P-containing diets had improved (P < .01) daily DMI, ADG, and gain:feed ratios (G:F) compared with controls. However, due to compensatory gain and the fact that G/P replaced corn in the finishing phase, control steers had increased (P < .01) ADG and improved (P < .05) G:F vs steers fed G/P-containing diets. Over the entire study (growing and finishing phases) steers fed diets containing G/P and the control had similar performance. Amount of G/P in the diet had no effect (P > .05) on carcass characteristics. Steaks from steers fed 20% G/P had improved (P < .01) juiciness compared with steaks from steers fed 30% G/P; no other sensory attributes were affected. Aluminum, zinc, and barium content of longissimus muscle and liver were within the normal expected ranges for all treatments. These data indicate that G/P can safely replace at least 30% of growing and finishing diets without impairing feedlot performance or carcass merit. PMID:8923170

  2. Nutrient losses in runoff from feedlot surfaces as affected by unconsolidated surface materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated surface materials (USM) (loose manure pack) that accumulate within feedlot pens during a feeding cycle. The effects of varying amounts of USM on feedlot runoff water quality are not well defined. The objectives of this field investigation were to: a) compa...

  3. Hydraulic conditions required to not move unconsolidated surface materials located within feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated surface material that accumulates within feedlot pens during a feeding cycle. Runoff from feedlot surfaces is diverted into settling basins. The storage capacity of settling basins will be substantially reduced if large quantities of solid material are tra...

  4. Preventive Medicine and Management in Beef Feedlots

    PubMed Central

    Church, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of beef feedlot preventive medicine are to reduce morbidity, mortality and culling rates, maximize feed efficiency and optimize expenditures for biologicals and pharmaceuticals. The veterinarian must provide regular inspection of all areas of the feedlot and constantly monitor disease incidence. The provision of advice on vaccination, treatment schedules, necropsies on all dead cattle and the regular analysis of disease and production records are all part of feedlot preventive medicine. All of this is aimed at improving net economical gain for the producer. PMID:7427851

  5. Soil micro nutrients in backgrounding beef feedlot site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beef cattle backgrounding represent an intermediate tire of the U.S. commercial beef production system and grow out weaned calves from cow-calf enterprises to weights and conditions ready for feedlot finishing (Bradford et al.,1978). Steer calves in backgrounding feedlots are fed mainly with gr...

  6. Effect of slow-release urea inclusion in diets containing modified corn distillers grains on total tract digestibility and ruminal fermentation in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-08-01

    Ruminal degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit may result when cattle are fed diets containing a greater inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). This deficit may arise from greater proportions of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and RUP in corn grain. Urea-derived N is 100% DIP; however, rates of degradation of carbohydrates and conventional urea (CU) may not match. Therefore, beneficial effects may result from the use of slow-release urea (SRU) sources over CU when added to DIP-deficient diets. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing DIP concentration through inclusion of 1 of 2 SRU sources or CU in DG-containing feedlot diets on ruminal fermentation and total tract digestibility. In addition, an in situ experiment was conducted to characterize N disappearance of urea sources from polyester bags. Four ruminally cannulated steers (initial BW = 588 ± 8 kg) were arranged in a 4 × 4 Latin square design and assigned randomly to 1 of 4 dietary treatments containing 0% (CON) or 0.6% urea in the form of CU (UREA) or SRU as Optigen II (polymer-encapsulated urea; OPTI) or NitroShure (lipid-encapsulated urea; NITRO), and 30% corn earlage, 20% modified corn DG with solubles, 7.8% corn silage, 4.3% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DM basis). Dietary DIP was estimated at 6.6% and 8.3% for CON and urea-containing dietary treatments, respectively. Steers were fed ad libitum once daily. Differences in purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index between treatments were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Intake of OM, digestibility of OM, NDF, CP, and starch, ruminal pH, total VFA ruminal concentration, and PDC index were not affected by treatment ( ≥ 0.21). Concentration of ammonia-N noticeably peaked at 4 h after feed delivery for cattle fed UREA (treatment × time, = 0.06) and measured at least 5.5 mg/dL for any treatment and at any hour after feed delivery

  7. DESIGN AND COST OF FEEDLOT RUNOFF CONTROL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cattle feedlot runoff pollution control necessitates facilities to intercept and store surface runoff so manure-contaminated waters are prevented from entering streams and lakes. Design of these facilities requires a matching of individual structures to proposed management techni...

  8. Feedlot therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Apley, M D; Fajt, V R

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses therapeutic approaches to conditions commonly encountered in feedlots. Challenges discussed include bovine respiratory complex, tracheal edema, atypical interstitial pneumonia, footrot, toe abscesses, mycoplasma arthritis, cardiovascular disease, lactic acidosis, bloat, coccidiosis, central nervous system diseases, abscesses and cellulitis, pregnancy management and abortion, and ocular disease. PMID:9704416

  9. Environmental residuals and capital costs of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, S W; Dale, L; Johnson, R; Chambers, W; Mittelhauser, H

    1980-09-01

    The capital and environmental cost of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure is analyzed. Literature on waste processing and energy conversion and interviews with manufacturers were used for baseline data for construction of theoretical models using three energy conversion processes: anaerobic digestion, incineration, and pyrolysis. Process characteristics, environmental impact data, and capital costs are presented in detail for each conversion system. The energy recovery systems described would probably be sited near large sources of sludge and manure, i.e., metropolitan sewage treatment plants and large feedlots in cattle-raising states. Although the systems would provide benefits in terms of waste disposal as well as energy production, they would also involve additional pollution of air and water. Analysis of potential siting patterns and pollution conflicts is needed before energy recovery systems using municipal sludge can be considered as feasible energy sources.

  10. Effects of crude glycerin in steam-flaked corn-based diets fed to growing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hales, K E; Bondurant, R G; Luebbe, M K; Cole, N A; MacDonald, J C

    2013-08-01

    Crude glycerin is a by-product of biodiesel production and has recently become more available as a livestock feed with the growth of the biofuel industry. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of crude glycerin (GLY) as a feed ingredient in steam-flaked corn (SFC)-based growing diets fed to beef cattle. In Exp. 1, crossbred steers (n = 50; initial BW = 282 ± 2 kg) were used to determine the effects of GLY when included at 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10% of DM in a growing diet on cattle performance. In Exp. 2, crossbred steers (n = 54; initial BW = 283 ± 1 kg) were used to determine the effects of replacing SFC (REPSFC) or alfalfa hay (REPAH) with 7.5% GLY or a control diet without GLY (CON) on growing steer performance. In Exp. 1, final BW tended to respond in a quadratic manner (P = 0.09) in which it increased from 0 to 7.5% GLY and decreased from 7.5 to 10% GLY. Dry matter intake did not differ (P > 0.23), yet ADG responded quadratically (P = 0.04), where it increased from 0 to 7.5% GLY and decreased from 7.5 to 10% GLY. Feed efficiency (G:F) decreased linearly (P = 0.05) with increasing GLY concentration. In Exp. 2, final BW was greater for steers fed REPAH than CON or REPSFC (P = 0.04). Steers fed REPAH had a greater ADG than CON or REPSFC (P = 0.04). When GLY replaced SFC, ADG increased from 0 to 7.5% GLY where it was maximized before decreasing from 7.5 to 10% GLY inclusion. Replacing 7.5% of alfalfa hay (AH) in a growing diet with GLY can be beneficial to animal performance, which is likely the result of GLY being greater in energy than AH. PMID:23658347

  11. Integrating Genomics with Nutrition Models to Improve the Prediction of Cattle Performance and Carcass Composition under Feedlot Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Cattle body composition is difficult to model because several factors affect the composition of the average daily gain (ADG) of growing animals. The objective of this study was to identify commercial single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels that could improve the predictability of days on feed (DOF) to reach a target United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) grade given animal, diet, and environmental information under feedyard conditions. The data for this study was comprised of crossbred heifers (n = 681) and steers (n = 836) from commercial feedyards. Eleven molecular breeding value (MBV) scores derived from SNP panels of candidate gene polymorphisms and two-leptin gene SNP (UASMS2 and E2FB) were evaluated. The empty body fat (EBF) and the shrunk body weight (SBW) at 28% EBF (AFSBW) were computed by the Cattle Value Discovery System (CVDS) model using hip height (EBFHH and AFSBWHH) or carcass traits (EBFCT and AFSBWCT) of the animals. The DOFHH was calculated when AFSBWHH and ADGHH were used and DOFCT was calculated when AFSBWCT and ADGCT were used. The CVDS estimates dry matter required (DMR) by individuals fed in groups when observed ADG and AFSBW are provided. The AFSBWCT was assumed more accurate than the AFSBWHH because it was computed using carcass traits. The difference between AFSBWCT and AFSBWHH, DOFCT and DOFHH, and DMR and dry matter intake (DMI) were regressed on the MBV scores and leptin gene SNP to explain the variation. Our results indicate quite a large range of correlations among MBV scores and model input and output variables, but MBV ribeye area was the most strongly correlated with the differences in DOF, AFSBW, and DMI by explaining 8, 13.2 and 6.5%, respectively, of the variation. This suggests that specific MBV scores might explain additional variation of input and output variables used by nutritional models in predicting individual animal performance. PMID:26599759

  12. Integrating Genomics with Nutrition Models to Improve the Prediction of Cattle Performance and Carcass Composition under Feedlot Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Luis O

    2015-01-01

    Cattle body composition is difficult to model because several factors affect the composition of the average daily gain (ADG) of growing animals. The objective of this study was to identify commercial single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels that could improve the predictability of days on feed (DOF) to reach a target United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) grade given animal, diet, and environmental information under feedyard conditions. The data for this study was comprised of crossbred heifers (n = 681) and steers (n = 836) from commercial feedyards. Eleven molecular breeding value (MBV) scores derived from SNP panels of candidate gene polymorphisms and two-leptin gene SNP (UASMS2 and E2FB) were evaluated. The empty body fat (EBF) and the shrunk body weight (SBW) at 28% EBF (AFSBW) were computed by the Cattle Value Discovery System (CVDS) model using hip height (EBFHH and AFSBWHH) or carcass traits (EBFCT and AFSBWCT) of the animals. The DOFHH was calculated when AFSBWHH and ADGHH were used and DOFCT was calculated when AFSBWCT and ADGCT were used. The CVDS estimates dry matter required (DMR) by individuals fed in groups when observed ADG and AFSBW are provided. The AFSBWCT was assumed more accurate than the AFSBWHH because it was computed using carcass traits. The difference between AFSBWCT and AFSBWHH, DOFCT and DOFHH, and DMR and dry matter intake (DMI) were regressed on the MBV scores and leptin gene SNP to explain the variation. Our results indicate quite a large range of correlations among MBV scores and model input and output variables, but MBV ribeye area was the most strongly correlated with the differences in DOF, AFSBW, and DMI by explaining 8, 13.2 and 6.5%, respectively, of the variation. This suggests that specific MBV scores might explain additional variation of input and output variables used by nutritional models in predicting individual animal performance. PMID:26599759

  13. Primary genome scan to identify putative quantitative trait loci for feedlot growth rate, feed intake, and feed efficiency of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Nkrumah, J D; Sherman, E L; Li, C; Marques, E; Crews, D H; Bartusiak, R; Murdoch, B; Wang, Z; Basarab, J A; Moore, S S

    2007-12-01

    Feed intake and feed efficiency of beef cattle are economically relevant traits. The study was conducted to identify QTL for feed intake and feed efficiency of beef cattle by using genotype information from 100 microsatellite markers and 355 SNP genotyped across 400 progeny of 20 Angus, Charolais, or Alberta Hybrid bulls. Traits analyzed include feedlot ADG, daily DMI, feed-to-gain ratio [F:G, which is the reciprocal of the efficiency of gain (G:F)], and residual feed intake (RFI). A mixed model with sire as random and QTL effects as fixed was used to generate an F-statistic profile across and within families for each trait along each chromosome, followed by empirical permutation tests to determine significance thresholds for QTL detection. Putative QTL for ADG (chromosome-wise P < 0.05) were detected across families on chromosomes 5 (130 cM), 6 (42 cM), 7 (84 cM), 11 (20 cM), 14 (74 cM), 16 (22 cM), 17 (9 cM), 18 (46 cM), 19 (53 cM), and 28 (23 cM). For DMI, putative QTL that exceeded the chromosome-wise P < 0.05 threshold were detected on chromosomes 1 (93 cM), 3 (123 cM), 15 (31 cM), 17 (81 cM), 18 (49 cM), 20 (56 cM), and 26 (69 cM) in the across-family analyses. Putative across-family QTL influencing F:G that exceeded the chromosome-wise P < 0.05 threshold were detected on chromosomes 3 (62 cM), 5 (129 cM), 7 (27 cM), 11 (16 cM), 16 (30 cM), 17 (81 cM), 22 (72 cM), 24 (55 cM), and 28 (24 cM). Putative QTL influencing RFI that exceeded the chromosome-wise P < 0.05 threshold were detected on chromosomes 1 (90 cM), 5 (129 cM), 7 (22 cM), 8 (80 cM), 12 (89 cM), 16 (41 cM), 17 (19 cM), and 26 (48 cM) in the across-family analyses. In addition, a total of 4, 6, 1, and 8 chromosomes showed suggestive evidence (chromosome-wise, P < 0.10) for putative ADG, DMI, F:G, and RFI QTL, respectively. Most of the QTL detected across families were also detected within families, although the locations across families were not necessarily the locations within families, which is

  14. Incidence and persistence of zoonotic bacterial and protozoan pathogens in a beef cattle feedlot runoff control - vegetative treatment system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the survival of zoonotic pathogens in livestock manure and runoff is critical for understanding the environmental and public health risks associated with these wastes. The occurrence and persistence of the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter spp. in a passive ...

  15. Comparison of wheat- versus corn-based dried distillers' grains with solubles on meat quality of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Aldai, N; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R; Robertson, W M; McAllister, T A; Walter, L J; McKinnon, J J

    2010-03-01

    A considerable amount of information has been generated on the feeding value and impact of corn dried distillers' grains with solubles (DDGS) on meat quality, whereas little is known about the effects of wheat DDGS on meat quality, and no direct comparison of these two sources of DDGS has been completed. The current study was conducted to examine the objective and subjective carcass and meat quality traits of cattle fed diets containing corn or wheat (20% or 40%) DDGS (DM basis) as compared to a standard barley-based finishing diet (control). In general, meat obtained from animals fed the barley-based control diet was slightly darker in colour (lower chroma and hue at 24 h, P<0.01) and less tender (highest proportion of tough shears at 2 d and lowest proportion of tender shears at 20 d). Meat from corn DDGS was rated as more tender and palatable than control samples (P<0.05), and 20% corn samples were rated better for beef flavour intensity (P<0.01) and desirability (P<0.05) than 40% corn DDGS samples. In contrast, meat from steers fed wheat DDGS showed intermediate characteristics between steers fed control and corn DDGS diets. Hence, feeding wheat DDGS had no negative effects, and feeding corn DDGS had some positive effects on meat quality characteristics of beef. PMID:20374826

  16. Evaluation of carcass, live, and real-time ultrasound measures in feedlot cattle: I. Assessment of sex and breed effects.

    PubMed

    Hassen, A; Wilson, D E; Rouse, G H

    1999-02-01

    Carcass and live-animal measures from 1,029 cattle were collected at the Iowa State University Rhodes and McNay research farms over a 6-yr period. Data were from bull, heifer, and steer progeny of composite, Angus, and Simmental sires mated to three composite lines of dams. The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for carcass traits, to evaluate effects of sex and breed of sire on growth models (curves), and to suggest a strategy to adjust serially measured data to a constant age end point. Estimation of genetic parameters using a three-trait mixed model showed differences between bulls and steers in estimates of h2 and genetic correlations. Heritability for carcass weight, percentage of retail product, retail product weight, fat thickness, and longissimus muscle area from bull data were .43, .04, .46, .05, and .21, respectively. The corresponding values for steer data were in order of .32, .24, .40, .42, and .07, respectively. Analysis of serially measured fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, body weight, hip height, and ultrasound percentage of intramuscular fat using a repeated measures model showed a limitation in the use of growth models based on pooled data. In further evaluation of regression parameters using a linear mixed model analysis, sex and breed of sire showed an important (P < .05) effect on intercept and slope values. Regression of serially measured traits on age within animal showed a relatively larger R2 (62 to 98%) and a smaller root mean square error (RMSE, .09 to 8.85) as compared with R2 (0 to 58%) and RMSE (.31 to 67.9) values when the same model was used on pooled data. We concluded that regression parameters from a within-animal regression of a serially measured trait on age, averaged by sex and breed, are the best choice in describing growth and adjusting data to a constant age end point. PMID:10100654

  17. Using organic acids to control subacute ruminal acidosis and fermentation in feedlot cattle fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Beauchemin, K A; Koenig, K M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether supplementing organic acids can prevent incidences of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in beef heifers fed a diet consisting of 8% barley silage and 92% barley grain-based concentrate (DM basis). Ten ruminally cannulated Hereford crossbred heifers (484 ± 25 kg BW) were used in a replicated 5 × 5 Latin square design with 14-d periods including 10 d for dietary adaptation and 4 d for measurements. Dietary treatments included no supplementation (Control), low fumaric acid (61 g/d), high fumaric acid (125 g/d), low malic acid (59 g/d), and high malic acid (134 g/d). Organic acid supplementation had no effect on DMI ( = 0.77). Similarly, no effects were observed on mean ( = 0.74), minimum ( = 0.64), and maximum ( = 0.27) ruminal pH measured continuously for 48 h. Moreover, area under the curve for pH thresholds 6.2 ( = 0.97), 5.8 ( = 0.66), 5.5 ( = 0.55), and 5.2 ( = 0.93) was similar for all treatments. However, malic acid supplementation lowered the amount of time that ruminal pH was <6.2 compared with the Control ( = 0.02) and fumaric acid treatments ( < 0.01). No effects were observed on total VFA concentrations with organic acid supplementation ( = 0.98) compared with the Control, but greater total VFA concentrations were observed with fumaric acid compared with the malic acid treatments ( = 0.02). The population of total culturable bacteria 3 h after feeding was reduced with supplemental malic acid compared with the Control ( = 0.03) and fumaric acid treatments ( = 0.03). However, no effects were observed with organic acid supplementation on lactic acid-utilizing bacteria ( = 0.59). In conclusion, under the conditions of the present study, organic acid supplementation did not have any significant effects on ruminal fermentation parameters compared with the Control and were not effective in preventing SARA in beef cattle fed high-grain diets. PMID:26440175

  18. Genetic and phenotypic relationships of serum leptin concentration with performance, efficiency of gain, and carcass merit of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Nkrumah, J D; Keisler, D H; Crews, D H; Basarab, J A; Wang, Z; Li, C; Price, M A; Okine, E K; Moore, S S

    2007-09-01

    generally greater than the phenotypic correlations and included ultrasound backfat (r = 0.76 +/- 0.19), carcass 12th-rib fat (r = 0.54 +/- 0.23), ultrasound marbling (r = 0.27 +/- 0.22), carcass marbling (r = 0.76 +/- 0.21), ultrasound LM area (r = -0.71 +/- 0.19), carcass LM area (r = -0.75 +/- 0.20), lean meat yield (r = -0.59 +/- 0.22), and yield grade (r = 0.39 +/- 0.26). Serum leptin concentration can be a valuable tool that can be incorporated into appropriate selection programs to favorably improve the carcass merit of cattle. PMID:17468416

  19. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  20. Wet distillers grains plus solubles concentration in steam-flaked-corn-based diets: Effects on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, nutrient digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of wet distiller's grains plus solubles (WDG; < 15% sorghum grain) concentration in steam-flaked corn- (SFC) based diets on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, and diet digestibility of feeedlt ocattle. In Experi...

  1. Effect of N-(n-butyl) Phosphoric Triamide (NPBT) and a Linalool or Pine Oil Extract on Urea Concentration, Odorants, and Coliform Bacteria in Cattle Feedlot Manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of a urease inhibitor (NBPT) in combination with plant oils for their ability to maintain urea in feedlot manure, control odor production, and reduce pathogens. Initially, NBPT (40 ppm) and a linalool extract (LE; 4000 ppm) were sprayed on...

  2. Summer and Winter Prevalence of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 in Feces of Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, Diana M A; Renter, David G; Shridhar, Pragathi B; Noll, Lance W; Shi, Xiaorong; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Cernicchiaro, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service has declared seven Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157) as adulterants in raw, nonintact beef products. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of these seven serogroups and the associated virulence genes (Shiga toxin [stx1, stx2], and intimin [eae]) in cattle feces during summer (June-August 2013) and winter (January-March 2014) months. Twenty-four pen floor fecal samples were collected from each of 24 cattle pens, in both summer and winter months, at a commercial feedlot in the United States. Samples were subjected to culture-based detection methods that included enrichment, serogroup-specific immunomagnetic separation and plating on selective media, followed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction for serogroup confirmation and virulence gene detection. A sample was considered STEC positive if a recovered isolate harbored an O gene, stx1, and/or stx2, and eae genes. All O serogroups of interest were detected in summer months, and model-adjusted prevalence estimates are as follows: O26 (17.8%), O45 (14.6%), O103 (59.9%), O111 (0.2%), O121 (2.0%), O145 (2.7%), and O157 (41.6%); however, most non-O157 isolates did not harbor virulence genes. The cumulative model-adjusted sample-level prevalence estimates of STEC O26, O103, O145, and O157 during summer (n=576) were 1.0, 1.6, 0.8, and 41.4%, respectively; STEC O45, O111, and O121 were not detected during summer months. In winter, serogroups O26 (0.9%), O45 (1.5%), O103 (40.2%), and O121 (0.2%) were isolated; however, no virulence genes were detected in isolates from cattle feces collected during winter (n=576). Statistically significant seasonal differences in prevalence were identified for STEC O103 and O157 (p<0.05), but data on other STEC were sparse. The results of this study indicate that although non-O157 serogroups were present, non-O157 STEC were

  3. Cattle waste tops cars as source of Southern California smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-06-01

    A new study shows that cows, not cars, are the more substantial source of ammonia that leads to ammonium nitrate in California's South Coast Air Basin, the smoggiest place in the United States. Within the region, which consists of the area surrounding and downwind of Los Angeles, a large proportion of the fine-grained particulate matter that makes up smog is formed from ammonium nitrate. Nowak et al. found two main sources of ammonium nitrate: small gas-powered vehicles and dairy farms. Catalytic converters designed to stem the emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons from the region's 9.9 million vehicles can produce gaseous ammonia as an unwanted by-product. Bacteria decomposing organic wastes from the region's 298,000 dairy cattle, on the other hand, also account for a sizable source of ammonia emissions.

  4. Susceptibility of Cattle to First-Passage Intracerebral Inoculation with Chronic Wasting Disease Agent from Elk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle could be exposed to chronic wasting disease (CWD) from infected farmed or free-ranging cervids. The purpose of this study was to assess the transmissibility of CWD derived from elk to cattle. Intracerebral inoculation of calves (n=14) of approximately 3 months of age was done with 1 ml of a...

  5. Susceptibility of cattle to the agent of chronic wasting disease from elk after intracranial inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle could be exposed to the agent of chronic wasting disease (CWD) through contact with infected farmed or free-ranging cervids or exposure to contaminated premises. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for CWD derived from elk to transmit to cattle after intracranial inoculation...

  6. Soil conductivity and multiple linear regression for precision monitoring of beef feedlot manure and runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open-lot cattle feeding operations face challenges in control of nutrient runoff, leaching, and gaseous emissions. This report investigates the use of precision management of saline soils as found on 1) feedlot surfaces and 2) a vegetative treatment area (VTA) utilized to control feedlot runoff. A...

  7. Nutrient concentrations of runoff as affected by the diameter of unconsolidated material from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated material that accumulates on the feedlot surface during a feeding cycle. This study was conducted to measure the effects of varying diameters of unconsolidated surface material and varying flow rates on nutrient concentrations in runoff. Unconsolidated sur...

  8. Effect of growth promotants on the occurrence of endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones on feedlot soils and in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplements and growth promotants containing steroid hormones are routinely administered to beef cattle to improve feeding efficiency, reduce behavioral problems, and enhance production. As a result, beef cattle manure will contain both synthetic steroids as well as a range of endogenous steroids i...

  9. Effect of calcium hydroxide application to cattle feedlot pens on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total E. coli in pen surface manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Cattle and beef products are sources of the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. Lime products have a long history of use in cattle production as disinfectants for sick pens, calving pens, and muddy areas, to control the spread of diseases. Lime may also be useful as a preharvest trea...

  10. Dissemination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from a cattle feedlot: effect of proximity on contamination of leafy greens, bioaerosols, and pest flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks linked to the consumption of leafy green vegetables have focused attention on cattle as potential sources of contamination, and fueled the need for information regarding the dissemination of this pathogen from cattle production facilities. Questions include: can E...

  11. Effect of proximity to a cattle feedlot on the occurrence of Escherichia coli 0157:H7-positive pest flies in a leafy green crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks linked to produce have focused attention on cattle as contamination sources. Cattle pest flies can harbor this pathogen, and may disseminate it to produce. The Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement proposes an interim guidance distance of 400 feet betwee...

  12. Investigations of ash fouling with cattle wastes as reburn fuel in a small-scale boiler burner under transient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyukjin Oh; Kalyan Annamalai; John M. Sweeten

    2008-04-15

    Fouling behavior under reburn conditions was investigated with cattle wastes (termed as feedlot biomass, FB) and coal as reburn fuels under a transient condition and short-time operation. A small-scale (30 kW or 100,000 Btu/hr) boiler burner research facility was used for the reburn experiments. The fuels considered for these experiments were natural gas (NG) for the ashless case, pure coal, pure FB, and blends of coal and FB. Two parameters that were used to characterize the ash 'fouling' were (1) the overall heat-transfer coefficient (OHTC) when burning NG and solid fuels as reburn fuels, and (2) the combustible loss through ash deposited on the surfaces of heat exchanger tubes and the bottom ash in the ash port. A new methodology is presented for determining ash fouling behavior under transient conditions. Results on the OHTCs for solid reburn fuels are compared with the OHTCs for NG. It was found that the growth of the layer of ash depositions over longer periods typically lowers OHTC, and the increased concentration of ash in gas phase promotes radiation in high-temperature zones during initial periods while decreasing the heat transfer in low-temperature zones. The ash analyses indicated that the bottom ash in the ash port contained a smaller percentage of combustibles with a higher FB percentage in the fuels, indicating better performance compared with coal because small particles in FB burn faster and the FB has higher volatile matter on a dry ash-free basis promoting more burn out. 16 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Investigations of ash fouling with cattle wastes as reburn fuel in a small-scale boiler burner under transient conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyukjin; Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John M

    2008-04-01

    Fouling behavior under reburn conditions was investigated with cattle wastes (termed as feedlot biomass [FB]) and coal as reburn fuels under a transient condition and short-time operation. A small-scale (30 kW or 100,000 Btu/hr) boiler burner research facility was used for the reburn experiments. The fuels considered for these experiments were natural gas (NG) for the ashless case, pure coal, pure FB, and blends of coal and FB. Two parameters that were used to characterize the ash "fouling" were (1) the overall heat-transfer coefficient (OHTC) when burning NG and solid fuels as reburn fuels, and (2) the combustible loss through ash deposited on the surfaces of heat exchanger tubes and the bottom ash in the ash port. A new methodology is presented for determining ash-fouling behavior under transient conditions. Results on the OHTCs for solid reburn fuels are compared with the OHTCs for NG. It was found that the growth of the layer of ash depositions over longer periods typically lowers OHTC, and the increased concentration of ash in gas phase promotes radiation in high-temperature zones during initial periods while decreasing the heat transfer in low-temperature zones. The ash analyses indicated that the bottom ash in the ash port contained a smaller percentage of combustibles with a higher FB percentage in the fuels, indicating better performance compared with coal because small particles in FB burn faster and the FB has higher volatile matter on a dry ash-free basis promoting more burn out. PMID:18422038

  14. Anaerobic pretreatment and increased solid destruction for vegetable solid waste codigested with cattle slurry.

    PubMed

    Mandachittibabu; Saravanane, R; Sivacoumar, R

    2009-01-01

    Municipal solid waste and industrial solid waste are considered to be a large quantity of organic fraction which have contributed to different levels of pollution on land and ground water. The present study was carried out for the determination of characteristics of vegetable solid wastes, cattle slurry and sewage sludge for effective anaerobic co-digestion. The objective of the work was to study the treatability of vegetable solid wastes by co-digestion with municipal sewage and cattle slurry in different ratios. The laboratory batch scale studies were carried out to determine effects of various process parameters on startup and digestion. The pretreatment on solid waste has resulted in effective co-digestion of vegetable solid waste and hence showed increased biogas yield. The optimum ratio of vegetable wastes to inoculum (cow dung and anaerobic sewage sludge in the ratio of 1:1) was found to be 1:2 for effective co-digestion and maximum biogas yield. PMID:21114156

  15. Energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and profitability of thermobarical pretreatment of cattle waste in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Budde, Jörn; Prochnow, Annette; Plöchl, Matthias; Suárez Quiñones, Teresa; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-03-01

    In this study modeled full scale application of thermobarical hydrolysis of less degradable feedstock for biomethanation was assessed in terms of energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions, and economy. Data were provided whether the substitution of maize silage as feedstock for biogas production by pretreated cattle wastes is beneficial in full-scale application or not. A model device for thermobarical treatment has been suggested for and theoretically integrated in a biogas plant. The assessment considered the replacement of maize silage as feedstock with liquid and/or solid cattle waste (feces, litter, and feed residues from animal husbandry of high-performance dairy cattle, dry cows, and heifers). The integration of thermobarical pretreatment is beneficial for raw material with high contents of organic dry matter and ligno-cellulose: Solid cattle waste revealed very short payback times, e.g. 9 months for energy, 3 months for greenhouse gases, and 3 years 3 months for economic amortization, whereas, in contrast, liquid cattle waste did not perform positive replacement effects in this analysis. PMID:26709050

  16. RANGELAND WATERSHED WATER BUDGET AND GRAZING CATTLE WASTE NUTRIENT CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was designed to determine baseline data concerning the source, movement, concentration and factors affecting nonpoint pollutants in runoff from a representative 60-hectare, tallgrass prairie watershed grazed by cattle in North Central Oklahoma. Measurements ...

  17. Ammonia emissions and performance of backgrounding and finishing beef feedlot cattle fed barley-based diets varying in dietary crude protein concentration and rumen degradability.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K M; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-05-01

    Crossbred beef steers (n = 312) were used in an experiment with a completely randomized design during the growing (235 ± 1.6 kg initial BW) and finishing (363 ± 2.7 kg) phase to determine the effects of dietary CP concentration and rumen degradability on NH3-N emissions, growth performance, and carcass traits. Diets were barley based and consisted of 55% silage and 45% concentrate in the backgrounding phase and 9% silage and 91% concentrate in the finishing phase. For each phase, there were 4 dietary treatments (6 pens of 13 cattle per diet): the basal diet with no protein supplementation (12% CP backgrounding and 12.6% CP finishing) or supplemented (14% CP) with urea (UREA), urea and canola meal (UREA+CM), or urea, corn gluten meal, and xylose-treated soybean meal (UREA+CGM+xSBM). Feed intake and BW of cattle were measured at 3-wk intervals. One pen of steers fed the 12 or 12.6% CP and 1 pen fed 1 of the 14% CP diets were housed in 2 isolated pens to quantify NH3-N emissions using the integrated horizontal flux technique with passive NH3 samplers. In the backgrounding phase final BW, ADG, and G:F were less (P < 0.05) in cattle fed the 12% CP and UREA compared with the UREA+CM and UREA+CGM+xSBM diets. Nitrogen-use efficiency of cattle fed UREA+CM and UREA+CGM+xSBM was equal to that of cattle fed 12% CP and averaged 19.8%. In the finishing phase, there was no effect (P > 0.10) of CP supplementation on BW, DMI, ADG, G:F, N-use efficiency, and carcass traits. The NH3-N emissions from December to February during the backgrounding phase ranged from 4.3 to 25.6 g N/(steer•d) and 3.8 to 16.3% of N intake and from April to July during the finishing phase ranged from 9.7 to 76.4 g N/(steer•d) and 4.4 to 26.7% of N intake. Differences in NH3-N emissions between the pens of cattle fed the backgrounding diets with 12 and 14% CP were not detected. For cattle fed the 12.6 and 14% CP finishing diets, NH3-N emissions tended (P ≤ 0.16) to be less for 2 of the 5 periods and

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall objectives of this study were to determine if a correlation exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran®) at the label dose, and if there was a s...

  19. Impacts of Individual Animal Response to Heat and Handling Stresses on Escherichia coli and E. coli O157:H7 Fecal Shedding by Feedlot Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reduction of foodborne pathogens in cattle destined for human consumption will require knowledge of the factors that impact the carriage and shedding of these organisms. The effects of heat and handling stress levels on the fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and generic E. coli by feedl...

  20. Effects of ruminally degradable N in diets containing wet corn distiller's grains and steam-flaked corn on feedlot cattle performance and carcass characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of degradable nitrogen (N) needs in diets containing wet corn distiller's grains with solubles (WCDGS) is needed to aid the cattle feeding industry in managing feed costs and potential environmental issues. Yearling steers (n = 525; initial weight = 822 +/- 28 lb) were housed in 56 pens (...

  1. Longitudinal Study of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a Beef Cattle Feedlot and the Role of High Shedders in Hide Contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now well established that, at the time of harvest, hides are the major source of Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination on beef carcasses. Thus, reducing the levels of foodborne pathogens on cattle hides has been the focus of many pre- and post-harvest research efforts. In the area of pre-ha...

  2. Acyl-homoserine-lactone autoinducer (AHL) in the gastrointestinal tract of feedlot cattle and correlation to season, E. coli 0157:H7 prevalence and diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acyl-homoserine-lactone autoinducer (AHL) produced by non-enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) species in cattle appears to be required for EHEC colonization of the gastro¬intestinal tract (GIT). The objectives of the current research were to examine the effect of season, diet, EHEC shedding, and locat...

  3. Spatial variations in nutrient and microbial transport from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient and microbial transport by runoff may vary at different locations within a beef cattle feedlot. If the areas making the greatest contributions to nutrient and microbial transport can be identified, it may be possible to institute precision management practices to reduce nutrient and microbi...

  4. Limited amplification of chronic wasting disease prions in the peripheral tissues of intracerebrally inoculated cattle.

    PubMed

    Haley, Nicholas J; Siepker, Christopher; Greenlee, Justin J; Richt, Jürgen A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, classified as a prion disease or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Cervids affected by CWD accumulate an abnormal protease-resistant prion protein throughout the central nervous system (CNS), as well as in both lymphatic and excretory tissues - an aspect of prion disease pathogenesis not observed in cattle with BSE. Using seeded amplification through real-time quaking-induced conversion, we investigated whether the bovine host or prion agent was responsible for this aspect of TSE pathogenesis. We blindly examined numerous central and peripheral tissues from cattle inoculated with CWD for prion seeding activity. Seeded amplification was readily detected in the CNS, though rarely observed in peripheral tissues, with a limited distribution similar to that of BSE prions in cattle. This seems to indicate that prion peripheralization in cattle is a host-driven characteristic of TSE infection. PMID:27031704

  5. Effect of urea inclusion in diets containing corn dried distillers grains on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine index.

    PubMed

    Ceconi, I; Ruiz-Moreno, M J; DiLorenzo, N; DiCostanzo, A; Crawford, G I

    2015-01-01

    Increased availability of rapidly fermentable carbohydrates and a great proportion of corn-derived CP in the diet may result in a degradable intake protein (DIP) deficit. Therefore, ruminal DIP deficit may result from high dietary inclusion of processed corn grain and small to moderate inclusion of corn distillers grains (DG). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of increasing dietary DIP concentration through the inclusion of urea on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, ruminal fermentation, total tract digestibility, and purine derivatives-to-creatinine (PDC) index. In Exp. 1, 42 steers (428 ± 5 kg initial BW) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets containing (DM basis) 0 (control [CON]), 0.4 (low urea [LU]), or 0.6% urea (high urea [HU]) to provide 6.4, 7.5, or 8.0% dietary DIP, respectively, and 12% high-moisture corn (HMC), 20% corn dried DG with solubles (DDGS), 10% ryegrass haylage, 2.9% dry supplement, and dry-rolled corn (DRC). Steers were fed ad libitum once daily using a Calan gate system. Carcass-adjusted final BW and DMI were similar among treatments (P ≥ 0.58). Carcass-adjusted ADG was greater (P ≤ 0.04) for the HU diet compared with the LU and CON diets and was similar (P = 0.73) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass-adjusted G:F was greater (P = 0.03) for the HU diet compared with the LU diet, tended (P = 0.09) to be greater compared with the CON diet, and was similar (P = 0.61) between the LU and CON diets. Carcass characteristics were similar (P ≥ 0.34) among treatments. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally cannulated steers (347 ± 18 kg initial BW) were randomly assigned to a replicated 2 × 2 Latin square design. Steers were fed the same CON or HU diet used in Exp. 1 ad libitum once daily. Differences in the PDC index were used as indicators of differences in microbial CP synthesis. Ruminal pH, OM intake, and starch and CP digestibility were not affected by treatment (P ≥ 0.13). Digestibility of OM and NDF and

  6. Release of bacterial alkaline phosphatase in the rumen of cattle fed a feedlot bloat-provoking diet or a hay diet.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K J; Hironaka, R; Costerton, J W

    1976-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (APase) was present in the bovine rumen in both cell-free and cell-associated states and levels of the enzyme varied with dietary regime. Reaction product deposition showed that the enzyme was associated with the mixed bacterial population. No enzyme was observed to be associated with protozoa. Trace activity of APase was also detected in the saliva. The presence of large amounts of APase in cell-free rumen fluid of cattle fed fine concentrate feed is believed to be due, in part, to the breakage of bacterial cells that occurs in the rumen. PMID:1277000

  7. Using Feedlot Operational Data to Make Valid Conclusions for Improving Health Management.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Miles E; Renter, David G; White, Brad J

    2015-11-01

    Feedlot operational data can be useful for monitoring cattle health and performance outcomes and evaluating associations between these outcomes and potentially important cattle population or management factors. Operational data are inherently relevant to clients; however, there are potential limitations that need to be considered to make appropriate conclusions. Assessing data quality, potential for bias, data distributions, and multiple health outcomes can provide a more thorough understanding of feedlot cattle health and factors that may affect health management systems. Accurate and useful information is derived only when the advantages and limitations of the data and the analysis process are fully understood. PMID:26210763

  8. Estimating the comparative clinical and economic consequences of tulathromycin for treatment of present or anticipated outbreaks of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nautrup, B Poulsen; Van Vlaenderen, I; Gasper, S M; Holland, R E

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the clinical and economic impact of using tulathromycin as first line treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) compared with other commonly used antimicrobials. Two decision trees were developed simulating the consequences of treating cattle at high risk of developing BRD [control model (CM)] or cattle with first clinical BRD episode [treatment model (TM)]. As comparators florfenicol and tilmicosin were considered in both models whereas enrofloxacin was included in the TM because it was only labeled for treatment of BRD at the time of development of the calculators. A total of 5 (CM) and 10 (TM) comparative clinical studies that reported efficacy data for the selected drugs and indications were identified as suitable for model population. The following outcomes were considered: first treatment success, number of subsequent BRD treatments, chronics, and mortalities. Cost parameters were considered from the perspective of the producer and included treatment costs (first treatment and retreatments) and costs of chronics and deaths derived from published sources for 2010 (default). The models allowed the estimation of clinical and economic consequences according to each individual trial outcomes. Treatment with tulathromycin resulted in more first treatment successes and fewer removals (chronics and deaths) in all comparisons. The average total number of antimicrobial treatments required for the management of BRD was also least with tulathromycin as first treatment option. Because of better efficacy, total costs over the entire study periods were always lowest with tulathromycin. Depending on the study selected as the basis for the efficacy evaluation, cost savings with tulathromycin were calculated in the CM between US$21.00 and $47.86 (vs. florfenicol) and $11.37 and $72.64 (vs. tilmicosin); cost savings in the TM ranged between $28.47 and $143.87 (vs. florfenicol) and $7.75 and $84.91 (vs. tilmicosin) as well as between

  9. Relative contribution of ruminal buffering systems to pH regulation in feedlot cattle fed either low- or high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Chibisa, G E; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2016-07-01

    The relative contribution of ruminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption and salivary buffering to pH regulation could potentially change under different dietary conditions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of altering the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO) on absorptive function and salivation in beef cattle. Eight heifers (mean BW±SD=410±14 kg) were randomly allocated to two treatments in a crossover design with 37-day periods. Dietary treatments were barley silage at 30% low forage (LF) or 70% high forage (HF) of dietary dry matter (DM), with the remainder of the diet consisting of barley grain (65% or 25% on a DM basis) and a constant level (5%) of supplement. The LF and HF diets contained 45.3% and 30.9% starch, and 4.1% and 14.0% physically effective fiber (DM basis), respectively. Ruminal pH was continuously measured from day 17 to day 23, whereas ruminal fluid was collected on day 23 to determine SCFA concentration. Ruminal liquid passage rate was determined on day 23 using Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Eating or resting salivation was measured by collecting masticate (days 28 and 29) or saliva samples (days 30 and 31) at the cardia, respectively. On days 30 and 31, the temporarily isolated and washed reticulo-rumen technique was used to measure total, and Cl--competitive (an indirect measure of protein-mediated transport) absorption of acetate, propionate and butyrate. As a result of the higher dietary starch content and DM intake, the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable CHO, total ruminal SCFA concentration (118 v. 95 mM; P<0.001) and osmolality (330 v. 306 mOsm/kg; P=0.018) were greater in cattle fed LF compared with HF. In addition, feeding LF resulted in a longer duration (2.50 v. 0.09 h/day; P=0.02) and a larger area (0.44 v. 0.01 (pH×h)/day; P=0.050) that pH was below 5.5. There was no diet effect on total and Cl--competitive absorption (mmol/h and %/h) of acetate, propionate

  10. Reburn system with feedlot biomass

    DOEpatents

    Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John M.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention pertains to the use of feedlot biomass as reburn fuel matter to reduce NO.sub.x emissions. According to one embodiment of the invention, feedlot biomass is used as the reburn fuel to reduce NO.sub.x. The invention also includes burners and boiler in which feedlot biomass serves a reburn fuel.

  11. Susceptibility of cattle to first-passage intracerebral inoculation with chronic wasting disease agent from white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare clinicopathological findings of chronic wasting disease (CWD) from white-tailed deer (CWD**wtd) with other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies [transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), prion diseases) that have been shown to be experimentally transmissible to cattle [sheep scr...

  12. The carbon-footprint of cattle feeding: A North American perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In contrast to much of the world, in North America, beef cattle typically spend a portion of their life in feedlots where they are fed diets high in grains and/or by-products. Feeding cattle nutritionally balanced, high-energy diets in confined feedlots can have several advantages over pastoral sys...

  13. Diet, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and cattle: A review after 10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli are commensal bacteria that can account for up to 1% of the bacterial population of the gut. Ruminant animals are reservoirs of the pathogenic bacteria E. coli O157:H7, and approximately 30% of feedlot cattle shed E. coli O157:H7. Feedlot and high-producing dairy cattle are fed hi...

  14. Diet, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, and cattle, a review after 10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli are commensal bacteria that can account for up to 1% of the bacterial population of the gut. Ruminant animals are reservoirs of the pathogenic bacteria E. coli strain O157:H7 and approximately 30% of feedlot cattle shed E. coli O157:H7. Feedlot and high-producing dairy cattle are ...

  15. Tertiary recycling of PVC-containing plastic waste by copyrolysis with cattle manure.

    PubMed

    Duangchan, Apinya; Samart, Chanatip

    2008-11-01

    The corrosion from pyrolysis of PVC in plastic waste was reduced by copyrolysis of PVC with cattle manure. The optimization of pyrolysis conditions between PVC and cattle manure was studied via a statistical method, the Box-Behnken model. The pyrolysis reaction was operated in a tubular reactor. Heating rate, reaction temperature and the PVC:cattle manure ratio were optimized in the range of 1-5 degrees C/min, 250-450 degrees C and the ratio of 1:1-1:5, respectively. The suitable conditions which provided the highest HCl reduction efficiency were the lowest heating rate of 1 degrees C/min, the highest reaction temperature of 450 degrees C, and the PVC:cattle manure ratio of 1:5, with reliability of more than 90%. The copyrolysis of the mixture of PVC-containing plastic and cattle manure was operated at optimized conditions and the synergistic effect was studied on product yields. The presence of manure decreased the oil yield by about 17%. The distillation fractions of oil at various boiling points from both the presence and absence of manure were comparable. The BTX concentration decreased rapidly when manure was present and the chlorinated hydrocarbon was reduced by 45%. However, the octane number of the gasoline fraction was not affected by manure and was in the range of 99-100. PMID:18314324

  16. Tertiary recycling of PVC-containing plastic waste by copyrolysis with cattle manure

    SciTech Connect

    Duangchan, Apinya Samart, Chanatip

    2008-11-15

    The corrosion from pyrolysis of PVC in plastic waste was reduced by copyrolysis of PVC with cattle manure. The optimization of pyrolysis conditions between PVC and cattle manure was studied via a statistical method, the Box-Behnken model. The pyrolysis reaction was operated in a tubular reactor. Heating rate, reaction temperature and the PVC:cattle manure ratio were optimized in the range of 1-5 deg. C/min, 250-450 deg. C and the ratio of 1:1-1:5, respectively. The suitable conditions which provided the highest HCl reduction efficiency were the lowest heating rate of 1 deg. C/min, the highest reaction temperature of 450 deg. C, and the PVC:cattle manure ratio of 1:5, with reliability of more than 90%. The copyrolysis of the mixture of PVC-containing plastic and cattle manure was operated at optimized conditions and the synergistic effect was studied on product yields. The presence of manure decreased the oil yield by about 17%. The distillation fractions of oil at various boiling points from both the presence and absence of manure were comparable. The BTX concentration decreased rapidly when manure was present and the chlorinated hydrocarbon was reduced by 45%. However, the octane number of the gasoline fraction was not affected by manure and was in the range of 99-100.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D; Li, M; Gehring, R; Harhay, D M; Lubbers, B V; White, B J; Capik, S F; KuKanich, B; Riviere, J E; Tessman, R K

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether an association exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran(®) ) at the label dose and (ii) whether there was a stronger association between treatment outcome and gamithromycin concentration in plasma or in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) effect compartment. The study design was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial utilizing three groups of 60 (362-592 lb) steers/bulls randomly allocated within origin to sham injection or gamithromycin mass medication. Cattle were evaluated daily for signs of BRD by a veterinarian blinded to treatment. Animals meeting the BRD case definition were enrolled and allocated to a sample collection scheme consisting of samples for bacterial isolation (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and nasopharyngeal swabs) and gamithromycin concentration determination (PELF and plasma). Gamithromycin susceptibility of M. haemolytica (n = 287) and P. multocida (n = 257) were determined using broth microdilution with frozen panels containing gamithromycin at concentrations from 0.03 to 16 μg/mL. A two-compartment plasma pharmacokinetic model with an additional compartment for gamithromycin in PELF was developed using rich data sets from published and unpublished studies. The sparse data from our study were then fit to this model using nonlinear mixed effects modeling to estimate individual parameter values. The resulting parameter estimates were used to simulate full time-concentration profiles for each animal in this study. These profiles were analyzed using noncompartmental methods so that PK/PD indices (AUC24 /MIC, AUC∞ /MIC, CMAX /MIC) could be calculated for plasma and PELF (also T>MIC) for each individual. The calculated PK/PD indices were indicative that for both M. haemolytica and P. multocida a higher drug

  18. Potential for nitrate and Fe(III) additions to control indicator bacteria, retain nitrogen, and reduce odors in beef cattle feedlot soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide variety of volatile odor compounds accumulate during the anaerobic fermentation of livestock wastes. Since these compounds are easily degraded in other environments when alternate electron acceptors (compounds other than O2) are available, we evaluated the use of amending NO3- and Fe(III) in...

  19. Effects of feeding combinations of steam-flaked grain sorghum and steam-flaked, high-moisture, or dry-rolled corn on growth performance and carcass characteristics in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Huck, G L; Kreikemeier, K K; Kuhl, G L; Eck, T P; Bolsen, K K

    1998-12-01

    The objective of these two feeding trials was to determine the associative effects of feeding steam-flaked grain sorghum (SFGS) in combination with steam-flaked (SFC), dry-rolled (DRC), or high-moisture (HMC) corn on growth performance and carcass characteristics in feedlot cattle. In Trial 1, 200 yearling heifers were blocked by weight, allotted to 25 pens, and fed one of five finishing diets (77% grain, 15% corn silage, and 8% supplement on a DM basis) for an average of 137 d. The grain combinations were 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 SFC:SFGS, respectively. Treatment had no effect on DMI (P > .05), but ADG, gain efficiency, and final live and hot carcass weights decreased linearly (P < .05) as the proportion of SFGS increased in the diet. Carcass backfat, quality grade, and liver abscess score were not affected (P > .05) by treatment. In Trial 2, 306 yearling steers were blocked by weight, allotted to 30 pens, and fed diets that contained 74.5% grain, 10% corn silage, 7.5% soybean meal, 4% tallow, and 4% supplement (DM basis) for an average of 139 d. The grain and grain combinations were 100% DRC, HMC, SFC, or SFGS and a 67%:33% combination of SFGS: DRC or SFGS:HMC. For steers fed diets containing a single source of grain, those fed SFC gained 7% more live weight and had a 7% higher gain efficiency (P < .05) than those fed DRC or HMC. Growth performance of steers fed SFGS was intermediate. Feeding grain combinations (67% SFGS:33% HMC or DRC) resulted in a 5 to 6% positive associative effect (P < .05) for ADG and gain efficiency. Carcass characteristics were not affected (P > .05) by treatment. We concluded that there were significant benefits (positive associative effects) when SFGS was fed in combination with DRC or HMC, but the effects were smaller when SFGS was fed in combination with SFC. PMID:9928601

  20. Nitrogen metabolism and route of excretion in beef feedlot cattle fed barley-based finishing diets varying in protein concentration and rumen degradability.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K M; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-05-01

    The objectives were to characterize the effects of supplemental CP concentration and ruminal degradability in barley-based finishing diets on microbial protein synthesis, ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestion, and route and chemical form of N excretion in beef cattle. Four Angus heifers (564 ± 18 kg BW) with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in an experiment designed as a 4 × 4 Latin square with four 28-d periods (9 d for diet adaptation and 19 d for measurements). The basal diet consisted of 9% barley silage and 91% barley-based concentrate (DM basis). Dietary treatments included the basal diet with no added protein (13% CP) or diets containing 14.5% CP by supplementation with urea (UREA), urea and canola meal (UREA+CM), or urea, corn gluten meal, and xylose-treated soybean meal (UREA+CGM+xSBM). Nutrient digestion was determined using Yb as a digesta flow marker and purine N as a microbial marker with the collection of ruminal, duodenal, and fecal samples over 5 d. The next week, total collections of feces and urine were performed for 5 d to quantify route and chemical form of N excretion. Feed offered was restricted (95% of ad libitum) and there was no effect of the dietary treatments on DMI (P = 0.55); therefore, N intake was less (P < 0.05) in heifers fed the 13% CP diets than the 14.5% CP diets. Supplemental RDP and RUP had no effect on ruminal NH3-N (P = 0.17), peptide N (P = 0.46), and VFA (P = 0.62) concentrations, flow of microbial (P = 0.69) and feed (P = 0.22) N, and ruminal and total tract nutrient digestibility (P ≥ 0.18). Nutrient digestion in the rumen and total tract averaged 75.4 ± 3.8% and 84.6 ± 0.9% for OM, 80.8 ± 3.6% and 95.8 ± 0.8% for starch, and 41.2 ± 7.9% and 60.4 ± 3.3% of intake for NDF, respectively. Daily output of N in feces (P = 0.91) and urine (P = 0.14) were not affected by the dietary treatments. Fecal N output averaged 19.9 ± 1.9% (P = 0.30) and urine N output averaged 44.1 ± 2.8% (P = 0.63) of N intake

  1. Recovery of energy and nutrient resources from cattle paunch waste using temperature phased anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Paul D; Mehta, Chirag M; Carney, Chris; Batstone, D J

    2016-05-01

    Cattle paunch is comprised of partially digested cattle feed, containing mainly grass and grain and is a major waste produced at cattle slaughterhouses contributing 20-30% of organic matter and 40-50% of P waste produced on-site. In this work, Temperature Phased Anaerobic Digestion (TPAD) and struvite crystallization processes were developed at pilot-scale to recover methane energy and nutrients from paunch solid waste. The TPAD plant achieved a maximum sustainable organic loading rate of 1-1.5kgCODm(-3)day(-1) using a feed solids concentration of approximately 3%; this loading rate was limited by plant engineering and not the biology of the process. Organic solids destruction (60%) and methane production (230LCH4kg(-1) VSfed) achieved in the plant were similar to levels predicted from laboratory biochemical methane potential (BMP) testing. Model based analysis identified no significant difference in batch laboratory parameters vs pilot-scale continuous parameters, and no change in speed or extent of degradation. However the TPAD process did result in a degree of process intensification with a high level of solids destruction at an average treatment time of 21days. Results from the pilot plant show that an integrated process enabled resource recovery at 7.8GJ/dry tonne paunch, 1.8kgP/dry tonne paunch and 1.0kgN/dry tonne paunch. PMID:26965211

  2. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on internal body temperature and respiration rate of black-hided feedlot steers and heifers during moderate heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on the internal body temperature and respiration rate of feedlot cattle during moderate heat stress. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech...

  3. Nitrogen metabolism and route of excretion in beef feedlot cattle fed barley-based backgrounding diets varying in protein concentration and rumen degradability.

    PubMed

    Koenig, K M; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to characterize the effects of CP concentration and ruminal degradability of barley-based backgrounding diets on route and chemical form of N excretion, ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, and nutrient digestion in beef cattle. Four Angus heifers (479 ± 14.6 kg average BW) with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in an experiment designed as a 4 × 4 Latin square. The basal diet consisted of 54% barley silage and 46% barley grain-based concentrate (DM basis). Dietary treatments included the basal diet with no added protein (12% CP) or diets formulated to contain 14% CP by supplementation with urea (UREA), urea and canola meal (UREA+CM), or urea, corn gluten meal, and xylose-treated soybean meal (UREA+CGM+xSBM). The amount of feed offered was restricted to 95% of ad libitum intake. There was no effect of the diets on DMI (P = 0.38), and therefore, N intake was less (P < 0.05) in heifers fed the 12% CP diets than the 14% CP diets. Fecal N output was not affected by the diet (P = 0.15), but urine N (P < 0.10) and urea N output were greater (P < 0.05) in heifers fed the 14% CP than the 12% CP diets. There was no effect of CP degradability (P > 0.10) on the amount of urine N output. Urine N output was 38.9 and 45.1 ± 5.50% of N intake in heifers fed the 12% CP and 14% CP diets (P < 0.05), respectively. Urea N, the form of N most susceptible to NH3-N volatilization and loss, was the major form of N in urine (75.5% in heifers fed the 12% CP diet and 81.4 ± 1.7% in heifers fed the 14% CP diets; P < 0.05). Supplemental RDP (UREA+CM) and RUP combined with urea (UREA+CGM+xSBM) to provide 14% CP increased (P < 0.05) ruminal NH3-N but had no effect on ruminal peptide N (P = 0.62) and free AA N (P = 0.18) concentration, the flow of microbial (P = 0.34) and feed (P = 0.55) N, and ruminal (starch, P = 0.11; NDF, P = 0.78) and total tract nutrient digestibility (OM, P = 0.21; starch, P = 0.16). Supplementation of barley

  4. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence. PMID:26139194

  5. Methane production by fermentation cultures acclimated to waste from cattle fed monensin, lasalocid, salinomycin, or avoparcin

    SciTech Connect

    Varel, V.H.; Hashimoto, A.G.

    1982-12-01

    The ability of microorganisms to ferment waste from cattle fed monensin, lasalocid, or salinomycin to methane was determined. Continuously mixed anaerobic fermentors with 3-liter working volumes at 55 degrees C were used; fermentors were fed once per day. Initially, all fermentors were fed waste without antibiotics at 6% volatile solids (VSs, organic matter) and a 20-day retention time (RT) for 60 days. Waste from animals fed monensin, lasalocid, or salinomycin at 29, 20, and 16.5 mg per kg of feed, respectively, was added to duplicate fermentors at the above VSs, and RT. Avoparcin (5 to 45 mg/liter) was not fed to animals but was added directly to duplicate fermentors. Lasalocid and salinomycin had minimal effects of the rate of methane production at RTs of 20 days and later at 6.5 days. Avoparcin caused an increaes in organic acids from 599 to 1,672 mg/liter (as acetate) after 4 weeks, but by 6 weeks, acid concentrations declined and the rate of methane production was similar to controls at 6.5 day RT. The monensin fermentors stopped producing methane 3 weeks after antibiotic addition. However, after a 6-month acclimation period, the microorganisms apparently adapted, and methane production rates of 1.65 and 2.51 liters per liter of fermentor volume per day were obtained with 6% VSs, and RTs of 10 and 6.5 days, respectively. All fermentors that were fed waste containing antibiotics had lower pH values and ammonia and alkalinity concentrations, suggesting less buffering capacity and protein catabolism than in controls. Acclimation results obtained with fermentors at 35 degrees C were similar to those for fermentors at 55 degrees C. These studies indicate that waste from cattle fed these selected growth-promoting antibiotics can be thermophilically fermented to methane at RTs of 6.5 days or longer and VS concentrations of 6%, at rates comparable to waste without antibiotics. (Refs. 21).

  6. Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production.

    PubMed

    Marañón, E; Castrillón, L; Quiroga, G; Fernández-Nava, Y; Gómez, L; García, M M

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH(4)/kg VS(feed) for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36°C, for an OLR of 1.2g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55°C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment. PMID:22743289

  7. Effect of ultrasound pre-treatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, G; Castrillón, L; Fernández-Nava, Y; Marañón, E; Negral, L; Rodríguez-Iglesias, J; Ormaechea, P

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of applying ultrasound pre-treatment in the production of methane when co-digesting mixtures of cattle manure with food waste and sludge. A series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions in continuously stirred-tank reactors containing 70% cattle manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge. Ultrasound pre-treatment allows operating at lower HRT, achieving higher volumetric methane yields: 0.85 L CH4/L day at 36°C and 0.82 CH4/L day at 55°C, when cattle manure and sewage sludge were sonicated. With respect to the non-sonicated waste, these values represent increases of up to 31% and 67% for mesophilic and thermophilic digestion, respectively. PMID:24384312

  8. Surfactants in anaerobic digestion of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.; Madamwar, D.

    1994-05-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste and cheese whey, with enriched methane content, the effect of various surfactants was studied. Among the surfactants tested, Tween 80 and sodium lauryl sulphate showed the maximum enhancement in gas production as well as methane content, indicating better process performance. The Tween 80 dosed digester (300 {mu}L/L) produced about 3.5 L gas/L of digester/d with 70% methane. Results also indicated increased percent COD reduction in the presence of Tween 80. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Bacteriophages Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Fecal Waste from Cattle, Pigs, and Poultry▿

    PubMed Central

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Imamovic, Lejla; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the occurrence of bacteriophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes in animal environments. blaTEM, blaCTX-M (clusters 1 and 9), and mecA were quantified by quantitative PCR in 71 phage DNA samples from pigs, poultry, and cattle fecal wastes. Densities of 3 to 4 log10 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM, 2 to 3 log10 GC of blaCTX-M, and 1 to 3 log10 GC of mecA per milliliter or gram of sample were detected, suggesting that bacteriophages can be environmental vectors for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:21807968

  10. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  11. Molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 hide contamination routes: feedlot to harvest.

    PubMed

    Childs, K D; Simpson, C A; Warren-Serna, W; Bellenger, G; Centrella, B; Bowling, R A; Ruby, J; Stefanek, J; Vote, D J; Choat, T; Scanga, J A; Sofos, J N; Smith, G C; Belk, K E

    2006-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify the origin of Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination on steer hides at the time of harvest. Samples were collected from the feedlot, transport trailers, and packing plant holding pens and from the colons and hides of feedlot steers. A total of 50 hide samples were positive for E. coli O157:H7 in two geographical locations: the Midwest (25 positive hides) and Southwest (25 positive hides). Hide samples were screened, and the presence of E. coli O157: H7 was confirmed. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were fingerprinted by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and subjected to multiplex PCR procedures for amplification of E. coli O157:H7 genes stx1, stx2, eaeA, fliC, rfbEO157, and hlyA. Feedlot water trough, pen floor, feed bunk, loading chute, truck trailer side wall and floor, packing plant holding pen floor and side rail, and packing plant cattle drinking water samples were positive for E. coli O157:H7. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis banding patterns were analyzed after classifying isolates according to the marker genes present and according to packing plant. In this study, hide samples positive for E. coli O157:H7 were traced to other E. coli O157:H7-positive hide, colon, feedlot pen floor fecal, packing plant holding pen drinking water, and transport trailer side wall samples. Links were found between packing plant side rails, feedlot loading chutes, and feedlot pens and between truck trailer, different feedlots, and colons of multiple cattle. This study is the first in which genotypic matches have been made between E. coli O157:H7 isolates obtained from transport trailer side walls and those from cattle hide samples within the packing plant. PMID:16786841

  12. Vaccination: Is it Effective in Preventing Respiratory Disease or Influencing Weight Gains in Feedlot Calves?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Respiratory disease, both undifferentiated and etiologically defined, remains a major problem in feedlot cattle. Vaccination has been used in an attempt to reduce the frequency and/or severity of respiratory disease in the first few weeks after the cattle arrive at the feedlot. The efficacy of vaccination has been studied both in controlled laboratory experiments and field trials as well as observational studies. (In this review, efficacy refers to the ability to reduce overall treatment rate and/or increase weight gains.) This review summarizes the data resulting from studies of vaccine efficacy. In general, there is little published data to support the use of vaccines against respiratory disease under feedlot conditions. Treatment rates and weight gains usually did not differ between vaccinated and nonvaccinated groups. The use of live bovine virus diarrhea virus vaccines was associated with a significant subsequent increase in treatment rates. Criteria to be considered in future field trials are described. PMID:17422213

  13. Plant-Derived Oils Reduce Pathogens and Gaseous Emissions from Stored Cattle Waste

    PubMed Central

    Varel, Vincent H.; Miller, Daniel N.

    2001-01-01

    Carvacrol and thymol in combination at 6.7 mM each completely inhibited the production of short-chain volatile fatty acids and lactate from cattle waste in anoxic flasks over 23 days. Fecal coliforms were reduced from 4.6 × 106 to 2.0 × 103 cells per ml 2 days after treatment and were nondetectable within 4 days. Total anaerobic bacteria were reduced from 8.4 × 1010 to 1.5 × 107 cells per ml after 2 days and continued to be suppressed to that level after 14 days. If the concentration of carvacrol or thymol were doubled (13.3 mM), either could be used to obtain the same inhibitory fermentation effect. We conclude that carvacrol or thymol may be useful as an antimicrobial chemical to control pathogens and odor in stored livestock waste. PMID:11229933

  14. 40 CFR Table Jj-3 to Subpart Jj of... - State-Specific Volatile Solids (VS) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2015-07-01

    ...) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle JJ Table JJ-3 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of... Volatile Solids (VS) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle State Volatile solids excretion rate (kg VS/day/1000 kg animal mass) Dairy cows Dairy heifers Feedlot steer Feedlot heifers Nitrogen...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF AN INFILTRATION BASIN AND CONSTRUCTED WETLAND FOR REMOVAL OF PATHOGENS FROM FEEDLOT RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of an infiltration basin and constructed wetland to treat process wastewater from a cattle feedlot prior to discharge to an adjacent waterway was explored in regards to fecal pathogens. Weekly sampling of typical operating conditions and rainfall-generated runoff during 2...

  16. Feedlot Nutritionist Boot Camp: An Intensive Short-Course for Commercial Agriculture Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Chris; Hubbert, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In the digital age, face-to-face meetings combining didactic and experiential learning are valuable. Beef cattle nutrition graduate students (n = 33) from 11 universities attended a 5-day feedlot nutrition and management short-course. Topics included nutrition, veterinary medicine, feedmill maintenance, and management of the financial and human…

  17. Feedlot research at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (U.S. MARC) conducts research in several areas to support the feedlot industry and the U.S. consumer. Several studies have been conducted to determine the nutrient value of emerging coproduct feeds and their usage in cattle of diverse genetics. The amount of me...

  18. Effects of total solids concentrations of poultry, cattle, and piggery waste slurries on biogas yield

    SciTech Connect

    Itodo, I.N.; Awulu, J.O.

    1999-12-01

    The effects of total solids concentrations of poultry, cattle and piggery waste slurries on biogas yield was investigated. Twelve laboratory-size anaerobic batch digesters with 25 L volume were constructed and used for the experiments. Three replicates of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% TS concentrations of poultry, cattle, and piggery waste slurries were anaerobically digested for a 30-day detention period and gas yield was measured by the method of water displacement. Temperature variation within the digesters was measured with a maximum and minimum thermometer. Anaerobic digestion of the slurries was undertaken in the mesophilic temperature range (20--40 C). The carbon:nitrogen ratio of each of the slurries digested was determined. The carbon content was determined using the wackley-Black method, and nitrogen content was determined by the regular kjeldhal method. The pH was measured weekly during the period of digestion from a digital pH meter. Gas quality (% methane fraction) was also measured weekly from an analyzer. Coefficient of variation was computed to ascertain the status of the digestion process. Analysis of variance was used to determine the significant difference in gas yield at p < 0.05. Duncan's New Multiple Range Test at p < 0.05 was used to analyze the difference in gas yield among the various TS concentrations of the slurries investigated. The results indicate that biogas yield is of the order: 5% TS > 10% TS > 15% TS > 20% TS. This result shows that gas yield increases with decreasing TS concentration of the slurries. The ANOVA showed that the gas yield from the various TS % was significantly different (p < 0.05). DNMRT showed that there was significant difference in gas yield from the slurries and wastetypes investigated. Poultry waste slurries had the greatest gas yield (L CH4/kg TS) as the gas yield from the waste types was of the order: Poultry > Piggery > Cattle. The pH of the slurries was of the range 5.5 to 6.8 (weakly acidic). The C:N of the

  19. Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Maranon, E.; Castrillon, L.; Quiroga, G.; Fernandez-Nava, Y.; Gomez, L.; Garcia, M.M.

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small increase in methane production was observed applying sonication pretreatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas productions between 720 and 1100 mL/Lreactor day were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volatile solids removal efficiencies ranged between 53% and 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower methane yields were obtained when operating under thermophilic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum OLR in lab-scale CSTR was 1.2-1.3 g VS/L day (HRT: 20 days). - Abstract: Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH{sub 4}/kg VS{sub feed} for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36 Degree-Sign C, for an OLR of 1.2 g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5 g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55 Degree-Sign C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment.

  20. Methane Production by Fermentor Cultures Acclimated to Waste from Cattle Fed Monensin, Lasalocid, Salinomycin, or Avoparcin

    PubMed Central

    Varel, V. H.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to ferment waste from cattle fed monensin, lasalocid, or salinomycin to methane was determined. Continuously mixed anaerobic fermentors with 3-liter working volumes at 55°C were used; fermentors were fed once per day. Initially, all fermentors were fed waste without antibiotics at 6% volatile solids (VSs, organic matter) and a 20-day retention time (RT) for 60 days. Waste from animals fed monensin, lasalocid, or salinomycin at 29, 20, and 16.5 mg per kg of feed, respectively, was added to duplicate fermentors at the above VSs, and RT. Avoparcin (5 to 45 mg/liter) was not fed to animals but was added directly to duplicate fermentors. Lasalocid and salinomycin had minimal effects on the rate of methane production at RTs of 20 days and later at 6.5 days. Avoparcin caused an increase in organic acids from 599 to 1,672 mg/liter (as acetate) after 4 weeks, but by 6 weeks, acid concentrations declined and the rate of methane production was similar to controls at a 6.5-day RT. The monensin fermentors stopped producing methane 3 weeks after antibiotic addition. However, after a 6-month acclimation period, the microorganisms apparently adapted, and methane production rates of 1.65 and 2.51 liters per liter of fermentor volume per day were obtained with 6% VSs, and RTs of 10 and 6.5 days, respectively. This compares with 1.78 and 2.62 liters/liter per day for controls (P > 0.05). All fermentors that were fed waste containing antibiotics had lower pH values and ammonia and alkalinity concentrations, suggesting less buffering capacity and protein catabolism than in controls. Acclimation results obtained with fermentors at 35°C were similar to those for fermentors at 55°C. These studies indicate that waste from cattle fed these selected growth-promoting antibiotics can be thermophilically fermented to methane at RTs of 6.5 days or longer and VS concentrations of 6%, at rates comparable to waste without antibiotics. PMID:16346156

  1. Escherichia coli O157:H7 vaccine field trial in 9 feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A feedlot trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 vaccine in reducing fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in 218 pens of feedlot cattle in 9 feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Pens of cattle were vaccinated once at arrival processing and again at reimplanting with either the E. coli O157:H7 vaccine or a placebo. The E. coli O157:H7 vaccine included 50 μg of type III secreted proteins. Fecal samples were collected from 30 fresh manure patties within each feedlot pen at arrival processing, revaccination at reimplanting, and within 2 wk of slaughter. The mean pen prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feces was 5.0%; ranging in pens from 0% to 90%, and varying signif icantly (P < 0.001) among feedlots. There was no signif icant association (P > 0.20) between vaccination and pen prevalence of fecal E. coli O157:H7 following initial vaccination, at reimplanting, or prior to slaughter. PMID:16187717

  2. Effect of temperature and retention time on methane production from beef cattle waste

    SciTech Connect

    Varel, V.H.; Hashimoto, A.G.; Chen, Y.R.

    1980-08-01

    The effect of temperature and retention time on the rate of methane production from waste of beef cattle fed a finishing diet was investigated by using continuously mixed 3-liter working volume anaerobic fermentors. The temperatures ranged from 30 to 65/sup 0/C with 5/sup 0/C increments between fermentors. The fermentors were fed once per day with 6% volatile solids (organic matter). Retention time for each temperature was varied from 18 to 2.5 days. After 3-volume turnovers, samples were obtained on 4 consecutive days. The highest methane production rate (liters/liter of fermentor per day) and methane yield at that rate (liters/gram of volatile solids) were 1.27 and 0.19 at 9 days and 30/sup 0/C, 1.60 and 0.16 at 6 days and 35/sup 0/C, 2.28 and 0.23 at 6 days and 40/sup 0/C, 2.42 and 0.24 at 6 days and 45/sup 0/C, 2.83 and 0.14 at 3 days and 50/sup 0/C, 2.75 and 0.14 at 3 days and 55/sup 0/C, 3.18 and 0.14 at 2.5 days and 60/sup 0/C, and 1.69 and 0.17 at 6 days and 65/sup 0/C. Volatile solids degradation at these retention times and temperatures was between 46 and 54%. The concentrations of volatile acids in the 30 to 55/sup 0/C fermentors were generally below 2000 mg/liter, with the exception of the 3-day retention time. The 60 and 65/sup 0/C fermentors were usually above this level for all retention times. These studies indicate potential rates of methane production from the fermentation of untreated waste of beef cattle fed high-grain finishing diets. This information should serve as preliminary guidelines for various kinetic analyses and aid in economic evaluations of the potential feasibility of fermenting beef cattle waste to methane.

  3. Rainfall Driven Sorting of Soils and Manure in Beef Feedlot Pens, Implications for Steroid Hormone Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, R.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has documented elevated estrogenic and androgenic activity in surface waters receiving cattle feedlot effluent, while current research shows that significant concentrations of hydrophobic steroid hormones are transported in the solid phase of feedlot pen surface runoff. Accumulated manure in beef feedlot pens includes organic matter ranging from colloidal particles to partially digested feed, forming a complex soil-manure conglomerate at the pen surface. We hypothesized that the transport of solid phase particles in rainfall runoff on beef feedlots would be influenced but not limited by shield layer development. Soils and manure at a beef feedlot were evaluated before and after rainfall-runoff events to determine changes in soil composition and structure. Runoff samples were also collected during an hour of runoff and analyzed for suspended solids. Results indicate that rainfall actively sorts the soil and manure components through raindrop impact, depression storage and runoff. However, transport of solid phase constituents was found to be elevated throughout the hydrograph. This suggests that the surface shield layer conceptualization applied to other soils should be modified before application to the soil-manure conglomerate found in beef feedlot pens.

  4. Effect of age at feedlot entry on performance and carcass characteristics of bulls and steers.

    PubMed

    Schoonmaker, J P; Loerch, S C; Fluharty, F L; Zerby, H N; Turner, T B

    2002-09-01

    Seventy Angus x Simmental calves (BW = 166.3 +/- 4.2 kg) were used in a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement to determine the effect of age at feedlot entry and castration on growth, performance, and carcass characteristics. At 82 d of age, steers were castrated. Calves were placed in the feedlot at 111 (early-weaned), 202, or 371 (yearling) d of age. Steers were implanted with Synovex-S followed 93 d later with Revalor-S. Calves were harvested on an individual basis when fat thickness was estimated to be 1.27 cm. During the feedlot phase, yearlings gained faster (P < 0.01) than calves placed in the feedlot at 202 or 111 d of age (1.88, 1.68, and 1.62 kg/d, respectively); however, from 111 d of age until harvest, ADG was greatest for early-weaned calves, intermediate for cattle placed in the feedlot at 202 d of age, and lowest for yearlings (1.62, 1.47, and 1.21 kg/d, respectively; P < 0.01). Early-weaned calves spent the most days in the feedlot, followed by calves placed in the feedlot at 202 d of age; yearlings spent the fewest days in the feedlot (221, 190, and 163 d, respectively; P < 0.01). Total DMI when in the feedlot was similar (P = 0.22) among age groups; however, daily DMI was lowest for early-weaned calves, intermediate for calves placed in the feedlot at 202 d of age, and the highest for yearlings (7.1, 8.1, 10.5 kg/ d, respectively; P < 0.01). Early-weaned calves were the most efficient, followed by calves placed in the feedlot at 202 d of age; yearlings were the least efficient (227, 207, 180 g gain/kg feed, respectively; P < 0.01). Weight at harvest (682, 582, 517 kg, respectively; P < 0.01) and hot carcass weight (413, 358, 314 kg, respectively; P < 0.01) were greatest for yearlings, intermediate for cattle placed in the feedlot at 202 d of age, and lowest for early-weaned calves. Early-weaned calves had the smallest longissimus area, followed by calves placed in the feed-lot at 202 d of age; yearlings had the largest longissimus area (77, 86, 88 cm2

  5. A new model for phosphorus loss in runoff from outdoor cattle lots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture persists as a water quality issue. For cattle farms, nutrients can be lost from cropland, pastures, and barnyards and feedlots. Barnyards and feedlots can be significant sources of P loss, but there are few modeling tools to estimate that loss. We developed a use...

  6. Use of a resistance meter to locate manure suitable for energy recovery in beef cattle feedyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral constituents, i.e., salts, contained in beef feedlot manure alter inherent soil conductivity. Researchers at USMARC have adapted tools such as electromagnetic soil conductivity meters and mapping/modeling software to identify areas where by manure accumulates on beef cattle feedlots. These t...

  7. Effects of thermobarical pretreatment of cattle waste as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Budde, Jörn; Heiermann, Monika; Quiñones, Teresa Suárez; Plöchl, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    Lab-scale experiments were conducted to assess the impact of thermobarical treatment of cattle waste on anaerobic digestion. Treatment was at temperatures of 140-220°C in 20K steps for a 5-min duration. Methane yields could be increased by up to 58% at a treatment temperature of 180°C. At 220°C the abundance of inhibitors and other non-digestible substances led to lower methane yields than those obtained from untreated material. In an extended analysis it could be demonstrated that there is a functional correlation between the methane yields after 30 days and the formation rate and methane yield in the acceleration phase. It could be proved in a regression of these correlation values that the optimum treatment temperature is 164°C and that the minimum treatment temperature should be above 115°C. PMID:24238801

  8. Feedlot Euthanasia and Necropsy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Timely euthanasia of feeder cattle can minimize suffering of cattle that have little hope of recovery or pain abatement. Euthanasia techniques are described, including primary and secondary steps to ensure humane death. Considerations are discussed to ensure rendered product from euthanized cattle will be safe. A necropsy technique that is time efficient and thorough is outlined. An important aspect is minimizing the number of detached body organs, thereby making it easier to remove the necropsied animal. A necropsy data collection system is discussed that uses check-boxes to record findings. A link to a database that can be downloaded is included. PMID:26188549

  9. Shade material evaluation based on physiological response of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle produced in open feedlots are vulnerable to a variety of weather events; under certain conditions heat events can be especially detrimental. Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing cattle stress. A variety of shading materials are available; selection of a suitable m...

  10. Salmonella in lymph nodes of cattle presented for harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Salmonella in the subiliac lymph nodes (LN) of cattle. Lymph node samples were obtained from carcasses of cull and feedlot cattle at commercial packing plants. Lymph nodes were trimmed of all fat, surface sterilized by submersion in boiling ...

  11. Characterization of microbiomes related to respiratory disease in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease is the single largest disease-related issue for the beef cattle industry in the United States, estimated to be responsible for up to 75% of morbidity in beef cattle feedlots. Despite decades of research into this problem, incidence of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) h...

  12. Shade Material Evaluation Using a Cattle Response Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle produced in open feedlots are vulnerable to a variety of weather events; under certain conditions heat events can be especially detrimental. Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing cattle stress. A variety of shading materials are available; selection of a suitable mat...

  13. Greenhouse gas and alcohol emissions from feedlot steers and calves.

    PubMed

    Stackhouse, Kimberly R; Pan, Yuee; Zhao, Yongjing; Mitloehner, Frank M

    2011-01-01

    Livestock's contributions to climate change and smog-forming emissions are a growing public policy concern. This study quantifies greenhouse gas (GHG) and alcohol emissions from calves and feedlot steers. Carbon dioxide (CO) methane (CH), nitrous oxide (NO), ethanol (EtOH), and methanol (MeOH) were measured from a total of 45 Holstein and Angus steers and 9 Holstein calves representative of four different growth stages commonly present on calf ranches and commercial feedlots. Individuals from each animal type were randomly assigned to three equal replicate groups of nine animals per group. Steers were fed a high concentrate diet and calves a milk replacer and grain supplement. Cattle and calves were housed in groups of three animals in an environmental chamber for 24 h. The CO, NO, EtOH, and MeOH concentrations from the air inlet and outlet of the chamber were measured using an INNOVA 1412 monitor and CH using a TEI 55C methane analyzer. Emission rates (g head h) were calculated. The GHGs were mainly produced by enteric fermentation and respiration and differed across life stages of cattle. Compared with dairy cows, feedlot steers produce relatively less GHG. In general, ethanol and methanol, the most important volatile organic compound (VOC) group in the dairy sector, were below the lower limit of detection of the gas analyzer. The present data will be useful to verify models and to enhance GHG emission inventories for enteric fermentation, respiration, and fresh excreta for numerous cattle life stages across the beef industry. PMID:21546675

  14. Predicting water intake by yearling feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Sexson, J L; Wagner, J J; Engle, T E; Eickhoff, J

    2012-06-01

    Data from 4 separate beef cattle feedlot experiments, which were conducted at the Southeast Colorado Research Center (SECRC) in Lamar, CO, in 2001, 2003, 2004, and 2007, were utilized in a retrospective longitudinal study investigating possible relationships between daily water consumption (WC), DMI, and weather variables. The data set consisted of 8,209 records from 2001, 2003, 2004, and 2007, with pen based daily WC (L•animal(-1)) and DMI measurements and calculated daily steer BW from April to October in each year. Daily weather data were obtained from the weather station located at Lamar Municipal Airport located approximately 1.9 km from SECRC. Data collected consisted of daily high, low, and mean temperature; high, low, and mean humidity; high, low, and mean sea level pressure; mean wind speed; total precipitation; and average daily wind direction (cosine of radians from due north). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the continuous variables of BW, humidity, and sea level pressure were negatively related (P < 0.0001), whereas DMI, temperature the previous day, daily temperature, change in temperature from the previous day, average wind speed, and the temperature-humidity index (THI) were positively related (P < 0.001) to daily WC. There was a trend (P < 0.06) for the cosine of wind direction (1 = due north and -1 = due south) to be negatively related to WC. The multivariate, parsimonious model predicting average daily WC included (P < 0.05) average humidity, average humidity squared, high temperature squared, high humidity squared, low temperature, low temperature squared, low humidity, average sea level pressure, average wind speed, average daily BW, high sea level pressure, low sea level pressure, high humidity, and low humidity. The generalized R(2) of the parsimonious multivariate model was 0.32. These results indicate that BW and numerous weather factors are related to WC by yearling feedlot steers. Dry matter intake had minimal impact on WC for

  15. Electromagnetic Induction and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Applied to evaluate contamination at a site of disposal of animal wastes from a feedlot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, C. M.; Marquez Molina, J.; Losinno, B.; Urricariet, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    In Argentina, the systems of animal feeding in pens (feedlots) are expanding the production, generating a great quantity of solids and liquid residuals, being a highly risky source of soil and groundwater contamination. The aim of this work was to evaluate the relation between soil bulk conductivity and the distribution of concentrations of nitrates and other potential contaminants of groundwater from animal manure. Shallow electromagnetic induction (EMI) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys were carried out at a pen of a feedlot at San Pedro , Bs. As. Province , Argentina, where large quantities of manure (3.5 m height) had been placed at the center of them, for a few months of activity. Soil sampling up to 2 m depth was performed for physical and chemical analysis. Wells were drilled for monitoring groundwater level (12 m depth) and water quality. Soil texture was defined as loamy clayey silty. Distribution of electrical conductivity obtained from the two exploration methods was similar, being higher the values at the pen than at the background site, coinciding with laboratory measurements of electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract. At the center of the pen, bellow the manure accumulation, the highest values of conductivity were found (greater than 120mS/m), decreasing to the surroundings. However, values of N-NO3 in soil were lower at the center of the pen than at the surroundings. Concentration decreases with depth at sites of the pen with high soil compaction. Water content showed a strong influence on values of conductivity. Groundwater values of NO3 concentration do not exceed the level for human consumption although SO4 concentration increases respect to background deeper well.Values of conductivity and N-NO3 were still lower compared with the ones found at another pen with 10 years of use. An EMI survey carried out two years later showed an increase of twice the values of electrical conductivity. We conclude that higher

  16. Tegoprens in anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, C.; Sastry, V.; Madamwar, D.

    1996-01-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste, and cheese whey, the effect of various doses of Tegoprens: T-3012, T-3099, T-5842, T-5843, T-5851, T-5852 has been studied, in bench-scale digesters. Among them, Tegoprens 3022 showed more than a 45% increase in gas production with higher methane content. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The development in beef cattle manure of Petriedllidium boydii (Shear) Malloch, a potential pathogen for man and cattle.

    PubMed

    Bell, R G

    1976-04-01

    Petriellidium boydii (Allescheria boydii) dominated the mycoflora of manure samples form three beef cattle feedlots after incubation at room temperature for 4 months. The possible dangers associated with this pathogenic fungus, which causes mycotic abortion in livestock, pulmonary allescheriasis in man, and mycetomas in both man and animals, are discussed. This fungus could create a health hazard in feedlots where in situ manure decompostion is encouraged. PMID:944082

  18. Beef feedlot industry.

    PubMed

    Mintert, James

    2003-07-01

    The United States cattle feeding sector has changed dramatically over time. Movement from an industry largely populated by farmer feeders using livestock to market their grain production to an industry composed of large, specialized, commercial cattle feeding firms has occurred since the end of World War II. Moreover, the industry also shifted geographically, moving away from the Corn Belt to the Plains as farmer feeders exited the industry. Today, the 10 largest firms in the industry likely market 22% to as much as 29% of all fed cattle produced in the United States. The shift in industry structure was at least partially motivated by the advent of improved technology. Successful implementation of rapidly evolving technology often required more intense, specialized management (and in some cases, larger operations) than was available in many farmer feeder operations. The ongoing shift away from live-weight pricing of fed cattle toward grid-based pricing could increase the need for specialized management yet again, encouraging even more industry consolidation in the future. PMID:12951739

  19. Manure odor potential and Escherichia coli concentrations in manure slurries of feedlot steers fed 40% corn wet distillers grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated feeding 0 and 40% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) diets to cattle and effects on feedlot manure collected from soil-based pens and incubated for 28 d. Steers (n = 603; 261 ± 32 kg) were fed in eight pens (15 x 150 m) of 75 to 77 steers per pen. Two experiments were ...

  20. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  1. Isolation and characterization of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, and O157 shed from range and feedlot cattle from postweaning to slaughter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle are the main reservoirs for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. E. coli O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 are among the STEC serogroups that cause severe foodborne illness and have been declared as adulterants by the United States Department of Agriculture, Food Sa...

  2. Influence of therapeutic ceftiofur treatments of feedlot cattle on fecal and hide prevalences of commensal Escherichia coli resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, and molecular characterization of resistant isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States the bla**CMY-2** gene contained within incompatibility type A/C (IncA/C) plasmids is frequently identified in extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (ESCr) from both human and cattle sources. Concerns have been raised that therapeutic use of ceftiofur in catt...

  3. Flooding event impacts soil pH, Ca, and P concentration distribution in a cattle backgrounding site on karst topography.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle backgrounding in US, function as an intermediate between cow-calf enterprises and feedlot finishing. Beef cattle backgrounding receives weaned calves of different growth stages from cow-calf operations and prepare them ready for feed lot finishing. Many beef cattle backgrounding operati...

  4. Growth and Development Symposium: Impacts of inflammation on cattle growth and carcass merit.

    PubMed

    Gifford, C A; Holland, B P; Mills, R L; Maxwell, C L; Farney, J K; Terrill, S J; Step, D L; Richards, C J; Burciaga Robles, L O; Krehbiel, C R

    2012-05-01

    Inflammation caused by bovine respiratory disease (BRD) continues to be one of the greatest challenges facing beef cattle producers and feedlot managers. Inflammation decreases DMI, ADG, and G:F in feedlot calves, decreasing growth rate and increasing days on feed, which results in economic losses during the feeding period. During the past decade, marketing of feedlot animals has changed from selling cattle on a live basis to a grid-based marketing system. When cattle are marketed on a live basis, the economic effects of BRD stop at increased health cost and decreased feedlot performance, carcass weight, and death loss. However, when cattle are marketed in a grid-based system, inflammation has the potential to also affect carcass cutability and quality. The effects of inflammation on feedlot cattle in regards to performance are well understood; however, specific effects on cattle growth and ultimately carcass merit are not as well described. Recent studies in feedlot cattle have indicated that the incidence of BRD decreases both HCW and marbling; however, mechanisms are not understood. Research in other species has demonstrated that during the acute phase response, pro-inflammatory cytokines promote skeletal muscle catabolism to supply AA and energy substrates for immune tissues. Further, during this early immune response, the liver changes its metabolic priorities to the production of acute phase proteins for use in host defense. Together these dramatic shifts in systemic metabolism may explain the detrimental effects on performance and carcass traits commonly associated with BRD in feedlot calves. Moreover, recent studies relative to human health have revealed complex multilevel interactions between the metabolic and immune systems, and highlighted inflammation as being a significant contributor to major metabolic diseases. The objective of this paper is to review data to help explain the economical and physiological effects of inflammation on cattle growth and

  5. Relationship between cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity carcass merit in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use cattle temperament, as determined by exit velocity only, as a means to evaluate the impact of temperament on carcass merit and the possible utilization of exit velocity alone as a sorting tool within the feedlot. At the time of processing, exit velocity and bod...

  6. Nutritional recommendations of feedlot consulting nutritionists: The 2015 New Mexico State and Texas Tech University survey.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, K L; Hubbert, M E; Galyean, M L; Löest, C A

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 feedlot consulting nutritionist survey is a collaborative project between New Mexico State University and Texas Tech University that focuses on summarizing the professional practices of consulting feedlot nutritionists and updates a 2007 survey. Forty-nine consulting feedlot nutritionists were asked to participate, of which 24 completed the survey. The nutritionists surveyed service over 14,000,000 cattle annually and were representatives from individual consulting practices (54.2%), corporate cattle feeding companies (20.8%), corporate feed manufacturing companies (20.8%), or a combination of consulting practices (4.2%). The survey was completed using a web-based survey tool and contained 101 questions that were divided into sections regarding general information about the consulting practice; general cattle management; receiving cattle management, diet adaption; mixers, feed mills, and feeding management; grains and grain processing; grain by-product use; roughage use; information about supplements and microingredients; liquid feed use; nutrient formulation; feed additive use; and information used as a basis for nutritional recommendations. In most cases, the results of the current survey were similar to those reported for the 2007 survey, with a few notable exceptions such as shifts in cattle numbers and preferences for specific feedstuffs. The present study introduced a number of new questions not included in the 2007 survey that focused on management strategies used in the receiving period. Data from this survey provide insight into current nutritional and management practices of consulting nutritionists and, as in past surveys, should be useful for informing national committees that make nutritional recommendations for cattle, as well as nutrition and management strategies employed within university research settings. PMID:27285940

  7. Propioniciclava tarda gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yoshimichi; Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2011-09-01

    Two facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains, designated WR061(T) and WR054, were isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. The two strains were phylogenetically positioned close to one another and had almost the same phenotypic properties. Cells were Gram-reaction-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, irregular rods. Cobalamin (vitamin B₁₂) was required for growth. The strains utilized various carbohydrates, including hexoses and disaccharides, and produced acetate and propionate from these carbohydrates. Pentoses and polysaccharides were not utilized. They grew at 20-37 °C (optimum 35 °C) and pH 5.3-8.0 (optimum pH 6.8-7.5). Catalase and nitrate-reducing activities were detected. Aesculin was hydrolysed. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C₁₅:₀ and C₁₅:₀ DMA, the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-9(H₄) and the genomic DNA G+C content was 69.3-69.5  mol%. The diagnostic diamino acid in the peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strains in the phylum Actinobacteria. Both strains were remotely related to the species in the family Propionibacteriaceae and Propionibacterium propionicum JCM 5830(T) was the most closely related type strain with a sequence similarity of 91.6 %. Based on phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, the two novel strains together represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Propioniciclava tarda gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WR061(T) ( = JCM 15804(T)  = DSM 22130(T)). PMID:20971831

  8. Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov., isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2011-02-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WK042(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rods. Growth was stimulated well by haemin, and was enhanced by cobalamin (vitamin B(12)). Strain WK042(T) utilized arabinose, xylose, glucose, mannose and aesculin as preferred substrates. Maltose, dextrin, glycogen, starch and pectin were also utilized, although growth on these substrates was much slower. The strain produced acetate, propionate and succinate from these saccharides. The strain was slightly alkaliphilic, with optimum growth at pH 7.7. The temperature range for growth was 10-40 °C, the optimum being 35 °C. The strain was sensitive to bile. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and C(15 : 0). Menaquinone 11 (MK-11) was the major respiratory quinone and the genomic DNA G+C content was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strain in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain WK042(T) was related distantly to the type strains of species in the cluster including Bacteroides massiliensis, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides dorei (91-92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Based on data from the present phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, strain WK042(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacteroides, for which the name Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WK042(T) (=JCM 15092(T) =DSM 21004(T)). PMID:20348319

  9. Transport of three veterinary antimicrobials from feedlot pens via simulated rainfall runoff.

    PubMed

    Sura, Srinivas; Degenhardt, Dani; Cessna, Allan J; Larney, Francis J; Olson, Andrew F; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-07-15

    Veterinary antimicrobials are introduced to wider environments by manure application to agricultural fields or through leaching or runoff from manure storage areas (feedlots, stockpiles, windrows, lagoons). Detected in manure, manure-treated soils, and surface and ground water near intensive cattle feeding operations, there is a concern that environmental contamination by these chemicals may promote the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Surface runoff and leaching appear to be major transport pathways by which veterinary antimicrobials eventually contaminate surface and ground water, respectively. A study was conducted to investigate the transport of three veterinary antimicrobials (chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, tylosin), commonly used in beef cattle production, in simulated rainfall runoff from feedlot pens. Mean concentrations of veterinary antimicrobials were 1.4 to 3.5 times higher in surface material from bedding vs. non-bedding pen areas. Runoff rates and volumetric runoff coefficients were similar across all treatments but both were significantly higher from non-bedding (0.53Lmin(-1); 0.27) than bedding areas (0.40Lmin(-1); 0.19). In keeping with concentrations in pen surface material, mean concentrations of veterinary antimicrobials were 1.4 to 2.5 times higher in runoff generated from bedding vs. non-bedding pen areas. Water solubility and sorption coefficient of antimicrobials played a role in their transport in runoff. Estimated amounts of chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and tylosin that could potentially be transported to the feedlot catch basin during a one in 100-year precipitation event were 1.3 to 3.6ghead(-1), 1.9ghead(-1), and 0.2ghead(-1), respectively. This study demonstrates the magnitude of veterinary antimicrobial transport in feedlot pen runoff and supports the necessity of catch basins for runoff containment within feedlots. PMID:25839178

  10. Influence of cattle wastes on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes in pasture land

    SciTech Connect

    Flessa, H.; Doersch, P.; Beese, F.

    1996-11-01

    Agricultural practices are assumed to contribute significantly to the increase in atmospheric N{sub 2}O concentrations observed in the last decades, and they might influence the consumption of atmospheric CH{sub 4}. We report on measurements of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} exchange of a pasture soil, as influenced by droppings of a grazing cattle (Bos taurus) herd. Nitrous oxide and methane fluxes in pasture soil were largely determined by the emission rates from cattle excrement with dung patches being hot spots of CH{sub 4} production and urine-affected areas showing extremely high N{sub 2}O release rates. Methane emissions from dung patches (0.778 g CH{sub 4}-C per animal and day) were insignificant when compared with those from the rumen of the cattle. Total N{sub 2}O-N losses from the droppings were equivalent to 3.2% of the nitrogen excreted. Based on global data of total nitrogen excretion by dairy cattle, non-dairy cattle, buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and bison during grazing, we estimate the global N{sub 2}O emission from this source to be {approximately}1.18 teragrams N{sub 2}O-N per year, indicating that grazing cattle excretory products are one of the most important sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide. Our work suggests that these sources have been drastically underestimated. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The effects of technology use in feedlot production systems on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, C L; Bernhard, B C; O'Neill, C F; Wilson, B K; Hixon, C G; Haviland, C L; Grimes, A N; Calvo-Lorenzo, M S; VanOverbeke, D L; Mafi, G G; Richards, C J; Step, D L; Holland, B P; Krehbiel, C R

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of feedlot production systems with and without the use of a β-adrenergic agonist compared to an all-natural production program on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics. Crossbred beef steers ( = 336; initial BW = 379 ± 8 kg) were randomized to 1 of 3 treatments in a randomized complete block design (RCBD; 14 steers/pen; 8 pens/treatment). Treatments consisted of an all-natural treatment (NAT), a conventional treatment (CONV), and a conventional treatment with a β-agonist (CONV-Z). All treatments were fed the same basal diet with NAT cattle receiving no growth promoting technologies. The CONV and CONV-Z cattle were implanted with 40 mg of estradiol and 200 mg of trenbolone acetate (TBA) on d 0 and were fed 33 and 9 mg/kg of monensin and tylosin daily, respectively. The CONV-Z cattle were fed zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) at 6.76 mg/kg (90% DM basis) for the last 20 days on feed (DOF) There was no effect of treatment on DMI ( = 0.83); however, CONV-Z steers gained 3.8% faster (1.64 vs. 1.58 kg/d; < 0.01) and were 5.3% more efficient (0.160 vs. 0.152; < 0.01) than CONV steers, and CONV steers gained 32.8% faster (1.58 vs. 1.19 kg/d; < 0.01) and were 26.7% more efficient (0.152 vs. 0.120; < 0.01) than NAT steers. There was a 35.7% improvement in estimated carcass gain (1.29 vs. 0.95 kg/d; < 0.01) and a 32.6% improvement in carcass efficiency (0.126 vs. 0.095; < 0.01) for CONV-Z steers compared to NAT steers. Hot carcass weight was increased by 8 kg for CONV-Z steers compared to CONV steers (394 vs. 386 kg; = 0.05) and 46 kg compared to NAT steers (394 vs. 348 kg; < 0.01). Longissimus muscle area was increased by 3.6 cm for CONV-Z steers compared to CONV steers (92.29 vs. 88.67 cm; = 0.02) and 12.1 cm for CONV-Z steers compared to NAT steers (92.29 vs. 80.16 cm; < 0.01), resulting in a 9.6% unit increase in USDA yield grade (YG) 1 (15.14 vs. 5.52%; < 0.05) and a 21.6% unit reduction in USDA YG 3 for

  12. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Devin B.; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers’ grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills. PMID:27300323

  13. Effect of Co-Composting Cattle Manure with Construction and Demolition Waste on the Archaeal, Bacterial, and Fungal Microbiota, and on Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; Hao, Xiying; Topp, Edward; Yang, Hee Eun; Alexander, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural operations generate large quantities of manure which must be eliminated in a manner that is consistent with public health guidelines. Meanwhile, construction and demolition waste makes up about 25% of total solid municipal waste. Co-composting of manure with construction and demolition waste offers a potential means to make manure safe for soil amendment and also divert construction and demolition waste from municipal landfills. Therefore, the archaeal, bacterial, and fungal microbiota of two different types of composted cattle manure and one co-composted with construction and demolition waste, were assessed over a 99-day composting period. The microbiota of the three compost mixtures did not differ, but significant changes over time and by sampling depth were observed. Bacillus and Halocella, however, were more relatively abundant in composted manure from cattle fed dried distillers' grains and solubles. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were enriched at day 0 and Firmicutes at day 99. The fungal genus Kernia was the most relatively abundant overall and was enriched at day 0. The concentration of 12 antimicrobial resistance determinants in the compost mixtures was also determined, and 10 of these determinants decreased significantly from days 0 to 99. The addition of construction and demolition waste did not affect the persistence of antimicrobial resistance genes or community structure of the compost microbiota and therefore co-composting construction and demolition waste with cattle manure offers a safe, viable way to divert this waste from landfills. PMID:27300323

  14. CH4 and N2O emissions from China's beef feedlots with ad libitum and restricted feeding in fall and spring seasons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhi; Liao, Wenhua; Yang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Zhiling; Ma, Wenqi; Wang, Dianwu; Cao, Yufeng; Li, Jianguo; Cai, Zhenjiang

    2015-04-01

    Accurately quantifying methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from beef operations in China is necessary to evaluate the contribution of beef cattle to greenhouse gas budgets at the national and global level. Methane and N2O emissions from two intensive beef feedlots in the North China Plain, one with a restricted feeding strategy and high manure collection frequency and the other with an ad libitum feeding strategy and low manure collection frequency, were quantified in the fall and spring seasons using an inverse dispersion technique. The diel pattern of CH4 from the beef feedlot with an ad libitum feed strategy (single peak during a day) differed from that under a restricted feeding condition (multiple peaks during a day), but little difference in the diel pattern of N2O emissions between two feeding strategies was observed. The two-season average CH4 emission rates of the two intensive feedlots were 230 and 198gCH4animal(-1)d(-1) and accounted for 6.7% and 6.8% of the gross energy intake, respectively, indicating little impact of the feeding strategy and manure collection frequency on the CH4 conversion factor at the feedlot level. However, the average N2O emission rates (21.2g N2Oanimal(-1)d(-1)) and conversion factor (8.5%) of the feedlot with low manure collection frequency were approximately 131% and 174% greater, respectively, than the feedlot under high frequency conditions, which had a N2O emission rate and conversion factor of 9.2g N2Oanimal(-1)d(-1) and 3.1%, respectively, indicating that increasing manure collection frequency played an important role in reducing N2O emissions from beef feedlots. In addition, comparison indicated that China's beef and dairy cattle in feedlots appeared to have similar CH4 conversion factors. PMID:25769128

  15. Soil nutrients, bacterial communities, and veterinary pharmaceuticals in beef cattle backgrounding confinement on karst environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States hosts the world’s largest grain fed beef production. Commercial beef production in the US consists of three tiers that include: cow-calf enterprises, cattle backgrounding/stockering, and feedlot finishing. Beef cattle backgrounding/stockering represents an intermediate between the ...

  16. Investigation of bacterial diversity in the feces of cattle fed different diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to investigate individual animal variation of bovine fecal microbiota including as affected by diets. Fecal samples were collected from 426 cattle fed 1 of 3 diets typically fed to feedlot cattle: 1) 143 steers fed finishing diet (83% dryrolled corn, 13% corn silage, a...

  17. Effect of cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity on lung respiratory lesions and liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this trial was to use exit velocity as a means of determining temperament of cattle to evaluate the impact of temperament on animal health. At the time of processing, exit velocity and body weight were recorded on 20 pens of cattle (2,877 head) at a commercial feedlot. Infrared sens...

  18. Investigation of microbial diversity in the feces of cattle fed different diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding of the bovine fecal microbiome could contribute to solving issues regarding animal production, cattle health and food safety. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of diet on the fecal microbiome in feedlot cattle. The next-generation pyrosequencing technology was us...

  19. Wasting and mortality in beef cattle parasitized by Eurytrema coelomaticum in the State of Paraná, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ilha, M R S; Loretti, A P; Reis, A C F

    2005-10-10

    A sporadic wasting syndrome affecting beef cattle herds parasitized by Eurytrema coelomaticum is described in the State of Paraná, southern Brazil. The disease was characterized by progressive weight loss, poor body condition despite plenty of good quality forage available, and death. Annual losses ranged from 1 to 3%. The clinical course of the disease varied from 2 to 10 months after the onset of the first clinical signs. At necropsy, one of the three distinct following patterns of lesions were observed: the pancreas was of normal size and color; small, shrunken, white and markedly and diffusely firm (fibrosis); or slightly enlarged and dark with a shriveled capsular surface. Myriads of leaf-shaped trematodes of the genus Eurytrema were packed inside multiple dilated ducts with thickened, whitish fibrous walls, or the flukes were embedded in the remaining pancreatic parenchyma. Microscopic findings included extensive loss of the pancreatic parenchyma with replacement fibrosis, intralesional flukes and eggs, and ductal hyperplasia. Inflammatory reaction varied from absent to severe with the presence of a granulomatous reaction around the trematode eggs. One affected animal had high plasma amylase concentration (1580U/L) suggesting exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Glucose blood levels were not significantly increased. We suggest that diffuse and marked fibrosis of the pancreas induced by the presence of large amounts of pancreatic flukes is the cause of the sporadic cases of chronic wasting and death of cattle in this geographic area. PMID:16046069

  20. Use of FBC ash to stablize dairy barn feedlots, minimize nutrient pollution, and develop new utilization outlets

    SciTech Connect

    Korcak, R.F.; Stout, W.

    1995-11-01

    Using technology developed by the USDA/ARS and US DOE, the Ahlstrom Ash Development Corporation has been successfully using fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash from the Black River Co-Gen plant in Watertown, NY as an agricultural soil amendment. This permitted land application was based primarily on the jointly derived handbook on FBC utilization. During times of the year when ash cannot be spread on crop land, Ahlstrom has been using the ash as a low strength concrete to stabilize dairy barn feedlots. The stabilized feedlots provide a place for cattle to escape from muddy conditions in the spring and fall. Farmer acceptance of these stabilized feedlots is very positive. However, there is a need to provide data on the leachates from and through these barnyard pads.

  1. LIVESTOCK FEEDLOT RUNOFF CONTROL BY VEGETATIVE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetative filters were installed to treat runoff from two beef feedlots, one dairy lot, and one swine feedlot in central Illinois. Two configurations were used-channelized flow and overland flow. Runoff underwent settling for partial solids removal and was then applied directly ...

  2. Feedlot Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Calves From Dams With Different Levels of Winter Supplementation Developed With or Without Feed Restriction During the Postweaning Period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvested feedstuffs are a major input cost for beef cattle production. The objective of this research was to evaluate the impacts of 2 levels of supplemental feed provided to cows during late gestation and 2 levels of feed provided to their sons during postweaning development on subsequent feedlot ...

  3. Odor Production and Escherichia coli Concentrations in Manure Slurries of Feedlot Steers Fed 0 or 40% Corn Wet Distillers Grains with Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated feeding 0 and 40% wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) diets to cattle and effects on feedlot manure collected from soil-based pens and incubated for 28 d. Steers (n = 603; 261 ± 32 kg) were fed in eight pens (15 x 150 m) of 75 to 77 steers per pen. Two experiments were ...

  4. CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from China’s beef feedlots with ad libitum and restricted feeding in fall and spring seasons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhi; Liao, Wenhua; Yang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Zhiling; Ma, Wenqi; Wang, Dianwu; Cao, Yufeng; Li, Jianguo; Cai, Zhenjiang

    2015-04-15

    Accurately quantifying methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from beef operations in China is necessary to evaluate the contribution of beef cattle to greenhouse gas budgets at the national and global level. Methane and N{sub 2}O emissions from two intensive beef feedlots in the North China Plain, one with a restricted feeding strategy and high manure collection frequency and the other with an ad libitum feeding strategy and low manure collection frequency, were quantified in the fall and spring seasons using an inverse dispersion technique. The diel pattern of CH{sub 4} from the beef feedlot with an ad libitum feed strategy (single peak during a day) differed from that under a restricted feeding condition (multiple peaks during a day), but little difference in the diel pattern of N{sub 2}O emissions between two feeding strategies was observed. The two-season average CH{sub 4} emission rates of the two intensive feedlots were 230 and 198 g CH{sub 4} animal{sup −1} d{sup −1} and accounted for 6.7% and 6.8% of the gross energy intake, respectively, indicating little impact of the feeding strategy and manure collection frequency on the CH{sub 4} conversion factor at the feedlot level. However, the average N{sub 2}O emission rates (21.2 g N{sub 2}O animal{sup −1} d{sup −1}) and conversion factor (8.5%) of the feedlot with low manure collection frequency were approximately 131% and 174% greater, respectively, than the feedlot under high frequency conditions, which had a N{sub 2}O emission rate and conversion factor of 9.2 g N{sub 2}O animal{sup −1} d{sup −1} and 3.1%, respectively, indicating that increasing manure collection frequency played an important role in reducing N{sub 2}O emissions from beef feedlots. In addition, comparison indicated that China’s beef and dairy cattle in feedlots appeared to have similar CH{sub 4} conversion factors. - Highlights: • CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from China’s beef feedlots were

  5. DRY NONHEATED ANAEROBIC BIOGAS FERMENTATION USING AGED BEEF CATTLE MANURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biogas production at beef cattle feedlots is hard to justify because of the large amounts of dilution water required and the high cost to design and operate conventional water-based digestion systems. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of producing biogas us...

  6. Overview of the Progress in Reducing Environmental Effects on Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hot weather can have negative impacts on feedlot cattle by reducing animal performance and compromising animal well-being. In most circumstances, animals adapt with amazing ease – balancing their heat production (maintenance energy, production levels, feed intake and activity) with their ability to ...

  7. Management of Pregnant Heifers in the Feedlot.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Ryan D; Warr, Brian N; Booker, Calvin W

    2015-07-01

    Pregnant heifers in the feedlot pose many economic and management issues to the producer. Heifers that enter the feedlot pregnant will have increased costs associated with them regardless of the management strategy implemented. It is imperative that practitioners be aware of management concerns associated with pregnant heifers in order to provide sound recommendations for their clients. The purpose of this article is to provide the bovine practitioner with a summary of current literature and present common options for managing pregnant heifers in a feedlot setting. PMID:26139188

  8. Effects of bulk density of steam-flaked corn in diets containing wet corn gluten feed on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, apparent total tract digestibility, and ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, C H; Domby, E M; Anele, U Y; Schutz, J S; Gautam, K K; Galyean, M L

    2013-07-01

    The effects of varying bulk density of steam-flaked corn (SFC) in diets containing wet corn gluten feed (WCGF; Sweet Bran; Cargill Corn Milling, Blair, NE) have not been defined. In Exp. 1, yearling steers (n = 108; initial BW = 367 ± 1.18 kg) were housed in 27 pens (4 steers/pen) and received 1 of 3 different SFC bulk density treatments in a randomized complete block design. Bulk density treatments were 283, 335, or 386 g/L SFC in diets containing 25% WCGF (% of DM). Steers were fed once daily to provide ad libitum access to feed for an average of 163 d. For a 5-d period before d 70 of the experiment, DMI was measured, and fecal samples were collected from each pen for measurement of nutrient digestibility using dietary acid insoluble ash as a marker. Varying bulk densities of SFC did not affect (P ≥ 0.233) overall DMI, ADG, or G:F on a live- or carcass-adjusted basis. Dressing percent and LM area increased linearly (P ≤ 0.05) as bulk density increased, but other carcass traits were not affected by treatments. Intake of DM, OM, and CP during the 5-d digestion phase did not differ among bulk densities; however, starch intake increased linearly (P = 0.004) as bulk density of SFC increased. Digestibility of DM, OM, and CP tended (P ≤ 0.065) to decrease and starch digestibility decreased (P = 0.002) linearly as bulk density of SFC increased. In Exp. 2, a 3 × 3 Latin square design was used for collection of ruminal fluid from 3 ruminally cannulated Jersey steers adapted to the same diets used in Exp. 1. Bulk density did not affect NH3 concentrations, VFA molar proportions, ruminal fluid osmolality, and IVDMD of the diets. Total gas production increased linearly (P = 0.003) as bulk density of SFC increased from 283 to 335 g/L, but it decreased (P = 0.002) at 386 g/L. Present data suggest that bulk density can be increased up to 386 g/L in finishing diets containing 25% (DM basis) WCGF without affecting cattle performance and with limited effects on ruminal

  9. Feeding behavior as an early predictor of bovine respiratory disease in North American feedlot systems.

    PubMed

    Wolfger, B; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; Barkema, H W; Pajor, E A; Levy, M; Orsel, K

    2015-01-01

    , and mean inter-meal interval were associated with a decreased BRD hazard up to 7 d before feedlot staff noticed clinical symptoms (P < 0.001). In conclusion, mean intake per meal as well as mean meal time and frequency of meals could be used to predict the hazard of BRD in feedlot cattle 7 d before visual detection and could be considered in commercial feedlot settings once a predictive algorithm has been developed. PMID:25568380

  10. Occurrence of sulfonamide-, tetracycline-, plasmid-mediated quinolone- and macrolide-resistance genes in livestock feedlots in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Mu, Quanhua; Li, Jin; Sun, Yingxue; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Qing; Luo, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock feedlots deserve attention because they are prone to transfer to human pathogens and thus pose threats to human health. In this study, the occurrence of 21 ARGs, including tetracycline (tet)-, sulfonamide (sul)-, plasmid-mediated quinolone (PMQR)- and macrolide-resistance (erm) genes were investigated in feces and adjacent soils from chicken, swine, and cattle feedlots in Northern China. PMQR and sul ARGs were the most prevalent and account for over 90.0 % of the total ARGs in fecal samples. Specifically, PMQR genes were the most prevalent, accounting for 59.6 % of the total ARGs, followed by sul ARGs (34.2 %). The percentage of tet ARGs was 3.4 %, and erm ARGs accounted for only 1.9 %. Prevalence of PMQR and sul ARGs was also found in swine and cattle feces. The overall trend of ARG concentrations in feces of different feeding animals was chicken > swine > beef cattle in the studied area. In soils, sul ARGs had the highest concentration and account for 71.1 to 80.2 % of the total ARGs, which is possibly due to the widely distributed molecular carriers (i.e., class one integrons), facilitating sul ARG propagation. Overall, this study provides integrated profiles of various types of ARGs in livestock feedlots and thus provides a reference for the management of antibiotic use in livestock farming. PMID:25475616

  11. Harvesting feedlot manure for fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeten, J.M.; Higgins, A.; Spindler, D.; Undersander, D.J.; Egg, R.P.; Reddell, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to determine the variation of manure quality as a function of depth in the manure pack, the quantity of feedlot manure that can be harvested with elevating scrapers and wheel loader, and the yield of reasonable high-quality feedlot manure for biogas plant feedstock. Feedlot manure quality (ash, heat of combustion, and S content) varied with vertical location in the manure pack. Loose surface manure had the highest quality for these purposes. Heat of combustion was closely related with ash and moisture contents, it averaged 8302 Btu per pound on a dry ash-free basis for all samples. The majority of the manure pack could be collected with an elevating scraper to yield a feedstock with 30% ash and a heat of combustion of 8800 Btu per pound on a dry ash-free basis. Feedlot manure collected by the elevating scraper is much higher in quality for essentially all uses than the 1-2 inch, thick manure/soil interfacial layer. The quantity and quality of feedlot manure that can be collected from feedlots in the vicinity of a proposed biogas production plant in southeastern Colorado are reported.

  12. Isolation of Leptospira hardjo from kidneys of Ontario cattle at slaughter.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, J F; Miller, R B; Nicholson, V M

    1987-01-01

    Kidneys from 117 cattle from 110 Ontario farms were examined at slaughter for leptospires. Leptospira hardjo (hardjo-bovis A) was isolated from 11 kidneys and L. kennewicki from one. The isolations were all made (12/89, 13.5%) from beef cattle from feedlots, no isolates being obtained from dairy or beef cattle from extensive farms (0/28). Isolations were only made from cattle with antibody titers (greater than or equal to 20) against the serovars recovered. Isolation was more sensitive than immunofluorescence in identifying leptospira, particularly in animals with low antibody titers against L. hardjo. Leptospira were isolated from two kidneys with multiple gross lesions of focal nephritis, but there was no correlation between the presence of scanty kidney lesions and isolations of leptospira. Leptospira hardjo infection appears to be common in Ontario feedlot cattle. PMID:3300922

  13. Biomethanation of a mixture of salty cheese whey and poultry waste or cattle dung - a study of effect of temperature and retention time

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, C.; Madamwar, D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a study aimed at improving the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of salty cheese whey in combination with poultry waste or cattle dung. Best results were obtained when salty cheese whey was mixed with poultry waste in the ratio of 7:3, or cattle dung in the ratio of 1:1, both on dry weight basis giving maximum gas production of 1.2 L/L of digester/d with enriched methane content of 64% and 1.3 L/L of digester/d having methane content of 63% respectively. Various conditions such as temperature and retention time have been optimized for maximum process performance. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  14. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  15. Limited amplification of chronic wasting disease prions in the peripheral tissues of intracerebrally inoculated cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, classified as a prion disease or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Cervids affected by CWD accumulate an abnormal protease resistant prion protein throughout the central...

  16. The effect of anaerobic fermentation processing of cattle waste for biogas as a renewable energy resources on the number of contaminant microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnani, Tb. Benito A.; Hidayati, Yuli Astuti; Marlina, Eulis Tanti; Harlia, Ellin

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle waste has a positive potential that can be exploited, as well as a negative potential that must be controlled so as not to pollute the environment. Beef cattle waste can be processed into an alternative energy, namely biogas. Anaerobic treatment of livestock waste to produce gas can be a solution in providing optional energy, while the resulted sludge as the fermentation residue can be used as organic fertilizer for crops. However, this sludge may containt patogenic microorganism that will damage human and environmet healt. Therefor, this study was aimed to know the potency of beef cattle waste to produce biogas and the decrease of the microorganism's number by using fixed dome digester. Beef cattle waste was processed into biogas using fixed dome digester with a capacity of 12 m3. Biogas composition was measured using Gas Cromatografi, will microorganism species was identified using Total plate Count Methode. The result of this study shows that the produced biogas contains of 75.77% Mol (CH4), 13.28% Mol (N), and 6.96% Mol (CO2). Furthermor, this study show that the anaerobic fermrntation process is capable of reducing microorganisms that could potentially pollute the environment. The number of Escherichia coli and Samonella sp. were <30 MPN/ml respectively save for environment. This process can reduce 84.70% the amount of molds. The only molds still existed after fermentation was A.fumigatus. The number of protozoa can be reduced in order of 94.73%. Protozoa that can be identified in cattle waste before, and after anaerobic fermentation was merely Eimeria sp.. The process also reduced the yeast of 86.11%. The remaining yeast after fermentation was Candida sp. Finally, about 93.7% of endoparasites was reduced by this process. In this case, every trematode and cestoda were 100% reduced, while the nematode only 75%. Reducing some microorganisms that have the potential to pollute the environment signifies sludge anaerobic fermentation residue is safe to

  17. Effect of dietary melengestrol acetate on the incidence of acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot heifers

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tim A.; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M.; Yost, Garold S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Over a 3-y period, 906 000 cattle were monitored in 23 feedlots in southern Alberta for symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Plasma, urine, and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 299 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP and from 156 healthy penmates and analyzed for 3-methylindole (3MI) derivatives and reduced glutathione concentration. From each animal, the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Concentrations of glutathione in lung tissue were reduced (P < 0.001) in animals showing clinical symptoms of AIP as compared with their asymptomatic penmates. Animals histologically confirmed as having AIP had higher levels of 3MI protein adducts in blood and lung tissue (P < 0.05) than did emergency-slaughtered animals without AIP. Within feedlots, where pens of heifers were fed either a standard dosage of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or none, the rate of death attributable to AIP was similar between treatment groups, but emergency slaughter after clinical diagnosis of AIP was done 3.2 times more often (P < 0.001) in the MGA-fed heifers than in the group not fed MGA. Use of MGA did not influence glutathione concentration. As growth performance of heifers given steroidal implants may not be improved by feeding MGA, the most cost-effective method of reducing the incidence of AIP-related emergency slaughter in feedlot heifers may be to eliminate MGA from the diet. PMID:16850945

  18. Measuring cattle feedlot dust using laser diffraction analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable amounts of particulate matter (PM), including total suspended particulates (TSP), particulates with equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 um (PM10), and particulates with equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 um (PM2.5), are emitted from large beef...

  19. Assessment of antibiotic resistance in runoff from cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine, especially at sub-therapeutic doses, is an important issue that has captured national attention, and there is considerable concern about the potential to transmit antibiotic resistance from animals to humans via fecal contamination of surface and ground...

  20. Distant Odors: Identifying Key Odors Associated With Cattle Feedlots Downwind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Research Council identified odors as the most significant animal emission at the local level and has highlighted the need for the development of standardized protocols for sampling and analysis of odors. To date, however, little progress has been made on identifying sampling and analys...

  1. Evaluation of the health, performance and economic effects on the general population from exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus from persistently infected animals in the starter phase of the feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects on health and performance in beef cattle resulting from exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) persistently infected (PI) animals in a commercial feedlot. The study focused on economic effects associated with PI exposure during the ...

  2. Water and chloride transport in a fine-textured soil in a feedlot pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizaga, E. A.; Rodríguez, L.; Ocampo, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    Cattle feeding in feedlot pens produces large amounts of manure and animal urine. Manure solutions resulting from surface runoff are composed of numerous chemical constituents whose leaching causes salinization of the soil profile. There is a relatively large number of studies on preferential flow characterization and modeling in clayed soils. However, research on water flow and solute transport derived from cattle feeding operations in fine-textured soils under naturally occurring precipitation events is less frequent. A field monitoring and modeling investigation was conducted at two plots on a fine-textured soil near a feedlot pen in Argentina to assess the potential of solute leaching into the soil profile. Soil pressure head and chloride concentration of the soil solution were used in combination with HYDRUS-1D numerical model to simulate water flow and chloride transport resorting to the concept of mobile/immobile-MIM water for solute transport. Pressure head sensors located at different depths registered a rapid response to precipitation suggesting the occurrence of preferential flow-paths for infiltrating water. Cracks and small fissures were documented at the field site where the % silt and % clay combined is around 94%. Chloride content increased with depth for various soil pressure head conditions, although a dilution process was observed as precipitation increased. The MIM approach improved numerical results at one of the tested sites where the development of cracks and macropores is likely, obtaining a more dynamic response in comparison with the advection-dispersion equation.

  3. Water and chloride transport in a fine-textured soil in a feedlot pen.

    PubMed

    Veizaga, E A; Rodríguez, L; Ocampo, C J

    2015-11-01

    Cattle feeding in feedlot pens produces large amounts of manure and animal urine. Manure solutions resulting from surface runoff are composed of numerous chemical constituents whose leaching causes salinization of the soil profile. There is a relatively large number of studies on preferential flow characterization and modeling in clayed soils. However, research on water flow and solute transport derived from cattle feeding operations in fine-textured soils under naturally occurring precipitation events is less frequent. A field monitoring and modeling investigation was conducted at two plots on a fine-textured soil near a feedlot pen in Argentina to assess the potential of solute leaching into the soil profile. Soil pressure head and chloride concentration of the soil solution were used in combination with HYDRUS-1D numerical model to simulate water flow and chloride transport resorting to the concept of mobile/immobile-MIM water for solute transport. Pressure head sensors located at different depths registered a rapid response to precipitation suggesting the occurrence of preferential flow-paths for infiltrating water. Cracks and small fissures were documented at the field site where the % silt and % clay combined is around 94%. Chloride content increased with depth for various soil pressure head conditions, although a dilution process was observed as precipitation increased. The MIM approach improved numerical results at one of the tested sites where the development of cracks and macropores is likely, obtaining a more dynamic response in comparison with the advection-dispersion equation. PMID:26348833

  4. Transport of pollutants from cow feedlots in eastern Colorado into Rocky Mountain alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, A.; Denning, S.; Schumacher, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), also called factory farms, are known for raising tens of millions head of livestock including cows (beef and dairy), swine, and poultry. With as many as 250 head of cattle per acre, a United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) report showed beef cattle from CAFOs in the United States produce as much as 24.1 million tons of manure annually. Gases released from cow manure include methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and ammonia (NH3). During boreal summers Colorado experiences fewer synoptic weather systems, allowing the diurnal cycle to exert greater control of meteorological events along the mountain-plains interface. Anabatic, or upslope winds induced by the diurnal cycle, contribute largely to the transport of gases and particulates from feedlots in eastern Colorado into the Rocky Mountains, presenting a potential harm to natural alpine ecosystems. This study focuses on locating the source of transport of gases from feedlots along the eastern Front Range of Colorado into alpine lakes of the Rocky Mountains. Source regions are approximated using backward time simulation of a Lagrangian Transport model.

  5. Predicting back fat thickness in beef cattle using A-mode ultrasound

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because fat thickness in feedlot cattle can be a predictor of carcass quality and yield grade, estimates of fat thickness during the later stages of the finishing period can be used to make marketing decisions. Ultrasound technology is a nondestructive and humane technique used to estimate fat thick...

  6. Utilization of wet distillers grains in high-energy beef cattle diets based on processed grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distiller's grains (DG) are used extensively by beef cattle feeding operations in the United States, including the Southern Great Plains. Our regional research consortium has been conducting research focused on utilization of wet DG in feedlot diets based on steam-flaked corn (SFC). Effects of DG on...

  7. Shade Material Evaluation Using a Cattle Response Model and Meteorological Instrumentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing stress in feedlot cattle. Selection of a suitable shade material can be difficult without data that quantify material effectiveness for stress reduction. A summer study was conducted during 2007 using instrumented shade structures in ...

  8. Nutrient Excretion and Odorant Production in Manure from Cattle Fed Corn Wet Distillers Grains With Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-four cross bred steers (BW 452. 5 ± 15.5 kg) were used to evaluate nutrient excretion and odorous compounds in urine and feces of feedlot steers fed diets containing corn wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). Cattle were weighed, blocked by weight, and assigned randomly to one of four ...

  9. Evaluation of Biochemical Parameters and Genetic Markers for Association with Meat Tenderness in South African Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large proportion of South African feedlot cattle are crossbreds of Brahman (BrX, Bos indicus), and Simmental (SiX, Bos taurus). A sample of 20 grain fed bulls from each of these crossbreeds was used to compare meat quality with that of the small frame indigenous Nguni (NgX, Sanga) by evaluating a ...

  10. Characterizing feedlot heifer response to environmental temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme summertime conditions can have negative impacts on growth, performance, and can cause death in vulnerable animals. A study was conducted over a three-year period to evaluate the characteristics that contribute to heat stress. Three hundred eighty four feedlot heifers of four distinct breed...

  11. Performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef cattle managed in a bedded hoop-barn system.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, M S; Busby, W D; Lonergan, S M; Johnson, A K; Maxwell, D L; Harmon, J D; Shouse, S C

    2010-08-01

    The use of bedded hoop barns in finishing systems for beef cattle has not been widely researched. In this management system, beef cattle are confined to hoop barns throughout finishing, and bedding is used to absorb animal waste, which results in minimal effluent. The objective of this study was to compare the performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef steers (n = 1,428) managed in a bedded hoop-barn management system vs. an open-feedlot system with shelter. Six feeding trials were conducted over a 3-yr period. Three trials were conducted during summer-fall and 3 trials were conducted during winter-spring. Crossbred steers were allotted to 3 pens in the hoop-barn system and to 3 pens in the open-lot system (approximately 40 steers per pen in both facility systems). Stocking densities for the steers were 4.65 m(2) per steer in the hoop-barn system and 14.7 m(2) per steer in the open-lot system. The steers were begun on trial weighing 410 and 411 kg (SD = 21), were fed for 102.3 and 103.0 d (SD = 3.8), and were weighed off test at 595 and 602 kg (SD = 21) for the hoop-barn and open-lot systems, respectively. Steer performance measures consisted of ADG, DMI, and G:F. Carcass characteristics were HCW, fat thickness, LM area, KPH percentage, marbling score, USDA yield grade, and USDA quality grade. No year, season, or pen (management system) main effects, or season x management system and year x management system interactions were observed for any of the items measured related to cattle performance or carcass characteristics (P > 0.05). Final mud scores (a subjective evaluation of the amount of soil and manure adhering to the hair coat of the animals) were greater for the steers from the open-lot system compared with those from the hoop-barn system (P < 0.02), suggesting steers in the hoop-barn system carried less mud than steers from the open-lot system. Average daily cornstalk bedding use in the hoop-barn system was 2.3 kg/steer during summer-fall and 2

  12. Predicting cumulative risk of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) using feedlot arrival data and daily morbidity and mortality counts

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Abram H.; White, Brad J.; Renter, David G.; Dubnicka, Suzanne R.; Scott, H. Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Although bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is common in post-weaning cattle, BRDC prediction models are seldom analyzed. The objectives of this study were to assess the ability to predict cumulative cohort-level BRDC morbidity using on-arrival risk factors and to evaluate whether or not adding BRDC risk classification and daily BRDC morbidity and mortality data to the models enhanced their predictive ability. Retrospective cohort-level and individual animal health data were used to create mixed negative binomial regression (MNBR) models for predicting cumulative risk of BRDC morbidity. Logistic regression models were used to illustrate that the percentage of correctly (within |5%| of actual) classified cohorts increased across days, but the effect of day was modified by arrival weight, arrival month, and feedlot. Cattle arriving in April had the highest (77%) number of lots correctly classified at arrival and cattle arriving in December had the lowest (28%). Classification accuracy at arrival varied according to initial weight, ranging from 17% (< 182 kg) to 91% (> 409 kg). Predictive accuracy of the models improved from 64% at arrival to 74% at 8 days on feed (DOF) when risk code was known compared to 56% accuracy at arrival and 69% at 8 DOF when risk classification was not known. The results of this study demonstrate how the predictive ability of models can be improved by utilizing more refined data on the prior history of cohorts, thus making these models more useful to operators of commercial feedlots. PMID:23814354

  13. Detection and determinants of Escherichia coil O157:H7 in Alberta feedlot pens immediately prior to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Renter, David G; Smith, David R; King, Robin; Stilborn, Robert; Berg, Janice; Berezowski, John; McFall, Margaret

    2008-04-01

    Food safety risks due to Escherichia coli O157:H7 may be affected by variability in prevalence in or on live cattle at slaughter. Our objectives were to assess the prevalence and risk factors associated with E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot pens immediately prior to slaughter, and assess relationships among methods of monitoring the E. coli O157:H7 status of pre-harvest pens. We studied 84 pens containing a total of nearly 27,000 head of cattle in commercial feedlots in Alberta during 2003 and 2004. Sampling devices (ROPES) prepared from manila ropes were used to detect high prevalence pens. Forty of 84 pens (48%) were classified ROPES-positive. Within pens, fecal prevalence ranged between 0% to 80% (median = 20%) and the hide prevalence ranged between 0% and 30% (median = 0%). Pens that were ROPES-positive had a higher median prevalence for feces (40%) and for hides (3.8%) than those that were ROPES-negative (13.3% and 0%, respectively). The prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in pens immediately prior to slaughter was found to be quite high or very low even within feedlots and seasons. Factors such as sampling month, temperature, precipitation, pen floor conditions, and water tank cleanliness were associated with E. coli O157:H7 outcome measures, although associated factors were not completely consistent among years and outcome measures. Fecal and hide prevalence are considered primary pre-harvest indicators of potential carcass contamination, but other methods such as ROPES that are associated with these outcomes may provide logistic advantages to efficiently classify pens of cattle as high or low risk to food safety. PMID:18505184

  14. Detection and determinants of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Alberta feedlot pens immediately prior to slaughter

    PubMed Central

    Renter, David G.; Smith, David R.; King, Robin; Stilborn, Robert; Berg, Janice; Berezowski, John; McFall, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Food safety risks due to Escherichia coli O157:H7 may be affected by variability in prevalence in or on live cattle at slaughter. Our objectives were to assess the prevalence and risk factors associated with E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot pens immediately prior to slaughter, and assess relationships among methods of monitoring the E. coli O157:H7 status of pre-harvest pens. We studied 84 pens containing a total of nearly 27 000 head of cattle in commercial feedlots in Alberta during 2003 and 2004. Sampling devices (ROPES) prepared from manila ropes were used to detect high prevalence pens. Forty of 84 pens (48%) were classified ROPES-positive. Within pens, fecal prevalence ranged between 0% to 80% (median = 20%) and the hide prevalence ranged between 0% and 30% (median = 0%). Pens that were ROPES-positive had a higher median prevalence for feces (40%) and for hides (3.8%) than those that were ROPES-negative (13.3% and 0%, respectively). The prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in pens immediately prior to slaughter was found to be quite high or very low even within feedlots and seasons. Factors such as sampling month, temperature, precipitation, pen floor conditions, and water tank cleanliness were associated with E. coli O157:H7 outcome measures, although associated factors were not completely consistent among years and outcome measures. Fecal and hide prevalence are considered primary pre-harvest indicators of potential carcass contamination, but other methods such as ROPES that are associated with these outcomes may provide logistic advantages to efficiently classify pens of cattle as high or low risk to food safety. PMID:18505184

  15. Bacteroides propionicifaciens sp. nov., isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2008-02-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains (SV434(T) and S562) were isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. They had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and showed almost the same phenotypic properties. The cells of both strains were Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rods; extraordinarily long rods often occurred. Remarkable stimulation of growth occurred with the addition of haemin and cobalamin (vitamin B(12)) to the medium. The supplementary cobalamin and haemin could be replaced if autoclaved and clarified sludge fluid obtained from the reactor was added. Both strains utilized a range of growth substrates, including arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, cellobiose, maltose, glycogen, starch, dextrin, amygdalin, lactate and pyruvate. Both strains produced acetate and propionate with a small amount of succinate from these substrates in the presence of haemin and cobalamin. Both strains were slightly alkaliphilic, having a pH optimum at about 7.9. The temperature range for growth was 5-35 degrees C, the optimum being 30 degrees C. The NaCl concentration range for growth was 0-4 % (w/v). Catalase activity was not detected in cells cultivated without haemin, whereas cells cultivated with haemin usually had the enzyme activity. Oxidase and nitrate-reducing activities were not detected. Aesculin was hydrolysed, but gelatin was not hydrolysed. Both strains were sensitive to bile acids. The major cellular fatty acids of both strains were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). Menaquinones MK-8(H(0)) and MK-9(H(0)) were the major respiratory quinones and the genomic DNA G+C contents were 46.2-47.5 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed both strains in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Bacteroides coprosuis (isolated from swine-manure storage pits) was the species most closely related to both strains (95.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain). On the

  16. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  17. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  18. Use of Antimicrobial Metaphylaxis for the Control of Bovine Respiratory Disease in High-Risk Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ives, Samuel E; Richeson, John T

    2015-11-01

    Despite research and increased availability of antimicrobials, the prevalence and challenges associated with BRD in stocker and feedlot operations remain. Preconditioned calves can better handle the transition from the origin ranch to the feedlot, yet there is incentive for buyers to purchase high-risk cattle at a reduced cost, and this is influenced by the proven efficacy and availability of antimicrobial metaphylaxis. The poor sensitivity of current BRD field diagnostic methods, typical pathogenesis of BRD, and labor issues are additional reasons to use metaphylaxis. Nevertheless, practitioners should consider comprehensive and novel approaches to judiciously guide decisions on metaphylactic use of antimicrobials. PMID:26227871

  19. Nitrogen loss from sprinkler applied beef feedlot effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of nitrogen from sprinkler applied beef feedlot effluent can be costly for both the producer and the environment. Sprinkler application of effluent is common throughout the Great Plains, though little work has occurred focusing specifically on N losses from beef feedlot effluent. The objectives...

  20. Bedding and within-pen location effects on feedlot pen runoff quality using a rainfall simulator.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jim J; Olson, Edith C S; Chanasyk, David S; Beasley, Bruce W; Yanke, L Jay; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim A; Olson, Barry M; Selinger, L Brent

    2006-01-01

    Soluble salts, nutrients, and pathogenic bacteria in feedlot-pen runoff have the potential to cause pollution of the environment. A 2-yr study (1998-1999) was conducted at a beef cattle (Bos taurus) feedlot in southern Alberta, Canada, to determine the effect of bedding material [barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) straw versus wood chips] and within-pen location on the chemical and bacterial properties of pen-floor runoff. Runoff was generated with a portable rainfall simulator and analyzed for chemical content (nitrogen [N], phosphorus [P], soluble salts, electrical conductivity [EC], sodium adsorption ratio [SAR], dissolved oxygen [DO], and pH) and populations of three groups of bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms, total aerobic heterotrophs at 27 degrees C) in 1998 and 1999. Bedding had a significant (P < or = 0.05) effect on NH4-N concentration and load in 1999, SO4 load in 1998, SO4 concentration and load in 1999, and total coliforms in both years; where these three variables were higher in wood than straw pens. Location had a significant effect on EC and concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), Na, K, SO4, and Cl in 1998, and total coliforms in both years. These seven variables were higher at the bedding pack than pen floor location, indicating that bedding packs were major reservoirs of TKN, soluble salts, and total coliforms. Significantly higher dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), total P, and NH4-N concentrations and loads at the bedding pack location in wood pens in 1998, and a similar trend for TKN concentration in 1999, indicated that this bedding-location treatment was a greater source of nutrients to runoff than the other three bedding-location treatments. Bedding, location, and their interaction may therefore be a potential tool to manage nutrients, soluble salts, and bacteria in feedlot runoff. PMID:16455851

  1. Haptoglobin concentrations from shipping through sickness and recovery in cattle either mass-medicated with gamithromycin or sham-treated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious respiratory diseases of ruminants are a serious health and economic problem for U.S. agriculture. In cattle alone, bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) costs the feedlot industry approximately 1 billion USD annually. Respiratory disease results in inflammation and is associated with ...

  2. Utilization of geothermal energy for methane production for J. A. Albertson Land and Cattle Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of an integrated system to utilize a geothermal resource for a bioconversion plant. This integrated facility would use the manure from approximately 30,000 head of feedlot cattle as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion plant. The findings on engineering design, geological assessment, environmental, economic, and institutional requirements of the proposed project are summarized. (MHR)

  3. Comparison of bacterial communities in faeces of beef cattle fed diets containing corn and wet distillers grain with solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: The microbial ecology of feedlot Escherichia coli is poorly understood. It is a minority component of feces and must interact with many other bacteria. Use of wet distiller’s grains with solubles (WDGS) in cattle feed creates a gastrointestinal environment where some bacterial species are enri...

  4. Assessment of contamination by intensive cattle activity through electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, Claudia M.; Losinno, Beatriz N.; Malleville, Horacio J.

    2012-01-01

    The intensive animal production is considered highly risky for groundwater and soil because of high mobility of some contaminants from animal wastes. The aim of this work was to obtain an electrical conductivity image of unsaturated and saturated zones at a feedlot (cattle feeding field) at the surroundings of Buenos Aires city (Argentina) in order to detect the most critical sectors of the field, with regard to contamination by animal wastes. Dipole-dipole electrical soundings (electrical resistivity tomography) were performed at the corral zone and the surroundings. 2D and 3D models of conductivity were obtained. Even if there is a calcareous plate below some parts of the corrals and soil compaction is high, vertical infiltration or subsurface runoff may have occurred since these sites, with high animal charge, show soil conductivities higher than the surroundings. The models showed higher conductivities of saturated zone increasing in the direction of groundwater flow. These results were taken into account for further designs of soil and groundwater sampling. Groundwater conductivity was three times greater downgradient from the corrals with high concentrations of nitrates and phosphorous. A zone of high conductivity was found below a small channel of effluents from the corrals.

  5. Summary of BRD data from the 2011 NAHMS feedlot and dairy heifer studies.

    PubMed

    Dargatz, David A; Lombard, Jason E

    2014-12-01

    The USDA:APHIS National Animal Health Monitoring System collects data on health and health management in livestock and poultry populations throughout the USA in order to provide stakeholders with population estimates to use as benchmarks for comparison, to guide policy development, and to identify research needs and prioritize education efforts. Recent studies of both the beef cattle feedlot industry and dairy heifer rearing operations provided information about BRD occurrence as well as information about prevention and treatment practices used on these operations. While a great deal of effort is dedicated to BRD prevention, there are still opportunities to improve the strategies used. Despite efforts to prevent the disease, BRD continues to be widespread on both of these types of operations. PMID:25390892

  6. Risk factors for initial respiratory disease in United States' feedlots based on producer-collected daily morbidity counts.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Michael W; Dargatz, David A; Wagner, Bruce A

    2008-04-01

    The incidence of initial respiratory disease was followed for 12 weeks in 122 pens of feedlot cattle, based on producer-collected daily morbidity counts. Weekly incidence density was calculated based on the number of new cases and the population at risk. Incidence density was greatest in the 1st week after arrival and decreased in following weeks. Weekly incidence rate varied between pens and over time from 0 to 27.7 cases per 100 animal weeks at risk. A negative binomial model controlling for multiple events within pens and over time was used to model effects on the number of new cases. Mixed gender groups, cattle from multiple sources and increasing distance shipped were associated with increased risk for initial respiratory morbidity. Heavier entry weight was associated with decreased morbidity risk. These factors may be useful in categorizing groups of calves into risk groups for targeted purchase and management decision making. PMID:18481546

  7. Effects of the Programmed Nutrition Beef Program on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Phelps, K J; Drouillard, J S; Jennings, J S; Depenbusch, B E; Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Vaughn, M A; Burnett, D D; Gonzalez, J M

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of alternative finishing strategies on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics. Beef steers (64 pens; 8 steers/pen) were allocated to a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement. Factor 1 consisted of diet, with cattle fed a conventional (CON) diet or a diet consisting of Programmed Nutrition Beef Program (PN) supplements. The PN treatment included Programmed Nutrition Beef Receiver fed from d 1 through 20 of feeding and Programmed Nutrition Beef Finisher fed from d 21 to harvest. Factor 2 evaluated the presence (EGP+) or absence (EGP-) of exogenous growth promotants (ExGP) in the production system. Steers in the EGP+ treatments were initially implanted with Component E-S, reimplanted with Component TE-IS, and fed 400 mg·animal·dof ractopamine hydrochloride for the final 28 d before harvest. Steers were harvested on d 175, and strip loins were removed from 2 carcasses selected at random from each pen for transport to Kansas State University. One 1.27-cm-thick steak was removed from the anterior face for proximate and long-chain fatty acid analysis. There were no diet × ExGP interactions ( > 0.10) for feedlot performance except for DMI ( = 0.02). Steers in the PN/EGP+ treatment consumed more feed than all other treatments ( < 0.05). Both diet and ExGP affected DMI ( < 0.05), with PN and EGP+ steers consuming more feed than their contemporaries. Gain:feed and ADG were unaffected ( > 0.10) by diet, but ExGP improved these measures ( < 0.01). There were no diet × ExGP interactions for carcass characteristics except KPH fat and percentages of yield grade 3 and 4 carcasses ( < 0.05). Diet affected total incidence of liver abscesses because PN steers had a greater ( = 0.05) incidence of liver abscesses than steers in the CON treatment. Diet did not affect the other carcass characteristics ( > 0.10). Use of ExGP increased ( < 0.05) HCW, LM area, and 12th-rib fat but did

  8. Evolution of process control parameters during extended co-composting of green waste and solid fraction of cattle slurry to obtain growing media.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Coromina, Narcís; Malińska, Krystyna; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to monitor process parameters when two by-products (green waste - GW, and the solid fraction of cattle slurry - SFCS) were composted to obtain growing media. Using compost in growing medium mixtures involves prolonged composting processes that can last at least half a year. It is therefore crucial to study the parameters that affect compost stability as measured in the field in order to shorten the composting process at composting facilities. Two mixtures were prepared: GW25 (25% GW and 75% SFCS, v/v) and GW75 (75% GW and 25% SFCS, v/v). The different raw mixtures resulted in the production of two different growing media, and the evolution of process management parameters was different. A new parameter has been proposed to deal with attaining the thermophilic temperature range and maintaining it during composting, not only it would be useful to optimize composting processes, but also to assess the hygienization degree. PMID:25553571

  9. Measurement of seepage losses and chemical export from waste lagoons at animal feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; DeSutter, T. M.

    2001-05-01

    Whole-lagoon seepage rates were measured from 20 lagoons in Kansas using water balance techniques. Study sites included cattle feedlots, swine facilities, and one dairy. Seepage rates ranged from 0.2 mm/day to 2.4 mm/day with and overall average of 1.2 mm/day. Analysis of lagoon effluent (58 samples from 38 sites) indicated large differences in lagoon chemistry between locations. Ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), which accounted for over 99 percent of the soluble nitrogen, ranged from 10 ppm to 3500 ppm. On average, nitrogen concentrations in swine lagoons were about five times higher than those at cattle feedlots. The chemical flux density (flux boundary condition) was estimated from the seepage rate and the corresponding waste chemistry data from each lagoon. Results showed that ammonium-N export was between 0.02 and 1.06 kg NH4-N m-2 yr^{-1} with an overall average of about 0.3 kg NH4-N m^{-2} yr^{-1}$ . Similar data are available for other soluble compounds. Soil cores were collected beneath eight lagoons that had been operated from 12 to 25 years. Results showed that NH4-N was strongly adsorbed by the soil clay particles and that nitrogen concentrations often decreased to background levels at 3 m beneath the lagoon. Other ions, such as chloride, penetrated to much lower depths at all locations. The 'reservoir' of NH4-N that exists beneath older lagoons could convert to nitrate and move to lower depths after lagoon closure. Data suggest that the properties if the soil beneath lagoons, the concentration of the waste, the seepage rate, and the depth to groundwater are the crucial factors that affect the risk of groundwater contamination.

  10. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  11. Heavy metal and hydrocarbon residues in tissue and blood of beef steers bedded on waste newspapers

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, J.W.

    1992-07-01

    There are over 3 million tons of waste newspaper generated annually in Pennsylvania alone. This provides a significant disposal problem for many municipalities who are confronted with dwindling options for solid waste disposal. Previous studies have identified several of the potential advantages of the material as a bedding material for livestock. With over 1 million beef and dairy cattle in the state, the potential use of newspaper as bedding is important. Of concern, however, is the effect of the chemical composition of the paper on animals which have the opportunity to consume it, and subsequent entry of undesirable residues into the food chain. Metals such as cadmium, lead, mercury and copper are known to exist in relatively high quantities in newsprint from the ink used in printing. Naphthalene and other aromatic hydrocarbons which are found in coal tar and synthetic and natural crude oils are known to accumulate in marine life and are absorbed by humans after consumption. A preliminary report indicated beef steers bedded on newspaper did consume varying amounts of the material. Few studies have determined if residues of heavy metals or organic compounds are found in the carcasses of animals continuously bedded on newspaper. The objectives of this study were to determine the levels of cadmium, copper, lead, mercury and certain aromatic hydrocarbons in the blood and liver of feedlot cattle bedded continuously on waste newspaper or sawdust. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Melatonin and food safety: Investigating a possible role in the seasonality of the bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seasonality of E. coli O157:H7 prevalence in feedlot cattle in the United States has been well documented but poorly understood. Our hypothesis, that this phenomenon is related to hormonal changes within the animal in response to changing day-length, is supported by the data from numerous studi...

  13. Effects of corn processing method and dietary inclusion of corn wet distillers grains with solubles on odor and gas production in cattle manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growing ethanol industry in the Southern Great Plains has recently increased the use of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in beef cattle finishing diets. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate odorous compound production in urine and feces of feedlot steers fed diets with different...

  14. Effect of feeding wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) to growing-finishing cattle on ammonia concentration in air and manure nutrient composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air quality is a difficult and pressing problem for feedlot producers. This is compounded by feeding practices that influence the excretion of starch, fiber, crude protein, and sulfur (S) by cattle that significantly affect the production of odorous compounds. Wet distillers grains with solubles (...

  15. Comparison of the molecular genotypes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from the hides of beef cattle in different regions of North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle hides become contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 via pathogen transmission in the feedlot, during transport, and in the lairage environment at the processing facility and the bacteria can be transferred to beef carcasses during processing. Several studies have shown that E. coli O157:H7 strain...

  16. Influence of monensin on the performance of cattle.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, R D; Garrett, J E; Gast, D R; Kirick, M A; Larson, D A; Meiske, J C

    1984-06-01

    Performance data on nearly 16,000 head of cattle that were used in trials to document effects of monensin on feedlot cattle were summarized. Cattle fed monensin-containing diets gained 1.6% faster, consumed 6.4% less feed and required 7.5% less feed/100 kg gain than cattle fed control diets. Monensin resulted in the greatest improvement in feed/gain at 2.9 Mcal metabolizable energy (ME)/kg diet dry matter (DM). Within the range of monensin concentrations used in the trials that were summarized (31.8 +/- 7.5 mg/kg DM), high monensin concentrations did not improve feed/gain over that obtained with lower concentrations. Carcass characteristics were not significantly influenced by monensin. Responses of cattle to monensin and implants were additive. Energy metabolism data suggested that monensin improved digestibility of DM, reduced fasting heat production and increased dietary net energy maintenance (NEm) values more than it increased net energy gain (NEg) values. Data showing the response of cattle to monensin when fed various dietary protein concentrations or sources of supplemental N suggested that monensin had a protein sparing effect. Monensin has also been shown to reduce lactic acid production, aid in the control of coccidia and bloat and to be toxic to face and horn fly larva in feces of monensin-fed cattle. In pasture trials, monensin improved daily gains. When fed to beef cows, monensin reduced amounts of feed required to maintain cow weight. PMID:6378865

  17. Resistome diversity in cattle and the environment decreases during beef production.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Noelle R; Yang, Xiang; Linke, Lyndsey M; Magnuson, Roberta J; Dettenwanger, Adam; Cook, Shaun; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale E; Gow, Sheryl P; McAllister, Tim A; Yang, Hua; Ruiz, Jaime; Jones, Kenneth L; Boucher, Christina A; Morley, Paul S; Belk, Keith E

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant determinants (ARDs) can be transmitted from livestock systems through meat products or environmental effluents. The public health risk posed by these two routes is not well understood, particularly in non-pathogenic bacteria. We collected pooled samples from 8 groups of 1741 commercial cattle as they moved through the process of beef production from feedlot entry through slaughter. We recorded antimicrobial drug exposures and interrogated the resistome at points in production when management procedures could potentially influence ARD abundance and/or transmission. Over 300 unique ARDs were identified. Resistome diversity decreased while cattle were in the feedlot, indicating selective pressure. ARDs were not identified in beef products, suggesting that slaughter interventions may reduce the risk of transmission of ARDs to beef consumers. This report highlights the utility and limitations of metagenomics for assessing public health risks regarding antimicrobial resistance, and demonstrates that environmental pathways may represent a greater risk than the food supply. PMID:26952213

  18. Outbreak of fatal nitrate toxicosis associated with consumption of fennels (Foeniculum vulgare) in cattle farmed in Campania region (southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Alessandro; Roperto, Franco; Benedetto, Domenico; Anastasio, Aniello; Marrone, Raffaele; Perillo, Antonella; Russo, Valeria; Papparella, Serenella; Paciello, Orlando

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate and nitrite are toxicants that have become increasingly significant environmental chemicals. Increase in environmental distribution of nitrogenous compounds, especially in surface and ground water, has been attributed to the intensive use of nitrate as agricultural fertilizers and to increasing amounts of nitrogenous wastes produced by municipalities, industries, and feedlots. The purpose of this study is to illustrate a fatal nitrate toxicosis in cattle associated with the consumption of fennels (Foeniculum vulgare). Fifteen cows from the same farm suddenly developed weakness, muscular tremors, respiratory distress, and finally convulsions. The affected animals died within 24 to 48 h from the onset of the clinical signs. Five cows underwent a complete post-mortem examination. In all examined animals, gross lesions included presence of dark unclotted blood around the nostrils and the anal region, moderate inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and brown discoloration of the skeletal muscles and kidneys. The histological examination showed tubular degeneration and congestion of glomerular vessels in the kidney. Toxicological analysis detected nitrates at 4 672.2 ppm in the fennels used to feed the animals. The source of exposure to nitrates was identified in the fennels. The fennels were grown in a polluted area of the Campania region in southern Italy and distributed in a public market for human consumption. The waste from the sale of the fennels was fed to the cows. The accumulation of nitrates in some vegetables poses a risk not only for animal health but also for human and environmental safety. PMID:24453016

  19. Pathogens of Bovine Respiratory Disease in North American Feedlots Conferring Multidrug Resistance via Integrative Conjugative Elements

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Booker, Calvin W.; Hendrick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD. PMID:24478472

  20. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2003-06-01

    Reburn with animal waste yield NO{sub x} reduction of the order of 70-80%, which is much higher than those previously reported in the literature for natural gas, coal and agricultural biomass as reburn fuels. Further, the NO{sub x} reduction is almost independent of stoichiometry from stoichiometric to upto 10% deficient air in reburn zone. As a first step towards understanding the reburn process in a boiler burner, a simplified zero-dimensional model has been developed for estimating the NO{sub x} reduction in the reburn process using simulated animal waste based biomass volatiles. However the first model does not include the gradual heat up of reburn fuel particle, pyrolysis and char combustion. Hence there is a need for more rigorous treatment of the model with animal waste as reburn fuel. To address this issue, an improved zero-dimensional model is being developed which can handle any solid reburn fuel, along with more detailed heterogeneous char reactions and homogeneous global reactions. The model on ''NO{sub x} Reduction for Reburn Process using Feedlot Biomass,'' incorporates; (a) mixing between reburn fuel and main-burner gases, (b) gradual heat-up of reburn fuel accompanied by pyrolysis, oxidation of volatiles and char oxidation, (c) fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) pyrolysis, and FBN including both forward and backward reactions, (d) prediction of NO{sub x} as a function of time in the reburn zone, and (e) gas phase and solid phase temperature as a function of time. The fuel bound nitrogen is assumed to be released to the gas phase by two processes, (a) FBN evolution to N{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}, and (b) FBN oxidation to NO at the char surface. The formulation has been completed, code has been developed, and preliminary runs have been made to test the code. Note that, the current model does not incorporate the overfire air. The results of the simulation will be compared with the experimental results. During this quarter, three journal and four conference

  1. Influence of forage level on response of feedlot steers to salinomycin supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A

    1986-12-01

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate the influence of forage level on the response of feedlot cattle to salinomycin. Diets containing 10, 15 and 20% forage were compared with 0 or 11 mg/kg salinomycin. In trial 1, treatment effects on feedlot performance were evaluated using 108 crossbred steers (295 kg) in a crossover design experiment. There were no salinomycin X forage level interactions (P greater than .20). Weight gain response to salinomycin supplementation averaged 5.4, 5.3 and 6.9%, respectively, for diets containing 10, 15 and 20% forage. Corresponding values for feed conversion response to salinomycin supplementation were 5.1, 3.9 and 5.9%. Averaged across forage level, salinomycin supplementation improved rate of weight gain and feed conversion by 5.9 and 5.2%, respectively (P less than .01). In trial 2, treatment effects on characteristics of ruminal and total tract digestion were evaluated in a 6 X 6 Latin-square design trial involving six crossbred steers (191 kg) with cannulae in the rumen and proximal duodenum. There were no interactions between salinomycin supplementation and forage level on characteristics of ruminal digestion (P greater than .20). Salinomycin supplementation did not influence synthesis of microbial N, ruminal digestion of organic matter, acid detergent fiber and starch, or molar proportions of acetate, propionate and butyrate (P greater than .20). Salinomycin supplementation increased passage of non-ammonia N to the small intestine (5.4%, P less than .10) and increased ruminal escape of feed N (24%, P less than .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3818473

  2. Use of rope devices to describe and explain the feedlot ecology of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by time and place.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Moxley, R A; Clowser, S L; Folmer, J D; Hinkley, S; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important pathogen of humans, and cattle populations serve as an important reservoir for human exposure. The organism is ubiquitous to feedlot cattle populations, although the nature of its occurrence is quite dynamic. Why E. coli O157:H7 varies by time and place in fed cattle is poorly understood. This study was designed to describe and explain the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 by pen-level factors of time and place. From each pen, we cultured seven ropes placed within pens for cattle to rub and chew (ROPES), in order to classify the pens as high or low prevalence in longitudinal studies conducted during the summer and winter feeding periods of 2 full years. We observed differences in occurrence of ROPES-positive pens by season, weeks within season, and feedyard. ROPES-positive pens clustered temporally. Factors associated with ROPES-positive pen-weeks during both the summer and winter feeding periods were feedyard, prior 7-day mean air temperature, recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from the composite fecal sample, and recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from the water tank. Pens of summer-fed cattle were less likely to be ROPES-positive for E. coli O157:H7 if the ROPES were positive for Salmonella spp. The condition of the pen surface was associated with the likelihood for winter-fed pens of cattle to be ROPES-positive. We were able to monitor these pens of cattle using ROPES at minimal cost and without disturbing individual cattle. These observations improve our understanding of the ecology of E. coli O157:H7 in fed cattle, and also illustrate the importance of designing and analyzing observational studies and clinical trials to account for time- and place-dependent variables that affect the probability of detecting E. coli O157:H7. PMID:15992298

  3. Variation in Weed Seed Fate Fed to Different Holstein Cattle Groups

    PubMed Central

    Mesgaran, Mohsen Beheshtian

    2016-01-01

    Weed seeds may maintain their viability when passing through the digestive tract of cattle and can be therefore dispersed by animal movement or the application of manure. Whether different cattle types of the same species can cause differential weed seed fate is largely unknown to us particularly under non-grazed systems similar to Holstein-Friesian dairy farming. We investigated the effect on the seed survival of four weed species in the digestive tracts of four groups of Holstein cattle: lactating cows, feedlot male calves, dry cows and growing heifers. The weed species used were Cuscuta campestris, Polygonum aviculare, Rumex crispus and Sorghum halepense. Cattle excretion was sampled for recovery and viability of seeds at four 24 hourly intervals after seed intake. The highest seed recovery occurred two days after seed intake in all cattle groups. Averaged over weed species, dry and lactating cows had the lowest and highest seed recovery of 36.4% and 74.4% respectively. No significant differences were observed in seed recovery of the four weed species when their seeds were fed to dry cows. Based on a power model fitted to seed viability data, the estimated time to 50% viability loss after seed intake, over all cattle groups ranged from 65 h (R. crispus) to 76 h (P. aviculare). Recovered seeds from the dung of feedlot male calves showed the highest mortality among cattle groups. Significant correlation was found between seed viability and ruminal pH (r = 0.86; P<0.05). This study shows that management programs aiming to minimize weed infestation caused by livestock should account for the variation amongst cattle groups in seed persistence. Our findings can be used as a guideline for evaluating the potential risk of the spread of weeds via the application of cattle manure. PMID:27104783

  4. Variation in Weed Seed Fate Fed to Different Holstein Cattle Groups.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Salman; Mashhadi, Hamid Rahimian; Banadaky, Mehdi Dehghan; Mesgaran, Mohsen Beheshtian

    2016-01-01

    Weed seeds may maintain their viability when passing through the digestive tract of cattle and can be therefore dispersed by animal movement or the application of manure. Whether different cattle types of the same species can cause differential weed seed fate is largely unknown to us particularly under non-grazed systems similar to Holstein-Friesian dairy farming. We investigated the effect on the seed survival of four weed species in the digestive tracts of four groups of Holstein cattle: lactating cows, feedlot male calves, dry cows and growing heifers. The weed species used were Cuscuta campestris, Polygonum aviculare, Rumex crispus and Sorghum halepense. Cattle excretion was sampled for recovery and viability of seeds at four 24 hourly intervals after seed intake. The highest seed recovery occurred two days after seed intake in all cattle groups. Averaged over weed species, dry and lactating cows had the lowest and highest seed recovery of 36.4% and 74.4% respectively. No significant differences were observed in seed recovery of the four weed species when their seeds were fed to dry cows. Based on a power model fitted to seed viability data, the estimated time to 50% viability loss after seed intake, over all cattle groups ranged from 65 h (R. crispus) to 76 h (P. aviculare). Recovered seeds from the dung of feedlot male calves showed the highest mortality among cattle groups. Significant correlation was found between seed viability and ruminal pH (r = 0.86; P<0.05). This study shows that management programs aiming to minimize weed infestation caused by livestock should account for the variation amongst cattle groups in seed persistence. Our findings can be used as a guideline for evaluating the potential risk of the spread of weeds via the application of cattle manure. PMID:27104783

  5. Virulence Properties and Serotypes of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Healthy Australian Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Hornitzky, Michael A.; Vanselow, Barbara A.; Walker, Keith; Bettelheim, Karl A.; Corney, Bruce; Gill, Paul; Bailey, Graham; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    The virulence properties and serotypes of complex Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (cSTEC) were determined in two studies of healthy cattle in eastern Australia. In the first, a snapshot study, 84 cSTEC isolates were recovered from 37 of 1,692 (2.2%) fecal samples collected from slaughter-age cattle from 72 commercial properties. The second, a longitudinal study of three feedlots and five pasture beef properties, resulted in the recovery of 118 cSTEC isolates from 104 animals. Of the 70 serotypes identified, 38 had not previously been reported. PMID:12450875

  6. Cattle temperament: persistence of assessments and associations with productivity, efficiency, carcass and meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Cafe, L M; Robinson, D L; Ferguson, D M; McIntyre, B L; Geesink, G H; Greenwood, P L

    2011-05-01

    Relationships between temperament and a range of performance, carcass, and meat quality traits in young cattle were studied in 2 experiments conducted in New South Wales (NSW) and Western Australia (WA), Australia. In both experiments, growth rates of cattle were assessed during backgrounding on pasture and grain finishing in a feedlot. Carcass and objective meat quality characteristics were measured after slaughter. Feed intake and efficiency during grain finishing were also determined in NSW. Brahman (n = 82 steers and 82 heifers) and Angus (n = 25 steers and 24 heifers) cattle were used in the NSW experiment. In NSW, temperament was assessed by measuring flight speed [FS, m/s on exit from the chute (crush)] on 14 occasions, and by assessing agitation score during confinement in the crush (CS; 1 = calm to 5 = highly agitated) on 17 occasions over the course of the experiment. Brahman (n = 173) and Angus (n = 20) steers were used in the WA experiment. In WA, temperament was assessed by measuring FS on 2 occasions during backgrounding and on 2 occasions during grain feeding. At both sites, a hormonal growth promotant (Revalor-H, Virbac, Milperra, New South Wales, Australia) was applied to one-half of the cattle at feedlot entry, and the Brahman cattle were polymorphic for 2 calpain-system markers for beef tenderness. Temperament was not related (most P > 0.05) to tenderness gene marker status in Brahman cattle and was not (all P > 0.26) modified by the growth promotant treatment in either breed. The Brahman cattle had greater individual variation in, and greater correlations within and between, repeated assessments of FS and CS than did the Angus cattle. Correlations for repeated measures of FS were greater than for repeated assessments of CS, and the strength of correlations for both declined over time. Average FS or CS for each experiment and location (NSW or WA × backgrounding or finishing) were more highly correlated than individual measurements, indicating

  7. Leptin as a predictor of carcass composition in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Geary, T W; McFadin, E L; MacNeil, M D; Grings, E E; Short, R E; Funston, R N; Keisler, D H

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if serum concentrations of leptin could be used to predict carcass composition and merit in feedlot finished cattle. Two different groups of crossbred Bos taurus steers and heifers were managed under feedlot conditions near Miles City, MT. The first group consisted of 88 1/2 Red Angus, 1/4 Charolais, and 1/4 Tarentaise composite gene combination steers (CGC) harvested at the ConAgra processing facility in Greeley, CO. The second group (Lean Beef Project; LB) consisted of 91 F2 steers and heifers born to Limousin, Hereford, or Piedmontese by CGC F1 cows crossed to F1 bulls of similar breed composition and harvested at a local processing facility in Miles City, MT. Blood samples were collected approximately 24 h before harvest (CGC) or approximately 3 d before and at harvest (LB). No differences in serum concentrations of leptin were detected (P > 0.10) between Hereford, Limousin, or Piedmontese F2 calves nor between LB steers and heifers. Positive correlations (P < 0.01) existed between serum leptin and marbling score (r = 0.35 and 0.50), fat depth measured between the 12th and 13th rib (r = 0.34 and 0.46), kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (KPH) (r = 0.42 and 0.46), and quality grade (r = 0.36 and 0.49) in CGC and LB cattle, respectively. Serum leptin was also positively correlated with calculated yield grade for CGC steers (r = 0. 19; P = 0. 10) and LB cattle (r = 0.52; P < 0.01). Longissimus area was not correlated with serum leptin in CGC steers (r = 0.12; P > 0.10). However, a negative correlation existed between longissimus area and serum leptin in the LB cattle (r = -0.45; P < 0.01). Serum concentrations of leptin were significantly associated with carcass composition (marbling, back fat depth, and KPH fat) and quality grade in both groups of cattle studied and may provide an additional indicator of fat content in feedlot cattle. PMID:12597366

  8. Technical note: validation of rumination collars for beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, C; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate a wireless rumination monitoring system (Hi-Tag; SCR Engineers Ltd., Netanya, Israel) for recording rumination in beef cattle. The system operates based on acoustics of rumination and has been used previously for monitoring rumination in both young and adult dairy cattle. Study 1 consisted of beef cattle in tie-stall housing with 72 observations for 4 cattle fed a high forage backgrounding diet and 47 observations for 3 cattle fed a high grain finishing diet. Study 2 consisted of 44 observations for 6 beef cattle fed a high forage diet in a loose-housing feedlot pen. Each observation consisted of the rumination time during a 2-h period as estimated by visual observations made by trained observers (inter-observer correlation r = 0.97) and the Hi-Tag system. The mean difference between visual and Hi-Tag rumination times was 9.8 ± 18.7 min/2 h. The rumination times from the Hi-Tag system were only moderately correlated with visual observations (r = 0.41, P < 0.001). The difference between visual and Hi-Tag rumination times was not correlated with head posture during the 2 h period (r = -0.02, P = 0.89). Physical and dietary differences between dairy and beef cattle may have resulted in the inaccuracy of the Hi-Tag system when used in beef cattle fed typical backgrounding and finishing diets. More work is required to improve the accuracy of this automated system for rumination monitoring before it can be used reliably with beef cattle. PMID:23482572

  9. Mean pulmonary arterial pressures in Angus steers increase from cow-calf to feedlot-finishing phases.

    PubMed

    Neary, J M; Garry, F B; Holt, T N; Thomas, M G; Enns, R M

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension due to hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling is the predominant cause of right-sided congestive heart failure (CHF) in cattle. Historically, heart failure was problematic only at altitudes over 2,134 m. However, anecdotal reports suggest that the incidence of heart failure is increasing in feedlot cattle at moderate altitude (800 to 1,600 m), with late-fed, or fat, cattle at greatest risk. The goal of this study was to evaluate pulmonary arterial pressures (PAP) in a cohort of male Angus calves from suckling to finishing to better understand why heart failure is particularly problematic in fat cattle. It was hypothesized that mean PAP would increase through the feeding period and that the calves with the greatest pressures at high altitude would have the greatest pressures as fat cattle. A total of 362 PAP measurements were obtained from 153 calves. Calves were tested at altitudes of 2,170 (4 and 6 mo old), 1,560 (13 mo old), and 1,300 m (13 and 18 mo old). Mean PAP were greater in 18-mo-old steers than any other age group (mean = 50.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 48.2 to 52.4; < 0.05). Calves that had the greatest mean pressure at 6 mo of age tended to have the greatest mean pressures at 18 mo of age ( = 0.45, < 0.001). The increase in mean PAP with increasing age and adiposity likely predisposed the steers to an increased risk of CHF during the finishing phase. PMID:26440165

  10. Methane emission by Nellore cattle subjected to different nutritional plans.

    PubMed

    Cota, Olinta Leone; de Figueiredo, Darcilene Maria; Branco, Renata Helena; Magnani, Elaine; do Nascimento, Cleisy Ferreira; de Oliveira, Luiza Freitas; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate the emission of enteric methane by Nellore cattle subjected to different nutritional plans, as well as the intake and digestibility of nutrients from the diets supplied. Forty-seven animals in a confinement system (feedlot) were fed a corn silage-based diet for 35 days. Afterwards, these animals were evaluated in a grazing system during the rainy periods, in Urochloa brizantha cv Marandu paddocks, for 44 days. Chromic oxide was used as external marker to estimate the fecal production of animals. Samples of feces, ingredients, and pasture were collected and sampled for subsequent chemical analyses. The SF6 tracer gas technique was adopted to quantify the methane gas emitted by the animals. The experimental design was completely randomized, using procedure GLM of software SAS (9.2), including the fixed effects of sex and nutritional plan and the linear effect of the co-variable weights. Means were analyzed by Tukey's test at 5 % probability. The intakes of total dry matter and organic matter were greater for the animals subjected to the feedlot diet (P < 0.05). In this treatment, the animals showed greater dry matter digestibility, whereas the organic matter digestibility was lower (P < 0.05). The digestibility of the dry matter was higher in confinement, whereas the digestibility of the organic matter was lower in this treatment (P < 0.05). Emission of CH4/day (104.01 g) by the animals fed the feedlot diet (P < 0.05) was greater, but the loss of consumed energy for methane production (CH4/CEB) and methane emission per dry matter consumed were lower in relation to the grazing treatment (3.75 vs 4.23 % and 11.67 vs 15.71 g/kg). The better quality of the diet in the feedlot promoted lower energy losses as methane. PMID:25224394

  11. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission. PMID:25388561

  12. Effects of N loading rate on CH4 and N2O emissions during cultivation and fallow periods from forage rice fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Riya, S; Zhou, S; Kobara, Y; Sagehashi, M; Terada, A; Hosomi, M

    2015-09-15

    The use of liquid cattle waste (LCW) as a fertilizer for forage rice is important for material recycling because it can promote biomass production, and reduce the use of chemical fertilizer. Meanwhile, increase in emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs), especially CH4 and N2O would be concerned. We conducted a field study to determine the optimum loading rate of LCW as N to promote forage rice growth with lower GHG emissions. The LCW was applied to forage rice fields, N100, N250, N500, and N750, at four different N loading rates of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1), respectively, including 50 kg N ha(-1) of basal chemical fertilizer. The above-ground biomass yields increased 14.6-18.5 t ha(-1) with increases in N loading rates. During the cultivation period, both the CH4 and N2O fluxes increased with increases in LCW loading rates. In the treatments of N100, N250, N500, and N750, the cumulative CH4 emissions during the entire period, including cultivation and fallow period were 29.6, 18.1, 54.4, and 67.5 kg C ha(-1), respectively, whereas those of N2O were -0.15, -0.02, 1.49, and 5.82 kg N ha(-1), respectively. Considering the greenhouse gas emissions and above-ground biomass, the yield-scaled CO2-equivalents (CO2-eqs) were 66.3, 35.9, 161, and 272 kg CO2 t(-1) for N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. These results suggest that N250 is the most appropriate LCW loading rate for promoting forage rice production with lower GHG emissions. PMID:26164270

  13. Effects of pain mitigation and method of castration on behavior and feedlot performance in cull beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Repenning, P E; Ahola, J K; Callan, R J; Fox, J T; French, J T; Giles, R L; Peel, R K; Whittier, J C; Engle, T E

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of castration method (banding vs. surgical) and use of analgesia on behavior and feedlot performance in cull bulls. Angus, Hereford, and Angus-crossbred bulls (n = 20; initial BW = 384 ± 59.3 kg; 336 ± 20.1 d old) were housed in feedlot pens equipped with the ability to measure individual daily feed intake. A balanced randomized block design using a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used. A multimodal analgesia (MMA) protocol was used and consisted of sutcutaneous ketamine stun containing butorphanol (0.01 mg/kg BW), xylazine (0.02 mg/kg BW), ketamine (0.04 mg/kg BW), and a local 2% lidocaine hydrochloride anesthetic block of the spermatic cords (10 mL/cord) and scrotum (10 mL) on d 0. Flunixin meglumine (1.2 mg/kg) was administered intravenously on d 0, 1, 2, and 3 to MMA cattle. Cattle were stratified to treatments based on breed, BW, age, and a temperament score. Treatments included 1) band castration without analgesia (BND), 2) band castration with analgesia (BND-MMA), 3) surgical castration without analgesia (SURG), and 4) surgical castration with analgesia (SURG-MMA). All castrations were performed on d 0. Chute exit velocity (EV) and time in chute (TIC) were collected on d -9, 0, 1, 2, and 13. Willingness-to-enter-chute (WTE) score, rectal temperature (TEMP), heart rate (HR), and respiration (RESP) were collected on d 0, 1, 2, 3, and 13. Cattle were weighed on d -9 and 13 while feeding behaviors were collected continuously for 57 d precastration and 28 d postcastration. There was a tendency (P < 0.09) for ADG to be greater in cattle receiving analgesia. Both SURG treatments exhibited elevated TEMP on d 1 (P < 0.001) and 2 (P < 0.05) compared to BND treatments. Postcastration DMI was greater (P = 0.02) in MMA treatments compared with nonmedicated treatments throughout the trial. Meal duration was greater (P < 0.05) in BND than SURG castrates during the first week postcastration. Results

  14. Characterizing stress in shaded and unshaded feedlot heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme summertime conditions can have negative impacts on growth, performance, and can cause death in vulnerable animals. A study was conducted over a three-year period to evaluate the characteristics that contribute to heat stress. Three hundred eighty four feedlot heifers of four distinct breed...

  15. Assessment and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This was an invited 45 minute oral presentation concerning assessment and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from feedlots. The audience at the summit (about 60 people) included university professors, environmental regulators, and producers. The presentation included a brief review of environm...

  16. Environmental impact of new feeding choices in the feedlot industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feedlot industry is adapting to an economic environment that has fundamentally changed because of high corn prices. Developing strategies to improve the efficiency of feed utilization and reduce costs are important. Uses of agricultural commodity products for alternative fuels are rapidly incr...

  17. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Sayeed Mukhtar

    2000-10-24

    The following are proposed activities for quarter 1 (6/15/00-9/14/00): (1) Finalize the allocation of funds within TAMU to co-principal investigators and the final task lists; (2) Acquire 3 D computer code for coal combustion and modify for cofiring Coal:Feedlot biomass and Coal:Litter biomass fuels; (3) Develop a simple one dimensional model for fixed bed gasifier cofired with coal:biomass fuels; and (4) Prepare the boiler burner for reburn tests with feedlot biomass fuels. The following were achieved During Quarter 5 (6/15/00-9/14/00): (1) Funds are being allocated to co-principal investigators; task list from Prof. Mukhtar has been received (Appendix A); (2) Order has been placed to acquire Pulverized Coal gasification and Combustion 3 D (PCGC-3) computer code for coal combustion and modify for cofiring Coal: Feedlot biomass and Coal: Litter biomass fuels. Reason for selecting this code is the availability of source code for modification to include biomass fuels; (3) A simplified one-dimensional model has been developed; however convergence had not yet been achieved; and (4) The length of the boiler burner has been increased to increase the residence time. A premixed propane burner has been installed to simulate coal combustion gases. First coal, as a reburn fuel will be used to generate base line data followed by methane, feedlot and litter biomass fuels.

  18. Remote Sensing Methods for Identifying Potential Emissions from Feedlot Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing methods have been developed to measure manure accumulation patterns on feedlot surfaces. This study was designed to determine if this sensor data could be used to predict differences in volatile fermentation products and the areas in the pens where they are produced following a rain...

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and mouth disease infection in cattle in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Abed El Khaliq, Mohamad; Sharir, Beni; Berke, Olaf; Klement, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease with major economic consequences. In Israel, FMD epidemics recur almost every year and mostly affect cattle. The highest number of outbreaks occurs among beef cattle farms, followed by feedlot farms and dairy farms. We performed several cross-sectional serological studies in Israel during 2006-2014, aimed to reveal if the virus is endemic among cattle and to determine the sero-prevalence of antibodies directed against non-structural proteins (NSP) of FMD virus. Additionally we aimed to determine the risk factors for such sero-positivity. A risk based sampling was performed and the presence of anti-NSP antibodies was estimated using the PrioCHECK(®) ELISA kit. Beef cattle showed the highest sero-prevalence (13.2%, CI95%=10.8-15.8%). Higher FMD sero-prevalence in beef cattle sampled in 2014 was associated with previous FMD outbreaks in the farm and with age (adult cows versus calves (p<0.05)). Sero-prevalence in feedlot calves was significantly lower with only one sero-positive calf out of 256 (0.4%, CI95%=0-2.2%). Sero-prevalence among dairy cattle was 2.7% (CI95%=2-3.6%) with location of up to 3km from FMD outbreaks in multiple farms and location of up to 5km from the nearest border standing out as significant (p<0.05) risk factors for sero-positivity. The extremely low sero-prevalence of FMD in feedlot cattle and the significant association of infection in beef cattle with previous outbreaks suggest absence of virus circulation between these two populations during the study period, although previous data show that during outbreaks such transmission can occur. Low sero-prevalence in dairy cattle located in areas adjacent to previous FMD outbreaks may be attributed to intense routine vaccination and stringent control measures that were applied during outbreaks such as emergency vaccination and strict quarantine. Early detection of FMD outbreaks among grazing beef herds as well as the implementation

  20. Feeding cotton products to cattle.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Glenn M; Poore, Matthew H; Paschal, Joe C

    2002-07-01

    Despite the potential for gossypol toxicosis (particularly in pre-ruminants) and risk factors associated with impaired fertility in bulls, cottonseed products offer a safe alternative feed for cattle producers when fed at recommended levels. Beef producers seeking to lower production costs should consider using cotton byproducts in their feeding programs. If carefully incorporated, cotton byproduct feeds can reduce feed costs while maintaining or increasing the level of cattle performance. Cottonseed meal will remain a standard protein supplement for beef cattle throughout the country. Whole cottonseed has much potential for Southern producers near cotton gins if it is purchased in a timely fashion and fed according to recommendations. Cotton gin trash, cottonseed hulls, and cotton textile mill waste also have potential economic benefits, especially to producers located near cotton and cottonseed processing facilities. PMID:12235661

  1. Investigation into Possible Differences in Salmonella Prevalence in the Peripheral Lymph Nodes of Cattle Derived from Distinct Production Systems and of Different Breed Types.

    PubMed

    Brown, T R; Edrington, T S; Loneragan, G H; Hanson, D L; Malin, K; Ison, J J; Nisbet, D J

    2015-11-01

    Previous research demonstrated significant variation in the prevalence of Salmonella in peripheral lymph nodes (LNs) of feedlot cattle and cull cows, with greater prevalence in feedlot cattle. Therefore, we performed experiments to investigate whether these differences in Salmonella prevalence in subiliac LNs are due to, or influenced by, breed, which in many respects is a proxy for the production system in which the animal is derived. Holstein steers are a by-product of dairy systems, and beef steers are an intended product of commercial beef operations. For the first experiment, Holstein and beef steers originating from the same feedlot and harvested on the same day were sampled. Of the 467 Holstein and 462 beef cattle LNs collected, 62.1% of Holstein and 59.7% of beef cattle samples harbored Salmonella (P = 0.46; qualitative culture), with 51.2 and 48.9% of samples containing quantifiable concentrations (P = 0.49), respectively. The concentration of Salmonella within the LN followed a decreasing trend over the collection period (May to October), averaging 1.4 log CFU/g of LN for both Holstein and beef cattle samples (P = 0.78). In a second experiment, we compared 100% Brahman cattle to their beef cattle counterparts, as we hypothesized that the resistance of Brahman cattle to insects may reduce Salmonella transmission via biting insects. Of the 42 Brahman and 31 beef cattle LNs collected, the concentration of Salmonella within the LN averaged 3.0 log CFU/g for Brahman cattle and 2.9 log CFU/g for beef cattle samples (P = 0.30). Using qualitative culture, we recovered Salmonella from 100% of LNs from Brahman cattle and 97% of beef cattle samples (P = 0.25). Results of this research indicate that the differences observed are not due to breed and are likely a function of age, immune function, or other factors yet to be identified. Understanding which cattle are more likely to harbor Salmonella within LNs will aid in targeting both pre- and postharvest intervention

  2. Rates of diseases and their associated costs in two Colorado sheep feedlots (1985-1986).

    PubMed

    Salman, M D; Dargatz, D A; Kimberling, C V; Reif, J S; Hopper, G E

    1988-12-15

    Data related to rates of disease and their associated costs were collected for 12 months from 2 sheep feedlots in northern Colorado. There was an apparent seasonal occurrence of many of the diseases. Pneumonia, enterotoxemia, acidosis, and transport tetany accounted for most of the diseases seen in these feedlots and were responsible for most of the economic losses. There was a large difference in the incidence of diseases between the 2 feedlots and in the expenditures for disease prevention between the 2 feedlots. PMID:3215810

  3. ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of salt level of the ration for beef steers upon salinity of the waste and the effects of the applied waste upon the soil and upon crop production was investigated. In addition, the study was conducted in both covered and open feedlot pens to study the effect of shelte...

  4. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella isolated from feedlot lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study examined the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in feedlot lambs. Fifty-six feedlot lambs originating from eight different sheep farming operations were grouped in a single drylot pen, fed and managed as typical for a sheep feedlot in the southwestern United States. Feca...

  5. Salmonella enterica Burden in Harvest-Ready Cattle Populations from the Southern High Plains of the United States▿

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, David J.; Loneragan, Guy H.; Platt, Tammy M.; Miller, Mark F.; Besser, Thomas E.; Koohmaraie, Mohammad; Stephens, Tyler; Brashears, Mindy M.

    2008-01-01

    Our objectives were to quantify the Salmonella enterica burdens in harvest-ready cattle and to identify specific at-risk populations of cattle most likely to harbor multiply resistant S. enterica. Hide swabs were collected in abattoirs from three cohorts of cattle (feedlot origin cattle that had achieved desirable harvest characteristics and dairy- and beef-type cows harvested because of poor productivity). Feces were collected from two cohorts housed in feedlots (cattle that had achieved desirable harvest characteristics and animals identified for salvage recovery because of poor productivity). Facilities were visited on four occasions over a 12-month period. Salmonella enterica isolates were recovered, and organisms were quantified using standard microbiological methodologies. Susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs and serotype were determined for one S. enterica isolate per sample. Salmonella enterica was recovered from 55.6% of 1,681 samples. The prevalences on hides and in feces were 69.6% and 30.3%, respectively. The concentrations of S. enterica organisms averaged (as determined by the most probable number technique) 1.82 log10/100 cm2 of hides and 0.75 log10/g of feces. None of the isolates recovered from cattle that had achieved desirable harvest characteristics were resistant to four or more drugs. For isolates recovered from animals with poor productivity characteristics, 6.5% were resistant to four or more drugs. Twenty-two serovars were identified, with the most common being Salmonella enterica serovar Anatum (25.5%), Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo (22.2%), and Salmonella enterica serovar Cerro (12.5%). High-level resistance, i.e., resistance to four or more drugs, was clustered within a few relatively uncommon serovars. These results demonstrate that even though S. enterica isolates are readily recoverable from harvest-ready cattle, multiply resistant variants are rare and are associated with specific serovars in cattle harvested because of

  6. Temporal Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance in Campylobacter spp. from Beef Cattle in Alberta Feedlots†

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, G. D.; Morck, D. W.; McAllister, T. A.; Entz, T.; Olson, M. E.; Yanke, L. J.; Read, R. R.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was temporally assessed in campylobacters isolated from beef cattle (7,738 fecal samples from 2,622 animals) in four commercial feedlots in Alberta. All calves were administered chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline in feed, and a majority of the animals (93%) were injected with long-acting oxytetracycline upon arrival at the feedlot. Fecal samples from individual animals were collected upon arrival (i.e., entry sample), 69 days (standard deviation [SD] = 3 days) after arrival (i.e., interim sample), and 189 days (SD = 33 days) after arrival (i.e., exit sample) at the feedlot. In total, 1,586 Campylobacter isolates consisting of Campylobacter coli (n = 154), Campylobacter fetus (n = 994), Campylobacter jejuni (n = 431), Campylobacter hyointestinalis (n = 4), and Campylobacter lanienae (n = 3) were recovered and characterized. The administration of antimicrobials did not decrease carriage rates of campylobacters, and minimal resistance (≤4%) to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and meropenem was observed. In contrast, substantive increases in the prevalence of isolates resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline (56 to 89%) for C. coli, C. fetus, and C. jejuni, as well as in the number of animals (7 to 42%) from which resistant isolates were recovered, were observed during the feedlot period. Increased resistance to erythromycin (total isolates and carriages rates) was also observed in isolates of C. coli over the three isolation times. The majority of C. fetus isolates recovered were resistant to nalidixic acid, but this was independent of when they were isolated. A relatively limited number of multidrug-resistant isolates were recovered and consisted primarily of C. coli resistant to tetracyclines and erythromycin (10% of isolates). Over the course of the feedlot period, considerable increases in antimicrobial resistance were observed in C. coli, C. fetus, and C. jejuni, but with the exception of erythromycin

  7. Assessment of L-lactatemia as a predictor of respiratory disease recognition and severity in feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Buczinski, S; Rademacher, R D; Tripp, H M; Edmonds, M; Johnson, E G; Dufour, S

    2015-03-01

    The bovine respiratory disease complex (BRD) is a major health issue in feedlot cattle and one of the primary reasons for antimicrobial use in the North American feedlot industry. The purpose of the present study was to assess blood L-lactate levels of feedlot steers at high risk of developing BRD during the early feeding period. Blood samples were obtained at initial processing and again after BRD confirmation (using bronchial lavage or thoracic ultrasound exam). The study involved 232 recently weaned steers received at a single research feedlot that were processed without metaphylactic antimicrobial treatment. Blood samples were obtained for determination of L-lactatemia and temperament scores (very quiet or stoic [score 1], average [score 2] and very excited [score 3]) were systematically assigned at initial processing. A subsample of calves that were later confirmed as cases of BRD were sampled at first pull (day 0), and at subsequent observation points on days 3, 6, 9 and 15 following initial BRD diagnosis for blood lactate determination as a potential indicator of subsequent death. The clinical BRD cumulative incidence in the cohort was 38% (87/232). Temperament was associated with the probability of becoming a BRD case during the early feeding period. Stoic or very excited calves showed 2.2 times higher odds (95%CI: 1.3, 3.8) of becoming BRD cases compared to calves with average temperament. The impact of L-lactatemia differed by temperament strata. In calves with a temperament score of 2 (average temperament) every 1-log unit increase of lactatemia at processing resulted in 1.9 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.2, 3.1) of becoming a BRD case; this relationship was not significant in calves with a score of either 1 or 3. Twenty-nine confirmed BRD cases were studied for the dynamic lactate assessment analysis. L-lactate at first pull was not significantly different between survivors (median 3.3mmol/L; range 0.8-7.8mmol/L) and non-survivors (median 2.7mmol/L; range

  8. Effect of grain type and processing index on growth performance, carcass quality, feeding behavior, and stress response of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Moya, D; He, M L; Jin, L; Wang, Y; Penner, G B; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; McAllister, T A

    2015-06-01

    One hundred sixty crossbred steers (538 ± 36 kg BW) were used in an 84-d experiment with a randomized block design to study the effects of wheat or barley grain processed to 2 different indices on growth performance, feeding behavior, carcass characteristics, stress, and temperament of finishing beef cattle. Treatments were a wheat-based diet (88.4% of diet DM; WH) and a barley-based diet (89% of diet DM; BA), processed to an index of either 75% (HI) or 85% (LO) of their original volume weight. Cattle were allocated to 16 feedlot pens (10 animals per pen, 4 pens per treatment), 8 of which were equipped with the GrowSafe system for monitoring feeding behavior. Flight speed, hair, and saliva samples were collected on d 1, 28, 56, and 84 to determine temperament, acute, and chronic stress. All steers were slaughtered at the end of the experiment, and carcass quality was evaluated. Cattle fed WH had a lower (P < 0.05) meal length and frequency of visits per meal and tended (P = 0.10) to have a lower DMI, meal size, and feeding time than those fed BA. The LO processing index increased (P = 0.05) DMI and reduced (P < 0.05) the G:F and the percentage of saleable meat of the carcass compared to HI. There was a trend (P = 0.09) for a grain × processing index interaction, where cattle fed BA-LO had a lower incidence of severe liver abscesses compared with cattle fed other treatments. Cattle fed WH had greater hair cortisol concentrations (P = 0.01) and flight speed (P < 0.01) than those fed BA. There was a trend (P = 0.07) for a grain × processing index interaction, where heifers fed WH-LO had a lower salivary cortisol than those fed other treatments. Results suggest that a LO processing index had a negative effect on feed efficiency and carcass performance and that the WH diet caused a range of effects on feed intake and behavior indicative of steers with greater excitability and chronic stress. PMID:26115295

  9. Diseases and pathogens associated with mortality in Ontario beef feedlots.

    PubMed

    Gagea, Mihai I; Bateman, Kenneth G; van Dreumel, Tony; McEwen, Beverly J; Carman, Susy; Archambault, Marie; Shanahan, Rachel A; Caswell, Jeff L

    2006-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of diseases and pathogens associated with mortality or severe morbidity in 72 Ontario beef feedlots in calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Routine pathologic and microbiologic investigations, as well as immunohistochemical staining for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen, were performed on 99 calves that died or were euthanized within 60 days after arrival. Major disease conditions identified included fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%), caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia or arthritis (or both) caused by Mycoplasma bovis (36%), viral respiratory disease (19%), BVDV-related diseases (21%), Histophilus somni myocarditis (8%), ruminal bloat (2%), and miscellaneous diseases (8%). Viral infections identified were BVDV (35%), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (9%), bovine herpesvirus-1 (6%), parainfluenza-3 virus (3%), and bovine coronavirus (2%). Bacteria isolated from the lungs included M. bovis (82%), Mycoplasma arginini (72%), Ureaplasma diversum (25%), Mannheimia haemolytica (27%), Pasteurella multocida (19%), H. somni (14%), and Arcanobacterium pyogenes (19%). Pneumonia was the most frequent cause of mortality of beef calves during the first 2 months after arrival in feedlots, representing 69% of total deaths. The prevalence of caseonecrotic bronchopneumonia caused by M. bovis was similar to that of fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia, and together, these diseases were the most common causes of pneumonia and death. M. bovis pneumonia and polyarthritis has emerged as an important cause of mortality in Ontario beef feedlots. PMID:16566254

  10. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings...

  11. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings to those seen ...

  12. Experimental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, chronic wasting disease, transmissible mink encephalopathy) to cattle and their differentiation from bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for identification of potential host ranges of known TSEs. This report provides a synopsis of TSE (scrapie, CWD, TME) transmission studies that have been conducted in cattle and compares these findings to...

  13. Effect of Subtherapeutic Administration of Antibiotics on the Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli Bacteria in Feedlot Cattle▿

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, T. W.; Yanke, L. J.; Topp, E.; Olson, M. E.; Read, R. R.; Morck, D. W.; McAllister, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in 300 feedlot steers receiving subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics was investigated through the collection of 3,300 fecal samples over a 314-day period. Antibiotics were selected based on the commonality of use in the industry and included chlortetracycline plus sulfamethazine (TET-SUL), chlortetracycline (TET), virginiamycin, monensin, tylosin, or no antibiotic supplementation (control). Steers were initially fed a barley silage-based diet, followed by transition to a barley grain-based diet. Despite not being administered antibiotics prior to arrival at the feedlot, the prevalences of steers shedding TET- and ampicillin (AMP)-resistant E. coli were >40 and <30%, respectively. Inclusion of TET-SUL in the diet increased the prevalence of steers shedding TET- and AMP-resistant E. coli and the percentage of TET- and AMP-resistant E. coli in the total generic E. coli population. Irrespective of treatment, the prevalence of steers shedding TET-resistant E. coli was higher in animals fed grain-based compared to silage-based diets. All steers shed TET-resistant E. coli at least once during the experiment. A total of 7,184 isolates were analyzed for MIC of antibiotics. Across antibiotic treatments, 1,009 (13.9%), 7 (0.1%), and 3,413 (47.1%) E. coli isolates were resistant to AMP, gentamicin, or TET, respectively. In addition, 131 (1.8%) and 143 (2.0%) isolates exhibited potential resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactamases, as indicated by either ceftazidime or cefpodoxime resistance. No isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. The findings of the present study indicated that subtherapeutic administration of tetracycline in combination with sulfamethazine increased the prevalence of tetracycline- and AMP-resistant E. coli in cattle. However, resistance to antibiotics may be related to additional environmental factors such as diet. PMID:18502931

  14. EMI-Sensor Data to Identify Areas of Manure Accumulation on a Feedlot Surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to test the validity of using electromagnetic induction (EMI) survey data, a prediction-based sampling strategy and ordinary linear regression modeling to predict spatially variable feedlot surface manure accumulation. A 30 m × 60 m feedlot pen with a central mound was selecte...

  15. Lung pathology and infectious agents in fatal feedlot pneumonias and relationship with animal and treatment information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory diseases (BRD) occurring in the feedlot represent the major disease entity during the feeding period. Several bacteria, viruses, and Mycoplasma spp. are reported as causative agents. Feedlot BRD may occur at various times, although the early disease appearing after arrival and pro...

  16. APPLICATION OF CONTINUOUS WATERSHED MODELLING TO FEEDLOT RUNOFF MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A continuous simulation, digital computer, hydrologic model of feedlot runoff generation and disposal has been developed at Kansas State University. The purpose of the model is to establish guidelines and design parameters for feedlot runoff control facilities which will meet the...

  17. Lung pathology and infectious agents in fatal feedlot pneumonias and relationship with animal and treatment information.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Bovine respiratory diseases (BRD) occurring in the feedlot represent the major, if not the most important, disease entities during the feeding period. Several bacteria, viruses, Mycoplasma spp.are reported as causative agents. The feedlot BRD may occur at varied times, although the ear...

  18. Effects of a single foot rot incident on weight performance of feedlot steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot performance records from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center feedlot for 1993 through 2000 were analyzed to evaluate the impact of foot rot on adjusted daily gain (ADG) and total days on feed. Records from the original pool of 36,755 bull, steer, and heifer calves were sorted so that only...

  19. Electromagnetic Induction Sensor Data to Identify Areas of Manure Accumulation on a Feedlot Surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was initiated to test the validity of using electromagnetic induction (EMI) survey data, a prediction-based sampling strategy and ordinary linear regression modeling to predict spatially variable feedlot surface manure accumulation. A 30 m × 60 m feedlot pen with a central mound was selecte...

  20. Effects of pen bedding and feeding high crude protein diets on manure composition and greenhouse gas emissions from a feedlot pen surface.

    PubMed

    Borhan, M S; Gautam, D P; Engel, C; Anderson, V L; Rahman, S

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations vary by stage of production and management practices. The objective of this research was to study the effect of two dietary crude protein levels (12 and 16%) fed to beef steers in pens with or without corn stover bedding. Manure characteristics and GHG emissions were measured from feedlot pen surfaces. Sixteen equal-sized feedlot pens (19 x 23 m) were used. Eight were bedded approximately twice a week with corn stover and the remaining eight feedlot pens were not bedded. Angus steers (n = 138) were blocked by live weights (lighter and heavier) with 7 to 10 animals per pen. The trial was a 2 x 2 factorial design with factors of two protein levels and two bedding types (bedding vs. non bedding), with four replicates. The study was conducted from June through September and consisted of four -28-day periods. Manure from each pen was scrapped once every 28 days and composite manure samples from each pen were collected. Air samples from pen surfaces were sampled in Tedlar bags using a Vac-U-Chamber coupled with a portable wind tunnel and analyzed with a greenhouse gas gas chromatograph within 24 hr of sampling. The manure samples were analyzed for crude protein (CP), total nitrogen (TN), ammonia (NH3), total volatile fatty acid (TVFA), total carbon (TC), total phosphorus (TP), and potassium (K). The air samples were analyzed for methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations. The concentration of TN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in manure from pens with cattle fed the high protein diets. The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids concentrations were similar across both treatments. There were no significant differences in pen surface GHG emissions across manure management and dietary crude protein levels. PMID:24558708

  1. Effects of two beta-adrenergic agonists on finishing performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Reyes, L; Torres-Rodríguez, V; Meraz-Murillo, F J; Pérez-Linares, C; Figueroa-Saavedra, F; Robinson, P H

    2006-12-01

    The impact of using 2 beta-adrenergic agonists in feedlot cattle fed finishing diets was evaluated using 54 steers (45 crossbred Charolais and 9 Brangus) initially weighing 424 +/- 26.6 kg in a randomized complete block design with 3 treatments and 6 blocks (i.e., 18 pens with 3 steers per pen). Response variables were feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality. Treatments were 1) control (no supplement added); 2) zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 60 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)); and 3) ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 300 mg.steer(-1).d(-1)). The beta-agonists were added to the diets during the final 33 d of the experiment. The groups of steers fed ZH or RH improved (P < 0.01) ADG by 26 or 24%, respectively, compared with control steers. Steers supplemented with RH consumed less (P = 0.03) DM (8.37 kg) than control steers (8.51 kg), whereas intake was similar (P = 0.37) for ZH and control steers. Addition of either beta-agonist to the diet considerably improved (P < 0.01) the G:F (ZH, 0.253 and RH, 0.248 vs. control, 0.185). Hot carcass weight and carcass yield were enhanced (P < 0.05) with both beta-agonists. The LM area was increased (P = 0.026) by ZH (75.2 cm(2)), but that of RH (72.2 cm(2)) was similar (P = 0.132) to the control steers (66.8 cm(2)). Meat from the ZH- (P = 0.0007) and RH- (P = 0.0267) supplemented steers had greater shear force values than control steers (ZH = 5.11; RH = 4.83; control = 4.39 kg/cm(2)). Variables related to meat color indicated that both beta-agonists led to a similar redness of the LM area related to the control group. In general, feedlot performance was greatly enhanced by beta-adrenergic agonists, and meat tenderness from treated animals was classified as intermediate. Furthermore, meat color was not altered by beta-agonist supplementation. PMID:17093218

  2. Beef cattle welfare in the USA: identification of priorities for future research.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Cassandra B; Coetzee, Johann F; Stookey, Joseph M; Thomson, Daniel U; Grandin, Temple; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen S

    2015-12-01

    This review identifies priorities for beef cattle welfare research in the USA. Based on our professional expertise and synthesis of existing literature, we identify two themes in intensive aspects of beef production: areas where policy-based actions are needed and those where additional research is required. For some topics, considerable research informs best practice, yet gaps remain between scientific knowledge and implementation. For example, many of the risk factors and management strategies to prevent respiratory disease are understood, but only used by a relatively small portion of the industry. This is an animal health issue that will require leadership and discussion to gain widespread adoption of practices that benefit cattle welfare. There is evidence of success when such actions are taken, as illustrated by the recent improvements in handling at US slaughter facilities. Our highest priorities for additional empirical evidence are: the effect of technologies used to either promote growth or manage cattle in feedlots, identification of management risk factors for disease in feedlots, and management decisions about transport (rest stops, feed/water deprivation, climatic conditions, stocking density). Additional research is needed to inform science-based recommendations about environmental features such as dry lying areas (mounds), shade, water and feed, as well as trailer design. PMID:26459152

  3. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Alicia G; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V; Ward, Michael P; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of ery(R) and tyl(R) resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of ery(R) E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of ery(R) enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate

  4. Effect of in-feed administration and withdrawal of tylosin phosphate on antibiotic resistance in enterococci isolated from feedlot steers

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, Alicia G.; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R.; Stanford, Kim; Chaves, Alexandre V.; Ward, Michael P.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Tylosin phosphate is a macrolide commonly administered to cattle in North America for the control of liver abscesses. This study investigated the effect of in-feed administration of tylosin phosphate to cattle at subtherapeutic levels and its subsequent withdrawal on macrolide resistance using enterococci as an indicator bacterium. Fecal samples were collected from steers that received no antibiotics and steers administered tylosin phosphate (11 ppm) in-feed for 197 days and withdrawn 28 days before slaughter. Enterococcus species isolated from fecal samples were identified through sequencing the groES-EL intergenic spacer region and subject to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, identification of resistance determinants and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiling. Tylosin increased (P < 0.05) the proportion of eryR and tylR enterococci within the population. Just prior to its removal, the proportion of eryR and tylR resistant enterococci began decreasing and continued to decrease after tylosin was withdrawn from the diet until there was no difference (P > 0.05) between treatments on d 225. This suggests that antibiotic withdrawal prior to slaughter contributes to a reduction in the proportion of macrolide resistant enterococci entering the food chain. Among the 504 enterococci isolates characterized, Enterococcus hirae was found to predominate (n = 431), followed by Enterococcus villorum (n = 32), Enterococcus faecium (n = 21), Enterococcus durans (n = 7), Enterococcus casseliflavus (n = 4), Enterococcus mundtii (n = 4), Enterococcus gallinarum (n = 3), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1), and Enterococcus thailandicus (n = 1). The diversity of enterococci was greater in steers at arrival than at exit from the feedlot. Erythromycin resistant isolates harbored the erm(B) and/or msrC gene. Similar PFGE profiles of eryR E. hirae pre- and post-antibiotic treatment suggest that increased abundance of eryR enterococci after administration of tylosin phosphate reflects

  5. Effect of dietary inclusion of triticale dried distillers' grain and oilseeds on quality and fatty acid profile of meat from feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, M L; McAllister, T A; Hernandez-Calva, L M; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R; McKinnon, J J

    2014-05-01

    This study compared carcass, meat quality and fatty acid profiles of longissimus thoracis (LT) from feedlot cattle fed barley grain with or without oilseed (OS). Six diets containing no oilseed (No-OS), 10% ground flaxseed (FS), 10% high oleate sunflower seeds (SS) with or without 30% triticale dried distiller's grain (DDGS) were prepared. Feeding DDGS increased chroma at 24 and 144 h post mortem. Feeding FS increased weight% of LT PUFA (P<0.05) compared to No-OS or SS. An OS by DDGS interaction occurred for 18:3n-3 (P<0.05) where FS increased weight% of 18:3n-3 (P<0.05), a response accentuated (P<0.05) by DDGS. Feeding DDGS increased weight% of LT 18:2n-6 (P<0.05), but neither OS nor DDGS affected conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, t7,c9 &c9,t11-18:2). Feeding FS increased weight% of n-3 FA, and both FS and SS increased t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. Combination feeding of DDGS and FS further increased weight% of n-3 FA and tempered increases in t10-18:1 with no effect on CLA or t11-18:1. The findings suggest a new strategy to increase beef omega-3 fatty acids efficiently through inclusion of a combination of DDGS and FS in feedlot diet. PMID:24530992

  6. Analyses of thermoregulatory responses of feeder cattle exposed to simulated heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Brandl, T. M.; Eigenberg, R. A.; Hahn, G. L.; Nienaber, J. A.; Mader, T. L.; Spiers, D. E.; Parkhurst, A. M.

    2005-05-01

    Heat stress in feedlot cattle causes reduced performance, and in the most severe cases, death of the animals, thus causing the loss of millions of dollars in revenue to the cattle industry. A study was designed to evaluate dynamics of thermoregulation and feeding activities when feeder cattle were exposed to simulated heat waves, in comparison with repeated sinusoidal hot and thermoneutral environments. Nine beef steers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in one of three environmental chambers. Each chamber was subjected to each of three temperature regimes (Heatwave simulation from Rockport, Mo., 1995, Heatwave simulation from Columbia, Mo., 1999, and Controlled heat stress treatment of 32±7°C) for a period of 18 days, according to a Latin square treatment design, with a 10-day thermoneutral period (18±7°C) separating treatment periods. Respiration rate, core body temperature, heat production, feed intake, and feeding behavior were measured on each animal for the duration of the experiment. Differences were found in all treatments for all parameters except feeding behavior. It was shown that the two simulated heat waves elicited very different thermoregulatory responses. Based on these results the heat wave centered at Rockport, Mo. in 1995 was devastating because the animals were not acclimated to hot conditions, thus causing an acute response to heat stress. The responses of cattle to conditions at Columbia, Mo. showed some acclimation to heat prior to the peak stress days, and therefore a dampened response was seen. It appears the extreme conditions at Columbia, Mo., 1999 were made severe by environmental conditions not simulated during this study (low wind speed and intensive solar radiation). Overall, it was determined while a cyclic heat stress treatment is a representative model to test heat stress in cattle, further heat stress experiments should be conducted in an actual feedlot.

  7. Assessing the heat tolerance of 17 beef cattle genotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, J. B.; Mader, T. L.; Holt, S. M.; Sullivan, M. L.; Hahn, G. L.

    2010-11-01

    Cattle production plays a significant role in terms of world food production. Nearly 82% of the world's 1.2 billion cattle can be found in developing countries. An increasing demand for meat in developing countries has seen an increase in intensification of animal industries, and a move to cross-bred animals. Heat tolerance is considered to be one of the most important adaptive aspects for cattle, and the lack of thermally-tolerant breeds is a major constraint on cattle production in many countries. There is a need to not only identify heat tolerant breeds, but also heat tolerant animals within a non-tolerant breed. Identification of heat tolerant animals is not easy under field conditions. In this study, panting score (0 to 4.5 scale where 0 = no stress and 4.5 = extreme stress) and the heat load index (HLI) [HLIBG<25°C = 10.66 + 0.28 × rh + 1.30 × BG - WS; and, HLI BG> 25°C = 8.62 + 0.38 × rh + 1.55 × BG - 0.5 × WS + e(2.4 - WS), where BG = black globe temperature (oC), rh = relative humidity (decimal form), WS = wind speed (m/s) and e is the base of the natural logarithm] were used to assess the heat tolerance of 17 genotypes (12,757 steers) within 13 Australian feedlots over three summers. The cattle were assessed under natural climatic conditions in which HLI ranged from thermonuetral (HLI < 70) to extreme (HLI > 96; black globe temperature = 40.2°C, relative humidity = 64%, wind speed = 1.58 m/s). When HLI > 96 a greater number ( P < 0.001) of pure bred Bos taurus and crosses of Bos taurus cattle had a panting score ≥ 2 compared to Brahman cattle, and Brahman-cross cattle. The heat tolerance of the assessed breeds was verified using panting scores and the HLI. Heat tolerance of cattle can be assessed under field conditions by using panting score and HLI.

  8. Efficacy and productive performance of moxidectin in feedlot calves infected with nematodes resistant to ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Fazzio, L E; Streitenberger, N; Galvan, W R; Sánchez, R O; Gimeno, E J; Sanabria, R E F

    2016-06-15

    Anthelmintic resistance (AR) of gastrointestinal nematodes to macrocyclic lactones is an increasingly common worldwide phenomenon limiting cattle production. This has motivated the search for alternatives, such as new active compounds, added drug synergisms, different doses, and alternate administration routes. The aim of this study was the assessment of moxidectin (MXD) performance in feedlot calves with a history of AR to ivermectin (IVM). Crossbred female calves aged 6-7 months and weighing 163kg (SD=34kg) were divided into 3 groups of 35 animals each. They were assigned to the following antiparasitic treatment groups: IVM group (0.2mg/kg IVM); MXD group (0.2mg/kg MXD), and ricobendazole+levamisole (RBZ+LEV) group (7.5mg/kg RBZ+8mg/kg LEV). On days 0, 26, and 47, fecal samples were taken and the weight of each animal was registered. Anthelmintic efficacy (by fecal egg count reduction), total weight gain (TWG) and average daily weight gain (AWG) were compared between the groups. A mixed SAS procedure was used for statistical analysis. Fecal egg count reduction 26 days post-treatment (PT) was calculated at 28% for the IVM group, 85% for the MXD group, and 99% for the RBZ+LEV group. AWGs (Standard Error) of 1.095g (56), 1.264g (49), and 1.340g (52) were registered for the IVM, MXD, and RBZ+LEV groups, respectively (p<0.05). Coprocultures revealed that MXD more effectively reduced Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. egg counts than IVM. This resulted in higher AWGs and TWGs for this group; similar results were seen for the RBZ+LEV group as well. In this study, animals treated with MXD gained about 160 more g/day than animals treated with IVM. This represents a gain of 16 USD per animal over the 47 day trial. PMID:27198772

  9. Bovine coronavirus (BCV) infections in transported commingled beef cattle and sole-source ranch calves.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Step, Douglas L; Wahrmund, Jackie; Burge, Lurinda J; Payton, Mark E; Cook, Billy J; Burken, Dirk; Richards, Chris J; Confer, Anthony W

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated bovine coronavirus (BCV) in both beef calves direct from the ranch and commingled, mixed-source calves obtained from an auction market. The level of BCV-neutralizing antibodies found in the calves varied among ranches in 2 different studies in a retained-ownership program (ROP), from the ranch to the feedlot. Calves with low levels of BCV-neutralizing antibodies (16 or less) were more likely to be treated for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) than those with higher titers. In 3 studies of commingled, mixed-source calves, BCV was recovered from calves at entry to the feedlot and the infections were cleared by day 8. The BCV was identified in lung samples [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) collection] as well as in nasal swabs. Calves with low levels of BCV-neutralizing antibodies at entry were most likely to be shedding BCV. Bovine coronavirus was isolated from both healthy and sick calves, but not from sick calves after 4 d arrival at the feedlot. Bovine coronavirus (BCV) should be considered along with other bovine respiratory viruses in the diagnosis of etiologies in bovine respiratory disease, especially for animals that become sick shortly after arrival. If approved vaccines are developed, it would be best to carry out vaccination programs before calves are weaned, giving them sufficient time to gain active immunity before commingling with other cattle. PMID:22210995

  10. Co-occurrence of antibiotic drugs, resistant bacteria and resistance genes in runoff from cattle feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural uses of antibiotics raises concerns about the development of antibiotic resistance in food animals, and the potential to transmit resistance to human clinical settings via fecal contamination of surface and ground water. Although there is broad agreement that agricultural resistance can...

  11. Spatial variation in selected veterinary drugs across a cattle feedlot transect from barn to retention basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on the off-site movement and fate of veterinary pharmaceuticals is needed in order to better manage these products. The benefits of these chemicals are well established; however, little information exists on their potential for environmental harm. An essential initial step to understanding th...

  12. Development of a graphical web-based heat stress forecast for feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until the mid 1990’s, livestock producers had access to National Weather Service (NWS) livestock weather warnings through local news outlets. The heat stress warnings were forecasts based on predicted temperature and humidity values (temperature humidity index – THI). After this service was discon...

  13. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores during Laboratory-Scale Composting of Feedlot Cattle Manure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanwei; Harvey, Amanda; Barbieri, Ruth; Reuter, Tim; Stanford, Kim; Amoako, Kingsley K; Selinger, Leonard B; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax outbreaks in livestock have social, economic and health implications, altering farmer's livelihoods, impacting trade and posing a zoonotic risk. Our study investigated the survival of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. anthracis spores sporulated at 15, 20, or 37°C, over 33 days of composting. Spores (∼7.5 log10 CFU g(-1)) were mixed with manure and composted in laboratory scale composters. After 15 days, the compost was mixed and returned to the composter for a second cycle. Temperatures peaked at 71°C on day 2 and remained ≥55°C for an average of 7 days in the first cycle, but did not exceed 55°C in the second. For B. thuringiensis, spores generated at 15 and 21°C exhibited reduced (P < 0.05) viability of 2.7 and 2.6 log10 CFU g(-1) respectively, as compared to a 0.6 log10 CFU g(-1) reduction for those generated at 37°C. For B. anthracis, sporulation temperature did not impact spore survival as there was a 2.5, 2.2, and 2.8 log10 CFU g(-1) reduction after composting for spores generated at 15, 21, and 37°C, respectively. For both species, spore viability declined more rapidly (P < 0.05) in the first as compared to the second composting cycle. Our findings suggest that the duration of thermophilic exposure (≥55°C) is the main factor influencing survival of B. anthracis spores in compost. As sporulation temperature did not influence survival of B. anthracis, composting may lower the viability of spores associated with carcasses infected with B. anthracis over a range of sporulation temperatures. PMID:27303388

  14. Spatial Variation in Microbial Populations Across a Cattle Feedlot Transect from Barn to Retention Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Run-off from livestock production can pose a risk to environmental quality particularly in karst terrains where geomorphic features like sinkholes provide rapid passage for contaminants to ground water resources. In these environments, it is especially important to understand how variations in terr...

  15. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores during Laboratory-Scale Composting of Feedlot Cattle Manure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shanwei; Harvey, Amanda; Barbieri, Ruth; Reuter, Tim; Stanford, Kim; Amoako, Kingsley K.; Selinger, Leonard B.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax outbreaks in livestock have social, economic and health implications, altering farmer’s livelihoods, impacting trade and posing a zoonotic risk. Our study investigated the survival of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. anthracis spores sporulated at 15, 20, or 37°C, over 33 days of composting. Spores (∼7.5 log10 CFU g-1) were mixed with manure and composted in laboratory scale composters. After 15 days, the compost was mixed and returned to the composter for a second cycle. Temperatures peaked at 71°C on day 2 and remained ≥55°C for an average of 7 days in the first cycle, but did not exceed 55°C in the second. For B. thuringiensis, spores generated at 15 and 21°C exhibited reduced (P < 0.05) viability of 2.7 and 2.6 log10 CFU g-1 respectively, as compared to a 0.6 log10 CFU g-1 reduction for those generated at 37°C. For B. anthracis, sporulation temperature did not impact spore survival as there was a 2.5, 2.2, and 2.8 log10 CFU g-1 reduction after composting for spores generated at 15, 21, and 37°C, respectively. For both species, spore viability declined more rapidly (P < 0.05) in the first as compared to the second composting cycle. Our findings suggest that the duration of thermophilic exposure (≥55°C) is the main factor influencing survival of B. anthracis spores in compost. As sporulation temperature did not influence survival of B. anthracis, composting may lower the viability of spores associated with carcasses infected with B. anthracis over a range of sporulation temperatures. PMID:27303388

  16. Distillers by-product cattle diets enhance reduced sulfur gas fluxes from feedlot soils and manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from animal feeding operations are a concern with increased feeding of high-sulfur distillers by-products. Three feeding trials were conducted to evaluate feeding wet distillers grain plus solubles (WDGS) on TRS fluxes. Fresh manure was collected three times duri...

  17. Feeding Distiller's Byproducts May Enhance Reduced Sulfur Emissions from Cattle Feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are normal products of manure decomposition which are emitted from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). These compounds not only contribute to nuisance odors, but with recent EPA regulations, H2S emissions in excess of 100 lbs per day must be reported by the livestock...

  18. Carbon, nitrogen balances and greenhouse gas emission during cattle feedlot manure composting.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiying; Chang, Chi; Larney, Francis J

    2004-01-01

    Carbon and N losses reduce the agronomic value of compost and contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigated GHG emissions during composting of straw-bedded manure (SBM) and wood chip-bedded manure (WBM). For SBM, dry matter (DM) loss was 301 kg Mg(-1), total carbon (TC) loss was 174 kg Mg(-1), and total nitrogen (TN) loss was 8.3 kg Mg(-1). These correspond to 30.1% of initial DM, 52.8% of initial TC, and 41.6% of initial TN. For WBM, DM loss was 268 kg Mg(-1), TC loss was 154 kg Mg(-1), and TN loss was 1.40 kg Mg(-1), corresponding to 26.5, 34.5, and 11.8% of initial amounts. Most C was lost as CO2 with CH4 accounting for <6%. However, the net contribution to greenhouse gas emissions was greater for CH4 since it is 21 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were 0.077 kg N Mg(-1) for SBM and 0.084 kg N Mg(-1) for WBM, accounting for 1 to 6% of total N loss. Total GHG emissions as CO2-C equivalent were not significantly different between SBM (368.4 +/- 18.5 kg Mg(-1)) and WBM (349.2 +/- 24.3 kg Mg(-1)). However, emission of 368.4 kg C Mg(-1) (CO2-C equivalent) was greater than the initial TC content (330.5 kg Mg(-1)) of SBM, raising the question of the net benefits of composting on C sequestration. Further study is needed to evaluate the impact of composting on overall GHG emissions and C sequestration and to fully investigate livestock manure management options. PMID:14964356

  19. Effect of salinomycin supplementation on characteristics of digestion and feedlot performance of cattle.

    PubMed

    Zinn, R A

    1986-12-01

    One hundred fifty large-frame British-cross calves, 75 heifers and 75 steers averaging 220 kg, were used in a 187-d growing-finishing trial to study the influence of dietary salinomycin levels of 0, 5.5, 11, 16.5 and 22 mg/kg on rate and efficiency of gain. The basal diet to which the ionophore was added was composed largely to steam processed grains, and contained 3% supplemental fat. Performance responses to salinomycin supplementation were similar for steers and heifers. Rate of gain was not influenced (P greater than .20); however, feed conversion was improved by an average of 5% at the 11- to 22-mg/kg levels of salinomycin supplementation (P less than .05). Although not necessarily mutually exclusive, this improvement in feed conversion could be accounted for as either a 5% increase in the net energy value of the diet (P less than .05) or a 10% reduction in maintenance requirement (P less than .10). Four steer calves (234 kg) with cannulae in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4 X 4 Latin-square design trial to determine the influence of salinomycin supplementation on characteristics of digestion. Four levels of supplementation (0, 55, 11 and 16.5 mg/kg) were evaluated using the same basal diet as in the performance trial. Total tract digestion of organic matter, acid detergent fiber, starch and protein was not significantly altered by salinomycin supplementation. However, ruminal digestion of organic matter was reduced 6.2% (P less than .05). Neither ruminal degradation of feed protein nor net microbial synthesis was significantly altered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3818472

  20. Abundance and fate of antibiotics and hormones in a vegetative treatment system receiving cattle feedlot runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetative treatment systems (VTS) have been developed and built as an alternative to conventional holding pond systems for managing run-off from animal feeding operations. Initially developed to manage runoff nutrients via uptake by grasses, their effectiveness at removing other runoff contaminant...

  1. Antibiotic resistance gene concentrations in soils from cattle feedlot: A three year study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a common trait that allows bacteria with AR genes to compete against organisms that produce and/or have susceptibilities to antibiotics. Antibiotics are commonly used in livestock production to promote growth and combat disease. However, as much as 80% may pass through ...

  2. Surgical Management of Orthopedic and Musculoskeletal Diseases of Feedlot Calves.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Miesner, Matt D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries, infections, and disorders of the musculoskeletal system are common in feedlot calves. These conditions often are amenable to surgical treatment with return of the calf to productivity. Weight gain and carcass quality are expected to be significantly adversely affected by pain and debilitation. The goal of surgical management of disorders of the joints, muscles, and feet should be resolution of the inciting cause, mitigation of pain, and restoration of form and function. If these are achieved, calves should return to acceptable, if not normal, feed intake, rate of gain, and carcass quality. PMID:26210767

  3. Surgical Management of Common Disorders of Feedlot Calves.

    PubMed

    Miesner, Matt D; Anderson, David E

    2015-11-01

    Procedures to improve animal and handler safety, shape production parameters, and directly address the prosperity of individuals in need of assistance are performed routinely. Techniques to accomplish these tasks have been described in many venues. Painful procedures are expected in feedlot practice. Assessing and managing pain and welfare for these procedures has strengthened significantly over the past decade to address increased public concerns and also to support the desires of the operators/managers to progress. Methods to perform common procedures are described, including evidence and techniques for managing the pain and distress while performing them. PMID:26210768

  4. Haemophilus somnus Infections I. A Ten Year (1969-1978) Retrospective Study of Losses in Cattle Herds in Western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, J. R.; Thiessen, W. A.; Janzen, E. D.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 838 outbreaks of fatal Haemophilus somnus infections in herds of cattle were diagnosed at provincial veterinary laboratories in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia during the period 1969-1978. The index cases from these outbreaks included 759 cases of thromboembolic meningoencephalitis, 78 cases of fibrinous pneumonia with pleuritis and one case of H. somnus abortion. The epizootics were subdivided on the basis of province, class and age of cattle and seasonal occurrence. Most outbreaks occurred in a feedlot-type of operation, approximately four weeks after arrival of the cattle. There was often a history of respiratory disease prior to an outbreak and in some cases thromboembolic meningoencephalitis had occurred in the herd the preceding year. The average morbidity-mortality ratio was 2.7/1. The average economic loss per herd was $3 190 based on an average of 15 sick animals and five deaths per affected herd. PMID:7397616

  5. WASTE CONTAINMENT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    BSE waste is derived from diseased animals such as BSE (bovine spongiform encepilopothy, also known as Mad Cow) in cattle and CWD (chronic wasting disease) in deer and elk. Landfilling is examined as a disposal option and this presentation introduces waste containment technology...

  6. A retrospective study of non-suppurative encephalitis in beef cattle from western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Sergio; Clark, Edward G.; Wobeser, Gary A.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Philibert, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Non-suppurative encephalitis occurs sporadically in beef cattle in western Canada, leading to loss of animals. This retrospective study investigated the presence of viral, bacterial, and protozoal antigens or DNA in 37 western Canadian feedlot cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis for which a cause had not been identified. Cases were selected based on the age of the animal (> 7 months), and clinical history of recumbency and depression. The identification of rabies in 1 case stresses the importance of including this viral disease in the list of differential diagnoses. Because there was variation in the severity, distribution, and type of lesions, it is possible that there may be more than 1 cause, but failure to identify an infectious agent might also suggest that non-infectious agents could play a role. PMID:24293671

  7. Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains Isolated from Supershedding Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafiq; Chase-Topping, Margo; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W.; Bono, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that a small proportion of cattle shedding high levels of Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the main source for transmission of this organism between animals. Cattle achieving a fecal shedding status of 104 CFU of E. coli O157:H7/gram or greater are now referred to as supershedders. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of E. coli O157:H7 strain type to supershedding and to determine if supershedding was restricted to a specific set of E. coli O157:H7 strains. Fecal swabs (n = 5,086) were collected from cattle at feedlots or during harvest. Supershedders constituted 2.0% of the bovine population tested. Supershedder isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), phage typing, lineage-specific polymorphism assay (LSPA), Stx-associated bacteriophage insertion (SBI) site determination, and variant analysis of Shiga toxin, tir, and antiterminator Q genes. Isolates representing 52 unique PFGE patterns, 19 phage types, and 12 SBI clusters were obtained from supershedding cattle, indicating that there is no clustering to E. coli O157:H7 genotypes responsible for supershedding. While being isolated directly from cattle, this strain set tended to have higher frequencies of traits associated with human clinical isolates than previously collected bovine isolates with respect to lineage and tir allele, but not for SBI cluster and Q type. We conclude that no exclusive genotype was identified that was common to all supershedder isolates. PMID:23645203

  8. 40 CFR Table Jj-3 to Subpart Jj of... - State-Specific Volatile Solids (VS) and Nitrogen (N) Excretion Rates for Cattle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VS/day/1000 kg animal mass) Dairy cows Dairy heifers Feedlot steer Feedlot heifers Nitrogen excretion rate (kg VS/day/1000 kg animal mass) Dairy cows Dairy heifers Feedlot steer Feedlot heifers Alabama...

  9. Resistome diversity in cattle and the environment decreases during beef production

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Noelle R; Yang, Xiang; Linke, Lyndsey M; Magnuson, Roberta J; Dettenwanger, Adam; Cook, Shaun; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale E; Gow, Sheryl P; McAllister, Tim A; Yang, Hua; Ruiz, Jaime; Jones, Kenneth L; Boucher, Christina A; Morley, Paul S; Belk, Keith E

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant determinants (ARDs) can be transmitted from livestock systems through meat products or environmental effluents. The public health risk posed by these two routes is not well understood, particularly in non-pathogenic bacteria. We collected pooled samples from 8 groups of 1741 commercial cattle as they moved through the process of beef production from feedlot entry through slaughter. We recorded antimicrobial drug exposures and interrogated the resistome at points in production when management procedures could potentially influence ARD abundance and/or transmission. Over 300 unique ARDs were identified. Resistome diversity decreased while cattle were in the feedlot, indicating selective pressure. ARDs were not identified in beef products, suggesting that slaughter interventions may reduce the risk of transmission of ARDs to beef consumers. This report highlights the utility and limitations of metagenomics for assessing public health risks regarding antimicrobial resistance, and demonstrates that environmental pathways may represent a greater risk than the food supply. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13195.001 PMID:26952213

  10. Estrogens and synthetic androgens in manure slurry from trenbolone acetate/estradiol implanted cattle and in waste-receiving lagoons used for irrigation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Bushra; Lee, Linda S

    2012-11-01

    The increasing size of concentrated animal feeding operations has led to a concomitant increase in the land-application of manure, which has spawned research on the concentrations and environmental risk assessment of natural and synthetic hormones in animal manures. 17β-Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is widely used in the United States for improving daily gains in beef cattle and is often administered in combination with 17β-estradiol (17β-E2). Trenbolone (TB) and E2 isomers and their metabolites were quantified in manure collection pits and lagoon effluent from beef cattle implanted with the commercial anabolic preparation Ravoler-S (containing 140 mg 17β-trenbolone acetate and 28 mg 17β-E2). Manure pit and lagoon effluent samples were collected weekly for 9 weeks post implanting and analyzed using reverse-phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. 17α-TB was the most abundant androgen with the highest concentration observed 2 weeks post implant. 17β-TB and trendione peaked at the end of week 2 and 4, respectively. For the estrogens, the highest concentrations for estrone (E1), estriol (E3), and 17α-E2 were observed after week 4, 6, and 8, respectively. 17β-E2 concentrations were the lowest of the estrogens and erratic over time. In lagoon water, which is used for irrigation, 17α-TB and E1 had the highest detected hormone concentrations (1.53 and 1.72 μg L(-1), respectively). Assuming a 1-2 order dilution during transport to surface water, these hormone levels could lead to concentrations in receiving waters that exceed some of the lowest observable effect levels (LOELs) reported for hormones (e.g., 0.01-0.03 μg L(-1)). PMID:22795306

  11. Feeding wet distillers grains plus solubles with and without a direct-fed microbial to determine performance, carcass characteristics, and fecal shedding of O157:H7 in feedlot heifers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B K; Holland, B P; Step, D L; Jacob, M E; VanOverbeke, D L; Richards, C J; Nagaraja, T G; Krehbiel, C R

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) in feedlot diets has become a common practice in many regions of the United States due to the expanded production of byproducts and fluctuating corn prices related to ethanol production and other factors. In addition, societal concerns over the continued use of antimicrobials in agriculture production combined with an enhanced interest in disease and pathogen prevention in the food supply have led to an increased interest in use of direct-fed microbials (DFM) in growing and finishing cattle. Direct-fed microbials have been shown to improve ADG and feed efficiency, alter ruminal fermentation, and decrease fecal shedding of potential harmful pathogens in feedlot cattle in some experiments. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of WDGS inclusion with or without a DFM containing (1 × 10 cfu ∙ heifer ∙ d) combined with (1 × 10 cfu ∙ heifer ∙ d) on the performance, carcass characteristics, and O157:H7 shedding in feedlot heifers. In early August, 288 crossbred heifers (initial BW = 295 ± 28 kg) were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments (12 pens per treatment; 6 heifers per pen) in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Body weights and fecal grab samples were obtained at approximately 28-d intervals throughout the experiment. Across the feeding period, heifers fed 30% WDGS tended ( = 0.09) to have greater ADG and had greater carcass-adjusted ADG ( = 0.05) compared with heifers fed dry-rolled corn (DRC). Dry matter intake was not affected ( = 0.65) by diet, although carcass-adjusted G:F tended ( = 0.10) to be improved for heifers fed WDGS. Heifers fed 30% WDGS tended ( ≤ 0.10) to have greater fat thickness at the 12th rib, lower marbling scores, and higher yield grades. The inclusion of . combined with . in the diet had no effect ( > 0.10) on performance or carcass merit in the present experiment. The incidence of O157:H7 throughout the

  12. Transportation and lairage environment effects on prevalence, numbers, and diversity of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on hides and carcasses of beef cattle at processing.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Guerini, Michael N; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Shackelford, Steven D; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2007-02-01

    Hide has been established as the main source of carcass contamination during cattle processing; therefore, it is crucial to minimize the amount of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cattle hides before slaughter. Several potential sources of E. coli O157: H7 are encountered during transportation and in the lairage environment at beef-processing facilities that could increase the prevalence and numbers of E. coli O157:H7 on the hides of cattle. On three separate occasions, samples were obtained from cattle at the feedlot and again after cattle were stunned and exsanguinated at the processing plant (286 total animals). The prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 on hides increased from 50.3 to 94.4% between the time cattle were loaded onto tractor-trailers at the feedlot and the time hides were removed in the processing plant. Before transport, nine animals had E. coli O157:H7 in high numbers (> 0.4 CFU/cm2) on their hides. When sampled at the slaughter facility, the number of animals with high hide numbers had increased to 70. Overall, only 29% of the E. coli O157:H7 isolates collected postharvest (221 of 764) matched pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types collected before transport. The results of this study indicate that transport to and lairage at processing plants can lead to increases in the prevalence and degree of E. coli O157:H7 contamination on hides and the number of E. coli O157:H7 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types associated with the animals. More study is needed to confirm the mechanism by which additional E. coli O157:H7 strains contaminate cattle hides during transport and lairage and to design interventions to prevent this contamination. PMID:17340859

  13. Randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing a nitric oxide releasing solution with a macrolide antibiotic for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef feedlot calves at high-risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Crepieux, T; Miller, C; Regev-Shoshani, G; Schaefer, A; Dorin, C; Alexander, T; Timsit, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide, a molecule produced in most mammalian cells, has bactericidal and virucidal properties. Nasal instillation of a nitric oxide releasing solution (NORS) on arrival at the feedlot was recently reported as non-inferior to a parenteral injection of a macrolide antibiotic, tilmicosin, for control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle at low-to-moderate risk of developing BRD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether NORS was non-inferior to tilmicosin for control of BRD in cattle at high-risk of developing BRD (the target population for many BRD control programs). High-risk Angus-cross heifers (n=840) were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups on arrival at a feedlot and received either NORS or tilmicosin for BRD control. Non-inferiority was assessed by calculating the difference in prevalence of heifers diagnosed with BRD during the first 40d after arrival between NORS and tilmicosin treatment groups. The non-inferiority margin (δ) was set at 8.5%. Thirty-six and 19% of heifers were diagnosed with BRD in the NORS and tilmicosin groups, respectively. Because the lower bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in BRD prevalence between the 2 treatment groups (17%; 95% CI=11-23%) was higher than δ, an inferiority of NORS was concluded. Although on-arrival nasal administration of NORS can be viewed as a more rational control strategy than parental injection of antibiotics, further research is needed to improve NORS efficacy before it can be recommended to prevent BRD in high-risk cattle. PMID:27033936

  14. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes and Antibiotic Residues in Wastewater and Soil Adjacent to Swine Feedlots: Potential Transfer to Agricultural Lands

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Thanh; Shao, Bing; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics in swine feed could cause accelerated emergence of antibiotic resistance genes, and agricultural application of swine waste could spread antibiotic resistance genes to the surrounding environment. Objectives: We investigated the distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes from swine feedlots and their surrounding environment. Methods: We used a culture-independent method to identify PMQR genes and estimate their levels in wastewater from seven swine feedlot operations and corresponding wastewater-irrigated farm fields. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones in wastewater and soil samples were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The predominant PMQR genes in both the wastewater and soil samples were qnrD, qepA, and oqxB, whereas qnrS and oqxA were present only in wastewater samples. Absolute concentrations of all PMQR genes combined ranged from 1.66 × 107 to 4.06 × 108 copies/mL in wastewater and 4.06 × 106 to 9.52 × 107 copies/g in soil. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones ranged from 4.57 to 321 ng/mL in wastewater and below detection limit to 23.4 ng/g in soil. Significant correlations were found between the relative abundance of PMQR genes and (fluoro)quinolone concentrations (r = 0.71, p = 0.005) and the relative abundance of PMQR genes in paired wastewater and agricultural soil samples (r = 0.91, p = 0.005). Conclusions: Swine feedlot wastewater may be a source of PMQR genes that could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in animal husbandry environments using a culture-independent method. PMID:22569244

  15. Metrics for quantifying antimicrobial use in beef feedlots

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Katharine M.; Gow, Sheryl P.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Booker, Calvin W.; Morley, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate antimicrobial drug use data are needed to enlighten discussions regarding the impact of antimicrobial drug use in agriculture. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the perceived accuracy and clarity of different methods for reporting antimicrobial drug use information collected regarding beef feedlots. Producers, veterinarians, industry representatives, public health officials, and other knowledgeable beef industry leaders were invited to complete a web-based survey. A total of 156 participants in 33 US states, 4 Canadian provinces, and 8 other countries completed the survey. No single metric was considered universally optimal for all use circumstances or for all audiences. To effectively communicate antimicrobial drug use data, evaluation of the target audience is critical to presenting the information. Metrics that are most accurate need to be carefully and repeatedly explained to the audience. PMID:23372190

  16. Increased Mortality in Groups of Cattle Administered the β-Adrenergic Agonists Ractopamine Hydrochloride and Zilpaterol Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Loneragan, Guy H.; Thomson, Daniel U.; Scott, H. Morgan

    2014-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two β-adrenergic agonists (βAA) for in-feed administration to cattle fed in confinement for human consumption. Anecdotal reports have generated concern that administration of βAA might be associated with an increased incidence of cattle deaths. Our objectives, therefore, were to a) quantify the association between βAA administration and mortality in feedlot cattle, and b) explore those variables that may confound or modify this association. Three datasets were acquired for analysis: one included information from randomized and controlled clinical trials of the βAA ractopamine hydrochloride, while the other two were observational data on zilpaterol hydrochloride administration to large numbers of cattle housed, fed, and cared for using routine commercial production practices in the U.S. Various population and time at-risk models were developed to explore potential βAA relationships with mortality, as well as the extent of confounding and effect modification. Measures of effect were relatively consistent across datasets and models in that the cumulative risk and incidence rate of death was 75 to 90% greater in animals administered the βAA compared to contemporaneous controls. During the exposure period, 40 to 50% of deaths among groups administered the βAA were attributed to administration of the drug. None of the available covariates meaningfully confounded the relationship between βAA and increased mortality. Only month of slaughter, presumably a proxy for climate, consistently modified the effect in that the biological association was generally greatest during the warmer months of the year. While death is a rare event in feedlot cattle, the data reported herein provide compelling evidence that mortality is nevertheless increased in response to administration of FDA-approved βAA and represents a heretofore unquantified adverse drug event. PMID:24621596

  17. Catalytic Wet Gasification of Municipal and Animal Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Ro, Kyoung S.; Cantrell, Keri; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hunt, Patrick G.

    2007-02-21

    Applicability of wet gasification technology for various animal and municipal wastes was examined. Wet gasification of swine manure and raw sewage sludge generated high number of net energies. Furthermore, the moisture content of these wastes is ideal for current wet gasification technology. Significant quantities of water must be added to dry feedstock wastes such as poultry litter, feedlot manures and MSW to make the feedstock pumpable. Because of their high ash contents, MSW and unpaved feedlot manure would not generate positive energy return from wet gasification. The costs of a conceptual wet gasification manure management system for a model swine farm were significantly higher than that of the anaerobic lagoon system. However, many environmental advantages of the wet gasification system were identified, which might reduce the costs significantly. Due to high sulfur content of the wastes, pretreatment to prevent the poisoning of catalysts is critically needed.

  18. Zinc Methionine Supplementation Impacts Gene and Protein Expression in Calf-Fed Holstein Steers with Minimal Impact on Feedlot Performance.

    PubMed

    Hergenreder, J E; Legako, J F; Dinh, T T N; Spivey, K S; Baggerman, J O; Broadway, P R; Beckett, J L; Branine, M E; Johnson, B J

    2016-06-01

    Providing cattle a more bioavailable zinc (Zn) source prior to administering a beta adrenergic agonist (βAA) may enhance the metabolic pool of primary nutrients that will influence the magnitude of the βAA response. Calf-fed Holstein steers were supplemented with a Zn methionine supplement (ZnMet; ZINPRO(®); Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) for 115 ± 5 days prior to harvest along with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax(®); Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ) for the last 20 days with a 3-day withdrawal to evaluate the effects on growth and carcass performance together with gene and protein expression of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and fatty acid composition of polar and neutral lipid depots. Steers (n = 1296; initial weight = 468.5 ± 0.5 kg) were sorted by weight, blocked by harvest date, and randomly assigned to pens (n = 12) and treatments: control (90 ppm Zn from ZnSO4) and ZnMet (Control plus 720 mg Zn from ZnMet/hd/d). There were no differences (P > 0.05) in growth performance or carcass characteristics. The ZnMet-fed cattle had reduced (P < 0.05) abundance of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-IIX, β1-adrenergic receptor (βAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA in skeletal muscle tissue. The ZnMet cattle had greater (P < 0.05) abundance of MHC-II protein, increased MHC-IIA and IIX cross-sectional areas (P < 0.05), an increased percentage of MHC-I fibers (P < 0.05), and a decreased percentage of MHC-IIX fibers (P < 0.05). The combination of ZnMet and ZH had positive biological effects on musculoskeletal tissue; however, these molecular effects were not significant enough to impact overall feedlot and carcass performance. PMID:26446862

  19. NEOSPOROSIS IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs that occasionally causes clinical infections in horses, goats, sheep, and deer. The domestic dog is the only known definitive host for N. caninum. In cattle N. caninum is a major cause of bovine abortion in many countries and is one of the mo...

  20. The effects of dry-rolled corn particle size on performance, carcass traits, and starch digestibility in feedlot finishing diets containing wet distiller's grains.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, E F; Wagner, J J; Engle, T E; Bartle, S J; Thomson, D U; Reinhardt, C D

    2016-03-01

    Crossbred yearling steers ( = 360; 395 ± 33.1 kg initial BW) were used to evaluate the effects of dry-rolled corn (DRC) particle size in diets containing 20% wet distiller's grains plus solubles on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and starch digestibility. Steers were used in a randomized complete block design and allocated to 36 pens (9 pens/treatment, with 10 animals/pen). Treatments were coarse DRC (4,882 μm), medium DRC (3,760 μm), fine DRC (2,359 μm), and steam-flaked corn (0.35 kg/L; SFC). Final BW and ADG were not affected by treatment ( > 0.05). Dry matter intake was greater and G:F was lower ( < 0.05) for steers fed DRC vs. steers fed SFC. There was a linear decrease ( < 0.05) in DMI in the final 5 wk on feed with decreasing DRC particle size. Fecal starch decreased (linear, < 0.01) as DRC particle size decreased. In situ starch disappearance was lower for DRC vs. SFC ( < 0.05) and linearly increased ( < 0.05) with decreasing particle size at 8 and 24 h. Reducing DRC particle size did not influence growth performance but increased starch digestion and influenced DMI of cattle on finishing diets. No differences ( > 0.10) were observed among treatments for any of the carcass traits measured. Results indicate improved ruminal starch digestibility, reduced fecal starch concentration, and reduced DMI with decreasing DRC particle size in feedlot diets containing 20% wet distiller's grains on a DM basis. PMID:27065280